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Sample records for disseminated synovial chondromatosis

  1. Synovial chondromatosis in raptors.

    PubMed

    Stone, E G; Walser, M M; Redig, P T; Rings, B; Howard, D J

    1999-01-01

    Fourteen raptors, consisting of 13 great horned owls (Bubo virginianus) and one red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis), from central and north central Minnesota, western Wisconsin, and eastern South Dakota (USA) were admitted to a raptor rehabilitation center between June 1992 and June 1995, with perisynovial and synovial chondromatosis affecting multiple joints. Birds were severely debilitated primarily due to loss of shoulder motion. The etiology of these lesions in raptors is unknown. PMID:10073365

  2. Glenohumeral Synovial Chondromatosis.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Robert

    2016-09-01

    A 20-year-old, right hand-dominant man reported to physical therapy with a history of deep anterior left shoulder pain. Radiographs, which were obtained after physical therapy was initiated, and subsequent magnetic resonance imaging showed the presence of numerous radio-opaque loose bodies that followed bone signal characteristics dispersed throughout the glenohumeral joint, leading to a diagnosis of synovial chondromatosis. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(9):809. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.0414.

  3. Glenohumeral Synovial Chondromatosis.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Robert

    2016-09-01

    A 20-year-old, right hand-dominant man reported to physical therapy with a history of deep anterior left shoulder pain. Radiographs, which were obtained after physical therapy was initiated, and subsequent magnetic resonance imaging showed the presence of numerous radio-opaque loose bodies that followed bone signal characteristics dispersed throughout the glenohumeral joint, leading to a diagnosis of synovial chondromatosis. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(9):809. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.0414. PMID:27581180

  4. Extra and Intra-articular Synovial Chondromatosis.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, R K; Banskota, B; Rijal, S; Banskota, A K

    2015-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis is not so rare intra-articular condition secondary to synovial metaplasia, that affects the knee joint. Extra-articular synovial chondromatosis however is an extremely rare condition that usually involves the synovial sheath or bursa of the foot or hand. We present two cases of synovial chondromatosis, one intra and one extra-articular. The first case was a 25 year old lady who presented with pain, swelling and restricted range of motion of left knee and was found to have an intra-articular synovial chondromatosis which was treated successfully by joint debridement. The second case was that of a 22 year old man who presented with right knee pain and was diagnosed to have an extra-articular synovial chondromatosis of his right medial hamstring tendon sheath, excision of which resulted in complete relief of symptoms. PMID:27549506

  5. Synovial chondromatosis in a great horned owl (Bubo virginianus).

    PubMed

    Howard, M O; Nieves, M A; Miles, K G

    1996-04-01

    A case of synovial chondromatosis in a great horned owl (Bubo virginianus) was found in June 1993. In radiographs of bilateral swelling of the scapulohumeral joint we observed numerous mineralized foci in the soft tissue. The foci were identified by light microscopy as cartilaginous metaplasia. This is the first report of synovial chondromatosis in an owl. PMID:8722282

  6. Extra-articular Synovial Chondromatosis Eroding and Penetrating the Acromion.

    PubMed

    El Rassi, George; Matta, Jihad; Hijjawi, Ayman; Khair, Ousama Abou; Fahs, Sara

    2015-10-01

    Synovial chondromatosis of the shoulder is an uncommon disorder. It usually affects the glenohumeral joint and is characterized by metaplasia of the synovium leading to the formation of osteochondral loose bodies. Few cases of extra-articular subacromial synovial chondromatosis involving the rotator cuff tendon have been reported in the literature. The treatment of previously reported cases consisted of open bursectomy and removal of loose bodies. We report a case of subacromial synovial chondromatosis without rotator cuff involvement but with severe erosion and fracture of the acromion. Treatment consisted of shoulder arthroscopy to remove all loose bodies, total bursectomy, and debridement of the acromion. Potential benefits of arthroscopy were also evaluated. PMID:26697302

  7. Extra-articular Synovial Chondromatosis Eroding and Penetrating the Acromion

    PubMed Central

    El Rassi, George; Matta, Jihad; Hijjawi, Ayman; Khair, Ousama Abou; Fahs, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis of the shoulder is an uncommon disorder. It usually affects the glenohumeral joint and is characterized by metaplasia of the synovium leading to the formation of osteochondral loose bodies. Few cases of extra-articular subacromial synovial chondromatosis involving the rotator cuff tendon have been reported in the literature. The treatment of previously reported cases consisted of open bursectomy and removal of loose bodies. We report a case of subacromial synovial chondromatosis without rotator cuff involvement but with severe erosion and fracture of the acromion. Treatment consisted of shoulder arthroscopy to remove all loose bodies, total bursectomy, and debridement of the acromion. Potential benefits of arthroscopy were also evaluated. PMID:26697302

  8. Synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Reyes Macías, Juan Francisco; Sánchez Prieto, Martín

    2007-01-01

    Synovial Chondromatosis (SC) is a disease whose etiology is unknown, can be defined as a benign synovial process characterized by the formation of metaplastic cartilaginous nodes inside connective tissue of articular surfaces, is considered an active metaplastic phenomenon better than a neoplastic process; it presents a greater preference to affect women who constitute almost 70% of reported cases, the age range is wide and oscillates between 18-75 years (average 44.6 years). Between the main clinical findings are: pain, crackle, volume augmentation and a limited buccal opening. SC is an unusual state and the reports in the English literature are no more than 75 cases, only 66 of those where histologically verified, most of those were affecting great joints like hip, knee and shoulder, but if SC is not frequent in this sites, is even more infrequent on temporomandibular joint. The aim of this paper is to report a clinical case and at the same time to realize a brief review of the literature.

  9. Diagnosis and treatment of synovial chondromatosis of the TMJ: a clinical case

    PubMed Central

    Valentini, Valentino; Arangio, Paolo; Egidi, Sara; Capriotti, Marco; Vellone, Valentino; Costrechini, Marco; Boschi, Giulio; Cascone, Piero; Calafati, Vincenzo; Torre, Umberto; Ricciardi, Irma

    2013-01-01

    Summary Synovial chondromatosis is a rare, benign, chronic, progressive and proliferative lesion that usually affects large joints. This disease is characterized by the development of cartilaginous nodules within the space of synovial joints, tendon sheaths or cases; the nodules subsequently degrade, detach and form free-floating, calcified bodies within the joint space. In 1933, Axhausen described the first case of synovial chondromatosis affecting the temporomandibular joint. The aetiology still remains unknown, but a history of trauma and inflammation is often found. Clinical symptoms of chondromatosis affecting the TMJ are often characterized by swelling, pain, headache, crepitation, malocclusion and joint dysfunction. The big challenge concerning synovial chondromatosis is to suspect and establish a correct diagnosis. These nonspecific initial signs and symptoms may mimic other nonspecific TMJ’s diseases and can easily lead to a delay in diagnosis or a misdiagnosis. Here we present a case of synovial chondromatosis of the TMJ and the appropriate diagnostic and treatment performed. PMID:24611093

  10. Bakers Cyst with Synovial Chondromatosis of Knee - A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Daivesh P; Diwakar, Manish; Dargar, Nitin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Synovial chondromatosis is a rare intraarticular benign condition arising from the synovial membrane of the joints, synovial sheaths or bursae around the joints. Primary synovial chondromatosis typically affects the large joints in the third to fifth decade of life, although involvement of smaller joints and presentation in younger age group is also documented. The purpose of this case report is to document this rare extra articular synovial pathology present inside the baker’s cyst which required open synovectomy and debridement to eradicate it. Case Report: A 43 yearold male presented with a two year history of pain, swelling and restriction of right knee joint. After the clinical and radiological assessment, open synovectomy, removal of cyst and thorough joint debridement procedure was performed. Histopathological study confirmed the findings of synovial chondromatosis. Conclusion: Synovial chondromatosis is a rare benign condition. Complete synovectomy offers reliable cure rate. PMID:27299117

  11. Giant Solitary Synovial Chondromatosis of the Temporomandibular Joint with Intracranial Extension

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Salú, José L.; Lázaro, Rafael; Aldasoro, José; Gonzalez-Darder, José M.

    1998-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis are rare entities but are well-described lesions in the literature that can affect many joint areas of the body. A case of tumoral synovial chondromatosis involving the temporomandibular joint with intracranial extension through mandibular fossa is reported. As long as there was significant infratemporal and extradural invasion of the middle and posterior fossa, a transtemporal and infratemporal approach was performed and total removal of the lesions was achieved. A brief review of skull base synovial chondromatosis is presented. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10Figure 11 PMID:17171059

  12. Solitary synovial chondromatosis arising in the gluteus maximus bursa: computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging findings

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Noriko; Nambu, Atsushi; Tago, Masao; Shibuya, Isao; Kawamoto, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    Chondral tumors in soft tissue are referred to as soft-tissue chondromas or extraskeletal chondromas, or as synovial chondromatosis if they arise in synovial tissue. We report the case of a 29-year-old man with synovial chondromatosis, also called synovial osteochondromatosis, which appeared in a solitary and extra-articular form. On magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography, the central portion of the tumor showed similar characteristics to bone marrow, despite the absence of any connection to adjacent bone. T2-weighted imaging displayed marked peripheral hyperintensity consistent with a cartilaginous area. These findings suggested the presence of enchondral ossification and were similar to those of skeletal osteochondroma, with the exception of the absence of attachment to bone. MRI is useful for distinguishing solitary synovial chondromatosis from other lesions, such as myositis ossificans, extraskeletal chondrosarcoma, and parosteal osteosarcoma. PMID:26998347

  13. Synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint with calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal deposition disease (pseudogout)

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, Y; Nomura, J; Nakanishi, K; Yanase, S; Kato, H; Tagawa, T

    2012-01-01

    This report describes a very rare case of synovial chondromatosis with deposition of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystals (pseudogout) in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of a 46-year-old male patient. Synovial chondromatosis is a non-neoplastic disease characterized by metaplasia of the connective tissue leading to chondrogenesis in the synovial membrane. Pseudogout is an inflammatory disease of the joints caused by the deposition of CPPD, producing similar symptoms to those observed in gout but not hyperuricaemia. Both diseases commonly affect the knee, hip and elbow joints, but rarely affect the TMJ. PMID:23166363

  14. Unilateral condylar hyperplasia combined with synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint. Report of a case.

    PubMed

    de Bont, L G; Blankestijn, J; Panders, A K; Vermey, A

    1985-02-01

    A case of unilateral condylar hyperplasia combined with synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is presented. Clinical and radiographic findings were consistent with an active unilateral hyperplasia. A high condylectomy was performed. During the operation numerous cartilaginous particles discharged from the TMJ and so it became clear that the patient was also suffering from chondromatosis. Both conditions were confirmed by histological examination. PMID:3856622

  15. Synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint: a clinical, radiological and histological study.

    PubMed

    Martín-Granizo, Rafael; Sánchez, Juan Jesús; Jorquera, Manuela; Ortega, Luis

    2005-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis (SC) is a cartilaginous metaplasy of the mesenchymal remnants of the synovial tissue of the joints. It is characterized by the formation of cartilaginous nodules in the synovium and inside the articular space (loose bodies). SC mainly affects to big synovial joints such as the knee and the elbow, being uncommon the onset within the TMJ, where 75 cases have been published. The main symptoms are pain, inflammation, limitation of the movements of the jaw and crepitation. Different methods of diagnosis include panoramic radiograph, CT, MR and arthroscopy of the TMJ. We report a new case of unilateral SC of the TMJ, including diagnostic images, treatment performed and histological analysis.

  16. Condylar hyperplasia associated to synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint: a case report.

    PubMed

    Gay-Escoda, C; Valmaseda-Castellón, E; Alaejos-Algarra, C; Vázquez-Rodriguez, E

    2001-04-01

    Condylar hyperplasia is a slowly developing malformation of the mandible, with elongation of the mandibular neck, that generally results in facial asymmetry. Synovial chondromatosis is a benign chronic disorder characterized by the formation of multiple small nodules of hyaline cartilage as a result of metaplasia of the synovial connective tissue. It affects mostly the large joints, particularly the knee, hip, elbow and ankle. The temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is rarely affected. The case of a 42-year-old male with a history of left preauricular pain and swelling and deviation of the mandible to the left upon opening the mouth is presented. Computed tomography disclosed hyperplasia of the left condyle with loose radiopaque bodies within the joint cavity. The left TMJ was subject to open surgery, which included resection of four loose bodies and a remodeling condylectomy. The histopathological study confirmed the diagnosis of condylar hyperplasia and chondromatosis of the left TMJ. PMID:11842870

  17. Loose bodies of the temporo-mandibular joint, synovial chondromatosis or osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Blenkinsopp, P T

    1978-07-01

    A patient is presented with multiple intra-articular loose bodies of the temporo-mandibular joint, the aetiology and management is discussed. In the absence of histological proof of metaplasia within the synovium the mechanism of cartilage production is open to question. Attention is drawn to the diagnostic problem in long-standing cases when osteo-arthritis supervenes. The clinical picture presented may represent the late stages of synovial chondromatosis or degenerative joint disease from another cause.

  18. Synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint: a clinical, radiological and histological study.

    PubMed

    Martín-Granizo, Rafael; Sánchez, Juan Jesús; Jorquera, Manuela; Ortega, Luis

    2005-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis (SC) is a cartilaginous metaplasy of the mesenchymal remnants of the synovial tissue of the joints. It is characterized by the formation of cartilaginous nodules in the synovium and inside the articular space (loose bodies). SC mainly affects to big synovial joints such as the knee and the elbow, being uncommon the onset within the TMJ, where 75 cases have been published. The main symptoms are pain, inflammation, limitation of the movements of the jaw and crepitation. Different methods of diagnosis include panoramic radiograph, CT, MR and arthroscopy of the TMJ. We report a new case of unilateral SC of the TMJ, including diagnostic images, treatment performed and histological analysis. PMID:15876973

  19. A rare case of synovial chondromatosis of the inferior TMJ compartment. Diagnosis and treatment aspect

    PubMed Central

    Sozzi, Davide; Bocchialini, Gabriele; Novelli, Giorgio; Valente, Maria Gabriella; Moltrasio, Francesca; Bozzetti, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Summary Aim Synovial Chondromatosis (SC) is a rare, benign non neoplastic arthopathy characterized by the metaplastic development of cartilaginous nodules within the synovial membrane. In only 3% of all cases does it affect the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and cases that arise from the lower compartment are rarely found in literature. The aim of this paper is to report a new case of SC of the inferior TMJ compartment with the description of the clinical, therapeutic and histopathological findings. Case report This article presents a 68-year-old woman with preauricular swelling on the right side, pain, crepitus and limited joint motion. This patient was evaluated by preoperative clinical manifestation, CT scan and MR images. Both showed multiple, calcified loose bodies in the inferior compartment. Based on these images as well as the patient’s signs and symptoms, a surgical intervention was performed. A good functional recovery with no signs of recurrence at 36 months of follow up was obtained. Conclusion Among cases of synovial chondromatosis in literature, only twelve originating in the lower compartment have been reported, this one included. In all the cases treated for SC in the lower compartment, both in literature and in our case report, surgical treatment led to healing. PMID:26941895

  20. Extra- and intra-articular synovial chondromatosis and malignant transformation to chondrosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Bertrana, C; Durall, I; Rial, J M; Franch, J; Fontecha, P; Ramis, A

    2010-01-01

    Intra- and extra-articular primary synovial chondromatosis (SC) was observed in a five-year-old, entire male German Shepherd. Thousands of small cartilaginous nodules were removed from the stifle joint as well as from several adjacent muscles. Diagnosis of SC was established based on clinical, radiographic and biopsy results. The owner declined to have a new surgery performed for complete nodule removal and partial synovectomy. Nine months after the initial presentation, a proximal pathological intra- articular tibial fracture was observed and malignant transformation to chondrosarcoma was diagnosed after limb amputation. No metastasis was observed after 1.5 years of follow-up.

  1. Pediatric Subtalar Joint Synovial Chondromatosis Report of a Case and an Up-to-date Review.

    PubMed

    Saibaba, Balaji; Sudesh, Pebam; Govindan, Gokul; Prakash, Mahesh

    2015-09-01

    Synovial chondromatosis is a rare, usually benign disorder affecting the population predominantly in the third and fourth decades of life and mainly involving the large weightbearing joints of the lower limb-the knees and the hip. In this report, we highlight an unusual pediatric clinical presentation of synovial osteochondromatosis involving the subtalar joint and discuss its surgical management; we also provide a comprehensive up-to-date literature review of the disorder. This patient was successfully treated with en masse surgical excision. He has been doing well, with complete pain relief and improved range of motion at 1-year follow-up. An exceptional involvement of the subtalar joint and an unusual presentation in the pediatric age group makes this case unique.

  2. Innovative Surgical Management of the Synovial Chondromatosis of Temporo-Mandibular Joints: Highly Conservative Surgical Technique.

    PubMed

    Ionna, Franco; Amantea, Massimiliano; Mastrangelo, Filiberto; Ballini, Andrea; Maglione, Maria Grazia; Aversa, Corrado; De Cecio, Rossella; Russo, Daniela; Marrelli, Massimo; Tatullo, Marco

    2016-07-01

    Synovial chondromatosis (SC) is an uncommon disease characterized by a benign nodular cartilaginous proliferation arising from the joint synovium, bursae, or tendon sheaths. Although the temporomandibular joint is rarely affected by neoplastic lesions, SC is the most common neoplastic lesion of this joint. The treatment of this disease consists in the extraoral surgery with a wide removal of the lesion; in this study, the authors described a more conservative intraoral surgical approach. Patient with SC of temporomandibular joint typically refer a limitation in the mouth opening, together with a persistent not physiological mandibular protrusion and an appearance of a neoformation located at the right preauricular region: the authors reported 1 scholar patient. After biopsy of the neoformation, confirming the synovial chondromatosis, the patient underwent thus to the surgical excision of the tumor, via authors' conservative transoral approach, to facilitate the enucleation of the neoformation. The mass fully involved the pterygo-maxillary fossa with involvement of the parotid lodge and of the right TMJ: this multifocal extension suggested for a trans-oral surgical procedure, in the light of the suspicion of a possible malignant nature of the neoplasm. Our intraoral conservative approach to surgery is aimed to reduce the presence of unaesthetic scars in preauricular and facial regions, with surgical results undoubtedly comparable to the traditional surgical techniques much more aggressive. Our technique could be a valid, alternative, and safe approach to treat this rare and complex kind of oncological disease.

  3. Synovial chondromatosis of the temporo-mandibular joint. Report of three cases and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Blankestijn, J; Panders, A K; Vermey, A; Scherpbier, A J

    1985-01-15

    Synovial chondromatosis of the temporo-mandibular joint is a rare affection, characterized by the formation of cartilage particles in the synovial membrane. These particles can break through and enter the joint compartments. The diagnosis must be considered for patients who complain of slowly progressive swelling, pain, and crepitus in the region of the temporo-mandibular joint. When the changes are not visible on plain X-rays due to absence of ossification, important diagnostic information can be obtained by a technetium 99m (99m Tc) bone scan and a computerized tomography (CT) sialogram. The diagnosis can be established only by histopathologic examination of surgically removed particles or resected synovial membrane. Discussed are 25 cases of histopathologically verified chondromatosis of the temporo-mandibular joint reported in the literature, as well as 3 new cases seen and treated at the University Hospital Groningen since 1970. A good clinical result can be obtained by removal of all particles and synovectomy. Condylectomy is seldom required.

  4. Synovial chondrosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Confalonieri, Norberto

    2016-01-01

    Background Synovial chondrosarcoma (SCH) is a very rare tumor arising in the intra-articular cavity. In the majority of literature reports it is described as a malignant transformation of a pre-existing synovial chondromatosis (SC). We reported a systematic review of primary and secondary SCH described in the literature with the aim to recollect data from different case-reports and case-series, trying to summarize general aspects of this very rare disease. Methods We collected 42 abstracts in the form of case series and case reports, which reported 67 cases of SCH. Studies were taken into account only if they proved a histological diagnosis of SCH, either primary or secondary, with or without evidence of pre-existing SC. Results The average age of SCH was 56.9 years, with prevalence for male sex. The average time of malignant transformation was 11.2 years. The most affected joint was the knee (47.7%), followed by hip (34.3%) and ankle (5.9%). SCH was described as de novo sarcoma only in 13 cases (19%). Surgery ended up with amputation in 59.7% of cases. Local recurrence rate was 28.3%. Conclusions We concluded that prognosis of SCH is worse than conventional one and we speculated this is due to the difficult site of the tumor (intraarticular), diagnostic delay and inappropriate previous treatments. We consider that a rapid deterioration of a SC or rapid recurrence after synoviectomy should be considered suspicious of malignant transformation and should be treated in a reference center. PMID:27570774

  5. A popliteal giant synovial osteochondroma mimicking a parosteal osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Both giant synovial osteochondroma and parosteal osteosarcoma are rare musculo-skeletal tumors, often localized in the vicinity of the knee. Misdiagnosis of a malignant bone tumor can entail fatal consequences. Etiology of giant synovial osteochondroma is widely unsolved but is believed to originate from synovial chondromatosis, a mostly benign metaplasia of the synovial membrane. Parosteal osteosarcoma is a low-grade surface osteosarcoma with a propensity of local recurrence and the potential of distant metastasis and therefore requiring a different therapeutical approach. We report the case of a popliteal giant osteochondroma mimicking a parosteal osteosarcoma. Relevant facts of this rare entity regarding pathogenesis, treatment, and differential diagnoses will be discussed. PMID:24066980

  6. Intraspinal synovial cyst in a dog.

    PubMed

    Perez, B; Rollan, E; Ramiro; Pumarola, M

    2000-01-01

    An eight-year-old, male Siberian husky cross was referred with a history of an acute onset of pelvic-limb ataxia and paraparesis. Radiography and subsequent myelography of the spine revealed an extradural compression of the spinal cord at the level of the 13th thoracic (T13) to first lumbar (L1) vertebrae. Hemilaminectomy resulted in the successful removal of an extradural cystic lesion. The morphological diagnosis based on histopathology was a synovial cyst with chondromatosis. There were no postoperative complications, and the dog's condition improved markedly. At two years postoperatively, the animal remains normal on both physical and neurological examination. To the authors' knowledge, this article is the first report of an intraspinal synovial cyst in a dog.

  7. Synovial fluid analysis

    MedlinePlus

    Joint fluid analysis; Joint fluid aspiration ... El-Gabalawy HS. Synovial fluid analysis, synovial biopsy, and synovial pathology. In: Firestein GS, Budd RC, Gabriel SE, McInnes IB, O'Dell JR, eds. Kelly's Textbook of ...

  8. [Diagnosis: synovial fluid analysis].

    PubMed

    Gallo Vallejo, Francisco Javier; Giner Ruiz, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Synovial fluid analysis in rheumatological diseases allows a more accurate diagnosis in some entities, mainly infectious and microcrystalline arthritis. Examination of synovial fluid in patients with osteoarthritis is useful if a differential diagnosis will be performed with other processes and to distinguish between inflammatory and non-inflammatory forms. Joint aspiration is a diagnostic and sometimes therapeutic procedure that is available to primary care physicians.

  9. Primary pleuropulmonary synovial sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Mirzoyan, Michael; Muslimani, Ala'a; Setrakian, Sebouh; Swedeh, Mohamed; Daw, Hamed A

    2008-09-01

    Pleuropulmonary synovial sarcoma (PPSS) is increasingly recognized as a subtype of sarcoma because of the recent identification of a distinctive chromosomal translocation specific to synovial sarcoma. Soft-tissue synovial sarcoma is far more common than PPSS and typically develops in para-articular locations of the extremities, affects young and middle-aged adults, with no difference in distribution between the sexes, and has well-documented radiologic manifestations. Pleuropulmonary synovial sarcoma can arise in the chest wall, heart, mediastinum, pleura, or lung, and it shares patient demographics and several imaging features with its soft-tissue counterpart. Patients present with a cough, chest pain, or dyspnea. On chest radiographs, PPSS typically appears as a sharply marginated mass with uniform opacity, based in the pleura or in the lung, and often accompanied by an ipsilateral pleural effusion. Computed tomographic images show a well-circumscribed, heterogeneously enhanced lesion without associated involvement of bone and without calcifications (except in the case of a chest wall primary tumor). Magnetic resonance imaging provides superior demonstration of nodular soft tissue and multilocular fluid-filled internal components of PPSS, in addition to peripheral rim enhancement after the intravenous administration of a gadoliniumbased contrast material such as gadopentetate dimeglumine. Current treatment consists of surgical resection followed by chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or both. PMID:18824448

  10. Primary Intracranial Synovial Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Luyuan; Sinson, Grant; Mueller, Wade

    2016-01-01

    Background. Synovial sarcoma is an aggressive soft tissue sarcoma with uncertain histological origin. The pathology frequently presents as a localized disease, especially near large joints around the knee and thigh. Intracranial disease, which is rare, has been reported as metastasis from synovial sarcoma. We report a case with no obvious primary extracranial pathology, suggesting primary intracranial disease; this has not been reported in the literature. Case Description. A 21-year-old male, with a prior right skull lesion resection for atypical spindle cell neoplasm, presented with headaches, gait instability, left arm weakness, and left homonymous hemianopsia. CT of head demonstrated a right parietal hemorrhagic lesion with mass effect, requiring surgical decompression. Histopathology revealed synovial sarcoma. FISH analysis noted the existence of the t(X;18)(p11.2;q11.2) chromosomal translocation. PET scan did not show other metastatic disease. He underwent stereotactic radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy. At 2-year follow-up, he remained nonfocal without recurrence. Conclusion. We report the first known case of primary intracranial synovial sarcoma. Moreover, we stress that intracranial lesions may have a tendency for hemorrhage, requiring urgent lifesaving decompression. PMID:27247811

  11. Primary Intracranial Synovial Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mohit; Li, Luyuan; Nguyen, Ha Son; Doan, Ninh; Sinson, Grant; Mueller, Wade

    2016-01-01

    Background. Synovial sarcoma is an aggressive soft tissue sarcoma with uncertain histological origin. The pathology frequently presents as a localized disease, especially near large joints around the knee and thigh. Intracranial disease, which is rare, has been reported as metastasis from synovial sarcoma. We report a case with no obvious primary extracranial pathology, suggesting primary intracranial disease; this has not been reported in the literature. Case Description. A 21-year-old male, with a prior right skull lesion resection for atypical spindle cell neoplasm, presented with headaches, gait instability, left arm weakness, and left homonymous hemianopsia. CT of head demonstrated a right parietal hemorrhagic lesion with mass effect, requiring surgical decompression. Histopathology revealed synovial sarcoma. FISH analysis noted the existence of the t(X;18)(p11.2;q11.2) chromosomal translocation. PET scan did not show other metastatic disease. He underwent stereotactic radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy. At 2-year follow-up, he remained nonfocal without recurrence. Conclusion. We report the first known case of primary intracranial synovial sarcoma. Moreover, we stress that intracranial lesions may have a tendency for hemorrhage, requiring urgent lifesaving decompression. PMID:27247811

  12. Synovial Sarcoma With Myoid Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Qassid, Omar; Ali, Ahmed; Thway, Khin

    2016-09-01

    Synovial sarcoma is a malignant mesenchymal tumor with variable epithelial differentiation, which is defined by the presence of a specific t(X;18)(p11.2;q11.2) chromosomal translocation that generates SS18-SSX fusion oncogenes. Synovial sarcoma typically arises within extremity deep soft tissue (particularly around large joints) of young adults, but has been shown to occur at almost any location. When it arises in more unusual sites, such as the abdomen, it can present a significant diagnostic challenge. We describe a case of intraabdominal monophasic synovial sarcoma that immunohistochemically showed strong expression of smooth muscle actin and calponin but only very scanty cytokeratin, and which showed morphologic and immunohistochemical overlap with other spindle cell neoplasms that can arise at this site, such as gastrointestinal stromal tumor and myofibrosarcoma. As correct diagnosis is of clinical and prognostic importance, surgical pathologists should be aware of the potential for synovial sarcoma to occur at a variety of anatomic sites and of its spectrum of immunoreactivity. Synovial sarcoma should be in the differential diagnosis of spindle cell neoplasms with myoid differentiation that do not fall into any definite tumor category, for which there should be a relatively low threshold for performing fluorescence in situ hybridization or reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction to assess for the specific SS18 gene rearrangement or SS18-SSX fusion transcripts, which remain the diagnostic gold standard. PMID:27106779

  13. SYNOVIAL SARCOMA OF THE LARYNX.

    PubMed

    Javed, Nabila; Iqbal, Javed

    2015-01-01

    Synovial sarcoma is a mesenchymal spindle cell tumour that displays variable epithelial differentiation. It most commonly occurs in lower extremities. Head and neck is a rare site for synovial sarcoma accounting for less than 10%. Larynx is an extremely rare site and only 16 cases with laryngeal location have been reported. Immunohistochemistry is important for correct diagnosis. Surgical excision of the tumour with clear margins and local radiotherapy is effective in local control. Chemotherapy is indicated in the presence of distant metastasis. Case of a 16 years old female is presented with hoarseness of voice and mass in supraglottic region. Lateral pharangotomy and excision of mass revealed synovial sarcoma. She had been treated with adjuvant radiotherapy in September 2012. She was fine and coming for regular follow up.

  14. Postlaminectomy Bilateral Lumbar Intraspinal Synovial Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sung Ik; Lee, Jung Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar intraspinal synovial cysts are included in the difference diagnosis of lumbar radiculopathy. Developing imaging modalities has result in increased reporting about these lesions. However, the case of bilateral new lumbar intraspinal synovial cysts after laminectomy has been rarely reported. We report of a rare case with bilateral lumbar intraspinal synovial cysts after laminectomy, requiring surgical excision. PMID:27799997

  15. Synovial plicae of the knee

    SciTech Connect

    Apple, J.S.; Martinez, S.; Daffner, R.H.; Gehweiler, J.A.; Hardaker, W.T.

    1982-01-01

    This report describes the anatomy, patho-physiology, clinical, and radiographic findings, and treatment of the synovial plicae of the knee joint. The suprapatellar plica is a synovial fold present in the suprapatellar pouch of the knee joint in approximately 20% of the population. This fold may become symptomatic after injury and cause symptoms similar to other common internal derangements of the knee. Double contrast arthrography of the knee can be used to identify the presence of plicae. Although arthrography can identify the presence of a plica, its clinical significance requires close correlation with symptoms and an accurate clinical examination.

  16. Disseminated sporotrichosis.

    PubMed

    Romero-Cabello, Raúl; Bonifaz, Alexandro; Romero-Feregrino, Raúl; Sánchez, Carlos Javier; Linares, Yancy; Zavala, Jorge Tay; Romero, Leticia Calderón; Romero-Feregrino, Rodrigo; Vega, José T Sánchez

    2011-03-25

    Sporotrichosis is a subacute or chronic infection caused by Sporothrix schenckii. It is a primary cutaneous infection and it has different clinical forms: disseminated by lymphatic vessels (75%), localised cutaneous form (20%), disseminated cutaneous and extracuteus rarely. The systemic disseminated sporotrichosis is considered a severe opportunistic infection. The best diagnostic test is the culture. The authors report a case of a 36-year-old man, originally from Puebla, Mexico, with a diagnosis of disseminated sporotrichosis. Differential diagnosis with other pathologies includes leishmaniasis, chromoblastomycosis, tuberculosis verrucose and lymphangitis. The development of unusual presentations in immunocompromised patients has been reported.

  17. Disseminated sporotrichosis

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Cabello, Raúl; Bonifaz, Alexandro; Romero-Feregrino, Raúl; Sánchez, Carlos Javier; Linares, Yancy; Zavala, Jorge Tay; Romero, Leticia Calderón; Romero-Feregrino, Rodrigo; Vega, José T Sánchez

    2011-01-01

    Sporotrichosis is a subacute or chronic infection caused by Sporothrix schenckii. It is a primary cutaneous infection and it has different clinical forms: disseminated by lymphatic vessels (75%), localised cutaneous form (20%), disseminated cutaneous and extracuteus rarely. The systemic disseminated sporotrichosis is considered a severe opportunistic infection. The best diagnostic test is the culture. The authors report a case of a 36-year-old man, originally from Puebla, Mexico, with a diagnosis of disseminated sporotrichosis. Differential diagnosis with other pathologies includes leishmaniasis, chromoblastomycosis, tuberculosis verrucose and lymphangitis. The development of unusual presentations in immunocompromised patients has been reported. PMID:22700076

  18. Synovial Sarcoma Mimicking Myositis Ossificans

    PubMed Central

    Erkut, Adem; Guvercin, Yılmaz; Bedir, Recep

    2016-01-01

    A calcification mass was incidentally found in the soft tissue of a patient who had a history of trauma to the extremity during examination. The patient had no symptom. The pathological analysis of the mass revealed it was an early-phase synovial sarcoma (SS). The diagnosis was made before the onset of symptoms and proper surgical intervention was performed. Therefore, in case of a <1 cm lesion clinically suspicious of myositis ossificans, SS should be taken into consideration as a possible diagnosis.

  19. Synovial Sarcoma Mimicking Myositis Ossificans

    PubMed Central

    Erkut, Adem; Guvercin, Yılmaz; Bedir, Recep

    2016-01-01

    A calcification mass was incidentally found in the soft tissue of a patient who had a history of trauma to the extremity during examination. The patient had no symptom. The pathological analysis of the mass revealed it was an early-phase synovial sarcoma (SS). The diagnosis was made before the onset of symptoms and proper surgical intervention was performed. Therefore, in case of a <1 cm lesion clinically suspicious of myositis ossificans, SS should be taken into consideration as a possible diagnosis. PMID:27595081

  20. Synovial Sarcoma Mimicking Myositis Ossificans.

    PubMed

    Balik, Mehmet Sabri; Erkut, Adem; Guvercin, Yılmaz; Bedir, Recep

    2016-09-01

    A calcification mass was incidentally found in the soft tissue of a patient who had a history of trauma to the extremity during examination. The patient had no symptom. The pathological analysis of the mass revealed it was an early-phase synovial sarcoma (SS). The diagnosis was made before the onset of symptoms and proper surgical intervention was performed. Therefore, in case of a <1 cm lesion clinically suspicious of myositis ossificans, SS should be taken into consideration as a possible diagnosis. PMID:27595081

  1. Disseminating research.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Lesley

    2015-07-01

    THE THEME of this edition of Nurse Researcher, 'disseminating research', is pertinent to researchers across the career spectrum and tackles two important issues: open access publishing and originality in PhD research. In the first paper, Suzanne Fredericks examines and contrasts two models of open access publishing, revealing some notable advantages of 'green' open access, achieved through repositories, as opposed to the more well-known 'gold' open access offered by journals ( Fredericks 2015 ). In the second paper, Paul Gill and Gina Dolan discuss originality in PhD studies, exploring the nature of the concept and how doctoral students can demonstrate originality, which is an essential consideration in their research dissemination activities as well as their thesis preparation ( Gill and Dolan 2015 ).

  2. Disseminating research.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Lesley

    2015-07-01

    THE THEME of this edition of Nurse Researcher, 'disseminating research', is pertinent to researchers across the career spectrum and tackles two important issues: open access publishing and originality in PhD research. In the first paper, Suzanne Fredericks examines and contrasts two models of open access publishing, revealing some notable advantages of 'green' open access, achieved through repositories, as opposed to the more well-known 'gold' open access offered by journals ( Fredericks 2015 ). In the second paper, Paul Gill and Gina Dolan discuss originality in PhD studies, exploring the nature of the concept and how doctoral students can demonstrate originality, which is an essential consideration in their research dissemination activities as well as their thesis preparation ( Gill and Dolan 2015 ). PMID:26168806

  3. Disseminated tungiasis.

    PubMed

    Vallarelli, Andrelou Fralete Ayres; Souza, Elemir Macedo de

    2011-01-01

    Tungiasis is a zoophilic and anthropophilic infestation caused by Tunga penetrans. It is endemic in Latin America and in the Caribbean. It occurs mainly in impoverished communities that have no access to basic sanitation and in individuals that visit contaminated areas. The most common penetration site of this ectoparasite is the periungueal region of the feet. The authors present its disseminated form occurring in a patient inhabiting a rural area. PMID:22147051

  4. Primary pleuropulmonary synovial sarcoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lianfang; Guan, Zhiyu; Dai, Xuan; Xu, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Pleuropulmonary synovial sarcoma (PPSS) is an extremely rare malignant tumor, which is increasingly recognized as a subtype of sarcoma with a distinctive chromosomal translocation specific to synovial sarcoma. It is often presents like any thoracic tumor with symptoms such as chest pain or cough. Here we report a case of PPSS in a 49-year-old woman presenting with cough, shortness of breath and chest pain. And who were found upon histologic examination of the resection specimen to have cystic primary pleuropulmonary synovial sarcoma. PMID:26823907

  5. Free radical oxidation products in plasma and synovial fluid of horses with synovial inflammation.

    PubMed

    Auer, D E; Ng, J C; Seawright, A A

    1993-02-01

    Free radical oxidation products, namely conjugated dienes, ultraviolet fluorescence (excitation 325 nm, emission 395 nm) and visible fluorescence (excitation 360 nm, emission 460 nm) were measured in equine synovial fluid exposed to free radicals in vitro and in the plasma and synovial fluids of horses with synovial effusions. The synovial effusions were induced by intra-articularly administered carrageenin (0.3 ml, 1%), which rarely resulted in clinical lameness. The free radicals were generated in vitro by mixtures of iron and ethylene diamine tetra acetate (Fe/EDTA) or mixtures of hypoxanthine and xanthine oxidase (HX/XO). The conjugated diene concentrations and intensity of ultraviolet fluorescence were negligible in plasma and synovial fluid specimens. No increase resulted from incubation of synovial fluids with either a free radical generating system or as a result of the induced inflammation. The intensity of visible fluorescence did not increase in specimens incubated with Fe/EDTA. However, the intensity of visible fluorescence increased in specimens incubated with HX/XO, in synovial effusions induced by carrageenin, in plasma and in synovial fluids aspirated from saline injected controls. The results indicate that the intensity of visible fluorescence of equine synovial fluid increases after exposure to free radicals and during synovitis in the horse, suggesting a possible role for free radicals in the pathogenesis of equine inflammatory joint disease.

  6. Disseminated histoplamosis.

    PubMed

    Joshi, S A; Kagal, A S; Bharadwaj, R S; Kulkarni, S S; Jadhav, M V

    2006-10-01

    A case of disseminated histoplasmosis in a 45-year-old male patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) from Pune is reported. The patient presented with high-grade fever and pain in hypochondrium. Clinical signs were pallor and hepatosplenomegaly. Bone marrow and splenic aspirate revealed numerous intracellular oval shaped yeast forms. Histoplasma capsulatum was isolated from the bone marrow and splenic aspirate. H. capsulatum infection is an opportunistic infection usually reported from patient with AIDS in areas endemic for H. capsulatum. The present case highlights the fact that histoplasmosis could be an emerging opportunistic infection in India. PMID:17185853

  7. Solitary pulmonary nodule: pleuropulmonary synovial sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Ward, Robert C; Birnbaum, Ariel E; Aswad, Bassam I; Healey, Terrance T

    2014-05-01

    Pleuropulmonary synovial sarcoma (PPSS) is an extremely rare primary malignancy of the lung. We present a case of a middle-aged female with PPSS that was initially discovered as an incidental indeterminate nodule on chest radiograph. Following evaluation with computed tomography (CT), the patient went on to positron-emission tomography (PET)/CT for work-up of the solitary pulmonary nodule, which demonstrated mild FDG-avidity and no other evidence of FDG-avid disease. The patient then underwent thoracotomy and right upper lobectomy for definitive treatment. Only after evaluation of the gross pathology, histology, immunohistochemistry and cytogenetics was the diagnosis of synovial sarcoma made. Importantly, the preceding PET/CT, in addition to physical exam of the upper and lower extremities, helped exclude the more common extra-thoracic soft-tissue variety of synovial sarcoma, which frequently metastasizes to lung, carrying a worse prognosis. Discussion of synovial sarcoma and PPSS follows. PMID:24791267

  8. Synovial Lipomatosis of the Glenohumeral Joint

    PubMed Central

    Safran, Ori

    2016-01-01

    Synovial lipomatosis (also known as lipoma arborescens) is a rare and benign lesion affecting synovium-lined cavities. It is characterized by hyperplasia of mature fat tissue in the subsynovial layer. Although the most commonly affected site is the knee joint, rarely additional locations such as tendon sheath and other joints are involved. We present a case of synovial lipomatosis of the glenohumeral joint in a 44-year-old man. The clinical data radiological studies and histopathologic results are described, as well as a review of the current literature. PMID:27563476

  9. Synovial Lipomatosis of the Glenohumeral Joint.

    PubMed

    Beyth, Shaul; Safran, Ori

    2016-01-01

    Synovial lipomatosis (also known as lipoma arborescens) is a rare and benign lesion affecting synovium-lined cavities. It is characterized by hyperplasia of mature fat tissue in the subsynovial layer. Although the most commonly affected site is the knee joint, rarely additional locations such as tendon sheath and other joints are involved. We present a case of synovial lipomatosis of the glenohumeral joint in a 44-year-old man. The clinical data radiological studies and histopathologic results are described, as well as a review of the current literature.

  10. Hyaluronan and synovial joint: function, distribution and healing

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Synovial fluid is a viscous solution found in the cavities of synovial joints. The principal role of synovial fluid is to reduce friction between the articular cartilages of synovial joints during movement. The presence of high molar mass hyaluronan (HA) in this fluid gives it the required viscosity for its function as lubricant solution. Inflammation oxidation stress enhances normal degradation of hyaluronan causing several diseases related to joints. This review describes hyaluronan properties and distribution, applications and its function in synovial joints, with short review for using thiol compounds as antioxidants preventing HA degradations under inflammation conditions. PMID:24678248

  11. Targeting epigenetic misregulation in synovial sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Waterfall, Joshua J; Meltzer, Paul S

    2012-03-20

    Like many sarcomas, synovial sarcoma is driven by a characteristic oncogenic transcription factor fusion, SS18-SSX. In this issue of Cancer Cell, Su et al. elucidate the protein partners necessary for target gene misregulation and demonstrate a direct effect of histone deacetylase inhibitors on the SS18-SSX complex composition, expression misregulation, and apoptosis.

  12. Synovial tissue hypoxia and inflammation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ng, C T; Biniecka, M; Kennedy, A; McCormick, J; FitzGerald, O; Bresnihan, B; Buggy, D; Taylor, C T; O'Sullivan, J; Fearon, U; Veale, D J

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Hypoxia is a microenvironmental feature in the inflamed joint, which promotes survival advantage for cells. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship of partial oxygen pressure in the synovial tissue (tPO2) in patients with inflammatory arthritis with macroscopic/microscopic inflammation and local levels of proinflammatory mediators. Methods Patients with inflammatory arthritis underwent full clinical assessment and video arthroscopy to quantify macroscopic synovitis and measure synovial tPO2 under direct visualisation. Cell specific markers (CD3 (T cells), CD68 (macrophages), Ki67 (cell proliferation) and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labelling (cell apoptosis)) were quantified by immunohistology. In vitro migration was assessed in primary and normal synoviocytes (synovial fibroblast cells (SFCs)) using a wound repair scratch assay. Levels of tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα), interleukin 1β (IL1β), interferon γ (IFNγ), IL6, macrophage inflammatory protein 3α (MIP3α) and IL8 were quantified, in matched serum and synovial fluid, by multiplex cytokine assay and ELISA. Results The tPO2 was 22.5 (range 3.2–54.1) mm Hg and correlated inversely with macroscopic synovitis (r=−0.421, p=0.02), sublining CD3 cells (−0.611, p<0.01) and sublining CD68 cells (r=−0.615, p<0.001). No relationship with cell proliferation or apoptosis was found. Primary and normal SFCs exposed to 1% and 3% oxygen (reflecting the median tPO2 in vivo) induced cell migration. This was coupled with significantly higher levels of synovial fluid tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα), IL1β, IFNγ and MIP3α in patients with tPO2 <20 mm Hg (all p values <0.05). Conclusions This is the first study to show a direct in vivo correlation between synovial tPO2, inflammation and cell migration, thus it is proposed that hypoxia is a possible primary driver of inflammatory processes in the arthritic joint. PMID:20439288

  13. Primary pulmonary synovial sarcoma: a rare neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Montserrat Blanco; Fontán, Eva María García; Carretero, Miguel Ángel Cańizares; Pińeiro, Ana González

    2016-01-01

    Primary pulmonary synovial sarcoma is an extremely rare tumor with an unknown cause. The diagnosis is established after other primary lung malignancies or metastatic extrathoracic sarcoma have been excluded. We report the case of a 69-year-old man who presented with a well-defined mass in the right upper lobe on a chest X-ray. A video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) right upper lobectomy was performed. Immunohistochemically, neoplastic cells were positive for vimentin, CD56 and Bcl-2, and focally positive for CD99, epithelial membrane antigen and cytokeratin 7 and 19. The cytogenetic study revealed a SYT genetic reassortment. So, the final pathological diagnosis was primary pulmonary synovial sarcoma. PMID:27516790

  14. JAWS coordinates chondrogenesis and synovial joint positioning.

    PubMed

    Sohaskey, Michael L; Yu, Jane; Diaz, Michael A; Plaas, Anna H; Harland, Richard M

    2008-07-01

    Properly positioned synovial joints are crucial to coordinated skeletal movement. Despite their importance for skeletal development and function, the molecular mechanisms that underlie joint positioning are not well understood. We show that mice carrying an insertional mutation in a previously uncharacterized gene, which we have named Jaws (joints abnormal with splitting), die perinatally with striking skeletal defects, including ectopic interphalangeal joints. These ectopic joints develop along the longitudinal axis and persist at birth, suggesting that JAWS is uniquely required for the orientation and consequent positioning of interphalangeal joints within the endochondral skeleton. Jaws mutant mice also exhibit severe chondrodysplasia characterized by delayed and disorganized maturation of growth plate chondrocytes, together with impaired chondroitin sulfation and abnormal metabolism of the chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan aggrecan. Our findings identify JAWS as a key regulator of chondrogenesis and synovial joint positioning required for the restriction of joint formation to discrete stereotyped locations in the embryonic skeleton.

  15. Primary pulmonary synovial sarcoma: a rare neoplasm.

    PubMed

    García, José Soro; Ramos, Montserrat Blanco; Fontán, Eva María García; Carretero, Miguel Ángel Cańizares; Pińeiro, Ana González

    2016-06-01

    Primary pulmonary synovial sarcoma is an extremely rare tumor with an unknown cause. The diagnosis is established after other primary lung malignancies or metastatic extrathoracic sarcoma have been excluded. We report the case of a 69-year-old man who presented with a well-defined mass in the right upper lobe on a chest X-ray. A video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) right upper lobectomy was performed. Immunohistochemically, neoplastic cells were positive for vimentin, CD56 and Bcl-2, and focally positive for CD99, epithelial membrane antigen and cytokeratin 7 and 19. The cytogenetic study revealed a SYT genetic reassortment. So, the final pathological diagnosis was primary pulmonary synovial sarcoma. PMID:27516790

  16. Identification of hydroxyapatite crystals in synovial fluid.

    PubMed

    Halverson, P B; McCarty, D J

    1979-04-01

    A semiquantitative technique employing (14C) ethane-1-hydroxy 1, -1-diphosphonate (EHDP) binding has been used to detect crystals, presumably hydroxyapatite, in human synovial fluid samples which were handled to prevent the formation of artifactual mineral phase. Binding material was found in 29% of non-inflammatory and in none of inflammatory joint fluids. Nuclide binding material was strongly correlated with the presence of CPPD crystals and with radiographic evidence of cartilaginous degeneration. PMID:106859

  17. Aztreonam penetration into synovial fluid and bone.

    PubMed Central

    MacLeod, C M; Bartley, E A; Galante, J O; Friedhoff, L T; Dhruv, R

    1986-01-01

    Eighteen patients with uncomplicated degenerative joint disease requiring joint replacement (hip or knee) were given a single 2-g intravenous dose of aztreonam over a 5-min period preoperatively. The mean concentration in synovial fluid of 83.0 +/- 9.2 micrograms/ml averaged 0.99 times the concomitant levels in serum. The mean concentration in cancellous bone of 16.0 +/- 4.3 micrograms/g averaged 0.20 times the concomitant levels in serum. PMID:3707115

  18. Primary pleuro-pulmonary synovial sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Shah, Unmil B; Joshi, S; Ghorpade, S V; Gaikwad, S N; Sundrani, R M

    2010-01-01

    Primary pleuro-pulmonary synovial sarcoma (PPSS) is a rare tumour and poses adiagnostic challenge particularly when unusual histological features are present. We report a case of a 30-year-old immunocompromised human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) sero-positive male who was referred to us with complaints of cough, breathlessness and left-sided chestpain for the past two months. The PPSS can be confirmed on tru-cut biopsy. PMID:20949738

  19. Femoral neck erosions: sign of hip joint synovial disease

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, R.P.; Weissman, B.N.; Naimark, A.

    1983-07-01

    Pathologic synovial processes in the hip joint can cause characteristic extrinsic erosions of the femoral neck, which in extreme cases produce an ''apple core'' appearance. Nine such cases of synovial diseases, including synovial osteochondromatosis, pigmented villonodular synovitis, rheumatoid arthritis, and amyloidosis, that demonstrate this radiographic finding are presented. The anatomic relations of the hip joint that result in theis appearance, differential diagnosis, and radiographic techniques useful in diagnosis are discussed.

  20. Dissemination Activities Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barclay, Hanna; Batatia, Hudj; Bauters, Merja; Ben Ami, Zvi; Drachman, Raul; Flouris, Giorgos; Jadin, Tanja; Jalonen, Satu; Karlgren, Klas; Karpati, Andrea; Kotzinos, Dimitris; Lakkala, Minna; Lallimo, Jiri; Moen, Anne; Nygard, Kathrine; Paavola, Sami; Padiglia, Sheila; Scapolla, Marina; Sins, Patrick; Vasileva, Tania

    2008-01-01

    In the first 24 months of the project, KP-Lab members were highly dedicated to dissemination and were engaged in various dissemination activities that contributed to the prime objective of the KP-Lab dissemination efforts which is "to make the project widely known to a variety of prospective users and, at a later stage, to promote the…

  1. Atlantoaxial Joint Synovial Cyst: Diagnosis and Percutaneous Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Velan, Osvaldo; Rabadan, Alejandra; Paganini, Lisandro; Langhi, Luciano

    2008-11-15

    Synovial cysts at the atlantoaxial level are found uncommonly. Lumbar symptomatic cases are treated by percutaneous cyst aspiration with or without corticoid injection or by surgical resection, but synovial cysts at the C1-C2 level are usually treated by surgery. We report here a 92-year-old woman with a retro-odontoid synovial cyst producing spinal cord compression that was treated by percutaneous aspiration of the cyst under CT guidance. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an atlantoaxial synovial cyst successfully treated with a minimally invasive procedure.

  2. Synovial sarcoma of kidney in a child: A rare presentation

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishnan, Venkatraman; Dhanushkodi, Manikandan; Narayanswamy, Kathiresan; Raja, Anand; Sundersingh, Shirley; Sagar, Tenali

    2016-01-01

    There are no reported cases in the literature of primary renal synovial sarcoma in pediatric patients. The management of renal synovial sarcoma has been extrapolated from the management of soft tissue sarcomas at other sites. We present a 4-year-old female who was suspected to have Wilms’ tumor. The patient underwent guided biopsy as she did not respond to neoadjuvant chemotherapy for Wilms’ tumor. The biopsy was consistent with primary renal synovial sarcoma. The child was treated with change in her neoadjuvant chemotherapy regimen and surgery. The diagnosis of synovial sarcoma was confirmed by demonstrating the t (X, 18) translocation using polymerase chain reaction. PMID:27046979

  3. Synovial sarcoma presenting as iliotibial band friction syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mesiha, Mena; Bauer, Thomas; Andrish, Jack

    2009-10-01

    Iliotibial band friction syndrome is a common entity that is often quickly diagnosed in orthopedic clinics. However, synovial sarcoma is an elusive clinical entity that appears around many joints with variable presentations. This case report is an example of a patient with a classic presentation of iliotibial band friction syndrome that was diagnosed as a synovial sarcoma on further investigation.

  4. Plasma and synovial fluid kinetics of flurbiprofen in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Aarons, L; Salisbury, R; Alam-Siddiqi, M; Taylor, L; Grennan, D M

    1986-01-01

    Clinical assessment, plasma and synovial fluid kinetics were studied in 29 rheumatoid patients receiving 100 mg flurbiprofen twice daily. Clinical assessment and pharmacokinetic measurements varied widely within the group of patients. The average values for plasma clearance, volume of distribution and elimination halflife of flurbiprofen were 0.65 +/- 0.24 ml min-1 kg-1, 0.160 +/- 0.093 l kg-1 and 3.1 +/- 1.7 h, respectively. Synovial fluid drug concentrations peaked later and were lower than corresponding plasma concentrations: 5.2 h and 4.4 mg l-1 as against 1.49 h and 12.5 mg l-1, respectively. At 48 h after an oral dose of flurbiprofen, all the drug had been cleared from the synovial fluid. Synovial fluid drug concentrations were not related to synovial fluid albumin concentration or pH. There was a weak relationship between synovial fluid drug concentration and the thermographic measurements of disease activity. The fractions of flurbiprofen not bound to protein in synovial fluid and plasma were not significantly different. A simple model is proposed to account for the plasma and synovial fluid pharmacokinetics. PMID:3954931

  5. The Rheological Properties of the Biopolymers in Synovial Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Wendy E.; Klossner, Rebecca R.; Wetsch, Julie; Oates, Katherine M. N.; Colby, Ralph H.

    2005-03-01

    The polyelectrolyte hyaluronic acid (HA, hyaluronan), its interactions with anti-inflammatory drugs and other biopolymers, and its role in synovial fluid are being studied. We are investigating the rheological properties of sodium hyaluronate (NaHA) solutions and an experimental model of synovial fluid (comprised of NaHA, and the plasma proteins albumin and γ-globulins). Steady shear measurements on bovine synovial fluid and the synovial fluid model indicate that the fluids are highly viscoeleastic and rheopectic (stress increases with time under steady shear). In addition, the influence of anti-inflammatory agents on these solutions is being explored. Initial results indicate that D-penicillamine and hydroxychloroquine affect the rheology of the synovial fluid model and its components. The potential implications of these results will be discussed.

  6. [A case of disseminated gonococcal infection without typical skin rash].

    PubMed

    Yokota, Kazuhisa; Gomi, Harumi; Morisawa, Yuji

    2011-07-01

    Few case reports have been published on disseminated gonococcal infection in Japan. We report such a non-HIV case without typical skin rash. A 49-year-old Japanese man living in Thailand on business was seen for fever and multiple arthralgia after returning to Japan. Given the travel history, differential diagnoses included endemic viral infection such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), dengue fever, and chikungunya. Diagnosis was based on right-knee arthrocentesis, and synovial fluid culture followed by Neisseria gonorrhoeae polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The isolated strain was sensitive to penicillin. The man was treated with intravenous ceftriaxone and oral levofloxacin. Disseminated gonococcal infection should thus be considered when examining those with classical polyarthralgia symptoms even without a typical skin rash.

  7. Relations among synovial membrane histopathologic findings, synovial fluid cytologic findings, and bacterial culture results in horses with suspected infectious arthritis: 64 cases (1979-1987).

    PubMed

    Madison, J B; Sommer, M; Spencer, P A

    1991-05-01

    A retrospective evaluation of 64 cases of suspected infectious arthritis in horses was undertaken to determine the relations among histopathologic findings in synovial membrane specimens, cytologic findings in synovial fluid samples, and bacterial culture results. Positive cultures were obtained from 55% of the joints, and 18 different bacterial organisms were cultured. Culturing of synovial fluid yielded bacterial growth more often than did culturing of synovial membrane. Histologic evaluation (H&E and Gram stain) of synovial membrane specimens provided little information to help distinguish infected from culture-negative joints. We do not advocate the routine use of closed synovial biopsy in suspected cases of equine septic arthritis.

  8. Dissemination beyond publication.

    PubMed

    2015-07-01

    The mantra 'publish or perish' has meant disseminating work in peer-reviewed literature. Digital has changed the way readers access content and has created a need to disseminate work widely for maximum impact. Research metrics used internationally to evaluate research are now based on the number of citations of a paper. PMID:26168805

  9. Synovial Sarcoma in Head and Neck: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Adriano Santana; Azevedo, Amanda Canário Andrade; Magalhães, Fabíola Moreira; Andrade, Nilvano Alves de

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Synovial sarcoma is a malignant tumor of mesenchymal pluripotent cells. Objectives We present a case of synovial sarcoma in the posterolateral wall of the oropharynx. Resumed report The patient, a 23-year-old woman, was admitted with a history of dysphagia and difficulty in breathing for 8 months, resulting in progressive deterioration and onset of snoring, muffled voice, and local pain. An oropharyngeal tumor in the left posterolateral wall touched the base of the ipsilateral tongue. The patient underwent endoscopic pharyngectomy to remove the lesion. Pathologic examination revealed synovial sarcoma with positive margins, and Mohs technique was proposed for margin control. The margins were disease-free, without the need for total laryngectomy. The pharynx was reconstructed with a microvascular forearm flap. The patient developed postoperative stability. Conclusion Despite its name, synovial sarcoma is rarely sourced directly from synovial membranes. It is most commonly found in the vicinity of large joints. The location at the head and neck, a location poor in synovial tissue, is unusual. Synovial sarcoma in the head and neck has an aggressive nature and poor prognosis. Resection with negative margins remains the foundation of therapy, which is not so easily achieved in the head and neck. It is important for the otorhinolaryngologist and head and neck surgeon to be familiar with this aggressive tumor, which carries high mortality and morbidity. The appropriate diagnosis and treatment can improve prognosis and patient survival. PMID:25992071

  10. Contribution of synovial lining cells to synovial vascularization of the rat temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Nozawa-Inoue, Kayoko; Harada, Fumiko; Magara, Jin; Ohazama, Atsushi; Maeda, Takeyasu

    2016-03-01

    The lining layer of the synovial membrane in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) contains two types of lining cells: macrophage-like type A and fibroblast-like type B cells. The type B cells are particularly heterogeneous in their morphology and immunoreactivity, so that details of their functions remain unclear. Some of the type B cells exhibit certain resemblances in their ultrastructure to those of an activated capillary pericyte at the initial stage of the angiogenesis. The articular surface, composed of cartilage and the disc in the TMJ, has few vasculatures, whereas the synovial lining layer is richly equipped with blood capillaries to produce the constituent of synovial fluid. The present study investigated at both the light and electron microscopic levels the immunocytochemical characteristics of the synovial lining cells in the adult rat TMJ, focusing on their contribution to the synovial vascularization. It also employed an intravascular perfusion with Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato) lectin to identify functional vessels in vivo. Results showed that several type B cells expressed desmin, a muscle-specific intermediate filament which is known as the earliest protein to appear during myogenesis as well as being a marker for the immature capillary pericyte. These desmin-positive type B cells showed immunoreactions for vimentin and pericyte markers (neuron-glial 2; NG2 and PDGFRβ) but not for the other markers of myogenic cells (MyoD and myogenin) or a contractile apparatus (αSMA and caldesmon). Immunoreactivity for RECA-1, an endothelial marker, was observed in the macrophage-like type A cells. The arterioles and venules inside the synovial folds extended numerous capillaries with RECA-1-positive endothelial cells and desmin-positive pericytes to distribute densely in the lining layer. The distal portion of these capillaries showing RECA-1-immunoreactivity lacked lectin-staining, indicating a loss of blood-circulation due to sprouting or termination in the

  11. Synovial joints: from development to homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Longobardi, Lara; Li, Tieshi; Tagliafierro, Lidia; Temple, Joseph D; Willcockson, Helen H; Ye, Ping; Esposito, Alessandra; Xu, Fuhua; Spagnoli, Anna

    2015-02-01

    Synovial joint morphogenesis occurs through the condensation of mesenchymal cells into a non-cartilaginous region known as the interzone and the specification of progenitor cells that commit to the articular fate. Although several signaling molecules are expressed by the interzone, the mechanism is poorly understood. For treatments of cartilage injuries, it is critical to discover the presence of joint progenitor cells in adult tissues and their expression gene pattern. Potential stem cell niches have been found in different joint regions, such as the surface zone of articular cartilage, synovium, and groove of Ranvier. Inherited joint malformations as well as joint-degenerating conditions are often associated with other skeletal defects and may be seen as the failure of morphogenic factors to establish the correct microenvironment in cartilage and bone. Therefore, exploring how joints form can help us understand how cartilage and bone are damaged and develop drugs to reactivate this developing mechanism.

  12. Synovial Joints: from Development to Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tieshi; Tagliafierro, Lidia; Temple, Joseph D.; Willcockson, Helen H.; Ye, Ping; Esposito, Alessandra; Xu, Fuhua; Spagnoli, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Synovial joint morphogenesis occurs through the condensation of mesenchymal cells into a non-cartilaginous region known as interzone, and the specification of progenitor cells that commit to the articular fate. Although several signaling molecules are expressed by the interzone, the mechanism is poorly understood. For treatments of cartilage injuries, it is critical to discover the presence of joint progenitor cells in adult tissues and their expression gene pattern. Potential stem cells niches have been found in different joint regions, such as the surface zone of articular cartilage, synovium and groove of Ranvier. Inherited joint malformation as well as joint degenerating conditions are often associated with other skeletal defects, and may be seen as the failure of morphogenic factors to establish the correct microenvironment in cartilage and bone. Therefore, exploring how joints form can help us understand how cartilage and bone are damaged and to develop drugs to reactivate this developing mechanism. PMID:25431159

  13. Tumour necrosis factor in synovial exudates.

    PubMed Central

    Di Giovine, F S; Nuki, G; Duff, G W

    1988-01-01

    The actions of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) include resorption of bone and cartilage, suggesting a potential role in the pathogenesis of arthritis. TNF activity was looked for in synovial fluids from 137 patients with different rheumatic diseases. Unfractionated samples were tested in the L929 bioassay. Significant TNF activity that was neutralised by monoclonal antibody to TNF alpha occurred in 13 (30%) of 44 samples. Raised TNF levels were not associated with any particular disease type or routine laboratory markers of inflammation but were related to disease duration in osteoarthritis. The finding of biologically active TNF in symptomatic joints of arthritic patients supports the idea that it may contribute to the pathogenesis of joint damage in chronic rheumatic diseases. PMID:3263088

  14. Detection of kallikrein-like activity in inflamed synovial tissue.

    PubMed

    Sharma, J N; Zeitlin, I J; Deodhar, S D; Buchanan, W W

    1983-04-01

    The synovial tissue kallikrein of rheumatoid patients, arthritic dogs and normal dogs has been partially characterized and estimated. Both human and dog synovial tissue kinin-forming enzyme appears to be distinct from plasmin, plasma kallikrein and pancreatic kallikrein. In three rheumatoid arthritic patients, the mean synovial tissue kallikrein level was found to be 106 +/- 13.5 ng bradykinin equivalents (BK Equiv) per g per min. In nine arthritic dogs the mean synovial tissue kallikrein level, 60.5 +/- 4.5 ng BK Equiv per g per min, was found to be greater (p less than 0.05) than that of five normal dogs (21.6 +/- 5.3 ng BK Equiv per g per min). The possible significance of this finding is discussed. PMID:6553485

  15. Lyme arthritis. Spirochetes found in synovial microangiopathic lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Y. E.; Duray, P. H.; Steere, A. C.; Kashgarian, M.; Buza, J.; Malawista, S. E.; Askenase, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    In 17 patients with Lyme disease, synovial specimens, obtained by synovectomy or needle biopsy, showed nonspecific villous hypertrophy, synovial cell hyperplasia, prominent microvasculature, lymphoplasmacellular infiltration, and sometimes lymphoid follicles. The larger surgically obtained specimens also showed striking deposition of fibrin in synovial stroma and a form of endarteritis obliterans. In 2 patients, spirochetes were seen in and around blood vessels by the Dieterle silver stain. Compared with 55 cases of other synovial disease, obliterative microvascular lesions were seen only in Lyme synovia, but marked stromal deposition of fibrin seemed nonspecific. These findings imply that the Lyme spirochete may survive for years in affected synovium and may be directly responsible for the microvascular injury. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:3966535

  16. Disseminating good practice.

    PubMed

    Roush, Karen

    2015-09-01

    COMMUNICATION IS a core competency for nurse executives. Being able to write well and share this writing through publication is essential to disseminate information, engender support and share a vision. PMID:26308996

  17. Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC)

    MedlinePlus

    Levi M. Disseminated intravascular coagulation. In: Hoffman R, Benz EJ Jr, Silberstein LE, et al, eds. Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:chap ...

  18. [Azlocillin--synovial fluid levels after intravenous doses].

    PubMed

    Härle, A; Ritzerfeld, W; Wiynck, G; Knoche, U

    1983-01-01

    The corresponding levels of azlocillin in serum and in synovial fluid in the knee-joint were investigated in patients who had undergone aseptic surgery of the lower limbs. The mean synovial fluid concentrations for azlocillin were determined on the basis of 30 samples. Clinically relevant azlocillin levels of approximately 40 mu g/ml were recorded in synovial fluid 10 minutes after start of a short infusion of 5 gm. These increased until about 90 minutes after commencement of antibiotic administration when the maximum level was attained. Subsequently synovial fluid levels decreased slowly and approximately 170 minutes after commencement of the short infusion the mean for serum and synovial concentrations corresponded. The results confirm that with an i.v. infusion of 5 g azlocillin levels can be attained for 3 hours in the synovial fluid that are above the break-point for this antibiotic of 64 mu g/ml. However, despite these good pharmacokinetic data it should be remembered that experience has shown that surgical reintervention is often necessary in addition in joint infections to achieve ultimate cure. PMID:6405553

  19. Infection of human synovial cells by human T cell lymphotropic virus type I. Proliferation and granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor production by synovial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, M; Eguchi, K; Terada, K; Nakashima, M; Yamashita, I; Ida, H; Kawabe, Y; Aoyagi, T; Takino, H; Nakamura, T

    1993-01-01

    The present study was performed to clarify the relationship between human T cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) infection and chronic inflammatory arthropathy. To determine the ability of HTLV-I to infect synovial cells and the effect on synovial cell proliferation, synovial cells were cocultured with the HTLV-I-producing T cell lines (MT-2 or HCT-1). After coculture with HTLV-I-infected T cells, the synovial cells expressed HTLV-I-specific core antigens, and HTLV-I proviral DNA was detected from the synovial cells by polymerase chain reaction. These cocultured synovial cells with HTLV-I-infected T cells proliferated more actively than the synovial cells cocultured with uninfected T cells. This stimulatory effect of HTLV-I-infected T cells on synovial cell proliferation seems necessary to contact each other. After being cocultured with MT-2 cells, synovial cells proliferated more actively than control cells even after several passages. Furthermore, HTLV-I-infected synovial cells produced significant amounts of granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor. These results suggest that HTLV-I can infect synovial cells, resulting their active proliferation and may be involved in the pathogenesis of proliferative synovitis similar to that found in rheumatoid arthritis. Images PMID:8408648

  20. Quantitative image analysis of synovial tissue.

    PubMed

    van der Hall, Pascal O; Kraan, Maarten C; Tak, Paul Peter

    2007-01-01

    Quantitative image analysis is a form of imaging that includes microscopic histological quantification, video microscopy, image analysis, and image processing. Hallmarks are the generation of reliable, reproducible, and efficient measurements via strict calibration and step-by-step control of the acquisition, storage and evaluation of images with dedicated hardware and software. Major advantages of quantitative image analysis over traditional techniques include sophisticated calibration systems, interaction, speed, and control of inter- and intraobserver variation. This results in a well controlled environment, which is essential for quality control and reproducibility, and helps to optimize sensitivity and specificity. To achieve this, an optimal quantitative image analysis system combines solid software engineering with easy interactivity with the operator. Moreover, the system also needs to be as transparent as possible in generating the data because a "black box design" will deliver uncontrollable results. In addition to these more general aspects, specifically for the analysis of synovial tissue the necessity of interactivity is highlighted by the added value of identification and quantification of information as present in areas such as the intimal lining layer, blood vessels, and lymphocyte aggregates. Speed is another important aspect of digital cytometry. Currently, rapidly increasing numbers of samples, together with accumulation of a variety of markers and detection techniques has made the use of traditional analysis techniques such as manual quantification and semi-quantitative analysis unpractical. It can be anticipated that the development of even more powerful computer systems with sophisticated software will further facilitate reliable analysis at high speed.

  1. Persistence of Antigen in Rabbit Synovial Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Webb, F. W. S.; Ford, P. M.; Glynn, L. E.

    1971-01-01

    It is already known that rabbits which show delayed-type hypersensitivity to an antigen will, after a single injection of the same antigen into a knee joint develop a chronic proliferative synovitis. It is also known that almost all of a foreign protein injected into a normal knee joint is rapidly cleared in a few days. It has now been shown that if an animal is given foreign protein into a knee joint, and delayed-type hypersensitivity is produced later, that a chronic proliferative synovitis can also develop. This suggests that minute amounts of foreign protein can persist in an antigenic form in normal rabbit synovial membrane. It is possible that the persistence of this small amount of antigen may account in part for the chronicity of this form of experimental synovitis, and the fact that unlike human rheumatoid arthritis this type of experimental synovitis is confined to the joint injected with antigen. ImagesFigs. 3-4Figs. 1-2 PMID:5547654

  2. Functional analysis of an arthritogenic synovial fibroblast

    PubMed Central

    Aidinis, Vassilis; Plows, David; Haralambous, Sylva; Armaka, Maria; Papadopoulos, Petros; Kanaki, Maria Zambia; Koczan, Dirk; Thiesen, Hans Juergen; Kollias, George

    2003-01-01

    Increasing attention has been directed towards identifying non-T-cell mechanisms as potential therapeutic targets in rheumatoid arthritis. Synovial fibroblast (SF) activation, a hallmark of rheumatoid arthritis, results in inappropriate production of chemokines and matrix components, which in turn lead to bone and cartilage destruction. We have demonstrated that SFs have an autonomous pathogenic role in the development of the disease, by showing that they have the capacity to migrate throughout the body and cause pathology specifically to the joints. In order to decipher the pathogenic mechanisms that govern SF activation and pathogenic potential, we used the two most prominent methods of differential gene expression analysis, differential display and DNA microarrays, in a search for deregulated cellular pathways in the arthritogenic SF. Functional clustering of differentially expressed genes, validated by dedicated in vitro functional assays, implicated a number of cellular pathways in SF activation. Among them, diminished adhesion to the extracellullar matrix was shown to correlate with increased proliferation and migration to this matrix. Our findings support an aggressive role for the SF in the development of the disease and reinforce the perspective of a transformed-like character of the SF. PMID:12723986

  3. Rheumatoid synovial cells from intact joints. Morphology, growth, and polykaryocytosis.

    PubMed

    Clarris, B J; Fraser, J R; Moran, C J; Muirden, K D

    1977-08-01

    Synovial cell lines were isolated by instillation of trypsin or chymotrypsin into intact knee joints of patients with persistent rheumatoid effusions resistant to conventional therapy. Morphology and growth in the primary phase were compared with rheumatoid cells isolated from excised synovium and nonrheumatoid synovial cells obtained from intact joints of cadavers or amputated limbs. Cell populations from all sources included varying proportions of macrophage-like and fibroblast-like cells, with only 1-3% multinucleated cells. In medium supplemented with calf serum alone, rheumatoid cells from intact joints showed negligible changes in morphology. However, in the presence of nonrheumatoid, autologous rheumatoid or homologous rheumatoid serum a rapid increase occurred in size of the macrophage-like cells and numbers of polykaryocytes, including some giant syncytial cells. These effects were directly proportional to serum concentration and were identical in fresh or heat-inactivated serum. In most of these rheumatoid cell lines no multiplication occurred, regardless of serum type or concentration. In rheumatoid synovial cells from excised synovium, human serum induced both polykaryocytosis and rapid growth of fibroblasts. Nonrheumatoid synovial cells grew rapidly but few polykaryocytes developed, mostly with less than 6 nuclei. Evidence of viral infection in rheumatoid synovial cells was sought by electron microscopy after stimulation of polykaryocytosis by human serum. In one of the cultures many cells were found with intranuclear particles possessing characteristics of the adenovirus group. PMID:901027

  4. Disseminated Balamuthia mandrillaris Infection

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Neil; Almira-Suarez, M. I.; Reese, Jennifer M.; Hoke, George M.; Mandell, James W.; Roy, Sharon L.; Visvesvara, Govinda

    2015-01-01

    Balamuthia mandrillaris is a rare cause of human infection, but when infections do occur, they result in high rates of morbidity and mortality. A case of disseminated Balamuthia infection is presented. Early diagnosis and initiation of recommended therapy are essential for increased chances of successful outcomes. PMID:26135864

  5. Validity, not Dissemination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Samindranath

    2015-03-01

    Science journals have been transformed by the internet. In particular, increasingly their role appears to be to validate research, not to disseminate it. How are journals, and the communities they interact with, adapting? In this context, are alternatives to peer review on the horizon? Are these challenges unique to physics journals, or also seen in other publication scenarios?

  6. Synovial Sarcoma of the Tongue: Report of a Case.

    PubMed

    Basile, Lauren E; Hoch, Benjamin; Dillon, Jasjit K

    2016-01-01

    This report outlines the workup and management of a 55-year-old woman with a synovial sarcoma of the lateral border of the tongue that was initially diagnosed as a glomus tumor. A review was performed of the literature on synovial sarcomas of the oral cavity and current National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines. Synovial sarcomas of the tongue are rare neoplasms, with variable morphologic microscopic types and immunohistochemical profiles. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis of the known gene translocation also can be used in diagnosis. According to the literature, resection of the tumor is the current treatment of choice; however, owing to the rarity of this entity, diagnosis and management prove challenging for the oral and maxillofacial surgeon.

  7. Growth factors with heparin binding affinity in human synovial fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Hamerman, D.; Taylor, S.; Kirschenbaum, I.; Klagsbrun, M.; Raines, E.W.; Ross, R.; Thomas, K.A.

    1987-12-01

    Synovial effusions were obtained from the knees of 15 subjects with joint trauma, menisceal or ligamentous injury, or osteoarthritis. Heparin-Sepharose affinity chromatography of these synovial fluids revealed, in general, three major peaks of mitogenic activity as measured by incorporation of /sup 3/H-thymidine into 3T3 cells. Gradient elution patterns showed activities at 0.5M NaCl, which is characteristic of platelet derived growth factor, and at 1.1 M NaCl and 1.6M NaCl, indicative of acidic and basic fibroblast growth factors, respectively. The identities of these mitogenic fractions were confirmed by specific immunologic and receptor-binding assays. The presence of platelet derived, acidic and basic fibroblast growth factors in the synovial fluid may contribute to wound healing in the arthritic joint.

  8. Intraarticular volume and clearance in human synovial effusions

    SciTech Connect

    Wallis, W.J.; Simkin, P.A.; Nelp, W.B.; Foster, D.M.

    1985-04-01

    Intraarticular volumes were measured by radiolabeled albumin (RISA) distribution in chronic knee effusions from 11 rheumatoid arthritis patients and 9 osteoarthritis patients. Volumes of synovial fluid obtained at joint aspiration were substantially less than those found by RISA dilution. Up to 24 hours was needed for full distribution of RISA throughout the intraarticular compartment. Measured 123I and RISA radioactivity over the knee described monoexponential rate constants, lambda (minute-1). The clearance of 123I and RISA from synovial effusions was derived by the formulation volume (ml) X lambda (minute-1) = clearance (ml/minute). RISA clearance in rheumatoid effusions was significantly greater than that found in osteoarthritis effusions. Intraarticular volume and isotope clearance were easily quantified and provide measures for further evaluating the microvascular physiology of synovial effusions.

  9. Minimally invasive CT guided treatment of intraspinal synovial cyst

    PubMed Central

    Kozar, Sergeja; Jeromel, Miran

    2014-01-01

    Background Intraspinal synovial cysts of vertebral facet joints are uncommon cause of radicular pain as well as neurological deficits. They can be managed both conservatively and surgically. Case report A 77-year old polymorbid patient presented with bilateral low back pain which worsened during the course of time and did not respond to the conservative treatment. A diagnosis of intraspinal synovial cyst was made using the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Percutaneous computed tomography (CT) guided injection with installation of local anesthetic together with corticosteroid and rupture of the cyst was successfully used. A month after the procedure his pain improved, the usage of analgesics diminished and his over-all quality of life improved. Conclusions Percutaneous CT guided lumbar synovial cyst treatment is safe and reliable alternative to the surgical treatment in polymorbid patients with radiculopathy who are not able to tolerate general anesthesia and operation. PMID:24587777

  10. Synovial sarcoma: a rare presentation of parapharyngeal mass.

    PubMed

    Shaariyah, Mohd Mokhtar; Mazita, Ami; Masaany, Mansor; Razif, Mohd Yunus; Isa, Mohamed Rose; Asma, Abdullah

    2010-06-01

    Synovial sarcoma is a rare soft tissue sarcoma of the head and neck region involving the parapharyngeal space. The diagnosis of synovial sarcoma can be very challenging to the pathologists. We present a rare case of parapharyngeal synovial sarcoma in a young female patient who had a two-month history of left cervical intumescent mass at level II. The fine needle aspiration cytology of the mass was proved inconclusive. Transcervical excision of the mass was performed and the first case of parapharyngeal sarcoma was identified in our center by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique. Repeat imaging revealed residual tumor. The patient successfully underwent a second excision of the residual tumor and received adjuvant radiotherapy.

  11. [Immunomorphological characteristics of the synovial membrane in rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Radenska-Lopovok, S G

    2016-01-01

    The synovial membrane is frequently a target in rheumatic diseases. A search for diagnostic criteria and determination of changes in the pathological process necessitate standardized biopsy diagnostic techniques and quantification of morphological changes using digital imaging methods. The paper considers main methods for obtaining synovial membrane samples. It presents major morphological and immunohistochemical variations in synovitis in the presence of rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and osteoarthrosis. It shows different immunological and autoinflammatory mechanisms of these diseases. Synovial membrane inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and osteoarthrosis is characterized by different components of morphogenesis, which is proven by the expression of different cell markers. Rheumatoid synovitis is an autoinflammatory process; synovitis in ankylosing spondylitis is characterized by autoinflammatory processes; biomechanical factors as joint inflammation triggers are leading in osteoarthrosis. PMID:27600785

  12. Synovial tumefactive extramedullary hematopoiesis associated to polycythemia vera.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Argüelles Cabrera, Hugo; Carrasco Juan, José Luis; García Castro, María Candelaria; González Gaitano, Manuel; Bonilla Arjona, Alfonso; Díaz-Flores, Lucio

    2007-01-01

    The case of a 66-year-old male patient with a chronic myeloproliferative type polycythemia vera disorder, who after 2 years of evolution is developing a tumefactive extramedullary hematopoiesis (TEH) located in the synovial of the articulation in the right knee, is described. The tumor histologically consists of a relatively lax and edematous synovial structure diffusely infiltrated by mature and semimature hematopoietic cellular population. The simultaneous study of the bone marrow reveals medullar spaces full of hematopoietic cellularity, with a predominance of megakaryocytic and red series, and with the addition of severe reticulin fibrosis, facts that suggest a progression toward myelofibrosis. The TEH developed in tissues without a reticulum endothelial system is very uncommon. We provide data about the first case located in the synovial membrane and we review the literature regarding this pathologic entity.

  13. The significance of interleukin-6 and lactate in the synovial fluid for diagnosing native septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Lenski, Markus; Scherer, Michael A

    2014-03-01

    Aim of this study was to evaluate the role of synovial interleukin-6 and synovial lactate for predicting native septic arthritis. We analyzed retrospectively synovial fluid parameters (interleukin-6, total-protein, glucose, lactate, synovial-fluid-white-blood-cell-count) of 62 patients with culture-verified native septic arthritis and compared them to 57 patients with acute aseptic arthritis. Receiver-Operating-Characteristic-curves were calculated to determine the 'Area-under-the-curves' (AUC), the best thresholds and the corresponding likelihood-ratios. The best parameter for diagnosing septic arthritis was synovial lactate (AUC = 0.864, sensitivity = 74.5%, specificity = 87.2%), followed by synovial interleukin-6 (AUC = 0.803, sensitivity = 92.5%, specificity = 64.1%) and the synovial-fluid-white-blood-cell-count (AUC = 0.782, sensitivity = 71.2%, specificity = 84.9%). Synovial lactate levels above 10 mmol/l almost proofed septic arthritis (interval-Likelihood-Ratio = 20.4), synovial interleukin-6 levels lower than 7000 pg/ml almost ruled out infection (interval-Likelihood-Ratio = 0.12). If none of these thresholds are met, physicians should estimate disease probability by the simultaneous use of the interval-Likelihood-Ratios of synovial lactate, synovial interleukin-6 and synovial-fluid-white-blood-cell-count.

  14. An investigation of the optical properties of cholesterol crystals in human synovial fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharova, M. M.; Nasonova, V. A.; Konstantinova, A. F.; Chudakov, V. S.; Gaĭnutdinov, R. V.

    2009-05-01

    The synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid diseases has been investigated. The presence of cholesterol crystals in the synovial fluid is revealed by polarization microscopy. A comparative analysis of the composition and properties of synovial fluid and the optical properties of cholesterol crystals is performed. It is established that the size, number, and growth of cholesterol crystals are interrelated to the synovial fluid composition. It is shown that rheumatoid diseases can be accompanied by the formation of cholesterol crystals in the synovial fluid from different joints and in rheumatic nodules. It is shown that all investigated crystals have a significant birefringence.

  15. Ultrastructural demonstration of spirochetal antigens in synovial fluid and synovial membrane in chronic Lyme disease: possible factors contributing to persistence of organisms.

    PubMed

    Nanagara, R; Duray, P H; Schumacher, H R

    1996-10-01

    To perform the first systematic electronmicroscopic (EM) and immunoelectron microscopy (IEM) study of the pathological changes and the evidence of spirochete presence in synovial membranes and synovial fluid (SF) cells of patients with chronic Lyme arthritis. EM examination was performed on four synovial membrane and eight SF cell samples from eight patients with chronic Lyme disease. Spirochetal antigens in the samples were sought by IEM using monoclonal antibody to Borrelia burgdorferi outer surface protein A (OspA) as the immunoprobe. Prominent ultrastructural findings were surface fibrin-like material, thickened synovial lining cell layer and signs of vascular injury. Borrelia-like structures were identified in all four synovial membranes and in two of eight SF cell samples. The presence of spirochetal antigens was confirmed by IEM in all four samples studied (one synovial membrane and three SF cell samples). OspA labelling was in perivascular areas, deep synovial stroma among collagen bundles, and in vacuoles of fibroblasts in synovial membranes; and in cytophagosomes of mononuclear cells in SF cell samples. Electron microscopy adds further evidence for persistence of spirochetal antigens in the joint in chronic Lyme disease. Locations of spirochetes or spirochetal antigens both intracellulary and extracellulary in deep synovial connective tissue as reported here suggest sites at which spirochaetes may elude host immune response and antibiotic treatment.

  16. A Normative Study of the Synovial Fluid Proteome from Healthy Porcine Knee Joints

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Synovial fluid in an articulating joint contains proteins derived from the blood plasma and proteins that are produced by cells within the joint tissues, such as synovium, cartilage, ligament, and meniscus. The proteome composition of healthy synovial fluid and the cellular origins of many synovial fluid components are not fully understood. Here, we present a normative proteomics study using porcine synovial fluid. Using our optimized method, we identified 267 proteins with high confidence in healthy synovial fluid. We also evaluated mRNA expression data from tissues that can contribute to the synovial fluid proteome, including synovium, cartilage, blood, and liver, to better estimate the relative contributions from these sources to specific synovial fluid components. We identified 113 proteins in healthy synovial fluid that appear to be primarily derived from plasma transudates, 37 proteins primarily derived from synovium, and 11 proteins primarily derived from cartilage. Finally, we compared the identified synovial fluid proteome to the proteome of human plasma, and we found that the two body fluids share many similarities, underlining the detected plasma derived nature of many synovial fluid components. Knowing the synovial fluid proteome of a healthy joint will help to identify mechanisms that cause joint disease and pathways involved in disease progression. PMID:25160569

  17. The discovery of the synovial lymphatic stomata and lymphatic reabsorption in knee effusion.

    PubMed

    Ping, Zepeng; Jiang, Tingting; Wang, Chong; Chen, Zhongyi; Chen, Zhongliang; Wang, Jiaxiong; Wang, Li; Wang, Beibei; Xu, Dandan; Liu, Changming; Li, Zhongjie; Li, Ji-Cheng

    2015-06-01

    To illustrate the mechanism of lymphatic reabsorption in knee joint effusion. The current investigation employed transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques to reveal the ultrastructure of the knee synovial membrane in New Zealand rabbits and human. Ultrastructural changes of the synovial lymphatic stomata were observed by using trypan blue absorption and sodium hydroxide (NaOH) digestion methods, and the animal models of synovitis. New Zealand rabbits and human synovial membranes were composed of two types of synovial cells: type A and type B. No lymphatic stomata were found among type A synovial cells, whereas lymphatic stomata with the diameters ranging 0.74-3.26 µm were found in type B synovial cells, and some stomata were closed. After the NaOH digestion, a number of sieve pores, similar to lymphatic stomata in size and shape, were observed in the dense fibrous connective tissue underneath the type B synovial cells. After injecting trypan blue into the rabbit knee joint cavity, absorption of trypan blue through the lymphatic stomata was observed, suggesting the absorption function of the synovial lymphatic stomata. In the rabbit knee joint synovitis models, the synovial lymphatic stomata diameter enlarged. Some macrophages migrated from the lymphatic stomata, indicating that the synovial lymphatic stomata were involved in the joint effusion absorption and inflammatory response. Our study is the first to report the existence of synovial lymphatic stomata in the New Zealand rabbits and human knee joints. Lymphatic stomata may have an important role in the reabsorption of joint effusion.

  18. Osteoarthritis screening using Raman spectroscopy of dried human synovial fluid drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmonde-White, Karen A.; Mandair, Gurjit S.; Esmonde-White, Francis W. L.; Raaii, Farhang; Roessler, Blake J.; Morris, Michael D.

    2009-02-01

    We describe the use of Raman spectroscopy to investigate synovial fluid drops deposited onto fused silica microscope slides. This spectral information can be used to identify chemical changes in synovial fluid associated with osteoarthritis (OA) damage to knee joints. The chemical composition of synovial fluid is predominately proteins (enzymes, cytokines, or collagen fragments), glycosaminoglycans, and a mixture of minor components such as inorganic phosphate crystals. During osteoarthritis, the chemical, viscoelastic and biological properties of synovial fluid are altered. A pilot study was conducted to determine if Raman spectra of synovial fluid correlated with radiological scoring of knee joint damage. After informed consent, synovial fluid was drawn and x-rays were collected from the knee joints of 40 patients. Raman spectra and microscope images were obtained from the dried synovial fluid drops using a Raman microprobe and indicate a coarse separation of synovial fluid components. Individual protein signatures could not be identified; Raman spectra were useful as a general marker of overall protein content and secondary structure. Band intensity ratios used to describe protein and glycosaminoglycan structure were used in synovial fluid spectra. Band intensity ratios of Raman spectra indicate that there is less ordered protein secondary structure in synovial fluid from the damage group. Combination of drop deposition with Raman spectroscopy is a powerful approach to examining synovial fluid for the purposes of assessing osteoarthritis damage.

  19. Hypoxia, mitochondrial dysfunction and synovial invasiveness in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Fearon, Ursula; Canavan, Mary; Biniecka, Monika; Veale, Douglas J

    2016-07-01

    Synovial proliferation, neovascularization and leukocyte extravasation transform the normally acellular synovium into an invasive tumour-like 'pannus'. The highly dysregulated architecture of the microvasculature creates a poor oxygen supply to the synovium, which, along with the increased metabolic turnover of the expanding synovial pannus, creates a hypoxic microenvironment. Abnormal cellular metabolism and mitochondrial dysfunction thus ensue and, in turn, through the increased production of reactive oxygen species, actively induce inflammation. When exposed to hypoxia in the inflamed joint, immune-inflammatory cells show adaptive survival reactions by activating key proinflammatory signalling pathways, including those mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), nuclear factor κB (NF-κB), Janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK-STAT) and Notch, which contribute to synovial invasiveness. The reprogramming of hypoxia-mediated pathways in synovial cells, such as fibroblasts, dendritic cells, macrophages and T cells, is implicated in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory conditions, and might therefore provide an opportunity for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27225300

  20. Delusions of Disseminated Fungosis

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Paul Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Delusional infestation is a rare monosymptomatic hypochondriacal psychosis according to The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th ed.; DSM-5; American Psychiatric Association, 2013). It can be a primary disorder or associated with an underlying psychological or physical disorder. It commonly presents as delusional parasitosis, and less than 1% may be fungi related. We present this case as it is a rare presentation of a rare condition. Case Presentation. Our patient is a 60-year-old Caucasian man who presented with a 7-year history of delusional infestation manifested as a disseminated fungal infection. He had previously been reviewed by multiple physicians for the same with no systemic illness diagnosed. After multiple reviews and thorough investigation we diagnosed him with a likely delusional disorder. As is common with this patient cohort he refused psychiatric review or antipsychotic medication. Conclusion. A delusion of a disseminated fungal infestation is a rare condition. It is exceedingly difficult to treat as these patients often refuse to believe the investigation results and diagnosis. Furthermore, they either refuse or are noncompliant with treatment. Multidisciplinary outpatient evaluation may be the best way to allay patient fears and improve treatment compliance. PMID:25610675

  1. Characterization of the porcine synovial fluid proteome and a comparison to the plasma proteome

    PubMed Central

    Bennike, Tue Bjerg; Barnaby, Omar; Steen, Hanno; Stensballe, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Synovial fluid is present in all joint cavities, and protects the articular cartilage surfaces in large by lubricating the joint, thus reducing friction. Several studies have described changes in the protein composition of synovial fluid in patients with joint disease. However, the protein concentration, content, and synovial fluid volume change dramatically during active joint diseases and inflammation, and the proteome composition of healthy synovial fluid is incompletely characterized. We performed a normative proteomics analysis of porcine synovial fluid, and report data from optimizing proteomic methods to investigate the proteome of healthy porcine synovial fluid (Bennike et al., 2014 [1]). We included an evaluation of different proteolytic sample preparation techniques, and an analysis of posttranslational modifications with a focus on glycosylation. We used pig (Sus Scrofa) as a model organism, as the porcine immune system is highly similar to human and the pig genome is sequenced. Furthermore, porcine model systems are commonly used large animal models to study several human diseases. In addition, we analyzed the proteome of human plasma, and compared the proteomes to the obtained porcine synovial fluid proteome. The proteome of the two body fluids were found highly similar, underlining the detected plasma derived nature of many synovial fluid components. The healthy porcine synovial fluid proteomics data, human rheumatoid arthritis synovial fluid proteomics data used in the method optimization, human plasma proteomics data, and search results, have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PXD000935. PMID:26543887

  2. Myxovirus Dissemination by Air

    PubMed Central

    McLean, D. M.; Bannatyne, R. M.; Givan, Kathleen F.

    1967-01-01

    Myxoviruses including 150 strains of parainfluenza 1, 15 of parainfluenza 3 and five of influenza B virus were isolated from nasopharyngeal secretions obtained from 300 children less than 3 years of age who developed acute laryngotracheobronchitis during the preceding 48 hours. The patients were examined between October 1966 and January 1967, the peak monthly rate of virus isolation (67%) occurring during January. Parainfluenza 1 virus was isolated from air obtained in the vicinity of one of 30 children whose nasopharyngeal secretions yielded this agent. Samples comprising 150 litres of air were collected for virus assay by placing an Andersen sampler about 60 cm. from the child's face inside an oxygen tent which surrounded the patient. These findings confirm previous observations that parainfluenza 1 virus is the dominant agent associated with acute laryngotracheobronchitis in children in Toronto, and they show that this virus is disseminated in the air. PMID:4290621

  3. Supramolecular synergy in the boundary lubrication of synovial joints

    PubMed Central

    Seror, Jasmine; Zhu, Linyi; Goldberg, Ronit; Day, Anthony J.; Klein, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronan, lubricin and phospholipids, molecules ubiquitous in synovial joints, such as hips and knees, have separately been invoked as the lubricants responsible for the remarkable lubrication of articular cartilage; but alone, these molecules cannot explain the extremely low friction at the high pressures of such joints. We find that surface-anchored hyaluronan molecules complex synergistically with phosphatidylcholine lipids present in joints to form a boundary lubricating layer, which, with coefficient of friction μ≈0.001 at pressures to over 100 atm, has a frictional behaviour resembling that of articular cartilage in the major joints. Our findings point to a scenario where each of the molecules has a different role but must act together with the others: hyaluronan, anchored at the outer surface of articular cartilage by lubricin molecules, complexes with joint phosphatidylcholines to provide the extreme lubrication of synovial joints via the hydration–lubrication mechanism. PMID:25754223

  4. Synovial cutaneous fistula complicating a reverse total shoulder arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Letter, Haley P; Limback, Joseph; Wasyliw, Christopher; Bancroft, Laura; Scherer, Kurt

    2016-06-01

    Reverse total shoulder arthroplasty is becoming a common form of shoulder arthroplasty that is often performed in the setting of rotator cuff pathology. Infection is a rare complication but is more common in reverse total shoulder arthroplasty than in hemiarthroplasty or anatomic total shoulder arthroplasty. We present the case of a 69-year-old patient with a reverse total shoulder arthroplasty who presented with purulent drainage from the skin of his anterior shoulder. Computed tomography arthrogram confirmed the presence of a synovial cutaneous fistula. Synovial cutaneous fistula is a rare variant of periprosthetic infection that, to our knowledge, has not been described previously in the setting of a reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. Computed tomography arthrogram proved to be a reliable method for confirming the diagnosis and was used for operative planning to remove the hardware. PMID:27257460

  5. Boundary lubricating ability of synovial fluid in degenerative joint disease.

    PubMed

    Davis, W H; Lee, S L; Sokoloff, L

    1978-01-01

    The boundary lubricating ability of eleven synovial fluids was measured in a miniaturized latex--glass test system. The specimens were obtained at necropsy from knees in which the degree of degenerative joint disease varied from none to very severe. The lubricating ability of the fluid was independent of the viscosity over a wide range of shear rates. It was not diminished even in advanced lesions. In two additional fluids, the mucin clot was poor; the lubricating ability of one of these was compromised. Thus, although degenerative joint disease, during its quiescent stages, is not associated with defective synovial lubrication, the possibility that transient defects might lead to cartilage wear during life has not been excluded. The measurements are believed to be valid indicators of boundary lubricating ability under physiological conditions despite the fact that the test surfaces were not cartilaginous and the loading was relatively low (up to 47 pounds per square inch).

  6. Imatinib mesylate inhibits platelet derived growth factor stimulated proliferation of rheumatoid synovial fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Sandler, Charlotta; Joutsiniemi, Saima; Lindstedt, Ken A.; Juutilainen, Timo; Kovanen, Petri T.; Eklund, Kari K. . E-mail: kari.eklund@hus.fi

    2006-08-18

    Synovial fibroblast is the key cell type in the growth of the pathological synovial tissue in arthritis. Here, we show that platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) is a potent mitogen for synovial fibroblasts isolated from patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Inhibition of PDGF-receptor signalling by imatinib mesylate (1 {mu}M) completely abrogated the PDGF-stimulated proliferation and inhibited approximately 70% of serum-stimulated proliferation of synovial fibroblasts. Similar extent of inhibition was observed when PDGF was neutralized with anti-PDGF antibodies, suggesting that imatinib mesylate does not inhibit pathways other than those mediated by PDGF-receptors. No signs of apoptosis were detected in synovial fibroblasts cultured in the presence of imatinib. These results suggest that imatinib mesylate specifically inhibits PDGF-stimulated proliferation of synovial fibroblasts, and that inhibition of PDGF-receptors could represent a feasible target for novel antirheumatic therapies.

  7. Endoscopic Resection of Lateral Synovial Cyst of the Knee.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-12-01

    Synovial cysts on the lateral side of the knee can cause pain, limitation of joint mobility, compression of the neighboring neurovascular structures, rupture leading to compartment syndrome, infection, erosion of adjacent bone, and iliotibial band friction syndrome. Open resection is commonly performed for symptomatic cysts. We describe an alternative, endoscopic approach to cyst resection. This has the advantages of minimally invasive surgery of smaller wounds, better cosmesis, and less surgical trauma. PMID:27284517

  8. Heterogeneity of Synovial Molecular Patterns in Patients with Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Lauwerys, Bernard R.; Hernández-Lobato, Daniel; Gramme, Pierre; Ducreux, Julie; Dessy, Adrien; Focant, Isabelle; Ambroise, Jérôme; Bearzatto, Bertrand; Nzeusseu Toukap, Adrien; Van den Eynde, Benoît J.; Elewaut, Dirk; Gala, Jean-Luc; Durez, Patrick; Houssiau, Frédéric A.; Helleputte, Thibault; Dupont, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an unmet medical need in the field of rheumatology. Previously, we performed high-density transcriptomic studies on synovial biopsies from patients with arthritis, and found that synovial gene expression profiles were significantly different according to the underlying disorder. Here, we wanted to further explore the consistency of the gene expression signals in synovial biopsies of patients with arthritis, using low-density platforms. Methods Low-density assays (cDNA microarray and microfluidics qPCR) were designed, based on the results of the high-density microarray data. Knee synovial biopsies were obtained from patients with RA, spondyloarthropathies (SA) or osteoarthritis (OA) (n = 39), and also from patients with initial undifferentiated arthritis (UA) (n = 49). Results According to high-density microarray data, several molecular pathways are differentially expressed in patients with RA, SA and OA: T and B cell activation, chromatin remodelling, RAS GTPase activation and extracellular matrix regulation. Strikingly, disease activity (DAS28-CRP) has a significant influence on gene expression patterns in RA samples. Using the low-density assays, samples from patients with OA are easily discriminated from RA and SA samples. However, overlapping molecular patterns are found, in particular between RA and SA biopsies. Therefore, prediction of the clinical diagnosis based on gene expression data results in a diagnostic accuracy of 56.8%, which is increased up to 98.6% by the addition of specific clinical symptoms in the prediction algorithm. Similar observations are made in initial UA samples, in which overlapping molecular patterns also impact the accuracy of the diagnostic algorithm. When clinical symptoms are added, the diagnostic accuracy is strongly improved. Conclusions Gene expression signatures are overall different in patients with OA, RA and SA, but overlapping molecular signatures are found in

  9. Knee synovial cyst presenting as iliotibial band friction syndrome.

    PubMed

    Costa, M L; Marshall, T; Donell, S T; Phillips, H

    2004-06-01

    We present the case of a 28-year-old competitive runner with iliotibial band (ITB) friction syndrome associated with a synovial cyst. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) did not demonstrate a fluid collection. However, open exploration revealed a large cyst beneath the ITB arising from the capsule of the knee proximal to the lateral meniscus. The cyst disappeared on extension. The pre-operative MRI scan may have revealed the cyst, if it had been taken with the knee flexed.

  10. Sports-related changes of the synovial membrane

    PubMed Central

    MANUNTA, ANDREA F.; ZEDDE, PIETRO; PISANU, FRANCESCO; MARRAS, FRANCESCO

    2014-01-01

    Purpose the aim of this study is to differentiate the behavior of the synovial membrane in the presence of various stimuli in patients who practice sports. Methods fifty one patients (30 males and 21 females, mean age 48 years, range 31–59 years) who actively practiced non-competitive sports underwent a biopsy of the synovial membrane during arthroscopic surgery performed for joint effusion secondary to meniscal lesion (24 cases), anterior cruciate ligament injury (ACL) (17 cases), postoperative knee joint stiffness (2 cases), aseptic loosening or dislocation of the polyethylene component of uni-compartmental knee arthroplasty (5 cases), and anterior fibrous impingement of the ankle (3 cases). Synovial tissue samples were obtained during surgery from all the patients and processed for light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy observation. Results circulatory phenomena were observed in acute inflammatory processes, characterized by hyperemia and vasodilation. Exudative and infiltrative phenomena were observed in the presence of foreign bodies and were characterized by leukocytic exudation (presence of polynuclear neutrophils), accompanied by lymphomonocytic infiltration. Proliferative phenomena were observed in post-traumatic forms of synovitis (ACL and meniscal injuries), characterized by hypertrophy and proliferation of villous formations. Degenerative and regressive phenomena were observed in cases of fibrous reaction (ankle impingement and joint stiffness) and were characterized by formation of dense fibrous connective tissue with hyaline patches, evolving towards sclerosis. Conclusions the activation of inflammatory processes in patients who expose their joints to excessive stress may lead to the formation of hyperplastic tissue. Ultramicroscopic debris is usually capable of transforming the structural organization of the synovial tissue. Level of evidence Level IV, observational case series. PMID:25750907

  11. A rapid screen for four corticosteroids in equine synovial fluid.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Karan; Ebel, Joseph G; Bischoff, Karyn

    2014-06-01

    Most antidoping method development in the equine industry has been for plasma and urine, though there has been recent interest in the analysis of synovial fluid for evidence of doping by intra-articular corticosteroid injection. Published methods for corticosteroid analysis in synovial fluid are primarily singleplex methods, do not screen for all corticosteroids of interest and are not adequately sensitive. The purpose of this study is to develop a rapid and sensitive liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) screening method for the detection of four of the most common intra-articularly administered corticosteroids--betamethasone, methylprednisolone, methylprednisolone acetate and triamcinolone acetonide. Sample preparation consisted of protein precipitation followed by a basified liquid-liquid extraction. LC-MS-MS experiments consisted of a six-min isocratic separation using a Phenomenex Polar-RP stationary phase and a mobile phase consisting of 35% acetonitrile, 5 mM ammonium acetate and 0.1% formic acid in nanopure water. The detection system used was a triple quadrupole mass analyzer with thermospray ionization, and compounds were identified using selective reaction monitoring. The method was validated to the ISO/IEC 17025 standard, and real synovial fluid samples were analyzed to demonstrate the application of the method in an antidoping context. The method was highly selective for the four corticosteroids with limits of detection of 1-3 ng/mL. The extraction efficiency was 50-101%, and the matrix effects were 14-31%. These results indicate that the method is a rapid and sensitive screen for the four corticosteroids in equine synovial fluid, fit for purpose for equine antidoping assays. PMID:24713534

  12. Place of radiotherapy in the treatment of synovial sarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, J.H.; Harwood, A.R.; Cummings, B.J.; Fornasier, V.; Langer, F.; Quirt, I.

    1981-01-01

    This paper reviews 36 patients with synovial sarcoma; 18 were referred within three months of surgery. None had undergone en bloc excision and all were treated with post-operative radiotherapy. Local control and survival were analyzed with respect to Tumor Node Metastasis Classification, histology, site of primary and surgical procedure. Eight patients with T1-2N0M0 tumors were alive and well (minimum two year follow-up) following excision and radiotherapy; 7 had a normally functional extremity. In contrast, only one of 8 patients with T3N0M0 tumors is alive and well. Seven of 8 patients with well or moderately differentiated histology were alive and well whereas no patient with poorly differentiated histologies survived. Six of 7 patients were alive and well if their tumor was distal to the elbow or knee whereas none of those who had a primary thigh synovial sarcoma survived. Eighteen patients were referred with recurrent disease and 2 were salvaged. A management policy is proposed for synovial sarcoma with the integrated use of surgery, radiation and chemotherapy; it emphasizes optimal cure rates and a functional extremity reserving amputation for salvage.

  13. Tribological and Rheological Properties of a Synovial Fluid Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klossner, Rebecca; Liang, Jing; Krause, Wendy

    2010-03-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) and the plasma proteins, albumin and globulins, are the most abundant macromolecules in synovial fluid, the fluid that lubricates freely moving joints. In previous studies, bovine synovial fluid, a synovial fluid model (SFM) and albumin in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) were observed to be rheopectic---viscosity increases over time under constant shear. Additionally, steady shear experiments have a strong shear history dependence in protein-containing solutions, whereas samples of HA in PBS behaved as a ``typical'' polyelectrolyte. The observed rheopexy and shear history dependence are indicative of structure building in solution, which is most likely caused by protein aggregation. The tribology of the SFM was also investigated using nanoindenter-based scratch tests. The coefficient of frictions (μ) between the diamond nanoindenter tip and a polyethylene surface was measured in the presence of the SFM and solutions with varied protein and HA concentrations. The lowest μ is observed in the SFM, which most closely mimics a healthy joint. Finally, an anti-inflammatory drug, hydroxychloroquine, was shown to inhibit protein interactions in the SFM in rheological studies, and thus the tribological response was examined. We hypothesize that the rheopectic behavior is important in lubrication regimes and therefore, the rheological and tribological properties of these solutions will be correlated.

  14. From the archives of the AFIP: Pleuropulmonary synovial sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Frazier, Aletta Ann; Franks, Teri J; Pugatch, Robert D; Galvin, Jeffrey R

    2006-01-01

    Pleuropulmonary synovial sarcoma (PPSS) is increasingly recognized as a subtype of sarcoma because of the recent identification of a distinctive chromosomal translocation specific to synovial sarcoma. Soft-tissue synovial sarcoma is far more common than PPSS and typically develops in para-articular locations of the extremities; affects young and middle-aged adults, with no difference in distribution between the sexes; and has well-documented radiologic manifestations. PPSS may arise in the chest wall, heart, mediastinum, pleura, or lung, and it shares patient demographics and several imaging features with its soft-tissue counterpart. Patients present with a cough, chest pain, or dyspnea. On chest radiographs, PPSS typically appears as a sharply marginated mass with uniform opacity, based either in the pleura or in the lung, and often accompanied by an ipsilateral pleural effusion. Computed tomographic images show a well-circumscribed heterogeneously enhanced lesion without associated involvement of bone and without calcifications (except in the case of a chest wall primary tumor). Magnetic resonance imaging provides superior demonstration of nodular soft tissue and multilocular fluid-filled internal components of PPSS, in addition to peripheral rim enhancement after the intravenous administration of a gadolinium-based contrast material such as gadopentetate dimeglumine. Current treatment consists of surgical resection followed by chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or both. PMID:16702463

  15. Survey for immune complexes in disseminated gonococcal arthritis-dermatitis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ludivico, C L; Myers, A R

    1979-01-01

    Seventeen patients with characteristic disseminated gonococcal arthritis-dermatitis syndrome were studied for the presence of immune complexes, and circulating gonococcal antigen and antibody. The two immune complex techniques, monoclonal rheumatoid factor assay and cryoglobulin survey, did not reveal any consistent abnormalities. Complement levels (CH50, C'3, C'4) were not consistent with peripheral consumption except in 2 patients with coinciding systemic lupus erythematosus. Gonococcal antibody was detected in 47% of patients when they presented with the syndrome. However, gonococcal antigen was not found in either serum or synovial fluid. These results do not support the hypothesis that circulating immune complexes are involved in the pathogenesis of disseminated gonococcal arthritis-dermatitis syndrome.

  16. Massachusetts Dissemination Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiBella, Cecilia M.

    This report outlines the activities and impact of the Massachusetts Dissemination Project, a capacity-building program funded from 1976 to 1982 to further the dissemination of information on educational resources in Massachusetts. Major project outcomes are listed, including the production of two serials entitled Resources for Schools (26 issues)…

  17. The role of lubricin in the mechanical behavior of synovial fluid

    PubMed Central

    Jay, G. D.; Torres, J. R.; Warman, M. L.; Laderer, M. C.; Breuer, K. S.

    2007-01-01

    Synovial fluid is a semidilute hyaluronate (HA) polymer solution, the rheology of which depends on HA–protein interactions, and lubricin is a HA-binding protein found in synovial fluid and at cartilage surfaces, where it contributes to boundary lubrication under load. Individuals with genetic deficiency of lubricin develop precocious joint failure. The role of lubricin in synovial fluid rheology is not known. We used a multiple-particle-tracking microrheology technique to study the molecular interactions between lubricin and HA in synovial fluid. Particles (200 nm mean diameter) embedded in normal and lubricin-deficient synovial fluid samples were tracked separately by using multiple-particle-tracking microrheology. The time-dependent ensemble-averaged mean-squared displacements of all of the particles were measured over a range of physiologically relevant frequencies. The mean-squared displacement correlation with time lag had slopes with values of unity for simple HA solutions and for synovial fluid from an individual who genetically lacked lubricin, in contrast to slopes with values less than unity (α ≈ 0.6) for normal synovial fluid. These data correlated with bulk rheology studies of the same samples. We found that the subdiffusive and elastic behavior of synovial fluid, at physiological shear rates, was absent in fluid from a patient who lacks lubricin. We conclude that lubricin provides synovial fluid with an ability to dissipate strain energy induced by mammalian locomotion, which is a chondroprotective feature that is distinct from boundary lubrication. PMID:17404241

  18. Primary Synovial Sarcoma of the Kidney with Inferior Vena Caval Thrombus.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Deepak; Narayanaswamy, Kathiresan; Sundersingh, Shirley; Senniappan, Karthikeyan; Raja, Anand

    2016-09-01

    Synovial sarcomas occurs primarily in the soft tissues, mostly in para-articular regions of the extremities. These tumors have been described in other unusual locations like the pleura, lungs, mediastinum, and kidneys. Primary synovial sarcoma of the kidney is a recently described entity; to date, a total of approximately 35 cases have been reported. Only three cases of primary synovial sarcoma of kidney with IVC thrombus have been reported so far. Here we present the case of a 44 year old gentleman, with primary synovial sarcoma of the left kidney with caval thrombus. PMID:27651698

  19. Disseminated intravascular coagulation.

    PubMed

    Gando, Satoshi; Levi, Marcel; Toh, Cheng-Hock

    2016-01-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is an acquired syndrome characterized by widespread intravascular activation of coagulation that can be caused by infectious insults (such as sepsis) and non-infectious insults (such as trauma). The main pathophysiological mechanisms of DIC are inflammatory cytokine-initiated activation of tissue factor-dependent coagulation, insufficient control of anticoagulant pathways and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1-mediated suppression of fibrinolysis. Together, these changes give rise to endothelial dysfunction and microvascular thrombosis, which can cause organ dysfunction and seriously affect patient prognosis. Recent observations have pointed to an important role for extracellular DNA and DNA-binding proteins, such as histones, in the pathogenesis of DIC. The International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH) established a DIC diagnostic scoring system consisting of global haemostatic test parameters. This scoring system has now been well validated in diverse clinical settings. The theoretical cornerstone of DIC management is the specific and vigorous treatment of the underlying conditions, and DIC should be simultaneously managed to improve patient outcomes. The ISTH guidance for the treatment of DIC recommends treatment strategies that are based on current evidence. In this Primer, we provide an updated overview of the pathophysiology, diagnosis and management of DIC and discuss the future directions of basic and clinical research in this field. PMID:27250996

  20. How Is Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation Treated? Treatment for disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) depends ... and treat the underlying cause. Acute Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation People who have acute DIC may have severe ...

  1. Herpes zoster (shingles) disseminated (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Herpes zoster (shingles) normally occurs in a limited area that follows a dermatome (see the "dermatome" picture). In individuals with damaged immune systems, herpes zoster may be widespread (disseminated), causing serious illness. ...

  2. Optimized “In Vitro” Culture Conditions for Human Rheumatoid Arthritis Synovial Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Lattuada, Donatella; Crotta, Katia; Truzzi, Marcello Claudio; Corradini, Costantino; Marelli, Ornella

    2014-01-01

    The composition of synovial fluid in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is complex and strongly influences the microenvironment of joints and it is an inseparable element of the disease. Currently, “in vitro” studies are performed on RA cells cultured in the presence of either recombinant proinflammatory cytokines-conditioned medium or medium alone. In this study, we evaluated the use of synovial fluid, derived from RA patients, as optimal culture condition to perform “in vitro” studies on RA synovial fibroblasts. We observed that synovial fluid is more effective in inducing cell proliferation with respect to TNF-alpha or culture medium alone. Spontaneous apoptosis in fibroblasts was also decreased in response to synovial fluid. The expression of proinflammatory cytokines in the presence of synovial fluid was significantly elevated with respect to cells cultured with TNF-alpha or medium, and the overall morphology of cells was also modified. In addition, modulation of intracellular calcium dynamics elicited in response to synovial fluid or TNF-alpha exposure is different and suggests a role for the purinergic signalling in the modulation of the effects. These results emphasize the importance of using RA synovial fluid in “in vitro” studies involving RA cells, in order to reproduce faithfully the physiopathological environmental characteristic of RA joints. PMID:25548436

  3. Auriculotemporal neuralgia secondary to TMJ synovial cyst: a rare presentation of a rare entity.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Hossein; Robertson, Carrie E; Lane, John I; Viozzi, Christopher F; Garza, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Synovial cysts of the temporomandibular joint are rare, and to our knowledge, only 14 cases have been reported. The most common presentation is local pain and swelling. We present a case of a synovial cyst presenting with neuralgia in the distribution of the auriculotemporal nerve, initially misdiagnosed as trigeminal neuralgia.

  4. MR evaluation of synovial injury in shoulder trauma.

    PubMed

    Chalian, Majid; Soldatos, Theodoros; Faridian-Aragh, Neda; Andreisek, Gustav; McFarland, Edward G; Carrino, John A; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings relevant to synovial injury of the shoulder in patients with and without acute shoulder trauma. Three hundred and nine consecutive shoulder MRI studies (185-male, 124-female, 50 ± 15 years old) were retrospectively evaluated for findings suggestive of synovial injury including rupture and/or diverticulum of the joint capsule, bursa, and biceps tendon sheath (BTS), ganglion/synovial cyst, geyser phenomenon, and sequel of previous shoulder dislocation (Hill-Sachs deformity). Patients with one or more of these findings were included in the MR-positive group, whereas the remaining subjects were used as MR negatives. Based on their medical records, patients were also divided into trauma and non-trauma groups, and statistical analysis was performed to evaluate the association between the aforementioned MRI findings and history of shoulder trauma. Fifty-six patients were included in the MR-positive group and 253 in the MR-negative group. In MR-positive group, the incidence of capsular rupture (CR) and subacromial/subdeltoid (SASD) bursal rupture was higher in trauma patients, whereas the incidence of BTS diverticulum and ganglion cyst was higher in subjects without trauma. Significant association was found between the history of acute trauma and CR, SASD bursal rupture, BTS rupture, and Hill-Sachs deformity. In shoulder MR examination, presence of CR and/or SASD bursal rupture is strongly suggestive of acute shoulder trauma. In addition, BTS rupture and Hill-Sachs deformity are more prevalent in patients with acute shoulder trauma. The presence of these features should alert MRI readers to assess for additional trauma-related internal derangements, if a respective history has not been provided.

  5. MR evaluation of synovial injury in shoulder trauma.

    PubMed

    Chalian, Majid; Soldatos, Theodoros; Faridian-Aragh, Neda; Andreisek, Gustav; McFarland, Edward G; Carrino, John A; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings relevant to synovial injury of the shoulder in patients with and without acute shoulder trauma. Three hundred and nine consecutive shoulder MRI studies (185-male, 124-female, 50 ± 15 years old) were retrospectively evaluated for findings suggestive of synovial injury including rupture and/or diverticulum of the joint capsule, bursa, and biceps tendon sheath (BTS), ganglion/synovial cyst, geyser phenomenon, and sequel of previous shoulder dislocation (Hill-Sachs deformity). Patients with one or more of these findings were included in the MR-positive group, whereas the remaining subjects were used as MR negatives. Based on their medical records, patients were also divided into trauma and non-trauma groups, and statistical analysis was performed to evaluate the association between the aforementioned MRI findings and history of shoulder trauma. Fifty-six patients were included in the MR-positive group and 253 in the MR-negative group. In MR-positive group, the incidence of capsular rupture (CR) and subacromial/subdeltoid (SASD) bursal rupture was higher in trauma patients, whereas the incidence of BTS diverticulum and ganglion cyst was higher in subjects without trauma. Significant association was found between the history of acute trauma and CR, SASD bursal rupture, BTS rupture, and Hill-Sachs deformity. In shoulder MR examination, presence of CR and/or SASD bursal rupture is strongly suggestive of acute shoulder trauma. In addition, BTS rupture and Hill-Sachs deformity are more prevalent in patients with acute shoulder trauma. The presence of these features should alert MRI readers to assess for additional trauma-related internal derangements, if a respective history has not been provided. PMID:21735271

  6. Dissemination, redissemination and fiber life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eiber, W.

    1979-01-01

    The technical background of dissemination of carbon fibers as well as the possibility of redissemination and fiber life are outlined. Plume spread and weather, measures of pollution and of damage potential, and parameters controlling dissemination patterns are among the topics discussed. It is shown that the redissemination rate off hard surfaces decreases with time and that fiber length decreases with time. Redissemination from vegetated land is shown to be insignificant.

  7. Adiponectin stimulates IL-8 production by rheumatoid synovial fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Kitahara, Kanako; Kusunoki, Natsuko; Kakiuchi, Terutaka; Suguro, Toru; Kawai, Shinichi

    2009-01-09

    The adipokines are linked not only to metabolic regulation, but also to immune responses. Adiponectin, but not leptin or resistin induced interleukin-8 production from rheumatoid synovial fibroblasts (RSF). The culture supernatant of RSF treated with adiponectin induced chemotaxis, although adiponectin itself had no such effect. Addition of antibody against adiponectin, and inhibition of adiponectin receptor gene decreased adiponectin-induced IL-8 production. Nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-kappa B was increased by adiponectin. The induction of interleukin-8 was inhibited by mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitors. These findings suggest that adiponectin contributes to the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis.

  8. Subcutaneous Phaeohyphomycosis Due to Pyrenochaeta romeroi Mimicking a Synovial Cyst.

    PubMed

    Dinh, Aurélien; Levy, Bruno; Bouchand, Frédérique; Davido, Benjamin; Duran, Clara; Cristi, Marin; Felter, Adrien; Salomon, Jérôme; Ait Ammar, Nawel

    2016-01-01

    Opportunistic subcutaneous fungal infections are increasing nowadays due to the growing number of medical conditions causing immunosuppression, especially organ transplant. The incidence rate of subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis is very low. Most studies found are case reports. They showed a wide variation of clinical presentations. Pyrenochaeta romeroi, a fungus from the Dematiaceae group is a saprophyte found in soil and plants and a possible causative agent of phaeohyphomycosis. We present a rare case of subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis caused by P. romeroi mimicking a synovial cyst in a diabetic patient. PMID:27630637

  9. GUYON'S CANAL SYNDROME DUE TO A SYNOVIAL CYST

    PubMed Central

    Ruas, Evandro Silva; Castilho, Rodrigo Simões; Maia, Philipe Eduardo Carvalho; Melo, Gustavus Lemos Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of Guyon's canal syndrome caused by a synovial cyst within the left wrist of a 48-year-old female patient. The patient presented pain and paresthesia in the region of the ulnar nerve, with loss of muscle strength and left-hand deformity. Electroneuromyography showed a compression of the ulnar nerve at the wrist level. Surgical decompression of the nerve at Guyon's canal with resection of the cyst was performed. After the surgery, the patient presented an improvement in the pain and paresthesia, as well as an increase in muscle trophism and correction of the deformity. PMID:27026975

  10. Subcutaneous Phaeohyphomycosis Due to Pyrenochaeta romeroi Mimicking a Synovial Cyst.

    PubMed

    Dinh, Aurélien; Levy, Bruno; Bouchand, Frédérique; Davido, Benjamin; Duran, Clara; Cristi, Marin; Felter, Adrien; Salomon, Jérôme; Ait Ammar, Nawel

    2016-01-01

    Opportunistic subcutaneous fungal infections are increasing nowadays due to the growing number of medical conditions causing immunosuppression, especially organ transplant. The incidence rate of subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis is very low. Most studies found are case reports. They showed a wide variation of clinical presentations. Pyrenochaeta romeroi, a fungus from the Dematiaceae group is a saprophyte found in soil and plants and a possible causative agent of phaeohyphomycosis. We present a rare case of subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis caused by P. romeroi mimicking a synovial cyst in a diabetic patient.

  11. Subcutaneous Phaeohyphomycosis Due to Pyrenochaeta romeroi Mimicking a Synovial Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Dinh, Aurélien; Levy, Bruno; Bouchand, Frédérique; Davido, Benjamin; Duran, Clara; Cristi, Marin; Felter, Adrien; Salomon, Jérôme; Ait Ammar, Nawel

    2016-01-01

    Opportunistic subcutaneous fungal infections are increasing nowadays due to the growing number of medical conditions causing immunosuppression, especially organ transplant. The incidence rate of subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis is very low. Most studies found are case reports. They showed a wide variation of clinical presentations. Pyrenochaeta romeroi, a fungus from the Dematiaceae group is a saprophyte found in soil and plants and a possible causative agent of phaeohyphomycosis. We present a rare case of subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis caused by P. romeroi mimicking a synovial cyst in a diabetic patient.

  12. Subcutaneous Phaeohyphomycosis Due to Pyrenochaeta romeroi Mimicking a Synovial Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Dinh, Aurélien; Levy, Bruno; Bouchand, Frédérique; Davido, Benjamin; Duran, Clara; Cristi, Marin; Felter, Adrien; Salomon, Jérôme; Ait Ammar, Nawel

    2016-01-01

    Opportunistic subcutaneous fungal infections are increasing nowadays due to the growing number of medical conditions causing immunosuppression, especially organ transplant. The incidence rate of subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis is very low. Most studies found are case reports. They showed a wide variation of clinical presentations. Pyrenochaeta romeroi, a fungus from the Dematiaceae group is a saprophyte found in soil and plants and a possible causative agent of phaeohyphomycosis. We present a rare case of subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis caused by P. romeroi mimicking a synovial cyst in a diabetic patient. PMID:27630637

  13. IGF2 is critical for tumorigenesis by synovial sarcoma oncoprotein SYT-SSX1.

    PubMed

    Sun, Y; Gao, D; Liu, Y; Huang, J; Lessnick, S; Tanaka, S

    2006-02-16

    Synovial sarcoma is an aggressive soft tissue tumor characterized by a specific chromosomal translocation between chromosome 18 and X. This translocation can generate a fusion transcript encoding SYT-SSX1, a transforming oncoprotein. We present evidence that SYT-SSX1 induces insulin-like growth factor II expression in fibroblast cells. SYT-SSX2, a fusion also frequently found in synovial sarcoma, is necessary for maintaining Igf2 expression in the synovial sarcoma cell line, and the increased IGF2 synthesis protects cells from anoikis and is required for tumor formation in vivo. We also found a loss of imprinting (LOI) for Igf2 in a limited number of primary synovial sarcomas despite demethylation of CpG dinucleotides critical for maintaining imprinting. These findings suggest that inhibition of the IGF2/IGF1-R signaling pathway may represent a significant therapeutic modality for treating synovial sarcoma. PMID:16247461

  14. Plasma and synovial fluid meclofenamic acid concentrations in patients with rheumatoid arthritis of the knee.

    PubMed

    Koup, J R; Thomas, D; Tucker, E; Black, A; Ruderman, M; Dixon, J A; Kinkel, A

    1988-01-01

    We have measured plasma and synovial fluid concentrations of meclofenamic acid at 2, 4, 8, and 12 h during steady-state administration (100 mg three times daily for 4-7 days). Paired plasma and synovial samples were obtained pre-treatment and at one of the above times in twelve patients with a diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. In addition, the extent of protein binding of meclofenamic acid was assessed in vitro in the pre-treatment plasma and synovial fluid specimens. Peak total concentrations of 1.73 and 0.86 micrograms.ml-1 were observed in plasma (at 2 h) and synovial fluid (at 4 h) respectively. The extent of protein binding was 99.7 and 99.6% (not significantly different) in plasma and synovial fluid respectively. The results of this study are compared to those from similar reported studies of other nonsteroidal anti-inflamatory compounds.

  15. Upregulation of fibroblast growth factor 1 in the synovial membranes of patients with late stage osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Li, R; Wang, B; He, C Q; Yang, Y Q; Guo, H; Chen, Y; Du, T H

    2015-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative disease of the systemic joint that involves multiple cytokines and growth factors. Fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF-1) is increased in patients with rheumatic arthritis. The aim of this study was to determine whether the expression and secretion of FGF-1 differed in synovial tissue from patients with late stage OA from that in normal tissues. We selected eight patients with late stage OA and eight healthy donors for this study. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to determine the amount of FGF-1 in the synovial fluid and in the culture medium of synovial fibroblasts. Real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis was performed to examine the expression levels of FGF-1 and FGF receptor 2 (FGFR2) in synovial and cartilage tissues. We detected FGF-1 in the synovial fluid from all eight donors, as well as in the culture medium of synovial fibroblasts. Synovial fluid from patients with OA and culture medium of OA synovial fibroblasts contained significantly more FGF-1 than those from controls. FGF-1 expression was also lower in the synovial membranes of normal donors than in those of OA patients. FGFR2 expression was also higher in OA cartilage than in normal cartilage. Overall, these results demonstrated that FGF-1 synthesis and secretion by synovial fibroblasts were significantly increased in OA. FGFR2 expression was also shown to be upregulated in patients with OA. These findings suggest that increased FGF-1 signaling correlates with an OA pathological condition. PMID:26400350

  16. Genesis and morphogenesis of limb synovial joints and articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Decker, Rebekah S; Koyama, Eiki; Pacifici, Maurizio

    2014-10-01

    Limb synovial joints are intricate structures composed of articular cartilage, synovial membranes, ligaments and an articular capsule. Together, these tissues give each joint its unique shape, organization and biomechanical function. Articular cartilage itself is rather complex and organized in distinct zones, including the superficial zone that produces lubricants and contains stem/progenitor cells. For many years there has been great interest in deciphering the mechanisms by which the joints form and come to acquire such unique structural features and diversity. Decades ago, classic embryologists discovered that the first overt sign of joint formation at each prescribed limb site was the appearance of a dense and compact population of mesenchymal cells collectively called the interzone. Work carried out since then by several groups has provided evidence that the interzone cells actively participate in joint tissue formation over developmental time. This minireview provides a succinct but comprehensive description of the many important recent advances in this field of research. These include studies using various conditional reporter mice to genetically trace and track the origin, fate and possible function of joint progenitor cells; studies on the involvement and roles in signaling pathways and transcription factors in joint cell determination and functioning; and studies using advanced methods of gene expression analyses to uncover novel genetic determinants of joint formation and diversity. The overall advances are impressive, and the findings are not only of obvious interest and importance but also have major implications in the conception of future translational medicine tools to repair and regenerate defective, overused or aging joints.

  17. Disseminated sporotrichosis mimicking sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Deborah J; Krishnan, Ravi S; Guillen, David R; Schmiege, Lorenz M; Leis, Paula F; Hsu, Sylvia

    2006-04-01

    A 40-year-old Caucasian man presented to the dermatology clinic at Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas, in February 2003, for the evaluation of three nonhealing ulcers. The patient's past medical history was significant for hypothyroidism and pulmonary sarcoidosis, the diagnosis of which was made in June 2000. In March 2000, the patient had complained of cough and shortness of breath. A purified protein derivative (PPD) (Mantoux text) was negative. Computed tomography (CT) scans of the chest revealed diffuse hilar and mediastinal adenopathy and bilateral interstitial and alveolar infiltrates. Although consistent with sarcoidosis, these findings were insufficient to exclude other etiologies, including disseminated fungal infection. Cultures and stains of subsequent bronchoscopy specimens failed to reveal any organisms, and histopathologic evaluation of the specimens was nondiagnostic. Based on the imaging studies and the negative cultures, a diagnosis of sarcoidosis was made, and the patient was started on therapy with prednisone. Before coming to our clinic, the patient had been on several courses of prednisone. In May 2002, the patient had presented to a private dermatologist with a 1-year history of a nonhealing 2.4 cm x 2.0 cm ulcer on the left medial forearm. Two biopsies were reported as nondiagnostic. The patient's presentation was interpreted as most consistent with Mycobacterium marinum infection, and so he was empirically treated with minocycline. This treatment was continued for almost 3 months without improvement in the ulcer. A few months after the minocycline had been discontinued, the patient was treated empirically for 2 months with ciprofloxacin. This treatment was also unsuccessful in ameliorating the ulcer. In between the two courses of antibiotics, specimens from the lesion were sent for bacterial and fungal cultures, which revealed normal skin flora. In January 2003, the patient returned to his private dermatologist with three ulcerations

  18. Characterization of ESBL disseminating plasmids.

    PubMed

    Brolund, Alma; Sandegren, Linus

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria producing extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) constitute a globally increasing problem that contributes to treatment complications and elevated death rates. The extremely successful dissemination by ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae during the latest decades is a result of the combination of mobilization, evolution and horizontal spread of β-lactamase genes on plasmids. In parallel, spread of these plasmids to particularly well-adapted bacterial clones (outbreak clones) has expanded. In this review we describe ESBL-producing bacteria and the genetic mechanisms for dissemination of ESBL resistance. We describe available methodology for studying plasmids and the importance of including plasmids in epidemiological typing as natural parts of the organisms. Plasmids play a fundamental role in how resistance arises and disseminates.

  19. An altered repertoire of T cell receptor V gene expression by rheumatoid synovial fluid T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Lunardi, C; Marguerie, C; So, A K

    1992-12-01

    The pattern of T cell receptor V gene expression by lymphocytes from rheumatoid synovial fluid and paired peripheral blood samples was compared using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assay. Eight rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients who had varying durations of disease (from 2 to 20 years) were studied. In all patients there was evidence of a different pattern of V gene expression between the two compartments. Significantly increased expression of at least one V alpha or V beta gene family by synovial fluid T cells was observed in all the patients studied. Three different V alpha (V alpha 10, 15 and 18) and three V beta (V beta 4, 5 and 13) families were commonly elevated. Sequencing of synovial V beta transcripts demonstrated that the basis of increased expression of selected V gene families in the synovial fluid was due to the presence of dominant clonotypes within those families, which constituted up to 53% of the sequences isolated from one particular synovial V gene family. There were considerable differences in the NDJ sequences found in synovial and peripheral blood T cell receptor (TCR) transcripts of the same V beta gene family. These data suggest that the TCR repertoire in the two compartments differs, and that antigen-driven expansion of particular synovial T cell populations is a component of rheumatoid synovitis, and is present in all stages of the disease. PMID:1458680

  20. Disseminated Fusarium oxysporum neurospinal infection.

    PubMed

    Sreedharan Namboothiri, Pe; Nair, Sreehari Narayanan; Vijayan, Krishnan; Visweswaran, Vk

    2014-03-01

    We report a case of disseminated meningospondylodiscitis in an elderly diabetic patient caused by Fusarium oxysporum. As the clinical presentation was nonspecific, the diagnosis of the condition could only be arrived at after laboratory and imaging studies. The diagnosis of the condition requires a high index of suspicion. Patient underwent thorough surgical debridement along with a short course of variconazole and remained asymptomatic after 36 months of diagnosis. Fusarium is a large genus of filamentous fungi widely distributed in soil and in association with plants. It is known to cause local infections (nail, cornea) in healthy humans and disseminated infection only in the immunocompromised.

  1. Can lumbar hemorrhagic synovial cyst cause acute radicular compression? Case report

    PubMed Central

    Timbó, Luciana Sátiro; Rosemberg, Laercio Alberto; Brandt, Reynaldo André; Peres, Ricardo Botticini; Nakamura, Olavo Kyosen; Guimarães, Juliana Frota

    2014-01-01

    Lumbar synovial cysts are an uncommon cause of back pain and radiculopathy, usually manifesting with gradual onset of symptoms, secondary to involvement of the spinal canal. Rarely, intracyst hemorrhage occurs, and may acutely present as radicular - or even spinal cord - compression syndrome. Synovial cysts are generally associated with degenerative facets, although the pathogenesis has not been entirely established. We report a case of bleeding complication in a synovial cyst at L2-L3, adjacent to the right interfacet joint, causing acute pain and radiculopathy in a patient on anticoagulation therapy who required surgical resection. PMID:25628207

  2. Editorial Commentary: Role of Synovial Biomarkers in Patient Outcomes After Knee Arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Brand, Jefferson C

    2016-03-01

    Humans are notably poor at predicting event outcomes. In "Correlation of Synovial Fluid Biomarkers With Cartilage Pathology and Associated Outcomes in Knee Arthroscopy," Cuellar, Cuellar, Kirsch, and Strauss show that some synovial fluid biomarkers (20 were sampled for the investigation) may predict operative findings at the time of arthroscopy and patient-reported outcome measures at follow-up. Further research will clarify the role of synovial biomarkers in knee pathology and, hopefully, narrow the choices to one or two pertinent markers that can be used to improve our ability to predict outcomes from arthroscopic knee surgery.

  3. Development of Synovial Membrane in the Temporomandibular Joint of the Human Fetus

    PubMed Central

    Tedesco, R.C.; Arraéz-Aybar, L.A.; Klein, O.; Mérida-Velasco, J.R.; Alonso, L.G.

    2015-01-01

    The development of the synovial membrane was analyzed in serial sections of 21 temporomandibular joints of human fetuses at 9 to 13 weeks of gestation. Sections of two fetuses at 12 weeks of development were used to perform immunohistochemical expression of the markers CD68 and Hsp27 on the synovial lining. Macrophage-like type A and fibroblast-like type B cells, which express CD68 and Hsp27, respectively, were observed at the twelfth week of development. Our results suggest that the development of the synovial membrane is related to the vascularization of the joint and the formation of the articular cavities. PMID:26708184

  4. Disseminating and Using Research Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Overs, Robert P.; Trotter, Ann B.

    The authors offer some practical guidelines in four areas of rehabilitation research information dissemination: (1) filing and retrieval problems; (2) level and styles of writing, listing, abstracting, summarizing, and reconceptualizing; (3) profiling the average practitioner-consumers; and (4) leveling attitudinal barriers. Filing and retrieval…

  5. The Dissemination of Pedagogical Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennedsen, Jens

    2006-01-01

    Pedagogical patterns have been around since 1995, but several authors claim their impact is limited. However, these claims are based on authors' own observations and not on methodical evaluations of the use and dissemination of pedagogical patterns. This claim is in contrast to the vision of the creators of pedagogical patterns--they think…

  6. ERIC Products and Information Dissemination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carruthers, Iva E.

    The focus of this paper is the Educational Resources Information Center's (ERIC's) products and information dissemination. Its purpose is to collect and review existing studies and analyze information: (1) about the effectiveness and appropriateness of the array of products ERIC now produces in meeting user demands and needs; (2) about the styles,…

  7. Disseminating Educational Research with IT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Niki

    Teachers and researchers need to use the research produced in education to improve their practice. However, the current modes of dissemination through journals and papers are often written for the expert community. The Telematics Centre at the University of Exeter (United Kingdom), School of Education provides creative solutions for the effective…

  8. SYT-SSX fusion genes and prognosis in synovial sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Mezzelani, A; Mariani, L; Tamborini, E; Agus, V; Riva, C; Lo Vullo, S; Fabbri, A; Stumbo, M; Azzarelli, A; Casali, P G; Gronchi, A; Sozzi, G; Pierotti, M A; Pilotti, S

    2001-01-01

    A case series of 64 synovial sarcomas was characterized for the SYT-SSX fusion transcripts and statistically analysed in order to correlate molecular data with prognosis and morphology. SYT-SSX1 fusion transcript appeared to be an independent, though not reaching statistical significance (P = 0.183), prognostic factor clearly associated with a reduced metastasis-free survival. Regarding the association between transcript type and histologic subtype we found, a borderline P value (P = 0.067) between the SYT-SSX1 transcript and the biphasic subtype which, subsequently expanding the analysis to 70 cases, turned out to be significant. However, we could not confirm the prediction value of the biphasic subtype for the presence of the SYT-SSX1 transcript since in our hands 6 out 33 (18%) biphasic tumours carried the SYT-SSX2 transcript.© 2001 Cancer Research Campaign  http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11720441

  9. Borrelia burgdorferi migrates into joint capsules and causes an up-regulation of interleukin-8 in synovial membranes of dogs experimentally infected with ticks.

    PubMed Central

    Straubinger, R K; Straubinger, A F; Härter, L; Jacobson, R H; Chang, Y F; Summers, B A; Erb, H N; Appel, M J

    1997-01-01

    . Histologically, nonsuppurative arthritis was found in multiple joints, and mild to moderate cortical hyperplasia was found in draining lymph nodes. Five uninfected dogs without lameness (group C) had normal synovial fluids and tissues. In all infected dogs, live spirochetes were demonstrated more frequently in tissues of the somatic quadrant closest to the tick bite than in tissues further from the site of infection, suggesting that dissemination of B. burgdorferi occurs more by migration than by blood-borne spread. From these studies employing a canine model of B. burgdorferi infection, we conclude that IL-8 is involved in the pathogenesis of acute Lyme arthritis. PMID:9119462

  10. Borrelia burgdorferi migrates into joint capsules and causes an up-regulation of interleukin-8 in synovial membranes of dogs experimentally infected with ticks.

    PubMed

    Straubinger, R K; Straubinger, A F; Härter, L; Jacobson, R H; Chang, Y F; Summers, B A; Erb, H N; Appel, M J

    1997-04-01

    . Histologically, nonsuppurative arthritis was found in multiple joints, and mild to moderate cortical hyperplasia was found in draining lymph nodes. Five uninfected dogs without lameness (group C) had normal synovial fluids and tissues. In all infected dogs, live spirochetes were demonstrated more frequently in tissues of the somatic quadrant closest to the tick bite than in tissues further from the site of infection, suggesting that dissemination of B. burgdorferi occurs more by migration than by blood-borne spread. From these studies employing a canine model of B. burgdorferi infection, we conclude that IL-8 is involved in the pathogenesis of acute Lyme arthritis. PMID:9119462

  11. Effect of repeated through-and-through joint lavage on serum amyloid A in synovial fluid from healthy horses.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Teran, A F; Bracamonte, J L; Hendrick, S; Riddell, L; Musil, K; Hoff, B; Rubio-Martínez, L M

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of through-and-through joint lavage on systemic and synovial serum amyloid A (SAA), total protein, nucleated cell count and percentage of neutrophils in the synovial fluid of six healthy horses. A prospective experimental study was performed where one healthy tarsocrural joint of each horse was randomly assigned to receive repeated through-and-through joint lavage at 0, 48 and 96 h. Synovial fluid and blood samples were collected at 0 (baseline), 24, 48, 72, 96 and 120 h. Systemic and synovial SAA, total protein, nucleated cell count and percentage of neutrophils were measured and compared to baseline. Concentrations of systemic and synovial SAA percentage of neutrophils were not increased from baseline in contrast to total protein and nucleated cell counts (except for nucleated cell count at 96 h). In conclusion, repeated through-and-through joint lavage did not affect synovial SAA concentrations in horses; however, synovial total protein and nucleated cell count values increased. Some of the total protein and nucleated cell count values observed in this study were within the range reported for septic arthritis 24 h after joint lavage. Hence, synovial SAA may be a valuable marker to evaluate the clinical progression of septic joints after through-and-through joint lavage. Clinical studies evaluating synovial fluid SAA concentrations while treating synovial sepsis with through-and-through joint lavage are warranted.

  12. Staphylococcal persistence due to biofilm formation in synovial fluid containing prophylactic cefazolin.

    PubMed

    Dastgheyb, Sana S; Hammoud, Sommer; Ketonis, Constantinos; Liu, Andrew Yongkun; Fitzgerald, Keith; Parvizi, Javad; Purtill, James; Ciccotti, Michael; Shapiro, Irving M; Otto, Michael; Hickok, Noreen J

    2015-04-01

    Antibiotic prophylaxis is standard for patients undergoing surgical procedures, yet despite the wide use of antibiotics, breakthrough infections still occur. In the setting of total joint arthroplasty, such infections can be devastating. Recent findings have shown that synovial fluid causes marked staphylococcal aggregation, which can confer antibiotic insensitivity. We therefore asked in this study whether clinical samples of synovial fluid that contain preoperative prophylactic antibiotics can successfully eradicate a bacterial challenge by pertinent bacterial species. This study demonstrates that preoperative prophylaxis with cefazolin results in high antibiotic levels. Furthermore, we show that even with antibiotic concentrations that far exceed the expected bactericidal levels, Staphylococcus aureus bacteria added to the synovial fluid samples are not eradicated and are able to colonize model implant surfaces, i.e., titanium pins. Based on these studies, we suggest that current prophylactic antibiotic choices, despite high penetration into the synovial fluid, may need to be reexamined. PMID:25624333

  13. The First Ever Reported Case of Primary Synovial Sarcoma of Scalp

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Biplab; Bhirud, Deepak Prakash

    2016-01-01

    Synovial sarcomas are a rare entity with predilection for extremities and joints. The literature suggests that these tumours are rare in the head and neck region. Very few authors have reported their origin in head. Among the ones occurring in the head region, most of them are found to originate from the parotid area. According to our extensive review of available literature, there has been no reported case of the primary case of synovial sarcoma originating from the scalp convexity. We hereby report one such case in a young female which, by far to the best of our knowledge, is the first ever reported case of a synovial sarcoma occurring on the scalp. The tumour is also the largest ever reported in the literature and posed a great surgical and diagnostic challenge to our team. Through this paper, we recommend that synovial sarcoma should be included as a very rare yet possible differential diagnosis for the scalp tumours. PMID:27446625

  14. Ganglion and Synovial Cyst of the Temporomandibular Joint: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Steen, M Willemijn; Hofstede, Diederik J

    2015-09-01

    Ganglion and synovial cysts of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are rare. Although histopathological findings differ, clinical presentation is comparable. This study adds a case report of a ganglion of the TMJ to existing literature and a review of all available case reports on ganglion and synovial cysts of the TMJ. Including our own case report, we reviewed 49 cases of ganglion and synovial cysts of the TMJ. They occurred in a female:male ratio of 3:1, at an median age of 46 years (range, 11-64 years). Patients mainly presented with preauricular swelling and pain. After imaging, the ganglion or synovial cyst was most commonly excised under general anesthesia. No recurrences were described. PMID:26495237

  15. Ganglion and Synovial Cyst of the Temporomandibular Joint: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Hofstede, Diederik J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Ganglion and synovial cysts of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are rare. Although histopathological findings differ, clinical presentation is comparable. This study adds a case report of a ganglion of the TMJ to existing literature and a review of all available case reports on ganglion and synovial cysts of the TMJ. Including our own case report, we reviewed 49 cases of ganglion and synovial cysts of the TMJ. They occurred in a female:male ratio of 3:1, at an median age of 46 years (range, 11–64 years). Patients mainly presented with preauricular swelling and pain. After imaging, the ganglion or synovial cyst was most commonly excised under general anesthesia. No recurrences were described. PMID:26495237

  16. Lipid bilayer membranes: Missing link in the comprehension of synovial lubrication?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packard, Ross; Cowley, Leonie; Dubief, Yves

    2010-03-01

    The human body hosts an extremely efficient tribological system in its synovial joints that operate under very low friction and virtually no wear. It has long been assumed that the higher molecular weight molecules present in the synovial fluid (hyaluronic acid, lubricin) are solely responsible for the mechanical properties of joint. Smaller components, unsaturated phospholipids, have a virtually an undefined role, most probably because of the cancellation of their amphiphilic properties ex vivo caused by oxidation. Using experimental observations of multilamellar arrangements in synovial joints, we formulate the assumption that self-assembling structures provide the anisotropy necessary to synovial fluid to resist drainage under normal compression. Our molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate the tremendous mechanical properties of lipid bilayers and also highlight their weakening consistent with modifications resulting from injuries or joint prosthesis.

  17. Staphylococcal Persistence Due to Biofilm Formation in Synovial Fluid Containing Prophylactic Cefazolin

    PubMed Central

    Dastgheyb, Sana S.; Hammoud, Sommer; Ketonis, Constantinos; Liu, Andrew Yongkun; Fitzgerald, Keith; Parvizi, Javad; Purtill, James; Ciccotti, Michael; Shapiro, Irving M.; Otto, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic prophylaxis is standard for patients undergoing surgical procedures, yet despite the wide use of antibiotics, breakthrough infections still occur. In the setting of total joint arthroplasty, such infections can be devastating. Recent findings have shown that synovial fluid causes marked staphylococcal aggregation, which can confer antibiotic insensitivity. We therefore asked in this study whether clinical samples of synovial fluid that contain preoperative prophylactic antibiotics can successfully eradicate a bacterial challenge by pertinent bacterial species. This study demonstrates that preoperative prophylaxis with cefazolin results in high antibiotic levels. Furthermore, we show that even with antibiotic concentrations that far exceed the expected bactericidal levels, Staphylococcus aureus bacteria added to the synovial fluid samples are not eradicated and are able to colonize model implant surfaces, i.e., titanium pins. Based on these studies, we suggest that current prophylactic antibiotic choices, despite high penetration into the synovial fluid, may need to be reexamined. PMID:25624333

  18. Diagnosing joint infections: synovial fluid differential is more sensitive than white blood cell count.

    PubMed

    Baran, Sean; Price, Connie; Hak, David J

    2014-12-01

    In order to identify the predictive value of synovial fluid white blood cell (WBC) count and differential white blood cell count in identifying nonprosthetic joint infection in immunocompetent and immunosuppressed populations, we retrospectively reviewed 96 adult patients who underwent hip or knee aspiration because of symptoms suggesting a possible nonprosthetic joint infection. Medical history, including immunosuppressive disease or drugs, was recorded, and synovial fluid cell count, differential, and culture results were compared. There were 44 patients with positive synovial cultures. Of 36 patients who had a synovial WBC ≥50,000/mm³, 89% had positive cultures. The sensitivity to synovial WBC ≥50,000/mm³ was 0.727 (95% CI 0.570-0.845), and specificity was 0.923 (95% CI 0.806-0.975). There were 12 patients with a synovial WBC <50,000/mm³ that had positive cultures. The sensitivity of percentage polymorphonuclear cells (%PMNs) to predict positive cultures when the %PMNs were at least 80, 85, and 90% was 0.932, 0.886, and 0.818, respectively. The specificity when the %PMNs was at least 80, 85, and 90% was 0.598, 0.577, and 0.673, respectively. Among the 29% of immunocompromised patients, the sensitivity to synovial WBC ≥50,000/mm³ was 0.714 (95% CI 0.420-0.904), and specificity was 1.000 (95% CI 0.732-1.000). Twenty-nine percent of patients with a synovial WBC <50,000/mm³ had positive cultures. The sensitivity of %PMNs to predict positive cultures when the %PMNs was at least 80, 85, and 90% was 1.000, 0.929, and 0.786, respectively. The specificity when the %PMNs were at least 80, 85, and 90% was 0.500, 0.643, and 0.714, respectively. We found that the synovial WBC differential (percentage synovial fluid PMNs) is a more sensitive predictor for nonprosthetic adult joint infection than the synovial absolute WBC count. This was true in both the general population and the immunosuppressed population.

  19. Unusual Presentation of Synovial Sarcoma as Meniscal Cyst: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Jamshidi, Khodamorad; Yahyazadeh, Hooman; Bagherifard, Abolfazl

    2015-01-01

    Periarticular cyst and cystic soft tissue lesion around the knee are common. Synovial sarcoma is a rare and malignant soft tissue tumor accounting for approximately 5% of soft tissue sarcoma. A case is presented where a lesion adjacent to the joint line of the knee was diagnosed clinically and on imaging as a meniscal cyst. MRI signal was homogenous and no concomitant meniscal tears were seen. The tissue diagnosis was monophasic synovial sarcoma. PMID:26550597

  20. Recurrent Primary Synovial Sarcoma of Median Nerve: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Bhat, A K; Jayakrishnan, K N; Acharya, A M

    2016-10-01

    We report a case of intraneural synovial sarcoma of the median nerve in a 39 year old lady with multiple local recurrences over thirteen years with no distant metastasis. The diagnosis of biphasic type of synovial sarcoma was confirmed by histopathology and immunohistochemistry. At the time of the fourth recurrence below elbow amputation was performed. This case is being reported for its rarity and propensity for local recurrence without distant metastasis. PMID:27595961

  1. Comparing the mechanical properties of the porcine knee meniscus when hydrated in saline versus synovial fluid.

    PubMed

    Lakes, Emily H; Kline, Courtney L; McFetridge, Peter S; Allen, Kyle D

    2015-12-16

    As research progresses to find a suitable knee meniscus replacement, accurate in vitro testing becomes critical for feasibility and comparison studies of mechanical integrity. Within the knee, the meniscus is bathed in synovial fluid, yet the most common hydration fluid in laboratory testing is phosphate buffered saline (PBS). PBS is a relatively simple salt solution, while synovial fluid is a complex non-Newtonian fluid with multiple lubricating factors. As such, PBS may interact with meniscal tissue differently than synovial fluid, and thus, the hydration fluid may be an important factor in obtaining accurate results during in vitro testing. To evaluate these effects, medial porcine menisci were used to evaluate tissue mechanics in tension (n=11) and compression (n=15). In all tests, two samples from the same meniscus were taken, where one sample was hydrated in PBS and the other was hydrated in synovial fluid. Statistical analysis revealed no significant differences between the mean mechanical properties of samples tested in PBS compared to synovial fluid; however, compressive testing revealed the variability between samples was significantly reduced if samples were tested in synovial fluid. For example, the compressive Young׳s Modulus was 12.69±7.49MPa in PBS versus 12.34±4.27MPa in synovial fluid. These results indicate testing meniscal tissue in PBS will largely not affect the mean value of the mechanical properties, but performing compression testing in synovial fluid may provide more consistent results between samples and assist in reducing sample numbers in some experiments.

  2. Recurrent Primary Synovial Sarcoma of Median Nerve: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Bhat, A K; Jayakrishnan, K N; Acharya, A M

    2016-10-01

    We report a case of intraneural synovial sarcoma of the median nerve in a 39 year old lady with multiple local recurrences over thirteen years with no distant metastasis. The diagnosis of biphasic type of synovial sarcoma was confirmed by histopathology and immunohistochemistry. At the time of the fourth recurrence below elbow amputation was performed. This case is being reported for its rarity and propensity for local recurrence without distant metastasis.

  3. Comparing the mechanical properties of the porcine knee meniscus when hydrated in saline versus synovial fluid.

    PubMed

    Lakes, Emily H; Kline, Courtney L; McFetridge, Peter S; Allen, Kyle D

    2015-12-16

    As research progresses to find a suitable knee meniscus replacement, accurate in vitro testing becomes critical for feasibility and comparison studies of mechanical integrity. Within the knee, the meniscus is bathed in synovial fluid, yet the most common hydration fluid in laboratory testing is phosphate buffered saline (PBS). PBS is a relatively simple salt solution, while synovial fluid is a complex non-Newtonian fluid with multiple lubricating factors. As such, PBS may interact with meniscal tissue differently than synovial fluid, and thus, the hydration fluid may be an important factor in obtaining accurate results during in vitro testing. To evaluate these effects, medial porcine menisci were used to evaluate tissue mechanics in tension (n=11) and compression (n=15). In all tests, two samples from the same meniscus were taken, where one sample was hydrated in PBS and the other was hydrated in synovial fluid. Statistical analysis revealed no significant differences between the mean mechanical properties of samples tested in PBS compared to synovial fluid; however, compressive testing revealed the variability between samples was significantly reduced if samples were tested in synovial fluid. For example, the compressive Young׳s Modulus was 12.69±7.49MPa in PBS versus 12.34±4.27MPa in synovial fluid. These results indicate testing meniscal tissue in PBS will largely not affect the mean value of the mechanical properties, but performing compression testing in synovial fluid may provide more consistent results between samples and assist in reducing sample numbers in some experiments. PMID:26592438

  4. Human epidermal growth factor for the stratification of synovial lining layer and neovascularisation in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Shiozawa, S; Shiozawa, K; Tanaka, Y; Morimoto, I; Uchihashi, M; Fujita, T; Hirohata, K; Hirata, Y; Imura, S

    1989-01-01

    Immunohistochemical study showed selective localisation of human epidermal growth factor (hEGF) to the synovial lining layer. Although the synovial lining layer of the rheumatoid, osteoarthritic, and traumatic joints was hEGF positive, hEGF staining was especially dense at the rheumatoid synovial lining layer; the staining increasing linearly according to the degree of stratification of the lining layer (r = 1). Human epidermal growth factor was ultrastructurally localised to cytoplasm, especially to rough endoplasmic reticulum, of the synovial lining fibroblast-like (type B) cell. Only the cell surface of macrophage-like (type A) cells was hEGF positive. When different histological variables were compared with each other a positive correlation was found between hEGF staining of the synovial lining layer and the degree of neovascularisation of rheumatoid synovium (r = 0.72). Although some lymphocytes were weakly hEGF positive, neovascularisation did not correlate with the extent of lymphocyte infiltration or of hEGF staining of lymphocytes. Lymphocyte infiltration or hEGF staining of lymphocytes did not correlate with hEGF staining of the synovial lining layer, whereas the lymphocyte infiltration correlated positively with the extent of perivascular accumulation of lymphocytes (r = 0.89). These findings suggest that (a) hEGF is synthesised by and secreted through endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus from the synovial lining type B cell; (b) hEGF is at least partially responsible for the pathogenesis of stratification of the rheumatoid synovial lining layer, and perhaps of neovascularisation of the rheumatoid synovium, whereas it is not responsible for lymphocyte accumulation to the rheumatoid synovium. Images PMID:2479344

  5. Unusual Presentation of Synovial Sarcoma as Meniscal Cyst: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Jamshidi, Khodamorad; Yahyazadeh, Hooman; Bagherifard, Abolfazl

    2015-10-01

    Periarticular cyst and cystic soft tissue lesion around the knee are common. Synovial sarcoma is a rare and malignant soft tissue tumor accounting for approximately 5% of soft tissue sarcoma. A case is presented where a lesion adjacent to the joint line of the knee was diagnosed clinically and on imaging as a meniscal cyst. MRI signal was homogenous and no concomitant meniscal tears were seen. The tissue diagnosis was monophasic synovial sarcoma.

  6. Influence of Anti-inflammatory Drugs on the Rheological Properties of Synovial Fluid and Its Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Wendy E.; Klossner, Rebecca R.; Liang, Jing; Colby, Ralph H.

    2006-03-01

    The polyelectrolyte hyaluronic acid (HA, hyaluronan), its interactions with anti-inflammatory drugs and other biopolymers, and its role in synovial fluid are being studied. We are investigating the rheological properties of sodium hyaluronate (NaHA) solutions and an experimental model of synovial fluid (comprised of NaHA, and the plasma proteins albumin and γ-globulins). Steady shear measurements on bovine synovial fluid, the synovial fluid model, and plasma protein solutions indicate that the fluids are rheopectic (stress increases with time under steady shear). In addition, the influence of anti-inflammatory agents on these solutions is being explored. Initial results indicate that D-penicillamine and hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) affect the rheology of the synovial fluid model and its components. While HCQ has no effect on the viscosity of NaHA solutions, it inhibits/suppresses the observed rheopexy of the synovial fluid model and plasma protein solutions. In contrast, D-penicillamine has a complex, time dependent effect on the viscosity of NaHA solutions,---reducing the zero shear rate viscosity of a 3 mg/mL NaHA (in phosphate buffered saline) by ca. 40% after 44 days. The potential implications of these results will be discussed.

  7. Arthroscopic treatment of synovial osteochondromatosis of the elbow. Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Terra, Bernardo Barcellos; Moraes, Eduardo Wanzenboeck; de Souza, Alceuleir Cardoso; Cavatte, José Maria; Teixeira, João Carlos de Medeiros; De Nadai, Anderson

    2015-01-01

    Synovial osteochondromatosis is a benign proliferative disorder with metaplasia of the synovial membrane that affects the fibroblasts of the synovial joints, tendons and bursae. In literature, there are few descriptions of synovial osteochondromatosis of the elbow. The objective of this article was to report a case of synovial osteochondromatosis of the elbow in a patient aged 32, basketball athlete, in which surgical treatment was chosen because of the pain and functional limitation and stage of disease with multiple loose bodies. Patient 32, male, presented with pain and limitation of motion of the elbow. The range of passive motion was 100° of flexion and 30° extension. The range of active motion was 40-90°. Magnetic resonance observed many loose bodies mainly in the posterior compartment in the olecranon fossa plus some chondral lesions in the capitellum. The arthroscopic treatment was chosen with two anteriors portals (medial and lateral) and two posterior portals (standard posterior and posterolateral) for easing loose bodies and osteoplasty of the olecranon fossa. The visual analog scale pain was 9-3 and its arc of active motion was 110° to -20° of flexion and extension. On a scale of performance from Mayo Clinic patients was 65 points preoperatively to 90 postoperatively with 9 months follow-up and the patient was satisfied with the treatment outcome. Arthroscopic treatment of synovial osteochondromatosis of the elbow is an effective and safe therapeutic management with low morbidity and early return to activities.

  8. Clonal heterogeneity of synovial fluid T lymphocytes from patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Duby, A.D.; Sinclair, A.K.; Osborne-Lawrence, S.L. ); Zeldes, W.; Kan, Li; Fox, D.A. )

    1989-08-01

    Although substantial evidence suggests that synovial T lymphocytes are critical in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), little is known regarding their antigenic specificities, antigen receptor gene rearrangements, and mechanisms of activation. To assess the extend of expansion of specific clones among RA synovial fluid T cells, Southern blot analyses of T-cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangements were performed on 40 RA synovial fluid T-cell clones, as well as on fresh and polyclonally activated T cells from RA synovial fluid, RA peripheral blood, and normal peripheral blood. Two of the clones had identical TCR rearrangement patterns, but the remainder were unique. The nonclonal RA T-cell samples showed the same pattern of TCR {beta}-chain rearrangement that was observed among normal peripheral blood T cells, indicating no dominant clonal T-cell population in these samples. It was noted that with sufficient exposure of autoradiograms of the Southern blots, discrete TCR gene rearrangements, representing in some cases common D{sub {beta}}J{sub {beta}} (D, diversity; J, joining) rearrangements, were evident in T cells from peripheral blood of normal individuals and patients with RA, as well as T cells from RA synovial fluid. Taken together, the findings indicate that only a minor degree of oligoclonality can be demonstrated among T lymphocytes from RA synovial fluid.

  9. Synovial fluid lubrication of artificial joints: protein film formation and composition.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jingyun; Myant, Connor; Underwood, Richard; Cann, Philippa

    2012-01-01

    Despite design improvements, wear of artificial implants remains a serious health issue particularly for Metal-on-Metal (MoM) hips where the formation of metallic wear debris has been linked to adverse tissue response. Clearly it is important to understand the fundamental lubrication mechanisms which control the wear process. It is usually assumed that MoM hips operate in the ElastoHydrodynamic Lubrication (EHL) regime where film formation is governed by the bulk fluid viscosity; however there is little experimental evidence of this. The current paper critically examines synovial fluid lubrication mechanisms and the effect of synovial fluid chemistry. Two composition parameters were chosen; protein content and pH, both of which are known to change in diseased or post-operative synovial fluid. Film thickness and wear tests were carried out for a series of model synovial fluid solutions. Two distinct film formation mechanisms were identified; an adsorbed surface film and a high-viscosity gel. The entrainment of this gel controls film formation particularly at low speeds. However wear of the femoral head still occurs and this is thought to be due primarily to a tribo-corrosion mechanisms. The implications of this new lubrication mechanism and the effect of different synovial fluid chemistries are examined. One important conclusion is that patient synovial fluid chemistry plays an important role in determining implant wear and the likelihood of failure.

  10. Synovial effusion and synovial fluid biomarkers in psoriatic arthritis to assess intraarticular tumor necrosis factor-α blockade in the knee joint

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study was theevaluation of synovial effusion (SE), synovial fluid (SF) and synovial tissue (ST) biomarkers in relation to disease activity indexes to assess the response to intraarticular (IA) tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α blockers in psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Methods Systemic and local disease activity indexes (disease activity score (DAS); the Ritchie articular index (mRAI), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP); Thompson articular (THOMP) and joint articular (KJAI)-Index ) and ST samples were assessed at baseline, throughout treatment, and during the follow-up in 14 patients affected with PsA who underwent IA injections (0.5 ml to 12.5 mg) in the knee joint of etanercept (E) or placebo (P) once every two weeks for a 10-week period. Total SF white blood cell (WBC) counts (WBC/μl) and SF cytokine/chemokine (CK/CCK) levels were measured before IA-E at baseline, after IA-E, and as long as there were adequate amounts of SF for knee aspiration (post). Characterization of synovial mononuclear cell infiltration and synovial vessels was carried out in 8 out of 14 knees by staining serial sections of synovial tissue biopsies for CD45, CD3, CD68, CD31 and CD105. Results At baseline, CRP and/or ESR were significantly correlated with SF-CK (interleukin- (IL-)1β, IL-1Ra, IL-6, IL-8) and CCK (CCL3). Post-IA injections, there was a decrease in SE in the knees in which aspiration following IA-E injection was possible as well as a significant reduction in SF WBC/μl and in SF-CK (IL-1β, IL-1Ra, IL-6 and IL-22). Pre- and post-IA-E injections, there were significant correlations between ST markers and SF-CK (IL-1β with CD45; IL-1β and IL-6 with CD31) and between SF-CCK (CCL4 and CCL3 with CD3). At the end of the study, there was a significant reduction in disease activity indexes (CRP, DAS, RAI, THOMP, KJAI) as well as in the ST markers (CD45; CD3). Conclusions Synovial effusion regression is a reliable indicator

  11. Creating new realities: program development and dissemination.

    PubMed Central

    Fixsen, D L; Blase, K A

    1993-01-01

    Program development and dissemination in human services present challenges and opportunities for social scientists. Over the past 27 years the Teaching-Family Model of group home treatment has moved from prototype development to widespread dissemination across North America. Reviewing concepts in industry related to product development and dissemination, the application of these concepts to a human services delivery system, and program replication and dissemination data offer information about how innovative human services can be widely adapted and adopted. PMID:8307838

  12. [Treatment of disseminated breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Mattson, Johanna; Huovinen, Riikka

    2015-01-01

    Although several effective drugs have in recent years been introduced for the treatment of disseminated breast cancer, it is still an incurable illness. Many patients live a fairly normal life with their illness for a long time, and some of them are able to continue working in spite of the therapies. Factors considered in tailoring the treatment include tumor subtype, extent of the disease, symptoms, previous treatments and the achieved treatment outcome, and adverse effects of the treatments. PMID:26245064

  13. Disseminated sporotrichosis in an immunocompetent patient

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Kareem; Turker, Tolga; Zangeneh, Tirdad

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Sporothrix schenckii, the causative agent of sporotrichosis, is a relatively rare infection. Local infection usually occurs through direct inoculation of the organism through the skin; disseminated disease is rarely seen. This article describes a case of disseminated sporotrichosis in a middle-aged man without the commonly seen risk factors for dissemination. PMID:27583270

  14. Disseminated sporotrichosis in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Kareem; Turker, Tolga; Zangeneh, Tirdad

    2016-01-01

    Sporothrix schenckii, the causative agent of sporotrichosis, is a relatively rare infection. Local infection usually occurs through direct inoculation of the organism through the skin; disseminated disease is rarely seen. This article describes a case of disseminated sporotrichosis in a middle-aged man without the commonly seen risk factors for dissemination. PMID:27583270

  15. Federal Mechanisms to Support Intervention Dissemination.

    PubMed

    Diana, Augusto; Bennett, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines federal mechanisms that support program developers and researchers in disseminating effective interventions for public benefit. The purpose of this paper is not to discuss the dissemination of intervention research (i.e., how to inform stakeholders about research findings), nor is it intended to discuss the research of intervention dissemination (i.e., what is the best approach to disseminate an intervention). Rather, the paper discusses the challenges specific to finding pathways to disseminate an intervention and describes federal opportunities to support intervention dissemination. Three specific mechanisms are discussed: Federal Registries of Evidence-Based Programs, the Tiered Evidence Grant Programs, and the Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) and the Small Technology Transfer Research (STTR) programs. The article presents some limitations associated with federal mechanisms for dissemination of effective interventions, but is intended to highlight current and future opportunities they may offer. PMID:26375192

  16. Insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor acts as a growth regulator in synovial sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Friedrichs, N; Küchler, J; Endl, E; Koch, A; Czerwitzki, J; Wurst, P; Metzger, D; Schulte, J H; Holst, M I; Heukamp, L C; Larsson, O; Tanaka, S; Kawai, A; Wardelmann, E; Buettner, R; Pietsch, T; Hartmann, W

    2008-12-01

    Synovial sarcomas account for 5-10% of all soft tissue sarcomas and the majority of synovial sarcomas display characteristic t(X;18) translocations that result in enhanced transcription of the insulin-like growth factor-2 (IGF-2) gene. IGF-2 is an essential fetal mitogen involved in the pathogenesis of different tumours, leading to cellular proliferation and inhibition of apoptosis. Here we asked whether activation of IGF signalling is of functional importance in synovial sarcomas. We screened human synovial sarcomas for expression of IGF-2 and the phosphorylated IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R), which mainly mediates the proliferative and anti-apoptotic effects of IGF-2. Since both the phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase (PI3K)-AKT pathway and the MAPK signalling cascade are known to be involved in the transmission of IGF-1R signals, expression of phosphorylated (p)-AKT and p-p44/42 MAPK was additionally assessed. All tumours expressed IGF-2 and 78% showed an activated IGF-1R. All tumours were found to express p-AKT and 92% showed expression of activated p44/42 MAPK. To analyse the functional and potential therapeutic relevance of IGF-1R signalling, synovial sarcoma cell lines were treated with the IGF-1R inhibitor NVP-AEW541. Growth was impaired by the IGF-1R antagonist, which was consistently accompanied by a dose-dependent reduction of phosphorylation of AKT and p44/42 MAPK. Functionally, inhibition of the receptor led to increased apoptosis and diminished mitotic activity. Concurrent exposure of selected cells to NVP-AEW541 and conventional chemotherapeutic agents resulted in positive interactions. Finally, synovial sarcoma cell migration was found to be dependent on signals transmitted by the IGF-1R. In summary, our data show that the IGF-1R might represent a promising therapeutic target in synovial sarcomas.

  17. Synovial fluid dynamics with small disc perforation in temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y; Zhan, J; Zheng, Y; Han, Y; Zhang, Z; Xi, Y; Zhu, P

    2012-10-01

    The articular disc plays an important role as a stress absorber in joint movement, resulting in stress reduction and redistribution in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The flow of synovial fluid in the TMJ may follow a regular pattern during movement of the jaw. We hypothesised that the regular pattern is disrupted when the TMJ disc is perforated. By computed tomography arthrography, we studied the upper TMJ compartment in patients with small disc perforation during jaw opening-closing at positions from 0 to 3 cm. Finite element fluid dynamic modelling was accomplished to analyse the pattern of fluid flow and pressure distribution during the movements. The results showed that the fluid flow in the upper compartment generally formed an anticlockwise circulation but with local vortexes with the jaw opening up to 2 cm. However, when the jaw opening-closing reached 3 cm, an abnormal flow field and the fluid pressure change associated with the perforation may increase the risk of perforation expansion or rupture and is unfavourable for self-repair of the perforated disc. PMID:22582815

  18. Next generation sequencing in synovial sarcoma reveals novel gene mutations

    PubMed Central

    Vlenterie, Myrella; Hillebrandt-Roeffen, Melissa H.S.; Flucke, Uta E.; Groenen, Patricia J.T.A.; Tops, Bastiaan B.J.; Kamping, Eveline J.; Pfundt, Rolph; de Bruijn, Diederik R.H.; van Kessel, Ad H.M. Geurts; van Krieken, Han J.H.J.M.; van der Graaf, Winette T.A.; Versleijen-Jonkers, Yvonne M.H.

    2015-01-01

    Over 95% of all synovial sarcomas (SS) share a unique translocation, t(X;18), however, they show heterogeneous clinical behavior. We analyzed multiple SS to reveal additional genetic alterations besides the translocation. Twenty-six SS from 22 patients were sequenced for 409 cancer-related genes using the Comprehensive Cancer Panel (Life Technologies, USA) on an Ion Torrent platform. The detected variants were verified by Sanger sequencing and compared to matched normal DNAs. Copy number variation was assessed in six tumors using the Oncoscan array (Affymetrix, USA). In total, eight somatic mutations were detected in eight samples. These mutations have not been reported previously in SS. Two of these, in KRAS and CCND1, represent known oncogenic mutations in other malignancies. Additional mutations were detected in RNF213, SEPT9, KDR, CSMD3, MLH1 and ERBB4. DNA alterations occurred more often in adult tumors. A distinctive loss of 6q was found in a metastatic lesion progressing under pazopanib, but not in the responding lesion. Our results emphasize t(X;18) as a single initiating event in SS and as the main oncogenic driver. Our results also show the occurrence of additional genetic events, mutations or chromosomal aberrations, occurring more frequently in SS with an onset in adults. PMID:26415226

  19. Progressive growth of primary synovial sarcoma of the lung.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Jun; Yokomise, Hiroyasu; Huang, Cheng-Long; Misaki, Noriyuki; Chang, Sung-Soo; Okuda, Masaya; Kushida, Yoshio; Haba, Reiji

    2010-06-01

    An 80-year-old male was admitted because of a giant mass in the left lower lobe of the lung on a routine chest X-ray. Chest computed tomography verified this to be a well-defined heterogeneous mass as described with no associated lymphadenopathy. FDG-PET depicted moderately marginal FDG uptake. The patient underwent a left lower lobectomy and lymphadenectomy. Grossly, the tumor measured 60 × 50 mm and was uniformly filled with a pure white, pudding-like friable substance. No lymph node metastasis was observed microscopically. Histologically, the tumor showed a dense proliferation of rounded or spindled malignant cells with a frequent mitotic activity and an increased nuclear-to-cytoplasmic ratio. The immunohistochemical staining was positive for vimentin, negative for cytokeratin, keratin-wide, EMA, CD34. A SYT-SSX2 fusion gene transcript was detected as a result of RT-PCR analysis. Because of these results, the tumor was diagnosed as a monophasic synovial sarcoma.

  20. Cutaneous Metaplastic Synovial Cyst: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Kermani, Hamed; Dehghani, Nima; Dehghani, Siavash; Behnia, Hossein; Pourdanesh, Fereydoun; Mohajerani, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Cutaneous metaplastic synovial cyst (CMSC) is a rare cutaneous lesion characterized by a tender subcutaneous nodule, which usually occurs at the site of previous surgical or local trauma. Histologically, the lesion includes a cystic structure with villous-like projections and a lining mimicking hyperplastic synovium. Case Presentation: We reported the first case of CMSC which developed at the surgical incision site of treatment of a maxillofacial fracture. In addition, we reviewed English literature to evaluate all previously reported CMSC cases and discussed its clinical and histopathological features and etiology. From 1987 to now, reviewing the English literature about CMSC includes 17 studies that described 28 cases, and our presented case was the 29th. There was no sex predilection and age of patients ranged from 7 to 82 years, but most of them were over 40 years. We can see this lesion in any site of the body and hand/arm is the most prevalent involved region (28% cases). Most of the patients had a history of previous local trauma or operation in the involved area. Conclusions: Although the actual etiology of CMSC remains unclear, trauma, as the most probable etiologic factor, plays a role in development of CMSC. Surgical excision of the lesion is the preferable treatment choice and rate of recurrence is low. PMID:26756011

  1. Fibrinolysis in disseminated intravascular coagulation.

    PubMed

    Hack, C E

    2001-12-01

    Studies in experimental models for sepsis, the most common cause of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), have put forward the concept of a procoagulant state that is characterized by thrombin generation exceeding that of plasmin. Convincing evidence indicates that this imbalance between coagulation and fibrinolysis is due to increased levels of plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1). Levels of this fibrinolysis inhibitor indeed correlate with outcome and severity of multiple organ failure in patients with sepsis, as well as in patients with DIC from other causes. Hence we suggest that PAI-1 constitutes an important target for therapy in patients with DIC.

  2. [Two cases of disseminated toxoplasmosis].

    PubMed

    Stief, B; Kiesow, C; Ellenberger, C

    2012-01-01

    Two cases of disseminated fatal toxoplasmosis of a pet mouse and a red panda are described. The pet mouse had a private owner; the red panda lived in a zoological garden in Saxony. At necropsy, both animals suffered from a systemic toxoplasmosis. A severe necrotizing hepatitis was the main histological feature in both animals. Parasitic cysts could be abundantly found in the liver, moderately in the brain and in a low number in other organs. With the PAS-reaction, cysts showed a weak staining in the mouse and a strong staining in the red panda. Diagnosis was confirmed by PCR and immunohistochemistry.

  3. Disseminated histoplasmosis and necrotizing vasculitis.

    PubMed Central

    Small, P.; Levitt, P.

    1976-01-01

    A 74-year-old man with congestive heart failure was found to have Histoplasma capsulatum in a lesion of the right nasal septum. His initial treatment with amphotericin B was inadequate because of severe intolerance to the drug. Three months after initial presentation H. capsulatum was detected in his blood and bone marrow. Slightly elevated purpuric lesions on the arms, lower legs and trunk showed the typical features of necrotizing vasculitis. Cutaneous anergy was reversed after treatment with transfer factor. Skin involvement in disseminated histoplasmosis is unusual and there are no previous reports of vasculitis associated with this infection. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 PMID:1253047

  4. Intra-Articular Synovial Sarcomas: Incidence and Differentiating Features from Localized Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis

    PubMed Central

    Nordemar, D.; Öberg, J.; Brosjö, O.; Skorpil, M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the incidence of intra-articular synovial sarcomas and investigate if any radiological variables can differentiate them from localized (unifocal) pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) and if multivariate data analysis could be used as a complementary clinical tool. Methods. Magnetic resonance images and radiographs of 7 cases of intra-articular synovial sarcomas and 14 cases of localized PVNS were blindedly reviewed. Variables analyzed were size, extra-articular growth, tumor border, blooming, calcification, contrast media enhancement, effusion, bowl of grapes sign, triple signal intensity sign, synovial low signal intensity, synovitis, age, and gender. Univariate and multivariate data analysis, the method of partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), were used. Register data on all synovial sarcomas were extracted for comparison. Results. The incidence of intra-articular synovial sarcomas was 3%. PLS-DA showed that age, effusion, size, and gender were the most important factors for discrimination between sarcomas and localized PVNS. No sarcomas were misclassified as PVNS with PLS-DA, while some PVNS were misclassified as sarcomas. Conclusions. The most important variables in differentiating intra-articular sarcomas from localized PVNS were age, effusion, size, and gender. Multivariate data analysis can be helpful as additive information to avoid a biopsy, if the tumor is classified as most likely being PVNS. PMID:26819567

  5. The Zinc Finger Transcription Factors Osr1 and Osr2 Control Synovial Joint Formation

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yang; Lan, Yu; Liu, Han; Jiang, Rulang

    2011-01-01

    Synovial joints enable smooth articulations between different skeletal elements and are essential for the motility of vertebrates. Despite decades of extensive studies of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of limb and skeletal development, the molecular mechanisms governing synovial joint formation are still poorly understood. In particular, whereas several signaling pathways have been shown to play critical roles in joint maintenance, the mechanism controlling joint initiation is unknown. Here we report that Osr1 and Osr2, the mammalian homologs of the odd-skipped family of zinc finger transcription factors that are required for leg joint formation in Drosophila, are both strongly expressed in the developing synovial joint cells in mice. Whereas Osr1−/− mutant mice died at midgestation and Osr2−/− mutant mice had only subtle defects in synovial joint development, tissue-specific inactivation of Osr1 in the developing limb mesenchyme in Osr2−/− mutant mice caused fusion of multiple joints. We found that Osr1 and Osr2 function is required for maintenance of expression of signaling molecules critical for joint formation, including Gdf5, Wnt4 and Wnt9b. In addition, joint cells in the double mutants failed to upregulate expression of the articular cartilage marker gene Prg4. These data indicate that Osr1 and Osr2 function redundantly to control synovial joint formation. PMID:21262216

  6. Differential expression of the urokinase receptor (CD87) in arthritic and normal synovial tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Szekanecz, Z; Haines, G K; Koch, A E

    1997-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (u-PAR; CD87) exhibits a possible pathogenic role in rheumatoid and osteoarthritis. METHODS: A semiquantitative, indirect immunoperoxidase histochemical analysis was performed on frozen synovial tissue sections. The recently characterised monoclonal antibody 10G7 recognising transfectants bearing u-PAR was used. Synovial tissue was obtained from 10 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, 10 patients with osteoarthritis, and four normal subjects. RESULTS: u-PAR was expressed on 70-90% of synovial tissue lining cells and subsynovial, interstitial macrophages from the arthritis patients, but only on a few myeloid cells from the normal subjects. It was also present on more endothelial cells from the rheumatoid and osteoarthritis patients, than from normal synovial tissue. CONCLUSIONS: Plasminogen activators are important in joint destruction underlying arthritis. The up-regulated expression of u-PAR in diseased versus normal synovial tissue suggests a role for this antigen in the inflammatory and angiogenic mechanisms underlying rheumatoid and osteoarthritis. Images PMID:9215148

  7. Functional capacities of T lymphocyte subsets from synovial fluid and blood in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, J

    1986-01-01

    A reverse haemolytic plaque forming cell (PFC) assay was employed to analyse the impact of T suppressor/cytotoxic and T helper cells on B cell function in 10 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In all cases T8-enriched cells from synovial fluid and blood suppressed the pokeweed mitogen (PWM) induced IgM, IgG, and IgA secretion by autologous lymphocytes to the same degree. The suppression was partly abolished by irradiation of T8-enriched cells. T4-enriched cells from blood increased the PWM induced Ig secretion by autologous blood B cells. In six of 10 patients responses 1.2 to four times higher were obtained with T4-enriched cells from synovial fluid, but in four of 10 patients synovial fluid T4-enriched cells did not increase the PWM responses of blood B cells. T4- and T8-enriched T cells from synovial fluid comprised more Ia+ cells than did T cells from blood (36% v 3% and 43% v 6%). Ia+ T helper and suppressor/cytotoxic cells may modulate in vivo activation of synovial B cells in RA. PMID:2943237

  8. Determination of lead in paired samples of human blood and synovial fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Villegas-Navarro, A.; Rosales, D.; Bustos, E.; Reyes, R.; Reyes, J.L.; Dieck, T.A.; Heredia, A. )

    1992-09-01

    In spite of the numerous papers published on the toxicity of lead in mammals, little is known about its effects in synovial fluid and bone joints. Our literature search showed a lack of quantitative studies regarding the concentration of lead in human synovial fluid; in addition, normal values regarding the threshold for poisoning by lead in that fluid are unknown. The available literature published corresponds to samples of human wounds by lead bullets localized close to or in a joint. Some of those papers dealing with lead-induced arthritis include symptoms of plumbism. They clearly demonstrate the ability of synovial fluid to dissolve lead and thereby make it available for systemic absorption. The molecular mechanism whereby this process is performed is still unknown, although it would be of interest because of its possible relationship with joint pain, a common problem in patients with lead poisoning that so far has not been fully explained. In a series of experiments with cattle, we found an average ratio of lead between synovial fluid and blood for paired observations of 4.2, although we have not found similar reports, and there is not sufficient information to make a total interpretation of these data. The purpose of this study was to determine the concentration of lead in synovial fluid and blood of corpses and to establish a possible numerical relationship between those two variables. 19 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  9. [LE cells in synovial fluid: prevalence and diagnostic usefulness in rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Puszczewicz, Mariusz; Białkowska-Puszczewicz, Grazyna

    2010-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of LE cells in synovial fluid and their importance for the diagnosis of rheumatic disease. Synovial fluid was obtained from 631 patients: 31 with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 337 with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 4 with Still's disease, 9 with systemic scleroderma (SS), 27 with the overlap syndrome (RA/SLE), 132 with ankylosing spondylitis (AS), 57 with Reiter's syndrome, and 34 with psoriatic arthritis (PA). The fluid was centrifuged, precipitate smears were done and were May-Grünwald-Giemsa stained for cytologic assessment. The supernatant was collected for antinuclear antibody (ANA) testing. Physicochemical and serologic properties of the synovial fluid were routinely determined. All synovial fluids demonstrated signs of inflammation. The presence of LE cells was ascertained in five patients with SLE and nine patients with the overlap syndrome. In these cases, LE cells were accompanied by ANA. In addition, hematoxylin bodies were revealed in SLE patients. LE cells were observed in 2.6% of patients with RA but were not accompanied by ANA. Patients with SS, Still's disease, AS, Reiter's syndrome, and PA tested negative for LE cells. It appears from these results that LE cells are rarely present in the synovial fluid of patients with rheumatic diseases. In contrast, they occur in more than 40% of patients with the overlap syndrome and may thus be regarded as important for the diagnosis of this condition. PMID:21365954

  10. Joint aspiration and injection and synovial fluid analysis.

    PubMed

    Courtney, Philip; Doherty, Michael

    2009-04-01

    Joint aspiration/injection and synovial fluid (SF) analysis are both invaluable procedures for the diagnosis and treatment of joint disease. This chapter addresses: (1) the indications, the technical principles and the expected benefits and risks of aspiration and injection of intra-articular corticosteroid; and (2) practical aspects relating to SF analysis, especially in relation to crystal identification. Intra-articular injection of long-acting insoluble corticosteroids is a well-established procedure that produces rapid pain relief and resolution of inflammation in most injected joints. The knee is the most common site to require aspiration, although any non-axial joint is accessible for obtaining SF. The technique requires a knowledge of basic anatomy and should not be unduly painful for the patient. Provided sterile equipment and a sensible, aseptic approach are used, it is very safe. Analysis of aspirated SF is helpful in the differential diagnosis of arthritis and is the definitive method for diagnosis of septic arthritis and crystal arthritis. The gross appearance of SF can provide useful diagnostic information in terms of the degree of joint inflammation and presence of haemarthrosis. Microbiological studies of SF are the key to the confirmation of infectious conditions. Increasing joint inflammation is associated with increased SF volume, reduced viscosity, increasing turbidity and cell count, and increasing ratio of polymorphonuclear: mononuclear cells, but such changes are non-specific and must be interpreted in the clinical setting. However, detection of SF monosodium urate and calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals, even from un-inflamed joints during intercritical periods, allow a precise diagnosis of gout and of calcium pyrophosphate crystal-related arthritis. PMID:19393565

  11. Identification of link proteins in canine synovial cell cultures and canine articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    Link proteins are glycoproteins in cartilage that are involved in the stabilization of aggregates of proteoglycans and hyaluronic acid. We have identified link proteins in synovial cell cultures form normal canine synovium using sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, immunofluorescence, and immunolocation with specific antibodies by electrophoretic transfer. We have also found evidence for the synthesis of link proteins in these cultures by fluorography of radiolabeled synovial cell extracts. We have identified a 70,000 mol-wt protein in canine synovial cell culture extracts that has antigenic cross-reactivity with the 48,000-mol-wt link protein. Three link proteins were identified in normal canine articular cartilage. These results indicate that link proteins are more widely distributed in connective tissues than previously recognized and may have biological functions other than aggregate stabilization. PMID:3980578

  12. THE UPTAKE OF IRON IN RABBIT SYNOVIAL TISSUE FOLLOWING INTRA-ARTICULAR INJECTION OF IRON DEXTRAN

    PubMed Central

    Ball, J.; Chapman, J. A.; Muirden, K. D.

    1964-01-01

    Iron dextran (molecular weight 7,000) diffuses rapidly from the joint cavity through the synovium, along lymphatics and extracellular tissue spaces; articular cartilage is impermeable to iron dextran. There is also rapid cellular uptake by synovial lining cells, particularly of the vacuolar type; endoplasmic reticulum-containing lining cells rarely take up iron dextran. Cellular uptake is probably effected by pseudopodial folds projecting from the cell surface and enclosing extracellular material. Cells containing iron may degenerate and be ingested by phagocytes, and this may account for the concentration of iron in a smaller proportion of cells on or below the synovial surface in the later stages. At 6 to 18 hours after injection there is a mild inflammatory reaction and some synovial proliferation; from this stage onwards intracellular iron occurs in the form of haemosiderin. Granules of haemosiderin are present in the synovium 3 months after injection and possibly longer. PMID:14203385

  13. [The MR tomography of hemophilic osteoarthropathy with special reference to the synovial and chondrogenic changes].

    PubMed

    Erlemann, R; Pollmann, H; Vestring, T; Peters, P E

    1992-03-01

    52 knee and ankle joints of hemophiliacs were examined by MRI using FLASH and FISP-3-D sequences; and the degree of synovial hypertrophy and of cartilage destruction were assessed. Findings of synovial hypertrophy varied between thin membranes and tumorous tissue destroying the joint cartilage. Degree of cartilage destruction varied between focal signal decrease and total loss. In spite of recurrent joint bleedings no synovial or cartilaginous changes were seen in 31% and 29% of joints, respectively. Changes were more frequently seen and degree was more marked in the ankle than in the knee joints. With the exception of cysts, osseous destruction was more obvious with radiographs. MRI is suitable for the investigation of joints of hemophiliacs showing no osseous destruction. PMID:1550926

  14. Synovial Sarcoma in the Foot of a 5-Year-Old ChildA Case Report.

    PubMed

    Lepow, Gary M; Grimmer, Daniel L; Lemar, Onya V; Bridges, Evan A

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this case report is to present a rare finding of synovial sarcoma in a 5-year-old child. Most soft-tissue masses of the foot are too often presumed to be small and benign; therefore, compared with soft-tissue sarcomas, they are difficult to clinically differentiate and treat. A 5-year-old girl presented with a painful lesion that was diagnosed as synovial sarcoma after an excisional biopsy was performed. This was an unexpected finding of synovial sarcoma involving the tibialis posterior tendon of her right foot. The patient presented with an 8-month history of tenderness and an antalgic gait. We would like to encourage that all soft-tissue tumors of the foot be preoperatively evaluated with the aid of diagnostic imaging so that a well-planned biopsy assessment can be performed, with adequate margins excised.

  15. Synovial cyst of lumbar spine presenting as disc disease: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Reddy, P; Satyanarayana, S; Nanda, A

    2000-11-01

    Synovial cysts most commonly involve the joints of the extremities. These cysts are rarely found in the spinal canal or the vertebral facet joints. However, if manifested as such, they can pose serious diagnostic and therapeutic problems due to the presentation, which most often resembles nerve root or spinal cord compression. Acute low back pain and radiculopathy are often attributed to a herniated nucleus pulposus. This paper presents a case of synovial cyst in a 62-year-old woman with a 2-year history of refractory low back pain with distal radiation. A facet joint cyst was encountered upon neuroimaging, resulting in excision of the cyst. In this report, we discuss the differential diagnosis of synovial cysts, the role of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis, and treatment options for this uncommon entity. PMID:11125509

  16. Synovial Sarcoma in the Foot of a 5-Year-Old ChildA Case Report.

    PubMed

    Lepow, Gary M; Grimmer, Daniel L; Lemar, Onya V; Bridges, Evan A

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this case report is to present a rare finding of synovial sarcoma in a 5-year-old child. Most soft-tissue masses of the foot are too often presumed to be small and benign; therefore, compared with soft-tissue sarcomas, they are difficult to clinically differentiate and treat. A 5-year-old girl presented with a painful lesion that was diagnosed as synovial sarcoma after an excisional biopsy was performed. This was an unexpected finding of synovial sarcoma involving the tibialis posterior tendon of her right foot. The patient presented with an 8-month history of tenderness and an antalgic gait. We would like to encourage that all soft-tissue tumors of the foot be preoperatively evaluated with the aid of diagnostic imaging so that a well-planned biopsy assessment can be performed, with adequate margins excised. PMID:27489968

  17. Disseminated intravascular coagulation in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Zeerleder, Sacha; Hack, C Erik; Wuillemin, Walter A

    2005-10-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation is a frequent complication of sepsis. Coagulation activation, inhibition of fibrinolysis, and consumption of coagulation inhibitors lead to a procoagulant state resulting in inadequate fibrin removal and fibrin deposition in the microvasculature. As a consequence, microvascular thrombosis contributes to promotion of organ dysfunction. Recently, three randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials investigated the efficacy of antithrombin, activated protein C (APC), and tissue factor pathway inhibitor, respectively, in sepsis patients. A significant reduction in mortality was demonstrated in the APC trial. In this article, we first discuss the physiology of coagulation and fibrinolysis activation. Then, the pathophysiology of coagulation activation, consumption of coagulation inhibitors, and the inhibition of fibrinolysis leading to a procoagulant state are described in more detail. Moreover, therapeutic concepts as well as the three randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies are discussed.

  18. Weather dissemination and public usage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stacey, M. S.

    1973-01-01

    The existing public usage of weather information was examined. A survey was conducted to substantiate the general public's needs for dissemination of current (0-12 hours) weather information, needs which, in a previous study, were found to be extensive and urgent. The goal of the study was to discover how the general public obtains weather information, what information they seek and why they seek it, to what use this information is put, and to further ascertain the public's attitudes and beliefs regarding weather reporting and the diffusion of weather information. Major findings from the study include: 1. The public has a real need for weather information in the 0-6 hour bracket. 2. The visual medium is preferred but due to the lack of frequent (0-6 hours) forecasts, the audio media only, i.e., telephone recordings and radio weathercasts, were more frequently used. 3. Weather information usage is sporadic.

  19. Obstetrical disseminated intravascular coagulation score.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Takao

    2014-06-01

    Obstetrical disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is usually a very acute, serious complication of pregnancy. The obstetrical DIC score helps with making a prompt diagnosis and starting treatment early. This DIC score, in which higher scores are given for clinical parameters rather than for laboratory parameters, has three components: (i) the underlying diseases; (ii) the clinical symptoms; and (iii) the laboratory findings (coagulation tests). It is justifiably appropriate to initiate therapy for DIC when the obstetrical DIC score reaches 8 points or more before obtaining the results of coagulation tests. Improvement of blood coagulation tests and clinical symptoms are essential to the efficacy evaluation for treatment after a diagnosis of obstetrical DIC. Therefore, the efficacy evaluation criteria for obstetrical DIC are also defined to enable follow-up of the clinical efficacy of DIC therapy.

  20. Treatment of Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation.

    PubMed

    Makruasi, Nisa

    2015-11-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is a syndrome characterized by systemic activation of blood coagulation, generation of thrombin, and leading to disturbance of the microvasculature. In this article, definition and diagnostic criteria of DIC depend on the International Society of Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH). There is no gold standard for diagnosis of DIC, only low quality evidence is used in general practice. Many diagnostic tests and repeated measurement are required. For the treatment of DIC, there is no good quality evidence. The most important treatment for DIC is the specific treatment of the conditions associated DIC. Platelets and/or plasma transfusion may be also necessary if indicated. Nevertheless, there is no gold standard for diagnosis and treatment of DIC, we use only low quality evidence in general practice.

  1. NIST Mechanisms for Disseminating Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Gills, T. E.; Dittman, S.; Rumble, J. R.; Brickenkamp, C. S.; Harris, G. L.; Trahey, N. M.

    2001-01-01

    The national responsibilities assigned to the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) early in the last century for providing measurement assistance and service are carried out today by the four programs that comprise the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Office of Measurement Services (OMS). They are the Calibration Program (CP), the Standard Reference Materials Program (SRMP), the Standard Reference Data Program (SRDP), and the Weights and Measures Program (W&MP). Organized when the U.S. Congress changed the NBS name to NIST, the OMS facilitates access to the measurement and standards activities of NIST laboratories and programs through the dissemination of NIST products, data, and services. A brief historical introduction followed by a perspective of pivotal measurement developments from 1901 to the present and concluding with a look to the future of NIST measurement services in the next decade of the new millennium are presented for each OMS program. PMID:27500025

  2. Premonitory Pain Preceding Swelling: A Distinctive Clinical Presentation of Synovial Sarcoma which may Prompt Early Detection

    PubMed Central

    De Silva, M. V. Chandu; Barrett, Ann

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to document the unusual presentation of long-standing pain at the tumour site before development of a swelling in patients with synovial sarcoma. Patients/methods and results: The clinical presentation of 53 patients with synovial sarcoma was compared with 56 randomly selected patients with other sarcomas of the trunk and extremities. The two groups were similar with regard to age (P = 0.980), sex (P = 0.784) duration of symptoms (P = 0.697), size (P = 0.931) and site of tumour (P = 0.288). Sixteen (30.2%) patients with synovial sarcoma had pain before development of a swelling compared to two (3.6%) patients with other sarcomas (P < 0.001, odds ratio = 11.68, 95% confidence interval 2.53, 53.83). The mean duration of such pain was 37 months (median 24, range 6–120 months). The nature of the pain was variable. Eight patients had sharply localised tenderness. Calcification seen in the X-rays of four patients was initially misdiagnosed as benign lesions. A swelling was ultimately detected by MRI, CT, ultrasound or at physical examination. The mean duration from first presentation with pain till diagnosis of synovial sarcoma was 20 months. In three patients, at explorative surgery there was friable, vascular or necrotic tissue in the absence of a well-defined tumour mass. Discussion: The occurrence of long-standing pain at the tumour site prior to development of a swelling is significantly more common with synovial sarcomas than with other sarcomas. Awareness of this unusual presentation and appropriate investigation may enable detection of synovial sarcoma at a prognostically favourable early stage. PMID:18521377

  3. Gene Expression Profiling in Peripheral Blood Cells and Synovial Membranes of Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, Alessandro; Patuzzo, Giuseppe; Tinazzi, Elisa; Argentino, Giuseppe; Beri, Ruggero; Lunardi, Claudio; Puccetti, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Background Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an inflammatory arthritis whose pathogenesis is poorly understood; it is characterized by bone erosions and new bone formation. The diagnosis of PsA is mainly clinical and diagnostic biomarkers are not yet available. The aim of this work was to clarify some aspects of the disease pathogenesis and to identify specific gene signatures in paired peripheral blood cells (PBC) and synovial biopsies of patients with PsA. Moreover, we tried to identify biomarkers that can be used in clinical practice. Methods PBC and synovial biopsies of 10 patients with PsA were used to study gene expression using Affymetrix arrays. The expression values were validated by Q-PCR, FACS analysis and by the detection of soluble mediators. Results Synovial biopsies of patients showed a modulation of approximately 200 genes when compared to the biopsies of healthy donors. Among the differentially expressed genes we observed the upregulation of Th17 related genes and of type I interferon (IFN) inducible genes. FACS analysis confirmed the Th17 polarization. Moreover, the synovial trascriptome shows gene clusters (bone remodeling, angiogenesis and inflammation) involved in the pathogenesis of PsA. Interestingly 90 genes are modulated in both compartments (PBC and synovium) suggesting that signature pathways in PBC mirror those of the inflamed synovium. Finally the osteoactivin gene was upregulared in both PBC and synovial biopsies and this finding was confirmed by the detection of high levels of osteoactivin in PsA sera but not in other inflammatory arthritides. Conclusions We describe the first analysis of the trancriptome in paired synovial tissue and PBC of patients with PsA. This study strengthens the hypothesis that PsA is of autoimmune origin since the coactivity of IFN and Th17 pathways is typical of autoimmunity. Finally these findings have allowed the identification of a possible disease biomarker, osteoactivin, easily detectable in PsA serum. PMID

  4. Descriptions of therapeutic arthrocenthesis and of synovial fluid in a Nahuatl text from prehispanic Mexico.

    PubMed Central

    Alarcon-Segovia, D

    1980-01-01

    Paracelsus is considered to have been the first to record the viscid quality of the synovial fluid. However, his contemporary Bernardino de Sahagún, a Franciscan friar who came to Mexico shortly after the Spanish conquest, obtained from elderly Aztec Indians who spoke only Nahuatl the descriptions of therapeutic arthrocentesis and of the viscid nature of the synovial fluid. They compared the fluid from the knee joint to the viscid fluid from the leaves of the nopal cactus (Opuntia sp.). We here record their description and confirm the accuracy of their comparison. Images PMID:7416821

  5. Descriptions of therapeutic arthrocenthesis and of synovial fluid in a Nahuatl text from prehispanic Mexico.

    PubMed

    Alarcon-Segovia, D

    1980-06-01

    Paracelsus is considered to have been the first to record the viscid quality of the synovial fluid. However, his contemporary Bernardino de Sahagún, a Franciscan friar who came to Mexico shortly after the Spanish conquest, obtained from elderly Aztec Indians who spoke only Nahuatl the descriptions of therapeutic arthrocentesis and of the viscid nature of the synovial fluid. They compared the fluid from the knee joint to the viscid fluid from the leaves of the nopal cactus (Opuntia sp.). We here record their description and confirm the accuracy of their comparison.

  6. Monophasic Synovial Sarcoma of Prostatic Fascia: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Benecchi, Luigi; Corti, Serena; Del Boca, Carlo; Ferrari, Matteo; Sergio, Pietro; Bercich, Luisa; Tanzi, Giulia

    2015-01-01

    Synovial sarcoma (SS) primarily occurs in the para-articular soft tissue of the lower extremities in young adults and it is extremely rare in the prostatic region. We report a case of a 46-year-old man who presented with urinary retention. Pelvic ultrasound (US) examination, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated an 8.5 cm mass that appeared to originate in the prostatic fascia of the right lobe. Preoperative prostatic ultrasound transrectal needle biopsy revealed mesenchymal neoplastic tissue. Patient underwent surgery. The final pathologic findings were consistent with the diagnosis of monophasic synovial sarcoma. PMID:26075135

  7. A giant pleural poorly differentiated synovial sarcoma (PDSS) in a 64-year-old woman

    PubMed Central

    Chabowski, Mariusz; Janczak, Dawid; Dorobisz, Tadeusz; Leśniak, Michał; Jeleń, Michal; Janczak, Dariusz

    2016-01-01

    The article presents the rare case of a 64-year-old woman, who was admitted to our thoracic surgery department with a giant tumor in a right hemithorax measuring 88 mm × 137 mm × 188 mm, revealed by a thoracic CT scan. An anterolateral thoracotomy with a radical tumor resection was performed. The final pathological diagnosis of the poorly differentiated synovial sarcoma (PDSS) was made. The adjuvant radiotherapy of 60 Gy in 30 fractions was applied postoperatively. One year after operation patient remains in good health. The literature review on pleural synovial sarcoma has been shortly presented. PMID:27747031

  8. [Primary Synovial Sarcoma in the Anterior Mediastinum;Report of a Case].

    PubMed

    Yanagawa, Naoki; Shiono, Satoshi; Katahira, Masato; Osakabe, Mitsumasa; Abiko, Masami; Ogata, Shinya

    2016-06-01

    We report a rare case of synovial sarcoma in the anterior mediastinum. A 43-year-old man consulted our hospital with a complaint of dyspnea and chest discomfort. Chest computed tomography revealed an anterior mediastinal mass. Small open biopsy was performed, and the pathological examination revealed spindle-shaped cells with severe atypia. Tumor resection was performed. On pathology, fascicular and storiform patterns of spindle-shaped cells with severe atypia were noted. The tumor cells were positive for cytokeratin 7, vimentin, Bcl -2 and CD99, and the amplification of SYT-SSX fusion gene was also found. Therefore it was diagnosed as a synovial sarcoma.

  9. Descriptions of therapeutic arthrocenthesis and of synovial fluid in a Nahuatl text from prehispanic Mexico.

    PubMed

    Alarcon-Segovia, D

    1980-06-01

    Paracelsus is considered to have been the first to record the viscid quality of the synovial fluid. However, his contemporary Bernardino de Sahagún, a Franciscan friar who came to Mexico shortly after the Spanish conquest, obtained from elderly Aztec Indians who spoke only Nahuatl the descriptions of therapeutic arthrocentesis and of the viscid nature of the synovial fluid. They compared the fluid from the knee joint to the viscid fluid from the leaves of the nopal cactus (Opuntia sp.). We here record their description and confirm the accuracy of their comparison. PMID:7416821

  10. Immunohistochemical validation of TLE1, a novel marker, for synovial sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Rekhi, Bharat; Basak, Ranjan; Desai, Sangeeta B.; Jambhekar, Nirmala A.

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: Logistic and financial constraints limit application of several available immunohistochemical (IHC) markers and molecular analysis in every case of synovial sarcoma, diagnosed in our settings. Recently, TLE1 has been recognized as a robust IHC marker for diagnosing a synovial sarcoma. Here, we present IHC features of synovial sarcomas, including TLE1 expression in these cases and in some other tumours. Methods: Conventional sections from 42 synovial sarcomas (30 retrospective & 12 prospectively diagnosed) were subjected to TLE1 IHC staining, including 21 tumours confirmed with molecular testing. TLE1 immunostaining was graded from 0, 1+, 2+, 3+, with 2+ or 3+ grades interpreted as positive staining. Results: Of the 42 tumours, 26 (61.9%) were of monophasic spindle cell type, 13 biphasic type (30.9%), two (4.7%) calcifying type and remaining one (2.3%) was a poorly differentiated synovial sarcoma. On immunohistochemistry (IHC), tumours were positive for epithelial membrane antigen (EMA) (26/34, 76.4%), cytokeratin (CK)7 (6/10, 60%), CK/MNF116 (6/21, 28.6%), B cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2) (36/37, 97.3%), cluster of differentiation molecule 99 (MIC2) (23/31, 74.1%) and transducin-like enhancer of split 1 (TLE1) (40/42, 95.2%), while negative for CD34 in all 21 tumours, wherever performed. TLE1 was also positive in tumour controls, including schwannomas (5/5, 100%), neurofibromas (2/2, 100%), malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (2/12, 17%) and Ewing sarcomas (4/10, 40%). TLE1 sensitivity for diagnosis of synovial sarcomas was 95.2 per cent. Its overall specificity was 63.7 per cent, whereas with regards to tumors forming its closest differential diagnoses, its specificity was 72 per cent. Interpretation & conclusions: Although molecular confirmation is the diagnostic gold standard for synovial sarcoma, TLE1, in view of its high sensitivity may be a useful marker within the optimal IHC panel comprising EMA, BCL2, MIC2, CD34 and CK7, especially on

  11. The lateral synovial recess of the knee: anatomy and role in chronic Iliotibial band friction syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nemeth, W C; Sanders, B L

    1996-10-01

    The tissue deep to the iliotibial band (ITB) and its relationship to the lateral knee joint capsule was studied anatomically and the histopathology of this tissue in chronic iliotibial band friction syndrome (ITBFS) was examined. Findings show that the tissue under the ITB consists of a synovium that is a lateral extension and invagination of the actual knee joint capsule and is not a separate bursa as described in the literature. Additionally, in cases of chronic ITBFS seen in young elite athletes, synovial tissue taken from this lateral synovial recess reveals histological evidence of inflammation and hyperplasia that suggests its involvement in the pathological process.

  12. Producing Dissemination Materials. Final Draft Version.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Degener, David, Comp.; And Others

    This manual is intended to help projects approved by the Joint Dissemination Review Panel produce materials that will support their dissemination activities. Specifically directed toward career education projects, it should be equally useful for other projects. Section 1 discusses diffusion/adoption and these topics regarding materials: purpose,…

  13. 14 CFR 1203.303 - Dissemination considerations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Dissemination considerations. 1203.303 Section 1203.303 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION INFORMATION SECURITY PROGRAM Classification Principles and Considerations § 1203.303 Dissemination considerations. The...

  14. 14 CFR 1203.303 - Dissemination considerations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Dissemination considerations. 1203.303 Section 1203.303 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION INFORMATION SECURITY PROGRAM Classification Principles and Considerations § 1203.303 Dissemination considerations. The...

  15. 14 CFR 1203.303 - Dissemination considerations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Dissemination considerations. 1203.303 Section 1203.303 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION INFORMATION SECURITY PROGRAM Classification Principles and Considerations § 1203.303 Dissemination considerations. The...

  16. Federal Mechanisms to Support Intervention Dissemination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diana, Augusto; Bennett, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines federal mechanisms that support program developers and researchers in disseminating effective interventions for public benefit. The purpose of this paper is not to discuss the dissemination of intervention research (i.e., how to inform stakeholders about research findings), nor is it intended to discuss the research of…

  17. 14 CFR 1203.303 - Dissemination considerations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Dissemination considerations. 1203.303 Section 1203.303 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION INFORMATION SECURITY PROGRAM Classification Principles and Considerations § 1203.303 Dissemination considerations. The...

  18. Disseminated Mycobacterium chimaera Infection After Cardiothoracic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Nicholas; Sampath, Rahul; Abu Saleh, Omar M.; Tweet, Marysia S.; Jevremovic, Dragan; Alniemi, Saba; Wengenack, Nancy L.; Sampathkumar, Priya; Badley, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    Ten case reports of disseminated Mycobacterium chimaera infections associated with cardiovascular surgery were published from Europe. We report 3 cases of disseminated M chimaera infections with histories of aortic graft and/or valvular surgery within the United States. Two of 3 patients demonstrated ocular involvement, a potentially important clinical finding. PMID:27703994

  19. 34 CFR 75.192 - Dissemination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of Curricula Or Instructional Materials § 75.192 Dissemination. If an applicant proposes to publish and disseminate curricula or instructional materials under a grant, the applicant shall include an assurance in its application that the curricula or materials will reach the populations for which...

  20. 34 CFR 75.192 - Dissemination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of Curricula Or Instructional Materials § 75.192 Dissemination. If an applicant proposes to publish and disseminate curricula or instructional materials under a grant, the applicant shall include an assurance in its application that the curricula or materials will reach the populations for which...

  1. National Dissemination Forum, 1977. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brickell, Henry M.

    Presented is an analysis of nine agreements focused on three areas of common concern to dissemination specialists involved in the 1977 National Dissemination Forum: resources, linkage, research, evaluation and quality control. FORUM participants represented the Education Resources Information Center (ERIC of the National Institute of Education…

  2. GOES satellite time code dissemination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beehler, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    The GOES time code system, the performance achieved to date, and some potential improvements in the future are discussed. The disseminated time code is originated from a triply redundant set of atomic standards, time code generators and related equipment maintained by NBS at NOAA's Wallops Island, VA satellite control facility. It is relayed by two GOES satellites located at 75 W and 135 W longitude on a continuous basis to users within North and South America (with overlapping coverage) and well out into the Atlantic and Pacific ocean areas. Downlink frequencies are near 468 MHz. The signals from both satellites are monitored and controlled from the NBS labs at Boulder, CO with additional monitoring input from geographically separated receivers in Washington, D.C. and Hawaii. Performance experience with the received time codes for periods ranging from several years to one day is discussed. Results are also presented for simultaneous, common-view reception by co-located receivers and by receivers separated by several thousand kilometers.

  3. Orally incoculated Salmonella typhimurium is detected in the lymph nodes and synovial fluid of swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salmonella is a foodborne pathogen that has been associated with illnesses from the consumption of meat products. Traditional carcass sampling techniques fail to account for contamination via atypical carcass reservoirs such as lymph nodes and synovial fluid that may harbor Salmonella. In this two-p...

  4. Magnetic Capture of a Molecular Biomarker from Synovial Fluid in a Rat Model of Knee Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Yarmola, Elena G; Shah, Yash; Arnold, David P; Dobson, Jon; Allen, Kyle D

    2016-04-01

    Biomarker development for osteoarthritis (OA) often begins in rodent models, but can be limited by an inability to aspirate synovial fluid from a rodent stifle (similar to the human knee). To address this limitation, we have developed a magnetic nanoparticle-based technology to collect biomarkers from a rodent stifle, termed magnetic capture. Using a common OA biomarker--the c-terminus telopeptide of type II collagen (CTXII)--magnetic capture was optimized in vitro using bovine synovial fluid and then tested in a rat model of knee OA. Anti-CTXII antibodies were conjugated to the surface of superparamagnetic iron oxide-containing polymeric particles. Using these anti-CTXII particles, magnetic capture was able to estimate the level of CTXII in 25 μL aliquots of bovine synovial fluid; and under controlled conditions, this estimate was unaffected by synovial fluid viscosity. Following in vitro testing, anti-CTXII particles were tested in a rat monoiodoacetate model of knee OA. CTXII could be magnetically captured from a rodent stifle without the need to aspirate fluid and showed tenfold changes in CTXII levels from OA-affected joints relative to contralateral control joints. Combined, these data demonstrate the ability and sensitivity of magnetic capture for post-mortem analysis of OA biomarkers in the rat. PMID:26136062

  5. Interleukin 35 Synovial Fluid Levels Are Associated with Disease Activity of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Šenolt, Ladislav; Šumová, Barbora; Jandová, Romana; Hulejová, Hana; Mann, Heřman; Pavelka, Karel; Vencovský, Jiří; Filková, Mária

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To study the association of systemic and local interleukin-35 (IL-35) levels in rheumatoid arthritis. Methods 37 patients with treatment naïve early RA, 49 with established RA and 29 control patients with osteoarthritis (OA) were studied. Serum and paired synovial fluid samples were analysed for IL-35. Disease activity of RA patients was assessed according to the 28-Joint Count Disease Activity Score (DAS28). Results The levels of serum IL-35 were significantly higher in patients with treatment naïve early RA compared to those with established disease and control OA subjects. In addition, serum levels of IL-35 significantly decreased 12 weeks after initiation of glucocorticoids and conventional synthetic disease modifying antirheumatic drugs in patients with treatment naïve early RA. Synovial fluid IL-35 levels were significantly higher in RA compared to OA patients, were significantly elevated compared to serum counterparts and correlated with synovial fluid leukocyte count (r=0.412; p<0.01), serum CRP levels (r=0.362; p<0.05) and DAS28 (r=0.430, p<0.01). Conclusion This is the first study showing elevated circulating levels of IL-35 in treatment naïve early RA, its significant decrease after treatment initiation and positive association between increased synovial fluid IL-35 and disease activity in patients with long-lasting RA. PMID:26204444

  6. Raman spectroscopy of dried synovial fluid droplets as a rapid diagnostic for knee joint damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmonde-White, Karen A.; Mandair, Gurjit S.; Raaii, Farhang; Roessler, Blake J.; Morris, Michael D.

    2008-02-01

    Human synovial fluid droplets were investigated using drop deposition in combination with Raman spectroscopy. Following informed consent, synovial fluid was obtained from forty human patients with various severities of knee pain and/or osteoarthritis at the time of knee arthroscopy or total joint replacement. Synovial fluid was aspirated from the knee joint of each patient and stored at -80°C until examination by near-infrared Raman spectroscopy. Synovial fluid aspirates from the knee joint of each patient were deposited onto a clean fused silica microscope slide and the droplet dried under ambient laboratory conditions. Each droplet was illuminated by a line-focused or a ring-focused 785 nm laser. As the droplet dries, biofluid components segregated based on solubility differences and a deposit that is spatially heterogeneous was made. Spectra taken from the droplet edges and center were dominated by protein bands and showed the presence of at least two protein moieties in the droplet. Band area and band height ratios (1410 cm -1/1450 cm -1) showed the greatest change between specimens from patients with mild/early osteoarthritis compared to those with severe/late stage osteoarthritis. The greatest differences were found in the center of the droplet, which contains more soluble protein components than the edges.

  7. Concentrations of some antibiotics in synovial fluid after oral administration, with special reference to antistaphylococcal activity.

    PubMed

    Sattar, M A; Barrett, S P; Cawley, M I

    1983-02-01

    One of 4 antibiotics with antistaphylococcal activity was given in a conventional oral dose for one day to each of 20 hospitalised patients with synovial effusion of a knee joint requiring aspiration. Serial synchronous samples of serum and synovial fluid (SF) were taken over 36 hours through indwelling cannulae. No morbidity was experienced either during or after this procedure. Satisfactory antistaphylococcal concentrations in SF were achieved with sodium fusidate (500 mg 8 hourly) and amoxycillin (250 mg 8 hourly). Cephradine (500 mg 6 hourly) frequently failed to reach the minimum inhibitory concentration for Staphylococcus aureus in the SF, and flucloxacillin (250 mg 6 hourly) was unpredictable in its penetration of the synovial space. Wide interpatient variation of both serum and SF concentrations was found. Our results indicate that sodium fusidate is an appropriate early treatment for a nonresistant staphylococcal joint infection. Amoxycillin is a suitable alternative or second antistaphylococcal drug and would also be appropriate initial therapy when the infecting organism is unknown. We strongly recommend that SF antibiotic concentrations be measured, to ensure adequate penetration of the synovial cavity, in the treatment of septic arthritis.

  8. Correlation of some cytomorphological and ultrastructural modifications of synovial fluid in juvenile chronic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ciobanu, A; Ciobanu, I R; Stroescu, I; Stoicescu, M; Gorinoiu, G; Stroe, S; Marian, M

    1995-01-01

    Experiments have been performed on 25 synovial fluid samples from patients with juvenile chronic arthritis (mono- and polyarticular forms) and with hydroarthrosis, the latter considered as controls. By cytomorphologic studies, we determined the cellularity, ragocytosis and synoviocytogram of the synovial fluid cellular pellet and found out that the synovial fluid from cases of juvenile chronic arthritis is characterised by cytosis (11.270/mm3; 15.275/mm3), polynucleosis (67.3%, 72.2%) and ragocytosis (12.8%, 17.5%) whereas hydroarthrosis synovial fluid is characterised by lymphocytosis (47.8%). Ultrastructurally, ragocyte-like polymorphonuclear cells are characterised by: a) segmentation of the nucleus and preferential concentration of chromatime on the periphery of the nuclear membrane: b) frequent intracytoplasmic inclusions and phagolysosomes. Phagocyte-like mononuclear cells present numerous inclusions and phagolysosomes, certainly indicating an endocytic activity. Lymphocytes are characterised by a narrow cytoplasmic rim, presenting relatively few cellular organelles. They coexist with immunely activated lymphocytes rich in cytoplasm, mitochondria and endoplasmic reticle. Corroboration of cytomorphological and ultrastructural date enables us to explain the morphological modifications and emphasize their importance in juvenile chronic arthritis pathogenesis and diagnosis. PMID:8772365

  9. A new TGF-β3 controlled-released chitosan scaffold for tissue engineering synovial sheath.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ke; Wang, Ziming; Du, Quanyin; Yu, Jiang; Wang, Aimin; Xiong, Yan

    2014-03-01

    The post-operative outcome of flexor tendon healing remains limited by flexor tendon adhesion that reduces joint range of motion. Despite improvement in different methods, peritendinous adhesion formation continues to present a formidable challenge. Recent studies showed that transforming growth factor-β3 (TGF-β3) may be the key factor to reducing adhesion formation in skin or tendon. In this study, we designed a novel type of tissue engineering synovial sheath containing TGF-β3, to prevent flexor tendon adhesion. First, to achieve a stable release of TGF-β3, chitosan microspheres, prepared by crosslinking-emulsion, were used for the delivery of TGF-β3. Second, a three-dimensional chitosan scaffold was prepared by lyophilization, and TGF-β3 microspheres were carefully introduced into the scaffold. Then, synovial cells were cultured and then seeded into the TGF-β3 loaded scaffold to produce TGF-β3 controlled-released tissue engineering synovial sheath. Tests clearly demonstrated that the scaffold has good structure and compatibility with cells. These results expand the feasibility of combinative strategies of controlled protein release and tissue-engineered synovial sheath formation. Application of this scaffold to tendon repair sites may help to prevent adhesion of tendon healing.

  10. Primary pleural synovial sarcoma presenting as a multiloculated cyst in an adolescent.

    PubMed

    Tailor, J; Roy, P G; Bowker, C; Lakhoo, K

    2008-05-01

    Primary pleural synovial sarcoma (PPSS) is a rare pleural malignancy with a grave prognosis. Most cases present as a well-circumscribed mass with foci of haemorrhage and necrosis. We present an unusual case in a Nepalese boy that presented as a multiloculated cyst mimicking hydatid disease. The diagnosis was confirmed by histology and cytogenetic analysis. PMID:18049822

  11. Localization of /sup 99m/Tc methylene disphosphonate within synovial fluid in osteosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sandler, M.S.; Heyman, S.; Watts, H.

    1984-08-01

    Extraosseous uptake of /sup 99m/Tc phosphate bone scanning agents has been reported in a wide variety of lesions, including malignant effusions. A case of uptake of bone scanning agent within synovial fluid in a joint involved with osteosarcoma is reported.

  12. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis: bacterial diversity in temporomandibular joint synovial fluid in comparison with immunological and clinical findings.

    PubMed

    Olsen-Bergem, H; Kristoffersen, A K; Bjørnland, T; Reseland, J E; Aas, J A

    2016-03-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) involvement in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) occurs in up to 80% of affected children. The purpose of this study was to investigate the presence of bacterial DNA in synovial fluid, and to compare this with clinical and immunological findings in children with JIA, adults with persistent JIA, and adults with rheumatoid arthritis, in order to detect whether bacteria contribute to inflammation in TMJ arthritis. Synovial fluid and skin swab samples were collected from 30 patients (54 TMJs). Bacterial detection was performed using 16S rRNA pyrosequencing. Bacterial DNA was detected in 31 TMJs (57%) in 19 patients (63%). A positive statistically significant correlation was registered between bacterial DNA detected in TMJ synovial fluid and the following factors: total protein concentration in synovial fluid, interleukin 1β, tumour necrosis factor alpha, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and adiponectin, as well as the duration of the general medical disease. Fourteen different bacterial species were detected in synovial fluid. Bacterial DNA in TMJ synovial fluid without contamination was detected in more than 50% of the patients. Studies are needed to evaluate the consequences of this bacterial DNA in synovial fluid with regard to TMJ arthritis. PMID:26554824

  13. Effect of Toll-Like Receptor 4 on Synovial Injury of Temporomandibular Joint in Rats Caused by Occlusal Interference

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Jingjing; Yang, Yingying; Sun, Shuzhen; Xie, Jianli; Lin, Xuefen; Ji, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Synovitis is an important disease that causes intractable pain in TMJ. Some investigations suggested that the increasing expression of IL-1β secreted by synovial lining cells plays an important role in synovial inflammation and cartilage destruction in TMJ. In our previous research, the results demonstrated that TLR4 is involved in the expression of IL-1β in SFs from TMJ with lipopolysaccharide stimulation. However, the inflammatory response that occurred in synovial membrane is not caused by bacterial infection. In the current study, we investigated whether or not TLR4 participates in the inflammatory responses and the expression of IL-1β in synovial membrane of rats induced by occlusal interference. The results showed that obvious inflammation changes were observed in the synovial membranes and the expression of TLR4 and IL-1β was increased at both mRNA and protein levels in the occlusal interference rats. In addition, the inflammation reactions and the increased expression of IL-1β could be restrained by treatment with TAK-242, a blocker of TLR4 signaling. The results prompted us that the activation of TLR4 may be involved in the inflammatory reactions and increased expression of IL-1β in patients with synovitis and participate in the mechanisms of the initiation and development of synovial injury by regulating the expression of inflammatory mediators like IL-1β in synovial membranes. PMID:27413256

  14. Identification of the advanced glycation end products N -carboxymethyllysine in the synovial tissue of patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Drinda, S; Franke, S; Canet, C; Petrow, P; Brauer, R; Huttich, C; Stein, G; Hein, G

    2002-01-01

    Background: Generation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) is an inevitable process in vivo and can be accelerated under pathological conditions such as oxidative stress. In serum and synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) raised AGE levels have been found. Objective: To determine the presence of N -carboxymethyllysine (CML; marker of oxidative stress) in RA synovial tissue by immunohistology. Methods: Frozen synovial tissue samples from 10 patients with RA and eight controls (four patients without joint disease and four patients with osteoarthritis (OA)) were treated with rabbit-anti-CML-IgG and goat-antirabbit-IgG. Immunostaining was visualised by streptavidine-alkaline phosphatase (chromogen fuchsin). Cell differentiation was performed with antibodies against CD68, CD45RO, and CD20. Results: CML was detected in the synovial lining, sublining, and endothelium in 10/10 RA and 4/4 OA synovial specimens. In RA some macrophages (CD68+) and T cells (CD45RO+) showed positive immunostaining for CML, whereas B cells were negative. Staining in OA synovial sublining was weak compared with RA. Conclusions: CML was detected for the first time in RA and OA synovial tissue. Different patterns of immunostaining in RA and OA and the presence of CML on macrophages and T cells, suggest a role for CML in the pathogenesis of RA. This might be due to presentation of new epitopes which can maintain or even trigger an autoimmune response. PMID:12006318

  15. Local fibroblast proliferation but not influx is responsible for synovial hyperplasia in a murine model of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Yusuke; Mizoguchi, Fumitaka; Saito, Tetsuya; Kawahata, Kimito; Ueha, Satoshi; Matsushima, Kouji; Inagaki, Yutaka; Miyasaka, Nobuyuki; Kohsaka, Hitoshi

    2016-02-12

    Synovial fibroblasts play crucial roles in inflammation and joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). How they accumulate in the RA joints remains unclear. This study was conducted to discern whether cellular influx from the outside of the joints and local proliferation are responsible for synovial fibroblast accumulation in an animal model of RA. We found that synovial fibroblasts were identified as GFP+ cells using collagen type I alpha 2 (Col1a2)-GFP transgenic reporter mice. Then, bone marrow transplantation and parabiosis techniques were utilized to study the cellular influx. Irradiated wild-type mice were transplanted with bone marrow from Col1a2-GFP mice. Col1a2-GFP and wild-type mice were conjoined for parabiosis. The transplanted mice and the parabionts were subjected to collagen antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA). We found no GFP+ cells in the hyperplastic synovial tissues from the transplanted mice with CAIA and from the wild-type parabionts with CAIA. Furthermore, normal and CAIA synovial tissues from Col1a2-GFP mice and from fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (Fucci) transgenic mice, in which cells in S/G2/M phases of the cell cycle express Azami-Green, were studied for Ki67, a cellular proliferation marker, and vimentin, a fibroblast marker, expression. The percentages of Ki67+/GFP+ and Azami-Green+/vimentin+ cells in the CAIA synovial tissues were higher than those in the untreated synovial tissues (34% vs. 0.40% and 19% vs. 0.26%, respectively). These findings indicate that local fibroblast proliferation but not cellular influx is responsible for the synovial hyperplasia in CAIA. Suppression of proliferation of the local synovial fibroblasts should be a promising treatment for RA. PMID:26806309

  16. Serum amyloid A triggers the mosodium urate -mediated mature interleukin-1β production from human synovial fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Monosodium urate (MSU) has been shown to promote inflammasome activation and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) secretion in monocyte/macrophages, but the cellular pathway and nod-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome activation in synovial tissues, remain elusive. In this study, we investigated the effects of MSU on synovial fibroblasts to elucidate the process of MSU-mediated synovial inflammation. Methods Human synovial fibroblasts were stimulated with MSU in the presence or absence of serum amyloid A (SAA). The cellular supernatants were analyzed by immunoblotting using anti-IL-1β or anti-caspase-1 antibodies. IL-1β or NLRP3 mRNA expressions were analyzed by real-time PCR or reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) method. Results Neither SAA nor MSU stimulation resulted in IL-1β or interleukin-1α (IL-1α) secretions and pro-IL-1β processing in synovial fibroblasts. However, in SAA-primed synovial fibroblasts, MSU stimulation resulted in the activation of caspase-1 and production of active IL-1β and IL-1α. The effect of SAA on IL-1β induction was impaired in cells by silencing NLRP3 using siRNA or treating with caspase-1 inhibitor. In addition, SAA induced the secretion of cathepsin B and NLRP3 mRNA expression in synovial fibroblasts. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that exposure of human synovial fibroblasts to SAA promotes MSU-mediated caspase-1 activation and IL-1β secretion in the absence of microbial stimulation. These findings provide insight into the molecular processes underlying the synovial inflammatory condition of gout. PMID:22608202

  17. Expression of molecules involved in B lymphocyte survival and differentiation by synovial fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Edwards, J C; Leigh, R D; Cambridge, G

    1997-06-01

    The synovitis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is one of few pathological lesions in which B lymphocyte accumulation progresses to the extent of germinal centre formation. The present study was designed to assess the ability of synovial fibroblasts to express molecules implicated in B lymphocyte survival and differentiation, both in vivo, and in response to cytokines in vitro. Normal and diseased synovia were examined by indirect immunofluorescence. In all tissues synovial intimal fibroblasts showed co-expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and complement decay-accelerating factor (DAF) comparable to that of follicular dendritic cells (FDC), but not complement receptor 2 (CR2). In rheumatoid synovia, subintimal cells showed variable expression of VCAM-1 and DAF, with bright co-expression of VCAM-1, DAF and CR2 in lymphoid follicle centres. B lymphocytes, some of which were proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive, were present in contact with subintimal cells expressing VCAM-1 with or without DAF or CR2. B lymphocytes were rarely present in the intimal layer, and, where present, showed fragmentation. In vitro, synovial fibroblasts exposed to tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in combination with interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) showed enhanced expression of VCAM-1, in comparison with fibroblasts from skin and lung and, unlike skin and lung fibroblasts, also expressed DAF and CR2. These findings support the hypothesis that synovial targeting in RA involves an enhanced ability of synovial fibroblasts to support B lymphocyte survival. This appears to be dependent, not on the constitutive expression of VCAM-1 and DAF on intimal cells, but on the increased ability of subintimal cells to respond to proinflammatory cytokines, perhaps critically in the expression of VCAM-1.

  18. Staphylococcal Enterotoxin C in Synovial Fluid of Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ataee, Ramezan Ali; Ataee, Mohammad Hosein; Alishiri, Gholam Hosein; Esmaeili, Davoud

    2014-01-01

    Background: In the previous studies using the commercial ELISA kit, the existence of staphylococcal superantigens has been reported in synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Objectives: This study aimed to design molecular methods to detect staphylococcal enterotoxin C in synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, Staphylococcus aureus strain producing enterotoxin C was used as the reference strain. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was set up by design a specific pair of primers. Besides bacterial culture, 50 synovial fluid samples of patients with rheumatoid arthritis were subjected to DNA extraction, and then PCR amplification was carried out according to the protocol. All samples were examined by ELISA method for enterotoxin C. The data were descriptively analyzed. Results: The results of bacterial culture were negative for all samples. The results showed that 66% (33 cases) of samples contained entC gene and only 46% (23 cases) have also enterotoxin C. The interesting finding was that the results of ELISA and PCR were the same and have shown only 22 positive cases (44%samples) for staphylococcal enterotoxin C. Conclusions: Based on the findings of this study, S. aureus enterotoxin C (SEC) has been detected in synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis by PCR and ELISA methods. These valuable findings may describe the exact etiology of the RA and as well as change the methods of its diagnosis and treatment. This is the first research, which has shown the staphylococcal entC gene in synovial fluid of RA patients. However, S. aureus strains can produce more than 20 types of enterotoxins. Therefore, its involvement on rheumatoid arthritis pathogenesis makes an important challenge in the future. In this regard, further investigation on the other enterotoxins is necessary. PMID:25558381

  19. Inner Synovial Membrane Footprint of the Anterior Elbow Capsule: An Arthroscopic Boundary

    PubMed Central

    Kamineni, Srinath; Bachoura, Abdo; Sasaki, Koichi; Reilly, Danielle; Harris, Kate N.; Sinai, Anthony; Deane, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The purpose of this study is to describe the inner synovial membrane (SM) of the anterior elbow capsule, both qualitatively and quantitatively. Materials and Methods. Twenty-two cadaveric human elbows were dissected and the distal humerus and SM attachments were digitized using a digitizer. The transepicondylar line (TEL) was used as the primary descriptor of various landmarks. The distance between the medial epicondyle and medial SM edge, SM apex overlying the coronoid fossa, the central SM nadir, and the apex of the SM insertion overlying the radial fossa and distance from the lateral epicondyle to lateral SM edge along the TEL were measured and further analyzed. Gender and side-to-side statistical comparisons were calculated. Results. The mean age of the subjects was 80.4 years, with six male and five female cadavers. The SM had a distinctive double arched attachment overlying the radial and coronoid fossae. No gender-based or side-to-side quantitative differences were noted. In 18 out of 22 specimens (81.8%), an infolding extension of the SM was observed overlying the medial aspect of the trochlea. The SM did not coincide with the outer fibrous attachment in any specimen. Conclusion. The humeral footprint of the synovial membrane of the anterior elbow capsule is more complex and not as capacious as commonly understood from the current literature. The synovial membrane nadir between the two anterior fossae may help to explain and hence preempt technical difficulties, a reduction in working arthroscopic volume in inflammatory and posttraumatic pathologies. This knowledge should allow the surgeon to approach this aspect of the anterior elbow compartment space with the confidence that detachment of this synovial attachment, to create working space, does not equate to breaching the capsule. Alternatively, stripping the synovial attachment from the anterior humerus does not constitute an anterior capsular release. PMID:26380112

  20. Gene Expression Pattern of Cells From Inflamed and Normal Areas of Osteoarthritis Synovial Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Cécile; Dubuc, Jean-Emile; Montell, Eulàlia; Vergés, Josep; Munaut, Carine; Noël, Agnès; Henrotin, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the gene expression patterns of synovial cells from inflamed or normal/reactive areas of synovial membrane obtained from the same patient with osteoarthritis (OA). Methods At the time of total knee replacement, synovial tissues were obtained from 12 patients with knee OA. The inflammation status of the synovial membrane was characterized according to macroscopic criteria and classified as normal/reactive or inflamed. Biopsy samples were cultured separately for 7 days. Microarray gene expression profiling was performed on normal/reactive and inflamed areas. Western blot and immunohistochemistry were used to confirm the identified genes that were differentially expressed. Results We identified 896 genes that were differentially expressed between normal/reactive and inflamed areas. The key pathways were related to inflammation, cartilage metabolism, Wnt signaling, and angiogenesis. In the inflammation network, the genes TREM1 and S100A9 were strongly up-regulated. The genes MMP3, MMP9, CTSH (cathepsin H), and CTSS (cathepsin S) were significantly up-regulated in the cartilage catabolism pathway, while the most up-regulated anabolism enzyme gene was HAS1. In the Wnt signaling pathway, the genes for Wnt-5a and low-density lipoprotein receptor–related protein 5 were up-regulated, while the gene FZD2 and the gene for Dkk-3 were down-regulated. Finally, STC1, which codes for a protein involved in angiogenesis, was identified as the most up-regulated gene in inflamed compared with normal/reactive areas. Conclusion This study is the first to identify different expression patterns between 2 areas of the synovial membrane from the same patient. These differences concern several key pathways involved in OA pathogenesis. This analysis also provides information regarding new genes and proteins as potential targets of treatment. PMID:24757147

  1. Synovial Fluid Response to Extensional Flow: Effects of Dilution and Intermolecular Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Haward, Simon J.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a microfluidic cross-slot device is used to examine the extensional flow response of diluted porcine synovial fluid (PSF) samples using flow-induced birefringence (FIB) measurements. The PSF sample is diluted to 10× 20× and 30× its original mass in a phosphate-buffered saline and its FIB response measured as a function of the strain rate at the stagnation point of the cross-slots. Equivalent experiments are also carried out using trypsin-treated PSF (t-PSF) in which the protein content is digested away using an enzyme. The results show that, at the synovial fluid concentrations tested, the protein content plays a negligible role in either the fluid's bulk shear or extensional flow behaviour. This helps support the validity of the analysis of synovial fluid HA content, either by microfluidic or by other techniques where the synovial fluid is first diluted, and suggests that the HA and protein content in synovial fluid must be higher than a certain minimum threshold concentration before HA-protein or protein-protein interactions become significant. However a systematic shift in the FIB response as the PSF and t-PSF samples are progressively diluted indicates that HA-HA interactions remain significant at the concentrations tested. These interactions influence FIB-derived macromolecular parameters such as the relaxation time and the molecular weight distribution and therefore must be minimized for the best validity of this method as an analytical technique, in which non-interaction between molecules is assumed. PMID:24651529

  2. Needle arthroscopy of the knee with synovial biopsy sampling: technical experience in 150 patients.

    PubMed

    Baeten, D; Van den Bosch, F; Elewaut, D; Stuer, A; Veys, E M; De Keyser, F

    1999-01-01

    Needle arthroscopy is an office-based technique allowing direct visualisation of the knee cavity and selective sampling of the synovial membrane. We performed needle arthroscopy in 150 patients with synovitis of the knee (1) to evaluate the diagnostic potential in early arthritis, (2) to perform therapeutic lavage in persistent inflammatory synovitis and (3) to assess the balance between technical feasibility, safety and patient comfort on the one hand, and the relevance of the obtained macro- and microscopic information for diagnosis and research purposes on the other. After disinfection of the leg and local anaesthesia of the skin and joint, a 1.8-2.7 mm needle arthroscope was introduced into the knee. Synovial fluid was aspirated and lavage of the joint cavity was performed to allow macroscopic evaluation of hyperaemia and hypertrophy of the synovial membrane. Biopsies were taken at inflamed sites, followed by another lavage to remove blood and debris. Needle arthroscopy of the knee is a simple and easy to perform technique made particularly attractive by the local anaesthesia and the ambulatory setting. It allows good macroscopic evaluation of synovial inflammation and selective sampling of the synovial membrane. Biopsies are suitable for RNA and DNA extraction, bacterial or lymphocyte culture, and cell isolation. Because samples were sometimes too small for representative histology, we switched from a 1.8 mm to a 2.7 mm biopsy forceps with good results. In nearly all cases the arthroscopy was well tolerated. Moreover, some patients reported relief of symptoms and even improvement of mobility after lavage of the inflamed joint. No major complications were noted. It was concluded that needle arthroscopy of the knee is a simple, safe and well-tolerated technique, with promising perspectives as a diagnostic, scientific and possibly therapeutic tool in rheumatic diseases. PMID:10638766

  3. Expression of molecules involved in B lymphocyte survival and differentiation by synovial fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Edwards, J C; Leigh, R D; Cambridge, G

    1997-06-01

    The synovitis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is one of few pathological lesions in which B lymphocyte accumulation progresses to the extent of germinal centre formation. The present study was designed to assess the ability of synovial fibroblasts to express molecules implicated in B lymphocyte survival and differentiation, both in vivo, and in response to cytokines in vitro. Normal and diseased synovia were examined by indirect immunofluorescence. In all tissues synovial intimal fibroblasts showed co-expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and complement decay-accelerating factor (DAF) comparable to that of follicular dendritic cells (FDC), but not complement receptor 2 (CR2). In rheumatoid synovia, subintimal cells showed variable expression of VCAM-1 and DAF, with bright co-expression of VCAM-1, DAF and CR2 in lymphoid follicle centres. B lymphocytes, some of which were proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive, were present in contact with subintimal cells expressing VCAM-1 with or without DAF or CR2. B lymphocytes were rarely present in the intimal layer, and, where present, showed fragmentation. In vitro, synovial fibroblasts exposed to tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) in combination with interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) showed enhanced expression of VCAM-1, in comparison with fibroblasts from skin and lung and, unlike skin and lung fibroblasts, also expressed DAF and CR2. These findings support the hypothesis that synovial targeting in RA involves an enhanced ability of synovial fibroblasts to support B lymphocyte survival. This appears to be dependent, not on the constitutive expression of VCAM-1 and DAF on intimal cells, but on the increased ability of subintimal cells to respond to proinflammatory cytokines, perhaps critically in the expression of VCAM-1. PMID:9182884

  4. Synovial fluid response to extensional flow: effects of dilution and intermolecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Haward, Simon J

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a microfluidic cross-slot device is used to examine the extensional flow response of diluted porcine synovial fluid (PSF) samples using flow-induced birefringence (FIB) measurements. The PSF sample is diluted to 10× 20× and 30× its original mass in a phosphate-buffered saline and its FIB response measured as a function of the strain rate at the stagnation point of the cross-slots. Equivalent experiments are also carried out using trypsin-treated PSF (t-PSF) in which the protein content is digested away using an enzyme. The results show that, at the synovial fluid concentrations tested, the protein content plays a negligible role in either the fluid's bulk shear or extensional flow behaviour. This helps support the validity of the analysis of synovial fluid HA content, either by microfluidic or by other techniques where the synovial fluid is first diluted, and suggests that the HA and protein content in synovial fluid must be higher than a certain minimum threshold concentration before HA-protein or protein-protein interactions become significant. However a systematic shift in the FIB response as the PSF and t-PSF samples are progressively diluted indicates that HA-HA interactions remain significant at the concentrations tested. These interactions influence FIB-derived macromolecular parameters such as the relaxation time and the molecular weight distribution and therefore must be minimized for the best validity of this method as an analytical technique, in which non-interaction between molecules is assumed.

  5. Temporomandibular joint synovial fluid sampling: estimation of dilution factor using calcium ion concentration.

    PubMed

    Aghabeigi, B; Cintra, N; Meghji, S; Evans, A; Crean, S J

    2002-12-01

    Saline aspirates have been commonly used in the biochemical investigations of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pathology. However, due to presence of adhesions in the diseased temporomandibular joint, full equilibration between the injected saline and the synovial fluid may not be achieved in all cases. We measured calcium ion concentration in the saline aspirates and the plasma to assess the degree of dilution of the synovial fluid by the injected media. Saline aspirates obtained prior to the arthroscopic examination of 17 patients with painful TMJs not responding to 3 months of conservative treatment were analysed for their calcium content by a highly sensitive spectrophotometric autoanalyser. In 10 patients with unilateral symptoms, the contralateral asymptomatic side was used as a control. Using a concentration volume equation the amount of the synovial fluid in the saline aspirates was calculated. The yield of the saline aspirates was variable ranging from 330 to 1000 microl. The mean calcium level was 0.787 mg/dl in the symptomatic group (C.I. 95% 0.337-1.237 mg/dl) and 0.512 mg/dl (C.I. 95% 0.235-0.797) in the asymptomatic group. Using a Student t-test there was no significant difference between the two groups. Furthermore, there was no demonstrable correlation between the volume of the aspirate and its synovial fluid content. This study confirms that the saline aspirate may not be a representative sample of the TMJ synovial fluid, and that expression of the results of the biochemical assays per volume of the aspirate may be misleading.

  6. Synovial chemokine expression and relationship with knee symptoms in patients with meniscal tears

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Anjali; Gan, Justin; Bush-Joseph, Charles; Verma, Nikhil; Tetreault, Matthew W.; Saha, Kanta; Margulis, Arkady; Fogg, Louis; Scanzello, Carla R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective In patients with knee OA, synovitis is associated with knee pain and symptoms. We previously identified synovial mRNA expression of a set of chemokines (CCL19, IL-8, CCL5, XCL-1, CCR7) associated with synovitis in patients with meniscal tears but without radiographic OA. CCL19 and CCR7 were also associated with knee symptoms. This study sought to validate expression of these chemokines and association with knee symptoms in more typical patients presenting for meniscal arthroscopy, many who have pre-existing OA. Design Synovial biopsies and fluid (SF) were collected from patients undergoing meniscal arthroscopy. Synovial mRNA expression was measured using quantitative RT-PCR. The Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) was administered preoperatively. Regression analyses determined if associations between chemokine mRNA levels and KOOS scores were independent of other factors including radiographic OA. CCL19 in SF was measured by ELISA, and compared to patients with advanced knee OA and asymptomatic organ donors. Results 90% of patients had intra-operative evidence of early cartilage degeneration. CCL19, IL-8, CCL5, XCL1, CCR7 transcripts were detected in all patients. Synovial CCL19 mRNA levels independently correlated with KOOS Activities of Daily Living scores (95% CI [-8.071, -0.331], p= 0.036), indicating higher expression was associated with more knee-related dysfunction. SF CCL19 was detected in 7 of 10 patients, compared to 4 of 10 asymptomatic donors. Conclusion In typical patients presenting for meniscal arthroscopy, synovial CCL19 mRNA expression was associated with knee-related difficulty with activities of daily living, independent of other factors including presence of radiographic knee OA. PMID:25724256

  7. Acute Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation in Neuroendocrine Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Teh, Ru-Wen; Tsoi, Daphne T.

    2012-01-01

    Malignancy is a common cause of disseminated intravascular coagulation and usually presents as a chronic disorder in solid organ tumours. We present a rare case of recurrent acute disseminated intravascular coagulation in neuroendocrine carcinoma after manipulation, firstly, by core biopsy and, later, by cytotoxic therapy causing a release of procoagulants and cytokines from lysed tumour cells. This is reminiscent of tumour lysis syndrome where massive quantities of intracellular electrolytes and nucleic acid are released, causing acute metabolic imbalance and renal failure. This case highlights the potential complication of acute disseminated intravascular coagulation after trauma to malignant cells. PMID:23139666

  8. Information Dissemination by Mail. Implications for CME.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Craig S.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Two evaluation approaches were used to assess the impact of a continuing medical education manual that was distributed by mail. Implications for development of materials and for information dissemination strategies in continuing medical education are discussed. (Author/CT)

  9. [Disseminated lichenoid form of lupus vulgaris].

    PubMed

    Bork, K

    1985-12-01

    The disseminated forms of skin tuberculosis are extremely uncommon and can occur as acute miliary tuberculosis with skin involvement, which is a severe disease with a rapid course, or as slowly developing lupus vulgaris, i.e., "postexanthematic lupus vulgaris" or "lupus vulgaris disseminatus". A 61-year-old female patient developed unusual lichenoid brownish lesions caused by disseminated lupus vulgaris, which were confined to the right leg. The patient had no other signs of tuberculosis.

  10. Functional genomics identifies drivers of medulloblastoma dissemination.

    PubMed

    Mumert, Michael; Dubuc, Adrian; Wu, Xiaochong; Northcott, Paul A; Chin, Steven S; Pedone, Carolyn A; Taylor, Michael D; Fults, Daniel W

    2012-10-01

    Medulloblastomas are malignant brain tumors that arise in the cerebellum in children and disseminate via the cerebrospinal fluid to the leptomeningeal spaces of the brain and spinal cord. Challenged by the poor prognosis for patients with metastatic dissemination, pediatric oncologists have developed aggressive treatment protocols, combining surgery, craniospinal radiation, and high-dose chemotherapy, that often cause disabling neurotoxic effects in long-term survivors. Insights into the genetic control of medulloblastoma dissemination have come from transposon insertion mutagenesis studies. Mobilizing the Sleeping Beauty transposon in cerebellar neural progenitor cells caused widespread dissemination of typically nonmetastatic medulloblastomas in Patched(+/-) mice, in which Shh signaling is hyperactive. Candidate metastasis genes were identified by sequencing the insertion sites and then mapping these sequences back to the mouse genome. To determine whether genes located at transposon insertion sites directly caused medulloblastomas to disseminate, we overexpressed candidate genes in Nestin(+) neural progenitors in the cerebella of mice by retroviral transfer in combination with Shh. We show here that ectopic expression of Eras, Lhx1, Ccrk, and Akt shifted the in vivo growth characteristics of Shh-induced medulloblastomas from a localized pattern to a disseminated pattern in which tumor cells seeded the leptomeningeal spaces of the brain and spinal cord. PMID:22875024

  11. Hsp90 inhibitor 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin prevents synovial sarcoma proliferation via apoptosis in in vitro models.

    PubMed

    Terry, Jefferson; Lubieniecka, Joanna M; Kwan, Wanda; Liu, Suzanne; Nielsen, Torsten O

    2005-08-01

    Synovial sarcoma is a soft tissue malignancy with a poor prognosis; many patients will die from this disease within 10 years of diagnosis, despite treatment. Gene expression profiling and immunohistochemistry studies have identified oncogenes that are highly expressed in synovial sarcoma. Included in this group are receptor tyrosine kinases such as epidermal growth factor receptor, insulin-like growth factor receptor 1, fibroblast growth factor receptor 3, KIT, and HER2. Inhibitors of these growth-promoting receptors are likely to inhibit proliferation of synovial sarcoma; however, the effect of receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors on synovial sarcoma is largely unknown. We assessed the ability of the following receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors to halt proliferation and induce apoptosis in synovial sarcoma monolayer and three dimensional spheroid in vitro models: gefitinib (Iressa), NVP-AEW541, imatinib mesylate (Gleevec), SU5402, PRO-001, trastuzumab (Herceptin), and 17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-AAG). Gefitinib, NVP-AEW541, and imatinib inhibited proliferation only at relatively high concentrations, which are not clinically applicable. 17-AAG, which destabilizes multiple receptor tyrosine kinases and other oncoproteins through heat shock protein 90 inhibition, prevented proliferation and induced apoptosis in synovial sarcoma monolayer models at concentrations achievable in human serum. 17-AAG treatment was also associated with receptor tyrosine kinase degradation and induction of apoptosis in synovial sarcoma spheroid models. 17-AAG was more effective than doxorubicin, particularly in the spheroid models. Here we provide in vitro evidence that 17-AAG, a clinically applicable drug with known pharmacology and limited toxicity, inhibits synovial sarcoma proliferation by inducing apoptosis, and thus has potential as a systemic therapy for this disease.

  12. Reduced expression of the complement receptor type 2 (CR2, CD21) by synovial fluid B and T lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Illges, H; Braun, M; Peter, H H; Melchers, I

    2000-01-01

    The expression of CR2 (CD21) by synovial B and T lymphocytes of patients suffering from various forms of arthritis was analysed with cytofluorometry and with reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. CR2 (CD21) cell surface protein was detected in normal quantities on peripheral B cells, but was almost absent on synovial B lymphocytes of the same patients. This reduction was most severe in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, but also observed in all other cases. CR2 (CD21) did not reappear after in vitro culture. CR2 (CD21) mRNA was also strongly reduced in synovial B and T lymphocytes. Synovial fluid B lymphocytes were larger than peripheral blood B lymphocytes, while T cells from the same patients showed no size differences. We conclude that synovial fluid B lymphocytes have undergone an irreversible step towards terminal differentiation. The presence or absence of CR2 (CD21) mRNA in peripheral versus synovial T cells indicates that CR2 (CD21) is also differentially expressed by T lymphocytes. PMID:11091285

  13. Temporomandibular joint osteoarthritis and crystal deposition diseases: a study of crystals in synovial fluid lavages in osteoarthritic temporomandibular joints.

    PubMed

    Dijkgraaf, L C; Liem, R S; de Bont, L G

    1998-08-01

    To study the presence of crystals in synovial fluid lavages of osteoarthritic temporomandibular joints (TMJs), in order to evaluate the possible role of these crystals in the osteoarthritic (OA) process, synovial fluid lavage samples of the upper joint compartment from 44 TMJs were obtained prior to arthroscopy. The OA group consisted of 32 TMJs. The control group consisted of 12 TMJs that had been diagnosed with other nonosteoarthritic conditions. The lavage samples were analysed as wet preparations, unstained and stained, with ordinary light, polarized light and compensated polarized light for the presence of crystals and white blood cells. One sample was prepared for subsequent electron microscopic (EM) examination. Synovial fluid lavage analysis of osteoarthritic TMJs did not show any monosodium urate monohydrate or calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals. However, in three lavages, particles which possibly contained calcium were identified with alizarin red S staining. White blood cells were occasionally seen. Synovial fluid analysis of the lavages of the control TMJs did not reveal any crystals. EM examination of synovial fluid lavage from an osteoarthritic TMJ failed to clearly show crystal formation. Concurrence of TMJ crystal deposition and OA appears less prominent than in other synovial joints. We conclude that crystals probably do not play an important role in TMJ OA. PMID:9698172

  14. Pim-2/mTORC1 Pathway Shapes Inflammatory Capacity in Rheumatoid Arthritis Synovial Cells Exposed to Lipid Peroxidations.

    PubMed

    Yin, Geng; Li, Yan; Yang, Min; Cen, Xiao-min; Xie, Qi-bing

    2015-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a systemic autoimmune disease characterized by chronic inflammation of multiple joints, with disruption of joint cartilage. The proliferation of synovial fibroblasts in response to multiple inflammation factors is central to the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis. Our previous studies showed that 4-HNE may induce synovial intrinsic inflammations by activating NF-κB pathways and lead to cell apoptosis. However, the molecular mechanisms of how synovial NF-κB activation is modulated are not fully understood. Here, the present findings demonstrated that 4-HNE may induce synovial intrinsic inflammations by mTORC1 inactivation. While ectopic activation of mTORC1 pathway by the overexpression of Pim-2 may disrupt the initiation of inflammatory reactions and maintain synovial homeostasis, our findings will help to uncover novel signaling pathways between inflammations and oxidative stress in rheumatoid arthritis development and imply that Pim-2/mTORC1 pathway may be critical for the initiation of inflammatory reactions in human rheumatoid arthritis synovial cells. PMID:26064888

  15. Tribological performance of the biological components of synovial fluid in artificial joint implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Subir; Choudhury, Dipankar; Roy, Taposh; Moradi, Ali; Masjuki, H. H.; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda

    2015-08-01

    The concentration of biological components of synovial fluid (such as albumin, globulin, hyaluronic acid, and lubricin) varies between healthy persons and osteoarthritis (OA) patients. The aim of the present study is to compare the effects of such variation on tribological performance in a simulated hip joint model. The study was carried out experimentally by utilizing a pin-on-disk simulator on ceramic-on-ceramic (CoC) and ceramic-on-polyethylene (CoP) hip joint implants. The experimental results show that both friction and wear of artificial joints fluctuate with the concentration level of biological components. Moreover, the performance also varies between material combinations. Wear debris sizes and shapes produced by ceramic and polyethylene were diverse. We conclude that the biological components of synovial fluid and their concentrations should be considered in order to select an artificial hip joint to best suit that patient.

  16. Knee Locking in Osteoarthritis due to Synovial Lipoma: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    S Amarjit, Kataria; Budhiraja, Shivali; Chandramouleeswari, K; Anita, S

    2013-08-01

    Intra-articular synovial lipomas are very rare and only few cases have been reported till now. We are reporting a rare case of a unilateral intra-articular lipoma of osteoarthritic knee joint in a 62 years old male. Patient had two episodes of sudden locking of knee joint, which resolved spontaneously. A plain X-ray showed changes which were suggestive of osteoarthritis. Clinically, patient was diagnosed as a case of loose bodies in left knee joint. An arthrotomy was performed. After a Histopathological Examination (HPE) of loose bodies, a diagnosis of an intra-articular synovial lipoma was made. Due to wide differentials and varied clinical behaviour of loose bodies, lipoma should be included in differential diagnosis of osteroarthritic patients who complain of episodic locking of knees. Intraarticular lipomas, on arthroscopic guided excision, get cured permanently, with no recurrence. The differentiation of an intra-articular lipoma from a relatively more common entity, Lipoma arborescens, has also been discussed.

  17. Diagnosing Septic Arthritis in the Synovial White Cell Count "Gray Zone".

    PubMed

    Ruzbarsky, Joseph J; Gladnick, Brian P; Dodwell, Emily

    2016-07-01

    Differentiating septic arthritis of the pediatric hip from other causes of hip pain and effusion continues to present a diagnostic challenge for the clinician. Although septic arthritis traditionally has been reported to have a synovial white blood cell count of 75,000 cells/mm3 or greater, lower counts can be seen in this condition. In cases where a synovial sample has been obtained and the cell count falls in the intermediate range between 25,000 and 75,000 cells/mm(3), it is unclear what proportion of these cases may be truly septic hips. In this evidence-based review, we examine Heyworth et al's study focusing on the predictive value of this intermediate white cell count range in a Lyme-endemic region.

  18. The surprising outcome of a giant primary mediastinal synovial sarcoma treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Balieiro, Marcos Alexandre; Costa, Bruno Pinheiro; Veras, Gustavo Perissé Moreira; Perelson, Paulo Sergio; Acatauassú Nunes, Rodolfo; Saito, Eduardo Haruo

    2013-01-01

    There are only a few cases of primary mediastinal synovial sarcoma in the literature. Normally, they do not respond well to chemotherapy. In our case, a 30-year-old patient was admitted due to thoracic pain, dyspnea, orthopnea, cough, hoarseness and weight loss over a 3-month period as well as a dramatic worsening a week before the admission. A chest radiography showed a completely white left hemithorax and contralateral mediastinal shift; in addition, a chest tomography revealed a giant heterogeneous mediastinal mass, lung atelectasia and a small pleural effusion. The patient was submitted to Chamberlain procedure (biopsy) under local anesthesia and the diagnosis of a synovial sarcoma was obtained after immunohistochemical analysis. Due to his poor general condition, he received chemotherapy first, with a dramatic response, after what, the mass that had been reduced was removed surgically. After a 5-year- follow-up period there are no signs of disease recurrence. PMID:23372956

  19. The surprising outcome of a giant primary mediastinal synovial sarcoma treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Balieiro, Marcos Alexandre; Lopes, Agnaldo José; Costa, Bruno Pinheiro; Veras, Gustavo Perissé Moreira; Perelson, Paulo Sergio; Acatauassú Nunes, Rodolfo; Saito, Eduardo Haruo

    2013-02-01

    There are only a few cases of primary mediastinal synovial sarcoma in the literature. Normally, they do not respond well to chemotherapy. In our case, a 30-year-old patient was admitted due to thoracic pain, dyspnea, orthopnea, cough, hoarseness and weight loss over a 3-month period as well as a dramatic worsening a week before the admission. A chest radiography showed a completely white left hemithorax and contralateral mediastinal shift; in addition, a chest tomography revealed a giant heterogeneous mediastinal mass, lung atelectasia and a small pleural effusion. The patient was submitted to Chamberlain procedure (biopsy) under local anesthesia and the diagnosis of a synovial sarcoma was obtained after immunohistochemical analysis. Due to his poor general condition, he received chemotherapy first, with a dramatic response, after what, the mass that had been reduced was removed surgically. After a 5-year- follow-up period there are no signs of disease recurrence. PMID:23372956

  20. Primary pulmonary synovial sarcoma: a case report with unique and impressive computed tomography findings.

    PubMed

    Kambo, Jaspreet S; Richardson, Bonnie; Ionescu, Diana N; Tucker, Tracy; Kraushaar, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Primary pulmonary synovial sarcoma (PPSS) is a rare malignancy. Its etiology, imaging features and optimal treatment are not well understood. Pulmonary pseudoaneurysms and lymphadenopathy are rare complications of synovial sarcomas. A 40-year-old woman with mild hemoptysis and thoracic back pain underwent a computed tomography scan that revealed multiple pulmonary lesions, paraesophageal lymphadenopathy and incidental bilateral pulmonary emboli. A diagnosis of PPSS was made through the identification of an SS18 translocation by fluorescence in situ hybridization. She was started on adriamycin, ifosfamide and mesna chemotherapy. Over the subsequent two months, she developed three pulmonary artery pseudoaneurysms, ultimately requiring endovascular coiling. Seven months after starting treatment, the patient was asymptomatic. The lesions and lymphadenopathy decreased in size. The present case highlights complications of a rare malignancy and demonstrates positive response to ifosfamide-based chemotherapy in the setting of PPSS. PMID:25664459

  1. Identification of cytotoxic agents disrupting synovial sarcoma oncoprotein interactions by proximity ligation assay

    PubMed Central

    Laporte, Aimée N.; Ji, Jennifer X.; Ma, Limin; Nielsen, Torsten O.; Brodin, Bertha A.

    2016-01-01

    Conventional cytotoxic therapies for synovial sarcoma provide limited benefit. Drugs specifically targeting the product of its driver translocation are currently unavailable, in part because the SS18-SSX oncoprotein functions via aberrant interactions within multiprotein complexes. Proximity ligation assay is a recently-developed method that assesses protein-protein interactions in situ. Here we report use of the proximity ligation assay to confirm the oncogenic association of SS18-SSX with its co-factor TLE1 in multiple human synovial sarcoma cell lines and in surgically-excised human tumor tissue. SS18-SSX/TLE1 interactions are disrupted by class I HDAC inhibitors and novel small molecule inhibitors. This assay can be applied in a high-throughput format for drug discovery in fusion-oncoprotein associated cancers where key effector partners are known. PMID:27120803

  2. Synovial sarcoma of the parotid gland: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Rigante, M; Visocchi, M; Petrone, G; Mulè, A; Bussu, F

    2011-02-01

    Parotid gland tumours are very heterogeneous, being benign in 80% of cases, and generally arising from epithelial cells. Nevertheless, a small group of non-epithelial tumours representing just 5% of all salivary gland neoplasms has also been reported, the most common of these being haemangioma, especially in children. However, lymphomas, neuromas, neurofibromas, lipomas and sarcomas can also be found. Synovial cell sarcoma is a high grade histological variety of sarcoma and is generally located near large joints and bursae of the lower extremities, such as knee, tendon sheaths and bursal structures. It is rarely found in the head and neck region due to its lack of synovioblastic tissue. Herewith, the case of a young female, affected by a synovial sarcoma of the left parotid gland, is presented and a review is made of the literature on this rare specific localization focusing on management and outcome.

  3. 5-Lipoxygenase Inhibitors Attenuate TNF-α-Induced Inflammation in Human Synovial Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Han-Ching; Lin, Tzu-Hung; Wu, Ming-Yueh; Chiu, Yung-Cheng; Tang, Chih-Hsin; Hour, Mann-Jen; Liou, Houng-Chi; Tu, Huang-Ju; Yang, Rong-Sen; Fu, Wen-Mei

    2014-01-01

    The lipoxygenase isoform of 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) is reported to be overexpressed in human rheumatoid arthritis synovial tissue and involved in the progress of inflammatory arthritis. However, the detailed mechanism of how 5-lipoxygenase regulates the inflammatory response in arthritis synovial tissue is still unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of lipoxygenase pathways in TNF-α-induced production of cytokines and chemokines. Human synovial fibroblasts from rheumatoid patients were used in this study. 5-LOX inhibitors and shRNA were used to examine the involvement of 5-LOX in TNF-α-induced cytokines and chemokines expression. The signaling pathways were examined by Western Blotting or immunofluorescence staining. The effect of 5-LOX inhibitor on TNF-α-induced chemokine expression and paw edema was also explored in vivo in C57BL/6 mice. Treatment with 5-LOX inhibitors significantly decreased TNF-α-induced pro-inflammatory mediators including interleukin-6 (IL-6) and monocyte chemo-attractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in human synovial fibroblasts. Knockdown of 5-LOX using shRNA exerted similar inhibitory effects. The abrogation of NF-κB activation was involved in the antagonizing effects of these inhibitors. Furthermore, 5-LOX inhibitor decreased TNF-α-induced up-regulation of serum MCP-1 level and paw edema in mouse model. Our results provide the evidence that the administration of 5-LOX inhibitors is able to ameliorate TNF-α-induced cytokine/chemokine release and paw edema, indicating that 5-LOX inhibitors may be developed for therapeutic treatment of inflammatory arthritis. PMID:25229347

  4. The impact of chromosomal translocation locus and fusion oncogene coding sequence in synovial sarcomagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Kevin B.; Barrott, Jared J.; Xie, Mingchao; Haldar, Malay; Jin, Huifeng; Zhu, Ju-Fen; Monument, Michael J.; Mosbruger, Tim L.; Langer, Ellen M.; Randall, R. Lor; Wilson, Richard K.; Cairns, Bradley R.; Ding, Li; Capecchi, Mario R.

    2016-01-01

    Synovial sarcomas are aggressive soft-tissue malignancies that express chromosomal translocation-generated fusion genes, SS18-SSX1 or SS18-SSX2 in most cases. Here, we report a mouse sarcoma model expressing SS18-SSX1, complementing our prior model expressing SS18-SSX2. Exome sequencing identified no recurrent secondary mutations in tumors of either genotype. Most of the few mutations identified in single tumors were present in genes that were minimally or not expressed in any of the tumors. Chromosome 6, either entirely or around the fusion gene expression locus, demonstrated a copy number gain in a majority of tumors of both genotypes. Thus, by fusion oncogene coding sequence alone, SS18-SSX1 and SS18-SSX2 can each drive comparable synovial sarcomagenesis, independent from other genetic drivers. SS18-SSX1 and SS18-SSX2 tumor transcriptomes demonstrated very few consistent differences overall. In direct tumorigenesis comparisons, SS18-SSX2 was slightly more sarcomagenic than SS18-SSX1, but equivalent in its generation of biphasic histologic features. Meta-analysis of human synovial sarcoma patient series identified two tumor-gentoype-phenotype correlations that were not modeled by the mice, namely a scarcity of male hosts and biphasic histologic features among SS18-SSX2 tumors. Re-analysis of human SS18-SSX1 and SS18-SSX2 tumor transcriptomes demonstrated very few consistent differences, but highlighted increased native SSX2 expression in SS18-SSX1 tumors. This suggests that the translocated locus may drive genotype-phenotype differences more than the coding sequence of the fusion gene created. Two possible roles for native SSX2 in synovial sarcomagenesis are explored. Thus even specific partial failures of mouse genetic modeling can be instructive to human tumor biology. PMID:26947017

  5. Nitric Oxide-Driven Hypoxia Initiates Synovial Angiogenesis, Hyperplasia and Inflammatory Lesions in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Fei; Wu, Pei; Xiao, Na; Qiu, Frank; Zeng, Qing-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory articular disease with cartilage and bone damage due to hyperplasic synoviocyte invasion and subsequent matrix protease digestion. Although monoclonal antibodies against tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) have been approved for clinical use in patients with RA, desired therapeutic regimens suitable for non-responders are still unavailable because etiological initiators leading to RA remain enigmatic and unidentified. Methodology/Principal Findings Bacteria-induced arthritis (BIA) that simulates collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is developed in mice upon daily live bacterial feeding. The morphological lesions of paw erythema and edema together with the histological alterations of synovial hyperplasia and lymphocytic infiltration emerge as the early-phase manifestations of BIA and CIA. Bacteria- or collagen-mediated global upregulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines is accompanied by the burst of nitric oxide (NO). Elevation of the serum NO level is correlated with decline of the blood oxygen saturation percentage (SpO2), reflecting a hypoxic consequence during development towards arthritis. NO-driven hypoxia is further evident from a positive relationship between NO and lactic acid (LA), an end product from glycolysis. Upregulation of hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) validates hypoxia-induced angiogenesis in the inflamed synovium of modeling mice. Administration of the NO donor compound sodium nitroprusside (SNP) causes articular inflammation by inducing synovial hypoxia. Anti-bacteria by the antibiotic cefotaxime and/or the immunosuppressant rapamycin or artesunate that also inhibits nitric oxide synthase (NOS) can abrogate NO production, mitigate hypoxia, and considerably ameliorate or even completely abort synovitis, hence highlighting that NO may serve as an initiator of inflammatory arthritis. Conclusions/Significance Like collagen, bacteria also

  6. A case of synovial sarcoma with bone metastasis identified by bone marrow scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Otsuka, N.; Morita, R.; Yamamoto, T.; Muranaka, A.; Tomomitsu, T.; Yanagimoto, S.; Sone, T.; Fukunaga, M.

    1985-04-01

    In a patient with synovial sarcoma, routine bone survey showed no abnormality, while bone marrow scintigraphy with Tc-99m sulfur colloid revealed a defect in the fifth lumbar vertebra. At surgery, tumorous invasion was noted in the fifth lumbar vertebra and the surrounding tissues. It was suggested that the bone marrow scintigraphy was particularly useful in the detection of tumorous invasion into the bone marrow at the early stage before the destruction of skeletal tissue.

  7. [Cyclic nucleotides and enzymes of the synovial fluid in various rheumatic diseases].

    PubMed

    Buneaux, J J; Djiane, F; Gounelle, J C; Galmiche, P

    1980-01-01

    The authors measured the activities of four enzymes (L.D.H., acid phosphatase, B glucuronidase, and lysozyme) and the contents of AMPc and GMPc in the synovial fluid in 35 patients with rheumatic disease. In those with various forms of inflammatory rheumatism, they found negative correlation between AMPc and the enzymes, whereas in rheumatoid arthritis they observed a positive correlation between GMPc and these enzymes. PMID:6968447

  8. The molecular structure and lubricating activity of lubricin isolated from bovine and human synovial fluids.

    PubMed Central

    Swann, D A; Silver, F H; Slayter, H S; Stafford, W; Shore, E

    1985-01-01

    Lubricin was isolated from bovine ankle, metacarpophalangeal and knee and human knee synovial fluids. The lubricins isolated from the bovine joint fluids had the same amino acid and carbohydrate compositions, but differences were observed in the relative molecular masses. The Mr values of bovine metacarpophalangeal and ankle lubricin determined by light-scattering measurements were about 200 000, whereas values of 132 000 and 143 000 were obtained for the bovine knee lubricin. The human knee lubricin had a similar carbohydrate composition to bovine knee lubricin except for the higher glucosamine content, and the amino acid composition differed slightly. The human sample had a lower glutamic acid content and a leucine/isoleucine ratio of 2:1 compared with 1:1 in the bovine. The Mr value of the human knee lubricin (166 000) was also lower than that of the bovine metacarpophalangeal and ankle samples. The Mr value of the bovine knee lubricin determined by sedimentation-equilibrium measurements was 171 000. The length measurements determined by electron microscopy and also the sedimentation measurements showed considerable polydispersity and indicate that the degree of extension of lubricin molecules can vary. Friction measurements showed that the human knee synovial-fluid lubricin had equivalent lubricating ability in a test system in vitro to that observed for lubricin isolated from normal bovine synovial fluids. The lubricating ability of lubricin was concentration-dependent, and each lubricin sample was able to act as a lubricant in vitro in an equivalent manner to whole synovial fluid at concentrations that are thought to occur in vivo. PMID:3977823

  9. Identification of candidate synovial membrane biomarkers after Achyranthes aspera treatment for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wen; Lu, Xianghong; Fu, Zhirong; Zhang, Lin; Li, Ximin; Xu, Xiaobao; Ren, Yina; Lu, Yongzhuang; Fu, Hongwei; Tian, Jingkui

    2016-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease whose main symptom is a heightened inflammatory response in synovial tissues. To verify the anti-arthritic activities of Achyranthes aspera and its possible therapy-related factors on the pathogenesis of RA, the saponins in A. aspera root were isolated and identified to treat the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rats. Phytochemical analysis isolated and identified methyl caffeate, 25-S-inokosterone, 25-S-inokosterone β-D-glucopyranosyl 3-(O-β-D-glucopyranosyloxy)-oleanolate, and β-D-glucopyranosyl 3-(O-β-D-galactopyranosyl (1→2)(O-β-D-glucopyranosyloxy)-oleanolate as main compounds in the root of A. aspera. Proteomics was performed to determine the differentially expressed proteins in either inflamed or drug-treated synovium of CIA rats. Treatment resulted in dramatically decreased paw swelling, proliferation of inflammatory cells, and bone degradation. Fibrinogen, procollagen, protein disulfide-isomerase A3, and apolipoprotein A-I were all increased in inflamed synovial tissues and were found to decrease when administered drug therapy. Furthermore, Alpha-1-antiproteinase and manganese superoxide dismutase were both increased in drug-treated synovial tissues. The inhibition of RA progression shows that A. aspera is a promising candidate for future treatment of human arthritis. Importantly, the total saponins found within A. aspera are the active component. Finally, autoantigens such as fibrinogen and collagen could act as inducers of RA due to their aggravation of inflammation. Given this, it is possible that the vimentin and PDIA3 could be the candidate biomarkers specific to Achyranthes saponin therapy for rheumatoid arthritis in synovial membrane.

  10. Extensive Surgical Treatment of Primary Pulmonary Synovial Sarcoma After Recurrent Pneumothorax.

    PubMed

    Petrosyan, Andranik; Bergeron, Patrice

    2015-11-01

    A 26-year-old woman with a history of right-sided recurrent pneumothorax and resection of pulmonary bullae, pleural abrasion, and talc pleurodesis underwent right-sided extensive pleural pneumonectomy for a monophasic primary pleural-pulmonary synovial sarcoma (PPSS). The pathologic diagnosis was predominantly fusiform PPSS with R0 resection. Sixteen months after the operation, she is alive, without signs of new lesions. The extensive tumor resection can achieve a good result for controlling local disease. PMID:26522536

  11. 15 CFR 296.31 - Dissemination of results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Dissemination of results. 296.31... PROGRAM Dissemination of Program Results § 296.31 Dissemination of results. Results stemming from the... perspective. Such disseminated results will serve to educate both external constituencies as well as...

  12. A Rare Sequela of Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Kodadhala, Vijay; Kurukumbi, Mohankumar; Jayam-Trouth, Annapurni

    2014-01-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis is a demyelinating disease, typically occurring in children following a febrile infection or a vaccination. Primary and secondary immune responses contribute to inflammation and subsequent demyelination, but the exact pathogenesis is still unknown. Diagnosis of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis is strongly suggested by temporal relationship between an infection or an immunization and the onset of neurological symptoms. Biopsy is definitive. In general, the disease is self-limiting and the prognostic outcome is favorable with anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive agents. Locked-in syndrome describes patients who are awake and conscious but have no means of producing limb, speech, or facial movements. Locked-in syndrome is a rare complication of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. We present a case of incomplete locked-in syndrome occurring in a 34-year-old male secondary to acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. Our case is unique, as acute disseminated encephalomyelitis occurred in a 34-year-old which was poorly responsive to immunosuppression resulting in severe disability. PMID:24977089

  13. Comprehensive analysis of information dissemination in disasters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, N.; Huang, H.; Su, Boni

    2016-11-01

    China is a country that experiences a large number of disasters. The number of deaths caused by large-scale disasters and accidents in past 10 years is around 900,000. More than 92.8 percent of these deaths could be avoided if there were an effective pre-warning system deployed. Knowledge of the information dissemination characteristics of different information media taking into consideration governmental assistance (information published by a government) in disasters in urban areas, plays a critical role in increasing response time and reducing the number of deaths and economic losses. In this paper we have developed a comprehensive information dissemination model to optimize efficiency of pre-warning mechanics. This model also can be used for disseminating information for evacuees making real-time evacuation plans. We analyzed every single information dissemination models for pre-warning in disasters by considering 14 media: short message service (SMS), phone, television, radio, news portals, Wechat, microblogs, email, newspapers, loudspeaker vehicles, loudspeakers, oral communication, and passive information acquisition via visual and auditory senses. Since governmental assistance is very useful in a disaster, we calculated the sensitivity of governmental assistance ratio. The results provide useful references for information dissemination during disasters in urban areas.

  14. Biphasic synovial sarcoma in a 19-year-old pregnant woman: a case report.

    PubMed

    Adameşteanu, Mădălina Olivia; Scurtu, Răzvan; Lascăr, Ioan; Vâlcu, Marek; Popescu, Şerban Arghir; Sebe, Ioana Teona

    2015-01-01

    Synovial sarcoma is a rare malignant tumor of mesenchymal multipotent cells. We hereby present a case of synovial sarcoma of the upper left thigh. A 19-year-old patient was referred to our clinic by another hospital in Bucharest, Romania, for a soft tissue mass in the left upper thigh. Local examination of the left thigh revealed a 15÷13 cm, ovoid, painful upon touch, soft tissue mass occupying the proximal-medial aspect of the thigh. Bilateral inguinal nodes' enlargement was noticed. Upon suspecting regional node involvement, the surgical team decided to perform left limb amputation due to tumor size and the proximity to major arterial and nervous trunks as well as the femoral shaft, making curative surgery and 'free of disease' resection margins improbable. The patient refused the operation. The surgical team (plastic surgeon, orthopedic surgeon) decided to attempt limb-sparing surgery. After tumor resection, free-of-disease surgical margins were achieved. The pathological examination as well as the immunohistochemistry (IHC) diagnosed a large biphasic synovial sarcoma warranting oncologic treatment. The association between tumor growth and pregnancy poses important therapeutic problems, such as the use of preoperative chemotherapy, potential pregnancy termination, limb amputation versus limb salvage intervention and types of protocols of chemotherapy or radiotherapy indicated.

  15. Pre-tibial synovial cyst after reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament: case report.

    PubMed

    Bulisani, Luís Eduardo Pedigoni; Bulisani, Erickson

    2014-01-01

    Arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament has been modernized through new surgical techniques and new materials. When tibial fixation is performed using an absorbable screw, complications may occur, such as formation of a pre-tibial cyst. The case described here is about a patient who presented an anteromedial synovial cyst in his right knee, three years after having undergone ACL reconstruction. The patient did not present any pain nor any complaints other than a mass that progressively increased in size, worsened after physical activities. Imaging examinations were requested: simple radiography of the knee and magnetic resonance. Anteromedial imaging of the knee showed a mass with well-delimited borders and internal fluid content, suggestive of a synovial cyst, with communication with the joint cavity through the tibial tunnel, without presenting enlargement or absorption of the bone tunnel. The cyst was surgically resected and the tibial tunnel occlusion was performed using a bone plug. The diagnosis of a synovial cyst was subsequently confirmed through the results from the anatomopathological examination. The patient presented good clinical evolution, with disappearance of the symptoms and a return to physical activities. PMID:26229880

  16. Fibronectin Splice Variation in Human Knee Cartilage, Meniscus and Synovial Membrane: Observations in Osteoarthritic Knee

    PubMed Central

    Scanzello, Carla R.; Markova, Dessislava Z.; Chee, Ana; Xiu, Yan; Adams, Sherrill L.; Anderson, Greg; Zgonis, Miltiadis; Qin, Ling; An, Howard S.; Zhang, Yejia

    2014-01-01

    Objective Fibronectin (FN) is a widely expressed molecule that can participate in development of osteoarthritis (OA) affecting cartilage, meniscus, and synovial membrane (SM). The alternatively spliced isoforms of FN in joint tissues other than cartilage have not been extensively studied previously. The present study compares FN splice variation in patients with varying degrees of osteoarthritic change. Design Joint tissues were collected from asymptomatic donors and patients undergoing arthroscopic procedures. Total RNA was amplified by PCR using primers flanking alternatively spliced Extra Domain A (EDA), Extra Domain B (EDB) and Variable (V) regions. Results EDB+, EDB− and EDA− and V+ variants were present in all joint tissues, while the EDA+ variant was rarely detected. Expression levels of EDB+ and EDV+ variants were similar in cartilage, synovium and meniscal tissues. Synovial expression of V+ FN in arthroscopy patients varied with degree of cartilage degeneration. Two V− isoforms, previously identified in cartilage, were also present in SM and meniscus. Conclusions Fibronectin splicing in meniscus and SM bears striking resemblance to that of cartilage. Expression levels of synovial V+ FN varied with degree of cartilage degeneration. V+ FN should be investigated as a potential biomarker of disease stage or progression in larger populations. PMID:25410897

  17. A protocol for the culture and isolation of murine synovial fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jinjun; Ouyang, Qingqing; Hu, Ziyou; Huang, Qin; Wu, Jing; Wang, Ran; Yang, Min

    2016-01-01

    The culture of synovial fibroblasts (SFs) is one of the most effective tools for investigating the pathology and physiology of synovial tissues and should prove useful for identifying the importance of SFs in disease as well as for the development of novel therapeutic approaches for several chronic joint diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis. However, thus far, a detailed protocol for the primary culture and isolation of murine SFs has not been established. Therefore, the present study describes an easy and convenient method for isolating and culturing SFs from C57BL/6 mice. This protocol can be divided into 4 stages: Isolation of synovial tissues, isolation of SFs, seeding of SFs for growth in culture and purity analysis of SFs using the four cell markers, vimentin, cluster of differentiation 90.2 (CD90.2; Thy-1.2), intracellular adhesion molecule 1 (CD54) and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (CD106). This method is efficient and a purified population of SFs can be obtained 10 days after the initiation of culture. PMID:27446536

  18. A Tumour in Disguise in the Right Palm- Monophasic Synovial Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Arumugam, Vasugi Gramani; Sundaram, Sandhya; Ramesh, Anita; Duvuru, Prathiba; Rajappa, Srinivasa

    2016-05-01

    Synovial sarcoma is one of the poorly differentiated malignant soft tissue tumour occuring commonly among young adults in the extremities. We report a 50-year-old female presenting with a soft tissue mass in the right palm. On examination, a single firm and non tender swelling was noticed adjacent to the thenar muscles. Radiology suggested a benign soft tissue lesion. The swelling, clinically thought to be a lipoma, was excised and sent for histopathological examination. Microscopy showed a highly cellular tumour arranged in nests, cords and pseudo glandular pattern separated by dense fibrocollagenous tissue. An interesting and baffling finding was the presence of a distinct mucin vacuole in many of the tumour cells. A diagnosis of soft tissue sarcoma with epithelial features was considered and a panel of immunohistochemical stains done. Tumour cells showed strong positivity for cytokeratin 7, vimentin, EMA & Bcl2. CD 99 and S100 were focally positive. CD 34 and CEA were negative. In view of the above microscopic and immunohistochemical findings, a diagnosis of monophasic synovial sarcoma of epithelial type was rendered. This case is being documented for the rare morphological appearance of mucin vacuoles in a monophasic epithelial type synovial sarcoma. PMID:27437233

  19. Penetration of daptomycin into bone and synovial fluid in joint replacement.

    PubMed

    Montange, D; Berthier, F; Leclerc, G; Serre, A; Jeunet, L; Berard, M; Muret, P; Vettoretti, L; Leroy, J; Hoen, B; Chirouze, C

    2014-07-01

    Daptomycin exhibits clinical activity in the treatment of infections with Gram-positive organisms, including infections due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. However, little is known about its penetration into bone and synovial fluid. The aim of our study was to assess the penetration of daptomycin into bone and synovial fluid after a single intravenous administration. This study was conducted in 16 patients who underwent knee or hip replacement and received a single intravenous dose of 8 mg of daptomycin per kg of body weight prior to surgery. Plasma daptomycin concentrations were measured 1 h after the end of daptomycin infusion and when bone fragments were removed. Daptomycin concentrations were also measured on bone fragments and synovial fluid collected at the same time during surgery. All samples were analyzed with a diode array-high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method. After a single-dose intravenous infusion, bone daptomycin concentrations were above the MIC of daptomycin for Staphylococcus aureus in all subjects, and the median bone penetration percentage was 9.0% (interquartile range [IQR], 4.4 to 11.4). These results support the use of daptomycin in the treatment of Staphylococcus aureus bone and joint infections.

  20. Pre-tibial synovial cyst after reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament: case report.

    PubMed

    Bulisani, Luís Eduardo Pedigoni; Bulisani, Erickson

    2014-01-01

    Arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament has been modernized through new surgical techniques and new materials. When tibial fixation is performed using an absorbable screw, complications may occur, such as formation of a pre-tibial cyst. The case described here is about a patient who presented an anteromedial synovial cyst in his right knee, three years after having undergone ACL reconstruction. The patient did not present any pain nor any complaints other than a mass that progressively increased in size, worsened after physical activities. Imaging examinations were requested: simple radiography of the knee and magnetic resonance. Anteromedial imaging of the knee showed a mass with well-delimited borders and internal fluid content, suggestive of a synovial cyst, with communication with the joint cavity through the tibial tunnel, without presenting enlargement or absorption of the bone tunnel. The cyst was surgically resected and the tibial tunnel occlusion was performed using a bone plug. The diagnosis of a synovial cyst was subsequently confirmed through the results from the anatomopathological examination. The patient presented good clinical evolution, with disappearance of the symptoms and a return to physical activities.

  1. Abundant lubricin expression suggests a link between synoviocytes, synovial tumors, and myxomas.

    PubMed

    Solka, Kathryn A; Schmid, Thomas M; Miller, Ira J

    2016-10-01

    Progenitor cell differentiation into fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLSs) and their ensuing phenotypic changes are incompletely explored. Synovial lining is composed of intimal macrophages and FLSs. FLSs have epithelioid morphology and directionally secrete components of synovial fluid, including lubricin. We stained human tissues and tumors using two anti-lubricin antibodies. Lubricin was found in FLSs in synovium and in tenosynovial giant cell tumors (TSGCTs) and not in the associated monocyte/macrophage cells, which were identified by double immunostaining for CD163. In TSGCTs, giant cells, known to form by fusion of mononuclear cells, were negative for both lubricin and CD163. Occasional mononuclear cells with the same phenotype were also seen, suggesting that the precursors of the giant cells are derived from the minor CD163-negative monocyte subset. Lubricin was also detected in intramuscular myxomas, in early myxoid changes of ganglion cysts, and in one of five low-grade myxofibrosarcomas, but not in other fibroconnective tissues, epithelial tissues, or other tumors tested. This suggests that lubricin expression may typify adaptive and neoplastic changes along a pathway toward FLSs. Further support for this concept comes from ganglion cysts and juxta-articular myxoma tumors, which show a spectrum of myxoid, cystic and synovial differentiation, and in which moderate lubricin staining of myxoid stroma was seen.

  2. A Tumour in Disguise in the Right Palm- Monophasic Synovial Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Arumugam, Vasugi Gramani; Sundaram, Sandhya; Ramesh, Anita; Duvuru, Prathiba; Rajappa, Srinivasa

    2016-05-01

    Synovial sarcoma is one of the poorly differentiated malignant soft tissue tumour occuring commonly among young adults in the extremities. We report a 50-year-old female presenting with a soft tissue mass in the right palm. On examination, a single firm and non tender swelling was noticed adjacent to the thenar muscles. Radiology suggested a benign soft tissue lesion. The swelling, clinically thought to be a lipoma, was excised and sent for histopathological examination. Microscopy showed a highly cellular tumour arranged in nests, cords and pseudo glandular pattern separated by dense fibrocollagenous tissue. An interesting and baffling finding was the presence of a distinct mucin vacuole in many of the tumour cells. A diagnosis of soft tissue sarcoma with epithelial features was considered and a panel of immunohistochemical stains done. Tumour cells showed strong positivity for cytokeratin 7, vimentin, EMA & Bcl2. CD 99 and S100 were focally positive. CD 34 and CEA were negative. In view of the above microscopic and immunohistochemical findings, a diagnosis of monophasic synovial sarcoma of epithelial type was rendered. This case is being documented for the rare morphological appearance of mucin vacuoles in a monophasic epithelial type synovial sarcoma.

  3. A Tumour in Disguise in the Right Palm- Monophasic Synovial Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Arumugam, Vasugi Gramani; Ramesh, Anita; Duvuru, Prathiba; Rajappa, Srinivasa

    2016-01-01

    Synovial sarcoma is one of the poorly differentiated malignant soft tissue tumour occuring commonly among young adults in the extremities. We report a 50-year-old female presenting with a soft tissue mass in the right palm. On examination, a single firm and non tender swelling was noticed adjacent to the thenar muscles. Radiology suggested a benign soft tissue lesion. The swelling, clinically thought to be a lipoma, was excised and sent for histopathological examination. Microscopy showed a highly cellular tumour arranged in nests, cords and pseudo glandular pattern separated by dense fibrocollagenous tissue. An interesting and baffling finding was the presence of a distinct mucin vacuole in many of the tumour cells. A diagnosis of soft tissue sarcoma with epithelial features was considered and a panel of immunohistochemical stains done. Tumour cells showed strong positivity for cytokeratin 7, vimentin, EMA & Bcl2. CD 99 and S100 were focally positive. CD 34 and CEA were negative. In view of the above microscopic and immunohistochemical findings, a diagnosis of monophasic synovial sarcoma of epithelial type was rendered. This case is being documented for the rare morphological appearance of mucin vacuoles in a monophasic epithelial type synovial sarcoma. PMID:27437233

  4. Penetration of Daptomycin into Bone and Synovial Fluid in Joint Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Montange, D.; Berthier, F.; Leclerc, G.; Serre, A.; Jeunet, L.; Berard, M.; Muret, P.; Vettoretti, L.; Leroy, J.; Hoen, B.

    2014-01-01

    Daptomycin exhibits clinical activity in the treatment of infections with Gram-positive organisms, including infections due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. However, little is known about its penetration into bone and synovial fluid. The aim of our study was to assess the penetration of daptomycin into bone and synovial fluid after a single intravenous administration. This study was conducted in 16 patients who underwent knee or hip replacement and received a single intravenous dose of 8 mg of daptomycin per kg of body weight prior to surgery. Plasma daptomycin concentrations were measured 1 h after the end of daptomycin infusion and when bone fragments were removed. Daptomycin concentrations were also measured on bone fragments and synovial fluid collected at the same time during surgery. All samples were analyzed with a diode array–high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method. After a single-dose intravenous infusion, bone daptomycin concentrations were above the MIC of daptomycin for Staphylococcus aureus in all subjects, and the median bone penetration percentage was 9.0% (interquartile range [IQR], 4.4 to 11.4). These results support the use of daptomycin in the treatment of Staphylococcus aureus bone and joint infections. PMID:24798278

  5. Plasma and synovial fluid concentrations of calcium pentosan polysulphate achieved in the horse following intramuscular injection.

    PubMed

    Fuller, C J; Ghosh, P; Barr, A R S

    2002-01-01

    Results from in vitro studies have indicated that calcium pentosan polysulphate (CaPPS) may be of therapeutic value in osteoarthritis (OA) in the horse. However, no controlled clinical trials using this drug in equine OA have yet been reported. If CaPPS is to be developed for such use, the relationship between the proposed i.m. dose of CaPPS to be used and the concentrations of drug attained in plasma and synovial fluid of the target joint should first be established. An investigation was undertaken to determine these concentrations after a single 2 mg/kg i.m. injection of CaPPS. Blood and synovial fluid samples were taken from 6 healthy, sound horses following i.m. CaPPS administration. Concentrations of CaPPS measured in the synovial fluid were, on the basis of published studies, sufficient to elicit a potential therapeutic effect on synoviocyte metabolism, and possibly also to stimulate proteoglycan synthesis and reduce matrix metalloproteinase activities in articular cartilage. It would therefore seem justified to investigate further the therapeutic effect of CaPPS in OA in the horse.

  6. Antiarthritis Effect of Morin is Associated with Inhibition of Synovial Angiogensis.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Ni; Tong, Bei; Zhang, Xinyu; Dou, Yannong; Wu, Xin; Xia, Yufeng; Dai, Yue; Wei, Zhifeng

    2015-12-01

    Morin, a flavonoid isolated from Morus alba L. (Moraceae), possesses anti-inflammatory, antiangiogenic among other biological activities. This study investigated its effect on type II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in rats and explored the underlying mechanisms in view of synovial angiogenesis. Morin administered po attenuated arthritic progression as indicated by reduction of arthritis scores and paw swelling. It also markedly reduced serum levels of the proinflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), but increased the level of anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10, and ameliorated histopathological changes of joints. Morin markedly inhibited expression of CD31, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and basic fibroblast growth factor in synovial membrane tissues, and decreased serum levels of VEGF in CIA rats. In vitro, morin markedly inhibited VEGF-induced migration and tube formation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. These results indicate that morin had antirheumatoid potential, and its mechanism might be associated with inhibition of synovial angiogenesis.

  7. Lameness caused by an extradural lumbosacral foraminal synovial cyst in three German Shepherd Dogs.

    PubMed

    Schmökel, Hugo; Rapp, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Three German Shepherd Dogs that were presented for investigation of chronic unilateral hindlimb lameness and pain in the lumbosacral region were diagnosed with an intraspinal, extradural synovial cyst and reactive fibrosis protruding into the foramen of the lumbosacral articulation using magnetic resonance imaging and histology. This extradural mass compressed the nerve root in the foramen and the cauda equina. During a dorsal laminectomy and unilateral partial foraminotomy, the cyst and the fibrotic tissue were removed with the aid of a 2.4 mm 30° arthroscope for visualization of the foramen. The fibrotic tissue surrounding the cysts was in all cases confluent with the annulus of the intervertebral disc. The histological examination confirmed the diagnosis of a synovial cyst in all three cases by finding inflamed synovial membrane in the samples from the wall of the cyst as well as reactive fibrosis and cartilaginous metaplasia in the surrounding tissue. The three patients improved after the surgery and were pain free during the follow-up evaluations.

  8. Strategies for dissemination of policy research.

    PubMed

    Ament, L A

    1994-01-01

    Although there is evidence of high-quality care and cost-effective practice by certified nurse-midwives, CNMs still face many barriers to practice. Outcomes must be documented and disseminated more widely so that policy makers will be convinced that restrictions to CNM practice must be removed. The author identifies three obstacles to policy-related research dissemination: lack of cumulative data, lack of relevance to specific issues, and lack of power. To overcome these obstacles, five strategies are proposed to promote a wider dissemination of policy-related research results. CNMs must use these strategies to promote nurse-midwifery to the general public, government officials, interest groups, and policy makers.

  9. Public information, dissemination, and behavior analysis

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Edward K.

    1985-01-01

    Behavior analysts have become increasingly concerned about inaccuracies and misconceptions in the public, educational, and professional information portraying their activities, but have done little to correct these views. The present paper has two purposes in this regard. First, the paper describes some of the conditions that have given rise to these concerns. Second, and more important, the paper surveys various procedures and programs for the dissemination of public information that may correct inaccuracies and misconceptions. Special consideration is also given to issues involving (a) the assessment of the problem, (b) the content and means of dissemination, (c) the possible contributions of behavior analysts to current misunderstandings, and (d) relationships between behavior analysts and the media. The dissemination of accurate and unbiased information constitutes an important new undertaking for behavior analysis. The future of the field may depend in part on such activity. PMID:22478623

  10. Precise time dissemination via portable atomic clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putkovich, K.

    1982-01-01

    The most precise operational method of time dissemination over long distances presently available to the Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) community of users is by means of portable atomic clocks. The Global Positioning System (GPS), the latest system showing promise of replacing portable clocks for global PTTI dissemination, was evaluated. Although GPS has the technical capability of providing superior world-wide dissemination, the question of present cost and future accessibility may require a continued reliance on portable clocks for a number of years. For these reasons a study of portable clock operations as they are carried out today was made. The portable clock system that was utilized by the U.S. Naval Observatory (NAVOBSY) in the global synchronization of clocks over the past 17 years is described and the concepts on which it is based are explained. Some of its capabilities and limitations are also discussed.

  11. [Clinical picture and epidemiology of disseminated sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Popov, V S

    1983-01-01

    The prevalence and characteristic features of the clinical course of disseminated sclerosis in the population of the Far North were studied. The proportion of disseminated sclerosis among organic diseases of the central nervous system in this area is considerably lower (0.36%) than in many regions and areas of Western and Eastern Siberia and especially in the central regions of the European part of the USSR. A considerable difference in the incidence of this disease between the local population and newcomers is noted, namely 7% and 93%, respectively. Local population displays a more progressive course of the disease. No cases of disseminated sclerosis have been recorded among the indigenous population i.e., yakutes and small nationalities of the North.

  12. The use of native fluorescence analysis of synovial fluid in the diagnosis of medial compartment disease in medium- and large-breed dogs.

    PubMed

    Bilská, Kamila; Šteffeková, Zuzana; Birková, Anna; Mareková, Mária; Ledecký, Valent; Hluchý, Marián; Kisková, Terézia

    2016-05-01

    We assumed that proteins are most likely responsible for synovial fluid fluorescence and that changes detected in fluorescence intensity are most likely the result of changes in the concentration of fluorescent proteins. Synchronous fluorescent matrices from synovial fluid samples were measured in the excitation wavelength range of 200-350 nm using a luminescence spectrophotometer. The synchronous matrix of synovial fluid consists of 2 dominant fluorescent centers (F1 and F2) in the ultraviolet region. The fluorescence intensities of both centers were significantly higher in pathological samples, with p = 0.001 (a 59% increase of the median value) for the F1 center and p = 0.002 (a 52% increase of the median value) for the F2 center. Receiver operating characteristic analysis confirmed that synovial fluid autofluorescence is a significant predictor of medial compartment disease in dogs, with the area under the curve at 0.776 (F1) and 0.778 (F2). We did not detect any differences in the autofluorescence of synovial fluid between male and female, or any breed-based changes. No position changes of fluorescent centers were recorded in the synovial fluid in diseased dogs compared with healthy dogs. The synovial fluid metabolic fingerprint of canine patients with medial compartment disease differed from that of healthy dogs. Our study demonstrated the feasibility of synovial fluid fingerprinting to identify disease-specific profiles of synovial fluid metabolites. PMID:27016720

  13. Borrelia burgdorferi Induces the Production and Release of Proinflammatory Cytokines in Canine Synovial Explant Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Straubinger, Reinhard K.; Straubinger, Alix F.; Summers, Brian A.; Erb, Hollis N.; Härter, Luc; Appel, Max J. G.

    1998-01-01

    Canine synovial membrane explants were exposed to high- or low-passage Borrelia burgdorferi for 3, 6, 12, and 24 h. Spirochetes received no treatment, were UV light irradiated for 16 h, or were sonicated prior to addition to synovial explant cultures. In explant tissues, mRNA levels for the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1α (IL-1α), IL-1β, and IL-8 were surveyed semiquantitatively by reverse transcription-PCR. Culture supernatants were examined for numbers of total and motile (i.e., viable) spirochetes, TNF-like and IL-1-like activities, polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) chemotaxis-inducing activities, and IL-8. During exposure to synovial explant tissues, the total number of spirochetes in the supernatants decreased gradually by ∼30%, and the viability also declined. mRNAs for TNF-α, IL-1α, IL-1β, and IL-8 were up-regulated in synovial explant tissues within 3 h after infection with untreated or UV light-irradiated B. burgdorferi, and mRNA levels corresponded to the results obtained with bioassays. During 24 h of coincubation, cultures challenged with untreated or UV light-irradiated spirochetes produced similar levels of TNF-like and IL-1-like activities. In contrast, explant tissues exposed to untreated B. burgdorferi generated significantly higher levels of chemotactic factors after 24 h of incubation than did explant tissues exposed to UV light-treated spirochetes. In identical samples, a specific signal for IL-8 was identified by Western blot analysis. High- and low-passage borreliae did not differ in their abilities to induce proinflammatory cytokines. No difference in cytokine induction between untreated and sonicated high-passage spirochetes was observed, suggesting that fractions of the organism can trigger the production and release of inflammatory mediators. The titration of spirochetes revealed a dose-independent cytokine response, where 103 to 107 B. burgdorferi organisms induced similar TNF

  14. Multicomponent T2 Analysis of Articular Cartilage With Synovial Fluid Partial Volume Correction

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fang; Chaudhary, Rajeev; Block, Walter F.; Samsonov, Alexey; Kijowski, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the use of a three-pool model to account for the confounding effects of synovial fluid on multicomponent T2 analysis of articular cartilage using Multicomponent Driven Equilibrium Single Shot Observation of T1 and T2 (mcDESPOT). Materials and Methods mcDESPOT was performed on the knee of eight asymptomatic volunteers and eight patients with osteoarthritis at 3.0T with multicomponent T2 maps created using the two-pool model and a three-pool model containing a nonexchanging synovial fluid water pool. The fraction of the fast-relaxing water component (FF) and the T2 relaxation times for the fast-relaxing (T2F) and slow-relaxing (T2S) water components were measured in the superficial and deep layers of patellar cartilage using the two-pool and three-pool models in asymptomatic volunteers and patients with osteoarthritis and were compared using Wilcoxon signed rank tests. Results Within the superficial layer of patellar cartilage, FF was 22.5% and 25.6% for asymptomatic volunteers and 21.3% and 22.8% for patients with osteoarthritis when using the two-pool and three-pool models, respectively, while T2S was 73.9 msec and 62.0 msec for asymptomatic volunteers and 72.0 msec and 63.1 msec for patients with osteoarthritis when using the two-pool and three-pool models, respectively. For both asymptomatic volunteers and patients with osteoarthritis, the two-pool model provided significantly (P < 0.05) lower FF and higher T2S than the three-pool model, likely due to the effects of synovial fluid partial volume averaging. Conclusion The effects of partial volume averaging between superficial cartilage and synovial fluid may result in biased multicomponent T2 measurements that can be corrected using an mcDESPOT three-pool model containing a nonexchanging synovial fluid water pool. PMID:26435385

  15. Hyaluronan secretion into the synovial cavity of rabbit knees and comparison with albumin turnover.

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, P J; Scott, D; Ray, J; Mason, R M; Levick, J R

    1997-01-01

    1. Hyaluronan is not only a lubricant but also enhances the synovial lining's resistance to fluid outflow. This finding led to the proposal that hyaluronan (> 2 x 10(6) Da, approximately 210 nm radius) may escape across the synovial lining less freely than smaller solutes (e.g. albumin, 6.7 x 10(4) Da, 3.6 nm radius) or water. Here multiple washouts were used to measure intraarticular hyaluronan mass and secretion rate in rabbit knees, leading to an estimate of hyaluronan turnover time. Plasma albumin permeation into the joint cavity was also measured to enable comparison of turnover times between molecules of very disparate size. 2. Endogenous hyaluronan mass in the joint cavity, analysed by high performance liquid chromatography of joint washes, was 182 +/- 9.9 micrograms (mean +/- S.E.M; n = 21). Since hyaluronan concentration in synovial fluid averages 3.62 +/- 0.19 micrograms microliters-1, the endogenous synovial fluid volume was calculated to be 50 microliters (mass/concentration), about double the aspiratable volume. 3. The hyaluronan secretion rate over 4 h was 4.80 +/- 0.77 micrograms h-1 (n = 5). The rate was significantly higher in contralateral joints expanded by 2 ml Ringer solution (5.80 +/- 0.84 micrograms h-1, n = 5, P = 0.01, Student's paired t test), indicating a stretch/hydration sensitive secretory mechanism. The newly secreted chains ((2.05-2.48) x 10(6) Da) were not significantly different in length from the endogenous chains (2.95 x 10(6) Da). 4. Hyaluronan turnover time, calculated as mass/secretion rate, was 31.4-37.9 h. This is more than an order of magnitude longer than turnover time for intra-articular albumin. The latter, determined from the intra-articular albumin mass and plasma-to-cavity permeation rate was 1.8 h (95% confidence intervals 1.2-3.5 h, n = 9). The big difference in turnover times support the view that, relative to albumin and water, hyaluronan is partially sieved out and retained in the joint cavity by the synovial

  16. The superbugs: evolution, dissemination and fitness.

    PubMed

    Morris, A; Kellner, J D; Low, D E

    1998-10-01

    Since the introduction of antibiotics, bacteria have not only evolved elegant resistance mechanisms to thwart their effect, but have also evolved ways in which to disseminate themselves or their resistance genes to other susceptible bacteria. During the past few years, research has revealed not only how such resistance mechanisms have been able to evolve and to rapidly disseminate, but also how bacteria have, in some cases, been able to adapt to this new burden of resistance with little or no cost to their fitness. Such adaptations make the control of these superbugs all the more difficult.

  17. Disseminated Nocardia farcinica in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Boamah, H; Puranam, P; Sandre, R M

    2016-01-01

    Nocardia farcinica is a gram-positive, partially acid-fast, methenamine silver-positive aerobic actinomycete that is infrequently associated with nocardiosis. The relative frequency of Nocardia farcinica isolates in nocardiosis is unknown but thought to be under diagnosis. It is increasingly been recognized in immunocompetent patients. We report a case of disseminated Nocardia farcinica causing brain abscess in 55 year old immunocompetent man who was successfully treated with long term antibiotics. The present report illustrates that early detection and treatment of disseminated Nocardia farcinica can lead to a good outcome. PMID:27617207

  18. Disseminated protothecosis in a Mexican child.

    PubMed

    Tello-Zavala, María Concepción; Mercado-Lara, Araceli; Gómez-Hernández, Nadia; Recio-Martinez, Veronica

    2013-12-01

    Protothecosis is a rare human infection. There are 3 clinical forms: cutaneous, olecranon bursitis and systemic. Here we present the first case of disseminated protothecosis in Mexico in an immunocompetent girl whose lesions were mostly dermatologic. The patient was successfully treated with amphotericin B colloidal dispersion and gentamicin, followed by itraconazole. PMID:23836139

  19. Knowledge Management and Global Information Dissemination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umunadi, Ejiwoke Kennedy

    2014-01-01

    The paper looked at knowledge management and global information dissemination. Knowledge is a very powerful tool for survival, growth and development. It can be seen as the information, understanding and skills that you gain through education or experience. The paper was addressed under the following sub-headings: Knowledge management knowledge…

  20. Disseminated cutaneous histoplasmosis in newly diagnosed HIV

    PubMed Central

    Soza, Gabriela M.; Patel, Mahir; Readinger, Allison

    2016-01-01

    We present a woman with a widespread severe papulopustular eruption, fever, and fatigue of 5 weeks' duration. HIV infection was diagnosed, with an absolute CD4+ count of 3 cells/µL. The eruption was consistent with disseminated cutaneous histoplasmosis. The clinical manifestations and management of cutaneous histoplasmosis are reviewed. PMID:26722169

  1. Dissemination Networks: Information Resources for Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Far West Lab. for Educational Research and Development, San Francisco, CA.

    Descriptive information is provided on 22 networks sponsored by the National Institute of Education (NIE) or the United States Office of Education (USOE) for the dissemination of educational information. The directory is arranged alphabetically by network title, followed by its acronym, sponsoring bureau/office, major functions, network members,…

  2. Computer software management, evaluation, and dissemination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The activities of the Computer Software Management and Information Center involving the collection, processing, and distribution of software developed under the auspices of NASA and certain other federal agencies are reported. Program checkout and evaluation, inventory control, customer services and marketing, dissemination, program maintenance, and special development tasks are discussed.

  3. A Proposed Framework for Educational Innovation Dissemination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazen, Benjamin T.; Wu, Yun; Sankar, Chetan S.; Jones-Farmer, L. Allison

    2012-01-01

    Although the need for new educational technologies is increasing, the process for disseminating these innovations remains a challenge. A literature review shows that few studies have thoroughly investigated this area. Furthermore, there is no comprehensive framework or coordinated research agenda that may be used to guide such investigation. This…

  4. Active Tools for Better Knowledge Dissemination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mikulecky, Peter; Mikulecka, Jaroslava

    1999-01-01

    Suggests that a solution to the inadequacy and passivity problems with push and pull technologies could be in a combination of both, with an active component, adding more intelligence to the whole process of information and knowledge dissemination and supply. Describes basic principles of activity components in intelligent systems, and some…

  5. Factors that Influence Dissemination in Engineering Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazen, B. T.; Wu, Yun; Sankar, C. S.

    2012-01-01

    Although the need for new educational materials and methods in engineering education is increasing, the process of disseminating (making target groups become aware of, accept, and use) these innovations remains a challenge. A literature review shows that few studies have thoroughly investigated this area. The purpose of this article is to identify…

  6. A Primer on Disseminating Applied Quantitative Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Bethany A.; DiStefano, Christine; Morgan, Grant B.

    2010-01-01

    Transparency and replication are essential features of scientific inquiry, yet scientific communications of applied quantitative research are often lacking in much-needed procedural information. In an effort to promote researchers dissemination of their quantitative studies in a cohesive, detailed, and informative manner, the authors delineate…

  7. Strategies for Production and Dissemination of CAI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olivier, W. P.; Scott, G. F.

    The Individualization Project at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) was organized on a cooperative basis with a federal agency and several community colleges. The main design goals were to produce needed courseware, move smoothly from research and development to a production mode of operation, and to emphasize dissemination of…

  8. Disseminated Enteroviral Infection Associated with Obinutuzumab

    PubMed Central

    Gilbertson, Michael; Korman, Tony M.; Golder, Vera; Morand, Eric; Opat, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Two cases of disseminated enteroviral infection occurred in patients who received the CD20 monoclonal antibody obinutuzumab. Clinical features included hepatitis, edema, and a dermatomyositis-like syndrome. These manifestations may be unfamiliar to clinicians and are possibly responsive to intravenous immunoglobulin. Clinicians should remain vigilant for enteroviral infections in patients receiving obinutuzumab. PMID:26291712

  9. Disseminated Mycobacterium abscessus Infection Following Septic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, Shoichi; Sekiya, Noritaka; Takizawa, Yasunobu; Morioka, Hiroshi; Kato, Hirofumi; Aono, Akio; Chikamatsu, Kinuyo; Mitarai, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Satomi; Kamei, Satoshi; Setoguchi, Keigo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mycobacterium abscessus is a rapidly growing mycobacterium found mainly in patients with respiratory or cutaneous infections, but it rarely causes disseminated infections. Little is known about the clinical characteristics, treatment, and prognosis of disseminated M abscessus infection. A 75-year-old Japanese woman who had been treated for 17 years with a corticosteroid for antisynthetase syndrome with antithreonyl-tRNA synthetase antibody developed swelling of her right elbow. X-ray of her right elbow joint showed osteolysis, and magnetic resonance imaging revealed fluid in her right elbow joint. M abscessus grew in joint fluid and blood cultures. She was diagnosed with a disseminated M abscessus infection following septic arthritis. Antimicrobial treatment by clarithromycin, amikacin, and imipenem/cilastatin combined with surgical debridement was administered. Although blood and joint fluid cultures became negative 1 week later, the patient died at 6 weeks from starting antimicrobial treatment. We reviewed 34 cases of disseminated M abscessus infections from the literature. Most of the patients had immunosuppressive backgrounds such as transplantation, use of immunosuppressive agents, hematological malignancy, and end stage renal disease. The duration from onset of symptoms to diagnosis was over 3 months in half of the cases. All fatal cases had positive blood cultures or use of immunosuppressive agents. Clinicians should bear in mind that mycobacterial infections including M abscessus are one of the differential diagnoses in patients with subacute arthritis and soft tissue infections. PMID:26020393

  10. Building State Capacity in Dissemination: Literature Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strang, Ernest W.

    This review was developed by and principally for the National Testing Service (NTS) Dissemination Project Staff. It is one of eight activities being used by NTS to develop a design for an evaluation of the State Capacity Building Program. The review is in two parts. The first part provides background information, evaluation methodologies and…

  11. Disseminating evidence-based care into practice.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Eric A; Rosenbek, Susan A; Roman, Sarah P

    2013-08-01

    The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has launched the Partnership for Patients initiative, promising a 20% reduction in readmissions nationally across all payers by December 31, 2013. To address this ambitious goal, CMS has awarded grants to Hospital Engagement Networks, Pioneer Accountable Care Organizations, and the Community-based Care Transitions Program, as well as instituted new penalties for excessive readmission that began in October 2012. National efforts aimed at realizing this goal are predicated, in part, on our effectiveness in disseminating evidence-based care models into practice to improve outcomes and reduce costs. The Care Transitions Intervention (CTI) has been developed, tested, and disseminated to over 750 health care organizations in 40 states nationwide. Four factors promote wide-scale CTI dissemination. The first factor focuses on model fidelity whereby adopters are given insight into which elements of the intervention can be adapted and customized. The second factor concerns the selection of Transitions Coaches and reinforcement of their role through training and participation in a national peer learning network. The third factor relates to model execution with attention to integrating the intervention into existing workflows and fostering relationships with community stakeholders. The fourth factor involves cultivating the support to sustain or expand the intervention through continually making the business case in a changing health care landscape. The lessons learned through the dissemination and implementation of the CTI may be generalizable to the spread of a variety of evidence-based care models.

  12. The FAIR-INNOVATION dissemination project.

    PubMed

    Gormley, R

    2001-08-01

    The goal of the FAIR-INNOVATION dissemination project (FLAIR-FLOW 3) (1997-2000) was to disseminate R&D results from the EU FAIR programme to small and medium-sized food enterprises (SMEs), health professionals (HPs) and consumer groups (CGs) in 19 European countries. The dissemination routes were: (i) one-page technical documents on research results; (ii) their reproduction on the internet; (iii) their reproduction in journals Europe-wide; (iv) workshops on results from EU-supported food research programmes; and (v) lectures and poster presentations by FLAIR-FLOW network personnel. Of the 135 one-pagers produced, 62% were targeted at SMEs, 18% at HPs and 5% at CGs. The remaining 15% were on food safety and were common to the three target groups. There were 1047 publications arising from one-pages in trade journals, and over 8000 requests (paper route) were received for follow-up information. These were in addition to 240 k downloads from the FLAIR-FLOW 3 web site (www.flair-flow.com). Initiatives for HPs included specially collated versions of the one-pagers for major conferences, 20 focused workshops, and interaction with the European Federation of Associations of Dieticians. Currently, dissemination is continuing through FLAIR-FLOW 4 (2001-2003) in 24 countries. FLAIR-FLOW 4 is co-ordinated by M. Jean François Quillien from INRA-CRIAA (FR) at criaa@rennes.inra.fr.

  13. CHRONIC DISSEMINATED HISTOPLASMOSIS WITH PROLONGED LATENCY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A case of chronic disseminated histoplasmosis in an ex-serviceman is described. Evidence is presented to support a latency period of over sixty years between acquisition of infection and clinical manifestation. This is the longest latency period for histoplasmosis described in the medical literature...

  14. Macrophages and the Viral Dissemination Super Highway

    PubMed Central

    Klepper, Arielle; Branch, Andrea D

    2016-01-01

    Monocytes and macrophages are key components of the innate immune system yet they are often the victims of attack by infectious agents. This review examines the significance of viral infection of macrophages. The central hypothesis is that macrophage tropism enhances viral dissemination and persistence, but these changes may come at the cost of reduced replication in cells other than macrophages. PMID:26949751

  15. Florida Dissemination Capacity Building Grant. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhn, G. Michael

    This report describes the goals, objectives, activities, and accomplishments of the Florida Capacity Building Project, which was undertaken to improve the information dissemination capabilities of the Florida educational community and which resulted in the establishment of the Florida Resources in Education Exchange (FREE). A detailed statement of…

  16. Groupware: Improving Group Communication and Information Dissemination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saka, Thomas; Shiigi, Clyde

    1996-01-01

    Faced with increased public expectations and decreased funding, the Hawaii Department of Education chose Lotus Notes groupware technology as an efficient means to support statewide collaboration and information dissemination among 4,200 users in 231 schools. Although initially resistant, respondents to a year-end evaluation of the project in one…

  17. Nerve Growth Factor Regulation by TNF-α and IL-1β in Synovial Macrophages and Fibroblasts in Osteoarthritic Mice.

    PubMed

    Takano, Shotaro; Uchida, Kentaro; Miyagi, Masayuki; Inoue, Gen; Fujimaki, Hisako; Aikawa, Jun; Iwase, Dai; Minatani, Atsushi; Iwabuchi, Kazuya; Takaso, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the role of macrophages as a regulator and producer of nerve growth factor (NGF) in the synovial tissue (ST) of osteoarthritis (OA) joints, the gene expression profiles of several inflammatory cytokines in the ST, including synovial macrophages and fibroblasts, of OA mice (STR/Ort) were characterized. Specifically, real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis was used to evaluate the expression of tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α, interleukin- (IL-) 1β, IL-6, and NGF in CD11b+ and CD11b- cells isolated from the ST of a murine OA model. The effects of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 on the expression of NGF in cultured synovial cells were also examined. The expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and NGF in the ST of STR/Ort was higher than that in C57/BL6J mice. Compared to the CD11b- cell fraction, higher expression levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 were detected in the CD11b+ cell fraction, whereas no differences in the expression of NGF were detected between the two cell fractions. Notably, TNF-α upregulated NGF expression in synovial fibroblasts and macrophages and IL-1β upregulated NGF expression in synovial fibroblasts. IL-1β and TNF-α may regulate NGF signaling in OA joints and be suitable therapeutic targets for treating OA pain. PMID:27635406

  18. Comparative study of normal and osteoarthritic canine synovial fluid using 500 MHz 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Damyanovich, A Z; Staples, J R; Chan, A D; Marshall, K W

    1999-03-01

    High resolution 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been used to investigate and compare the metabolic profiles of normal and osteoarthritic synovial fluids in a canine model of osteoarthritis. The spectra of osteoarthritic synovial fluid showed (a) increased concentrations of lactate, pyruvate, lipoprotein-associated fatty acids, and glycerol as well as the ketones hydroxybutyrate and hydroxyisobutyrate, (b) reduced levels of glucose, and (c) elevated levels of N-acetylglycoproteins, acetate, and acetamide compared with healthy normal canine synovial fluid. An increase was also observed in the concentrations of the amino acids alanine and isoleucine. These results suggest that (a) the intraarticular environment in canine osteoarthritis is more hypoxic and acidotic than in a normal joint, (b) lipolysis may play an increasingly important role as a source of energy in osteoarthritis, and (c) the N-acetylglycoprotein polymer component of synovial fluid (mostly hyaluronan) seems to be increasingly fragmented and degraded into acetate by way of an acetamide intermediate with progressive osteoarthritis. The observed changes in the biochemical profile of canine osteoarthritic synovial fluid may be useful in understanding alterations in joint metabolism consequent to arthritic diseases and helpful in identifying potential markers of osteoarthritis. PMID:10221839

  19. Misdiagnosis of Late-Onset Lyme Arthritis by Inappropriate Use of Borrelia burgdorferi Immunoblot Testing with Synovial Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Barclay, Sam S.; Melia, Michael T.

    2012-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine whether patients with putative late-onset Lyme arthritis based upon synovial fluid Borrelia burgdorferi IgM and IgG immunoblot testing offered by commercial laboratories satisfied conventional criteria for the diagnosis of Lyme arthritis. Secondary objectives included assessing the prior duration and responsiveness of associated antibiotic therapy. We conducted a retrospective analysis of 11 patients referred to an academic medical center infectious disease clinic during the years 2007 to 2009 with a diagnosis of Lyme disease based upon previously obtained synovial fluid B. burgdorferi immunoblot testing. Ten of the 11 (91%) patients with a diagnosis of late-onset Lyme arthritis based upon interpretation of synovial fluid B. burgdorferi immunoblot testing were seronegative and did not satisfy published criteria for the diagnosis of late-onset Lyme arthritis. None of the 10 patients had a clinical response to previously received antibiotics despite an average course of 72 days. Diagnosis of Lyme arthritis should not be based on synovial fluid B. burgdorferi immunoblot testing. This unvalidated test does not appear useful for the diagnosis of Lyme disease, and this study reinforces the longstanding recommendation to use B. burgdorferi immunoblot testing only on serum samples and not other body fluids. Erroneous interpretations of “positive” synovial fluid immunoblots may lead to inappropriate antibiotic courses and delays in diagnosis of other joint diseases. PMID:22971779

  20. Nerve Growth Factor Regulation by TNF-α and IL-1β in Synovial Macrophages and Fibroblasts in Osteoarthritic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Takano, Shotaro; Inoue, Gen; Aikawa, Jun; Iwase, Dai; Minatani, Atsushi; Iwabuchi, Kazuya; Takaso, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the role of macrophages as a regulator and producer of nerve growth factor (NGF) in the synovial tissue (ST) of osteoarthritis (OA) joints, the gene expression profiles of several inflammatory cytokines in the ST, including synovial macrophages and fibroblasts, of OA mice (STR/Ort) were characterized. Specifically, real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis was used to evaluate the expression of tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α, interleukin- (IL-) 1β, IL-6, and NGF in CD11b+ and CD11b– cells isolated from the ST of a murine OA model. The effects of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 on the expression of NGF in cultured synovial cells were also examined. The expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and NGF in the ST of STR/Ort was higher than that in C57/BL6J mice. Compared to the CD11b– cell fraction, higher expression levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 were detected in the CD11b+ cell fraction, whereas no differences in the expression of NGF were detected between the two cell fractions. Notably, TNF-α upregulated NGF expression in synovial fibroblasts and macrophages and IL-1β upregulated NGF expression in synovial fibroblasts. IL-1β and TNF-α may regulate NGF signaling in OA joints and be suitable therapeutic targets for treating OA pain.

  1. Targeting EZH2-mediated methylation of H3K27 inhibits proliferation and migration of Synovial Sarcoma in vitro.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jacson K; Cote, Gregory M; Gao, Yan; Choy, Edwin; Mankin, Henry J; Hornicek, Francis J; Duan, Zhenfeng

    2016-01-01

    Synovial sarcoma is an aggressive soft tissue sarcoma genetically defined by the fusion oncogene SS18-SSX. It is hypothesized that either SS18-SSX disrupts SWI/SNF complex inhibition of the polycomb complex 2 (PRC2) methyltransferase Enhancer of Zeste Homologue 2 (EZH2), or that SS18-SSX is able to directly recruit PRC2 to aberrantly silence target genes. This is of potential therapeutic value as several EZH2 small molecule inhibitors are entering early phase clinical trials. In this study, we first confirmed EZH2 expression in the 76% of human synovial sarcoma samples. We subsequently investigated EZH2 as a therapeutic target in synovial sarcoma in vitro. Knockdown of EZH2 by shRNA or siRNA resulted in inhibition of cell growth and migration across a series of synovial sarcoma cell lines. The EZH2 selective small-molecule inhibitor EPZ005687 similarly suppressed cell proliferation and migration. These data support the hypothesis that targeting EZH2 may be a promising therapeutic strategy in the treatment of synovial sarcoma; clinical trials are initiating enrollment currently. PMID:27125524

  2. Two cases of synovial haemangioma of the knee joint: Gd-enhanced image features on MRI and arthroscopic excision.

    PubMed

    Sasho, Takahisa; Nakagawa, Koichi; Matsuki, Kei; Hoshi, Hiroko; Saito, Masahiko; Ikegawa, Naoshi; Akagi, Ryuichiro; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2011-12-01

    Synovial haemangioma of the knee joint is a relatively rare benign condition with around 200 reported cases. We have recently encountered two cases of synovial haemangioma of the knee joint which preoperative MRI had assessed as highly suspect and which arthroscopic resection and subsequent histological examinations confirmed as synovial hemangiomas. Published studies have identified the following as characteristic MRI features of synovial haemangioma: homogenous low intensity to iso-intensity on T1 sequence; and heterogeneous high intensity with low-intensity septa or spots within the lesion on T2 sequence. However, several other intra-knee disorders mimic these characteristics. In our two cases, we found that gadolinium (Gd)-enhanced images, which have been relatively rarely discussed in the literature, were useful for making the diagnosis and for determining the extent of this condition. These images also were very helpful during arthroscopic excision of the lesion. Nonetheless, even after Gd enhancement, differentiating between malignant conditions such as synovial sarcoma and haemangioma solely from MRI findings is still difficult.

  3. Nerve Growth Factor Regulation by TNF-α and IL-1β in Synovial Macrophages and Fibroblasts in Osteoarthritic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Takano, Shotaro; Inoue, Gen; Aikawa, Jun; Iwase, Dai; Minatani, Atsushi; Iwabuchi, Kazuya; Takaso, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the role of macrophages as a regulator and producer of nerve growth factor (NGF) in the synovial tissue (ST) of osteoarthritis (OA) joints, the gene expression profiles of several inflammatory cytokines in the ST, including synovial macrophages and fibroblasts, of OA mice (STR/Ort) were characterized. Specifically, real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis was used to evaluate the expression of tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α, interleukin- (IL-) 1β, IL-6, and NGF in CD11b+ and CD11b– cells isolated from the ST of a murine OA model. The effects of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 on the expression of NGF in cultured synovial cells were also examined. The expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and NGF in the ST of STR/Ort was higher than that in C57/BL6J mice. Compared to the CD11b– cell fraction, higher expression levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 were detected in the CD11b+ cell fraction, whereas no differences in the expression of NGF were detected between the two cell fractions. Notably, TNF-α upregulated NGF expression in synovial fibroblasts and macrophages and IL-1β upregulated NGF expression in synovial fibroblasts. IL-1β and TNF-α may regulate NGF signaling in OA joints and be suitable therapeutic targets for treating OA pain. PMID:27635406

  4. Inhibitory effect of sodium houttuyfonate on synovial proliferation in vitro in cells from a patient with rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    LI, JUN; ZHOU, TING; ZHAO, FUTAO

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the inhibitory effect of sodium houttuyfonate (SH) on synovial cell proliferation in vitro. Primary cells were obtained from the synovial tissue of a patient with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The cells were divided into five treatment groups as follows: the control group (group 1), 25 μg/ml SH-treated group (group 2), 50 μg/ml SH-treated group (group 3), 100 μg/ml SH-treated group (group 4) and the 200 μg/ml SH-treated group (group 5). Following seven days of treatment, the proliferation rate of the synovial cells was then detected using an MTT assay. The expression level of proliferative synovial cells markedly decreased in the SH-treated groups in a dose-dependent manner compared with the control group. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that SH was able to inhibit the proliferation of synovial cells obtained from a patient with RA. These results provide a potential theoretical basis for the development of a safe and effective treatment against RA in the future. PMID:24926358

  5. Intra-articular injection of synovial mesenchymal stem cells improves cartilage repair in a mouse injury model.

    PubMed

    Mak, J; Jablonski, C L; Leonard, C A; Dunn, J F; Raharjo, E; Matyas, J R; Biernaskie, J; Krawetz, R J

    2016-01-01

    Controversy remains whether articular cartilage has an endogenous stem/progenitor cell population, since its poor healing capacity after injury can lead to diseases such as osteoarthritis. In the joint environment there are mesenchymal stem/progenitor cells (MSCs) in the synovial membrane and synovial fluid that can differentiate into cartilage, but it is still under debate if these cells contribute to cartilage repair in vivo. In this study, we isolated a Sca-1 positive, chondrogenesis capable population of mouse synovial MSCs from C57BL6 and MRL/MpJ "super-healer" strains. Intra-articular injection of Sca-1 + GFP + synovial cells from C57BL6 or MRL/MpJ into C57BL6 mice following cartilage injury led to increased cartilage repair by 4 weeks after injury. GFP expression was detected in the injury site at 2 weeks, but not 4 weeks after injury. These results suggest that synovial stem/progenitor cells, regardless of strain background, have beneficial effects when injected into an injured joint. MSCs derived from MRL/MpJ mice did not promote an increased repair capacity compared to MSCs derived from non-healing C57BL6 controls; however, MRL/MpJ MSCs were observed within the defect area at the time points examined, while C57BL6 MSCs were not. PMID:26983696

  6. Of Mice and Men: Opportunities to Use Genetically Engineered Mouse Models of Synovial Sarcoma for Preclinical Cancer Therapeutic Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Kevin B.; Haldar, Malay; Schiffman, Joshua D.; Cannon-Albright, Lisa; Lessnick, Stephen L.; Sharma, Sunil; Capecchi, Mario R.; Randall, R. Lor

    2016-01-01

    Background Synovial sarcoma is a soft tissue malignancy with a predilection for adolescents and young adults. Despite recent improvements in the understanding of its character and etiology, few therapeutic advances have been made. The mortality rate is high among the young population it affects. The low incidence of most subtypes of sarcoma, such as synovial sarcoma, makes disease-specific trials difficult to organize. The biological differences between sarcoma subtypes make inclusion of multiple types in general trials unsatisfactory as well. Methods A review of the literature regarding targetable pathways in synovial sarcoma was undertaken. A strategy has been devised to utilize available technologies in order to prioritize drug trial planning. Results Cell culture and xenograft research with synovial sarcoma cell lines have identified some critical pathways that may be targetable. Promising therapeutic strategies include newer cytotoxic chemotherapies, antiangiogenic agents, anti-IGF1R pathway agents, anti-Bcl-2/proapoptotic agents, and histone deacetylase complex inhibitors. Conclusions We propose to prioritize potential therapeutic strategies via preclinical testing of agents in a genetic mouse model of synovial sarcoma. Preclinical optimization of treatment regimens can guide the development of more focused patient trials. PMID:21666582

  7. HMGB1–LPS complex promotes transformation of osteoarthritis synovial fibroblasts to a rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblast-like phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Y; Chen, Y; Wang, W; Wang, Z; Tang, G; Zhang, P; He, Z; Liu, Y; Dai, S-M; Shen, Q

    2014-01-01

    It is generally believed that some inflammatory antigens can recognize Toll-like receptors on synovial fibroblasts (SFs) and then activate downstream signals, leading to the formation of RASFs and inducing rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The objective of the current work was to study on the hypothesis that outer PAMP (LPS) binds to the inner DAMP (HMGB1) and becomes a complex that recognizes TLRs/RAGE on SFs, thus initiating a signaling cascade that leads to the secretion of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, production of tissue-destructive enzymes, and formation of RASFs, finally resulting in RA. Osteoarthritis synovial fibroblasts (OASFs) were co-cultured with HMGB1–LPS complex in vitro for five generations to induce the transformation of human SFs to RA-like SFs (tOASFs). Then, changes of tOASFs in cell cycle and apoptosis–autophagy balance were investigated in vitro, and the pathogenicity of tOASFs was evaluated in a SCID mouse model in vivo. In vitro cell cycle analysis showed more tOASFs passing through the G1/S checkpoint and moving to S or G2 phase. Flow cytometry and confocal microscopy showed that apoptosis was reduced and autophagy was enhanced significantly in tOASFs as compared with those in OASFs. The expression of certain receptors and adhesion molecules in tOASFs was upregulated. In vivo experiments showed that tOASFs attached to, invaded, and degraded the co-implanted cartilage. In addition, histochemistry showed excessive proliferation of tOASFs and the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Based on the above findings, we conclude that HMGB1–LPS complex could promote the formation of RASFs. PMID:24556692

  8. Effects of Viscoseal, a synovial fluid substitute, on recovery after arthroscopic partial meniscectomy and joint lavage.

    PubMed

    Mathies, B

    2006-01-01

    This was a pilot, single blind, randomised, controlled study in patients requiring partial meniscectomy. The aim was to assess whether replacing the synovial fluid lost during arthroscopy with a hyaluronic acid-containing synovial fluid substitute (Viscoseal) would reduce the severity and duration of post-operative symptoms during the 4 weeks post-surgery, in comparison to the standard arthroscopy procedure alone. Fifty patients were randomly assigned to either undergo arthroscopic partial meniscectomy alone (control group: n=25) or to receive 10 ml Viscoseal into the joint at the end of the procedure (Viscoseal group: n=25). Forty patients (20 per group) completed the study. Despite the small patient population in this pilot study, some interesting results were obtained. On Day 1 after surgery, the mean values for pain at rest (VAS) increased in both groups but this increase was lower in the Viscoseal group (8.9+/-23.1 mm) than in the standard therapy group (20.0+/-25.9 mm) (Mann-Whitney statistic MW-S: P=0.0525) and remained in favour of Viscoseal for the first 3 days after surgery. Joint swelling decreased to a greater extent in the Viscoseal group with an observed superiority at Day 7 (MW-S: P=0.1187) and a proven superiority at Days 12 (MW-S: P=0.015) and 28 (MW-S: P=0.0072). Diclofenac intake was lower in the Viscoseal group from Day 3 to Day 28 with a proven superiority (LB-CI > 0.5) in favour of Viscoseal on Days 3 (MW-S: P = 0.0093), 4 (MW-S: P= 0.0075), and 7 (MW-S: P = 0.0195) indicating that the product had an NSAID-sparing effect. Viscoseal was safe and well-tolerated and no adverse reactions occurred during the study. These findings indicate that Viscoseal may be useful as a synovial fluid substitute after arthroscopy.

  9. Intra-articular synovial sarcoma treated with a transfemoral amputation: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Gresswell, Steven D; Corsini, Anthony A; Balsamo, Luke H; Miles, Edward F

    2013-08-01

    A case of monophasic intra-articular synovial sarcoma in the right knee of a 39-year-old active duty serviceman treated with a transfemoral amputation is presented. The patient was evaluated for right knee pain and fullness. After further workup, the patient underwent computed tomography guided biopsy, with the tissue specimen consistent with intra-articular synovial sarcoma. The patient elected for a transfemoral amputation rather than limb or joint-sparing surgery. The gross specimen measured 3.5 × 3.0 × 1.7 cm in the posteromedial knee. No metastatic lesions were seen on positron emission tomography-computed tomography. Chemotherapy and radiation therapy have not been utilized. The transfemoral amputation adds to the uniqueness of this report and is discussed with a review of the multimodality treatment toward intra-articular synovial sarcoma in prior published literature.

  10. In vivo electrochemical corrosion study of a CoCrMo biomedical alloy in human synovial fluids.

    PubMed

    Igual Munoz, A; Schwiesau, J; Jolles, B M; Mischler, S

    2015-07-01

    The present study was initiated with the aim to assess the in vivo electrochemical corrosion behaviour of CoCrMo biomedical alloys in human synovial fluids in an attempt to identify possible patient or pathology specific effects. For this, electrochemical measurements (open circuit potential OCP, polarization resistance Rp, potentiodynamic polarization curves, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy EIS) were carried out on fluids extracted from patients with different articular pathologies and prosthesis revisions. Those electrochemical measurements could be carried out with outstanding precision and signal stability. The results show that the corrosion behaviour of CoCrMo alloy in synovial fluids not only depends on material reactivity but also on the specific reactions of synovial fluid components, most likely involving reactive oxygen species. In some patients the latter were found to determine the whole cathodic and anodic electrochemical response. Depending on patients, corrosion rates varied significantly between 50 and 750 mg dm(-2)year(-1).

  11. Cytidine deaminase activity in synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis: relation to lactoferrin, acidosis, and cartilage proteoglycan release.

    PubMed Central

    Månsson, B; Geborek, P; Saxne, T; Björnsson, S

    1990-01-01

    It is claimed that cytidine deaminase activity reflects local granulocyte turnover or activity in the synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, but cytidine deaminase is not a granulocyte specific enzyme. Lactoferrin is a granulocyte specific protein that is released from the secondary granulae during activation. We measured cytidine deaminase activity and lactoferrin concentrations in 33 rheumatic synovial fluid samples. Cytidine deaminase activity and lactoferrin concentrations correlated closely, indicating that both analyses reflect similar events in the joint-that is, result in their release from granulocytes. Cytidine deaminase activity and granulocyte concentrations correlated less closely, suggesting that there are additional factors besides the cell number which contribute to this release. Joint acidosis may be one such factor, as pH and cytidine deaminase activity correlated inversely. There was no association with synovial fluid proteoglycan concentrations, a marker of cartilage degradation. PMID:2396864

  12. Musculosceletal tuberculosis with involvement of tendon sheaths and formation of synovial cyst.

    PubMed

    Zieliński, Michał; Mazur-Zielińska, Henryka; Kozielski, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    Due to an increasing amount of patients on immunosuppressive treatment, the number of tuberculosis (TB) of atypical course and extrapulmonary tuberculosis cases increase. Locomotor system is a place of every fifth case of extrapulmonary TB. Because of lack of characteristic symptoms, as well as rare co-occurrence of active lung lesions in radiological imaging, proper diagnosis is hard to establish. We present a case of patient on immunosuppressive therapy due to myositis, in whom we diagnosed musculoskeletal tuberculosis in form of involvement of tendon sheath and formation of synovial cyst. PMID:27672070

  13. The synovial prostaglandin system in chronic inflammatory arthritis: differential effects of steroidal and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs

    PubMed Central

    Bombardieri, S.; Cattani, P.; Ciabattoni, G.; Di Munno, O.; Pasero, G.; Patrono, C.; Pinca, E.; Pugliese, F.

    1981-01-01

    1 The present study was undertaken to characterize the spectrum of arachidonic acid metabolites present in synovial effusions of patients with rheumatoid or psoriatic arthritis, and to compare changes in their concentration following a short-term treatment with 6α-methyl-prednisolone (6-MeP: 4-8 mg/day) or indoprofen (1.2 g/day), a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agent with proven synovial prostaglandin inhibitory effect. 2 Measurements of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), thromboxane (TX) B2, 6-keto-PGF1α and PGF2α were performed by radioimmunoassay techniques in synovial effusions obtained from 23 patients, and validated by thin-layer chromatographic analysis of the extracted immunoreactivity. 3 PGE2 and TXB2 accounted for more than 60% of the total immunoreactivity in untreated patients. The absence of any constant ratio between the different arachidonic acid metabolites detected in synovial fluid is consistent with a heterogeneous cellular origin of these compounds. 4 Indoprofen treatment was associated with a consistent reduction of synovial prostaglandin and thromboxane concentrations, ranging from 36% in the case of 6-keto-PGF1α to 90% in the case of PGE2. 5 In contrast, 6-MeP caused opposite changes on different metabolites originating via the cyclo-oxygenase pathway. Thus, 6-keto-PGF1α concentrations were reduced by 35%, PGF2α concentrations were increased by 30%, while PGE2 and TXB2 were unchanged following 6-MeP. 6 Although the mechanism(s) underlying the failure of 6-MeP to reduce synovial PGE2 and TXB2 levels are uncertain, the results of the present study clearly indicate that therapeutic doses of steroidal and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs cause quite distinct changes in arachidonic acid metabolism, which might be relevant to their specific therapeutic actions and side-effects. PMID:6895043

  14. Prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility of bacterial isolates from horses with synovial sepsis: A cross-sectional study of 95 cases.

    PubMed

    Robinson, C S; Timofte, D; Singer, E R; Rimmington, L; Rubio-Martínez, L M

    2016-10-01

    Bacterial culture and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of septic synovial samples allows instigation of targeted antimicrobial therapy; however, bacterial culture takes more than 24 h and has low sensitivity. This study aimed to identify the most frequently cultured bacteria and their antimicrobial susceptibility profile from septic synovial samples in our referral equine hospital, to allow recommendations regarding appropriate initial antimicrobial therapy prior to culture results. Hospital records for all horses with synovial sepsis and a synovial sample submitted to the microbiology laboratory between 2004 and 2013 were retrieved (n= 379 samples). One horse had positive cultures from more than one synovial structure, and two horses had positive cultures obtained from repeat samples. Overall, 114 bacterial isolates were obtained. Gram-positive bacteria were isolated in 75% of cases, of which 22% were haemolytic Staphylococcus spp., and 52% were Staphylococcus aureus including two multidrug-resistant isolates. Gram-negative bacteria were isolated from 25% of cases. Anaerobic Clostridium spp. was isolated in 3% of cases. Of the first line antimicrobials, oxytetracycline and doxycycline were effective against 70-100% of the Gram-positive bacteria and 20-100% of the Gram-negative organisms, whilst trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole and gentamicin efficacy ranged between 50% and 88% for both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Of the equine protected antimicrobials, ceftiofur was effective against 70-90% of all bacterial isolates whilst 80% of isolates were susceptible to enrofloxacin. These results indicate that tetracyclines, trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole or gentamicin may be suitable first-line antimicrobials for treatment of synovial sepsis cases while awaiting laboratory results, findings which support current recommendations for antimicrobial stewardship in equine medicine. PMID:27687937

  15. Evaluation of a Genus- and Group-Specific Rapid PCR Assay Panel on Synovial Fluid for Diagnosis of Prosthetic Knee Infection

    PubMed Central

    Melendez, Dante P.; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E.; Berbari, Elie F.; Osmon, Douglas R.; Mandrekar, Jayawant N.; Hanssen, Arlen D.

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated a genus- and group-specific PCR assay panel using 284 prosthetic knee synovial fluid samples collected from patients presenting to our institution with implant failure. Using the Musculoskeletal Infection Society diagnostic criteria, 88 and 196 samples were classified as showing prosthetic joint infection (PJI) and aseptic failure (AF), respectively. Sensitivities of the synovial fluid PCR panel and culture were 55.6% and 76.1% (P ≤ 0.001), respectively, and specificities were 91.8% and 97.4% (P = 0.016), respectively. Among the 70 subjects who had received antibiotics within the month preceding synovial fluid aspiration (48 of whom had PJI), PCR panel and synovial fluid culture sensitivities were 64.5% and 85.4%, respectively (P < 0.0001). In this group, the PCR panel detected Staphylococcus aureus in two culture-negative PJI cases. Overall, the evaluated molecular diagnostic tool had low sensitivity when applied to synovial fluid. PMID:26537446

  16. Dissemination of Educational Tools and Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christian, C.

    1998-05-01

    The IDEAS program is oriented towards innovative approaches to education and therefore result in a wide range of programs including Astro Capella (the creation of a capella astronomy songs written and performed by a group from NASA/GSFC, Smale, Boyd, and Granger), video kiosks in the Air and Space Museum (SAO, Dow), teaching astronomy in the parks (U of Wisconsin, Bjorkman, Wilcots), as well as the more bread and butter programs of teacher training and curriculum development. In addition to describing some of the diverse programs to come out of the IDEAS programs, I will discuss the dissemination of the results of those programs, and especially the role of the broker/facilitator in that dissemination. The audience is invited to participate in this discussion.

  17. Multifocal brain radionecrosis masquerading as tumor dissemination

    SciTech Connect

    Safdari, H.; Boluix, B.; Gros, C.

    1984-01-01

    The authors report on an autopsy-proven case of multifocal widespread radionecrosis involving both cerebral hemispheres and masquerading as tumor dissemination on a CT scan done 13 months after complete resection of an oligodendroglioma followed by radiation therapy. This case demonstrates that radiation damage may be present in a CT scan as a multifocal, disseminated lesion. Since the survival of brain-tumor patients who have undergone radiation therapy is prolonged by aggressive therapy, the incidence and variability of radiation-induced complications in such cases is likely to increase. For similar reasons, the radionecrosis in such cases should be taken into consideration. A short review of the CT scan findings and diagnostic and therapeutic considerations in a case of widespread radionecrosis is presented. The need for appropriate diagnosis and subsequent life-saving management is emphasized.

  18. Persistent spontaneous synovial drainage from digital flexor sheath in proliferative tenosynovitis: Two case reports and a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Brian; Cheung, Kevin; Farhangkhoee, Hana; Thoma, Achilleas

    2015-01-01

    Proliferative flexor tenosynovitis of the hand is an inflammatory process involving the synovial sheaths surrounding the tendons. It is most commonly caused by infection, but may also be caused by overuse, diabetes and rheumatic conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and crystal arthropathies. The present report describes two patients with severe proliferative tenosynovitis, who developed a fistula between the tendon sheath and skin after instrumentation, resulting in persistent synovial drainage. After failing conservative management, both patients were managed with extensive flexor tenosynovectomy to prevent inoculation of bacteria into the flexor sheath. The presentation, management and outcome of each case is described in addition to a discussion of the literature on tenosynovial fistulas. PMID:26090353

  19. Tiludronate concentrations and cytologic findings in synovial fluid after intravenous regional limb perfusion with tiludronate in horses

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, Barbara G.; Larson, Maureen K.

    2015-01-01

    Anecdotal accounts of tiludronate administration via intravenous regional limb perfusion (IVRLP) exist despite a lack of information regarding safety for synovial structures in the perfused area. The objective of this study was to determine whether tiludronate concentrations in synovial structures after IVRLP with low dose (0.5 mg, LDT) or high dose (50 mg, HDT) tiludronate remain below a value demonstrated in vitro to be safe for articular cartilage (<19,000 ng/ml), and to determine effects of tiludronate on synovial fluid cytology variables compared to saline perfused control limbs. Using a randomized controlled experimental study design, horses received IVRLP with LDT (n = 6) or HDT (n = 6) in one forelimb and IVRLP with saline in the contralateral limb. Synovial fluid cytology variables and tiludronate concentrations were evaluated in navicular bursae (NB), and distal interphalangeal (DIP) and metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints one week before and 30–45 min after IVRLP, and in DIP and MCP joints 24 h after IVRLP. Data were analyzed with 2-way rmANOVA (p < 0.05). Highest measured synovial fluid tiludronate concentrations occurred 30–45 min post-perfusion. Mean tiludronate concentrations were lower in LDT limbs (MCP = 39.6 ± 14.3 ng/ml, DIP = 118.1 ± 66.6 ng/ml, NB = 82.1 ± 30.2 ng/ml) than in HDT limbs (MCP = 3,745.1 ± 1,536.6 ng/ml, DIP = 16,274.0 ± 5,460.2 ng/ml, NB = 6,049.3 ± 1,931.7 ng/ml). Tiludronate concentration was >19,000 ng/ml in DIP joints of two HDT limbs. Tiludronate was measurable only in synovial fluid from HDT limbs 24 h post-perfusion. There were no differences in synovial fluid cytology variables between control and treated limbs. Conclusions. In some horses, IVRLP with HDT may result in synovial fluid concentrations of tiludronate that may have adverse effects on articular cartilage, based on in vitro data. IVRLP with LDT is unlikely to promote articular cartilage degradation. Further studies to determine a safe and effective dose

  20. Disseminated nocardiosis masquerading as metastatic malignancy.

    PubMed

    Arjun, Rajalakshmi; Padmanabhan, Arjun; Reddy Attunuru, Bhanu Prakash; Gupta, Prerna

    2016-01-01

    Nocardiosis is an uncommon gram-positive bacterial infection caused by aerobic actinomycetes of the genus Nocardia. It can be localized or systemic and is regarded as an opportunistic infection that is commonly seen in immunocompromised hosts. We report a case of disseminated nocardiosis caused by Nocardia cyriacigeorgica in a patient with underlying malignancy in whom the clinical presentation was highly suggestive of a metastatic disease. PMID:27578940

  1. Disseminated nocardiosis masquerading as metastatic malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Arjun, Rajalakshmi; Padmanabhan, Arjun; Reddy Attunuru, Bhanu Prakash; Gupta, Prerna

    2016-01-01

    Nocardiosis is an uncommon gram-positive bacterial infection caused by aerobic actinomycetes of the genus Nocardia. It can be localized or systemic and is regarded as an opportunistic infection that is commonly seen in immunocompromised hosts. We report a case of disseminated nocardiosis caused by Nocardia cyriacigeorgica in a patient with underlying malignancy in whom the clinical presentation was highly suggestive of a metastatic disease. PMID:27578940

  2. [Disseminated intravascular coagulation in solid tumours].

    PubMed

    Ferrand, François Régis; Garcia-Hejl, Carine; Moussaid, Yassine; Schernberg, Antoine; Bidard, François-Clément; Pavic, Michel; Khenifer, Safia; Stoclin, Annabelle

    2014-06-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is a complex abnormality of hemostasis with dramatic consequences and long described as associated with tumors. Yet the diagnosis and management of paraneoplastic DIC are poorly defined. The purpose of this paper is to review DIC associated with solid tumors, at the pathophysiological and therapeutic levels in particular. We also report data from a recent retrospective series of patients with DIC in the context of a solid tumor, to illustrate the epidemiological, clinical and prognostic.

  3. Disseminated aspergillosis associated with tsunami lung.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Yutaka; Tagami, Takashi; Kusakabe, Takashi; Kido, Norihiro; Kawaguchi, Takanori; Omura, Mariko; Tosa, Ryoichi

    2012-10-01

    Many survivors of the tsunami that occurred following the Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011, contracted a systemic disorder called "tsunami lung," a series of severe systemic infections following aspiration pneumonia caused by near drowning in the tsunami. Generally, the cause of aspiration pneumonia is polymicrobial, including fungi and aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, but Aspergillus infection is rarely reported. Here we report a case of tsunami lung complicated by disseminated aspergillosis, as diagnosed during autopsy.

  4. Dissemination: Bringing Translational Research to Completion

    PubMed Central

    Park, Daniel J.; Burke, Janice P.

    2013-01-01

    Despite the availability of innovative health care research, a gap exists between research-generated knowledge and the utilization of that knowledge in real-world practice settings. This article examines the transition from research to implementation in the context of the dissemination of A. Jean Ayres’ sensory integration procedures and of the challenges currently facing the University of Southern California Well Elderly Studies research team. Drawing from the emerging field of implementation science, this article discusses how researchers can develop an implementation plan to more easily translate evidence into practice. Such plans should address the intervention’s reach (i.e., its capacity to penetrate into the intended target population), the settings for which it is applicable, the leaders who will encourage practitioner uptake, stakeholder groups, and challenges to dissemination. By taking action to ensure the more effective dissemination of research-generated knowledge, researchers can increase the likelihood that their interventions will lead to improvements in practice and more effective care for consumers. PMID:23433273

  5. [Cancer cell plasticity and metastatic dissemination].

    PubMed

    Moyret-Lalle, Caroline; Pommier, Roxane; Bouard, Charlotte; Nouri, Ebticem; Richard, Geoffrey; Puisieux, Alain

    Metastatic dissemination consists of a sequence of events resulting in the invasion by cancer cells of tissues located away from the primary tumour. This process is highly inefficient, since each event represents an obstacle that only a limited number of cells can overcome. However, two biological phenomena intrinsically linked with tumour development facilitate the dissemination of cancer cells throughout the body and promote the formation of metastases, namely the genetic diversity of cancer cells within a given tumour, which arises from their genetic instability and from successive clonal expansions, and cellular plasticity conveyed to the cells by micro-environmental signals. Genetic diversity increases the probability of selecting cells that are intrinsically resistant to biological and physical constraints encountered during metastatic dissemination, whereas cellular plasticity provides cells with the capacity to adapt to stressful conditions and to changes in the microenvironment. The epithelial-mesenchymal transition, an embryonic trans-differentiation process frequently reactivated during tumour development, plays an important role in that context by endowing tumor cells with a unique capacity of motility, survival and adaptability to the novel environments and stresses encountered during the invasion-metastasis cascade. PMID:27615180

  6. 10 CFR 605.20 - Dissemination of results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... accordance with the applicable provisions of 10 CFR part 600. (d) The article shall include an acknowledgment... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Dissemination of results. 605.20 Section 605.20 Energy... PROGRAM § 605.20 Dissemination of results. (a) Recipients are encouraged to disseminate project...

  7. 10 CFR 605.20 - Dissemination of results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... accordance with the applicable provisions of 10 CFR part 600. (d) The article shall include an acknowledgment... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Dissemination of results. 605.20 Section 605.20 Energy... PROGRAM § 605.20 Dissemination of results. (a) Recipients are encouraged to disseminate project...

  8. 10 CFR 602.18 - Dissemination of results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... normal publication channels in accordance with the applicable provisions of 10 CFR part 600. (d) The... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Dissemination of results. 602.18 Section 602.18 Energy... ASSISTANCE PROGRAM § 602.18 Dissemination of results. (a) Recipients are encouraged to disseminate...

  9. 10 CFR 470.20 - Dissemination of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Dissemination of information. 470.20 Section 470.20 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION APPROPRIATE TECHNOLOGY SMALL GRANTS PROGRAM § 470.20 Dissemination of information. DOE shall disseminate to the public, in an appropriate manner, information of...

  10. 21 CFR 99.101 - Information that may be disseminated.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Information that may be disseminated. 99.101 Section 99.101 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL DISSEMINATION OF INFORMATION ON UNAPPROVED/NEW USES FOR MARKETED DRUGS, BIOLOGICS, AND DEVICES Information To Be Disseminated § 99.101...

  11. [An abdominal tumor of unusual nature. Synovial cyst in the iliopsoas bursa].

    PubMed

    Dyon, J F; Ben Salah, S; Baudain, P; De Marliave, H; Delannoy, P

    1987-01-01

    The authors report a case of tumour of the right iliac region in a 14 years old girl, disclosed by a light traumatism, without appreciable antecedents, nor locomotor disfunction. Ultrasonography and computed tomography showed its cystic constitution. Surgically, there was a synovial cyst of the ilioinguinal area, cyst of the iliopsoas bursa, with a hip joint communication. It was resected and a partial recurrence occurred, corrected surgically three years later. A recent MRI showed the spontaneous development of a same cyst on the left side, asymptomatic at all. A non exhaustive survey of literature confirmed the iliopsoas synovial bursa is uncommonly pathologic, but a constant natural formation in man. Pathology occurs only in over sixty years old adults. This case seems to be the first pediatric case. The cyst of the psoas bursa is generally revealed by an inguinal swelling; abdominal growing is rare. Imaging with ultrasonography, computed tomography and RMI such as in this case, showed the cyst issued between the coxofemoral joint and the iliac psoas terminal tendon. It can grow in a retroperitoneal way. Pathogenic hypothesis are debated. In this bilateral case, etiology evoke an anatomic anomaly, in relation a joint communication.

  12. Expression of granzymes A and B in synovial tissue from patients with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Kummer, J A; Tak, P P; Brinkman, B M; van Tilborg, A A; Kamp, A M; Verweij, C L; Daha, M R; Meinders, A E; Hack, C E; Breedveld, F C

    1994-10-01

    Granzymes A and B are serine proteinases which are stored in the granules of activated cytotoxic T cells and NK cells. Expression of these granzymes by cytotoxic cells in tissues can be used as an activation marker for these cells. To investigate a possible role of cytotoxic lymphocytes in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA), we assessed the expression of granzymes A and B by cytotoxic lymphocytes in synovial biopsies from five RA and five OA patients using mAb specific for these serine proteinases. In three of the five RA patients but also in two of the five OA patients granzyme A- and B-expressing lymphocytes were observed in the synovium. Double-labeling immunohistochemical techniques revealed that up to 75% of the granzyme-positive synovial lymphocytes had the CD16+ or CD56+ natural killer cell phenotype. Less than 5% were CD3+, CD8+ cytotoxic T cells, whereas in some patients the phenotype of up to 50% of these cells could not be identified. The presence of granzymes A and B in the synovium of both RA as well as OA patients was confirmed on the molecular level in a second group of 11 RA and 5 OA patients using the polymerase chain reaction. Thus, expression of granzymes A and B occurs in the synovium in patients with RA as well as those with OA. These proteins are mainly expressed by NK cells that may therefore play a role in the pathogenesis of these diseases.

  13. Fluorescent sensing of pyrophosphate anion in synovial fluid based on DNA-attached magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tong, Li-Li; Chen, Zhen-zhen; Jiang, Zhong-yao; Sun, Miao-miao; Li, Lu; Liu, Ju; Tang, Bo

    2015-10-15

    In this work, a new fluorescent method for sensitive detection of pyrophosphate anion (P2O7(4-), PPi) in the synovial fluid was developed using fluorophore labeled single-stranded DNA-attached Fe3O4 NPs. The sensing approach is based on the strong affinity of PPi to Fe3O4 NPs and highly efficient fluorescent quenching ability of Fe3O4 NPs for fluorophore labeled single-stranded DNA. In the presence of PPi, the fluorescence would enhance dramatically due to desorption of fluorophore labeled single-stranded DNA from the surface of Fe3O4 NPs, which allowed the analysis of PPi in a very simple manner. The proposed sensing system allows for the sensitive determination of PPi in the range of 2.0 × 10(-7)-4 × 10(-6)M with a detection limit of 76 nM. Importantly, the protocol exhibits excellent selectivity for the determination of PPi over other phosphate-containing compounds. The method was successfully applied to the determination of PPi in the synovial fluid, which suggests our proposed method has great potential for diagnostic purposes. PMID:25957830

  14. Changes in lipoxygenase products from synovial fluid in carrageenan induced arthritis in dogs.

    PubMed

    Herlin, T; Fogh, K; Ewald, H; Hansen, E S; Knudsen, V E; Holm, I; Kragballe, K; Bunger, C

    1988-07-01

    A non-suppurative chronic arthritis was induced in the juvenile dog knee by intra-articular instillations with Carrageenan. Lipoxygenase products of arachidonic acid were separated from synovial fluid by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). After ten weeks we observed an accumulation of leukotriene B4 (LTB4) in synovial fluid in five out of six experimental knees (0.94 to 5.5 ng/ml), as judged by integrated optical density. Biological activity of LTB4 was confirmed by chemokinesis. LTB4 was not detected in control knees. The 15-lipoxygenase products, 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE) and 13-hydroxy-9,11-octadecadienoic acid (13-HODD), being inhibitors of 5-lipoxygenase, were found in relatively high levels in the control knees compared to the arthritic knees. The results denote LTB4 as a pro-inflammatory local mediator during carrageenan-induced arthritis; possibly, the decreased levels of 15-HETE and 13-HODD in the arthritic knees may have a regulatory function, thus facilitating LTB4 generation. PMID:2841956

  15. Primary peripheral neurolymphomatosis mimicking synovial sarcoma: FDG PETCT to the rescue.

    PubMed

    Padma, S; Sundaram, P Shanmuga; Praveen Kumar, S L G

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of the association between synovial sarcoma and peripheral neurolymphomatosis is limited to a few case reports in literature. Delay in diagnosis or misdiagnosis is possible due to its insidious onset and varied presentation compounded by non-specific imaging findings. Needle biopsy also may not be confirmatory especially, in cases of biphasic sarcoma as in our case, and it may be necessary to proceed to open biopsy. Here, is a case of a non-tender right calf muscle mass, which was reported as biphasic synovial sarcoma by FNAC. Positron emission tomography computed tomography-computed tomography (PETCT) showed right sciatic nerve involvement and multiple infra diaphragmatic lymph nodal lesions. Intensity of (18)F FDG ((18)Flourine labeled fluro de oxy glucose) uptake and the infra diaphragmatic lymph nodal lesions distribution, was more in favour of a lymphoma diagnosis rather than a sarcoma, (which are usually low metabolically active tumors). Thus, this case highlights the usefulness of FDG PETCT in arriving at a diagnosis in the background of indeterminate clinicopathological and radiologic findings. PMID:25313768

  16. Effects of ACL Reconstructive Surgery on Temporal Variations of Cytokine Levels in Synovial Fluid.

    PubMed

    Bigoni, Marco; Turati, Marco; Gandolla, Marta; Sacerdote, Paola; Piatti, Massimiliano; Castelnuovo, Alberto; Franchi, Silvia; Gorla, Massimo; Munegato, Daniele; Gaddi, Diego; Pedrocchi, Alessandra; Omeljaniuk, Robert J; Locatelli, Vittorio; Torsello, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction restores knee stability but does not reduce the incidence of posttraumatic osteoarthritis induced by inflammatory cytokines. The aim of this research was to longitudinally measure IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF-α levels in patients subjected to ACL reconstruction using bone-patellar tendon-bone graft. Synovial fluid was collected within 24-72 hours of ACL rupture (acute), 1 month after injury immediately prior to surgery (presurgery), and 1 month thereafter (postsurgery). For comparison, a "control" group consisted of individuals presenting chronic ACL tears. Our results indicate that levels of IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10 vary significantly over time in reconstruction patients. In the acute phase, the levels of these cytokines in reconstruction patients were significantly greater than those in controls. In the presurgery phase, cytokine levels in reconstruction patients were reduced and comparable with those in controls. Finally, cytokine levels increased again with respect to control group in the postsurgery phase. The levels of IL-1β and TNF-α showed no temporal variation. Our data show that the history of an ACL injury, including trauma and reconstruction, has a significant impact on levels of IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10 in synovial fluid but does not affect levels of TNF-α and IL-1β. PMID:27313403

  17. Effects of ACL Reconstructive Surgery on Temporal Variations of Cytokine Levels in Synovial Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Bigoni, Marco; Gandolla, Marta; Sacerdote, Paola; Piatti, Massimiliano; Castelnuovo, Alberto; Franchi, Silvia; Gorla, Massimo; Munegato, Daniele; Gaddi, Diego; Pedrocchi, Alessandra; Omeljaniuk, Robert J.; Locatelli, Vittorio; Torsello, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction restores knee stability but does not reduce the incidence of posttraumatic osteoarthritis induced by inflammatory cytokines. The aim of this research was to longitudinally measure IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF-α levels in patients subjected to ACL reconstruction using bone-patellar tendon-bone graft. Synovial fluid was collected within 24–72 hours of ACL rupture (acute), 1 month after injury immediately prior to surgery (presurgery), and 1 month thereafter (postsurgery). For comparison, a “control” group consisted of individuals presenting chronic ACL tears. Our results indicate that levels of IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10 vary significantly over time in reconstruction patients. In the acute phase, the levels of these cytokines in reconstruction patients were significantly greater than those in controls. In the presurgery phase, cytokine levels in reconstruction patients were reduced and comparable with those in controls. Finally, cytokine levels increased again with respect to control group in the postsurgery phase. The levels of IL-1β and TNF-α showed no temporal variation. Our data show that the history of an ACL injury, including trauma and reconstruction, has a significant impact on levels of IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10 in synovial fluid but does not affect levels of TNF-α and IL-1β. PMID:27313403

  18. Synovial fluid bupivacaine concentrations following single intra-articular injection in normal and osteoarthritic canine stifles.

    PubMed

    Barry, S L; Martinez, S A; Davies, N M; Remsberg, C M; Sayre, C L; Bachelez, A

    2015-02-01

    Intra-articular bupivacaine helps alleviate pain in animals receiving joint surgery, but its use has become controversial as ex vivo studies have illuminated the potential for chondrotoxicity. Such studies typically involve cell cultures incubated in solutions containing high bupivacaine concentrations for long durations. The aim of this study was to measure the actual synovial fluid bupivacaine concentrations after intra-articular injection. Eight healthy beagles with normal stifles and 22 large and giant-breed dogs with stifle osteoarthritis (OA) were treated with a single intra-articular injection of bupivacaine (1 mg/kg) into a stifle. Joint fluid samples were taken from the treated stifle immediately after injection and 30 min after injection and analyzed for bupivacaine concentrations. Immediately after injection, the median bupivacaine concentrations in normal and OA stifles were 3.6 and 2.5 mg/mL, respectively. Thirty minutes after injection, bupivacaine concentrations in normal and OA stifles were 0.4 and 0.6 mg/mL, respectively. These results provide insight into the pharmacokinetics of bupivacaine after injection into a joint. Given its immediate dilution and rapid drop in synovial fluid concentration, bupivacaine is unlikely to damage chondrocytes when administered as a single intra-articular injection.

  19. Surfactants identified in synovial fluid and their ability to act as boundary lubricants.

    PubMed Central

    Hills, B A; Butler, B D

    1984-01-01

    Thin-layer chromatography has been used to identify phospholipids extracted from canine synovial fluid, the major component (45%) being phosphatidyl choline (PC). The extracts and their components have been shown to be surface active in reducing the surface tension of water and to be readily adsorbed to hydrophilic solids, whose surfaces then become hydrophobic. These adsorbed monolayers of synovial surfactant were then found to be excellent boundary lubricants in vitro, reducing the coefficient of kinetic friction (mu) in the dry state and under physiological loading by up to 97% for extracts and 99% for PC alone, reaching mu = 0.01. Surface-active phospholipid is put forward as the possible active ingredient in joint lubrication and shown to be consistent with previous biochemical studies to elucidate its identity. The model essentially follows the classical Hardy model for boundary lubrication imparted by surfactants. It is discussed in relation to a new approach in providing artificial lubrication and facilitating tissue release in patients with arthritis. PMID:6476922

  20. Microscopical analysis of synovial fluid wear debris from failing CoCr hip prostheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, M. B.; Brown, A. P.; Cox, A.; Curry, A.; Denton, J.

    2010-07-01

    Metal on metal hip joint prostheses are now commonly implanted in patients with hip problems. Although hip replacements largely go ahead problem free, some complications can arise such as infection immediately after surgery and aseptic necrosis caused by vascular complications due to surgery. A recent observation that has been made at Manchester is that some Cobalt Chromium (CoCr) implants are causing chronic pain, with the source being as yet unidentified. This form of replacement failure is independent of surgeon or hospital and so some underlying body/implant interface process is thought to be the problem. When the synovial fluid from a failed joint is examined particles of metal (wear debris) can be found. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) has been used to look at fixed and sectioned samples of the synovial fluid and this has identified fine (< 100 nm) metal and metal oxide particles within the fluid. TEM EDX and Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) have been employed to examine the composition of the particles, showing them to be chromium rich. This gives rise to concern that the failure mechanism may be associated with the debris.

  1. Shape, Loading, and Motion in the Bioengineering Design, Fabrication, and Testing of Personalized Synovial Joints

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Gregory M.; Chan, Elaine F.; Temple-Wong, Michele M.; Bae, Won C.; Masuda, Koichi; Bugbee, William D.; Sah, Robert L.

    2009-01-01

    With continued development and improvement of tissue engineering therapies for small articular lesions, increased attention is being focused on the challenge of engineering partial or whole synovial joints. Joint-scale constructs could have applications in the treatment of large areas of articular damage or in biological arthroplasty of severely degenerate joints. This review considers the roles of shape, loading and motion in synovial joint mechanobiology and their incorporation into the design, fabrication, and testing of engineered partial or whole joints. Incidence of degeneration, degree of impairment, and efficacy of current treatments are critical factors in choosing a target for joint bioengineering. The form and function of native joints may guide the design of engineered joint-scale constructs with respect to size, shape, and maturity. Fabrication challenges for joint-scale engineering include controlling chemo-mechano-biological microenvironments to promote the development and growth of multiple tissues with integrated interfaces or lubricated surfaces into anatomical shapes, and joint-scale bioreactors which nurture and stimulate the tissue with loading and motion. Finally, evaluation of load-bearing and tribological properties can range from tissue to joint scale and can focus on biological structure at present or after adaptation. PMID:19815214

  2. Knee Locking in Osteoarthritis due to Synovial Lipoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    S. Amarjit, Kataria; Budhiraja, Shivali; Chandramouleeswari, K.; Anita, S.

    2013-01-01

    Intra–articular synovial lipomas are very rare and only few cases have been reported till now. We are reporting a rare case of a unilateral intra–articular lipoma of osteoarthritic knee joint in a 62 years old male. Patient had two episodes of sudden locking of knee joint, which resolved spontaneously. A plain X-ray showed changes which were suggestive of osteoarthritis. Clinically, patient was diagnosed as a case of loose bodies in left knee joint. An arthrotomy was performed. After a Histopathological Examination (HPE) of loose bodies, a diagnosis of an intra–articular synovial lipoma was made. Due to wide differentials and varied clinical behaviour of loose bodies, lipoma should be included in differential diagnosis of osteroarthritic patients who complain of episodic locking of knees. Intraarticular lipomas, on arthroscopic guided excision, get cured permanently, with no recurrence. The differentiation of an intra-articular lipoma from a relatively more common entity, Lipoma arborescens, has also been discussed. PMID:24086885

  3. Human Synovial Lubricin Expresses Sialyl Lewis x Determinant and Has L-selectin Ligand Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Chunsheng; Ekwall, Anna-Karin Hultgård; Bylund, Johan; Björkman, Lena; Estrella, Ruby P.; Whitelock, John M.; Eisler, Thomas; Bokarewa, Maria; Karlsson, Niclas G.

    2012-01-01

    Lubricin (or proteoglycan 4 (PRG4)) is an abundant mucin-like glycoprotein in synovial fluid (SF) and a major component responsible for joint lubrication. In this study, it was shown that O-linked core 2 oligosaccharides (Galβ1–3(GlcNAcβ1–6)GalNAcα1-Thr/Ser) on lubricin isolated from rheumatoid arthritis SF contained both sulfate and fucose residues, and SF lubricin was capable of binding to recombinant L-selectin in a glycosylation-dependent manner. Using resting human polymorphonuclear granulocytes (PMN) from peripheral blood, confocal microscopy showed that lubricin coated circulating PMN and that it partly co-localized with L-selectin expressed by these cells. In agreement with this, activation-induced shedding of L-selectin also mediated decreased lubricin binding to PMN. It was also found that PMN recruited to inflamed synovial area and fluid in rheumatoid arthritis patients kept a coat of lubricin. These observations suggest that lubricin is able to bind to PMN via an L-selectin-dependent and -independent manner and may play a role in PMN-mediated inflammation. PMID:22930755

  4. Human synovial lubricin expresses sialyl Lewis x determinant and has L-selectin ligand activity.

    PubMed

    Jin, Chunsheng; Ekwall, Anna-Karin Hultgård; Bylund, Johan; Björkman, Lena; Estrella, Ruby P; Whitelock, John M; Eisler, Thomas; Bokarewa, Maria; Karlsson, Niclas G

    2012-10-19

    Lubricin (or proteoglycan 4 (PRG4)) is an abundant mucin-like glycoprotein in synovial fluid (SF) and a major component responsible for joint lubrication. In this study, it was shown that O-linked core 2 oligosaccharides (Galβ1-3(GlcNAcβ1-6)GalNAcα1-Thr/Ser) on lubricin isolated from rheumatoid arthritis SF contained both sulfate and fucose residues, and SF lubricin was capable of binding to recombinant L-selectin in a glycosylation-dependent manner. Using resting human polymorphonuclear granulocytes (PMN) from peripheral blood, confocal microscopy showed that lubricin coated circulating PMN and that it partly co-localized with L-selectin expressed by these cells. In agreement with this, activation-induced shedding of L-selectin also mediated decreased lubricin binding to PMN. It was also found that PMN recruited to inflamed synovial area and fluid in rheumatoid arthritis patients kept a coat of lubricin. These observations suggest that lubricin is able to bind to PMN via an L-selectin-dependent and -independent manner and may play a role in PMN-mediated inflammation.

  5. Effect of Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 on Equine Synovial Fluid Chondroprogenitor Expansion and Chondrogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bianchessi, Marta; Chen, Yuwen; Durgam, Sushmitha; Pondenis, Holly; Stewart, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells have been identified in the synovial fluid of several species. This study was conducted to characterize chondroprogenitor (CP) cells in equine synovial fluid (SF) and to determine the effect of fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) on SF-CP monolayer proliferation and subsequent chondrogenesis. We hypothesized that FGF-2 would stimulate SF-CP proliferation and postexpansion chondrogenesis. SF aspirates were collected from adult equine joints. Colony-forming unit (CFU) assays were performed during primary cultures. At first passage, SF-cells were seeded at low density, with or without FGF-2. Following monolayer expansion and serial immunophenotyping, cells were transferred to chondrogenic pellet cultures. Pellets were analyzed for chondrogenic mRNA expression and cartilage matrix secretion. There was a mean of 59.2 CFU/mL of SF. FGF-2 increased the number of population doublings during two monolayer passages and halved the population doubling times. FGF-2 did not alter the immunophenotype of SF-CPs during monolayer expansion, nor did FGF-2 compromise chondrogenesis. Hypertrophic phenotypic markers were not expressed in control or FGF-2 groups. FGF-2 did prevent the development of a “fibroblastic” cell layer around pellet periphery. FGF-2 significantly accelerates in vitro SF-CP expansion, the major hurdle to clinical application of this cell population, without detrimentally affecting subsequent chondrogenic capacity. PMID:26839571

  6. Pharmacokinetics and penetration into synovial fluid of systemical and electroporation administered sinomenine to rabbits.

    PubMed

    Yan, Huan; Yan, Miao; Li, Huan-De; Jiang, Pei; Deng, Yang; Cai, Hua-Lin

    2015-06-01

    Sinomenine is an anti-rheumatoid arthritis (RA) drug derived from the Sinomenium acutum. The major site of RA treatment is within the synovial compartment. However, the pharmacokinetic and penetration into synovial fluid (SF) of sinomenine have not been reported. In our study, the pharmacokinetics and penetration into SF of systemic and electroporation administered sinomenine were investigated by microdialysis incorporated with HPLC-MS/MS. Sinomenine went into plasma and SF more rapidly with higher peak concentration (Cmax ) by intramuscular injection compared with oral administration. The area under the concentration-time graph (AUC0-∞ ) of intramuscularly injected sinomenine was 1,403,294.75 ± 125,534.567 ng min/mL in plasma and 456,116.37 ± 62,648.36 ng min/mL in SF, which were equivalent with those for an oral dose. These results indicated that equal amounts of sinomenine could penetrate into SF by the two administration routes, and the permeation ratios were approximately 1:3. The AUC0-∞ and Cmax were lower with electroporation compared with systemic administration, but the CSF /CPlasma (concentration of sinomenine in SF vs that of plasma) at 90, 120, 150, 180, 240 and 480 min by electroporation was 3- to 10-fold higher relative to systemic administration. This illustrated that sinomenine can be targeted into joints by electroporation, and electroporation is a potential technique for sinomenine's transdermal delivery.

  7. Immunomodulatory Effects of Bee Venom in Human Synovial Fibroblast Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Ebrahim; Vatanpour, Hossein; H Shirazi, Farshad

    2015-01-01

    As in Iranian traditional medicine, bee venom (BV) is a promising treatment for the rheumatoid arthritis (RA) which is considered as a problematic human chronic inflammatory disease in the present time. Smoking is considered to be a major risk factor in RA onset and severity. The main aim of this study is to investigate the effects of BV on cigarette smoke-induced inflammatory response in fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS). Cytotoxicity of cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) and bee venom were determined by the tetrazolium (MTT) method in cultured synovial fibroblastes. The expression of interleukin-1β and sirtuin1 mRNA were analyzed by SYBR green real-time quantitative PCR. Differences between the mean values of treated and untreated groups were assessed by student t-test. Based on MTT assay, CSC and BV did not exert any significant cytotoxic effects up to 40 µg/mL and 10 µg/mL, respectively. Our results showed that interleukin-1β mRNA level was significantly up-regulated by CSC treatments in LPS-stimulated synoviocytes in a dose-dependent manner. Conversely, the expressions of IL-1β and Sirt1 were up-regulated even in lower concentrations of BV and attenuated at higher concentrations. Also, BV attenuated the CSC-induced and LPS-induced inflammatory responses in synovial fibroblasts. Our results support the epidemiological studies indicating pro-inflammatory effects of CSC and anti-inflammatory effects of BV on FLS cell line. PMID:25561937

  8. Biodynamic Performance of Hyaluronic Acid versus Synovial fluid of the Knee for Osteoarthritic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Corvelli, Michael; Che, Bernadette; Saeui, Christopher; Singh, Anirudha; Elisseeff, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA), a natural biomaterial present in healthy joints but depleted in osteoarthritis (OA), has been employed clinically to provide symptomatic relief of joint pain. Joint movement combined with a reduced joint lubrication in osteoarthritic knees can result in increased wear and tear, chondrocyte apoptosis, and inflammation, leading to cascading cartilage deterioration. Therefore, development of an appropriate cartilage model and evaluation for its friction properties with potential lubricants in different conditions is necessary, which can closely resemble a mechanically induced OA cartilage. Additionally, the comparison of different models with and without endogenous lubricating surface zone proteins, such as PRG4 promotes a well-rounded understanding of cartilage lubrication. In this study, we present our findings on the lubricating effects of HA on different articular cartilage model surfaces in comparison to synovial fluid, a physiological lubricating biomaterial. The mechanical testings data demonstrated that HA reduced average static and kinetic friction coefficient values of the cartilage samples by 75% and 70%, respectively. Furthermore, HA mimicked the friction characteristics of freshly harvested natural synovial fluid throughout all tested and modeled OA conditions with no statistically significant difference. These characteristics led us to exclusively identify HA as an effective boundary layer lubricant in the technology that we develop to treat OA [Singh et al. 2104]. PMID:25858258

  9. Histopathological Analysis of PEEK Wear Particle Effects on the Synovial Tissue of Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jansson, V.; Giurea, A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Increasing interest developed in the use of carbon-fiber-reinforced-poly-ether-ether-ketones (CFR-PEEK) as an alternative bearing material in knee arthroplasty. The effects of CFR-PEEK wear in in vitro and animal studies are controversially discussed, as there are no data available concerning human tissue. The aim of this study was to analyze human tissue containing CFR-PEEK as well as UHMWPE wear debris. The authors hypothesized no difference between the used biomaterials. Methods and Materials. In 10 patients during knee revision surgery of a rotating-hinge-knee-implant-design, synovial tissue samples were achieved (tibial inserts: UHMWPE; bushings and flanges: CFR-PEEK). One additional patient received revision surgery without any PEEK components as a control. The tissue was paraffin-embedded, sliced into 2 μm thick sections, and stained with hematoxylin and eosin in a standard process. A modified panoptical staining was also done. Results. A “wear-type” reaction was seen in the testing and the control group. In all samples, the UHMWPE particles were scattered in the tissue or incorporated in giant cells. CFR-PEEK particles were seen as conglomerates and only could be found next to vessels. CFR-PEEK particles showed no giant-cell reactions. In conclusion, the hypothesis has to be rejected. UHMWPE and PEEK showed a different scatter-behavior in human synovial tissue. PMID:27766256

  10. Determination of marbofloxacin in plasma and synovial fluid by ultrafiltration followed by HPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Montesano, Camilla; Curini, Roberta; Sergi, Manuel; Compagnone, Dario; Celani, Gianluca; Varasano, Vincenzo; Petrizzi, Lucio; Amorena, Michele

    2016-05-10

    A rapid LC-MS/MS method for the determination of marbofloxacin in plasma and synovial fluid is presented in this study. The method uses a rapid sample preparation which only requires an ultrafiltration step with centrifugal filter devices. The optimized procedure allows a minimal need of sample (175 μL), particularly useful for synovial fluid samples which amount is rather limited; it is simple, rapid and easily applicable providing anyhow a satisfactory clean up, demonstrated by post-infusion experiments. On the other hand to maximize the speed of the analysis an ultrafast chromatographic separation has been obtained by selecting a column of 20 mm; the reduced run-time is suitable for processing numerous samples on a daily basis. Linearity was assessed in the range 5-2500 ng mL(-1); ofloxacin was used as internal standard. LOD and LOQ were respectively 1 and 5 ng/mL. The method was successfully applied to a set of samples generated during an experimental veterinary study.

  11. TLE1 is expressed in the majority of primary pleuropulmonary synovial sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Lino-Silva, Leonardo Saúl; Flores-Gutiérrez, Juan Pablo; Vilches-Cisneros, Natalia; Domínguez-Malagón, Hugo Ricardo

    2011-12-01

    Pleuropulmonary synovial sarcoma (PPSS) is a rare entity, similar to synovial sarcoma of soft tissue (STSS). There are 120 published cases of PPSS, but no studies have explored the expression of TLE1. In soft tissues, it has been proven a useful marker, but in tumors of other sites, its expression has not been explored. The main objective was to study the expression and diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of TLE1 in a group of PPSS, of which the diagnosis was corroborated by fluorescence in situ hybridization confirming t(X;18) in a tissue microarray. Immunohistochemistry including TLE1, vimentin, CD99, CD56, bcl-2, AE1-AE3, EMA, CD34, CK7, CK19, calponin, and S-100 was performed on all PPSS and on 25 control cases (five carcinomas, ten mesotheliomas, and ten thoracic sarcomas). TLE1 was positive in 11 cases (73.3%); bcl-2 and vimentin in 100%; calponin and CD56 in 26.6%; CD99, CK AE1-AE3, CK19, CK7, and EMA in 80%; and S100 negative in all. The only biphasic PPSS was positive for epithelial markers only in the epithelial component. TLE1 was negative in all control cases. TLE1 is expressed in 73% of PPSS, a value inferior to that reported in STSS, but is highly specific for PPSS. TLE1 may therefore be of value in the differential diagnosis of PPSS, but should be used in a panel of antibodies. PMID:22071579

  12. Synovial myxoma in the vertebral column of a dog: MRI description and surgical removal.

    PubMed

    Neary, Casey P; Bush, William W; Tiches, Deena M; Durham, Amy C; Gavin, Patrick R

    2014-01-01

    A 12 yr old castrated male mixed-breed dog presented with a 2 wk history of progressive tetraparesis. Neurologic deficits included a short-strided choppy gait in the thoracic limbs and a long-strided proprioceptive ataxia in the pelvic limbs. Withdrawal reflexes were decreased bilaterally in the thoracic limbs. Signs were consistent with a myelopathy of the caudal cervical/cranial thoracic spinal cord (i.e., the sixth cervical [C] vertebra to the second thoracic [T] vertebra). A mass associated with the C6-C7 articular facet on the left side was identified on MRI of the cervical spinal cord. The lesion was hyperintense to spinal cord parenchyma on T2-weighted images, hypointense on T1-weighted images, and there was strong homogenous contrast enhancement. Significant spinal cord compression was associated with the lesion. The mass was removed through a C6-C7 dorsal laminectomy and facetectomy. Histopathology of the mass was consistent with a synovial myxoma of the articular facet. A postoperative MRI showed complete surgical resection. Albeit rare, synovial myxomas should be included in the list of differential diagnoses for neoplasms affecting the vertebral columns in dogs.

  13. Summary - National Dissemination and the Five Target States, Part 3, Final Report for Phase II--Dissemination, Rural Shared Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Northern Montana Coll., Havre.

    The dissemination phase (Phase II) of the Rural Shared Services Project is reported in this document. Efforts of the dissemination phase were concentrated in 5 target states: Vermont, Georgia, Wyoming, Montana, and New Mexico; national dissemination was limited to attendance at national conferences, the U. S. Office of Education PREP materials for…

  14. A framework for disseminating evidence-based health promotion practices.

    PubMed

    Harris, Jeffrey R; Cheadle, Allen; Hannon, Peggy A; Forehand, Mark; Lichiello, Patricia; Mahoney, Eustacia; Snyder, Susan; Yarrow, Judith

    2012-01-01

    Wider adoption of evidence-based, health promotion practices depends on developing and testing effective dissemination approaches. To assist in developing these approaches, we created a practical framework drawn from the literature on dissemination and our experiences disseminating evidence-based practices. The main elements of our framework are 1) a close partnership between researchers and a disseminating organization that takes ownership of the dissemination process and 2) use of social marketing principles to work closely with potential user organizations. We present 2 examples illustrating the framework: EnhanceFitness, for physical activity among older adults, and American Cancer Society Workplace Solutions, for chronic disease prevention among workers. We also discuss 7 practical roles that researchers play in dissemination and related research: sorting through the evidence, conducting formative research, assessing readiness of user organizations, balancing fidelity and reinvention, monitoring and evaluating, influencing the outer context, and testing dissemination approaches. PMID:22172189

  15. Tumor formation in Hoffa's infrapatellar fat: Case report.

    PubMed

    Mozella, Alan de Paula; da Silveira Moller, João Victor; de Araújo Barros Cobra, Hugo Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Although tumors or pseudotumoral lesions are rare in the infrapatellar fat, they may affect it. Osteochondroma is the commonest benign bone tumor. However, extraskeletal presentations are rare. There are three extraskeletal variants of osteochondroma: synovial chondromatosis, para-articular chondroma and soft-tissue chondroma. We present a case of a single intra-articular lesion in the area of Hoffa's fat, in a 78-year-old female patient with a complaint of progressive knee pain associated with severe arthrosis. From the clinical and radiological findings, the diagnosis was para-articular osteochondroma. However, the histopathological findings, after excision of the lesion, showed that this was synovial chondromatosis secondary to osteoarthrosis.

  16. Measurements of C-reactive protein in serum and lactate dehydrogenase in serum and synovial fluid of patients with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Hurter, K; Spreng, D; Rytz, U; Schawalder, P; Ott-Knüsel, F; Schmökel, H

    2005-03-01

    Diagnosis of osteoarthritis (OA) is based upon the clinical orthopaedic examination and the radiographic assessment, both of which can be non-specific and insensitive in early joint disease. The aim of our study was to investigate if there is an increase in serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) in degenerative joint disease (DJD) and if CRP could be used to help diagnose OA. We also wished to investigate whether it was possible to distinguish a joint with clinically and radiographically confirmed OA from a healthy joint by comparing lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels within the synovial fluid and the serum. We have shown a difference in synovial LDH levels between diseased and healthy joints (P<0.0001). There was also a significant difference between LDH in arthritic synovial fluid and serum, with no correlation between the values. Despite the fact that the values of our clinical patients tended to be higher than the values of our control group (P=0.05) all measured values were within the normal limits of previous publications. From these data, we conclude that single measurements of serum CRP do not permit detection of OA in clinical patients and that serum LDH is not a reliable marker for osteoarthritis. LDH levels in the synovial fluid could be of diagnostic value for identifying osteoarthritis. PMID:15727922

  17. Occasional presence of herpes viruses in synovial fluid and blood from patients with rheumatoid arthritis and axial spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    Burgos, Rubén; Ordoñez, Graciela; Vázquez-Mellado, Janitzia; Pineda, Benjamín; Sotelo, Julio

    2015-10-01

    Viral agents have been suspected as participants of immune-mediated disorders. In the case of rheumatic diseases, the synovial joint cavity represents a secluded area of inflammation which could harbor etiological agents. We analyzed by polymerase chain reaction the possible presence of DNA from various herpes viruses in blood and synovial fluid from patients with either rheumatoid arthritis (n = 18), axial spondyloarthritis (n = 11), or osteoarthritis (n = 8). Relevant findings were as follows: DNA from varicella zoster virus was found in synovial fluid but not in blood mononuclear cells from 33 % of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and in 45 % of patients with axial spondyloarthritis but not in patients with osteoarthritis. Also, DNA from herpes simplex viruses 1 and 2 was found both in the blood and in the synovial fluid from 33 % of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Our results indicate the occasional presence of DNA from herpes viruses in patients with rheumatoid arthritis or with axial spondyloarthritis. However, these findings might represent a parallel epiphenomenon of viral activation associated either with immunosuppressive therapy or with primary immune disturbances, rather than the etiological participation of herpes viruses in these disorders.

  18. The lubricative function of artificial joint material surfaces by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Comparison with natural synovial joint surface.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masanori; Oka, Masanori

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to observe and compare the effect of the behavior of different lubricating surfaces, including articular cartilage and several artificial joint materials, under the physiological loading by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) to clarify the mechanism of lubrication in natural joints and subsequently improve the quality of artificial joints. In our experiment, even with considerable loading, natural articular cartilage exhibited a synovial fluid area and an area of direct and solid contact. In the region between these two areas, a liquid crystal layer was observed. On the other hand, the materials used for artificial joints (metal and polyethylene, which are now in use, and polyvinyl alcohol-hydrogel polymer which is being developed), did not exhibit neither a clear fluid pool area nor the intermediary area with liquid crystal formation. These results suggest that natural articular cartilage surface has a particular characteristic which builds up a synovial pooling area and liquid crystal formation in the third area by interaction with macromolecules in synovial fluid under the loading condition. These characteristics give natural articular cartilage its excellent lubricative function. To improve the quality of artificial joints, the characteristics of the implant material surface and the synovial macromolecules must be considered. PMID:14646057

  19. Single Molecule Microscopy Reveals an Increased Hyaluronan Diffusion Rate in Synovial Fluid from Knees Affected by Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Kohlhof, Hendrik; Gravius, Sascha; Kohl, Sandro; Ahmad, Sufian S; Randau, Thomas; Schmolders, Jan; Rommelspacher, Yorck; Friedrich, Max; Kaminski, Tim P

    2016-02-12

    Osteoarthritis is a common and progressive joint disorder. Despite its widespread, in clinical practice only late phases of osteoarthritis that are characterized by severe joint damage are routinely detected. Since osteoarthritis cannot be cured but relatively well managed, an early diagnosis and thereby early onset of disease management would lower the burden of osteoarthritis. Here we evaluated if biophysical parameters of small synovial fluid samples extracted by single molecule microscopy can be linked to joint damage. In healthy synovial fluid (ICRS-score < 1) hyaluronan showed a slower diffusion (2.2 μm(2)/s, N = 5) than in samples from patients with joint damage (ICRS-score > 2) (4.5 μm(2)/s, N = 16). More strikingly, the diffusion coefficient of hyaluronan in healthy synovial fluid was on average 30% slower than expected by sample viscosity. This effect was diminished or missing in samples from patients with joint damage. Since single molecule microscopy needs only microliters of synovial fluid to extract the viscosity and the specific diffusion coefficient of hyaluronan this method could be of use as diagnostic tool for osteoarthritis.

  20. Single Molecule Microscopy Reveals an Increased Hyaluronan Diffusion Rate in Synovial Fluid from Knees Affected by Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kohlhof, Hendrik; Gravius, Sascha; Kohl, Sandro; Ahmad, Sufian S.; Randau, Thomas; Schmolders, Jan; Rommelspacher, Yorck; Friedrich, Max; Kaminski, Tim P.

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is a common and progressive joint disorder. Despite its widespread, in clinical practice only late phases of osteoarthritis that are characterized by severe joint damage are routinely detected. Since osteoarthritis cannot be cured but relatively well managed, an early diagnosis and thereby early onset of disease management would lower the burden of osteoarthritis. Here we evaluated if biophysical parameters of small synovial fluid samples extracted by single molecule microscopy can be linked to joint damage. In healthy synovial fluid (ICRS-score < 1) hyaluronan showed a slower diffusion (2.2 μm2/s, N = 5) than in samples from patients with joint damage (ICRS-score > 2) (4.5 μm2/s, N = 16). More strikingly, the diffusion coefficient of hyaluronan in healthy synovial fluid was on average 30% slower than expected by sample viscosity. This effect was diminished or missing in samples from patients with joint damage. Since single molecule microscopy needs only microliters of synovial fluid to extract the viscosity and the specific diffusion coefficient of hyaluronan this method could be of use as diagnostic tool for osteoarthritis. PMID:26868769

  1. Nocardia mikamii a Novel Species Causing Disseminated Nocardiosis: A Literature Review of Disseminated Nocardiosis

    PubMed Central

    Adnan, Mohammed Muqeet; Mujeeb, Sufyan Abdul

    2014-01-01

    Nocardia is an uncommon Gram-positive organism. It typically appears as delicate filamentous Gram-positive branching rods. In the United States it was estimated to be approximately 500 to 1000 new cases per year. The organism causes disease in immunocompromised individuals with pulmonary infection representing the most common site of infection. Nocardia mikamii has been a recently isolated pathogen and not many cases of disseminated infection with this organism has been reported in the literature; we present a case of disseminated nocardiosis (mikamii sp.) in an immunocompromised patient. We also present a literature review on nocardiosis. PMID:27437492

  2. The future of time and frequency dissemination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Judah

    1994-01-01

    I will try to extrapolate the changes in the dissemination of time and frequency information that have taken place during the last 25 years to predict the future developments both in the methods of disseminating time and frequency and in the kinds of customers we will be asked to serve. Two important developments are likely to play pivotal roles in driving the evolution of dissemination. The first is the commercial availability of very high quality clocks -- devices whose performance may eventually rival that of the current generation of primary frequency standards. The widespread use of these devices may blur the traditional distinction between client and server, and may replace it with a more symmetrical interchange of data among peers. The second is the increasing demand for digital time and frequency information driven by the increasing sophistication of everything from traffic lights to electric power meters. The needs of these individual users may not tax the state of the art of primary frequency standards in principle, but their large numbers and wide geographical distribution present a technological challenge that is difficult to meet at a reasonable price using existing methods. Some of these problems may be solved (or at least addressed) using developments in communications and consumer electronics such as the increasing use of fiber-optic telephone circuits and the increasing bandwidth and sophistication of the cable network used to transmit television pictures. To be useful, these advances in hardware must stimulate parallel advances in software algorithms and methods. These advances are more difficult to predict with great confidence, but the developments of the last few years will be examined to provide some indications of the future.

  3. Disseminated granuloma annulare: study on eight cases.

    PubMed

    Pătraşcu, V; Giurcă, Claudia; Ciurea, Raluca Niculina; Georgescu, Claudia Valentina

    2013-01-01

    Granuloma annulare (GA) is classified as localized, generalized/disseminated, subcutaneous, and perforating types. The studies show connection with diabetes mellitus, lipidic metabolic disorders, malignant diseases, thyroid disorders, infections (HBV, HCV, HIV). We performed a retrospective study between 2010-2011, regarding disseminated GA (GAD), and the relationship between GAD and other comorbidities. We clinically and histologically diagnosed eight cases of GAD. The patients were also investigated for the diagnosis of associated diseases. The treatment included topical corticosteroids, antihistamines, Calcipotriol/Betamethasone, Tacrolimus 0.03%, Pentoxifylline, Hydroxychloroquine. Therapeutic response was assessed one month and three months after hospitalization. Our patients were five women and three men, aged 46-68 years, mean age 57.25 years, with a disease history of one year and a half (between three months and four years). The lesions occurred in the upper extremities (eight cases), distal extremities (three cases), cervical area (two cases), and trunk (five cases). In seven cases, we found annular appearance and one patient had disseminated small papules eruption. Associated pathology was diabetes mellitus type II (five cases), overweight and obesity (five cases), dyslipidemia (three cases), hypothyroidism (one case), rheumatoid arthritis (one case), external ear canal basal carcinoma (one case). Although there is controversy regarding the relationship between GAD and associated diseases, it is accepted that it is significantly associated with diabetes mellitus, also found in our study in five out of eight cases. We noticed obvious improvements after local and general treatment. It is confirmed that GAD is prevalent in women, over 40-year-old. GAD is often associated with diabetes and dyslipidemia, therefore it is necessary to investigate patients in this direction. The histopathological exam is essential for an accurate confirmation of GA. PMID

  4. The future of time and frequency dissemination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, Judah

    1994-05-01

    I will try to extrapolate the changes in the dissemination of time and frequency information that have taken place during the last 25 years to predict the future developments both in the methods of disseminating time and frequency and in the kinds of customers we will be asked to serve. Two important developments are likely to play pivotal roles in driving the evolution of dissemination. The first is the commercial availability of very high quality clocks -- devices whose performance may eventually rival that of the current generation of primary frequency standards. The widespread use of these devices may blur the traditional distinction between client and server, and may replace it with a more symmetrical interchange of data among peers. The second is the increasing demand for digital time and frequency information driven by the increasing sophistication of everything from traffic lights to electric power meters. The needs of these individual users may not tax the state of the art of primary frequency standards in principle, but their large numbers and wide geographical distribution present a technological challenge that is difficult to meet at a reasonable price using existing methods. Some of these problems may be solved (or at least addressed) using developments in communications and consumer electronics such as the increasing use of fiber-optic telephone circuits and the increasing bandwidth and sophistication of the cable network used to transmit television pictures. To be useful, these advances in hardware must stimulate parallel advances in software algorithms and methods. These advances are more difficult to predict with great confidence, but the developments of the last few years will be examined to provide some indications of the future.

  5. Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease produces chronic hip synovitis and elevation of interleukin-6 in the synovial fluid.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Nobuhiro; Yamaguchi, Ryosuke; Adapala, Naga Suresh; Chen, Elena; Neal, David; Jack, Obrien; Thoveson, Alec; Gudmundsson, Paul; Brabham, Case; Aruwajoye, Olumide; Drissi, Hicham; Kim, Harry K W

    2015-06-01

    Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease (LCPD) is a childhood hip disorder of ischemic osteonecrosis of the femoral head. Hip joint synovitis is a common feature of LCPD, but the nature and pathophysiology of the synovitis remain unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the chronicity of the synovitis and the inflammatory cytokines present in the synovial fluid at an active stage of LCPD. Serial MRI was performed on 28 patients. T2-weighted and gadolinium-enhanced MR images were used to assess synovial effusion and synovial enhancement (hyperemia) over time. A multiple-cytokine assay was used to determine the levels of 27 inflammatory cytokines and related factors present in the synovial fluid from 13 patients. MRI analysis showed fold increases of 5.0 ± 3.3 and 3.1 ± 2.1 in the synovial fluid volume in the affected hip compared to the unaffected hip at the initial and the last follow-up MRI, respectively. The mean duration between the initial and the last MRI was 17.7 ± 8.3 months. The volume of enhanced synovium on the contrast MRI was increased 16.5 ± 8.5 fold and 6.3 ± 5.6 fold in the affected hip compared to the unaffected hip at the initial MRI and the last follow-up MRI, respectively. In the synovial fluid of the affected hips, IL-6 protein levels were significantly increased (LCPD: 509 ± 519 pg/mL, non-LCPD: 19 ± 22 pg/mL; p = 0.0005) on the multi-cytokine assay. Interestingly, IL-1β and TNF-α levels were not elevated. In the active stage of LCPD, chronic hip synovitis and significant elevation of IL-6 are produced in the synovial fluid. Further studies are warranted to investigate the role of IL-6 on the pathophysiology of synovitis in LCPD and how it affects bone healing. PMID:25556551

  6. Geothermal Energy Information Dissemination and Outreach

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. John W. Lund

    2005-12-31

    The objective of this project is to continue on-going work by the Geo-Heat Center to develop and disseminate information; provide educational materials; develop short courses and workshops; maintain a comprehensive geothermal resource database; respond to inquiries from the public, industry and government; provide engineering, economic and environmental information and analysis on geothermal technology to potential users and developers; and provide information on market opportunities for geothermal development. These efforts are directed towards increasing the utilization of geothermal energy in the US and developing countries, by means of electric power generation and direct-use.

  7. Disseminated coccidoidomycosis in a koala (Phascolarctos cinereus).

    PubMed

    Burgdorf-Moisuk, Anne; Stalis, Ilse H; Pye, Geoffrey W

    2012-03-01

    A16-yr-old male koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) presented for nonspecific signs of illness and weight loss. Despite 2 mo of diagnostics and supportive care, the koala's health declined and euthanasia was elected. On histopathologic examination, lesions containing fungal organisms morphologically consistent with coccidioidomycosis were found in the lung, liver, spleen, kidney, lymph node, heart, eye, and bone marrow. Although disseminated infection was present, the koala was IgM and IgG seronegative for Coccidioides spp. 1 mo prior to euthanasia.

  8. Ultrasound features of disseminated adenomucinosis (pseudomyxoma).

    PubMed

    Tsai, C J

    1998-05-01

    Pseudomyxoma is a clinical entity in which the peritoneal surfaces and omentum are involved with gelatinous, mucinous implants, and often massive gelatinous ascites. Most cases originate from ruptured ovarian cysts or appendiceal mucoceles, and involve only the intraperitoneal cavity. This report describes a case of disseminated adenomucinosis, the benign form of pseudomyxoma, with both peritoneal and retroperitoneal involvement. The diagnosis was suggested by real-time ultrasound and confirmed at surgery. The ultrasound characteristics of this rare entity and the differential diagnoses are discussed.

  9. The National Dissemination of International Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Sahagia, Maria; Woods, Mike

    2008-08-14

    The paper presents the most significant actions which a primary Radionuclide Metrology Laboratory must accomplish, in order to disseminate the international equivalence to the entire national traceability chain: absolute standardization methods and demonstration of international equivalence, construction and calibration of a consistent set of secondary standardization equipment, preparation of radioactive standards. Delivery of radioactive standards to the end users and carrying out metrological services. Organization of national proficiency tests with the users. International validation of secondary standards by proficiency tests and establishment of a Quality System Assurance.

  10. Synovial biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... small incision. After anesthesia, an instrument called a trocar is inserted into the joint space. This tool ... area. A biopsy grasper is inserted through the trocar and turned to cut out a tissue segment. ...

  11. EGFP gene transfection into the synovial joint tissues of rats with rheumatoid arthritis by ultrasound-mediated microbubble destruction

    PubMed Central

    JING, XIANG-XIANG; LIU, JIE; YANG, BING-ANG; FU, SHAO-QING; WU, TANG-NA; WANG, DONG-LIN

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore the feasibility of enhancing green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene transfection into the synovial joint tissues of rats with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) by ultrasound-mediated microbubble destruction. An optimal SonoVue dose was determined using 40 normal rats categorized into five groups according to the various doses of microbubbles used. At 1 week after ultrasound irradiation, the rats were sacrificed. Damage to the joint synovial tissues was observed with hematoxylin and eosin histopathological staining under a microscope. A further 44 normal rats were used to establish a rat model of RA, and were then categorized into four groups: EGFP, ultrasound + EGFP, microbubbles + EGFP and ultrasound + microbubbles + EGFP. The last group was irradiated with ultrasound for 10 min following the injection of 300 μl SonoVue and 10 μg EGFP into the joint cavity. Rats were sacrificed after 3 days and synovial tissue was collected from the knee joints for observation of EGFP with fluorescence microscopy and analysis by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. EGFP expression was observed in the synovial tissues of all groups. However, high EGFP expression levels were observed in the ultrasound + microbubbles + EGFP group. No statistically significant differences (P>0.05) were observed in the EGFP expression levels between the EGFP, ultrasound + EGFP and microbubbles + EGFP groups. However, EGFP expression levels in the EGFP, ultrasound + EGFP and microbubbles + EGFP groups significantly differed (P<0.05) from that in the ultrasound + microbubbles + EGFP group. Therefore, ultrasound-mediated microbubble destruction improved EGFP transfection efficiency into the joint synovial tissues of rats with RA. PMID:24940446

  12. VEGF Gene Polymorphisms Affect Serum Protein Levels and Alter Disease Activity and Synovial Lesions in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Jin-Ping; Wu, Yu-Zhang; Yu, Nan; Yu, Zhi-Wu; Xie, Fu-Yuan; Yuan, Quan

    2016-01-01

    Background Our study investigated 2 common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) for their influences on serum VEGF levels, disease activity, and synovial lesions in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Material/Methods Clinical information and venous blood samples were collected from 98 RA patients and 100 healthy controls. Genotyping on samples from the subjects was performed using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Serum VEGF levels were determined using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The synovial thickness and joint effusion of 28 joints were measured in RA patients, and total sharp score (TSS) and disease activity score (DAS) of 28 joints were recorded. Results The genotype and allele frequencies of VEGF rs833070 (G>A) and rs3025030 (G>C) were significantly different between RA group and control group (all P<0.05). VEGF rs833070 and rs3025030 polymorphisms were associated with increasing VEGF serum levels in the RA group (all P<0.01). Statistically significant difference was observed in DAS28 between the different genotypes of VEGF rs833070 in RA patients (P<0.05). Importantly, significant differences in synovial thickening, joint effusion and synovial angiogenesis were observed between the different genotypes of VEGF rs833070 and rs3025030 polymorphisms (all P<0.05). Conclusions Our study provides evidence that VEGF polymorphisms might be important indicators of disease activity and synovial lesions, and prognostic factors in evaluating the treatment effectiveness in RA. PMID:26825024

  13. Synovial cytokine expression in psoriatic arthritis and associations with lymphoid neogenesis and clinical features

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an autoantibody-negative immune-mediated disease in which synovial lymphoid neogenesis (LN) occurs. We determined whether LN is associated with specific patterns of inflammatory cytokine expression in paired synovial tissue (ST) and fluid (SF) samples and their potential correlation with the clinical characteristics of PsA. Methods ST and paired SF samples were obtained from the inflamed knee of PsA patients. ST samples were immunostained with CD3 (T cell), CD20 (B cell), and MECA-79 (high endothelial vessels). Total ST mRNA was extracted, and the gene expression of 21 T-cell-derived and proinflammatory cytokines were measured with quantitative real-time PCR. SF concentrations of Th1, Th2, Th17, and proinflammatory cytokines were determined with the Quantibody Human Th17 Array. Clinical and biologic data were collected at inclusion and after a median of 27 months of follow-up. Results Twenty (43.5%) of 46 patients had LN. Only two genes showed differences (Wilcoxon test, P < 0.06) in ST between LN-positive and LN-negative patients: interleukin-23A (IL-23A) (P = 0.058) and transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β1) (P = 0.050). IL-23A expression was higher, and TGF-β1 expression was lower in LN-positive patients. ST IL-15 mRNA showed a nonsignificant trend toward higher expression in LN-positive patients, and SF IL-15 protein levels were significantly higher in LN-positive patients (P = 0.002). In all PsA patients, IL-23A mRNA expression correlated with C-reactive protein (CRP) (r = 0.471; P = 0.001) and swollen-joint count (SJC) (r = 0.350; P = 0.018), whereas SF levels of IL-6 and CC chemokine-ligand 20 (CCL-20) correlated with CRP levels (r = 0.377; P = 0.014 and r = 0.501; P < 0.0001, respectively). Conclusions These findings suggest differences in the cytokine profile of PsA patients with LN, with a higher expression of IL-23A and IL-15 and a lower expression of TGF-β1. In the entire group of patients, IL-23 ST

  14. Diagnosis and treatment of disseminated intravascular coagulation.

    PubMed

    Levi, M

    2014-06-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is a condition in which systemic activation of coagulation without a specific localization occurs, resulting in extensive formation of intravascular fibrin, particularly in small and midsize vessels. Disseminated intravascular coagulation may lead to several altered coagulation parameters, including a low platelet count, abnormal global clotting assays, low levels of physiological anticoagulant proteases, or increased fibrin degradation products. Also, more complex assays for activation of coagulation factors or pathways may indicate involvement of these molecules in DIC. None of these tests alone, however, can accurately ascertain or rebuff a diagnosis of DIC. Nonetheless, a combination of readily available routine assays may be instrumental in establishing a diagnosis of DIC and can also be useful to point to a subset of patients with DIC that may need definite, often costly, interventions in the hemostatic system. Current insights on relevant etiological pathways that may contribute to the occurrence of DIC have led to innovative therapeutic and adjunctive approaches to patient with DIC. Management options directed at the amelioration of hemostatic activation may tentatively be indicated and were found to be advantageous in experimental and clinical investigations. These treatments encompass elimination of tissue factor-mediated thrombin generation or restitution of normal anticoagulant function.

  15. [Disseminated histoplasmosis treated by boluses of fluconazole].

    PubMed

    Mandengue Ebenye, C; Takuefou Mfangam, B; Nouédoui, C; Atangana, P J A

    2015-01-01

    We report a case in which an HIV-infected man was cured of disseminated histoplasmosis (Histoplasma capsulatum var duboisii) after treatment by high-dose fluconazole (1,600 mg taken four times daily) for 2 months, combined with active antiretroviral therapy. The choice of fluconazole at this dosage was motivated by its availability as a generic and thus inexpensive medication, the patient's precarious status, and his critical clinical condition. At the end of the second month of treatment, the patient chose to stop the fluconazole, which he could no longer afford, while continuing the antiretroviral treatment, which was free. The clinical and laboratory improvement observed from the first week has continued to progress for more than 8 months after fluconazole treatment stopped. This single case needs - and deserves - to be confirmed in a series of patients. Nonetheless it makes it possible to envision fluconazole as a low-cost and efficacious antifungal agent for the treatment of disseminated histoplasmosis in AIDS patients in sub-Saharan Africa.

  16. Disseminated Cerebrospinal Embryonal Tumor in the Adult

    PubMed Central

    Armocida, Daniele; Caporlingua, Federico; Lapadula, Gennaro; Elefante, Grazia Maria; Antonelli, Manila; Salvati, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. According to the 2016 World Health Organization classification of Tumors of the Central Nervous System, the term Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor has been replaced by the term Embryonal Tumor (ET). We present a case of disseminated cerebrospinal ET presenting in an adult patient. Illustrative Case. A 49-year-old male presenting with low back pain, dysuria, and hypoesthesia of the lower extremities referred to our emergency department. Brain and whole spine contrast-enhanced MRI documented a diffusively disseminated heterogeneous neoplasm with intradural extra- and intramedullary involvement of the cervicothoracic tract and cauda equina. A primary biopsy of the lumbosacral localization was performed through L5 bilateral laminectomy. Histologic diagnosis was Embryonal Tumor Not Otherwise Specified. The patient underwent chemotherapy with postoperative adjuvant alternating Vincristine-Doxorubicin-Ifosfamide (VAI) and Ifosfamide-Etoposide (IE). Discussion. Spinal ETs are exceedingly rare especially when presenting in the adult patient. Neurosurgical and oncologic management is still unclear. When feasible, surgical removal should always be performed to obtain a histologic diagnosis. Postoperative adjuvant therapy might entail both chemo- and radiotherapy; however a consensus on this matter is still lacking.

  17. Hydrogen Technical Analysis -- Dissemination of Information

    SciTech Connect

    George Kervitsky, Jr.

    2006-03-20

    SENTECH is a small energy and environmental consulting firm providing technical, analytical, and communications solutions to technology management issues. The activities proposed by SENTECH focused on gathering and developing communications materials and information, and various dissemination activities to present the benefits of hydrogen energy to a broad audience while at the same time establishing permanent communications channels to enable continued two-way dialog with these audiences in future years. Effective communications and information dissemination is critical to the acceptance of new technology. Hydrogen technologies face the additional challenge of safety preconceptions formed primarily as a result of the crash of the Hindenburg. Effective communications play a key role in all aspects of human interaction, and will help to overcome the perceptual barriers, whether of safety, economics, or benefits. As originally proposed SENTECH identified three distinct information dissemination activities to address three distinct but important audiences; these formed the basis for the task structure used in phases 1 and 2. The tasks were: (1) Print information--Brochures that target the certain segment of the population and will be distributed via relevant technical conferences and traditional distribution channels. (2) Face-to-face meetings--With industries identified to have a stake in hydrogen energy. The three industry audiences are architect/engineering firms, renewable energy firms, and energy companies that have not made a commitment to hydrogen (3) Educational Forums--The final audience is students--the future engineers, technicians, and energy consumers. SENTECH will expand on its previous educational work in this area. The communications activities proposed by SENTECH and completed as a result of this cooperative agreement was designed to compliment the research and development work funded by the DOE by presenting the technical achievements and validations

  18. Synovial fluid matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 activities in dogs suffering from joint disorders

    PubMed Central

    MURAKAMI, Kohei; MAEDA, Shingo; YONEZAWA, Tomohiro; MATSUKI, Naoaki

    2016-01-01

    The activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 in synovial fluids (SF) sampled from dogs with joint disorders was investigated by gelatin zymography and densitometry. Pro-MMP-2 showed similar activity levels in dogs with idiopathic polyarthritis (IPA; n=17) or canine rheumatoid arthritis (cRA; n=4), and healthy controls (n=10). However, dogs with cranial cruciate ligament rupture (CCLR; n=5) presented significantly higher pro-MMP-2 activity than IPA and healthy dogs. Meanwhile, dogs with IPA exhibited significantly higher activity of pro- and active MMP-9 than other groups. Activity levels in pro- and active MMP-9 in cRA and CCLR dogs were not significantly different from those in healthy controls. Different patterns of MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity may reflect the differences in the underlying pathological processes. PMID:26902805

  19. Serum and Synovial Fluid Levels of CCL18 are Correlated with Radiographic Grading of Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yun; Chen, Juwu; Yang, Guohui

    2015-01-01

    Background Chemokines are involved in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). CCL18, a member of the chemokines family, is observed in synovial fluid (SF) of OA patients. The aim of this study was to determine the association between CCL18 levels in serum and SF with radiographic knee OA. Material/Methods This study was conducted in a population of 308 patients with knee OA. The radiological knee OA was graded by the Kellgren-Lawrence grading system. Results Serum levels of CCL18 in knee OA patients were markedly higher than those in healthy controls. Serum and SF levels of CCL18 increased with the severity of KL grades and were correlated with disease severity. Conclusions The CCL18 levels in serum and SF are correlated with the severity of OA. PMID:25794928

  20. Markers of activated T cells on synovial fluid lymphocytes in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, A

    1979-01-31

    Membrane markers of activated T lymphocytes of synovial fluid of two groups of patients with various forms of arthritis were studied. The first group (group A) concerns patients affected by rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and the other (group B) includes those affected by not immunologically-mediated arthropathies as osteoarthrosis, crystal synovitis, post-traumatic arthritis. Some other arthropathies included in a third group (group C) have been considered separately. Both the receptor for human group O Rh negative erythrocytes (H rosettes forming cells) and the receptor able to bind at 37 degrees C sheep red blood cells (stable-E-rosette forming cells) respectively were used as markers for the identification of activated T lymphocytes. The results show a marked increase of activated T cells in group A in comparison to group B. So the possible causes of this lymphocyte activation in rheumatoid patients are suggested.

  1. [Peroneal nerve palsy in children: Uncommon diagnosis of a proximal tibiofibular synovial cyst].

    PubMed

    Robin, F; Kuchenbuch, M; Sauleau, P; Marleix, S; Lucas, G; Fraisse, B; Violas, P

    2016-01-01

    Compression of the common peroneal nerve by synovial cysts of the tibiofibular joint is a rare disease. Two macroscopic forms may be encountered: extraneural cysts and intraneural cysts. In a review of the literature, we found only three pediatric cases of common peroneal nerve palsy due to extraneural cysts and about 60 cases reported in adults. Taking advantage of the clinical history of two children operated in our department for this disease, we describe this uncommon entity, which must be diagnosed and treated rapidly. Even in the presence of severe clinical and electrophysiological symptoms, a full clinical recovery is possible, as observed in these two children. However, follow-up is needed because recurrence is possible.

  2. Hyaluronan Inhibits Tlr-4-Dependent RANKL Expression in Human Rheumatoid Arthritis Synovial Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Hirabara, Shinya; Ishiguro, Naoki; Kojima, Toshihisa

    2016-01-01

    The Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathway is activated in synovial fibroblast cells in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB (RANK) and its ligand, RANKL, are key molecules involved in the differentiation of osteoclasts and joint destruction in RA. Hyaluronan (HA) is a major extracellular component and an important immune regulator. In this study, we show that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation significantly increases RANKL expression via a TLR-4 signaling pathway. We also demonstrate that HA suppresses LPS-induced RANKL expression, which is dependent on CD44, but not intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). Our study provides evidence for HA-mediated suppression of TLR-4-dependent RANKL expression. This could present an alternative target for the treatment of destructed joint bones and cartilages in RA. PMID:27054952

  3. The value of synovial fluid assays in the diagnosis of joint disease: a literature survey

    PubMed Central

    Swan, A; Amer, H; Dieppe, P

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To carry out a critical appraisal of the literature in an attempt to assess the current value of synovial fluid (SF) analysis in the diagnosis of joint disease. Methods: A literature search was undertaken using the Medline, Biomed, Bids, Pubmed, and Embase electronic databases using the keywords: synovial fluid (SF) analysis, SF crystals, joint sepsis, acute arthritis, and SF cell counts, cytology, biomarkers, and microbiology. Results: Publications fell into three main categories. Firstly, reports assessing the value of the three traditional assays (microbiology, white blood cell counts, and microscopy for pathogenic crystals). For these quality control evidence was found to be sparse, and tests for sensitivity, specificity, and reliability showed worrying variations. These poor standards in SF analysis may be due to lack of inclusion of some tests within routine pathology services. Secondly, claims for the usefulness of "new" assays (cytology and biochemical markers). For cytology, the supporting evidence was mainly anecdotal and there were no reports on specificity, sensitivity, and reliability. Interpretation difficulties are a major hindrance to the clinical use of biochemical assays, which remain primarily research tools. Finally, work on the diagnostic value of SF analysis in general. The appraisal confirmed that SF analysis remains of major diagnostic value in acute arthritis, where septic arthritis or crystal arthropathy is suspected, and in intercritical gout. Conclusions: Given the importance of SF tests, rationalisation of their use, together with improved quality control, should be immediate priorities. Further investigation is recommended into the contribution of SF inspection and white cell counts to diagnosis, as well as of the specificity and sensitivity of SF microbiological assays, crystal identification, and cytology. PMID:12006320

  4. In vivo role of phagocytic synovial lining cells in onset of experimental arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Van Lent, P. L.; Van den Hoek, A. E.; Van den Bersselaar, L. A.; Spanjaards, M. F.; Van Rooijen, N.; Dijkstra, C. D.; Van de Putte, L. B.; Van den Berg, W. B.

    1993-01-01

    The in vivo role of phagocytic synovial lining cells (SLC) was studied in acute experimental arthritis in the mouse. SLCs were selectively depleted by injecting liposomes encapsulating the drug dichloromethylene diphosphonate (CL2MDP, Clodronate). Optimal depletion of phagocytic lining cells occurred 7 days after CL2MDP liposome injection. Eliciting an immune complex-mediated arthritis in SLC-depleted knee joints largely prevented inflammation if compared to control arthritic knee joints. Joint swelling and influx of inflammatory cells into the joint cavity was markedly diminished. Cartilage damage, in this model related to influx of inflammatory cells, was significantly decreased. Reduced influx of inflammatory cells (mainly polymorphonuclear neutrophils) was correlated to a decreased production of chemotactic factors as measured in washouts of arthritic joints in a two-compartment Transwell system. Interleukin-1-driven chemotactic factors seem to be involved. Interleukin-1 levels were significantly lowered in SLC-depleted arthritic knee joints as compared to controls. Injection of recombinant murine interleukin-1 in SLC-depleted knee joints caused less influx of inflammatory cells as compared to injection into control knee joints. A specific damage of CL2MDP liposome treatment to synovial blood vessels was excluded as intraarticular injection of human recombinant C5a in lining-depleted knee joints showed similar influx of inflammatory cells if compared to human recombinant C5a injection in control knee joints. This study indicates that in immune complex-mediated arthritis, phagocytic lining cells regulate the onset of the inflammatory response. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 6 Figure 8 PMID:8214013

  5. Synovial fluid replication in knee wear testing: an investigation of the fluid volume.

    PubMed

    Reinders, Jörn; Sonntag, Robert; Kretzer, Jan Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Wear testing cannot replicate the variations in wear rates and wear mechanisms seen in vivo, which may be related to differences between in vivo and in vitro conditions. A considerable difference exists between the in vivo synovial fluid volume (few milliliter) and the in vitro substituted bovine serum volume (several hundred milliliter). The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of a reduced fluid volume on the wear behavior in a knee wear simulator study. Four wear tests with decreasing fluid volumes (250, 150, 75, and 45 ml) were carried out. Using a large fluid volume of 250 ml for wear testing resulted in a wear rate of 9.7±1.2 mm3/10(6)  cycles. Decreasing the fluid volume consecutively reduced the wear rate to down to 8.8±1.4 mm3/10(6) for 150 ml (p=1.00), 5.6±1.2 mm3/10(6) for 75 ml (p=0.01), and 1.0±0.2 mm3/10(6) cycles for 45 ml fluid volume (p≤0.01). Additionally, higher serum degradation and larger wear particles were observed with smaller fluid volumes used for testing. This study demonstrates the high relevance of the protein-based lubricant on the wear behavior and the technical limitation to replicate the synovial fluid in simulator tests. Wear testing should be carried out using larger fluid volumes (e.g., 250 ml) to generate physiological relevant wear masses.

  6. Chenopodium ambrosioides L. Reduces Synovial Inflammation and Pain in Experimental Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Calado, Gustavo P.; Lopes, Alberto Jorge O.; Costa Junior, Livio M.; Lima, Francisco das Chagas A.; Silva, Lucilene A.; Pereira, Wanderson S.; do Amaral, Flávia M. M.; Garcia, João Batista S.; Cartágenes, Maria do Socorro de S.; Nascimento, Flávia R. F.

    2015-01-01

    The chronicity of osteoarthritis (OA), characterized by pain and inflammation in the joints, is linked to a glutamate receptor, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA). The use of plant species such as Chenopodium ambrosioides L. (Amaranthaceae) as NMDA antagonists offers a promising perspective. This work aims to analyze the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory responses of the crude hydroalcoholic extract (HCE) of C. ambrosioides leaves in an experimental OA model. Wistar rats were separated into six groups (n = 24): clean (C), negative control (CTL-), positive control (CTL+), HCE0.5, HCE5 and HCE50. The first group received no intervention. The other groups received an intra-articular injection of sodium monoiodoacetate (MIA) (8 mg/kg) on day 0. After six hours, they were orally treated with saline, Maxicam plus (meloxicam + chondroitin sulfate) and HCE at doses of 0.5 mg/kg, 5 mg/kg and 50 mg/kg, respectively. After three, seven and ten days, clinical evaluations were performed (knee diameter, mechanical allodynia, mechanical hyperalgesia and motor activity). On the tenth day, after euthanasia, synovial fluid and draining lymph node were collected for cellular quantification, and cartilage was collected for histopathological analysis. Finally, molecular docking was performed to evaluate the compatibility of ascaridole, a monoterpene found in HCE, with the NMDA receptor. After the third day, HCE reduced knee edema. HCE5 showed less cellular infiltrate in the cartilage and synovium and lower intensities of allodynia from the third day and of hyperalgesia from the seventh day up to the last treatment day. The HCE5 and HCE50 groups improved in forced walking. In relation to molecular docking, ascaridole showed NMDA receptor binding affinity. C. ambrosioides HCE was effective in the treatment of OA because it reduced synovial inflammation and behavioral changes due to pain. This effect may be related to the antagonistic effect of ascaridole on the NMDA receptor. PMID:26524084

  7. Chenopodium ambrosioides L. Reduces Synovial Inflammation and Pain in Experimental Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Calado, Gustavo P; Lopes, Alberto Jorge O; Costa Junior, Livio M; Lima, Francisco das Chagas A; Silva, Lucilene A; Pereira, Wanderson S; Amaral, Flávia M M do; Garcia, João Batista S; Cartágenes, Maria do Socorro de S; Nascimento, Flávia R F

    2015-01-01

    The chronicity of osteoarthritis (OA), characterized by pain and inflammation in the joints, is linked to a glutamate receptor, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA). The use of plant species such as Chenopodium ambrosioides L. (Amaranthaceae) as NMDA antagonists offers a promising perspective. This work aims to analyze the antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory responses of the crude hydroalcoholic extract (HCE) of C. ambrosioides leaves in an experimental OA model. Wistar rats were separated into six groups (n = 24): clean (C), negative control (CTL-), positive control (CTL+), HCE0.5, HCE5 and HCE50. The first group received no intervention. The other groups received an intra-articular injection of sodium monoiodoacetate (MIA) (8 mg/kg) on day 0. After six hours, they were orally treated with saline, Maxicam plus (meloxicam + chondroitin sulfate) and HCE at doses of 0.5 mg/kg, 5 mg/kg and 50 mg/kg, respectively. After three, seven and ten days, clinical evaluations were performed (knee diameter, mechanical allodynia, mechanical hyperalgesia and motor activity). On the tenth day, after euthanasia, synovial fluid and draining lymph node were collected for cellular quantification, and cartilage was collected for histopathological analysis. Finally, molecular docking was performed to evaluate the compatibility of ascaridole, a monoterpene found in HCE, with the NMDA receptor. After the third day, HCE reduced knee edema. HCE5 showed less cellular infiltrate in the cartilage and synovium and lower intensities of allodynia from the third day and of hyperalgesia from the seventh day up to the last treatment day. The HCE5 and HCE50 groups improved in forced walking. In relation to molecular docking, ascaridole showed NMDA receptor binding affinity. C. ambrosioides HCE was effective in the treatment of OA because it reduced synovial inflammation and behavioral changes due to pain. This effect may be related to the antagonistic effect of ascaridole on the NMDA receptor.

  8. IL-17 in synovial fluids from patients with rheumatoid arthritis is a potent stimulator of osteoclastogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kotake, Shigeru; Udagawa, Nobuyuki; Takahashi, Naoyuki; Matsuzaki, Kenichiro; Itoh, Kanami; Ishiyama, Shigeru; Saito, Seiji; Inoue, Kazuhiko; Kamatani, Naoyuki; Gillespie, Matthew T.; Martin, T. John; Suda, Tatsuo

    1999-01-01

    IL-17 is a newly discovered T cell–derived cytokine whose role in osteoclast development has not been fully elucidated. Treatment of cocultures of mouse hemopoietic cells and primary osteoblasts with recombinant human IL-17 induced the formation of multinucleated cells, which satisfied major criteria of osteoclasts, including tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activity, calcitonin receptors, and pit formation on dentine slices. Direct interaction between osteoclast progenitors and osteoblasts was required for IL-17–induced osteoclastogenesis, which was completely inhibited by adding indomethacin or NS398, a selective inhibitor of cyclooxgenase-2 (COX-2). Adding IL-17 increased prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synthesis in cocultures of bone marrow cells and osteoblasts and in single cultures of osteoblasts, but not in single cultures of bone marrow cells. In addition, IL-17 dose-dependently induced expression of osteoclast differentiation factor (ODF) mRNA in osteoblasts. ODF is a membrane-associated protein that transduces an essential signal(s) to osteoclast progenitors for differentiation into osteoclasts. Osteoclastogenesis inhibitory factor (OCIF), a decoy receptor of ODF, completely inhibited IL-17–induced osteoclast differentiation in the cocultures. Levels of IL-17 in synovial fluids were significantly higher in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients than osteoarthritis (OA) patients. Anti–IL-17 antibody significantly inhibited osteoclast formation induced by culture media of RA synovial tissues. These findings suggest that IL-17 first acts on osteoblasts, which stimulates both COX-2–dependent PGE2 synthesis and ODF gene expression, which in turn induce differentiation of osteoclast progenitors into mature osteoclasts, and that IL-17 is a crucial cytokine for osteoclastic bone resorption in RA patients. PMID:10225978

  9. Comprehensive protein profiling of synovial fluid in osteoarthritis following protein equalization

    PubMed Central

    Peffers, M.J.; McDermott, B.; Clegg, P.D.; Riggs, C.M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objective The aim of the study was to characterise the protein complement of synovial fluid (SF) in health and osteoarthritis (OA) using liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) following peptide-based depletion of high abundance proteins. Design SF was used from nine normal and nine OA Thoroughbred horses. Samples were analysed with LC-MS/MS using a NanoAcquity™ LC coupled to an LTQ Orbitrap Velos. In order to enrich the lower-abundance protein fractions protein equalisation was first undertaken using ProteoMiner™. Progenesis-QI™ LC-MS software was used for label-free quantification. In addition immunohistochemistry, western blotting and mRNA expression analysis was undertaken on selected joint tissues. Results The number of protein identifications was increased by 33% in the ProteoMiner™ treated SF compared to undepleted SF. A total of 764 proteins (462 with≥2 significant peptides) were identified in SF. A subset of 10 proteins were identified which were differentially expressed in OA SF. S100-A10, a calcium binding protein was upregulated in OA and validated with western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Several new OA specific peptide fragments (neopeptides) were identified. Conclusion The protein equalisation method compressed the dynamic range of the synovial proteins identifying the most comprehensive SF proteome to date. A number of proteins were identified for the first time in SF which may be involved in the pathogenesis of OA. We identified a distinct set of proteins and neopeptides that may act as potential biomarkers to distinguish between normal and OA joints. PMID:25819577

  10. Protein oxidation markers in the serum and synovial fluid of psoriatic arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Firuzi, Omidreza; Spadaro, Antonio; Spadaro, Chiara; Riccieri, Valeria; Petrucci, Rita; Marrosu, Giancarlo; Saso, Luciano

    2008-01-01

    The role of oxidative stress has been studied in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other inflammatory joint diseases to some extent, but its importance in psoriatic arthritis (PsA) has rarely been investigated. The aim of this study was to analyze the levels of protein oxidation markers, sulfhydryl (SH) and carbonyl (CO) groups, in the synovial fluid (SF) and serum of PsA patients and compare them with the findings in RA and osteoarthritis (OA) patients. A total of 49 subjects with a knee-joint effusion including 16 PsA, 18 RA, and 15 OA patients were studied. In all patients, the levels of SH groups measured in the serum and SF inversely correlated with the number of white blood cells (WBC) (P<0.05) and the percentage of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) (P<0.01) in SF. Serum SH levels inversely correlated with serum erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) (P<0.02) and C-reactive protein (CRP) (P<0.05) values. The SH levels in SF were significantly lower in patients affected by PsA and RA compared to OA cases (P<0.02). The serum SH levels in PsA were lower than OA (P<0.001) and higher than RA patients (P<0.05). The serum and synovial levels of CO groups in PsA, RA, and OA patients were similar. Our study provides novel evidence on the involvement of protein oxidation in PsA and confirms the important role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of RA. These data suggest that antioxidant agents can potentially be a useful addition to the conventional therapy in the management of these diseases.

  11. Cancer Metastases: Early Dissemination and Late Recurrences

    PubMed Central

    Friberg, Sten; Nyström, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Metastatic cells from a primary tumor can occur before the primary cancer is detected. Metastatic cells can also remain in the patient for many years after removal of the primary tumor without proliferating. These dormant malignant cells can awaken and cause recurrent disease decades after the primary treatment. The purpose of this article is to review the clinical evidence for early dissemination and late recurrences in human malignant tumors. We used the following definitions: dormancy of cells may be defined as a nonproliferating state or an arrest in the cell cycle that results in a prolonged G0 phase. If one accepts the term “late metastases” to indicate a period exceeding 10 years from the removal of the primary tumor, then the two malignancies in which this occurs most frequently are cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) and renal cell carcinoma (RCC). METHODS PubMed, Web of Science, and Scopus were searched with the keywords “metastases,” “early dissemination,” “late recurrences,” “inadvertently transmitted cancer,” “tumor growth rate,” “dormancy,” “circulating tumor cells,” and “transplantation of cancer.” RESULTS Several case reports of early dissemination and late recurrences of various types of malignancies were found. Analyses of the growth rates of several malignant tumors in the original host indicated that the majority of cancers had metastasized years before they were detected. CMM, RCC, and malignant glioblastoma were the three most common malignancies resulting from an organ transplantation. CMM and RCC were also the two most common malignancies that showed dormancy. In several cases of transplanted CMM and RCC, the donor did not have any known malignancy or had had the malignancy removed so long ago that the donor was regarded as cured. CONCLUSION (1) Metastases can frequently exist prior to the detection of the primary tumor. (2) Metastatic cells may reside in organs in the original host that are not

  12. Disseminated Histoplasmosis with Haemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis in an Immunocompetent Host

    PubMed Central

    Sonawane, Pratibha Balasaheb; Chandak, Sachet Vijay; Rathi, Pravin M

    2016-01-01

    Haemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a devastating syndrome due to uninhibited immune activation. Disseminated histoplasmosis is a rare cause of HLH. There have been few case reports and series demonstrating a relation between the two disease entities in immunosuppressed hosts. HLH secondary to disseminated histoplasmosis is even rarer in an immunocompetant host. We report a rare case of HLH triggered by disseminated histoplasmosis in an immunocompetant patient. PMID:27134914

  13. [Clinico-roentgenologic diagnosis of disseminated and diffuse lung diseases].

    PubMed

    Kharchenko, V P; Gurevich, L A; Melent'eva, E G; Chkhikvadze, V D; Goncharova, I M; Gorb, A I; Svobodina, O N

    1990-01-01

    The results of clinical and x-ray investigations of 398 patients with disseminated pulmonary lesions were analyzed. Two groups were identified: patients with interstitial type of lesions (101) and patients with focal type of lesions (297). Proceeding from roentgeno-morphological correlations, the authors presented specified roentgeno-semiotics of 10 nosological entities with the syndrome of pulmonary dissemination. The possibilities of optimization of differential diagnosis of disseminated pulmonary lesions were shown basing on combined (clinical, functional and roentgenological) investigation.

  14. Quinine-Induced Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation.

    PubMed

    Abed, Firas; Baniya, Ramkaji; Bachuwa, Ghassan

    2016-01-01

    Every drug comes with some side effect. It is the benefit/risk ratio that determines the medical use of the drug. Quinine, a known antimalarial drug, has been used for nocturnal leg cramps since the 1930s; it is associated with severe life-threatening hematological and cardiovascular side effects. Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), albeit rare, is a known coagulopathy associated with Quinine. It is imperative to inquire about the Quinine intake in medication history in patients with coagulopathy, as most patients still consider it a harmless home remedy for nocturnal leg cramps. In this report, we present a case of coagulopathy in a middle-aged woman, who gave a history of taking Quinine for nocturnal leg cramps, as her home remedy. Early identification of the offending agent led to the diagnosis, prompt discontinuation of the medication, and complete recovery and prevented the future possibility of recurrence. PMID:27293443

  15. [Disseminated intravascular coagulation: clinical and biological diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Touaoussa, Aziz; El Youssi, Hind; El Hassani, Imane; Hanouf, Daham; El Bergui, Imane; Zoulati, Ghizlane; Amrani Hassani, Moncef

    2015-01-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is a syndrome characterized by the systemic activation of blood coagulation. Its pathophysiological mechanisms are complex and dependent on the underlying pathology, making the clinical and biological expression of quite variable DIC. Among the various biological parameters disrupted, most are not specific, and none of them allows in itself to make the diagnosis. All this does not facilitate the task of the practitioner for diagnosis of overt DIC, much less that of the non-overt DIC, early stage whose treatment would improve the prognosis. These considerations have led to develop scores, combining several parameters depending on their availability in daily practice, as well as their diagnostic relevance. Of all the scores, the ISTH (International society of thrombosis and hemostasis) remains the most used.

  16. Disseminated gonococcal infection: an unusual presentation

    PubMed Central

    Lohani, Saroj; Nazir, Salik; Tachamo, Niranjan; Patel, Nitin

    2016-01-01

    Gonococcus typically affects the mucosal surfaces but in rare cases can spread to bloodstream causing disseminated gonococcal infection (DGI). The usual presentation of DGI is rash, polyarthralgia, and tenosynovitis. We present the case of a 23-year-old female who presented to our hospital with pustular rash and tenosynovitis of hand and was sent home on Augmentin. Her symptoms worsened despite treatment and she presented back to the ED. On investigation, she was found to have DGI and was appropriately treated. DGI should be kept in mind in sexually active youngsters who have only one or two features of the classic triad of rash, tenosynovitis, and arthritis. Timely management and appropriate treatment of DGI is very important to avoid complications and morbidity. PMID:27406461

  17. Neuroborreliosis presenting as acute disseminated encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Ruben; Lisboa, Lurdes; Neves, João; García López, Milagros; Santos, Elsa; Ribeiro, Augusto

    2012-12-01

    We report a case of a 5-year-old boy with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis as the initial presentation of neuroborreliosis. Parents report an upper-airway infection a few days before the development of acute encephalopathy, mild facial palsy, and seizures. The patient needed mechanical ventilation for 10 days, and after extubation, he presented hypotonia, ataxia, dysarthria, as well as weak gag and cough reflexes. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed hyperintense lesions on T2- and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery sequences on the right subcortical occipital and parietal region, left posterior arm of the internal capsule, and in the medulla oblongata. Borrelia burgdorferi was identified in the plasma and cerebrospinal fluid by polymerase chain reaction and in the plasma by Western blotting. He was treated with ceftriaxone, methylprednisolone, and human immunoglobulin. Recovery was partial. PMID:23222106

  18. Disseminated visceral coccidiosis in sandhill cranes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carpenter, J.W.; Novilla, M.N.; Fayer, R.; Iverson, G.C.

    1984-01-01

    Disseminated visceral coccidiosis (DVC) caused by Eimeria spp was first recognized as a disease entity in captive sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis) and whooping cranes (G americana) at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center. Because cranes produced at the Center are reintroduced to the wild to augment wild populations, studies involving both experimentally induced and natural infections were initiated to determine the potential or actual occurrence of DVC in wild Gruidae. Nine sandhill cranes dosed orally with eimerian oocysts of wild origin developed lesions characteristic of DVC. Extraintestinal granulomas associated with developing schizonts were found in 6 birds. Similar lesions were observed in wild sandhill cranes throughout parts of midwestern United States, Alaska, and Saskatchewan. These studies revealed the wide geographic distribution and the high frequency of occurrence of DVC in wild cranes.

  19. Studies of the third component of complement in synovial fluid from arthritic patients. II. Conversion and its relation to total complement

    PubMed Central

    Hedberg, H.; Lundh, B.; Laurell, Anna-Brita

    1970-01-01

    Plasma and synovial fluid from arthritic patients were studied with antigen–antibody crossed electrophoresis for the conversion of C3. When present, C3 conversion was estimated planimetrically. The material included patients with rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus as well as patients with non-rheumatoid arthritis. C3 conversion was not found in plasma from any of the patients studied. In non-rheumatoid synovial fluids there was no conversion in five and less than 10% in four of the samples. In rheumatoid synovial fluids C3 conversion proved significantly (P<0·01) more pronounced, the degree of conversion exceeding 10% in fourteen out of twenty-three cases. An inverse relationship was found in synovial fluid between the degree of C3 conversion on the one hand, and the total complement activity or the C3 concentration on the other. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:5477926

  20. A Phase II, Multicenter Study of the EZH2 Inhibitor Tazemetostat in Adult Subjects With INI1-Negative Tumors or Relapsed/Refractory Synovial Sarcoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-20

    Malignant Rhabdoid Tumors (MRT); Rhabdoid Tumors of the Kidney (RTK); Atypical Teratoid Rhabdoid Tumors (ATRT); Selected Tumors With Rhabdoid Features; Synovial Sarcoma; INI1-negative Tumors; Malignant Rhabdoid Tumor of Ovary; Renal Medullary Carcinoma; Epithelioid Sarcoma

  1. Targeted gene delivery to the synovial pannus in antigen-induced arthritis by ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction in vivo.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Xi; Tang, Yuanjiao; Leng, Qianying; Zhang, Lingyan; Qiu, Li

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to optimize an ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) technique to improve the in vivo transfection efficiency of the gene encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in the synovial pannus in an antigen-induced arthritis rabbit model. A mixture of microbubbles and plasmids was locally injected into the knee joints of an antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) rabbits. The plasmid concentrations and ultrasound conditions were varied in the experiments. We also tested local articular and intravenous injections. The rabbits were divided into five groups: (1) ultrasound+microbubbles+plasmid; (2) ultrasound+plasmid; (3) microbubble+plasmid; (4) plasmid only; (5) untreated controls. EGFP expression was observed by fluorescent microscope and immunohistochemical staining in the synovial pannus of each group. The optimal plasmid dosage and ultrasound parameter were determined based on the results of EGFP expression and the present and absent of tissue damage under light microscopy. The irradiation procedure was performed to observe the duration of the EGFP expression in the synovial pannus and other tissues and organs, as well as the damage to the normal cells. The optimal condition was determined to be a 1-MHz ultrasound pulse applied for 5 min with a power output of 2 W/cm(2) and a 20% duty cycle along with 300 μg of plasmid. Under these conditions, the synovial pannus showed significant EGFP expression without significant damage to the surrounding normal tissue. The EGFP expression induced by the local intra-articular injection was significantly more increased than that induced by the intravenous injection. The EGFP expression in the synovial pannus of the ultrasound+microbubbles+plasmid group was significantly higher than that of the other four groups (P<0.05). The expression peaked on day 5, remained detectable on day 40 and disappeared on day 60. No EGFP expression was detected in the other tissues and organs. The UTMD

  2. Cell-mediated immune responses of synovial mononuclear cells to sexually transmitted, enteric and mumps antigens in patients with Reiter's syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Ford, D K; da Roza, D M; Shah, P

    1981-01-01

    3H-thymidine uptake responses by synovial mononuclear cells to stimulation with sexually transmitted, enteric and mumps antigens were studied in 12 patients with "sexually transmitted Reiter's syndrome", 5 with "enteric Reiter's syndrome", 5 with rheumatoid arthritis, 4 with ankylosing spondylitis and 10 with "indolent arthritis of one knee." The "sexually transmitted" and salmonella cases were distinguishable by the responses. Synovial responses were sometimes marked when peripheral blood responses were negligible.

  3. Synovial Mesenchymal Stem Cells Promote Meniscus Regeneration Augmented by an Autologous Achilles Tendon Graft in a Rat Partial Meniscus Defect Model

    PubMed Central

    Ozeki, Nobutake; Muneta, Takeshi; Matsuta, Seiya; Koga, Hideyuki; Nakagawa, Yusuke; Mizuno, Mitsuru; Tsuji, Kunikazu; Mabuchi, Yo; Akazawa, Chihiro; Kobayashi, Eiji; Saito, Tomoyuki; Sekiya, Ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Although meniscus defects and degeneration are strongly correlated with the later development of osteoarthritis, the promise of regenerative medicine strategies is to prevent and/or delay the disease's progression. Meniscal reconstruction has been shown in animal models with tendon grafting and transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs); however, these procedures have not shown the same efficacy in clinical studies. Here, our aim was to investigate the ability of tendon grafts pretreated with exogenous synovial-derived MSCs to prevent cartilage degeneration in a rat partial meniscus defect model. We removed the anterior half of the medial meniscus and grafted autologous Achilles tendons with or without a 10-minute pretreatment of the tendon with synovial MSCs. The meniscus and surrounding cartilage were evaluated at 2, 4, and 8 weeks (n = 5). Tendon grafts increased meniscus size irrespective of synovial MSCs. Histological scores for regenerated menisci were better in the tendon + MSC group than in the other two groups at 4 and 8 weeks. Both macroscopic and histological scores for articular cartilage were significantly better in the tendon + MSC group at 8 weeks. Implanted synovial MSCs survived around the grafted tendon and native meniscus integration site by cell tracking assays with luciferase+, LacZ+, DiI+, and/or GFP+ synovial MSCs and/or GFP+ tendons. Flow cytometric analysis showed that transplanted synovial MSCs retained their MSC properties at 7 days and host synovial tissue also contained cells with MSC characteristics. Synovial MSCs promoted meniscus regeneration augmented by autologous Achilles tendon grafts and prevented cartilage degeneration in rats. Stem Cells 2015;33:1927–1938 PMID:25993981

  4. Procalcitonin levels in fresh serum and fresh synovial fluid for the differential diagnosis of knee septic arthritis from rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis and gouty arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chenggong; Zhong, DA; Liao, Qiande; Kong, Lingyu; Liu, Ansong; Xiao, Han

    2014-10-01

    Whether the levels of procalcitonin (PCT) in the serum and synovial fluid are effective indicators for distinguishing septic arthritis (SA) from non-infectious arthritis remains controversial. The present study aimed to evaluate whether PCT levels in fresh serum or fresh joint fluid may be used in the differential diagnosis of SA from rheumatoid arthritis (RA), osteoarthritis (OA) and gouty arthritis (GA). From January 2012 to June 2013, 23 patients with knee SA, 21 patients with RA, 40 patients with OA and 11 patients with GA were enrolled in the current study. The levels of PCT were measured within 24 h after specimen collection at room temperature. An enzyme-linked fluorescence assay (ELFA) was used to detect the levels of PCT in the serum and synovial fluid. The correlations between the levels of PCT in the serum and synovial fluid and the arthritic patient groups were determined by the Nemenyi test. Areas under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve were calculated to evaluate the accuracy of the correlations. The levels of PCT in the serum and joint fluid of the patients in the SA group were higher compared with those of the other groups (P<0.01) and there were no significant differences among the RA, OA and GA groups in these levels. A PCT level of <0.5 μg/l in the serum and synovial fluid had high specificity in the differential diagnosis of SA from RA, OA and GA. Synovial fluid PCT revealed significantly greater sensitivity than serum PCT. The accuracy of the differential diagnosis of SA by the serum levels of PCT was significantly lower than that by the synovial fluid levels of PCT. The levels of PCT in the serum and synovial fluid may be used as alternative laboratory indicators to distinguish between SA and the non-infectious types of arthritis; however, the PCT levels in fresh synovial fluid are more sensitive and accurate indicators than PCT levels in fresh serum.

  5. BAY 11-7085 induces glucocorticoid receptor activation and autophagy that collaborate with apoptosis to induce human synovial fibroblast cell death

    PubMed Central

    Relic, Biserka; Charlier, Edith; Deroyer, Celine; Malaise, Olivier; Neuville, Sophie; Desoroux, Aline; Gillet, Philippe; de Seny, Dominique; Malaise, Michel G.

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of proapoptotic pathways in synovial fibroblasts is one of the major causes of synovial proliferation and hyperplasia in rheumatic diseases. We have shown previously that NF-κB inhibitor BAY 11-7085, through inactivation of PPAR-γ, induces apoptosis in human synovial fibroblasts. In this work we showed that BAY 11-7085 induced autophagy that preceded BAY 11-7085-induced apoptosis. Of interest, BAY 11-7085 induced Serine 211 phosphorylation and degradation of glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Glucocorticoid prednisolone induced both activation and degradation of GR, as well as autophagy in synovial fibroblasts. BAY 11-7085-induced cell death was significantly decreased with glucocorticoid inhibitor mifepristone and with inhibitors of autophagy. Both BAY 11-7085-induced autophagy and GR activation were down regulated with PPAR-γ agonist, 15d-PGJ2 and MEK/ERK inhibitor UO126. Inhibition of autophagy markedly decreased endogenous and BAY 11-7085-induced ERK phosphorylation, suggesting a positive feed back loop between ERK activation and autophagy in synovial fibroblasts. Co-transfection of MEK1 with PPAR-γ1 in HEK293 cells caused known inhibitory phosphorylation of PPAR-γ1 (Serine 112) and enhanced GR degradation, in the absence or presence of prednisolone. Furthermore, GR was both phosphorylated on Serine 211 and down regulated in synovial fibroblasts during serum starvation induced autophagy. These results showed that GR activation and PPAR-γ inactivation mediated BAY 11-7085-induced autophagy. PMID:26993765

  6. Hypothesis: Disseminated Intravascular Inflammation as the Inflammatory Counterpart to Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bull, Brian S.; Bull, Maureen H.

    1994-08-01

    We have identified a leukocyte activation syndrome that is occasionally associated with the transfusion of intraoperatively recovered erythrocytes. This syndrome appears to result from intravascular damage caused by leukocytes activated during the erythrocyte salvage process. We hypothesize that this syndrome is part of a larger disease grouping: disseminated intravascular inflammation (DII). DII is the analog of the coagulation disorder disseminated intravascular coagulation. In disseminated intravascular coagulation, the organ damage results from uncontrolled activation of the clotting pathway; in DII the damage is caused by leukocytes that have become activated by direct contact with bacteria or in rare instances-such as erythrocyte salvage-in the absence of bacteria and bacterial products. Recent studies of the hazards associated with intraoperative blood salvage indicate that activation of leukocytes can be achieved by exposure to activated platelets alone. If such activated leukocytes are reinfused along with the washed erythrocytes, widespread organ damage may result. The lung is the organ most severely affected by activated leukocytes. Adult respiratory distress syndrome is one outcome. It is likely that DII is a presently unrecognized pathophysiological process that complicates a variety of primary disease states and increases their lethality.

  7. Interleukin 2 (IL 2) inhibitor in rheumatoid synovial fluid: Correlation with prognosis and soluble IL 2 receptor levels

    SciTech Connect

    Miossec, P.; Elhamiani, M.; Chichehian, B.; D'Angeac, A.D.; Sany, J.; Hirn, M. )

    1990-03-01

    A soluble activity inhibiting over 50% of the CTLL-2 cell line response to recombinant human interleukin 2 (IL 2) was found in 17 of 29 (59%) rheumatoid synovial fluids. To study the prognosis value of this activity, 16 rheumatoid synovial fluids were collected before a radiation synovectomy of the knee with 7 mCi of 90Y. Patients with a good clinical result after the synovectomy had a lower IL 2 inhibitory activity than those with a bad or incomplete result (P less than 0.01). Levels of inhibitory activity and of soluble IL 2 receptors were correlated with each other and with the response of the synovitis to the radiation synovectomy. These results extend the clinical usefulness of soluble IL 2 receptor measurements and indicate a correlation between the immune activation of the rheumatoid synovitis and its clinical activity.

  8. Hairy polyelectrolyte brushes-grafted thermosensitive microgels as artificial synovial fluid for simultaneous biomimetic lubrication and arthritis treatment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guoqiang; Liu, Zhilu; Li, Na; Wang, Xiaolong; Zhou, Feng; Liu, Weimin

    2014-11-26

    We report the fabrication of poly(3-sulfopropyl methacrylate potassium salt) (PSPMK) brushes grafted poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) microgels and their potential as artificial synovial fluid for biomimetic aqueous lubrication and arthritis treatment. The negatively charged PSPMK brushes and thermosensitive PNIPAAm microgels play water-based hydration lubrication and temperature-triggered drug release, respectively. Under soft friction pairs, an ultralow coefficient of friction was achieved, while the hairy thermosensitive microgels showed a desirable temperature-triggered drugs release performance. Such a soft charged hairy microgel offers great possibility for designing intelligent synovial fluid. What is more, the combination of lubrication and drug loading capabilities enables the large clinical potential of novel soft hairy nanoparticles as synthetic joint lubricant fluid in arthritis treatment.

  9. Hemorrhagic lumbar synovial facet cyst secondary to transforaminal epidural injection: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Elgafy, Hossein; Peters, Nicholas; Lea, Justin E; Wetzel, Robert M

    2016-07-18

    A 64-year-old-female presented with progressive left foot weakness, low back and radicular pain after a left sided S1 transforaminal epidural steroid injection (ESI). Magnetic resonance imaging revealed left side L5-S1 large extradural heterogeneous mass with layering areas suggesting different stages of hematoma formation. Past medical history was significant for peripheral vascular disease and transient ischemic attacks, for which she took aspirin and clopidogrel (antiplatelet agent). These medications were discontinued one week prior to ESI. Although synovial cysts associated with facet arthropathy are common, hemorrhagic cyst is not. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of symptomatic hemorrhagic lumbar facet synovial cyst following ESI on a patient taking anti-platelet medications. PMID:27458557

  10. Hemorrhagic lumbar synovial facet cyst secondary to transforaminal epidural injection: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Elgafy, Hossein; Peters, Nicholas; Lea, Justin E; Wetzel, Robert M

    2016-01-01

    A 64-year-old-female presented with progressive left foot weakness, low back and radicular pain after a left sided S1 transforaminal epidural steroid injection (ESI). Magnetic resonance imaging revealed left side L5-S1 large extradural heterogeneous mass with layering areas suggesting different stages of hematoma formation. Past medical history was significant for peripheral vascular disease and transient ischemic attacks, for which she took aspirin and clopidogrel (antiplatelet agent). These medications were discontinued one week prior to ESI. Although synovial cysts associated with facet arthropathy are common, hemorrhagic cyst is not. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first reported case of symptomatic hemorrhagic lumbar facet synovial cyst following ESI on a patient taking anti-platelet medications. PMID:27458557

  11. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis after Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

    PubMed

    Wei, T Y; Baumann, R J

    1999-07-01

    Although acute disseminated encephalomyelitis has been observed after a variety of viral infections and an occasional bacterial infection, it has not been reported in association with rickettsial infections. Reported is a 7-year-old male with magnetic resonance images and clinical manifestations suggestive of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis after a tick bite and serologically proven Rocky Mountain spotted fever. PMID:10428440

  12. Disseminated intravascular coagulation in meningococcal sepsis. Case 7.

    PubMed

    Zeerleder, S; Zürcher Zenklusen, R; Hack, C E; Wuillemin, W A

    2003-08-01

    We report on a man (age: 49 years), who died from severe meningococcal sepsis with disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), multiple organ dysfunction syndrome and extended skin necrosis. We discuss in detail the pathophysiology of the activation of coagulation and fibrinolysis during sepsis. The article discusses new therapeutic concepts in the treatment of disseminated intravascular coagulation in meningococcal sepsis, too.

  13. Dual Dissemination: Writing for Colleagues and the Public

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sommer, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Although journals remain the major means of disseminating research knowledge within psychology, other types of outlets are needed to reach policymakers and the public. A model of dual dissemination is proposed in which psychologists continue to write articles for research journals and write different, complementary articles for popular outlets.

  14. 45 CFR 1388.7 - Program criteria-dissemination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... best practices. (c) Specific target audiences must be identified for dissemination activities and... Affiliated Programs, and State service systems to disseminate information to target audiences. (e) The... of disabilities, and appropriate target audiences. (i) The UAP must contribute to the development...

  15. Ultra-stable radio frequency dissemination in free space.

    PubMed

    Miao, J; Wang, B; Gao, C; Bai, Y; Zhu, X; Wang, L J

    2013-10-01

    We demonstrate an ultra-stable radio frequency (RF) dissemination scheme over 80 m free space. The frequency dissemination stability is 3.2 × 10(-13)/s and 4.4 × 10(-17)/day, which can be applied to transfer frequency signal without compromising its stability in a global navigation satellite system (GNSS) or radio astronomy.

  16. Do Haphazard Reviews Provide Sound Directions for Dissemination Efforts?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gambrill, Eileen; Littell, Julia H.

    2010-01-01

    Comments on The dissemination and implementation of evidence-based psychological treatments: A review of current efforts by Kathryn R. McHugh and David H. Barlow. The lead article in the February-March issue by McHugh and Barlow (2010) emphasized the need for "dissemination and implementation of evidence-based psychological treatments." The…

  17. A novel case of canine disseminated aspergillosis following mating.

    PubMed

    Walker, Jackson T; Frazho, Jean K; Randell, Susan C

    2012-02-01

    An intact bitch with a history of mating was presented with severe lameness and a vulvar discharge. A mixed lytic, proliferative tibial lesion and open pyometra were diagnosed. Bone biopsy and uterine culture revealed disseminated aspergillosis. This is the first report of Aspergillus pyometra with dissemination following mating in the dog. PMID:22851783

  18. A Dissemination Model for New Technical Education Programs. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hull, Daniel M.

    The Technical Education Research Center-SW has conceived, tested, and refined a model for disseminating newly developed programs and materials throughout the nation. The model performed successfully in the dissemination of more than 50,000 educational units (modules) of Laser/Electro-Optics Technician (LEOT) materials during a four-year period…

  19. 10 CFR 470.20 - Dissemination of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Dissemination of information. 470.20 Section 470.20 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION APPROPRIATE TECHNOLOGY SMALL GRANTS PROGRAM § 470.20 Dissemination... nature, usage and availability of the energy-related systems and supporting technologies developed...

  20. 10 CFR 602.18 - Dissemination of results.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ASSISTANCE REGULATIONS EPIDEMIOLOGY AND OTHER HEALTH STUDIES FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAM § 602.18 Dissemination of results. (a) Recipients are encouraged to disseminate research... appropriate, the reports resulting from research awards. (b) DOE may waive the technical reporting...

  1. 48 CFR 2905.101 - Methods of disseminating information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Methods of disseminating information. 2905.101 Section 2905.101 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ACQUISITION... dissemination of information concerning procurement actions. The Division of Acquisition Management...

  2. Cultivating Change: Disseminating Innovation in Higher Education Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gannaway, Deanne; Hinton, Tilly; Berry, Bianca; Moore, Kaitlin

    2013-01-01

    Effective dissemination is crucial if innovation and development in teaching and learning in higher education are to lead to sustainable changes in practice. In 2003, King used an agricultural metaphor to challenge innovators to understand the purposes behind their dissemination aims. Similar to the way that seed can be spread, one could choose to…

  3. Identification of prostaglandin E2 and leukotriene B4 in the synovial fluid of painful, dysfunctional temporomandibular joints.

    PubMed

    Quinn, J H; Bazan, N G

    1990-09-01

    It has been hypothesized that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and leukotriene B4 (LTB4) should be present in the synovial fluid of inflamed, dysfunctional temporomandibular joints. An assay to identify PGE2 and LTB4 and platelet-activating factor (PAF) was used, and a strong correlation between the levels of these lipid mediators of pain and inflammation and an index of clinical joint pathology was found. PMID:2168477

  4. Preclinical Evidence of Anti-Tumor Activity Induced by EZH2 Inhibition in Human Models of Synovial Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Satoshi; Grassian, Alexandra R; Tsuda, Masumi; Knutson, Sarah K; Warholic, Natalie M; Kuznetsov, Galina; Xu, Shanqin; Xiao, Yonghong; Pollock, Roy M; Smith, Jesse S; Kuntz, Kevin K; Ribich, Scott; Minoshima, Yukinori; Matsui, Junji; Copeland, Robert A; Tanaka, Shinya; Keilhack, Heike

    2016-01-01

    The catalytic activities of covalent and ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling are central to regulating the conformational state of chromatin and the resultant transcriptional output. The enzymes that catalyze these activities are often contained within multiprotein complexes in nature. Two such multiprotein complexes, the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) methyltransferase and the SWItch/Sucrose Non-Fermentable (SWI/SNF) chromatin remodeler have been reported to act in opposition to each other during development and homeostasis. An imbalance in their activities induced by mutations/deletions in complex members (e.g. SMARCB1) has been suggested to be a pathogenic mechanism in certain human cancers. Here we show that preclinical models of synovial sarcoma-a cancer characterized by functional SMARCB1 loss via its displacement from the SWI/SNF complex through the pathognomonic SS18-SSX fusion protein-display sensitivity to pharmacologic inhibition of EZH2, the catalytic subunit of PRC2. Treatment with tazemetostat, a clinical-stage, selective and orally bioavailable small-molecule inhibitor of EZH2 enzymatic activity reverses a subset of synovial sarcoma gene expression and results in concentration-dependent cell growth inhibition and cell death specifically in SS18-SSX fusion-positive cells in vitro. Treatment of mice bearing either a cell line or two patient-derived xenograft models of synovial sarcoma leads to dose-dependent tumor growth inhibition with correlative inhibition of trimethylation levels of the EZH2-specific substrate, lysine 27 on histone H3. These data demonstrate a dependency of SS18-SSX-positive, SMARCB1-deficient synovial sarcomas on EZH2 enzymatic activity and suggests the potential utility of EZH2-targeted drugs in these genetically defined cancers. PMID:27391784

  5. Preclinical Evidence of Anti-Tumor Activity Induced by EZH2 Inhibition in Human Models of Synovial Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Tsuda, Masumi; Knutson, Sarah K.; Warholic, Natalie M.; Kuznetsov, Galina; Xu, Shanqin; Xiao, Yonghong; Pollock, Roy M.; Smith, Jesse S.; Kuntz, Kevin K.; Ribich, Scott; Minoshima, Yukinori; Matsui, Junji; Copeland, Robert A.; Tanaka, Shinya; Keilhack, Heike

    2016-01-01

    The catalytic activities of covalent and ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling are central to regulating the conformational state of chromatin and the resultant transcriptional output. The enzymes that catalyze these activities are often contained within multiprotein complexes in nature. Two such multiprotein complexes, the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) methyltransferase and the SWItch/Sucrose Non-Fermentable (SWI/SNF) chromatin remodeler have been reported to act in opposition to each other during development and homeostasis. An imbalance in their activities induced by mutations/deletions in complex members (e.g. SMARCB1) has been suggested to be a pathogenic mechanism in certain human cancers. Here we show that preclinical models of synovial sarcoma—a cancer characterized by functional SMARCB1 loss via its displacement from the SWI/SNF complex through the pathognomonic SS18-SSX fusion protein—display sensitivity to pharmacologic inhibition of EZH2, the catalytic subunit of PRC2. Treatment with tazemetostat, a clinical-stage, selective and orally bioavailable small-molecule inhibitor of EZH2 enzymatic activity reverses a subset of synovial sarcoma gene expression and results in concentration-dependent cell growth inhibition and cell death specifically in SS18-SSX fusion-positive cells in vitro. Treatment of mice bearing either a cell line or two patient-derived xenograft models of synovial sarcoma leads to dose-dependent tumor growth inhibition with correlative inhibition of trimethylation levels of the EZH2-specific substrate, lysine 27 on histone H3. These data demonstrate a dependency of SS18-SSX-positive, SMARCB1-deficient synovial sarcomas on EZH2 enzymatic activity and suggests the potential utility of EZH2-targeted drugs in these genetically defined cancers. PMID:27391784

  6. Synovial tissue morphology of the cricoarytenoid joint in the elderly: a histological comparison with the cricothyroid joint.

    PubMed

    Katsumura, Sakura; Yamamoto, Masahito; Kitamura, Kei; Kasahara, Masaaki; Katori, Yukio; Abe, Shin-Ichi

    2016-03-01

    We compared the age-related morphology of the cricothyroid (CT) joint with that of the cricoarytenoid (CA) joint using 18 specimens from elderly cadavers in terms of their elastic fiber contents as well as the cells composing the joint capsule and synovial tissues. In contrast to an almost flat-flat interface in the CT joint, the CA joint was similar to a saddle joint. The CA joint capsule was thin and contained few elastic fibers, and in contrast to the CT joint, external fibrous tissues were not exposed to the joint cavity, there being no injury to the CA joint capsule. The lateral and posterior aspects of the CA joint were covered by the lateral and posterior CA muscles, respectively, and the fascia of the latter muscle was sometimes thick with abundant elastic fibers. However, due to possible muscle degeneration, loose connective tissue was often interposed between the fascia and the capsule. The medial and anterior aspects of the CA joint faced loose tissue that was continuous with the laryngeal submucosal tissue. Therefore, in contrast to the CT joint, a definite supporting ligament was usually absent in the CA joint. Synovial folds were always seen in the CA joint, comprising a short triangular mass on the posterior side and long laminar folds on the anterior side. The synovial folds usually contained multiple capillaries and a few CD68-positive macrophages. High congruity of the CA joint surfaces as well as strong muscle support to the arytenoid cartilage appeared to provide the specific synovial morphology. PMID:27051568

  7. Synovial tissue morphology of the cricoarytenoid joint in the elderly: a histological comparison with the cricothyroid joint

    PubMed Central

    Katsumura, Sakura; Kitamura, Kei; Kasahara, Masaaki; Katori, Yukio; Abe, Shin-ichi

    2016-01-01

    We compared the age-related morphology of the cricothyroid (CT) joint with that of the cricoarytenoid (CA) joint using 18 specimens from elderly cadavers in terms of their elastic fiber contents as well as the cells composing the joint capsule and synovial tissues. In contrast to an almost flat-flat interface in the CT joint, the CA joint was similar to a saddle joint. The CA joint capsule was thin and contained few elastic fibers, and in contrast to the CT joint, external fibrous tissues were not exposed to the joint cavity, there being no injury to the CA joint capsule. The lateral and posterior aspects of the CA joint were covered by the lateral and posterior CA muscles, respectively, and the fascia of the latter muscle was sometimes thick with abundant elastic fibers. However, due to possible muscle degeneration, loose connective tissue was often interposed between the fascia and the capsule. The medial and anterior aspects of the CA joint faced loose tissue that was continuous with the laryngeal submucosal tissue. Therefore, in contrast to the CT joint, a definite supporting ligament was usually absent in the CA joint. Synovial folds were always seen in the CA joint, comprising a short triangular mass on the posterior side and long laminar folds on the anterior side. The synovial folds usually contained multiple capillaries and a few CD68-positive macrophages. High congruity of the CA joint surfaces as well as strong muscle support to the arytenoid cartilage appeared to provide the specific synovial morphology. PMID:27051568

  8. Connecting Network Properties of Rapidly Disseminating Epizoonotics

    PubMed Central

    Rivas, Ariel L.; Fasina, Folorunso O.; Hoogesteyn, Almira L.; Konah, Steven N.; Febles, José L.; Perkins, Douglas J.; Hyman, James M.; Fair, Jeanne M.; Hittner, James B.; Smith, Steven D.

    2012-01-01

    Background To effectively control the geographical dissemination of infectious diseases, their properties need to be determined. To test that rapid microbial dispersal requires not only susceptible hosts but also a pre-existing, connecting network, we explored constructs meant to reveal the network properties associated with disease spread, which included the road structure. Methods Using geo-temporal data collected from epizoonotics in which all hosts were susceptible (mammals infected by Foot-and-mouth disease virus, Uruguay, 2001; birds infected by Avian Influenza virus H5N1, Nigeria, 2006), two models were compared: 1) ‘connectivity’, a model that integrated bio-physical concepts (the agent’s transmission cycle, road topology) into indicators designed to measure networks (‘nodes’ or infected sites with short- and long-range links), and 2) ‘contacts’, which focused on infected individuals but did not assess connectivity. Results The connectivity model showed five network properties: 1) spatial aggregation of cases (disease clusters), 2) links among similar ‘nodes’ (assortativity), 3) simultaneous activation of similar nodes (synchronicity), 4) disease flows moving from highly to poorly connected nodes (directionality), and 5) a few nodes accounting for most cases (a “20∶80″ pattern). In both epizoonotics, 1) not all primary cases were connected but at least one primary case was connected, 2) highly connected, small areas (nodes) accounted for most cases, 3) several classes of nodes were distinguished, and 4) the contact model, which assumed all primary cases were identical, captured half the number of cases identified by the connectivity model. When assessed together, the synchronicity and directionality properties explained when and where an infectious disease spreads. Conclusions Geo-temporal constructs of Network Theory’s nodes and links were retrospectively validated in rapidly disseminating infectious diseases. They distinguished

  9. Effect of nitric oxide on mitochondrial activity of human synovial cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Nitric oxide (NO) is a messenger implicated in the destruction and inflammation of joint tissues. Cartilage and synovial membrane from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA) have high levels of NO. NO is known to modulate various cellular pathways and, thus, inhibit the activity of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) of chondrocytes and induce the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cell death in multiple cell types. For these reasons, and because of the importance of the synovial membrane in development of OA pathology, we investigated the effects of NO on survival, mitochondrial function, and activity of fibroblastic human OA synovial cells. Methods Human OA synovia were obtained from eight patients undergoing hip joint replacement. Sodium nitroprusside (SNP) was used as a NO donor compound and cell viability was evaluated by MTT assays. Mitochondrial function was evaluated by analyzing the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) with flow cytometry using the fluorofore DePsipher. ATP levels were measured by luminescence assays, and the activities of the respiratory chain complexes (complex I: NADH CoQ1 reductase, complex II: succinate dehydrogenase, complex III: ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase, complex IV: cytochrome c oxidase) and citrate synthase (CS) were measured by enzymatic assay. Protein expression analyses were performed by western blot. Results SNP at a concentration of 0.5 mM induced cell death, shown by the MTT method at different time points. The percentages of viable cells at 24, 48 and 72 hours were 86.11 ± 4.9%, 74.31 ± 3.35%, and 43.88 ± 1.43%, respectively, compared to the basal level of 100% (*p < 0.05). SNP at 0.5 mM induced depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane at 12 hours with a decrease in the ratio of polarized cells (basal = 2.48 ± 0.28; SNP 0.5 mM = 1.57 ± 0.11; *p < 0.01). The time course analyses of treatment with SNP at 0.5 mM demonstrated that treatment reliably and

  10. Pre-tibial synovial cyst after reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament: case report☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Bulisani, Luís Eduardo Pedigoni; Bulisani, Erickson

    2014-01-01

    Arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament has been modernized through new surgical techniques and new materials. When tibial fixation is performed using an absorbable screw, complications may occur, such as formation of a pre-tibial cyst. The case described here is about a patient who presented an anteromedial synovial cyst in his right knee, three years after having undergone ACL reconstruction. The patient did not present any pain nor any complaints other than a mass that progressively increased in size, worsened after physical activities. Imaging examinations were requested: simple radiography of the knee and magnetic resonance. Anteromedial imaging of the knee showed a mass with well-delimited borders and internal fluid content, suggestive of a synovial cyst, with communication with the joint cavity through the tibial tunnel, without presenting enlargement or absorption of the bone tunnel. The cyst was surgically resected and the tibial tunnel occlusion was performed using a bone plug. The diagnosis of a synovial cyst was subsequently confirmed through the results from the anatomopathological examination. The patient presented good clinical evolution, with disappearance of the symptoms and a return to physical activities. PMID:26229880

  11. Inhibitor-free DNA for real-time PCR analysis of synovial fluid from horses, cattle and pigs.

    PubMed

    Schneeweiss, Wilfried; Stanek, Christian; Wagner, Martin; Hein, Ingeborg

    2007-03-31

    The potential of five different commercial DNA isolation methods to remove real-time PCR inhibitors from the synovial fluid of horses, cattle and pigs was investigated. All kits with the exception of one included a silica column-based purification of the DNA. With the fifth kit, DNA purification is achieved by removing contaminating macromolecules by a desalting process. We used a recently developed method based on comparison of the real-time PCR signal of an artificial target incorporated into each PCR reaction in the presence of the isolated DNA from the sample, and in control samples containing water instead of isolated DNA. This was followed by statistical analysis of the data. Inhibition and subsequent reduction of the endpoint fluorescence in the real-time PCR reaction was encountered in many cases. Less frequently, the target copy number in the samples was underestimated. However, we found no experimental evidence of a negative influence of the reduced endpoint fluorescence signal on the detection limit of the real-time PCR assay. All kits tested were useful for analyzing pelleted synovial fluid from horses, cattle and pigs. When analyzing non-pelleted synovial fluid, three kits - two based on silica columns and one employing a desalting process - yielded inhibitor-free DNA for real-time PCR analysis. PMID:17222992

  12. CTGF increases vascular endothelial growth factor-dependent angiogenesis in human synovial fibroblasts by increasing miR-210 expression

    PubMed Central

    Liu, S-C; Chuang, S-M; Hsu, C-J; Tsai, C-H; Wang, S-W; Tang, C-H

    2014-01-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF, a.k.a. CCN2) is inflammatory mediator and abundantly expressed in osteoarthritis (OA). Angiogenesis is essential for OA progression. Here, we investigated the role of CTGF in vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production and angiogenesis in OA synovial fibroblasts (OASFs). We showed that expression of CTGF and VEGF in synovial fluid were higher in OA patients than in controls. Directly applying CTGF to OASFs increased VEGF production then promoted endothelial progenitor cells tube formation and migration. CTGF induced VEGF by raising miR-210 expression via PI3K, AKT, ERK, and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB)/ELK1 pathways. CTGF-mediating miR-210 upregulation repressed glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 1-like (GPD1L) expression and PHD activity and subsequently promoted hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α-dependent VEGF expression. Knockdown of CTGF decreased VEGF expression and abolished OASF-conditional medium-mediated angiogenesis in vitro as well as angiogenesis in chick chorioallantoic membrane and Matrigel-plug nude mice model in vivo. Taken together, our results suggest CTGF activates PI3K, AKT, ERK, and NF-κB/ELK1 pathway, leading to the upregulation of miR-210, contributing to inhibit GPD1L expression and prolyl hydroxylases 2 activity, promoting HIF-1α-dependent VEGF expression and angiogenesis in human synovial fibroblasts. PMID:25341039

  13. The Overexpression of NALP3 Inflammasome in Knee Osteoarthritis Is Associated with Synovial Membrane Prolidase and NADPH Oxidase 2

    PubMed Central

    Clavijo-Cornejo, Denise; Martínez-Flores, Karina; Silva-Luna, Karina; Fernández-Torres, Javier; Zamudio-Cuevas, Yessica; Guadalupe Santamaría-Olmedo, Mónica

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis is characterized by the presence of proinflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species. We aimed to clarify the role of prooxidant enzyme content at the synovial membrane level and how it correlates with the inflammatory process in patients with knee osteoarthritis (KOA). In synovial membranes from KOA patients and control group, we analyzed the protein content of prooxidant enzymes such as Nox2, xanthine oxidase (XO), and prolidase as well as the proinflammatory NALP3. Results show that protein content of prolidase and Nox2 increased 4.8- and 8.4-fold, respectively, and XO showed an increasing trend, while the NALP3 inflammasome increased 5.4-fold with respect to control group. Levels of prolidase and XO had a positive correlation between the levels of NALP3 and Nox2. By principal component analysis the protein expression pattern by study groups was evaluated. Three clusters were identified; protein expression patterns were higher for clusters two (prolidase) and three (XO and Nox2) between KOA patients and controls. Data suggest that prooxidant enzymes increase in synovial membrane of KOA patients and may contribute to the inflammatory state and degradation of the articular cartilage. PMID:27777643

  14. Expression profiling of synovial sarcoma by cDNA microarrays: association of ERBB2, IGFBP2, and ELF3 with epithelial differentiation.

    PubMed

    Allander, Susanne V; Illei, Peter B; Chen, Yidong; Antonescu, Cristina R; Bittner, Mike; Ladanyi, Marc; Meltzer, Paul S

    2002-11-01

    Synovial sarcoma is an aggressive spindle cell sarcoma with two major histological subtypes, biphasic and monophasic, defined respectively by the presence or absence of areas of glandular epithelial differentiation. It is characterized by a specific chromosomal translocation, t(X;18)(p11.2;q11.2), which juxtaposes the SYT gene on chromosome 18 to either the SSX1 or the SSX2 gene on chromosome X. The chimeric SYT-SSX products are thought to function as transcriptional proteins that deregulate gene expression, thereby providing a putative oncogenic stimulus. We investigated the pattern of gene expression in synovial sarcoma using cDNA microarrays containing 6548 sequence-verified human cDNAs. A tissue microarray containing 37 synovial sarcoma samples verified to bear the SYT-SSX fusion was constructed for complementary analyses. Gene expression analyses were performed on individual tumor samples; 14 synovial sarcomas, 4 malignant fibrous histiocytomas, and 1 fibrosarcoma. Statistical analysis showed a distinct expression profile for the group of synovial sarcomas as compared to the other soft tissue sarcomas, which included variably high expression of ERBB2, IGFBP2, and IGF2 in the synovial sarcomas. Immunohistochemical analysis of protein expression in tissue microarrays of 37 synovial sarcomas demonstrated strong expression of ERBB2 and IGFBP2 in the glandular epithelial component of biphasic tumors and in solid epithelioid areas of some monophasic tumors. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis indicated that the ERBB2 overexpression was not because of gene amplification. Differentially expressed genes were also found in a comparison of the expression profiles of the biphasic and monophasic histological subgroups of synovial sarcoma, notably several keratin genes, and ELF3, an epithelial-specific transcription factor gene. Finally, we also noted differential overexpression of several neural- or neuroectodermal-associated genes in synovial sarcomas relative to

  15. Identification of target genes of synovial sarcoma-associated fusion oncoprotein using human pluripotent stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hayakawa, Kazuo; Ikeya, Makoto; Fukuta, Makoto; Woltjen, Knut; Tamaki, Sakura; Takahara, Naoko; Kato, Tomohisa; Sato, Shingo; Otsuka, Takanobu; Toguchida, Junya

    2013-03-22

    Highlights: ► We tried to identify targets of synovial sarcoma (SS)-associated SYT–SSX fusion gene. ► We established pluripotent stem cell (PSC) lines with inducible SYT–SSX gene. ► SYT–SSX responsive genes were identified by the induction of SYT–SSX in PSC. ► SS-related genes were selected from database by in silico analyses. ► 51 genes were finally identified among SS-related genes as targets of SYT–SSX in PSC. -- Abstract: Synovial sarcoma (SS) is a malignant soft tissue tumor harboring chromosomal translocation t(X; 18)(p11.2; q11.2), which produces SS-specific fusion gene, SYT–SSX. Although precise function of SYT–SSX remains to be investigated, accumulating evidences suggest its role in gene regulation via epigenetic mechanisms, and the product of SYT–SSX target genes may serve as biomarkers of SS. Lack of knowledge about the cell-of-origin of SS, however, has placed obstacle in the way of target identification. Here we report a novel approach to identify SYT–SSX2 target genes using human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) containing a doxycycline-inducible SYT–SSX2 gene. SYT–SSX2 was efficiently induced both at mRNA and protein levels within three hours after doxycycline administration, while no morphological change of hPSCs was observed until 24 h. Serial microarray analyses identified genes of which the expression level changed more than twofold within 24 h. Surprisingly, the majority (297/312, 95.2%) were up-regulated genes and a result inconsistent with the current concept of SYT–SSX as a transcriptional repressor. Comparing these genes with SS-related genes which were selected by a series of in silico analyses, 49 and 2 genes were finally identified as candidates of up- and down-regulated target of SYT–SSX, respectively. Association of these genes with SYT–SSX in SS cells was confirmed by knockdown experiments. Expression profiles of SS-related genes in hPSCs and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) were strikingly

  16. User data dissemination concepts for earth resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, R.; Scott, M.; Mitchell, C.; Torbett, A.

    1976-01-01

    Domestic data dissemination networks for earth-resources data in the 1985-1995 time frame were evaluated. The following topics were addressed: (1) earth-resources data sources and expected data volumes, (2) future user demand in terms of data volume and timeliness, (3) space-to-space and earth point-to-point transmission link requirements and implementation, (4) preprocessing requirements and implementation, (5) network costs, and (6) technological development to support this implementation. This study was parametric in that the data input (supply) was varied by a factor of about fifteen while the user request (demand) was varied by a factor of about nineteen. Correspondingly, the time from observation to delivery to the user was varied. This parametric evaluation was performed by a computer simulation that was based on network alternatives and resulted in preliminary transmission and preprocessing requirements. The earth-resource data sources considered were: shuttle sorties, synchronous satellites (e.g., SEOS), aircraft, and satellites in polar orbits.

  17. Laboratory testing in disseminated intravascular coagulation.

    PubMed

    Favaloro, Emmanuel J

    2010-06-01

    The diagnosis of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) relies on clinical signs and symptoms, identification of the underlying disease, the results of laboratory testing, and differentiation from other pathologies. The clinical features mainly depend on the underlying cause of the DIC. The laboratory diagnosis of DIC uses a combination of tests because no single test result alone can firmly establish or rule out the diagnosis. Global tests of hemostasis may initially provide evidence of coagulation activation and later in the process provide evidence of consumption of coagulation factors, but their individual diagnostic efficiency is limited. Fibrinolytic markers, in particular D-dimer, are reflective of activation of both coagulation and fibrinolysis, so that a normal finding can be useful for ruling-out DIC. Decreased levels of the natural anticoagulants (in particular, antithrombin and protein C) are frequently observed in patients with DIC, but their measurement is not normally incorporated into standard diagnostic algorithms. New tests are being explored for utility in DIC, and some additional tests may be useful on a case-by-case basis, depending on the proposed cause of the DIC or their local availability. For example, clot waveform analysis is useful but currently limited to a single instrument. Also, procalcitonin is an inflammatory biomarker that may be useful within the context of septic DIC, and activated factor X clotting time is an emerging test of procoagulant phospholipids that also seems to hold promise in DIC.

  18. Disseminated Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in a dog.

    PubMed

    Martinho, Anna Paula Vitirito; Franco, Marília Masello Junqueira; Ribeiro, Márcio Garcia; Perrotti, Isabella Belletti Mutt; Mangia, Simone Henriques; Megid, Jane; Vulcano, Luiz Carlos; Lara, Gustavo Henrique Batista; Santos, Adolfo Carlos Barreto; Leite, Clarice Queico Fujimura; de Carvalho Sanches, Osimar; Paes, Antonio Carlos

    2013-03-01

    An uncommon disseminated Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection is described in a 12-year-old female dog presenting with fever, dyspnea, cough, weight loss, lymphadenopathy, melena, epistaxis, and emesis. The dog had a history of close contact with its owner, who died of pulmonary tuberculosis. Radiographic examination revealed diffuse radio-opaque images in both lung lobes, diffuse visible masses in abdominal organs, and hilar and mesenteric lymphadenopathy. Bronchial washing samples and feces were negative for acid-fast organisms. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based species identification of bronchial washing samples, feces, and urine revealed M. tuberculosis using PCR-restriction enzyme pattern analysis-PRA. Because of public health concerns, which were worsened by the physical condition of the dog, euthanasia of the animal was recommended. Rough and tough colonies suggestive of M. tuberculosis were observed after microbiological culture of lung, liver, spleen, heart, and lymph node fragments in Löwenstein-Jensen and Stonebrink media. The PRA analysis enabled diagnosis of M. tuberculosis strains isolated from organs. PMID:23339199

  19. Endosialin-Expressing Pericytes Promote Metastatic Dissemination.

    PubMed

    Viski, Carmen; König, Courtney; Kijewska, Magdalena; Mogler, Carolin; Isacke, Clare M; Augustin, Hellmut G

    2016-09-15

    Metastasis is a multistep process that is critically dependent on the interaction of metastasizing tumor cells with cells in the local microenvironment. Within this tumor stroma, vessel-associated pericytes and myofibroblasts share a number of traits, including the upregulated expression of the transmembrane receptor endosialin (CD248). Comparative experiments in wild-type and endosialin-deficient mice revealed that stromal endosialin does not affect primary tumor growth but strongly promotes spontaneous metastasis. Mechanistically, endosialin-expressing pericytes in the primary tumor facilitate distant site metastasis by promoting tumor cell intravasation in a cell contact-dependent manner, resulting in elevated numbers of circulating tumor cells. Corresponding to these preclinical experiments, in independent cohorts of primary human breast cancers, upregulated endosialin expression significantly correlates with increased metastasis and poorer patient survival. Together, the data demonstrate a critical role for endosialin-expressing primary tumor pericytes in mediating metastatic dissemination and identify endosialin as a promising therapeutic target in breast cancer. Cancer Res; 76(18); 5313-25. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27635044

  20. The problem of dissemination: evidence and ideology.

    PubMed

    Traynor, M

    1999-09-01

    This paper recontextualises research evidence as an example of textually-based social control. It does this by drawing on two areas of theoretical literature; feminist literary theory and the sociology of scientific knowledge. Accounts of literary works as ideological instruments of social control suggest that (at least some kinds of) research literature may fulfil a similar role among a clinical readership. There have also been compelling accounts of scientific writing as expressions of desire on the part of one group to 'act at a distance' upon others. In the light of this literature, it becomes less tenable to see research dissemination as the simple transfer of information, supplemented by organisational work. Research is implicated in the attempt by one group to enrol others in its own project and in the (self-)construction of the identities of the healthcare worker. The accounts that literary theory can provide do not remain focused upon the text, but draw links between the reading process and the experience and place in society, for example the gender, of the writer and reader. As such their explanations create a space for the resisting reader. PMID:10795272

  1. Endotoxin Induced Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, G. W.; McSherry, B. J.; Valli, V. E. O.

    1974-01-01

    Endotoxin administered intravenously to a group of four calves resulted in disseminated intravascular coagulation. A sublethal dose of piromen, a commercially available Pseudomonas spp endotoxin, was used. Serial measurements of total plasma fibrinogen, soluble fibrin levels, ethanol gelation tests, protamine sulfate tests, fibrinogen-fibrin-related antigen (FR-antigen) and prothrombin and thrombin times were done. Initial depression of plasma fibrinogen with a nadir of about 40% of pre-endotoxin levels at eight to 11 hours post-endotoxin (+8 to +11 hours) followed by an overcompensation to 180% at +60 to +108 hours was shown. Soluble fibrin was demonstrated in plasma from +2 to +22 hours with a peak of 100-114 mg/100 ml at +4 to +9 hours. Positive plasma ethanol gelation and protamine sulfate tests, as well as the presence of serum FR-antigen, occurred consistently following endotoxin administration. Significant increases in prothrombin times (PT) from +4 to +40 hours and in thrombin times (TT) from +4 to +16 hours were demonstrated. The peak increase of PT at +8 to +10 hours was 180%. The peak increase of TT at +6 to +9 hours was 260-290%. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2.Fig. 3.Fig. 4. PMID:4279765

  2. The importance of serological tests implementation in disseminated candidiasis diagnose.

    PubMed

    Gegić, Merima; Numanović, Fatima; Delibegović, Zineta; Tihić, Nijaz; Nurkić, Mahmut; Hukić, Mirsada

    2013-03-01

    Candidiasis is defined as an infection or disease caused by a fungus of the genus Candida. Rate of disseminated candidiasis increases with the growth of the number of immunocompromised patients. In the the last few decades the incidence of disseminated candidiasis is in growth as well as the mortality rate. The aim of this survey is to show the importance of serological tests implementation in disseminated candidiasis diagnose. This is a prospective study involving 60 patients with malign diseases with and without clinical signs of disseminated candidiasis and 30 healthy people who represent the control group. Apart from hemoculture, detection of circulating mannan antigen and adequate antibodies of Candida species applying comercial ELISA test was determined in each patient. This survey deals with relevant factors causing disseminated candidiasis. This survey showed that the group of patients with clinical signs of disseminated candidiasis had more patients with positive hemoculture to Candida species, then the group of patients without clinical signs of disseminated candidiasis. The number of patients being examined and positive to antigens and antibodies was higher (p < 0.01) in the group of patients with clinical signs of disseminated candidiasis (7/30; 23.3%), then in the group of patients without clinical signs of disseminated candidiasis (0/30; 0%): Average value of titra antigen was statistically higher (p < 0.001) in patients with Candida spp. positive hemocultures rather then in patients with Candida spp. negative hemocultures. In the group of patients with clinical signs of disseminated candidiasis 6/30 (20%) of patients had Candida spp.positive hemocultures while in the group of patients without clinical signs of disseminated candidiasis 1/30 (3.3%) of patients had Candida spp. positive hemocultures, which was considerably higher (p < 0.05). Correlation of results of hemoculture and mannan antigens and antibodies in patients with disseminated

  3. Synovial fluid pH, cytologic characteristics, and gentamicin concentration after intra-articular administration of the drug in an experimental model of infectious arthritis in horses.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, K C; Stover, S M; Pascoe, J R; Adams, P

    1990-09-01

    Chemical and cytologic effects and bactericidal activity of gentamicin in septic synovial fluid were evaluated in an experimental model of infectious arthritis in horses. Septic arthritis was induced by inoculation of approximately 7.5 X 10(6) colony-forming units of Escherichia coli into 1 antebrachiocarpal joint in each of 16 clinically normal adult horses. Clinical signs of septic arthritis were evident 24 hours after inoculation. Horses were allotted to 3 groups: group-1 horses (n = 5) each were given 150 mg of gentamicin (50 mg/ml; 3 ml) intra-articularly (IA); group-2 horses (n = 5) each were given 2.2 mg of gentamicin/kg of body weight, IV, every 6 hours; and group-3 horses (n = 6) each were given buffered gentamicin, consisting of 3 mEq of sodium bicarbonate (1 mEq/ml; 3 ml) and 150 mg of gentamicin (50 mg/ml; 3 ml), IA. Synovial fluid specimens were obtained at posttreatment hour (PTH) 0, 0.25, 1, 4, 8, 12, and 24 via an indwelling intra-articular catheter. Synovial fluid pH was evaluated at PTH 0, 0.25, and 24. Microbiologic culture and cytologic examination were performed on synovial fluid specimens obtained at PTH 0 and 24, and gentamicin concentration was measured in all synovial fluid specimens. At PTH 0, E coli was isolated from synovial fluid specimens obtained from all horses. Synovial fluid pH was lower (range, 7.08 to 7.16) and WBC count was higher (range, 88,000 to 227,200 cells/microliters) and predominantly neutrophilic (95 to 99%) at PTH 0 than before inoculation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Largazole, a class I histone deacetylase inhibitor, enhances TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression in rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Salahuddin; Riegsecker, Sharayah; Beamer, Maria; Rahman, Ayesha; Bellini, Joseph V; Bhansali, Pravin; Tillekeratne, L M Viranga

    2013-07-15

    In the present study, we evaluated the effect of largazole (LAR), a marine-derived class I HDAC inhibitor, on tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-induced expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) activity. LAR (1-5 μM) had no adverse effect on the viability of RA synovial fibroblasts. Among the different class I HDACs screened, LAR (0.5-5 μM) inhibited the constitutive expression of HDAC1 (0-30%). Surprisingly, LAR increased class II HDAC [HDAC6] by ~220% with a concomitant decrease in HDAC5 [30-58%] expression in RA synovial fibroblasts. SAHA (5 μM), a pan-HDAC inhibitor, also induced HDAC6 expression in RA synovial fibroblasts. Pretreatment of RA synovial fibroblasts with LAR further enhanced TNF-α-induced ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression. However, LAR inhibited TNF-α-induced MMP-2 activity in RA synovial fibroblasts by 35% when compared to the TNF-α-treated group. Further, the addition of HDAC6 specific inhibitor Tubastatin A with LAR suppressed TNF-α+LAR-induced ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression and completely blocked MMP-2 activity, suggesting a role of HDAC6 in LAR-induced ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expression. LAR also enhanced TNF-α-induced phospho-p38 and phospho-AKT expression, but inhibited the expression of phospho-JNK and nuclear translocation of NF-κBp65 in RA synovial fibroblasts. These results suggest that LAR activates p38 and Akt pathways and influences class II HDACs, in particular HDAC6, to enhance some of the detrimental effects of TNF-α in RA synovial fibroblasts. Understanding the exact role of different HDAC isoenzymes in RA pathogenesis is extremely important in order to develop highly effective HDAC inhibitors for the treatment of RA.

  5. Limited T-cell receptor beta-chain heterogeneity among interleukin 2 receptor-positive synovial T cells suggests a role for superantigen in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed Central

    Howell, M D; Diveley, J P; Lundeen, K A; Esty, A; Winters, S T; Carlo, D J; Brostoff, S W

    1991-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a disease affecting the synovial membranes of articulating joints that is thought to result from T-cell-mediated autoimmune phenomena. T cells responsible for the pathogenesis of RA are likely present in that fraction of synovial T cells that expresses the interleukin 2 receptor (IL-2R), one marker of T-cell activation. We report herein an analysis of T-cell receptor (TCR) beta-chain gene expression by IL-2R-positive synovial T cells. These T cells were isolated from uncultured synovial tissue specimens by using IL-2R-specific monoclonal antibodies and magnetic beads, and TCR beta-chain transcription was analyzed by PCR-catalyzed amplification using a panel of primers specific for the human TCR beta-chain variable region (V beta). Multiple V beta gene families were found to be transcribed in these patients samples; however, three gene families, V beta 3, V beta 14, and V beta 17, were found in a majority of the five synovial samples analyzed, suggesting that T cells bearing these V beta s had been selectively retained in the synovial microenvironment. In many instances, the V beta 3, V beta 14, or V beta 17 repertoires amplified from an individual patient were dominated by a single rearrangement, indicative of clonal expansion in the synovium and supportive of a role for these T cells in RA. Of note is a high sequence similarity between V beta 3, V beta 14, and V beta 17 polypeptides, particularly in the fourth complementarity-determining region (CDR). Given that binding sites for superantigens have been mapped to the CDR4s of TCR beta chains, the synovial localization of T cells bearing V beta s with significant CDR4 homology indicates that V beta-specific T-cell activation by superantigen may play a role in RA. PMID:1660155

  6. A spread willingness computing-based information dissemination model.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haojing; Cui, Zhiming; Zhang, Shukui

    2014-01-01

    This paper constructs a kind of spread willingness computing based on information dissemination model for social network. The model takes into account the impact of node degree and dissemination mechanism, combined with the complex network theory and dynamics of infectious diseases, and further establishes the dynamical evolution equations. Equations characterize the evolutionary relationship between different types of nodes with time. The spread willingness computing contains three factors which have impact on user's spread behavior: strength of the relationship between the nodes, views identity, and frequency of contact. Simulation results show that different degrees of nodes show the same trend in the network, and even if the degree of node is very small, there is likelihood of a large area of information dissemination. The weaker the relationship between nodes, the higher probability of views selection and the higher the frequency of contact with information so that information spreads rapidly and leads to a wide range of dissemination. As the dissemination probability and immune probability change, the speed of information dissemination is also changing accordingly. The studies meet social networking features and can help to master the behavior of users and understand and analyze characteristics of information dissemination in social network. PMID:25110738

  7. A Spread Willingness Computing-Based Information Dissemination Model

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Zhiming; Zhang, Shukui

    2014-01-01

    This paper constructs a kind of spread willingness computing based on information dissemination model for social network. The model takes into account the impact of node degree and dissemination mechanism, combined with the complex network theory and dynamics of infectious diseases, and further establishes the dynamical evolution equations. Equations characterize the evolutionary relationship between different types of nodes with time. The spread willingness computing contains three factors which have impact on user's spread behavior: strength of the relationship between the nodes, views identity, and frequency of contact. Simulation results show that different degrees of nodes show the same trend in the network, and even if the degree of node is very small, there is likelihood of a large area of information dissemination. The weaker the relationship between nodes, the higher probability of views selection and the higher the frequency of contact with information so that information spreads rapidly and leads to a wide range of dissemination. As the dissemination probability and immune probability change, the speed of information dissemination is also changing accordingly. The studies meet social networking features and can help to master the behavior of users and understand and analyze characteristics of information dissemination in social network. PMID:25110738

  8. Cacades: A reliable dissemination protocol for data collection sensor network

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peng, Y.; Song, W.; Huang, R.; Xu, M.; Shirazi, B.; LaHusen, R.; Pei, G.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a fast and reliable data dissemination protocol Cascades to disseminate data from the sink(base station) to all or a subset of nodes in a data collection sensor network. Cascades makes use of the parentmonitor-children analogy to ensure reliable dissemination. Each node monitors whether or not its children have received the broadcast messages through snooping children's rebroadcasts or waiting for explicit ACKs. If a node detects a gap in its message sequences, it can fetch the missing messages from its neighbours reactively. Cascades also considers many practical issues for field deployment, such as dynamic topology, link/node failure, etc.. It therefore guarantees that a disseminated message from the sink will reach all intended receivers and the dissemination is terminated in a short time period. Notice that, all existing dissemination protocols either do not guarantee reliability or do not terminate [1, 2], which does not meet the requirement of real-time command control. We conducted experiment evaluations in both TOSSIM simulator and a sensor network testbed to compare Cascades with those existing dissemination protocols in TinyOS sensor networks, which show that Cascades achieves a higher degree of reliability, lower communication cost, and less delivery delay. ??2009 IEEE.

  9. Heparin modulates intracellular cyclic AMP in human trabecular bone cells and adherent rheumatoid synovial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Crisp, A J; Roelke, M S; Goldring, S R; Krane, S M

    1984-01-01

    Cells were cultured from explants of human trabecular bone excised from eight patients and incubated usually for 20 minutes with bovine parathyroid hormone, salmon calcitonin, prostaglandin E2, or heparin. The intracellular content of cyclic AMP was measured by radioimmunoassay and was significantly increased by parathyroid hormone in four, by calcitonin in two, by prostaglandin E2 in eight, and by heparin in seven out of eight cultures. In the two cultures containing calcitonin-responsive cells heparin inhibited the cyclic AMP response induced by calcitonin. Heparin did not affect the cyclic AMP response to parathyroid hormone or prostaglandin E2. Heparin also increased the cyclic AMP content of cultured adherent rheumatoid synovial cells. It is proposed that, in certain situations of focal pathological bone resorption, although concentrations of circulating hormones may be normal, the local release of products such as heparin may modify the effect of hormones which regulate connective tissue homoeostasis. local changes in hormone responses could contribute to the enhanced bone resorption associated with inflammatory processes such as rheumatoid arthritis. Images PMID:6089675

  10. Photodynamic damage to cartilage and synovial tissue grafted on a chick's chorioallantoic membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, M.; Nahir, A. M.; Kimel, Sol

    1997-09-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the synovial joints causing pain deformities and disability. The highly vascular inflamed synovium has aggressive and destructive characteristics, it invades, erodes and gradually destroys cartilage and underlying bone. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) was performed using the chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model to investigate the vitality of synovium and cartilage implanted on the CAM. Synovium, obtained from human patients, was grafted onto the CAM; gross microscopy and histology proved its vitality 7 days post grafting. Cartilage obtained from rabbit knee joint was also maintained on the CAM for 7 days. Its vitality was demonstrated by histology and by measuring metabolic and enzymatic activity of cartilage cells (chondrocytes) as well as the collagen and proteoglycans content. Selective PDT was performed using aluminum phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate (AlPcS4), a hydrophilic compound, soluble in biological solutions, as a photosensitizer. After irradiation with a diode laser (lambda equals 670 nm, 10 mW) damage was observed in vascularized synovium grafts, whereas avascular cartilage remained intact.

  11. An analysis of the levels of complement components in the synovial fluid in rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Swaak, A J; Van Rooyen, A; Planten, O; Han, H; Hattink, O; Hack, E

    1987-09-01

    A linear relationship between the synovial fluid to serum concentration ratios and log molecular weight was found for six plasma proteins, which are largely synthesized by the liver. Production or utilization of a given protein in the joint can, therefore, be determined by its deviation from the calculated diffusion line. Based on this diffusion model the role of the complement system was investigated in the joint effusions of 48 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 6 patients with osteoarthritis (OA) and 7 patients with meniscus lesions (ML). Among these three groups quantitative differences were found in the metabolism or utilization of several complement components, based on the fact that the ratios were lower than expected for diffusion of proteins of similar molecular weight. The ratios for the RA group were the lowest. In the three patient groups, results showed increased consumption mainly of C3 and C4 locally in the joint. The existence of a real complement activation in the joints of the three different patient groups was further proved by the elevated levels of C3 breakdown products (C3d). Overall this kind of calculation provides us with a method for studying the role of other proteins which may be important in the inflammatory process of the joint.

  12. A synovial amidase acting on tissue kallikrein-selective substrate in clinical and experimental arthritis.

    PubMed

    Al-Haboubi, H A; Bennett, D; Sharma, J N; Thomas, G R; Zeitlin, I J

    1986-01-01

    Increased levels of amidase acting on a tissue-kallikrein selective substrate, Val.Leu.Arg.pNA, with an activity optimum at pH9, were detected in blood-free inflamed tissues from adjuvant arthritic rats (p less than 0.01). The component of this activity resistant to inhibition by soybean trypsin inhibitor (SBTI) also greatly increased (p less than 0.05). Both the SBTI-sensitive and SBTI-resistant components were inhibited by aprotinin (93% and 72% respectively). Kallikrein-like amidase also increased in inflamed synovia from seropositive rheumatoid, and osteoarthritic dogs when compared with healthy canine synovia. This increase was parallelled by an increase in kinin-forming enzyme which was also measured in rheumatoid and healthy animals and this activity was inhibited 72% by aprotinin. Total kallikrein-like amidase also increased 989% (p less than 0.05) in synovia from seropositive rheumatoid human patients, compared with healthy synovial tissue. Evidence is presented indicating that the origin of this enzymic activity may be plasma kallikrein. PMID:3643734

  13. Recovery of microorganisms from synovial and pleural fluids of animals using hyperosmolar media.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, A M; Davis, D C; Pedersen, N C; Beaman, B L

    1982-03-01

    L-phase (CWD) broth and plate media were used in parallel with conventional microbiological media during a 3-year period for culturing synovial and pleural fluids of animals. Two kinds of recoveries were obtained where parallel conventional methods were negative: (1) parent or normal bacteria, in very low numbers; and (2) Type B CWD variants in equally low numbers. Organisms in group 1 were: Streptococcus zooepidemicus from horses (2x); beta-hemolytic streptococci, Lancefield Gp. G (2x); Staphylococcus aureus; Actinobacillus, and Actinomyces viscosus. Group 2 consisted of Bacteroides sp., Propionibacterium acnes, and three "Nocardia-like" sp. Catalase + Actinomyces was not recovered equally well on CWD plates as on conventional media with fluids obtained during ampicillin treatment. This occurred in spite of the fact that the CWD media was shown to support growth and reversion of laboratory induced L-phase variants of Nocardia caviae and N. asteroides, and had facilitated recovery of a Bacteroides L-phase variant from a pleural fluid. The nature of this fault in the media is under investigation in this laboratory. PMID:7101719

  14. Distinctive gene expression signatures in rheumatoid arthritis synovial tissue fibroblast cells: correlates with disease activity.

    PubMed

    Galligan, C L; Baig, E; Bykerk, V; Keystone, E C; Fish, E N

    2007-09-01

    Gene expression profiling of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA) joint tissue samples provides a unique insight into the gene signatures involved in disease development and progression. Fibroblast-like synovial (FLS) cells were obtained from RA, OA and control trauma joint tissues (non-RA, non-OA) and RNA was analyzed by Affymetrix microarray. Thirty-four genes specific to RA and OA FLS cells were identified (P<0.05). HOXD10, HOXD11, HOXD13, CCL8 and LIM homeobox 2 were highly and exclusively expressed in RA and CLU, sarcoglycan-gamma, GPR64, POU3F3, peroxisome proliferative activated receptor-gamma and tripartite motif-containing 2 were expressed only in OA. The data also revealed expression heterogeneity for patients with the same disease. To address disease heterogeneity in RA FLS cells, we examined the effects of clinical disease parameters (Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) score, C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), rheumatoid factor (RF)) and drug therapies (methotrexate/prednisone) on RA FLS cell gene expression. Eight specific and unique correlations were identified: human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DQA2 with HAQ score; Clec12A with RF; MAB21L2, SIAT7E, HAPLN1 and BAIAP2L1 with CRP level; RGMB and OSAP with ESR. Signature RA FLS cell gene expression profiles may provide insights into disease pathogenesis and have utility in diagnosis, prognosis and drug responsiveness. PMID:17568789

  15. Dynamic automated synovial imaging (DASI) for differential diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grisan, E.; Raffeiner, B.; Coran, A.; Rizzo, G.; Ciprian, L.; Stramare, R.

    2014-03-01

    Inflammatory rheumatic diseases are leading causes of disability and constitute a frequent medical disorder, leading to inability to work, high comorbidity and increased mortality. The gold-standard for diagnosing and differentiating arthritis is based on patient conditions and radiographic findings, as joint erosions or decalcification. However, early signs of arthritis are joint effusion, hypervascularization and synovial hypertrophy. In particular, vascularization has been shown to correlate with arthritis' destructive behavior, more than clinical assessment. Contrast Enhanced Ultrasound (CEUS) examination of the small joints is emerging as a sensitive tool for assessing vascularization and disease activity. The evaluation of perfusion pattern rely on subjective semiquantitative scales, that are able to capture the macroscopic degree of vascularization, but are unable to detect the subtler differences in kinetics perfusion parameters that might lead to a deeper understanding of disease progression and a better management of patients. We show that after a kinetic analysis of contrast agent appearance, providing the quantitative features characterizing the perfusion pattern of the joint, it is possible to accurately discriminate RA from PSA by building a random forest classifier on the computed features. We compare its accuracy with the assessment performed by expert radiologist blinded of the diagnosis.

  16. Chemical nature of implant-derived titanium(IV) ions in synovial fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Silwood, Christopher J.L.; Grootveld, Martin . E-mail: grootvm@lsbu.ac.uk

    2005-05-13

    Previous investigations have indicated a deleterious leakage of Ti(III) and/or Ti(IV) species from Ti-Al-V alloy joint prostheses into adjacent tissue, synovium or synovial fluid (SF) in vivo. In view of the importance of the particular chemical nature of such complexes in determining their biological activity, we have employed high field proton ({sup 1}H) NMR spectroscopy to 'speciate' Ti(IV) in inflammatory SF. Treatment of osteoarthritic SF samples with increasing concentrations of Ti(IV) (0.10-1.03 mM [TiO(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2}]{sup 2-}) gave rise to a specific broadening of the citrate proton resonances, indicating that this bioavailable oxygen-donor ligand plays an important role in complexing implant-derived Ti(IV). {sup 1}H NMR analysis of Ti(IV)-loaded SF samples subsequently treated with a large excess of ascorbate (0.05 M) showed that this added Ti(IV) chelator was only poorly effective in removing this metal ion from Ti(IV)-citrate/Ti(IV)-oxycitrate complexes. The results obtained here provide evidence for complexation of the low-molecular-mass (non-protein-bound) fraction of implant-derived Ti(IV) by citrate in vivo.

  17. The secreted glycoprotein lubricin protects cartilage surfaces and inhibits synovial cell overgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, David K.; Marcelino, Jose; Baker, MacArthur; Gong, Yaoqin; Smits, Patrick; Lefebvre, Véronique; Jay, Gregory D.; Stewart, Matthew; Wang, Hongwei; Warman, Matthew L.; Carpten, John D.

    2005-01-01

    The long-term integrity of an articulating joint is dependent upon the nourishment of its cartilage component and the protection of the cartilage surface from friction-induced wear. Loss-of-function mutations in lubricin (a secreted glycoprotein encoded by the gene PRG4) cause the human autosomal recessive disorder camptodactyly-arthropathy-coxa vara-pericarditis syndrome (CACP). A major feature of CACP is precocious joint failure. In order to delineate the mechanism by which lubricin protects joints, we studied the expression of Prg4 mRNA during mouse joint development, and we created lubricin-mutant mice. Prg4 began to be expressed in surface chondrocytes and synoviocytes after joint cavitation had occurred and remained strongly expressed by these cells postnatally. Mice lacking lubricin were viable and fertile. In the newborn period, their joints appeared normal. As the mice aged, we observed abnormal protein deposits on the cartilage surface and disappearance of underlying superficial zone chondrocytes. In addition to cartilage surface changes and subsequent cartilage deterioration, intimal cells in the synovium surrounding the joint space became hyperplastic, which further contributed to joint failure. Purified or recombinant lubricin inhibited the growth of these synoviocytes in vitro. Tendon and tendon sheath involvement was present in the ankle joints, where morphologic changes and abnormal calcification of these structures were observed. We conclude that lubricin has multiple functions in articulating joints and tendons that include the protection of surfaces and the control of synovial cell growth. PMID:15719068

  18. Lubricin expression in human osteoarthritic knee meniscus and synovial fluid: a morphological, immunohistochemical and biochemical study.

    PubMed

    Musumeci, Giuseppe; Trovato, Francesca Maria; Loreto, Carla; Leonardi, Rosalia; Szychlinska, Marta Anna; Castorina, Sergio; Mobasheri, Ali

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of lubricin, the product of the human PRG4 (proteoglycan 4) gene, in menisci and synovial fluid from normal donors and patients with osteoarthritis (OA), using a combination of histology, immunohistochemistry, ELISA and Western blotting analysis, to provide further insight on the role of this protein in the progression of OA and pathological processes in the meniscus. Lubricin expression was studied in samples from 40 patients and in 9 normal donors after arthroscopic partial meniscectomy. Histological analysis confirmed normal microanatomy and the absence of structural changes in control samples. Menisci derived from OA patients showed evidence of structural alterations, fibrillations and clefts. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed very strong lubricin immunostaining in normal menisci in contrast to weak/moderate staining seen in osteoarthritic menisci. Quantitative ELISA and Western blot analysis confirmed the above results. The findings of this study support the notion that changes in lubricin expression and boundary-lubricating ability of cartilage is followed by the development of OA. This study could provide the biological foundation for the development of novel therapeutic treatments, to be applied before the surgery, for the prevention of post-traumatic cartilage damage.

  19. Spontaneous generation of functional osteoclasts from synovial fluid mononuclear cells as a model of inflammatory osteoclastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Greisen, Stinne R; Einarsson, Halldór Bjarki; Hvid, Malene; Hauge, Ellen-Margrethe; Deleuran, Bent; Kragstrup, Tue Wenzel

    2015-09-01

    In osteoimmunology, osteoclastogenesis is understood in the context of the immune system. Today, the in vitro model for osteoclastogenesis necessitates the addition of recombinant human receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF). The peripheral joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and spondyloarthritis (SpA) are characterized by an immune-mediated inflammation that can lead to bone destruction. Here, we evaluate spontaneous in vitro osteoclastogenesis in cultures of synovial fluid mononuclear cells (SFMCs) activated only in vivo. SFMCs were isolated and cultured for 21 days at 0.5-1.0 × 10(6) cells/mL in culture medium. SFMCs and healthy control peripheral blood monocytes were cultured with RANKL and M-CSF as controls. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) positive multinucleated cells were found in the SFMC cultures after 21 days. These cells expressed the osteoclast genes calcitonin receptor, cathepsin K, and integrin β3, formed lacunae on dentin plates and secreted matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) and TRAP. Adding RANKL and M-CSF potentiated this secretion. In conclusion, we show that SFMCs from inflamed peripheral joints can spontaneously develop into functionally active osteoclasts ex vivo. Our study provides a simple in vitro model for studying inflammatory osteoclastogenesis.

  20. Molecular Characterization of Synovial Sarcoma in Children and Adolescents: Evidence of Akt Activation1

    PubMed Central

    Bozzi, Fabio; Ferrari, Andrea; Negri, Tiziana; Conca, Elena; Luca, Da Riva; Losa, Marco; Casieri, Paola; Orsenigo, Marta; Lampis, Andrea; Meazza, Cristina; Casanova, Michela; Pierotti, Marco A; Tamborini, Elena; Pilotti, Silvana

    2008-01-01

    Synovial sarcoma (SS) is the most frequent nonrhabdomyosarcomatous soft tissue sarcoma encountered in adolescents and young adults, and despite advances in the treatment of local disease, metastases remain the main cause of death. The aim of this study was to characterize a single-center series of pediatric SS molecularly to seek any biomarkers or pathways that might make suitable targets for new agents. Seventeen cases of pediatric SS showing the SYT-SSX fusion transcript were screened immunohistochemically, biochemically, molecularly, and cytogenetically (depending on the available material) to investigate any expression/activation of epidermal growth factor receptor, platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRα), PDGFRβ, Akt, and deregulated Wnt pathway. The most relevant outcome was the finding of activated epidermal growth factor receptor, PDGFRα, and PDGFRβ, which activated Akt in both the monophasic and biphasic histologic subtypes. Consistently, Akt activation was completely abolished in an SS cell line assay when stimulated by PDGF-AA and treated with the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002. Our results also showed the nuclear localization of β-catenin and cyclin D1 gene products in monophasic SS and the movement of β-catenin into the cytoplasm in the glandular component of the biphasic subtype. Although they need to be confirmed in larger series, these preliminary data suggest that therapeutic strategies including specific inhibitors of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway might be exploited in SS. PMID:18633459

  1. Aberrant histone acetylation contributes to elevated interleukin-6 production in rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Wada, Takuma Tsuzuki; Araki, Yasuto; Sato, Kojiro; Aizaki, Yoshimi; Yokota, Kazuhiro; Kim, Yoon Taek; Oda, Hiromi; Kurokawa, Riki; Mimura, Toshihide

    2014-02-21

    Accumulating evidence indicates that epigenetic aberrations have a role in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, reports on histone modifications are as yet quite limited in RA. Interleukin (IL)-6 is an inflammatory cytokine which is known to be involved in the pathogenesis of RA. Here we report the role of histone modifications in elevated IL-6 production in RA synovial fibroblasts (SFs). The level of histone H3 acetylation (H3ac) in the IL-6 promoter was significantly higher in RASFs than osteoarthritis (OA) SFs. This suggests that chromatin structure is in an open or loose state in the IL-6 promoter in RASFs. Furthermore, curcumin, a histone acetyltransferase (HAT) inhibitor, significantly reduced the level of H3ac in the IL-6 promoter, as well as IL-6 mRNA expression and IL-6 protein secretion by RASFs. Taken together, it is suggested that hyperacetylation of histone H3 in the IL-6 promoter induces the increase in IL-6 production by RASFs and thereby participates in the pathogenesis of RA. PMID:24513290

  2. DNA methylation regulates the expression of CXCL12 in rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Karouzakis, E; Rengel, Y; Jüngel, A; Kolling, C; Gay, R E; Michel, B A; Tak, P P; Gay, S; Neidhart, M; Ospelt, C

    2011-12-01

    In the search for specific genes regulated by DNA methylation in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), we investigated the expression of CXCL12 in synovial fibroblasts (SFs) and the methylation status of its promoter and determined its contribution to the expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). DNA was isolated from SFs and methylation was analyzed by bisulfite sequencing and McrBC assay. CXCL12 protein was quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay before and after treatment with 5-azacytidine. RASFs were transfected with CXCR7-siRNA and stimulated with CXCL12. Expression of MMPs was analyzed by real-time PCR. Basal expression of CXCL12 was higher in RASFs than osteoarthritis (OA) SFs. 5-azacytidine demethylation increased the expression of CXCL12 and reduced the methylation of CpG nucleotides. A lower percentage of CpG methylation was found in the CXCL12 promoter of RASFs compared with OASFs. Overall, we observed a significant correlation in the mRNA expression and the CXCL12 promoter DNA methylation. Stimulation of RASFs with CXCL12 increased the expression of MMPs. CXCR7 but not CXCR4 was expressed and functional in SFs. We show here that RASFs produce more CXCL12 than OASFs due to promoter methylation changes and that stimulation with CXCL12 activates MMPs via CXCR7 in SFs. Thereby we describe an endogenously activated pathway in RASFs, which promotes joint destruction. PMID:21753787

  3. Corroboration of in vivo cartilage pressures with implications for synovial joint tribology and osteoarthritis causation

    PubMed Central

    Morrell, Kjirste C.; Hodge, W. Andrew; Krebs, David E.; Mann, Robert W.

    2005-01-01

    Pressures on normal human acetabular cartilage have been collected from two implanted instrumented femoral head hemipros-theses. Despite significant differences in subjects' gender, morphology, mobility, and coordination, in vivo pressure measurements from both subjects covered similar ranges, with maximums of 5-6 MPa in gait, and as high as 18 MPa in other movements. Normalized for subject weight and height (nMPa), for free-speed walking the maximum pressure values were 25.2 for the female subject and 24.5 for the male subject. The overall maximum nMPa values were 76.2 for the female subject during rising from a chair at 11 months postoperative and 82.3 for the male subject while descending steps at 9 months postoperative. These unique in vivo data are consistent with corresponding cadaver experiments and model analyses. The collective results, in vitro data, model studies, and now corroborating in vivo data support the self-pressurizing “weeping” theory of synovial joint lubrication and provide unique information to evaluate the influence of in vivo pressure regimes on osteoarthritis causation and the efficacy of augmentations to, and substitutions for, natural cartilage. PMID:16203974

  4. Histamine and substance P in synovial fluid of patients with temporomandibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Li, W; Long, X; Jiang, S; Li, Y; Fang, W

    2015-05-01

    Although psychosocial factors and malocclusion are regarded as potential causes of temporomandibular disorders (TMD), the underlying pathogenesis is poorly understood. Recent studies suggest that substance P (SP), which has been associated with both psychosocial factors and malocclusion, and histamine, whose release can be induced by SP, may be implicated in the pathogenetic process. This study was designed to measure the concentration of histamine and SP in synovial fluid (SF) of both 38 patients with TMD and 11 healthy controls, and analyse the correlation between histamine and SP. Patients with TMD were divided into three subgroups: displaced disc with reduction (DDR), displaced disc without reduction (DDNR) and osteoarthritis (OA), with 10, 13, 15 subjects in every subgroup, respectively. After collecting SF samples, histamine and SP levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis (ELISA) and calibrated by bicinchoninic acid (BCA)-quantified protein level in the samples. The results suggest that OA group presented a significantly higher level of both histamine and SP than DDNR, DDR and healthy control groups. Histamine or SP in DDR and DDNR groups tend to be higher than control group, but no significance was found. Painful TMJs show higher histamine and SP than painless TMJs. Correlation analysis reveals a significant correlation between histamine and SP concentrations. Collectively, this study showed the changes of histamine and SP in the SF from different stages of TMD and found a significant correlation between the two substances, suggesting their potential implication in the pathogenesis of TMD.

  5. Converting hard copy documents for electronic dissemination

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, F.

    1994-12-31

    Since the advent of computer systems, the goal of a paperless office, and even a paperless society, has been pursued. While the normal paper flow in an organization is far from totally automated, particularly for items requiring signatures or authorizations, electronic information dissemination is becoming an almost simple task. The reasons for providing on-line documents are many and include faster and easier access for everyone, elimination of printing costs, reduction of wasted shelf and desk space, and the security of having a centrally-located, always up-to-date document. New computer software even provides the user with the ability to annotate documents and to have bookmarks so that the old scribbled-in and dog-eared manual can be replaced without loosing this `customizability`. Moreover, new hypermedia capabilities mean that documents can be read in a non-linear fashion and can include color figures and photographs, audio, and even animation sequences, capabilities which exceed those of paper. The proliferation of network-based information servers, coupled with the growth of the Internet, has enticed academic, governmental, and even commercial organizations to provide increasing numbers of documents and data bases in electronic form via the network, not just to internal staff, but to the public as well. Much of this information, which includes everything from mundane company procedures to spiffy marketing brochures, was previously published only in hard copy. Converting existing documents to electronic form and producing only electronic versions of new documents poses some interesting challenges to the maintainer or author.

  6. Disseminated intravascular coagulation in burn injury.

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Ippolito, Luigi; Cervellin, Gianfranco

    2010-06-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is a complex and multifaceted disorder characterized by the activation of coagulation and fibrinolytic pathways, consumption of coagulation factors, and depletion of coagulation regulatory proteins. The introduction into the circulation of cellular debris characterized by strong thromboplastic activity due to tissue factor exposition or release (in or from burned tissues), which can thereby activate extrinsic pathway of coagulation system and trigger massive thrombin generation when present in sufficient concentration, represents the most plausible biological explanation to support the development of intravascular coagulation in patients with burn injury. Severe burns left untreated might also lead to an immunological and inflammatory response (activation of the complement cascade), which can amplify fibrinolysis and blood clotting. Overall, the real prevalence of DIC in patients with burns is as yet unclear. Postmortem, retrospective, and even longitudinal investigations are in fact biased by several factors, such as the objective difficulty to establish whether DIC might have occurred as a primary complication of burns or rather as a consequence of other superimposed pathologies (e.g., sepsis, multiple organ failure), the different diagnostic criteria for assessing DIC, and the heterogeneity of the patient samples studied. Nevertheless, the current scientific evidence is consistent with the hypothesis that biochemical changes suggestive for DIC (hypercoagulability, hypo- and hyperfibrinolysis) are commonplace in patients with burn trauma, and their severity increases exponentially with the severity of injury. Overt DIC seems to occur especially in critically ill burn patients or in those with severe burns (up to third degree) and large involvement of body surface area, in whom an appropriate therapy might be effective to prevent the otherwise fulminant course. Although early prophylaxis with antithrombin concentrates

  7. Disseminated encephalomyelitis-like central nervous system neoplasm in childhood.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianhui; Bao, Xinhua; Fu, Na; Ye, Jintang; Li, Ting; Yuan, Yun; Zhang, Chunyu; Zhang, Yao; Zhang, Yuehua; Qin, Jiong; Wu, Xiru

    2014-08-01

    A malignant neoplasm in the central nervous system with diffuse white matter changes on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is rare in children. It could be misdiagnosed as acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. This report presents our experience based on 4 patients (3 male, 1 female; aged 7-13 years) whose MRI showed diffuse lesions in white matter and who were initially diagnosed with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. All of the patients received corticosteroid therapy. After brain biopsy, the patients were diagnosed with gliomatosis cerebri, primitive neuroectodermal tumor and central nervous system lymphoma. We also provide literature reviews and discuss the differentiation of central nervous system neoplasm from acute disseminated encephalomyelitis.

  8. [DISSEMINATED PERITONEAL LEYOMYOMATOSIS AFTER LAPAROSCOPIC MORCELLATION--A CASE REPORT].

    PubMed

    Gincheva, D; Nikolova, M

    2016-01-01

    We presented a case of 41-year-old patient underwent two laparoscopic Myomectomies and current laparotomy regarding suspection of necrotic leiomyoma. Intraoperative finding was suggestive of disseminated malignancy, but gefrir study showed benign smooth muscle tumors. The patient underwent total hysterectomy with right adnesectomy and total omentectomy. After histological and immunohistochemical study of the entire macroscopic material the final diagnosis was disseminated peritoneal leiomyomatosis. This disease is rare, but in recent years, in connection with the widespread introduction of laparoscopic surgery the reports of disseminated peritoneal leiomyomatosis occurring after laparoscopic morcellation, were frequent. PMID:27514144

  9. 77 FR 22792 - Non-Competitive Program Expansion Supplement To Revise, Update, and Disseminate Educational...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-17

    ... To Revise, Update, and Disseminate Educational Curricula Regarding Alzheimer's Disease and Related... Program Expansion Supplement To Revise, Update, and Disseminate Educational Curricula Regarding Alzheimer...) Program grantees to revise, update, and disseminate educational curricula regarding Alzheimer's...

  10. Osteochondritis dissecans affecting the temporo-mandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Olley, S F; Leopard, P J

    1978-07-01

    A case of a single loose body occurring in the temporo-mandibular joint is described. It is probable that this case represents the degenerative process of osteochondritis dissecans, a condition not previously described in this joint. The essential features of this condition are noted as a comparison to the condition of synovial chondromatosis.

  11. [Benign tumors and pseudotumors of temporo-mandibular joint: radiologic aspects].

    PubMed

    Izzo, L; Caputo, M; Buffone, A; Casullo, A; Perrone, A; Sassi, S; Impara, L; Luppi, G; Mazza, D; Marini, Marina

    2005-01-01

    Benign tumors and tumor-like lesions that involve temporo mandibular joint are very rare. Those more frequent are osteochondroma, chondroma, osteoma, pigmented villonodular synovitis and synovial chondromatosis. The Authors report six cases of patients affected by these pathologies in which imaging, such as TC, MRI and/or ortopantomography have been useful to have a diagnosis.

  12. Ceramide, a mediator of interleukin 1, tumour necrosis factor α, as well as Fas receptor signalling, induces apoptosis of rheumatoid arthritis synovial cells

    PubMed Central

    Mizushima, N.; Kohsaka, H.; Miyasaka, N.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To examine the effects of ceramide, which is a lipid second messenger of cell surface receptors, including tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα), interleukin 1 (IL1), and Fas receptors, on rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synovial cells.
METHODS—Synovial cells from RA patients and normal skin fibroblasts were cultured with cell permeable ceramide (C2-ceramide). Apoptosis was assessed by microscopic observation of morphological changes, nuclear staining, and DNA electrophoresis. DNA synthesis was examined by thymidine incorporation.
RESULTS—C2-ceramide induced reversible morphological changes of synovial cells such as cell rounding within four hours. Subsequently, irreversible nuclear changes characteristic to apoptosis were observed at 48 hours. DNA synthesis was not promoted. The addition of ceramide exerted similar effects on cultured dermal fibroblasts.
CONCLUSION—Ceramide induced apoptosis in RA synovial cells. Ceramide could be a second messenger specific for apoptosis of RA synovial cells.

 Keywords: ceramide; apoptosis; rheumatoid arthritis PMID:9797556

  13. Effect of synovial fluid, phosphate-buffered saline solution, and water on the dissolution and corrosion properties of CoCrMo alloys as used in orthopedic implants.

    PubMed

    Lewis, A C; Kilburn, M R; Papageorgiou, I; Allen, G C; Case, C P

    2005-06-15

    The corrosion and dissolution of high- and low-carbon CoCrMo alloys, as used in orthopedic joint replacements, were studied by immersing samples in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), water, and synovial fluid at 37 degrees C for up to 35 days. Bulk properties were analyzed with a fine ion beam microscope. Surface analyses by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Auger electron spectroscopy showed surprisingly that synovial fluid produced a thin oxide/hydroxide layer. Release of ions into solution from the alloy also followed an unexpected pattern where synovial fluid, of all the samples, had the highest Cr concentration but the lowest Co concentration. The presence of carbide inclusions in the alloy did not affect the corrosion or the dissolution mechanisms, although the carbides were a significant feature on the metal surface. Only one mechanism was recognized as controlling the thickness of the oxide/hydroxide interface. The analysis of the dissolved metal showed two mechanisms at work: (1) a protein film caused ligand-induced dissolution, increasing the Cr concentration in synovial fluid, and was explained by the equilibrium constants; (2) corrosion at the interface increased the Co in PBS. The effect of prepassivating the samples (ASTM F-86-01) did not always have the desired effect of reducing dissolution. The release of Cr into PBS increased after prepassivation. The metal-synovial fluid interface did not contain calcium phosphate as a deposit, typically found where samples are exposed to calcium rich bodily fluids.

  14. Ultrasound Assessment of Synovial Thickness of Some of the Metacarpophalangeal Joints of Hand in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients and the Normal Population

    PubMed Central

    Hussain Manik, Zuhudha; George, John; Sockalingam, Sargunan

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To compare ultrasound synovial thickness of the 2nd, 3rd and 4th metacarpophalangeal joints (MCPJ) in a group of patients with proven rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and a control group of normal individuals. Materials and Methods. This is a cross-sectional study comprising 30 rheumatoid arthritis patients and 30 healthy individuals. Ultrasound scans were performed at the dorsal side of 2nd, 3rd, and 4th MCPJ of both hands in RA patients and the healthy individuals. Synovial thickness was measured according to quantitative method. The synovial thickness of RA patients and healthy individuals was compared and statistical cut-off was identified. Results. Maximum synovial thickness was most often detected at the radial side of the 2nd MCPJ and 3rd MCPJ and ulnar side of the 4th MCPJ of both hands which is significantly higher (p < 0.05) in RA patients compared to healthy individuals. With high specificity (96%) and sensitivity (90%) the optimum cut-off value to distinguish RA patients and healthy individuals' synovial thickness differs for the radial side of the 2nd and 3rd MCPJ and ulnar side of the 4th MCPJ. Conclusion. Patients with early RA appear to exhibit a characteristic pattern of synovitis which shows radial side predominance in the 2nd and 3rd MCPJ and ulnar side in the 4th MCPJ. PMID:27190682

  15. Communicating Research to Small Drinking Water Systems: Dissemination by Researchers

    EPA Science Inventory

    This talk discusses the challenges of disseminating research relevant to small systems. The presentation discusses efforts by the U.S. EPA’s Office of Research and Development to effectively communicating drinking water information. In particular, communication approaches ...

  16. Modeling the dissemination and uptake of clinical trials results

    PubMed Central

    Rosas, Scott R.; Schouten, Jeffrey T.; Cope, Marie T.; Kagan, Jonathan M.

    2013-01-01

    A select set of highly cited publications from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials Networks was used to illustrate the integration of time interval and citation data, modeling the progression, dissemination, and uptake of primary research findings. Following a process marker approach, the pace of initial utilization of this research was measured as the time from trial conceptualization, development and implementation, through results dissemination and uptake. Compared to earlier studies of clinical research, findings suggest that select HIV/AIDS trial results are disseminated and utilized relatively rapidly. Time-based modeling of publication results as they meet specific citation milestones enabled the observation of points at which study results were present in the literature summarizing the evidence in the field. Evaluating the pace of clinical research, results dissemination, and knowledge uptake in synthesized literature can help establish realistic expectations for the time course of clinical trials research and their relative impact toward influencing clinical practice. PMID:24808630

  17. Tenosynovial Osteochondromatosis of the Flexor Hallucis Longus in a Division I Tennis Player.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Timothy W; Hogrefe, Christopher P; Hall, Mederic M; Amendola, Annunziato

    2015-11-01

    Tenosynovial (extra-articular) chondromatosis (TC) is a condition characterized by the cartilaginous proliferation of synovial cells derived from the synovial lining of bursa and tendon sheaths. These lesions are often multinodular and most commonly present with complaints of swelling or pain. Treatment of TC primarily entails surgical excision. There are no known reports of TC in collegiate athletes. We present a case of TC in a Division I tennis player. PMID:25514138

  18. Tenosynovial Osteochondromatosis of the Flexor Hallucis Longus in a Division I Tennis Player.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Timothy W; Hogrefe, Christopher P; Hall, Mederic M; Amendola, Annunziato

    2015-11-01

    Tenosynovial (extra-articular) chondromatosis (TC) is a condition characterized by the cartilaginous proliferation of synovial cells derived from the synovial lining of bursa and tendon sheaths. These lesions are often multinodular and most commonly present with complaints of swelling or pain. Treatment of TC primarily entails surgical excision. There are no known reports of TC in collegiate athletes. We present a case of TC in a Division I tennis player.

  19. Disseminated histoplasmosis in a Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris).

    PubMed

    Keller, Dominique L; Steinberg, Howard; Sladky, Kurt K

    2011-12-01

    Disseminated infection with Histoplasma capsulatum was diagnosed in a 7-yr-old female Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris). Clinical signs were nonspecific with the exception of brief periods of tachypnea for 5 days prior to death. H. capsulatum organisms were found in the lungs, tracheobronchial lymph nodes, and liver. Diagnosis was confirmed by tracheal wash, urine H. capsulatum enzyme immunoassay, and necropsy results. This report represents the first published account of disseminated histoplasmosis in a tiger.

  20. Acute disseminated toxoplasmosis in a juvenile cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus).

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Christopher; Stidworthy, Mark F

    2007-09-01

    A juvenile cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) died with rapidly progressive pyrexia, tachypnea, abdominal effusion, and hepatomegaly. Postmortem examination revealed lesions consistent with acute disseminated infection with Toxoplasma gondii. The presence of this organism was confirmed in multiple organs by immunohistochemistry and polymerase chain reaction. To the best of our knowledge, we propose this to be the first reported case of primary acute disseminated toxoplasmosis in a cheetah.