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Sample records for disseminated synovial chondromatosis

  1. Synovial chondromatosis in raptors.

    PubMed

    Stone, E G; Walser, M M; Redig, P T; Rings, B; Howard, D J

    1999-01-01

    Fourteen raptors, consisting of 13 great horned owls (Bubo virginianus) and one red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis), from central and north central Minnesota, western Wisconsin, and eastern South Dakota (USA) were admitted to a raptor rehabilitation center between June 1992 and June 1995, with perisynovial and synovial chondromatosis affecting multiple joints. Birds were severely debilitated primarily due to loss of shoulder motion. The etiology of these lesions in raptors is unknown.

  2. Glenohumeral Synovial Chondromatosis.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Robert

    2016-09-01

    A 20-year-old, right hand-dominant man reported to physical therapy with a history of deep anterior left shoulder pain. Radiographs, which were obtained after physical therapy was initiated, and subsequent magnetic resonance imaging showed the presence of numerous radio-opaque loose bodies that followed bone signal characteristics dispersed throughout the glenohumeral joint, leading to a diagnosis of synovial chondromatosis. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(9):809. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.0414.

  3. Uncalcified Synovial Chondromatosis in the Pisotriquetral Joint

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyo-Kon; Lee, Gi-Jun; Yu, Sun-O; Kim, Jung-Rae

    2015-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis is a rare lesion in the wrist, but some cases in the distal radioulnar joint have been reported and previous case reports emphasize joint calcifications, shown on preoperative plain radiographs. We report an extremely uncommon case of synovial chondromatosis in the pisotriquetral joint, in which radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging did not demonstrate apparent calcified bodies. In our case, for the accurate diagnosis and treatment, surgical exploration of the joint and synovectomy with removal of loose bodies was performed. PMID:26330969

  4. Synovial chondromatosis in a great horned owl (Bubo virginianus).

    PubMed

    Howard, M O; Nieves, M A; Miles, K G

    1996-04-01

    A case of synovial chondromatosis in a great horned owl (Bubo virginianus) was found in June 1993. In radiographs of bilateral swelling of the scapulohumeral joint we observed numerous mineralized foci in the soft tissue. The foci were identified by light microscopy as cartilaginous metaplasia. This is the first report of synovial chondromatosis in an owl.

  5. Extra-articular Synovial Chondromatosis Eroding and Penetrating the Acromion

    PubMed Central

    El Rassi, George; Matta, Jihad; Hijjawi, Ayman; Khair, Ousama Abou; Fahs, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis of the shoulder is an uncommon disorder. It usually affects the glenohumeral joint and is characterized by metaplasia of the synovium leading to the formation of osteochondral loose bodies. Few cases of extra-articular subacromial synovial chondromatosis involving the rotator cuff tendon have been reported in the literature. The treatment of previously reported cases consisted of open bursectomy and removal of loose bodies. We report a case of subacromial synovial chondromatosis without rotator cuff involvement but with severe erosion and fracture of the acromion. Treatment consisted of shoulder arthroscopy to remove all loose bodies, total bursectomy, and debridement of the acromion. Potential benefits of arthroscopy were also evaluated. PMID:26697302

  6. Recurrence of synovial chondromatosis of the Hoffa's body.

    PubMed

    Osti, Leonardo; Papalia, Rocco; Del Buono, Angelo; Denaro, Vincenzo; Maffulli, Nicola

    2009-12-01

    Synovial chondromatosis of Hoffa's body is uncommon. Recurrences usually result from incomplete removal of the loose bodies or diseased synovium at the initial surgery. We report a patient with synovial chondromatosis localized into the Hoffa's body who presented with anterior knee pain and mechanical symptoms. At the first arthroscopy, all pathological tissue was removed. At 1-year follow-up, clinical and radiographic examinations were normal. Symptoms recurred at 3 years, when a bony mass in the Hoffa's body was evident on MRI. The mass was removed through a mini-arthrotomy. Histology excluded malignancy. At 10-year follow-up, the patient remained free of symptoms. Synovial chondromatosis can occur with unusual patterns of recurrence. The growth of a large size mass confined to fat pad without intra-articular involvement does not allow to exclude the diagnosis of recurrent synovial chondromatosis.

  7. Primary synovial chondromatosis of the subtalar joint: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Derek Stensby, J; Fox, Michael G; Kwon, Michael S; Caycedo, Francisco J; Rahimi, Asal

    2017-09-20

    Primary synovial chondromatosis is a rare benign condition of uncertain etiology manifested by synovial proliferation. In the radiology literature, there is only 1 prior case report of primary synovial chondromatosis involving the subtalar joint with only partial description of the imaging appearance. We present a 28-year-old female with primary synovial chondromatosis of the subtalar joint and conduct a literature review of the imaging features of primary synovial chondromatosis presenting in the feet.

  8. Synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Reyes Macías, Juan Francisco; Sánchez Prieto, Martín

    2007-01-01

    Synovial Chondromatosis (SC) is a disease whose etiology is unknown, can be defined as a benign synovial process characterized by the formation of metaplastic cartilaginous nodes inside connective tissue of articular surfaces, is considered an active metaplastic phenomenon better than a neoplastic process; it presents a greater preference to affect women who constitute almost 70% of reported cases, the age range is wide and oscillates between 18-75 years (average 44.6 years). Between the main clinical findings are: pain, crackle, volume augmentation and a limited buccal opening. SC is an unusual state and the reports in the English literature are no more than 75 cases, only 66 of those where histologically verified, most of those were affecting great joints like hip, knee and shoulder, but if SC is not frequent in this sites, is even more infrequent on temporomandibular joint. The aim of this paper is to report a clinical case and at the same time to realize a brief review of the literature.

  9. Malignant transformation in synovial chondromatosis of the knee?

    PubMed

    Hallam, P; Ashwood, N; Cobb, J; Fazal, A; Heatley, W

    2001-10-01

    Although it has been reported, malignant transformation of synovial chondromatosis is rare. We report a case of malignant transformation of synovial chondromatosis in a knee to a low-grade chondrosarcoma, which was treated with synovial excision and total knee replacement. We also present a literature review of the subject. The case illustrates that malignant transformation should be suspected in chronic cases with a sudden exacerbation of symptoms and that interpretation of histology in cartilage lesions is difficult. It also demonstrates that even when guided biopsy techniques are used, the sampling error of a needle biopsy in any large lesion is unavoidable.

  10. Endoscopic Resection of the Lateral Ankle Bursa With Synovial Chondromatosis.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-06-01

    Bursal chondromatosis is synovial chondromatosis of the bursae. It is a rare disease entity that can involve the adventitial bursa of the lateral ankle. Complete synovectomy, removal of loose bodies, and bursectomy comprise the treatment of choice. Detailed preoperative radiologic assessment and surgical planning are the keys to success. Any accompanying synovial chondromatosis of the ankle or subtalar joint or tenosynovial chondromatosis of the peroneal tendon sheath should be treated together with the bursectomy. Endoscopic bursectomy can be performed through the bursal portal. The proximal and distal peroneal tendoscopy portals serve as viewing portals. The resection of the diseased tissues should be performed in a step-by-step zonal manner. Complete synovectomy and removal of loose bodies should be performed before bursectomy. Internal drainage of the bursal sac into the peroneal tendon sheath may be indicated if the sac is adherent to the skin. It should only be performed after complete synovectomy and removal of loose bodies.

  11. Intermetatarsal bursa primary synovial chondromatosis: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Trevino, Manuel; Laks, Shaked; Kafchinski, Lisa; Sundarakumar, Dinesh K; Smith, Crysela M

    2017-09-15

    Primary synovial chondromatosis is a benign neoplastic process, occurring mostly in large joints, more rarely in tendon sheaths, and extremely uncommonly in bursae. We describe a patient with primary synovial chondromatosis arising in the fourth intermetatarsal bursa. Knowledge of the bursal anatomy of the forefoot, and of characteristic imaging findings and the pathogenesis of synovial chondromatosis, is essential in including this uncommon entity in the differential when occurring in unusual locations.

  12. Tenosynovial (Extra-articular) Chondromatosis of the Extensor Digitorum Longus Tendon and Synovial Chondromatosis of the Ankle: Treated by Extensor Digitorum Longus Tendoscopy and Ankle Arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-10-01

    Synovial chondromatosis is a rare pathology in the foot and ankle region. We present a case of concomitant tenosynovial chondromatosis of the extensor digitorum longus tendon and synovial chondromatosis of the ankle, which was successfully treated by extensor digitorum tendon tendoscopy and ankle arthroscopy. Therapeutic, Level IV: Case study. © 2014 The Author(s).

  13. Diagnosis and treatment of synovial chondromatosis of the TMJ: a clinical case

    PubMed Central

    Valentini, Valentino; Arangio, Paolo; Egidi, Sara; Capriotti, Marco; Vellone, Valentino; Costrechini, Marco; Boschi, Giulio; Cascone, Piero; Calafati, Vincenzo; Torre, Umberto; Ricciardi, Irma

    2013-01-01

    Summary Synovial chondromatosis is a rare, benign, chronic, progressive and proliferative lesion that usually affects large joints. This disease is characterized by the development of cartilaginous nodules within the space of synovial joints, tendon sheaths or cases; the nodules subsequently degrade, detach and form free-floating, calcified bodies within the joint space. In 1933, Axhausen described the first case of synovial chondromatosis affecting the temporomandibular joint. The aetiology still remains unknown, but a history of trauma and inflammation is often found. Clinical symptoms of chondromatosis affecting the TMJ are often characterized by swelling, pain, headache, crepitation, malocclusion and joint dysfunction. The big challenge concerning synovial chondromatosis is to suspect and establish a correct diagnosis. These nonspecific initial signs and symptoms may mimic other nonspecific TMJ’s diseases and can easily lead to a delay in diagnosis or a misdiagnosis. Here we present a case of synovial chondromatosis of the TMJ and the appropriate diagnostic and treatment performed. PMID:24611093

  14. Giant Solitary Synovial Chondromatosis of the Temporomandibular Joint with Intracranial Extension

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Salú, José L.; Lázaro, Rafael; Aldasoro, José; Gonzalez-Darder, José M.

    1998-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis are rare entities but are well-described lesions in the literature that can affect many joint areas of the body. A case of tumoral synovial chondromatosis involving the temporomandibular joint with intracranial extension through mandibular fossa is reported. As long as there was significant infratemporal and extradural invasion of the middle and posterior fossa, a transtemporal and infratemporal approach was performed and total removal of the lesions was achieved. A brief review of skull base synovial chondromatosis is presented. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9Figure 10Figure 11 PMID:17171059

  15. Posterior interosseous nerve palsy caused by synovial chondromatosis arising in the annular periradial recesses of the elbow.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Hiroyuki; Futani, Hiroyuki; Fukunaga, Satoru; Okuno, Hiroaki; Kano, Masao; Tsukamoto, Yoshitane; Tanaka, Juichi; Yoshiya, Shinichi

    2011-04-01

    We present a rare case report of a patient who presented with posterior interosseous nerve palsy caused by synovial chondromatosis. Synovial chondromatosis arising in the annular periradial recesses of the elbow joint was detected, and the mass developed two major portions constricted with the annular ligament. After surgical resection, posterior interosseous nerve palsy fully recovered and there was no recurrence of the lesion of synovial chondromatosis.

  16. Synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint with calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystal deposition disease (pseudogout)

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, Y; Nomura, J; Nakanishi, K; Yanase, S; Kato, H; Tagawa, T

    2012-01-01

    This report describes a very rare case of synovial chondromatosis with deposition of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystals (pseudogout) in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of a 46-year-old male patient. Synovial chondromatosis is a non-neoplastic disease characterized by metaplasia of the connective tissue leading to chondrogenesis in the synovial membrane. Pseudogout is an inflammatory disease of the joints caused by the deposition of CPPD, producing similar symptoms to those observed in gout but not hyperuricaemia. Both diseases commonly affect the knee, hip and elbow joints, but rarely affect the TMJ. PMID:23166363

  17. Advanced imaging findings and computer-assisted surgery of suspected synovial chondromatosis in the temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Hohlweg-Majert, Bettina; Metzger, Marc C; Böhm, Joachim; Muecke, Thomas; Schulze, Dirk

    2008-11-01

    Synovial chondromatosis of the joint occurs mainly in teenagers and young adults. Only 3% of these neoplasms are located in the head and neck region. Synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint is therefore a very rare disorder. Therefore, developing a working, histological confirmation is required for differential diagnosis. In this case series, the outcome of histological investigation and imaging techniques are compared. Based on clinical symptoms, five cases of suspected synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint are presented. In each of the subjects, the diagnosis was confirmed by histology. Specific imaging features for each case are described. The tomography images were compared with the histological findings. All patients demonstrated preauricular swelling, dental midline deviation, and limited mouth opening. Computer-assisted surgery was performed. Histology disclosed synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint in four cases. The other case was found to be a developmental disorder of the tympanic bone. The diagnosis of synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint can only be based on histology. Clinical symptoms are too general and the available imaging techniques only show nonspecific tumorous destruction, infiltration, and/or residual calcified bodies, they are only for advanced cases. A rare developmental disorder of the tympanic bone--persistence of foramen of Huschke--has to be differentiated.

  18. Patellar Subluxation With Early-Phase Synovial Chondromatosis of the Knee.

    PubMed

    Bashaireh, Khaldoon M

    2016-01-01

    Primary synovial chondromatosis is a rare, benign, monoarticular disease process that affects the synovial membrane of the joint, the synovial sheath, or the bursa around the joint. The etiology is unknown, but it has been associated with trauma in some cases. Although it is a benign lesion, if left untreated, it may lead to early secondary osteoarthritis of the joint. The knee joint is affected in 50% to 65% of cases, followed by the elbow and the hip. This article reports a 30-year-old active woman who presented to the author's clinic with a large infrapatellar mass that caused lateral subluxation of the patella, swelling, and episodic pain with crepitations 14 months after direct trauma to the knee. Clinical examination, magnetic resonance imaging, and arthroscopy revealed a large infrapatellar mass causing lateral subluxation of the patella with no loose bodies. Hoffa's disease, para-articular osteochondroma, and early-phase synovial chondromatosis were considered in the differential diagnosis. The histopathologic and clinical features were consistent with early synovial chondromatosis. The patient underwent local excision of the mass through a medial parapatellar arthrotomy. At 5 years of follow-up, she had no recurrence of the lesion or progression of the disease. Early diagnosis of synovial chondromatosis with local excision offers a reliable cure. However, long-term follow-up is advised because of the high recurrence rates as well as the risk of metaplastic transformation.

  19. Synovial chondromatosis of the lumbar spine with compressive myelopathy: a case report with review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Abdelwahab, Ibrahim Fikry; Contractor, Daniel; Bianchi, Stefano; Hermann, George; Hoch, Benjamin

    2008-09-01

    Synovial chondromatosis has been rarely reported to occur in the spine with only one case found in the lumbar spine. We describe another case of synovial chondromatosis in the lumbar spine in a 41-year-old man who presented with compressive myelopathy. The tumor was located in the left ventrolateral corner of the epidural space just below the L(4)-L(5) intervertebral space. Besides being extremely rare, our case was unusual in that the juxtaposed facet joint was radiologically normal.

  20. Synovial Chondromatosis of Dorsal Spine: Case Report of Rare Pathological Entity and Review

    PubMed Central

    Lokanath, Yadhu K.

    2016-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis is an uncommon benign condition of metaplastic and focal formation of cartilage in the intimal layer of synovial membrane of joints with extremely low risk of malignant potential. Disease process is typically monoarticular predominantly involving large joints and spinal involvement being a very rare event. We report 31-year-old male patient who presented with history of low backache, left lower limb pain, difficulty in micturition since 8 months and difficulty in walking since 2 months .Magnetic resonance imaging of spine revealed D10-11 extradural lesion arising from left facet joint. Lesion was excised completely by posterior approach with resolution of symptoms. Literature reveals fourteen cases of spinal variant of synovial chondromatosis which has been published and this report represents the fifteenth case. PMID:28127377

  1. Synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint: a clinical, radiological and histological study.

    PubMed

    Martín-Granizo, Rafael; Sánchez, Juan Jesús; Jorquera, Manuela; Ortega, Luis

    2005-01-01

    Synovial chondromatosis (SC) is a cartilaginous metaplasy of the mesenchymal remnants of the synovial tissue of the joints. It is characterized by the formation of cartilaginous nodules in the synovium and inside the articular space (loose bodies). SC mainly affects to big synovial joints such as the knee and the elbow, being uncommon the onset within the TMJ, where 75 cases have been published. The main symptoms are pain, inflammation, limitation of the movements of the jaw and crepitation. Different methods of diagnosis include panoramic radiograph, CT, MR and arthroscopy of the TMJ. We report a new case of unilateral SC of the TMJ, including diagnostic images, treatment performed and histological analysis.

  2. A rare case of synovial chondromatosis of the inferior TMJ compartment. Diagnosis and treatment aspect.

    PubMed

    Sozzi, Davide; Bocchialini, Gabriele; Novelli, Giorgio; Valente, Maria Gabriella; Moltrasio, Francesca; Bozzetti, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Synovial Chondromatosis (SC) is a rare, benign non neoplastic arthopathy characterized by the metaplastic development of cartilaginous nodules within the synovial membrane. In only 3% of all cases does it affect the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and cases that arise from the lower compartment are rarely found in literature. The aim of this paper is to report a new case of SC of the inferior TMJ compartment with the description of the clinical, therapeutic and histopathological findings. This article presents a 68-year-old woman with preauricular swelling on the right side, pain, crepitus and limited joint motion. This patient was evaluated by preoperative clinical manifestation, CT scan and MR images. Both showed multiple, calcified loose bodies in the inferior compartment. Based on these images as well as the patient's signs and symptoms, a surgical intervention was performed. A good functional recovery with no signs of recurrence at 36 months of follow up was obtained. Among cases of synovial chondromatosis in literature, only twelve originating in the lower compartment have been reported, this one included. In all the cases treated for SC in the lower compartment, both in literature and in our case report, surgical treatment led to healing.

  3. A rare case of synovial chondromatosis of the inferior TMJ compartment. Diagnosis and treatment aspect

    PubMed Central

    Sozzi, Davide; Bocchialini, Gabriele; Novelli, Giorgio; Valente, Maria Gabriella; Moltrasio, Francesca; Bozzetti, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Summary Aim Synovial Chondromatosis (SC) is a rare, benign non neoplastic arthopathy characterized by the metaplastic development of cartilaginous nodules within the synovial membrane. In only 3% of all cases does it affect the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and cases that arise from the lower compartment are rarely found in literature. The aim of this paper is to report a new case of SC of the inferior TMJ compartment with the description of the clinical, therapeutic and histopathological findings. Case report This article presents a 68-year-old woman with preauricular swelling on the right side, pain, crepitus and limited joint motion. This patient was evaluated by preoperative clinical manifestation, CT scan and MR images. Both showed multiple, calcified loose bodies in the inferior compartment. Based on these images as well as the patient’s signs and symptoms, a surgical intervention was performed. A good functional recovery with no signs of recurrence at 36 months of follow up was obtained. Conclusion Among cases of synovial chondromatosis in literature, only twelve originating in the lower compartment have been reported, this one included. In all the cases treated for SC in the lower compartment, both in literature and in our case report, surgical treatment led to healing. PMID:26941895

  4. Extra- and intra-articular synovial chondromatosis and malignant transformation to chondrosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Bertrana, C; Durall, I; Rial, J M; Franch, J; Fontecha, P; Ramis, A

    2010-01-01

    Intra- and extra-articular primary synovial chondromatosis (SC) was observed in a five-year-old, entire male German Shepherd. Thousands of small cartilaginous nodules were removed from the stifle joint as well as from several adjacent muscles. Diagnosis of SC was established based on clinical, radiographic and biopsy results. The owner declined to have a new surgery performed for complete nodule removal and partial synovectomy. Nine months after the initial presentation, a proximal pathological intra- articular tibial fracture was observed and malignant transformation to chondrosarcoma was diagnosed after limb amputation. No metastasis was observed after 1.5 years of follow-up.

  5. Pediatric Subtalar Joint Synovial Chondromatosis Report of a Case and an Up-to-date Review.

    PubMed

    Saibaba, Balaji; Sudesh, Pebam; Govindan, Gokul; Prakash, Mahesh

    2015-09-01

    Synovial chondromatosis is a rare, usually benign disorder affecting the population predominantly in the third and fourth decades of life and mainly involving the large weightbearing joints of the lower limb-the knees and the hip. In this report, we highlight an unusual pediatric clinical presentation of synovial osteochondromatosis involving the subtalar joint and discuss its surgical management; we also provide a comprehensive up-to-date literature review of the disorder. This patient was successfully treated with en masse surgical excision. He has been doing well, with complete pain relief and improved range of motion at 1-year follow-up. An exceptional involvement of the subtalar joint and an unusual presentation in the pediatric age group makes this case unique.

  6. A systematic literature review of synovial chondromatosis and pigmented villonodular synovitis of the hip.

    PubMed

    Startzman, Ashley; Collins, Devin; Carreira, Dominic

    2016-11-01

    Benign synovial diseases of the hip including Synovial Chondromatosis (SC) and Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis (PVNS) are devastating diseases. Initially, patients present with hip pain unrelieved by conservative measures. The diagnosis of PVNS and SC are often delayed, leading to progression of joint damage. The purpose of this review is to present the latest on the diagnosis, management, and prognosis of SC and PVNS of the hip. An extensive systematic search of MEDLINE and PUBMED Databases was performed. Data parameters were set from 2005 to present day with set inclusion criteria. Systematic reviews were excluded. 427 abstracts were identified, with 12 articles meeting all inclusion criteria. Eight studies focused on SC, and 5 on PVNS. 233 patients with SC of the hip and 98 patients with PVNS of the hip were identified, a total of 331 patients. Benign Synovial disorders of the hip are rare. In patients with chronic hip pain secondary to benign synovial disorders, early diagnosis and surgical intervention demonstrate good outcomes, and patients may benefit due to prevention of morbidity from further joint destruction. There is no clear consensus between higher successes through open versus arthroscopic surgical debridement. In the final phase of benign synovial disorders of the hip, THA of different types based on the patient's age should be considered.

  7. Synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint: report of 2 patients whose joints were reconstructed with costochondral graft and alloplastic prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Goizueta-Adame, Carlos C; González-García, Raúl

    2010-07-01

    Synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is rare, and only about 100 cases have been reported. Among these, intracranial extension was reported in only 9. Although some patterns of clinical presentation and evolution, synovial histological changes, and diagnosis by computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging have been described, there is little information about surgical treatment. We report two new cases that focus particularly on reconstruction with costochondral graft and alloplastic TMJ prosthesis. We report what is to our knowledge the youngest reported case of synovial chondromatosis of the TMJ, which is also the tenth reported case with extension into the middle cranial fossa. Copyright 2009 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Synovial Chondromatosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... your doctor may order a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan or computerized tomography (CT) scan to better evaluate ... loose bodies are barely visible (arrows). ( Right ) This MRI scan shows a cross-section image of the same ...

  9. Synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Reed, Lucas S; Foster, Michael D; Hudson, John W

    2013-10-01

    Synovial chondromatosis (SC) is a pathologic condition in which mesenchymal tissue rests in a given synovial membrane undergo a metaplastic process, ultimately producing and secreting cartilaginous bodies into the joint space. It is more commonly discussed in the orthopedic literature, since the axial skeleton is the most frequently affected. Although rare, it does occur within the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), with approximately 100 cases previously being described. Within the TMJ, its presentation can be variable, though most cases will show it to be unilateral with fixed and/or loose cartilaginous bodies confined to the superior joint space. Clinically, patients may present with symptoms similar to that of an internal derangement disorder, including pain, clicking, tenderness, functional limitations, and swelling. A thorough history and physical examination, along with proper radiographic examination, are paramount in properly diagnosing SC. Treatment options consist of arthroscopy, arthrotomy with synovectomy, excision of cartilaginous bodies, and possible discectomy. In the current paper, the authors describe the presentation, diagnosis, and surgical management of a SC case involving the right TMJ in a 31-year-old Caucasian female.

  10. Synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint: a case description with systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Guarda-Nardini, L; Piccotti, F; Ferronato, G; Manfredini, D

    2010-08-01

    Synovial chondromatosis (SC) of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) is a rare disease characterized by the presence of calcified loose bodies within the joint, and few systematically gathered data are available about its epidemiology. The aim of this paper was to describe a case of SC of the TMJ, and to carry out a systematic review of the literature on epidemiology over the past decade. A case of a 53-year-old female with the classical triad of signs and symptoms of SC (pain, swelling, restricted mouth opening) is described. A systematic search in the National Library of Medicine's PubMed Database was performed. 155 cases were described in 103 publications. Most dealt with single case reports. Females are affected more than males with a 2.5:1 ratio and the mean age of patients was about 46 years. Late diagnosis is common and in most cases more than 2 years elapsed between symptom onset and surgical intervention. Open TMJ surgery is the treatment of choice, since less invasive techniques, such as arthroscopy, allowed complete removal of the loose bodies only in about half of cases. A single recurrence was described, confirming the benign nature of the disease. Copyright 2010 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Synovial chondromatosis of the right side temporomandibular joint extending to the middle cranial fossa: A case report with 7-year postoperative follow up and expression of a biomarker of cell proliferative activity

    PubMed Central

    Yoshitake, Hiroyuki; Kayamori, Kou; Wake, So; Sato, Fumiaki; Kino, Koji; Harada, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Synovial chondromatosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) with cranial extension is rare. Here, we report 7-year follow-up of a case with immunohistochemical examination of cell proliferative activity. Presentation of case The patient was a 72-year-old man. Severe bone resorption of the glenoid fossa was apparent on CT images. Pathological findings by biopsy led to diagnosis of synovial chondromatosis of the right side TMJ. Extirpation of the tumor was performed via temporopreauricular incision under general anesthesia. PCNA expression was examined by immunohistochemical analysis. The lesion had penetrated into the middle cranial fossa, but the cranial dura mater was intact. Expression of PCNA was confirmed. Discussion The PCNA expression suggested that growth activity caused expansion of the lesion to the skull base. Conclusion We were able to follow up this case for a long period without recurrence postoperatively. PMID:26855075

  12. Imaging Characteristics of Tenosynovial and Bursal Chondromatosis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    mass was the most common clinical presentation (53%). Lesion locations included the foot (n=8), hand (n=6), shoulder (n=3), knee (n=2), ankle (n=2) and...was the most common clinical presentation (53%). Lesion locations included the foot (n=8), hand (n=6), shoulder (n=3) knee (n=2), ankle (n=2) and one...Introduction Primary synovial chondromatosis represents an uncommon benign neoplastic process with formation of hyaline cartilage nodules in the subsynovial

  13. Melorheostosis mimicking synovial osteochondromatosis.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, Vibhor; Chhabra, Avneesh; Samet, Jonathan D

    2014-01-01

    Melorheostosis is an uncommon, sporadic, sclerosing bone lesion that may affect the adjacent soft tissues. It has been associated with many entities such as osteopoikilosis, soft tissue vascular malformations, bone and soft tissue tumors, nephrotic syndrome, segmental limb contractures, osteosarcoma, desmoid tumor, and mesenteric fibromatosis. Synovial osteochondromatosis is a benign neoplasia of the hyaline cartilage presenting as nodules in the subsynovial tissue of a joint or tendon sheath. The intra-articular extension of melorheostosis mimicking synovial osteochondromatosis has not been reported before. In this article, the authors describe an unusual case mimicking synovial chondromatosis arising as a result of melorheostosis and their characteristic imaging findings.

  14. Arthroscopic management of chondromatosis of the elbow: a case report.

    PubMed

    Wzietek, Bogdan; Frańczuk, Bogusław

    2002-06-30

    Background. This article describes a case of chondromatosis of the elbow in a 33-year-old male patient. An arthroscopic method was used to remove multiple loose bodies from the joint.
    Case history. The patient complained of pain in the right elbow. He presented with edema in the elbow joint, pain during movement, occasional slippage, and a 300 functional reduction in elbow extension.
    Procedure. After the arthroscope was introduced into the joint, numerous loose bodies were detected, covered with cartilage, pale pink synovial membrane with hyperthropied villi. The cartilage of the joint surfaces bent slighty under pressure: however, there was no sign of decay, destruction, or deep deficits. Using a punch and Pean forceps we removed ca. 20 loose chondral and condro-osseous bodies ranging in diameter from 0,3 to 2,0 cm.
    Outcome. There were no post-surgical complications. After several days the patient was discharged. Within a week he recovered a full range of motion in the joint and no pain. The patient continues to work in a job demanding physical exertion and plays volleyball.
    Conclusion. Arthroscopy of the elbow is a good solution for the problem of loose bodies in the elbow joint, especially when they occur in both sections of the joint, where classical surgical techniques require two routes of surgical access or two-phase surgery.

  15. Chondromatosis of the Temporomandibular Joint as a Consequence of Persistent Long-Lasting Joint Dysfunction: Late Diagnosis of a Rare Occurrence.

    PubMed

    Paparo, Francesco; Massarelli, Mauro; Cordeschi, Riccardo; Sciannameo, Vito; Spallaccia, Fabrizio

    2016-10-01

    The authors present a rare patient of right synovial chondromatosis (SC) of the temporomandibular joint in which diagnosis was late and delay led to SC extension to the cranial base. Synovial chondromatosis is a rare benign disorder characterized by multiple cartilaginous free-floating nodules originated from the synovial membrane of large articular joints of the body. Differential diagnosis is with neoplasm and radical surgical removal is essential. The patient came to the authors' observation complaining about long-lasting temporomandibular joint dysfunction. The patient already underwent either functional or medical therapy in times without any improvement. Clinical examination showed limited mouth opening and swelling of the right preauricolar region with no signs of facial nerve palsy and without paresthesia or hearing loss. No history of recent trauma was recorded. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a mucous-like hyperintense mass with small hypointense spots inside. A preoperative computed tomography scan was performed and showed a mass extending from the superior aspect of the temporomandibular joint to the glenoid fossa, which was partially eroded. The patient underwent either open joint surgery or arthroscopy of the superior joint space and a large number of chondrocytes were removed. No complications were recorded postoperatively and the patient completely recovered after 6 months. Histology confirmed the diagnosis of synovial condromatosys of the right temporomandibular joint.

  16. Synovial osteolipoma.

    PubMed

    Sistla, Radha; Satya, Josyula Venkata; Afroz, Tameem

    2016-01-01

    Intraarticular synovial osteolipoma is an extremely rare tumor. Only two cases have been reported earlier to the best of our knowledge. It is a rare histological variant of lipoma, which contains mature lamellar bone. The largest tumor reported so far in the joint is 3 cm × 4 cm. Knee is a most common site. We report a large osteolipoma measuring 12 cm × 10 cm in the knee.

  17. Intra articular synovial sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Sistla, Radha; Tameem, Afroz; Vidyasagar, J V S

    2010-01-01

    Synovial sarcoma is a soft tissue neoplasm with a characteristic biphasic pattern. Incidence in soft tissues is 5-10%. Intra articularly synovial sarcoma is extremely rare. Fewer than 5% of all synovial sarcomas arise within the joint space. We report a case of intra articular synovial sarcoma in a young male who presented as internal derangement of the knee.

  18. Elbow Synovial Fold Syndrome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-01

    Density MR with arrows The clinical differential diagnosis of plica syndrome includes lateral epicondylitis (aka tennis elbow ), loose bodies... Elbow Synovial Fold Syndrome Radiology Corner Elbow Synovial Fold Syndrome Guarantor: CPT Amit Sanghi, USA, MC FS Contributors: CPT Amit...the case of a 17 year old female with elbow synovial fold syndrome (aka plica synovialis). The etiology is thought to be related to repetitive

  19. Utility of synovial biopsy

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Synovial biopsies, gained either by blind needle biopsy or minimally invasive arthroscopy, offer additional information in certain clinical situations where routine assessment has not permitted a certain diagnosis. In research settings, synovial histology and modern applications of molecular biology increase our insight into pathogenesis and enable responses to treatment with new therapeutic agents to be assessed directly at the pathophysiological level. This review focuses on the diagnostic usefulness of synovial biopsies in the light of actual developments. PMID:19951395

  20. Posterior interosseous nerve palsy by synovial cyst of proximal radioulnar joint: our experience after 5 years.

    PubMed

    Monacelli, G; Ceci, F; Prezzemoli, G; Spagnoli, A; Lotito, S; Irace, S

    2011-06-01

    The posterior interosseous nerve palsy is a neuropathy of radial nerve interesting its deep motor branch. The neuropathy can appear with a hollow in the proximal half of the forearm without significant swelling, a complete loss of extension of the fingers with radial deviation of the wrist during extension. In some cases, PIN compression may simulate tendon rupture in rheumatologic diseases, because the pain and the paralysis occur suddenly, so often can be difficult to make a diagnosis. The palsy is caused by compression of the posterior interosseous nerve from soft tissue tumours or tumour-like masses: ganglions, lipomas, rheumatoid synovitis, synovial chondromatosis, fibromas, neurofibromas, bursitis, synovial cysts of the elbow and radioulnar proximal joints. The aim of our research was to individuate the better treatment for the posterior interosseous nerve palsy. From 2002 to 2007 we examined 8 patients: 2 female and 6 male. Median age was 43 years. The diagnosis was made by clinical examination, ultrasound, nerve conduction studies and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Patients underwent to decompressing posterior interosseous nerve surgery. After the surgical exploration in 8 cases a globular mass of around 2.5 cm to 4.5 cm diameter was discovered. At the histological examination, a synovial cyst of the elbow joint was found in 7 out of 8 patients and an hemangioma tumor in the one remaining patient. 12 months was the median time for a complete recovery after the operation, confirmed by EMG. The surgical treatment offers a complete resolution in all cases.

  1. [Diagnosis: synovial fluid analysis].

    PubMed

    Gallo Vallejo, Francisco Javier; Giner Ruiz, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    Synovial fluid analysis in rheumatological diseases allows a more accurate diagnosis in some entities, mainly infectious and microcrystalline arthritis. Examination of synovial fluid in patients with osteoarthritis is useful if a differential diagnosis will be performed with other processes and to distinguish between inflammatory and non-inflammatory forms. Joint aspiration is a diagnostic and sometimes therapeutic procedure that is available to primary care physicians. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  2. Juxtafacet Spinal Synovial Cysts

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Study Design This was a retrospective study. Purpose To study the surgical outcome of synovial cysts of the lumbar spine through posterior laminectomy in combination with transpedicular screw fixation. Overview of Literature Synovial cysts of the lumbar spine contribute significantly to narrowing of the spinal canal and lateral thecal sac and nerve root compression. Cysts form as a result of arthrotic disruption of the facet joint, leading to degenerative spondylolisthesis in up to 40% of patients. Methods Retrospective data from 6 patients, treated during the period of March 2007 to February 2011, were analyzed. All preoperative and postoperative manifestations, extension/flexion radiographs, magnetic resonance imaging, and computed tomography records were reviewed. All underwent surgery for synovial cysts with excision and decompression combined with posterior fixation. The result of surgery was evaluated with Macnab's classification. An excellent or good outcome was considered as satisfactory. Japanese Orthopedic Association Scale was used for evaluation of back pain. Results All patients included in this study had excellent outcomes as regarding to improvement of all preoperative manifestations and returning to normal daily activities. Only 2 cases developed postoperative transient cerebro-spinal fluid leak and were treated conservatively and improved during the follow up period. Conclusions Although this study included a small number of cases and we could not have statistically significant results, the good outcome of decompression of synovial cysts combined with posterior fixation and fusion encouraged us to recommend this approach for patients with juxtafacet synovial cysts. PMID:26949457

  3. INTRAOCULAR SYNOVIAL SARCOMA.

    PubMed

    Richards, Nikisha Q; Kofler, Julia K; Chu, Charleen T; Stefko, S Tonya

    2017-01-01

    To describe the first reported case of intraocular synovial sarcoma. A 29-year-old man was enucleated for a blind, painful eye. Pathologic examination revealed an unexpected intraocular spindle cell tumor. Immunohistochemical characterization revealed diffuse reactivity of the tumor cells for vimentin and focal positivity for epithelial markers pankeratin and epithelial membrane antigen. Melanoma markers were negative. Fluorescent in situ hybridization studies identified a t(X;18) (p11.2;q11.2) translocation, establishing a final diagnosis of synovial sarcoma. There was no evidence of extraocular extension as the resected margin of the optic nerve was free of tumor. Further imaging studies revealed no extraocular primary site or metastasis. The incidental discovery of an intraocular malignancy in this case underscores the importance of routine histopathologic analysis of all enucleated globes. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of an intraocular synovial sarcoma, either as metastasis or as primary site.

  4. Macrophages in Synovial Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Aisling; Fearon, Ursula; Veale, Douglas J.; Godson, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    Synovial macrophages are one of the resident cell types in synovial tissue and while they remain relatively quiescent in the healthy joint, they become activated in the inflamed joint and, along with infiltrating monocytes/macrophages, regulate secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and enzymes involved in driving the inflammatory response and joint destruction. Synovial macrophages are positioned throughout the sub-lining layer and lining layer at the cartilage–pannus junction and mediate articular destruction. Sub-lining macrophages are now also considered as the most reliable biomarker for disease severity and response to therapy in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). There is a growing understanding of the molecular drivers of inflammation and an appreciation that the resolution of inflammation is an active process rather than a passive return to homeostasis, and this has implications for our understanding of the role of macrophages in inflammation. Macrophage phenotype determines the cytokine secretion profile and tissue destruction capabilities of these cells. Whereas inflammatory synovial macrophages have not yet been classified into one phenotype or another it is widely known that TNFα and IL-l, characteristically released by M1 macrophages, are abundant in RA while IL-10 activity, characteristic of M2 macrophages, is somewhat diminished. Here we will briefly review our current understanding of macrophages and macrophage polarization in RA as well as the elements implicated in controlling polarization, such as cytokines and transcription factors like NFκB, IRFs and NR4A, and pro-resolving factors, such as LXA4 and other lipid mediators which may promote a non-inflammatory, pro-resolving phenotype, and may represent a novel therapeutic paradigm. PMID:22566842

  5. Rheological properties of synovial fluids.

    PubMed

    Fam, H; Bryant, J T; Kontopoulou, M

    2007-01-01

    Synovial fluid is the joint lubricant and shock absorber [Semin. Arthritis Rheum. 32 (2002), 10-37] as well as the source of nutrition for articular cartilage. The purpose of the present paper is to provide a comprehensive review of the rheological properties of synovial fluid as they relate to its chemical composition. Given its importance in the rheology of synovial fluid, an overview of the structure and rheology of HA (hyaluronic acid) is presented first. The rheology of synovial fluids is discussed in detail, with a focus on the possible diagnosis of joint pathology based on the observed differences in rheological parameters and trends. The deterioration of viscoelastic properties of synovial fluid in pathological states due to effects of HA concentration and molecular weight is further described. Recent findings pertaining to the composition and rheology of periprosthetic fluid, the fluid that bathes prosthetic joints in vivo are reported.

  6. Synovial sarcoma in childhood

    SciTech Connect

    Israels, S.J.; Chan, H.S.L.; Daneman, A.; Weitzman, S.S.

    1984-04-01

    The clinical and radiologic findings in seven children with synovial sarcoma are described. The five boys and two girls had a mean age at presentation of 4.4 years. All seven had the lesion situated in an extremity. Plain radiographs in four revealed the presence of a soft-tissue mass with no calcification or bone and joint involvement. In two patients studied with computed tomography (CT), the primary lesions had peripheral irregular areas of enhancement with central areas of poor enhancement, reflecting the necrotic, cystic, and hemorrhagic changes found in the centers of these tumors. Although the exact margins of these lesions were difficult to define accurately even with intravenous contrast enhancement, CT is still recommended as the best imaging method for assessing the local extent of the primary tumor and is a useful tool in the planning of appropriate therapy as well as the gauging of the tumor response to ongoing treatment.

  7. Synovial fluid analysis.

    PubMed

    Brannan, Scott R; Jerrard, David A

    2006-04-01

    AsA prompt and accurate diagnosis of a painful, swollen joint is imperative, primarily in the case of a septic joint, as delayed therapy may result in progression of disease or permanent loss of function. Procurement and analysis of synovial fluid (SF) are paramount in helping the clinician to determine a patient's clinical condition and further course of treatment. Measurement of white blood cell (WBC) counts, crystal analysis by polarized microscopy, and microbiologic studies including Gram stain and culture are the SF parameters that are collectively most important in the ultimate determination by a clinician of the presence or absence of an infectious or inflammatory joint. It is important for the clinician to understand and recognize the limitations of various SF parameters to minimize under-treating patients with potentially serious joint pathology.

  8. Disseminated sporotrichosis.

    PubMed

    Romero-Cabello, Raúl; Bonifaz, Alexandro; Romero-Feregrino, Raúl; Sánchez, Carlos Javier; Linares, Yancy; Zavala, Jorge Tay; Romero, Leticia Calderón; Romero-Feregrino, Rodrigo; Vega, José T Sánchez

    2011-03-25

    Sporotrichosis is a subacute or chronic infection caused by Sporothrix schenckii. It is a primary cutaneous infection and it has different clinical forms: disseminated by lymphatic vessels (75%), localised cutaneous form (20%), disseminated cutaneous and extracuteus rarely. The systemic disseminated sporotrichosis is considered a severe opportunistic infection. The best diagnostic test is the culture. The authors report a case of a 36-year-old man, originally from Puebla, Mexico, with a diagnosis of disseminated sporotrichosis. Differential diagnosis with other pathologies includes leishmaniasis, chromoblastomycosis, tuberculosis verrucose and lymphangitis. The development of unusual presentations in immunocompromised patients has been reported.

  9. Disseminated sporotrichosis

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Cabello, Raúl; Bonifaz, Alexandro; Romero-Feregrino, Raúl; Sánchez, Carlos Javier; Linares, Yancy; Zavala, Jorge Tay; Romero, Leticia Calderón; Romero-Feregrino, Rodrigo; Vega, José T Sánchez

    2011-01-01

    Sporotrichosis is a subacute or chronic infection caused by Sporothrix schenckii. It is a primary cutaneous infection and it has different clinical forms: disseminated by lymphatic vessels (75%), localised cutaneous form (20%), disseminated cutaneous and extracuteus rarely. The systemic disseminated sporotrichosis is considered a severe opportunistic infection. The best diagnostic test is the culture. The authors report a case of a 36-year-old man, originally from Puebla, Mexico, with a diagnosis of disseminated sporotrichosis. Differential diagnosis with other pathologies includes leishmaniasis, chromoblastomycosis, tuberculosis verrucose and lymphangitis. The development of unusual presentations in immunocompromised patients has been reported. PMID:22700076

  10. Synovial Sarcoma With Myoid Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Qassid, Omar; Ali, Ahmed; Thway, Khin

    2016-09-01

    Synovial sarcoma is a malignant mesenchymal tumor with variable epithelial differentiation, which is defined by the presence of a specific t(X;18)(p11.2;q11.2) chromosomal translocation that generates SS18-SSX fusion oncogenes. Synovial sarcoma typically arises within extremity deep soft tissue (particularly around large joints) of young adults, but has been shown to occur at almost any location. When it arises in more unusual sites, such as the abdomen, it can present a significant diagnostic challenge. We describe a case of intraabdominal monophasic synovial sarcoma that immunohistochemically showed strong expression of smooth muscle actin and calponin but only very scanty cytokeratin, and which showed morphologic and immunohistochemical overlap with other spindle cell neoplasms that can arise at this site, such as gastrointestinal stromal tumor and myofibrosarcoma. As correct diagnosis is of clinical and prognostic importance, surgical pathologists should be aware of the potential for synovial sarcoma to occur at a variety of anatomic sites and of its spectrum of immunoreactivity. Synovial sarcoma should be in the differential diagnosis of spindle cell neoplasms with myoid differentiation that do not fall into any definite tumor category, for which there should be a relatively low threshold for performing fluorescence in situ hybridization or reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction to assess for the specific SS18 gene rearrangement or SS18-SSX fusion transcripts, which remain the diagnostic gold standard. © The Author(s) 2016.

  11. Clinical manifestations of synovial cysts.

    PubMed

    Burt, T B; MacCarter, D K; Gelman, M I; Samuelson, C O

    1980-08-01

    Although synovial cysts are most commonly associated with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis, they may occur in many other conditions. The clinical manifestations of these cysts are numerous and may result from pressure, dissection or acute rupture. Vascular phenomena occur when popliteal cysts compress vessels, and result in venous stasis with subsequent lower extremity edema or thrombophlebitis. Rarely, popliteal cysts may cause arterial compromise with intermittent claudication. Neurological sequelae include pain, paresthesia, sensory loss, and muscle weakness or atrophy. When synovial cysts occur as mass lesions they may mimic popliteal aneurysms or hematomas, adenopathy, tumors or even inguinal hernias. Cutaneous joint fistulas, septic arthritis or osteomyelitis, and spinal cord and bladder compression are examples of other infrequent complications. Awareness of the heterogeneous manifestations of synovial cysts may enable clinicians to avoid unnecessary diagnostic studies and delay in appropriate management. Arthrography remains the definitive diagnostic procedure of choice, although ultrasound testing may be useful.

  12. Postlaminectomy Bilateral Lumbar Intraspinal Synovial Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sung Ik; Lee, Jung Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar intraspinal synovial cysts are included in the difference diagnosis of lumbar radiculopathy. Developing imaging modalities has result in increased reporting about these lesions. However, the case of bilateral new lumbar intraspinal synovial cysts after laminectomy has been rarely reported. We report of a rare case with bilateral lumbar intraspinal synovial cysts after laminectomy, requiring surgical excision. PMID:27799997

  13. Ultrasound-guided synovial biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Sitt, Jacqueline C M; Wong, Priscilla

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided needle biopsy of synovium is an increasingly performed procedure with a high diagnostic yield. In this review, we discuss the normal synovium, as well as the indications, technique, tissue handling and clinical applications of ultrasound-guided synovial biopsy. PMID:26581578

  14. [Therapeutic options for synovial sarcoma].

    PubMed

    Deme, Dániel; Telekes, András

    2015-05-31

    Synovial sarcomas account for approximately 5 to 10% of soft tissue sarcomas and 0.05 to 0.1% of all malignant neoplasms. They predominantly affect the extremities but can occur in any part of the body. More than 50% of the patients are expected to develop metastatic disease within 3-5 years. In some patients disease recurrence may develop after 20 years. The 5-year overall survival rate is 10% for patients with metastatic disease and 76% for patients with localized one. Age, tumour size, histological subtype, and adjuvant radiotherapy influence prognosis. The role of adjuvant chemotherapy has not been proven yet. There are several ongoing clinical trials to determine the efficacy of active agents used for therapy of locally advanced, relapsed/refractory or metastatic disease. Better understanding of the biological behaviour of synovial sarcomas would provide the future way for the targeted therapy in combination with conventional treatments.

  15. Disseminating research.

    PubMed

    Baillie, Lesley

    2015-07-01

    THE THEME of this edition of Nurse Researcher, 'disseminating research', is pertinent to researchers across the career spectrum and tackles two important issues: open access publishing and originality in PhD research. In the first paper, Suzanne Fredericks examines and contrasts two models of open access publishing, revealing some notable advantages of 'green' open access, achieved through repositories, as opposed to the more well-known 'gold' open access offered by journals ( Fredericks 2015 ). In the second paper, Paul Gill and Gina Dolan discuss originality in PhD studies, exploring the nature of the concept and how doctoral students can demonstrate originality, which is an essential consideration in their research dissemination activities as well as their thesis preparation ( Gill and Dolan 2015 ).

  16. Spontaneous hemorrhage into a lumbar synovial cyst

    PubMed Central

    Alen, Jose F.; Ramos, Ana; Lobato, Ramiro D.; Lagares, Alfonso

    2010-01-01

    Lumbar synovial cysts frequently present with back pain, chronic radiculopathy and/or progressive symptoms of spinal canal compromise. These cysts generally appear in the context of degenerative lumbar spinal disease. Few cases of spontaneous hemorrhage into synovial cysts have been reported in the literature. PMID:20174835

  17. Identification and isolation of synovial dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Pettit, Allison R; Cavanagh, Lois; Boyce, Amanda; Padmanabha, Jagadish; Peng, Judy; Thomas, Ranjeny

    2007-01-01

    In rheumatoid arthritis patients, three compartments need to be considered: peripheral blood, synovial fluid, and synovial tissue. Dendritic cells characterized from each compartment have different properties. The methods given are based on cell sorting for isolation of cells, and flow cytometry and immunohistochemical staining for analysis of cells in these compartments.

  18. Synovial fat necrosis associated with ischemic pancreatic disease.

    PubMed

    Smukler, N M; Schumacher, H R; Pascual, E; Brown, S; Ryan, W E; Sadeghian, M R

    1979-05-01

    A 59-year-old man with ischemic pancreatic disease, polyarthritis, and cutaneous nodules has shown histopathologic findings indicative of disseminated fat necrosis in a percutaneous biopsy specimen from the right knee. The histopathologic findings in the synovium included necrotic fat cells, distorted fat cells and adjacent lymphocytes, lipid laden histiocytes, and giant cells. In prior histopathologic studies of the joint involvement associated with this disorder, fat cell necrosis has been found only in the periarticular tissues, and the synovium has appeared normal or showed nonspecific inflammation. However, the present study shows that the synovial membrane may also be the site of fat necrosis and an associated inflammatory reaction; thus patients with this disorder may manifest arthritis in addition to periarthritis.

  19. SYNOVIAL GIANT CELL TUMOR OF THE KNEE.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, Rene Jorge; Cohen, Moisés; Nóbrega, Jezimar; Forgas, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Synovial giant cell tumor is a benign neoplasm, rarely reported in the form of malignant metastasis. Synovial giant cell tumor most frequently occurs on the hand, and, most uncommon, on the ankle and knee. In the present study, the authors describe a rare case of synovial giant cell tumor on the knee as well as the treatment approach. Arthroscopy has been shown, in this case, to be the optimal method for treating this kind of lesion, once it allowed a less aggressive approach, while providing good visualization of all compartments of knee joint and full tumor resection.

  20. SYNOVIAL GIANT CELL TUMOR OF THE KNEE

    PubMed Central

    Abdalla, Rene Jorge; Cohen, Moisés; Nóbrega, Jezimar; Forgas, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Synovial giant cell tumor is a benign neoplasm, rarely reported in the form of malignant metastasis. Synovial giant cell tumor most frequently occurs on the hand, and, most uncommon, on the ankle and knee. In the present study, the authors describe a rare case of synovial giant cell tumor on the knee as well as the treatment approach. Arthroscopy has been shown, in this case, to be the optimal method for treating this kind of lesion, once it allowed a less aggressive approach, while providing good visualization of all compartments of knee joint and full tumor resection. PMID:27004193

  1. Solitary pulmonary nodule: pleuropulmonary synovial sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Ward, Robert C; Birnbaum, Ariel E; Aswad, Bassam I; Healey, Terrance T

    2014-05-01

    Pleuropulmonary synovial sarcoma (PPSS) is an extremely rare primary malignancy of the lung. We present a case of a middle-aged female with PPSS that was initially discovered as an incidental indeterminate nodule on chest radiograph. Following evaluation with computed tomography (CT), the patient went on to positron-emission tomography (PET)/CT for work-up of the solitary pulmonary nodule, which demonstrated mild FDG-avidity and no other evidence of FDG-avid disease. The patient then underwent thoracotomy and right upper lobectomy for definitive treatment. Only after evaluation of the gross pathology, histology, immunohistochemistry and cytogenetics was the diagnosis of synovial sarcoma made. Importantly, the preceding PET/CT, in addition to physical exam of the upper and lower extremities, helped exclude the more common extra-thoracic soft-tissue variety of synovial sarcoma, which frequently metastasizes to lung, carrying a worse prognosis. Discussion of synovial sarcoma and PPSS follows.

  2. Early age renal synovial sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Romero-Rojas, Alfredo Ernesto; Díaz-Pérez, Julio Alexander; Messa-Botero, Oscar Alberto; Neira-Mejia, Fabían Enrique

    2010-01-01

    We report a primary renal Synovial Sarcoma (SS) case and analyze its features. A 15 year old male presented with left abdominal mass and weight loss. CT scan images showed a 13 cm mass located in the lower pole of the left kidney. Renal biopsy recognized an undifferentiated neoplasm, the immunohistochemistry suggesting the probability of neuroectodermic primitive tumor versus SS. Chemotherapy and radical nephrectomy were carried out. Pathological study showed a big multilobulated necrotic tumor 22 x 13 x 12.5 cm. Histopathological study demonstrated a neoplasm composed by immature cells. Currently, patient has survived 1,8 years. A structured bibliographical search was performed in the Medline, Imbiomed and Scielo databases. The final immunohistochemistry studies gave the diagnosis of poorly differentiated renal SS small cell variety. The renal SS is extremely infrequent, with less than 40 cases reported, of which this case reports the earlier age. These tumors, when located in the kidney, represent a great diagnostic challenge that requires adequate clinical, radiological, surgical, and pathological correlation for appropriate diagnosis and treatment.

  3. Primary Synovial Sarcoma of Lung: A Rare Tumor.

    PubMed

    Raj, Prince; Kumar, Parveen; Sarin, Yogesh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Synovial sarcoma of lung is a rare tumor with few case reports in literature. Though named synovial sarcoma due to its resemblance to synovium on light microscopy, it arises from mesenchymal tissue. Here, we present a case of synovial sarcoma of lung in a 7-year old boy, with main emphasis on difficulty faced in the management.

  4. Synovial Lipomatosis of the Glenohumeral Joint

    PubMed Central

    Safran, Ori

    2016-01-01

    Synovial lipomatosis (also known as lipoma arborescens) is a rare and benign lesion affecting synovium-lined cavities. It is characterized by hyperplasia of mature fat tissue in the subsynovial layer. Although the most commonly affected site is the knee joint, rarely additional locations such as tendon sheath and other joints are involved. We present a case of synovial lipomatosis of the glenohumeral joint in a 44-year-old man. The clinical data radiological studies and histopathologic results are described, as well as a review of the current literature. PMID:27563476

  5. Synovial Lipomatosis of the Glenohumeral Joint.

    PubMed

    Beyth, Shaul; Safran, Ori

    2016-01-01

    Synovial lipomatosis (also known as lipoma arborescens) is a rare and benign lesion affecting synovium-lined cavities. It is characterized by hyperplasia of mature fat tissue in the subsynovial layer. Although the most commonly affected site is the knee joint, rarely additional locations such as tendon sheath and other joints are involved. We present a case of synovial lipomatosis of the glenohumeral joint in a 44-year-old man. The clinical data radiological studies and histopathologic results are described, as well as a review of the current literature.

  6. Synovial fluid and synovial membrane mesenchymal stem cells: latest discoveries and therapeutic perspectives.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Eduardo Branco; Casado, Priscila Ladeira; Moura Neto, Vivaldo; Duarte, Maria Eugenia Leite; Aguiar, Diego Pinheiro

    2014-10-03

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the ability to differentiate into osteoblasts, chondroblasts, adipocytes, and even myoblasts. Most studies have focused on finding MSCs in different parts of the body for medical treatment. Every joint structure, including bone, joint fat, articular cartilage, and synovium, potentially contains resident MSCs. Recently, a progenitor cell population has been found in synovial fluid and showed similarities with both bone marrow and synovial membrane MSCs. Synovial fluid MSCs have been studied in healthy persons and osteoarthritic patients in order to explore its potential for treatment of some orthopedic disorders. Here, we briefly review the current knowledge on synovial fluid MSCs, their origin, relation to some orthopedic diseases, and future applications.

  7. Hyaluronan and synovial joint: function, distribution and healing

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Synovial fluid is a viscous solution found in the cavities of synovial joints. The principal role of synovial fluid is to reduce friction between the articular cartilages of synovial joints during movement. The presence of high molar mass hyaluronan (HA) in this fluid gives it the required viscosity for its function as lubricant solution. Inflammation oxidation stress enhances normal degradation of hyaluronan causing several diseases related to joints. This review describes hyaluronan properties and distribution, applications and its function in synovial joints, with short review for using thiol compounds as antioxidants preventing HA degradations under inflammation conditions. PMID:24678248

  8. Disseminated histoplasmosis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Histoplasmosis is a fungal infection caused by inhaling dust from spore-infected bird droppings. In the disseminated ... fairly high for people with untreated widespread (disseminated) histoplasmosis, but is reduced significantly with treatment.

  9. Disseminated fusariosis secondary to neuroblastoma with fatal outcome.

    PubMed

    Silva, Gleiciere Maia; Silveira, Alice Rangel Cristiane; Betânia, Claudia Abreu Rodrigues; Macêdo, Danielle Patrícia Cerqueira; Neves, Rejane Pereira

    2013-10-01

    Disseminated fusariosis is an uncommon clinical condition in immunocompromised patients. We report a fatal case of disseminated fusariosis secondary to neuroblastoma in a male patient, 15 years old, who underwent a bone marrow transplant. The patient was admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) of a public hospital in Recife-PE, Brazil, presenting bone marrow aplasia, severe leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia. After 15 days, the patient developed right knee effusion. Synovial fluid and blood samples were analyzed at the Medical Mycology Laboratory of the Federal University of Pernambuco. Mycological diagnosis was based on the presence of hyaline septate hyphae on direct examination and the isolation of Fusarium oxysporum in culture, confirming the case of disseminated fusariosis. In vitro, the isolate showed fluconazole resistance and sensitivity to amphotericin B, anidulafungin, and voriconazole. Therapy with voriconazole in combination with liposomal amphotericin B led to an improved clinical response; however, due to underlying disease complications, the patient progressed to death.

  10. Targeting epigenetic misregulation in synovial sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Waterfall, Joshua J; Meltzer, Paul S

    2012-03-20

    Like many sarcomas, synovial sarcoma is driven by a characteristic oncogenic transcription factor fusion, SS18-SSX. In this issue of Cancer Cell, Su et al. elucidate the protein partners necessary for target gene misregulation and demonstrate a direct effect of histone deacetylase inhibitors on the SS18-SSX complex composition, expression misregulation, and apoptosis.

  11. Dissemination Activities Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barclay, Hanna; Batatia, Hudj; Bauters, Merja; Ben Ami, Zvi; Drachman, Raul; Flouris, Giorgos; Jadin, Tanja; Jalonen, Satu; Karlgren, Klas; Karpati, Andrea; Kotzinos, Dimitris; Lakkala, Minna; Lallimo, Jiri; Moen, Anne; Nygard, Kathrine; Paavola, Sami; Padiglia, Sheila; Scapolla, Marina; Sins, Patrick; Vasileva, Tania

    2008-01-01

    In the first 24 months of the project, KP-Lab members were highly dedicated to dissemination and were engaged in various dissemination activities that contributed to the prime objective of the KP-Lab dissemination efforts which is "to make the project widely known to a variety of prospective users and, at a later stage, to promote the…

  12. Proteomic analysis of human osteoarthritis synovial fluid

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Osteoarthritis is a chronic musculoskeletal disorder characterized mainly by progressive degradation of the hyaline cartilage. Patients with osteoarthritis often postpone seeking medical help, which results in the diagnosis being made at an advanced stage of cartilage destruction. Sustained efforts are needed to identify specific markers that might help in early diagnosis, monitoring disease progression and in improving therapeutic outcomes. We employed a multipronged proteomic approach, which included multiple fractionation strategies followed by high resolution mass spectrometry analysis to explore the proteome of synovial fluid obtained from osteoarthritis patients. In addition to the total proteome, we also enriched glycoproteins from synovial fluid using lectin affinity chromatography. Results We identified 677 proteins from synovial fluid of patients with osteoarthritis of which 545 proteins have not been previously reported. These novel proteins included ADAM-like decysin 1 (ADAMDEC1), alanyl (membrane) aminopeptidase (ANPEP), CD84, fibulin 1 (FBLN1), matrix remodelling associated 5 (MXRA5), secreted phosphoprotein 2 (SPP2) and spondin 2 (SPON2). We identified 300 proteins using lectin affinity chromatography, including the glycoproteins afamin (AFM), attractin (ATRN), fibrillin 1 (FBN1), transferrin (TF), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP1) and vasorin (VSN). Gene ontology analysis confirmed that a majority of the identified proteins were extracellular and are mostly involved in cell communication and signaling. We also confirmed the expression of ANPEP, dickkopf WNT signaling pathway inhibitor 3 (DKK3) and osteoglycin (OGN) by multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) analysis of osteoarthritis synovial fluid samples. Conclusions We present an in-depth analysis of the synovial fluid proteome from patients with osteoarthritis. We believe that the catalog of proteins generated in this study will further enhance our knowledge regarding the

  13. Mimicry of lyme arthritis by synovial hemangioma.

    PubMed

    Hospach, Toni; Langendörfer, M; Kalle, T V; Tewald, F; Wirth, T; Dannecker, G E

    2011-12-01

    To report on the differential diagnosis of lyme arthritis and synovial hemangioma due to similar clinical and radiological signs and symptoms. A 15-year-old boy presented at the age of 9 with recurrent rather painless swelling of the right knee. Altogether four episodes lasting for 1-2 weeks each occurred over a period of 18 months before medical advice was sought. Physical examination revealed only a slightly limited range of motion. Living in an endemic area of borreliosis, he reported a tick bite 6 months prior to onset of his symptoms with erythema migrans and was treated for 10 days with amoxicillin. Serology revealed two positive unspecific bands in IgG immunoblot (p41 and 66) with slight positivity for ELISA. Ultrasound revealed synovial thickening and increased fluid. Despite the weak positive serology a diagnosis of lyme arthritis could not be excluded and intravenous antibiotic treatment with ceftriaxone was started. After two further relapses antiinflammatory therapy including intraarticular steroids were introduced with no long lasting effect. A chronical disease developed with alternate periods of swelling and almost complete remission. Ultrasound as well as MRI demonstrated ongoing signs of synovitis, therefore after further progression, a diagnostic arthroscopy was performed showing an inconspicuous knee joint. A second MRI showed focal suprapatellar enhancement and was followed by open arthrotomy revealing a histopathological proven synovial cavernous juxtaarticular hemangioma. To our knowledge, the differential diagnosis of lyme arthritis and synovial hemangioma has not yet been reported despite obvious clinical similarities. In conclusion, in children and adolescents synovial hemangioma has to be considered in differential diagnosis of recurrent knee swelling. Early diagnosis is important to prevent prolonged suffering from chronic joint swelling with probable joint damages, unnecessary treatment procedures and as well school and sports

  14. Effective dissemination strategies.

    PubMed

    Scullion, Philip A

    2002-01-01

    Dissemination of research findings or other key messages is increasingly acknowledged as a vital yet complex process. In this paper, Philip Scullion sets out to explore and disentangle some of these complexities, examine examples of successful dissemination strategies and provide valuable insights. It is argued that the process of dissemination needs to be afforded greater emphasis by project-funding bodies, research supervisors, researchers, and those responsible for implementing changes in clinical practice. Important initiatives are acknowledged before the concept of dissemination is explored. The source, message, medium and target groups, all key elements in the dissemination process, are then examined. It is argued that dissemination needs to be carefully considered at the design stage of research projects in relation to each of these elements. This paper concludes that the current commitment to research and evidence-based practice will have limited impact on patient care until a similar commitment to dissemination is evident at both corporate and individual levels.

  15. Microfluidic processing of synovial fluid for cytological analysis.

    PubMed

    Krebs, John C; Alapan, Yunus; Dennstedt, Barbara A; Wera, Glenn D; Gurkan, Umut A

    2017-06-01

    Cytological analysis of synovial fluid is widely used in the clinic to assess joint health and disease. However, in general practice, only the total number of white blood cells (WBCs) are available for cytologic evaluation of the joint. Moreover, sufficient volume of synovial aspirates is critical to run conventional analyses, despite limited volume of aspiration that can normally be obtained from a joint. Therefore, there is a lack of consistent and standardized synovial fluid cytological tests in the clinic. To address these shortcomings, we developed a microfluidic platform (Synovial Chip), for the first time in the literature, to achieve repeatable, cost- and time-efficient, and standardized synovial fluid cytological analysis based on specific cell surface markers. Microfluidic channels functionalized with antibodies against specific cell surface antigens are connected in series to capture WBC subpopulations, including CD4+, CD8+, and CD66b+ cells, simultaneously from miniscule volumes (100 μL) of synovial fluid aspirates. Cell capture specificity was evaluated by fluorescent labeling of isolated cells in microchannels and was around 90% for all three WBC subpopulations. Furthermore, we investigated the effect of synovial fluid viscosity on capture efficiency in the microfluidic channels and utilized hyaluronidase enzyme treatment to reduce viscosity and to improve cell capture efficiency (>60%) from synovial fluid samples. Synovial Chip allows efficient and standardized point-of-care isolation and analysis of WBC subpopulations in miniscule volumes of patient synovial fluid samples in the clinic.

  16. [Primary pharynx synovial sarcoma: a case report].

    PubMed

    Qingying, Cui; Youmei, Zhang; Shuai, Fu; Changbin, Zhang; Ming, Li

    2017-04-01

    A case of primary pharynx synovial sarcoma was reported in this paper. A 15-year-old male patient experienced painless pharyngeal swelling that gradually proliferated for 1 month. Special examination showed an 8 cm × 4 cm × 3 cm tumor located in the left pharynx and the supratonsillar crypt. Imaging tests revealed an irregular mass on the left side of the oropharynx and an unclear boundary. Immunohistochemical examination yielded the following results: epithelial membrane antigen (+), cytokeratin (CK)19 (+), CD7(+), vimentin (+), CK10(-), E-cadherin (+), B-cell lymphoma-2 (-), CD2 (-), CD10 (-), CD138 (+), CD99 (+), leukocyte common antigen (+), and Ki-67 (20%+). This condition was pathologically diagnosed as primary pharynx synovial sarcoma.

  17. Primary pulmonary synovial sarcoma: a rare neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Montserrat Blanco; Fontán, Eva María García; Carretero, Miguel Ángel Cańizares; Pińeiro, Ana González

    2016-01-01

    Primary pulmonary synovial sarcoma is an extremely rare tumor with an unknown cause. The diagnosis is established after other primary lung malignancies or metastatic extrathoracic sarcoma have been excluded. We report the case of a 69-year-old man who presented with a well-defined mass in the right upper lobe on a chest X-ray. A video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) right upper lobectomy was performed. Immunohistochemically, neoplastic cells were positive for vimentin, CD56 and Bcl-2, and focally positive for CD99, epithelial membrane antigen and cytokeratin 7 and 19. The cytogenetic study revealed a SYT genetic reassortment. So, the final pathological diagnosis was primary pulmonary synovial sarcoma. PMID:27516790

  18. Biphasic synovial sarcoma of the abdominal wall.

    PubMed

    Vera, Jesús; García, María-Dolores; Marigil, Miguel; Abascal, Manuel; Lopez, Jose-Ignacio; Ligorred, Luis

    2006-09-01

    Synovial sarcoma arising in the abdominal wall is a rare tumor. We report a case of a 38-year-old man who complained of abdominal pain. Physical examination revealed a firm mobile mass, 25 cm in diameter, in the left lower abdominal wall. The tumor was first thought to be a sarcoma arising from the omentum or mesentery. During surgery, a large tumor was found attached to the inner surface of the abdominal wall and compressing the gastrointestinal tract. On microscopic examination the tumor corresponded to a biphasic synovial sarcoma immunoreactive for cytokeratins (AE1/AE3, 7 and 19), epithelial membrane antigen and carcinoembryonic antigen in the epithelial tumor cells, for E-cadherin especially in their glandular structure, vimentin, CD99, and CD56 in the spindle cell component and for bcl-2 protein. The tumor recurred at the same site, and clinical course progressed to death 3 months after the initial diagnosis.

  19. Technology-based dissemination.

    PubMed

    Jennett, P A; Premkumar, K

    1996-01-01

    Health care reform and restructuring, changes in the scope and definitions of 'health', 'health care' and 'health research', along with a continued emphasis on multidisciplinary health promotion and prevention, all indicate the need for information dissemination, exchange and management. Technology can be a tool to help meet this need, as it can help us disseminate, as well as understand the process of dissemination. Rapid advances in, and reduced costs of technology, permit the integration of this tool. This paper provides a definition for dissemination, along with a background and rationale as to why now is the time and place to harness technology to assist with the dissemination process. In addition, it presents well-designed studies on the effective use of technology as an aid to dissemination. Concrete examples of innovative technology that are being tested are also examined. Finally, the challenge and strategies for technology integration are addressed.

  20. MR imaging of synovial disorders of the knee.

    PubMed

    Chung, Christine B; Boucher, Ronald; Resnick, Donald

    2009-12-01

    Synovial membranes line the diarthrodial (movable) joints, bursae, and tendon sheaths of the body. The primary function of this specialized, vascular tissue is to serve as a filter system that lubricates and nourishes the articular structures as well as serving as a shock-absorber. The synovium is affected by a variety of disorders that can be localized to a specific articulation or can be systemic in nature. These include inflammatory, infectious, degenerative, traumatic, or neoplastic categories of disease. Further, MR imaging provides an excellent non-invasive tool for the evaluation of the synovium and synovial-based processes. This article will discuss technical considerations pertinent to the MR imaging evaluation of synovial processes in the knee; will review the synovial and bursal anatomy of the knee as well as the imaging characteristics of general synovial abnormalities and their diagnostic implications. In addition, it will review specific synovial processes and their characteristic MR imaging findings.

  1. Synovial Cyst Mimicking an Intraspinal Sacral Mass

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A 68-year-old female had a three-week history of severe low back pain radiating down the posterior left buttocks and left leg exacerbated by standing and walking. Lumbar spine MRI revealed cystic mass with similar intensity to cerebrospinal fluid located on dorsolateral left side of the sacral spinal canal inferior to the S1 pedicle. There was compression of left exiting S1 and traversing S2 nerve roots. Neurosurgery consult was requested to evaluate the cystic mass in the sacral spinal canal. After clinical evaluation, an unusually located synovial cyst was thought possible. Cyst contents were heterogeneous, suggestive of small hemorrhage and acute clinical history seemed reasonable. Left S1 and partial left S2 hemilaminectomy was performed and an epidural, partially hemorrhagic cyst was removed. There was no obvious connection to the ipsilateral L5-S1 facet joint. Pathology revealed synovial cyst, and the patient's leg pain was improved postoperatively. This synovial cyst was unusual as it had no connection with the facet joint intraoperatively and its location in the sacral canal was uncommon. PMID:24716025

  2. Femoral neck erosions: sign of hip joint synovial disease

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, R.P.; Weissman, B.N.; Naimark, A.

    1983-07-01

    Pathologic synovial processes in the hip joint can cause characteristic extrinsic erosions of the femoral neck, which in extreme cases produce an ''apple core'' appearance. Nine such cases of synovial diseases, including synovial osteochondromatosis, pigmented villonodular synovitis, rheumatoid arthritis, and amyloidosis, that demonstrate this radiographic finding are presented. The anatomic relations of the hip joint that result in theis appearance, differential diagnosis, and radiographic techniques useful in diagnosis are discussed.

  3. Antigen-presenting capacity of rheumatoid synovial fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Boots, A M; Wimmers-Bertens, A J; Rijnders, A W

    1994-01-01

    In normal, healthy joints, synovial fibroblasts do not express major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules. However, in inflamed joints of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, synovial fibroblasts show an abundant expression of MHC class II. Does this increase in expression have functional consequences for antigen presentation to T cells? To date, the precise role of synovial fibroblasts in antigen presentation has not been documented. Here, we show by three different examples that cultured synovial fibroblasts with interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma)-induced MHC class II expression are capable of processing soluble protein for presentation to CD4+ T cells. First, the antigen-presenting cell (APC) function of synovial fibroblasts was studied in an autologous model. From synovial tissue of a RA patient both a fibroblast cell line and a tetanus toxoid (TT)-specific CD4+ T-cell line were generated. A dose-dependent TT response was observed only when TT was presented by IFN-gamma-pretreated synovial fibroblasts. As more direct evidence for MHC class II-restricted antigen presentation, the response of a Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific CD4+ T-cell clone isolated from rheumatoid synovial fluid was demonstrated in the presence of synovial fibroblasts. The response was DR4Dw4-restricted and could be inhibited by monoclonal antibody (mAb) to HLA-DR. In addition, the lymphokine secretion pattern of the synovial T-cell clone did not differ qualitatively upon antigen-specific stimulation using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) or synovial fibroblasts as APC. In order to provide evidence for intracellular antigen processing we next examined the response of a M. leprae-specific T-cell clone with known epitope specificity. Our data suggest that synovial fibroblasts are not passive bystanders, but can become active participants in the development and maintenance of chronic inflammation. PMID:7927499

  4. Synovial fluid lactic acid levels in septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Riley, T V

    1981-01-01

    Synovial fluid lactic acid estimations were carried out on 50 samples by gas liquid chromatography. Specimens from 4 patients with bacteria arthritis, other than gonococcal, had a mean lactic acid concentration of 215 mg/dl. One patient with gonococcal arthritis had a synovial fluid lactic acid of 30 mg/dl. Forty-one patients with inflammatory arthritis and 4 patients with degenerative arthritis had mean synovial fluid lactic acid levels of 27 and 23 mg/dl respectively. The estimation of synovial fluid lactic acid is reliable in differentiating septic arthritis from inflammatory and degenerative arthritis except when the infecting organism is NEisseria gonorrhoeae.

  5. Atlantoaxial Joint Synovial Cyst: Diagnosis and Percutaneous Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Velan, Osvaldo; Rabadan, Alejandra; Paganini, Lisandro; Langhi, Luciano

    2008-11-15

    Synovial cysts at the atlantoaxial level are found uncommonly. Lumbar symptomatic cases are treated by percutaneous cyst aspiration with or without corticoid injection or by surgical resection, but synovial cysts at the C1-C2 level are usually treated by surgery. We report here a 92-year-old woman with a retro-odontoid synovial cyst producing spinal cord compression that was treated by percutaneous aspiration of the cyst under CT guidance. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of an atlantoaxial synovial cyst successfully treated with a minimally invasive procedure.

  6. Contribution of synovial lining cells to synovial vascularization of the rat temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Nozawa-Inoue, Kayoko; Harada, Fumiko; Magara, Jin; Ohazama, Atsushi; Maeda, Takeyasu

    2016-03-01

    The lining layer of the synovial membrane in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) contains two types of lining cells: macrophage-like type A and fibroblast-like type B cells. The type B cells are particularly heterogeneous in their morphology and immunoreactivity, so that details of their functions remain unclear. Some of the type B cells exhibit certain resemblances in their ultrastructure to those of an activated capillary pericyte at the initial stage of the angiogenesis. The articular surface, composed of cartilage and the disc in the TMJ, has few vasculatures, whereas the synovial lining layer is richly equipped with blood capillaries to produce the constituent of synovial fluid. The present study investigated at both the light and electron microscopic levels the immunocytochemical characteristics of the synovial lining cells in the adult rat TMJ, focusing on their contribution to the synovial vascularization. It also employed an intravascular perfusion with Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato) lectin to identify functional vessels in vivo. Results showed that several type B cells expressed desmin, a muscle-specific intermediate filament which is known as the earliest protein to appear during myogenesis as well as being a marker for the immature capillary pericyte. These desmin-positive type B cells showed immunoreactions for vimentin and pericyte markers (neuron-glial 2; NG2 and PDGFRβ) but not for the other markers of myogenic cells (MyoD and myogenin) or a contractile apparatus (αSMA and caldesmon). Immunoreactivity for RECA-1, an endothelial marker, was observed in the macrophage-like type A cells. The arterioles and venules inside the synovial folds extended numerous capillaries with RECA-1-positive endothelial cells and desmin-positive pericytes to distribute densely in the lining layer. The distal portion of these capillaries showing RECA-1-immunoreactivity lacked lectin-staining, indicating a loss of blood-circulation due to sprouting or termination in the

  7. Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Gray, Matthew Philip; Gorelick, Marc H

    2016-06-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis is a primarily pediatric, immune-mediated disease characterized by demyelination and polyfocal neurologic symptoms that typically occur after a preceding viral infection or recent immunization. This article presents the pathophysiology, diagnostic criteria, and magnetic resonance imaging characteristics of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. We also present evaluation and management strategies.

  8. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Alper, Gulay

    2012-11-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis is an immune-mediated inflammatory and demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system, commonly preceded by an infection. It principally involves the white matter tracts of the cerebral hemispheres, brainstem, optic nerves, and spinal cord. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis mainly affects children. Clinically, patients present with multifocal neurologic abnormalities reflecting the widespread involvement in central nervous system. Cerebrospinal fluid may be normal or may show a mild pleocytosis with or without elevated protein levels. Magnetic resonance image (MRI) shows multiple demyelinating lesions. The diagnosis of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis requires both multifocal involvement and encephalopathy by consensus criteria. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis typically has a monophasic course with a favorable prognosis. Multiphasic forms have been reported, resulting in diagnostic difficulties in distinguishing these cases from multiple sclerosis. In addition, many inflammatory disorders may have a similar presentation with frequent occurrence of encephalopathy and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis.

  9. Periodontal bacterial colonization in synovial tissues exacerbates collagen-induced arthritis in B10.RIII mice.

    PubMed

    Chukkapalli, Sasanka; Rivera-Kweh, Mercedes; Gehlot, Prashasnika; Velsko, Irina; Bhattacharyya, Indraneel; Calise, S John; Satoh, Minoru; Chan, Edward K L; Holoshitz, Joseph; Kesavalu, Lakshmyya

    2016-07-12

    It has been previously hypothesized that oral microbes may be an etiological link between rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and periodontal disease. However, the mechanistic basis of this association is incompletely understood. Here, we investigated the role of periodontal bacteria in induction of joint inflammation in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in B10.RIII mice. CIA-prone B10.RIII mice were infected orally with a polybacterial mixture of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Treponema denticola, and Tannerella forsythia for 24 weeks before induction of CIA. The ability of polybacterial mixture to colonize the periodontium and induce systemic response, horizontal alveolar bone resorption in infected B10.RIII mice was investigated. Arthritis incidence, severity of joint inflammation, pannus formation, skeletal damage, hematogenous dissemination of the infection, matrix metalloproteinase 3 (MMP3) levels, and interleukin-17 expression levels were evaluated. B10.RIII mice had gingival colonization with all three bacteria, higher levels of anti-bacterial immunoglobulin G (IgG) and immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibodies, significant alveolar bone resorption, and hematogenous dissemination of P. gingivalis to synovial joints. Infected B10.RIII mice had more severe arthritis, and higher serum matrix metalloproteinase 3 levels and activity. Histopathological analysis showed increased inflammatory cell infiltration, destruction of articular cartilage, erosions, and pannus formation. Additionally, involved joints showed had expression levels of interleukin-17. These findings demonstrate that physical presence of periodontal bacteria in synovial joints of B10.RIII mice with collagen-induced arthritis is associated with arthritis exacerbation, and support the hypothesis that oral bacteria, specifically P. gingivalis, play a significant role in augmenting autoimmune arthritis due to their intravascular dissemination to the joints.

  10. Monophasic synovial sarcoma of the pharynx: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Betal, Dibendu; Babu, Ramesh; Mehmet, Veysi

    2009-01-01

    Synovial sarcomas are a rare form of soft tissue sarcomas. We present a case of a 62 year-old male presenting with a left thyroid lump initially though to be a thyroid adenoma but subsequently diagnosed as a monophasic synovial sarcoma of the pharynx. We discuss the diagnosis and treatment of this case. PMID:19335917

  11. Monophasic synovial sarcoma of the pharynx: a case report.

    PubMed

    Betal, Dibendu; Babu, Ramesh; Mehmet, Veysi

    2009-03-31

    Synovial sarcomas are a rare form of soft tissue sarcomas. We present a case of a 62 year-old male presenting with a left thyroid lump initially though to be a thyroid adenoma but subsequently diagnosed as a monophasic synovial sarcoma of the pharynx. We discuss the diagnosis and treatment of this case.

  12. Normal human synovial fluid: osmolality and exercise-induced changes.

    PubMed

    Baumgarten, M; Bloebaum, R D; Ross, S D; Campbell, P; Sarmiento, A

    1985-12-01

    We measured the osmolality of human synovial fluid in the knees of healthy young adults following minimum activity and exercise. These results were compared with each subject's blood-serum osmolality. The synovial fluid was hyperosmolal with minimum activity, decreasing to blood-serum levels after exercise.

  13. Single-molecule imaging of hyaluronan in human synovial fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kappler, Joachim; Kaminski, Tim P.; Gieselmann, Volkmar; Kubitscheck, Ulrich; Jerosch, Jörg

    2010-11-01

    Human synovial fluid contains a high concentration of hyaluronan, a high molecular weight glycosaminoglycan that provides viscoelasticity and contributes to joint lubrication. In osteoarthritis synovial fluid, the concentration and molecular weight of hyaluronan decrease, thus impairing shock absorption and lubrication. Consistently, substitution of hyaluronan (viscosupplementation) is a widely used treatment for osteoarthritis. So far, the organization and dynamics of hyaluronan in native human synovial fluid and its action mechanism in viscosupplementation are poorly characterized at the molecular level. Here, we introduce highly sensitive single molecule microscopy to analyze the conformation and interactions of fluorescently labeled hyaluronan molecules in native human synovial fluid. Our findings are consistent with a random coil conformation of hyaluronan in human synovial fluid, and point to specific interactions of hyaluronan molecules with the synovial fluid matrix. Furthermore, single molecule microscopy is capable of detecting the breakdown of the synovial fluid matrix in osteoarthritis. Thus, single molecule microscopy is a useful new method to probe the structure of human synovial fluid and its changes in disease states like osteoarthritis.

  14. Osteoarthritic synovial fluid rheology and correlations with protein concentration.

    PubMed

    Madkhali, Anwar; Chernos, Michael; Grecov, Dana; Kwok, Ezra

    2016-11-09

    Osteoarthritis is a common, localized joint disease that causes pain, stiffness and reduced mobility. Osteoarthritis is particularly common in the knees. The effects of osteoarthritis on the rheology of synovial fluid in the knees are not fully understood and consequently require further study. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of protein content on synovial fluid shear rheology. A secondary study outcome will include study of the temperature dependence of synovial fluid behaviour. 38 osteoarthritic synovial fluid samples were studied under shear flow. Shear properties were correlated with protein concentration. Viscosupplement was used as a comparison and to verify measurement reliability. The effects of temperature were investigated at 20, 29 and 37°C. Shear rheological properties were found to vary widely between samples, however all samples demonstrated clear non-Newtonian shear thinning behaviour. In general viscoelastic properties were lower in osteoarthritic samples than previously studied healthy synovial fluid. A moderate correlation was observed between synovial fluid dynamic moduli at a frequency of 2.5 Hz and protein concentration. Temperature was found to affect the rheology of osteoarthritic synovial fluid and was fitted with the Arrhenius model. Increased protein concentration has been correlated with decreased shear rheological parameters. Temperature dependence of synovial fluid was also demonstrated and modelled for use in Part 2 of this article.

  15. [Synovial sarcoma of the infratemporal fossa].

    PubMed

    Tamarit Conejeros, José Manuel; Estrems Navas, Paloma; Estellés Ferriol, Enrique; Dalmau Galofre, José

    2010-01-01

    Synovial sarcoma is the fourth most common type of sarcoma. It is usually found in the knee or ankle joints, and is exceptional in the head and neck. Most cases are diagnosed in men between 20 and 40 years of age. Diagnosis is often casual due to the infrequent nature of this tumour and its non-specific clinical and radiological characteristics. Confirmation is therefore based on immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy techniques. We report a case of biphasic sinovial sarcoma located in the infratemporal fossa treated at our hospital and we make a review of the literature. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  16. The Rheological Properties of the Biopolymers in Synovial Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Wendy E.; Klossner, Rebecca R.; Wetsch, Julie; Oates, Katherine M. N.; Colby, Ralph H.

    2005-03-01

    The polyelectrolyte hyaluronic acid (HA, hyaluronan), its interactions with anti-inflammatory drugs and other biopolymers, and its role in synovial fluid are being studied. We are investigating the rheological properties of sodium hyaluronate (NaHA) solutions and an experimental model of synovial fluid (comprised of NaHA, and the plasma proteins albumin and γ-globulins). Steady shear measurements on bovine synovial fluid and the synovial fluid model indicate that the fluids are highly viscoeleastic and rheopectic (stress increases with time under steady shear). In addition, the influence of anti-inflammatory agents on these solutions is being explored. Initial results indicate that D-penicillamine and hydroxychloroquine affect the rheology of the synovial fluid model and its components. The potential implications of these results will be discussed.

  17. Temporomandibular joint biomechanical restrictions: the fluid and synovial membrane.

    PubMed

    Cascone, P; Vetrano, S; Nicolai, G; Fabiani, F

    1999-07-01

    The authors analyze the functions of the synovial membrane and the chemical-physical properties of synovial fluid. In particular they evaluate the role played by synovial fluid in the complex mechanism of the temporomandibular joint. Every single part that belongs to the temporomandibular joint, together with the stomatognathic apparatus, plays a specific and particular role according to the dynamics and to the preservation of the correct temporomandibular joint physiology. The physiological postural and functional relationship between the various parts of the temporomandibular joint is guaranteed by a number of biomechanical restrictions that lead and influence the regular execution of the articular movements. The most involved biomechanical restrictions in the temporomandibular joint are the temporomandibular ligament, the lateral disc ligament, the bilaminar zone or retrodiscal tissue, the synovial membrane, and the synovial fluid.

  18. Synovial sarcoma: defining features and diagnostic evolution.

    PubMed

    Thway, Khin; Fisher, Cyril

    2014-12-01

    Synovial sarcoma (SS) is a malignant mesenchymal neoplasm with variable epithelial differentiation, with a propensity to occur in young adults and which can arise at almost any site. It is generally viewed and treated as a high-grade sarcoma. As one of the first sarcomas to be defined by the presence of a specific chromosomal translocation leading to the production of the SS18-SSX fusion oncogene, it is perhaps the archetypal "translocation-associated sarcoma," and its translocation remains unique to this tumor type. Synovial sarcoma has a variety of morphologic patterns, but its chief forms are the classic biphasic pattern, of glandular or solid epithelial structures with monomorphic spindle cells and the monophasic pattern, of fascicles of spindle cells with only immunohistochemical or ultrastructural evidence of epithelial differentiation. However, there is significant morphologic heterogeneity and overlap with a variety of other neoplasms, which can cause diagnostic challenge, particularly as the immunoprofile is varied, SS18-SSX is not detected in 100% of SSs, and they may occur at unusual sites. Correct diagnosis is clinically important, due to the relative chemosensitivity of SS in relation to other sarcomas, for prognostication and because of the potential for treatment with specific targeted therapies in the near future. We review SS, with emphasis on the diagnostic spectrum, recent immunohistochemical and genetic findings, and the differential diagnosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Synovial Sarcoma in Head and Neck: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Adriano Santana; Azevedo, Amanda Canário Andrade; Magalhães, Fabíola Moreira; Andrade, Nilvano Alves de

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Synovial sarcoma is a malignant tumor of mesenchymal pluripotent cells. Objectives We present a case of synovial sarcoma in the posterolateral wall of the oropharynx. Resumed report The patient, a 23-year-old woman, was admitted with a history of dysphagia and difficulty in breathing for 8 months, resulting in progressive deterioration and onset of snoring, muffled voice, and local pain. An oropharyngeal tumor in the left posterolateral wall touched the base of the ipsilateral tongue. The patient underwent endoscopic pharyngectomy to remove the lesion. Pathologic examination revealed synovial sarcoma with positive margins, and Mohs technique was proposed for margin control. The margins were disease-free, without the need for total laryngectomy. The pharynx was reconstructed with a microvascular forearm flap. The patient developed postoperative stability. Conclusion Despite its name, synovial sarcoma is rarely sourced directly from synovial membranes. It is most commonly found in the vicinity of large joints. The location at the head and neck, a location poor in synovial tissue, is unusual. Synovial sarcoma in the head and neck has an aggressive nature and poor prognosis. Resection with negative margins remains the foundation of therapy, which is not so easily achieved in the head and neck. It is important for the otorhinolaryngologist and head and neck surgeon to be familiar with this aggressive tumor, which carries high mortality and morbidity. The appropriate diagnosis and treatment can improve prognosis and patient survival. PMID:25992071

  20. TNFα modulates protein degradation pathways in rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Connor, Alison M; Mahomed, Nizar; Gandhi, Rajiv; Keystone, Edward C; Berger, Stuart A

    2012-03-14

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory and destructive disease of the joint. The synovial lining consists of two main types of cells: synovial fibroblasts and macrophages. The macrophage-derived cytokine TNFα stimulates RA synovial fibroblasts to proliferate and produce growth factors, chemokines, proteinases and adhesion molecules, making them key players in the RA disease process. If proteins are not correctly folded, cellular stress occurs that can be relieved in part by increased degradation of the aberrant proteins by the proteasome or autophagy. We hypothesized that the activity of the protein degradation pathways would be increased in response to TNFα stimulation in RA synovial fibroblasts compared with control fibroblasts. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress markers were examined in synovial fibroblasts by immunoblotting and PCR. Use of the autophagy and proteasome protein degradation pathways in response to TNFα stimulation was determined using a combination of experiments involving chemical inhibition of the autophagy or proteasome pathways followed by immunoblotting for the autophagy marker LC3, measurement of proteasome activity and long-lived protein degradation, and determination of cellular viability. RA synovial fibroblasts are under acute ER stress, and the stress is increased in the presence of TNFα. Autophagy is the main pathway used to relieve the ER stress in unstimulated fibroblasts, and both autophagy and the proteasome are more active in RA synovial fibroblasts compared with control fibroblasts. In response to TNFα, the autophagy pathway but not the proteasome is consistently stimulated, yet there is an increased dependence on the proteasome for cell viability. If autophagy is blocked in the presence of TNFα, an increase in proteasome activity occurs in RA synovial fibroblasts but not in control cells. TNFα stimulation of synovial fibroblasts results in increased expression of ER stress markers. Survival of synovial

  1. Synovial osteochondromatosis and sclerosing osteosarcoma in a cat.

    PubMed

    Tas, O; De Cock, H; Lemmens, P; Pool, R R

    2013-01-01

    The clinical, radiographic and histological features of synovial osteochondromatosis in multiple joints and an unrelated sclerosing osteosarcoma of the left tibia in a cat are reported. Radiographic evaluation showed signs of several nodular radiopacities in both stifles and both shoulders. Pathologic transverse fractures of the left tibia and fibula were also present. A midfemoral amputation of the left hindlimb was performed and treatment consisted of lifelong administration of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Histological evaluation confirmed synovial osteochondromatosis of the left stifle and sclerosing osteosarcoma of the left tibia. This is the first report of a feline patient with bilateral synovial osteochondromatosis that describes the clinical, radiographic and histological aspects of this disease.

  2. Synovial Joints: from Development to Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tieshi; Tagliafierro, Lidia; Temple, Joseph D.; Willcockson, Helen H.; Ye, Ping; Esposito, Alessandra; Xu, Fuhua; Spagnoli, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Synovial joint morphogenesis occurs through the condensation of mesenchymal cells into a non-cartilaginous region known as interzone, and the specification of progenitor cells that commit to the articular fate. Although several signaling molecules are expressed by the interzone, the mechanism is poorly understood. For treatments of cartilage injuries, it is critical to discover the presence of joint progenitor cells in adult tissues and their expression gene pattern. Potential stem cells niches have been found in different joint regions, such as the surface zone of articular cartilage, synovium and groove of Ranvier. Inherited joint malformation as well as joint degenerating conditions are often associated with other skeletal defects, and may be seen as the failure of morphogenic factors to establish the correct microenvironment in cartilage and bone. Therefore, exploring how joints form can help us understand how cartilage and bone are damaged and to develop drugs to reactivate this developing mechanism. PMID:25431159

  3. Congenital disseminated tufted angioma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Liu, Ling; Wang, Gang; Gao, Tianwen

    2013-04-01

    Tufted angioma represents a rare vascular tumor that can develop in children and young adults. It usually presents as solitary plaque or large tumor on the extremities, trunk or other anatomic sites. Histopathologically, it is characterized by proliferation of closely packed capillaries in the dermis in a 'cannonball' distribution. We described a 2-month-old child who developed widespread disseminated red papules since her birth. Eight lesions were excised for histopathology, seven of which showed typical cannonball-like distribution of proliferative capillaries, characteristic of tufted angioma, and one on the hand which showed focal disseminated proliferation of endothelial cells. Immunohistochemistry showed focal D2-40 positivity in one lesion and was negative in the other seven. Expression of Prox1 and Glut-1 was negative in all lesions. This case represented a disseminated form of tufted angioma.

  4. Testicular Synovial Sarcoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Nesrine, Mejri; Sellami, Rym; Doghri, Raoudha; Rifi, Hela; Raies, Henda; Mezlini, Amel

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports a case of testicular synovial sarcoma with molecular genetic analysis. A 24-year-old male presented with painless scrotal mass. Ultrasonography showed a heterogeneous mass of 66 mm × 34 mm in size involving the inguinal region. Histological examination of a surgical biopsy showed a grade III monophasic growth pattern of spindle cell proliferation. Immunohistochemical analyses indicated positive staining for pancytokeratine and epithelial membrane antigen. Cytogenetic analysis showed the presence of CYT-SSX1 mutation, and CT scan showed non-specific pleural micro-nodules with a size of 7.5 mm. The patient had an extended left orchidectomy but was lost to follow-up for 1 year. A local recurrent scrotal mass of 32 mm × 25 mm, multiple inguinal lymph nodes, and increased pleural nodules, which were confirmed by histological examination, were treated with three cycles of adriamycine and ifosfamide chemotherapy, surgical resection, and radiotherapy with complete response. After 3 months, the patient developed local recurrence and pulmonary metastases that did not respond to second-line chemotherapy based on gemcitabine and paclitaxel. The patient had dyspnea at the time of this writing and chest pain, and is under third-line chemotherapy based on Deticene after 30 months of following up. This patient died on November 16, 2012 after a resperatory failure and malignant pelural effusion. Synovial sarcoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of soft tissue tumor and it should be aggressively treated to improve prognosis. Although our patient has shown numerous factors of bad prognosis, he has had a relatively long survival time. PMID:23691490

  5. Testicular synovial sarcoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Nesrine, Mejri; Sellami, Rym; Doghri, Raoudha; Rifi, Hela; Raies, Henda; Mezlini, Amel

    2012-12-01

    This paper reports a case of testicular synovial sarcoma with molecular genetic analysis. A 24-year-old male presented with painless scrotal mass. Ultrasonography showed a heterogeneous mass of 66 mm × 34 mm in size involving the inguinal region. Histological examination of a surgical biopsy showed a grade III monophasic growth pattern of spindle cell proliferation. Immunohistochemical analyses indicated positive staining for pancytokeratine and epithelial membrane antigen. Cytogenetic analysis showed the presence of CYT-SSX1 mutation, and CT scan showed non-specific pleural micro-nodules with a size of 7.5 mm. The patient had an extended left orchidectomy but was lost to follow-up for 1 year. A local recurrent scrotal mass of 32 mm × 25 mm, multiple inguinal lymph nodes, and increased pleural nodules, which were confirmed by histological examination, were treated with three cycles of adriamycine and ifosfamide chemotherapy, surgical resection, and radiotherapy with complete response. After 3 months, the patient developed local recurrence and pulmonary metastases that did not respond to second-line chemotherapy based on gemcitabine and paclitaxel. The patient had dyspnea at the time of this writing and chest pain, and is under third-line chemotherapy based on Deticene after 30 months of following up. This patient died on November 16, 2012 after a resperatory failure and malignant pelural effusion. Synovial sarcoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of soft tissue tumor and it should be aggressively treated to improve prognosis. Although our patient has shown numerous factors of bad prognosis, he has had a relatively long survival time.

  6. Disseminated Blastomycosis Mimicking Malignancy.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jennifer L; Tjarks, B Joel; Berg, Aaron; Oliver, Tony

    2017-04-01

    Blastomycosis is an endemic fungal infection commonly found within the Mississippi and Ohio River basins and Great Lakes region. While patients typically present with acute pneumonia, Blastomyces dermatitidis has the potential to spread hematogenously, resulting in disseminated infection of multiple organs. In this report, we describe a 57-year-old male with disseminated blastomycosis acquired in South Dakota. The diagnostic evaluation was confounded by concern for malignancy given the involvement of multiple locations, including brain, lungs, adrenal glands, and testes. Despite aggressive therapy with amphotericin B, the patient succumbed to this infection. Copyright© South Dakota State Medical Association.

  7. Disseminated cutaneous sporotrichosis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shurong; Hersh, Andrew M; Naughton, Greg; Mullins, Kevin; Fung, Maxwell A; Sharon, Victoria R

    2013-11-15

    The dimorphic fungus Sporothrix schenckii commonly causes localized cutaneous disease with lymphocutaneous distribution. However, disseminated sporotrichosis occurs predominantly in immunocompromised patients. We report a case of disseminated cutaneous sporotrichosis in a patient with newly diagnosed HIV with a CD4 count of 208. The patient presented with multiple cutaneous and subcutaneous nodules as well as fever and malaise. Tissue culture and skin biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of sporotrichosis. He was started on itraconazole 200mg twice a day with rapid resolution of fever along with cessation of the development of new lesions.

  8. Hyaluronate synthesis by synovial villi in organ culture. [Dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, S.L.; Christine, T.A.

    1983-06-01

    Individual canine synovial villi were used to establish short-term synovial organ cultures. These villi incorporated /sup 3/H-glucosamine into highly-polymerized /sup 3/H-hyaluronic acid (/sup 3/H-HA), which was the only /sup 3/H-glycosaminoglycan identified in the culture medium. Some /sup 3/H-HA, and larger amounts of other /sup 3/H-glycosaminoglycans, were recovered from cultured tissues. Culture medium /sup 3/H-HA content was proportional to the surface area of cultured villi. Organ cultures of nonvillous synovium were compared with villi; nonvillous cultures synthesized less /sup 3/H-HA per mm2 of their synovial intimal surface than villi. These cultures complement cell culture techniques for in vitro studies of synovial lining cell function.

  9. Ruptured bilateral synovial cysts in presumed gonococcal arthritis.

    PubMed

    Terho, P; Viikari, J; Mäkelä, P; Toivanen, A

    1977-01-01

    A man with gonococcal urethritis who developed septic arthritis of both knees is described. The arthritis was complicated by rupture of bilateral synovial cysts. A rise in serum gonococcal complement-fixation antibody titer was demonstrated. Complement-fixing gonococcal antibodies with a high titer were observed in this synovial fluid. The patient responded well to antibiotic treatment and there was no permanent damage to his knee joints.

  10. Synovial sarcomna of larynx-a rare site.

    PubMed

    Sridhar Reddy, D; Shobhan Babu, A; Lenin, A

    2007-03-01

    Synovial sarcoma is a soft tissue sarcoma of unknown histiogenesis and occurs predominantly in the lower limbs of young adults and the head and neck is a relatively rare site, there are about 10 cases with laryngeal localization in the world literature. We present a 52 year old male with synovial sarcoma of larynx. Total laryngectomy was done and patient is free from disease till date.

  11. Cervical synovial cyst: case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Menghetti, Claudia; Cardia, Andrea; Fornari, Maurizio; Ortolina, Alessandro

    2009-01-01

    Synovial cysts, typically observed in the lumbar spine eventually associated with degenerative changes of the facet joints, only rarely present in the cervical spine. Up to now, only 28 symptomatic cases are described in literature. Typically, the treatment of these cases is a decompressive laminectomy followed by complete surgical removal of the lesion. The authors present the case of an 84-year-old man with a symptomatic synovial cyst involving the space between C7 and T1. PMID:19603197

  12. Cervical synovial cyst: case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Costa, Francesco; Menghetti, Claudia; Cardia, Andrea; Fornari, Maurizio; Ortolina, Alessandro

    2010-07-01

    Synovial cysts, typically observed in the lumbar spine eventually associated with degenerative changes of the facet joints, only rarely present in the cervical spine. Up to now, only 28 symptomatic cases are described in literature. Typically, the treatment of these cases is a decompressive laminectomy followed by complete surgical removal of the lesion. The authors present the case of an 84-year-old man with a symptomatic synovial cyst involving the space between C7 and T1.

  13. Giant Solitary Synovial Osteochondroma of the Subtalar Joint.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2016-01-01

    A rapidly progressing calcified mass was found in the left sinus tarsi in a 12-year-old female after a trivial ankle sprain. The lesion mimicked an aggressive lesion clinically and radiographically. Ultrasound-guided biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of a synovial chondroma. Excision of the tumor and partial synovectomy were performed. The histologic diagnosis was a solitary synovial osteochondroma. The condition had not recurred after a follow-up period of 12 months.

  14. Disseminated Balamuthia mandrillaris Infection

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Neil; Almira-Suarez, M. I.; Reese, Jennifer M.; Hoke, George M.; Mandell, James W.; Roy, Sharon L.; Visvesvara, Govinda

    2015-01-01

    Balamuthia mandrillaris is a rare cause of human infection, but when infections do occur, they result in high rates of morbidity and mortality. A case of disseminated Balamuthia infection is presented. Early diagnosis and initiation of recommended therapy are essential for increased chances of successful outcomes. PMID:26135864

  15. Tachykinin regulation of basal synovial blood flow

    PubMed Central

    Ferrell, W R; Lockhart, J C; Karimian, S M

    1997-01-01

    Experiments were performed to investigate the role of endogenously released tachykinins in the regulation of blood flow to the rat knee joint. Synovial perfusion was assessed by laser Doppler perfusion imaging, which permitted spatial measurement of relative changes in perfusion from control (pre drug administration), expressed as the percentage change. Most experiments were performed on the exposed medial aspect of the knee joint capsule.Neither the selective tachykinin NK1 receptor antagonist, FK888, nor the selective tachykinin NK2 receptor antagonist, SR48968, significantly influenced synovial blood flow at doses of 10−12, 10−10 and 10−8 mol. However, topical co-administration of these agents produced significant dose-dependent reductions in basal synovial perfusion of 6.3±4.6, 12.0±3.4 and 19.9±2.6%, respectively; n=29. The non-selective tachykinin NK1/NK2 receptor antagonist, FK224, also produced significant (at 10−10 and 10−8 mol), but less potent, reductions in perfusion of 5.3±4.0, 8.4±2.2 and 5.9±2.8%, respectively; n=25.Topical administration of the α1-, α2-adrenoceptor antagonist phenoxybenzamine elicited a 31.3±6.2% increase in blood flow which was substantially reduced to 10.4±3.8% by co-administration of the FK888 and SR48968 (both at 10−8 mol; n=8–13), suggesting that normally there is sympathetic vasoconstrictor ‘tone' which is opposed by the vasodilator action of endogenous tachykinins.One week after surgical interruption of the nerve supply to the knee joint, co-administration of FK888 and SR48968 (both at 10−8 mol) now produced slight vasodilatation (6.7±4.6%; n=9) which did not differ significantly from vehicle treatment. Depletion of tachykinins from sensory nerve fibres by systemic capsaicin administration also resulted in abolition of the vasoconstrictor effect of FK888 and SR48968 (both at 10−8 mol), with these agents only producing a slight vasodilatation (2.5±5.3%; n=6).By use of a near infra

  16. [Synovialitis of the arthrofibrotic type: criteria of a new synovialitis type for the diagnosis of arthrofibrosis].

    PubMed

    Krenn, V; Ruppert, M; Knöß, P; Kendoff, D; Poremba, C; Thomsen, M; Skutek, M; Hassenpflug, J; Ascherl, R; Krukemeyer, M G; Matziolis, G; Thomas, P; Gehrke, T

    2013-04-01

    After rheumatologic conservative medical therapy has been exhausted in degenerative and inflammatory joint diseases, arthroplastic operations are an important option to restore quality of life. Endoprosthesis-associated arthrofibrosis is a severe fibrosing disease of the synovial membrane after endoprosthetic operations. Neither the morphological substrate nor histopathological criteria have been described. The aim was to describe the histopathological substrate of arthrofibrosis and to define histological and immunohistochemical criteria of arthrofibrosis on the basis of tissue samples derived from revision. In histopathological analyses arthrofibrosis revealed a synovialitis with varying fibrosis, without detectable ossification and without minimal wear particle reaction (so-called synovialitis of arthrofibrotic type, SAT). A 3-stage grading was determined based on the cellular density of the fibrous tissue (fibroblast cellularity). In 191 cases with SAT, grade 1 was found in 24.1 % (n = 46), grade 2 was found in 51.8 % (n = 99) and grade 3 was found in 24.1 % (n = 46). The control group consisted of 29 cases with synovialitis of indifferent type (type IV membrane). If SAT grades 2 and 3 are summed together, i.e. the distance between the fibroblasts was less than two cell lengths, the difference of the fibroblast cellularity compared with the type IV membrane was significant (p < 0.001). Above SAT grade 2 the diagnosis of arthrofibrosis could be made with a sensitivity 0.7592 and specificity 0.8276. The SM-alpha-actin cytoplasmic positivity of fibroblasts indicates a myofibroblast phenotype and the β-catenin positivity suggests a resemblance to fibromatosis or a keloid-like process. In the quantitative evaluation of the β-catenin positive fibroblasts, there was a significant difference (p < 0.001) between type IV membrane and SAT. A threshold value of 20 beta-catenin positive cells per microscopic high power field (HPF) was determined

  17. [Disseminated mycosis fungoides].

    PubMed

    Trope, B M; Schmidt, J M; de Oliveira Neto, A A; Pereira Júnior, A C; Marques, A de S; Ishida, C E; Azulay, R D

    1985-01-01

    A case of mycosis fungoides (MF) that began with cutaneous eritemato-papular lesions leading to death with neurological symptoms is reported. Cutaneous histophatology was typical to MF and the liquoric citology showed Sézary cells. Necropsy evidenced extra-cutaneous dissemination of the tumor involving lymphnodes, heart, digestive system, bladder, liver, bone marrow and leptomeninges. The uncommon clinical manifestations and evolution are discussed.

  18. Disseminated superficial actinic porokeratosis.

    PubMed

    Rouhani, Panta; Fischer, Max; Meehan, Shane; Pomeranz, Miriam Keltz

    2012-12-15

    Disseminated superficial actinic porokeratosis, which was described in 1966, is characterized by small, atrophic patches with distinctive keratin rims that occur on sun-exposed areas of the extremities, shoulders, and back. The diagnosis is based on the histopathologic finding of a cornoid lamella, absence of a granular layer, and often a thin epidermis. It is associated with exposure to ultraviolet radiation. Gene studies suggest a pathway defect in which several mutations in keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation lead to development of porokeratosis.

  19. Disseminated superficial porokeratosis.

    PubMed

    Brauer, Jeremy A; Mandal, Rajni; Walters, Ruth; Solomon, Gary; Kundu, Roopal V; Strober, Bruce E

    2010-11-15

    A 62-year-old woman with psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis presented for evaluation and treatment of a one-week history of pruritic, pink spots on her trunk and extremities. Several weeks prior, therapy with certolizumab pegol and methotrexate was started for her psoriatic arthritis. A biopsy specimen was consistent with the diagnosis of porokeratosis. Owing to the setting of immunosuppression and presence of symmetric pruritic lesions on non-sun exposed areas, the diagnosis of disseminated superficial porokeratosis was made.

  20. Developing an Effective Dissemination Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southwest Educational Development Laboratory, Austin, TX. National Center for the Dissemination of Disability Research.

    This booklet offers guidelines for the development of dissemination strategies, especially those concerned with research and programs. Individual sections address: the importance of including sound dissemination plans in grant proposals, factors found to be closely related to information utilization in the dissemination process, a philosophical…

  1. Ultrasound-guided synovial Tru-cut biopsy: indications, technique, and outcome in 111 cases.

    PubMed

    Sitt, Jacqueline C M; Griffith, James F; Lai, Fernand M; Hui, Mamie; Chiu, K H; Lee, Ryan K L; Ng, Alex W H; Leung, Jason

    2017-05-01

    To investigate the diagnostic performance of ultrasound-guided synovial biopsy. Clinical notes, pathology and microbiology reports, ultrasound and other imaging studies of 100 patients who underwent 111 ultrasound-guided synovial biopsies were reviewed. Biopsies were compared with the final clinical diagnosis established after synovectomy (n = 43) or clinical/imaging follow-up (n = 57) (mean 30 months). Other than a single vasovagal episode, no complication of synovial biopsy was encountered. One hundred and seven (96 %) of the 111 biopsies yielded synovium histologically. Pathology ± microbiology findings for these 107 conclusive biopsies comprised synovial tumour (n = 30, 28 %), synovial infection (n = 18, 17 %), synovial inflammation (n = 45, 42 %), including gouty arthritis (n = 3), and no abnormality (n = 14, 13 %). The accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of synovial biopsy was 99 %, 97 %, and 100 % for synovial tumour; 100 %, 100 %, and 100 % for native joint infection; and 78 %, 45 %, and 100 % for prosthetic joint infection. False-negative synovial biopsy did not seem to be related to antibiotic therapy. Ultrasound-guided Tru-cut synovial biopsy is a safe and reliable technique with a high diagnostic yield for diagnosing synovial tumour and also, most likely, for joint infection. Regarding joint infection, synovial biopsy of native joints seems to have a higher diagnostic yield than that for infected prosthetic joints. • Ultrasound-guided Tru-cut synovial biopsy has high accuracy (99 %) for diagnosing synovial tumour. • It has good accuracy, sensitivity, and high specificity for diagnosis of joint infection. • Synovial biopsy of native joints works better than biopsy of prosthetic joints. • A negative synovial biopsy culture from a native joint largely excludes septic arthritis. • Ultrasound-guided Tru-cut synovial biopsy is a safe and well-tolerated procedure.

  2. Expression of CD44 on rheumatoid synovial fluid lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Kelleher, D; Murphy, A; Hall, N; Omary, M B; Kearns, G; Long, A; Casey, E B

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To investigate the involvement of the adhesion molecule CD44 in the homing of lymphocytes to synovial tissue, by examining the density of expression and molecular mass of CD44 on rheumatoid synovial fluid lymphocytes. METHODS--Twenty patients with rheumatoid arthritis were studied. Peripheral blood and synovial fluid lymphocytes were isolated by Ficoll-Hypaque sedimentation. CD44 expression was analysed by two colour flow cytometry of CD3 positive T lymphocytes with calculation of mean fluorescence intensity. Expression of activation markers M21C5, M2B3, interleukin (IL)-2 receptor and transferrin receptor was quantitated. In addition, CD44 molecular mass was examined by Western blot in six patients. RESULTS--CD44 expression was markedly increased on synovial fluid T lymphocytes of rheumatoid patients relative to peripheral blood lymphocytes from the same individuals. CD44 molecular mass on peripheral blood mononuclear cells was 88 kDa, but that on synovial fluid lymphocytes was only 83 kDa. CD44 expression correlated significantly with expression of activation markers M21C5, M2B3, and the IL-2 receptor. CONCLUSIONS--Alterations in density of expression or of the molecular mass of CD44 could contribute to local tissue injury, either directly by facilitating adhesion, or indirectly through effects on other adhesion molecules. Images PMID:7545382

  3. gamma. -Aminobutyric acid in synovial membrane of rat knee joint

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, A.; Kondo, M.; Taniyama, K.; Tanaka, S.

    1988-01-01

    ..gamma..-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) content was measured, and the release of GABA was studied in the synovial membrane of the rat knee joint. GABA content of the synovial membrane was 20.1 nmol/g tissue. Ten days after unilateral dissection of the sciatic nerve, femoral nerve or both nerves, the GABA contents of the ipsilateral membrane were 13.8, 14.6 and 7.8 nmol/g tissue, respectively. High K/sup +/ evoked the Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent release of (/sup 3/H) GABA from the synovial membranes of intact rats preloaded with (/sup 3/H) GABA, but did not evoke release from the membrane ipsilateral to the dissection of both sciatic and femoral nerves. Evoked release of (/sup 3/H) GABA was obtained in the synovial membrane preloaded with (/sup 3/H) GABA in the presence of ..beta..-alanine, but not in the presence of 2,4L-diaminobutyric acid. These results indicate that GABA is present in the neuronal elements of the synovial membrane of the rat knee joint.

  4. Intraarticular volume and clearance in human synovial effusions

    SciTech Connect

    Wallis, W.J.; Simkin, P.A.; Nelp, W.B.; Foster, D.M.

    1985-04-01

    Intraarticular volumes were measured by radiolabeled albumin (RISA) distribution in chronic knee effusions from 11 rheumatoid arthritis patients and 9 osteoarthritis patients. Volumes of synovial fluid obtained at joint aspiration were substantially less than those found by RISA dilution. Up to 24 hours was needed for full distribution of RISA throughout the intraarticular compartment. Measured 123I and RISA radioactivity over the knee described monoexponential rate constants, lambda (minute-1). The clearance of 123I and RISA from synovial effusions was derived by the formulation volume (ml) X lambda (minute-1) = clearance (ml/minute). RISA clearance in rheumatoid effusions was significantly greater than that found in osteoarthritis effusions. Intraarticular volume and isotope clearance were easily quantified and provide measures for further evaluating the microvascular physiology of synovial effusions.

  5. Growth factors with heparin binding affinity in human synovial fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Hamerman, D.; Taylor, S.; Kirschenbaum, I.; Klagsbrun, M.; Raines, E.W.; Ross, R.; Thomas, K.A.

    1987-12-01

    Synovial effusions were obtained from the knees of 15 subjects with joint trauma, menisceal or ligamentous injury, or osteoarthritis. Heparin-Sepharose affinity chromatography of these synovial fluids revealed, in general, three major peaks of mitogenic activity as measured by incorporation of /sup 3/H-thymidine into 3T3 cells. Gradient elution patterns showed activities at 0.5M NaCl, which is characteristic of platelet derived growth factor, and at 1.1 M NaCl and 1.6M NaCl, indicative of acidic and basic fibroblast growth factors, respectively. The identities of these mitogenic fractions were confirmed by specific immunologic and receptor-binding assays. The presence of platelet derived, acidic and basic fibroblast growth factors in the synovial fluid may contribute to wound healing in the arthritic joint.

  6. Cell culture-derived HCV cannot infect synovial fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Nadeem, Abd-Elshafy D; Thomas, Pietschmann; Ulf, Müller-Ladner; Elena, Neumann; Anggakusuma, A; Mohamed, Bahgat M; Frank, Pessler; Patrick, Behrendt

    2015-12-08

    Worldwide 170 million individuals are infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV), up to 45 million of whom are affected by arthropathy. It is unclear whether this is due to viral infection of synovial cells or immune-mediated mechanisms. We tested the capacity of primary synovial fibroblasts to support HCV propagation. Out of the four critical HCV receptors, only CD81 was expressed to any significant extent in OASF and RASF. Consistent with this, pseudotyped HCV particles were unable to infect these cells. Permissiveness for HCV replication was investigated by transfecting cells with a subgenomic replicon of HCV encoding a luciferase reporter. OASF and RASF did not support replication of HCV, possibly due to low expression levels of miR-122. In conclusion, primary human synovial fibroblasts are unable to support propagation of HCV in vitro. HCV-related arthropathy is unlikely due to direct infection of these cells.

  7. Synovial sarcoma: a rare presentation of parapharyngeal mass.

    PubMed

    Shaariyah, Mohd Mokhtar; Mazita, Ami; Masaany, Mansor; Razif, Mohd Yunus; Isa, Mohamed Rose; Asma, Abdullah

    2010-06-01

    Synovial sarcoma is a rare soft tissue sarcoma of the head and neck region involving the parapharyngeal space. The diagnosis of synovial sarcoma can be very challenging to the pathologists. We present a rare case of parapharyngeal synovial sarcoma in a young female patient who had a two-month history of left cervical intumescent mass at level II. The fine needle aspiration cytology of the mass was proved inconclusive. Transcervical excision of the mass was performed and the first case of parapharyngeal sarcoma was identified in our center by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique. Repeat imaging revealed residual tumor. The patient successfully underwent a second excision of the residual tumor and received adjuvant radiotherapy.

  8. Simulation Of The Synovial Fluid In A Deformable Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Gutierrez, Nancy; Ibarra-Bracamontes, Laura A.

    2016-11-01

    The main components of a synovial joint are a cartilage and a biofluid known as the synovial fluid. The results were obtained using the FLUENT software to simulate the behavior of the synovial fluid within a deformable cavity with a simple geometry. The cartilage is represented as a porous region. By reducing the available region for the fluid, a fluid displacement into the cartilage is induced. The total pressure reached in the interface of the deformable cavity and the porous region is presented. The geometry and properties of the system are scaled to values found in a knee joint. The effect of deformation rate, fluid viscosity and properties of the porous medium on the total pressure reached are analyzed. The higher pressures are reached either for high deformation rate or when the fluid viscosity increases. This study was supported by the Mexican Council of Science and Technology (CONACyT) and by the Scientific Research Coordination of the University of Michoacan in Mexico.

  9. Heart failure resulting from giant left atrial synovial sarcoma metastasis.

    PubMed

    Winkler, B; Grapow, M; Seeberger, M; Matt, P; Aulitzky, W; Eckstein, F

    2012-02-01

    Synovial sarcoma metastasis affecting the heart and infiltrating the mitral valve is a very rare pathology. We report the case of a 44-year-old male treated with chemotherapy for atypical synovial sarcoma of the oral mucosa who presented to our clinic after cardiac decompensation with a presumptive diagnosis of myxoma of the left atrium. A large necrotic tumour positive for CK 22, EMA, CD 99 and BCL-2 but negative for translocation in COBRA-FISH analysis by break-apart probe could be excised and revealed a very rare subtype of synovial sarcoma metastasis arising from the endocard of the left atrium. The tumour was resected and the mitral valve reconstructed through ring annuloplasty. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  10. Poorly differentiated synovial sarcoma in the wrist - Case report*

    PubMed Central

    Maia, Daniela Cristina Caetano; Menezes, Carla Kellen da Silva; Bastos, Thales Costa; Ferreira, Luiz Carlos de Lima; Francesconi, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    Synovial sarcomas are rare malignant tumors affecting mainly young adults, presenting as a slow growth mass located in deep soft tissues of extremities, near the joints. In this report a 34-year-old male patient, presented an ulcerovegetative lesion on the right wrist which was completely excised. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry confirmed synovial sarcomas with poorly differentiated cells. This patient presented 11 months later with ipsilateral axillary lymph node metastasis, which emphasizes the unfavorable prognosis of this synovial sarcoma variant. The indolent growth pattern of this sarcoma justifies the well circumscribed initial stages, which progressively infiltrate adjacent structures with lung metastasis (80%) and lymph node involvement (20%) and thus corroborates the importance of early diagnosis and proper treatment. PMID:25184926

  11. Delusions of Disseminated Fungosis

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Paul Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Delusional infestation is a rare monosymptomatic hypochondriacal psychosis according to The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th ed.; DSM-5; American Psychiatric Association, 2013). It can be a primary disorder or associated with an underlying psychological or physical disorder. It commonly presents as delusional parasitosis, and less than 1% may be fungi related. We present this case as it is a rare presentation of a rare condition. Case Presentation. Our patient is a 60-year-old Caucasian man who presented with a 7-year history of delusional infestation manifested as a disseminated fungal infection. He had previously been reviewed by multiple physicians for the same with no systemic illness diagnosed. After multiple reviews and thorough investigation we diagnosed him with a likely delusional disorder. As is common with this patient cohort he refused psychiatric review or antipsychotic medication. Conclusion. A delusion of a disseminated fungal infestation is a rare condition. It is exceedingly difficult to treat as these patients often refuse to believe the investigation results and diagnosis. Furthermore, they either refuse or are noncompliant with treatment. Multidisciplinary outpatient evaluation may be the best way to allay patient fears and improve treatment compliance. PMID:25610675

  12. Characterisation of lubricin in synovial fluid from horses with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Svala, E; Jin, C; Rüetschi, U; Ekman, S; Lindahl, A; Karlsson, N G; Skiöldebrand, E

    2017-01-01

    The glycoprotein lubricin contributes to the boundary lubrication of the articular cartilage surface. The early events of osteoarthritis involve the superficial layer where lubricin is synthesised. To characterise the glycosylation profile of lubricin in synovial fluid from horses with osteoarthritis and study secretion and degradation of lubricin in an in vitro inflammation cartilage model. In vitro study. Synovial fluid samples collected from horses with joints with normal articular cartilage and structural osteoarthritic lesions; with and without osteochondral fragments, were analysed for the lubricin glycosylation profiles. Articular cartilage explants were stimulated with or without interleukin-1β for 25 days. Media samples collected at 3-day intervals were analysed by quantitative proteomics, western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. O-glycosylation profiles in synovial fluid revealed both Core 1 and 2 O-glycans, with Core 1 O-glycans predominating. Synovial fluid from normal joints (49.5 ± 1.9%) contained significantly lower amounts of monosialylated Core 1 O-glycans compared with joints with osteoarthritis (53.8 ± 7.8%, P = 0.03) or joints with osteochondral fragments (57.3 ± 8.8%, P = 0.001). Additionally, synovial fluid from normal joints (26.7 ± 6.7%) showed higher amounts of disialylated Core 1 O-glycan than from joints with osteochondral fragments (21.2 ± 4.9%, P = 0.03). A C-terminal proteolytic cleavage site in lubricin was found in synovial fluid from normal and osteochondral fragment joints and in media from interleukin-1β stimulated and unstimulated articular cartilage explants. This is the first demonstration of a change in the glycosylation profile of lubricin in synovial fluid from diseased equine joints compared with that from normal joints. We demonstrate an identical proteolytic cleavage site of lubricin both in vitro and in vivo. The reduced sialation of lubricin in synovial fluid from diseased joints may affect the

  13. Synovial Osteochondromatosis at the Carpometacarpal Joint of the Thumb

    PubMed Central

    Hagiwara, Hiroyoshi; Nishimura, Takahiro; Amagai, Hiroshi; Yamamura, Mayu; Miyamoto, Osamu; Nakama, Sueo

    2017-01-01

    Synovial osteochondromatosis (SOC) is a benign tumor characterized by synovial connective tissue metaplasia. SOC commonly affects major joints including the knee followed by the hip, elbow, and wrist. SOC cases in the hand are not reported as often as SOC of major joints. Particularly SOC of the carpometacarpal joint of the thumb is rare. We report on a 57-year-old female with primary SOC of the carpometacarpal joint of her left thumb. Surgical excision was performed and the patient had no symptoms with full range of motion of her left thumb. At 3 years of follow-up, there was no recurrence. PMID:28168072

  14. An investigation of the optical properties of cholesterol crystals in human synovial fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharova, M. M.; Nasonova, V. A.; Konstantinova, A. F.; Chudakov, V. S.; Gaĭnutdinov, R. V.

    2009-05-01

    The synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid diseases has been investigated. The presence of cholesterol crystals in the synovial fluid is revealed by polarization microscopy. A comparative analysis of the composition and properties of synovial fluid and the optical properties of cholesterol crystals is performed. It is established that the size, number, and growth of cholesterol crystals are interrelated to the synovial fluid composition. It is shown that rheumatoid diseases can be accompanied by the formation of cholesterol crystals in the synovial fluid from different joints and in rheumatic nodules. It is shown that all investigated crystals have a significant birefringence.

  15. Disseminated extracranial metastatic meningioma.

    PubMed

    Chua, Felicia H Z; Low, Sharon Y Y; Tham, Chee K; Ding, Cristine; Wong, Chin F; Nolan, Colum P

    2016-11-01

    Meningiomas are usually low-grade, solitary lesions that rarely metastasize. In this group of central nervous system tumours, the higher grade subtypes are notorious for resistance to conventional chemo-radiation therapies. Recent studies have shown efficacy in the use of bevacizumab in patients with recurrent and, or progressive anaplastic meningioma. The authors report a case of a young patient with recurrent anaplastic meningioma who despite being treated with bevacizumab, progressed with disease dissemination to multiple extracranial sites. Although the majority of meningiomas are amendable to treatment, the higher grade subtypes remain therapeutically challenging. The unexpected resistance to anti-angiogenic therapy in this patient adds another layer of complexity to an elusive subset of a supposedly benign disease. This patient report reflects the need for in-depth studies, molecular characterization and overall, better disease understanding in order to improve prognosis for affected patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Tendon synovial cells secrete fibronectin in vivo and in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Banes, A.J.; Link, G.W.; Bevin, A.G.; Peterson, H.D.; Gillespie, Y.; Bynum, D.; Watts, S.; Dahners, L.

    1988-01-01

    The chemistry and cell biology of the tendon have been largely overlooked due to the emphasis on collagen, the principle structural component of the tendon. The tendon must not only transmit the force of muscle contraction to bone to effect movement, but it must also glide simultaneously over extratendonous tissues. Fibronectin is classified as a cell attachment molecule that induces cell spreading and adhesion to substratum. The external surface of intact avian flexor tendon stained positively with antibody to cellular fibronectin. However, if the surface synovial cells were first removed with collagenase, no positive reaction with antifibronectin antibody was detected. Analysis of immunologically stained frozen sections of tendon also revealed fibronectin at the tendon synovium, but little was associated with cells internal in tendon. The staining pattern with isolated, cultured synovial cells and fibroblasts from the tendon interior substantiated the histological observations. Analysis of polyacrylamide gel profiles of /sup 35/S-methionine-labeled proteins synthesized by synovial cells and internal fibroblasts indicated that fibronectin was synthesized principally by synovial cells. Fibronectin at the tendon surface may play a role in cell attachment to prevent cell removal by the friction of gliding. Alternatively, fibronectin, with its binding sites for hyaluronic acid and collagen, may act as a complex for boundary lubrication.

  17. THE FORM AND FUNCTION OF SYNOVIAL CELLS IN TISSUE CULTURES

    PubMed Central

    Vaubel, Ernst

    1933-01-01

    1. Synovial cultures are differentiated in tissue cultures from other tissues of mesenchymal origin by their type of growth and cell function. 2. In these respects they are more closely allied to chondroblasts and osteoblasts than to fibroblasts. 3. Synovial cells in tissue cultures develop marked globular cytoplasmic granulations that stain easily with neutral red and sometimes with toluidine blue; they show marked polymorphism with all transitions from round to spindle, polygonal and star shapes and eventually form an epithelial-like membrane, composed of cells with numerous syncytial bridges. 4. In cultures of typically growing synovial cells a mucin-like substance is elaborated. Typical growth and maximal mucin production is best maintained in media containing a minimum of growth-stimulating substances. Transformation of synovial cell growths into fibroblastic growth is accompanied by a loss of mucin production. Dying cells apparently do not produce mucin. 5. Amitotic cell division and the formation of macrophage-like cells were observed. 6. Marked tendency to liquefaction of the plasma about the growths was observed and attributed to the elaboration of a proteolytic ferment. 7. The specific designation "synovioblasts" is proposed for these cells. PMID:19870183

  18. Synovial sarcoma mimicking benign peripheral nerve sheath tumor.

    PubMed

    Larque, Ana B; Bredella, Miriam A; Nielsen, G Petur; Chebib, Ivan

    2017-07-08

    To assess the radiographic and clinicopathologic features of synovial sarcoma of the nerve that were clinically or radiologically interpreted as benign peripheral nerve sheath tumor. Five patients with synovial sarcoma arising from the peripheral nerve and interpreted clinically and radiologically as peripheral nerve sheath tumors were identified. Clinicopathologic and imaging features were evaluated. There were three females and two males, ranging in age from 28 to 50 (mean 35.8) years. Most patients (4/5) complained of a mass, discomfort or pain. MR images demonstrated a heterogeneous, enhancing, soft tissue mass contiguous with the neurovascular bundle. On histologic examination, most tumors were monophasic synovial sarcoma (4/5). At the time of surgery, all tumors were noted to arise along or within a peripheral nerve. All patients were alive with no evidence of disease with median follow-up of 44 (range 32-237) months. For comparison, approximately 775 benign peripheral nerve sheath tumors of the extremities were identified during the same time period. Primary synovial sarcoma of the nerve can mimic peripheral nerve sheath tumors clinically and on imaging and should be included in the differential diagnosis for tumors arising from peripheral nerves.

  19. Primary pulmonary synovial sarcoma: a rare primary pulmonary tumor.

    PubMed

    Falkenstern-Ge, Roger Fei; Kimmich, Martin; Grabner, Andreas; Horn, Heike; Friedel, Godehard; Ott, German; Kohlhäufl, Martin

    2014-02-01

    Pulmonary sarcomas overall are very uncommon and comprise only 0.5 % of all primary lung malignancies. The diagnosis is established only after sarcoma-like primary lung malignancies and a metastatic extrathoracic sarcoma have been excluded. Synovial sarcoma accounts for ~8 % of soft-tissue sarcomas. Synovial sarcoma arising from the pleura has rarely been reported. We report a case of a 58-year-old woman who complained of right-sided chest pain and shortness of breath. Chest CT scan revealed a large heterogeneous mass, occupying most of the right hemithorax. Histologic diagnosis was supplemented by interphase cytogenetic (FISH) analysis. Computed tomography guided Tru-cut biopsy was suspicious for a sarcomatous or fibrous malignancy. However, intraoperative frozen-section diagnostics confirmed the diagnosis of a sarcoma. Immunohistochemistry showed that tumor cells expressed epithelial membrane antigen, CD99 and BCL2. Based on immunohistochemistry, the diagnosis of synovial sarcoma was suspected and was confirmed by FISH analysis. The patient was treated with right upper bilobectomy. Due to R1-resection status, postsurgical systemic chemotherapy was administered. Primary pulmonary synovial sarcoma is a rare primary lung tumor. Due to extensive size of the tumor with pleural and mediastinal invasion only a R1-resection status could be achieved by thoracic surgery.

  20. A case report of pancreatic metastasis from synovial sarcoma successfully treated by metastasectomy with adjuvant chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Makino, Yuki; Shigekawa, Minoru; Kegasawa, Tadashi; Suda, Takahiro; Yoshioka, Teppei; Iwahashi, Kiyoshi; Ikezawa, Kenji; Sakamori, Ryotaro; Yakushijin, Takayuki; Kajihara, Jun; Tomimaru, Yoshito; Eguchi, Hidetoshi; Imura, Yoshinori; Outani, Hidetatsu; Naka, Norifumi; Honma, Keiichiro; Morii, Eiichi; Tatsumi, Tomohide; Hiramatsu, Naoki; Takehara, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Synovial sarcoma is a malignant soft tissue sarcoma which arises near joints. The most frequent metastasis sites of synovial sarcoma are the lungs, lymph nodes, and bone. Pancreatic metastasis is quite rare; only 3 cases have been reported worldwide to date. We herein present the 4th case of pancreatic metastasis from synovial sarcoma. Methods and Results: A 32-year-old man underwent extended excision of synovial sarcoma in the left pelvis and femur in 2009. In 2013, follow-up contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed a 35-mm heterogeneously enhanced mass in the pancreas body. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration of the mass revealed a diffuse proliferation of atypical spindle cells in a fascicular arrangement. Because the histology was quite similar to the resected specimen of synovial sarcoma in 2009, the mass was suspected to be a metastasis from synovial sarcoma. Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy with adjuvant adriamycin/ifosfamide chemotherapy was subsequently performed. Synovial sarcoma-specific SS18-SSX1 (synovial sarcoma translocation, chromosome 18-synovial sarcoma X1) or SS18-SSX2 chimera mRNA was detected in the resected specimen, confirming the diagnosis of metastasis from synovial sarcoma. The patient did well for 30 months without recurrence. Conclusion: This case suggests that pancreatic metastasis from synovial sarcoma can be successfully treated by metastasectomy with adjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:27684804

  1. Osteoarthritis screening using Raman spectroscopy of dried human synovial fluid drops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmonde-White, Karen A.; Mandair, Gurjit S.; Esmonde-White, Francis W. L.; Raaii, Farhang; Roessler, Blake J.; Morris, Michael D.

    2009-02-01

    We describe the use of Raman spectroscopy to investigate synovial fluid drops deposited onto fused silica microscope slides. This spectral information can be used to identify chemical changes in synovial fluid associated with osteoarthritis (OA) damage to knee joints. The chemical composition of synovial fluid is predominately proteins (enzymes, cytokines, or collagen fragments), glycosaminoglycans, and a mixture of minor components such as inorganic phosphate crystals. During osteoarthritis, the chemical, viscoelastic and biological properties of synovial fluid are altered. A pilot study was conducted to determine if Raman spectra of synovial fluid correlated with radiological scoring of knee joint damage. After informed consent, synovial fluid was drawn and x-rays were collected from the knee joints of 40 patients. Raman spectra and microscope images were obtained from the dried synovial fluid drops using a Raman microprobe and indicate a coarse separation of synovial fluid components. Individual protein signatures could not be identified; Raman spectra were useful as a general marker of overall protein content and secondary structure. Band intensity ratios used to describe protein and glycosaminoglycan structure were used in synovial fluid spectra. Band intensity ratios of Raman spectra indicate that there is less ordered protein secondary structure in synovial fluid from the damage group. Combination of drop deposition with Raman spectroscopy is a powerful approach to examining synovial fluid for the purposes of assessing osteoarthritis damage.

  2. A Normative Study of the Synovial Fluid Proteome from Healthy Porcine Knee Joints

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Synovial fluid in an articulating joint contains proteins derived from the blood plasma and proteins that are produced by cells within the joint tissues, such as synovium, cartilage, ligament, and meniscus. The proteome composition of healthy synovial fluid and the cellular origins of many synovial fluid components are not fully understood. Here, we present a normative proteomics study using porcine synovial fluid. Using our optimized method, we identified 267 proteins with high confidence in healthy synovial fluid. We also evaluated mRNA expression data from tissues that can contribute to the synovial fluid proteome, including synovium, cartilage, blood, and liver, to better estimate the relative contributions from these sources to specific synovial fluid components. We identified 113 proteins in healthy synovial fluid that appear to be primarily derived from plasma transudates, 37 proteins primarily derived from synovium, and 11 proteins primarily derived from cartilage. Finally, we compared the identified synovial fluid proteome to the proteome of human plasma, and we found that the two body fluids share many similarities, underlining the detected plasma derived nature of many synovial fluid components. Knowing the synovial fluid proteome of a healthy joint will help to identify mechanisms that cause joint disease and pathways involved in disease progression. PMID:25160569

  3. The discovery of the synovial lymphatic stomata and lymphatic reabsorption in knee effusion.

    PubMed

    Ping, Zepeng; Jiang, Tingting; Wang, Chong; Chen, Zhongyi; Chen, Zhongliang; Wang, Jiaxiong; Wang, Li; Wang, Beibei; Xu, Dandan; Liu, Changming; Li, Zhongjie; Li, Ji-Cheng

    2015-06-01

    To illustrate the mechanism of lymphatic reabsorption in knee joint effusion. The current investigation employed transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques to reveal the ultrastructure of the knee synovial membrane in New Zealand rabbits and human. Ultrastructural changes of the synovial lymphatic stomata were observed by using trypan blue absorption and sodium hydroxide (NaOH) digestion methods, and the animal models of synovitis. New Zealand rabbits and human synovial membranes were composed of two types of synovial cells: type A and type B. No lymphatic stomata were found among type A synovial cells, whereas lymphatic stomata with the diameters ranging 0.74-3.26 µm were found in type B synovial cells, and some stomata were closed. After the NaOH digestion, a number of sieve pores, similar to lymphatic stomata in size and shape, were observed in the dense fibrous connective tissue underneath the type B synovial cells. After injecting trypan blue into the rabbit knee joint cavity, absorption of trypan blue through the lymphatic stomata was observed, suggesting the absorption function of the synovial lymphatic stomata. In the rabbit knee joint synovitis models, the synovial lymphatic stomata diameter enlarged. Some macrophages migrated from the lymphatic stomata, indicating that the synovial lymphatic stomata were involved in the joint effusion absorption and inflammatory response. Our study is the first to report the existence of synovial lymphatic stomata in the New Zealand rabbits and human knee joints. Lymphatic stomata may have an important role in the reabsorption of joint effusion.

  4. Synovial inflammation in patients with different stages of knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Ene, Răzvan; Sinescu, Ruxandra Diana; Ene, Patricia; Cîrstoiu, Monica Mihaela; Cîrstoiu, Florin Cătălin

    2015-01-01

    The synovium is an intra-articular mesenchymal tissue and essential for the normal joint function. It is involved in many pathological characteristic processes and sometimes specific for this distinctive tissue. In this study, we refer to synovial proliferative disorders according to the stage of osteoarthritis (OA) disease. Forty-three patients with knee OA were treated in the Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Emergency University Hospital of Bucharest, Romania, in the last two years. In all cases, we used at least five criteria for the knee OA: knee pain, knee joint tenderness, no palpable warmth over the knee, stiffness, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein levels. In all the cases the synovial tissue was selected by the orthopedic surgeon. X-ray examination was taken in every case of the affected joint. Patients who were considered to have early OA underwent arthroscopic synovial biopsy of the symptomatic joint. Synovial tissue samples from patients with late OA were obtained at the time of knee joint arthroplasty. Microscopic examination in early osteoarthritis revealed for more than half of patients with synovial biopsy through arthroscopic technique having synovitis lesions with mononuclear infiltrates, diffuse fibrosis, thickening of the lining layer, macrophages appearance and neoformation vessels also. The synovitis seen in advanced OA knees tends to be diffuse and is not mandatory localized to areas of chondral defects, although an association has been reported between chondral defects and associated synovitis in the knee medial tibio-femoral compartment. The overexpression of mediators of inflammation and the increased mononuclear cell infiltration were seen in early OA, compared with late OA.

  5. Selected Dissemination/Diffusion Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitt, Marshall L.

    This analysis of selected diffusion and dissemination methods used by developer-demonstrator projects in the National Diffusion Network discusses strategies under the following headings: managing the project, developing materials, disseminating information, conducting awareness sessions, training personnel, using certified trainers, providing…

  6. Lingual ulceration in disseminated histoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Guttal, Kruthika S; Naikmasur, Venkatesh G; Bathi, Renuka J; Rao, Ravikala

    2010-03-01

    Histoplasmosis is a rare systemic fungal infection commonly presenting as mucosal ulceration of the oral cavity. It has been increasingly reported in India as disseminated disease with lesions in the oral cavity as a consequence of rapid spread of HIV infection. The authors report a case of disseminated histoplasmosis with oral manifestation in a 40-year-old male patient.

  7. Image dissemination and archiving.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Ian

    2007-08-01

    Images generated as part of the sonographic examination are an integral part of the medical record and must be retained according to local regulations. The standard medical image format, known as DICOM (Digital Imaging and COmmunications in Medicine) makes it possible for images from many different imaging modalities, including ultrasound, to be distributed via a standard internet network to distant viewing workstations and a central archive in an almost seamless fashion. The DICOM standard is a truly universal standard for the dissemination of medical images. When purchasing an ultrasound unit, the consumer should research the unit's capacity to generate images in a DICOM format, especially if one wishes interconnectivity with viewing workstations and an image archive that stores other medical images. PACS, an acronym for Picture Archive and Communication System refers to the infrastructure that links modalities, workstations, the image archive, and the medical record information system into an integrated system, allowing for efficient electronic distribution and storage of medical images and access to medical record data.

  8. Characterization of the porcine synovial fluid proteome and a comparison to the plasma proteome

    PubMed Central

    Bennike, Tue Bjerg; Barnaby, Omar; Steen, Hanno; Stensballe, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Synovial fluid is present in all joint cavities, and protects the articular cartilage surfaces in large by lubricating the joint, thus reducing friction. Several studies have described changes in the protein composition of synovial fluid in patients with joint disease. However, the protein concentration, content, and synovial fluid volume change dramatically during active joint diseases and inflammation, and the proteome composition of healthy synovial fluid is incompletely characterized. We performed a normative proteomics analysis of porcine synovial fluid, and report data from optimizing proteomic methods to investigate the proteome of healthy porcine synovial fluid (Bennike et al., 2014 [1]). We included an evaluation of different proteolytic sample preparation techniques, and an analysis of posttranslational modifications with a focus on glycosylation. We used pig (Sus Scrofa) as a model organism, as the porcine immune system is highly similar to human and the pig genome is sequenced. Furthermore, porcine model systems are commonly used large animal models to study several human diseases. In addition, we analyzed the proteome of human plasma, and compared the proteomes to the obtained porcine synovial fluid proteome. The proteome of the two body fluids were found highly similar, underlining the detected plasma derived nature of many synovial fluid components. The healthy porcine synovial fluid proteomics data, human rheumatoid arthritis synovial fluid proteomics data used in the method optimization, human plasma proteomics data, and search results, have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PXD000935. PMID:26543887

  9. Supramolecular synergy in the boundary lubrication of synovial joints.

    PubMed

    Seror, Jasmine; Zhu, Linyi; Goldberg, Ronit; Day, Anthony J; Klein, Jacob

    2015-03-10

    Hyaluronan, lubricin and phospholipids, molecules ubiquitous in synovial joints, such as hips and knees, have separately been invoked as the lubricants responsible for the remarkable lubrication of articular cartilage; but alone, these molecules cannot explain the extremely low friction at the high pressures of such joints. We find that surface-anchored hyaluronan molecules complex synergistically with phosphatidylcholine lipids present in joints to form a boundary lubricating layer, which, with coefficient of friction μ≈0.001 at pressures to over 100 atm, has a frictional behaviour resembling that of articular cartilage in the major joints. Our findings point to a scenario where each of the molecules has a different role but must act together with the others: hyaluronan, anchored at the outer surface of articular cartilage by lubricin molecules, complexes with joint phosphatidylcholines to provide the extreme lubrication of synovial joints via the hydration-lubrication mechanism.

  10. Supramolecular synergy in the boundary lubrication of synovial joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seror, Jasmine; Zhu, Linyi; Goldberg, Ronit; Day, Anthony J.; Klein, Jacob

    2015-03-01

    Hyaluronan, lubricin and phospholipids, molecules ubiquitous in synovial joints, such as hips and knees, have separately been invoked as the lubricants responsible for the remarkable lubrication of articular cartilage; but alone, these molecules cannot explain the extremely low friction at the high pressures of such joints. We find that surface-anchored hyaluronan molecules complex synergistically with phosphatidylcholine lipids present in joints to form a boundary lubricating layer, which, with coefficient of friction μ≈0.001 at pressures to over 100 atm, has a frictional behaviour resembling that of articular cartilage in the major joints. Our findings point to a scenario where each of the molecules has a different role but must act together with the others: hyaluronan, anchored at the outer surface of articular cartilage by lubricin molecules, complexes with joint phosphatidylcholines to provide the extreme lubrication of synovial joints via the hydration-lubrication mechanism.

  11. Supramolecular synergy in the boundary lubrication of synovial joints

    PubMed Central

    Seror, Jasmine; Zhu, Linyi; Goldberg, Ronit; Day, Anthony J.; Klein, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronan, lubricin and phospholipids, molecules ubiquitous in synovial joints, such as hips and knees, have separately been invoked as the lubricants responsible for the remarkable lubrication of articular cartilage; but alone, these molecules cannot explain the extremely low friction at the high pressures of such joints. We find that surface-anchored hyaluronan molecules complex synergistically with phosphatidylcholine lipids present in joints to form a boundary lubricating layer, which, with coefficient of friction μ≈0.001 at pressures to over 100 atm, has a frictional behaviour resembling that of articular cartilage in the major joints. Our findings point to a scenario where each of the molecules has a different role but must act together with the others: hyaluronan, anchored at the outer surface of articular cartilage by lubricin molecules, complexes with joint phosphatidylcholines to provide the extreme lubrication of synovial joints via the hydration–lubrication mechanism. PMID:25754223

  12. Tuberculosis diagnosed by PCR analysis of synovial fluid.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Nobukazu; Gemba, Kenichi; Yao, Atsushi; Ozaki, Shinji; Ono, Katsuichiro; Wada, Sae; Fujii, Yasuhiro; Namba, Yoshifumi; Kishimoto, Takumi

    2010-02-01

    Tuberculosis is a leading cause of mortality due to an infectious agent worldwide. It often affects multiple organs by hematogenous spread of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, but knee-joint involvement is extremely rare, comprising approximately 0.1% of all forms of tuberculosis. We present a case of tuberculous pleuritis with knee-joint involvement. Cytological and biochemical analysis of the pleural fluid and a biopsy specimen of the cervical lymph node indicated tuberculosis, but a definitive diagnosis was not given. A confirmed diagnosis was finally obtained through PCR analysis of the synovial fluid. Tuberculosis should be included in the differential diagnosis in patients with persistent pain and swelling of the knee. PCR analysis of the synovial fluid is a quick and useful method for the diagnosis.

  13. Disseminated Intra-Abdominal Hydatidosis

    PubMed Central

    Concha, Fátima; Maguiña, Ciro; Seas, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    We present the case of a 26-year-old male Peruvian patient who presented with disseminated intra-abdominal hydatidosis. The patient was treated with surgical removal of the cysts and prolonged medical treatment with albendazole. PMID:24006293

  14. Herpes zoster (shingles) disseminated (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Herpes zoster (shingles) normally occurs in a limited area that follows a dermatome (see the "dermatome" picture). In individuals with damaged immune systems, herpes zoster may be widespread (disseminated), causing serious illness. ...

  15. Sports-related changes of the synovial membrane

    PubMed Central

    MANUNTA, ANDREA F.; ZEDDE, PIETRO; PISANU, FRANCESCO; MARRAS, FRANCESCO

    2014-01-01

    Purpose the aim of this study is to differentiate the behavior of the synovial membrane in the presence of various stimuli in patients who practice sports. Methods fifty one patients (30 males and 21 females, mean age 48 years, range 31–59 years) who actively practiced non-competitive sports underwent a biopsy of the synovial membrane during arthroscopic surgery performed for joint effusion secondary to meniscal lesion (24 cases), anterior cruciate ligament injury (ACL) (17 cases), postoperative knee joint stiffness (2 cases), aseptic loosening or dislocation of the polyethylene component of uni-compartmental knee arthroplasty (5 cases), and anterior fibrous impingement of the ankle (3 cases). Synovial tissue samples were obtained during surgery from all the patients and processed for light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy observation. Results circulatory phenomena were observed in acute inflammatory processes, characterized by hyperemia and vasodilation. Exudative and infiltrative phenomena were observed in the presence of foreign bodies and were characterized by leukocytic exudation (presence of polynuclear neutrophils), accompanied by lymphomonocytic infiltration. Proliferative phenomena were observed in post-traumatic forms of synovitis (ACL and meniscal injuries), characterized by hypertrophy and proliferation of villous formations. Degenerative and regressive phenomena were observed in cases of fibrous reaction (ankle impingement and joint stiffness) and were characterized by formation of dense fibrous connective tissue with hyaline patches, evolving towards sclerosis. Conclusions the activation of inflammatory processes in patients who expose their joints to excessive stress may lead to the formation of hyperplastic tissue. Ultramicroscopic debris is usually capable of transforming the structural organization of the synovial tissue. Level of evidence Level IV, observational case series. PMID:25750907

  16. Management of locally advanced primary mediastinal synovial sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Ambarish S; Kumar, Rajiv; Purandare, Nilendu; Jiwnani, Sabita; Karimundackal, George; Pramesh, CS

    2017-01-01

    Primary mediastinal synovial sarcoma (PMSS) is a relatively rare disease, and patients are treated predominantly with surgery for resectable disease. Management of locally advanced borderline resectable and unresectable PMSS is not only challenging but also lacks standard guidelines. We present three patients with PMSS, who were unresectable or borderline resectable at presentation and were treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgery and postoperative radiotherapy. PMID:28360472

  17. Hyaluronan peroxidation is required for normal synovial function: an hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Juranek, I; Stern, R; Soltes, L

    2014-06-01

    Despite widespread use of antioxidants, reactive oxygen species have important functions in normal tissues. Herein, we present an example of a physiological role for free radicals, and in particular, reactive oxygen species, that are suppressed by anti-oxidants. Free radicals catalyze the degradation of hyaluronan in synovial fluid, a tissue in which hyaluronidase activity is barely detectable. Articular cartilage requires a low oxygen environment. The process of hyaluronan peroxidation consumes significant amounts of molecular oxygen, thus keeping the tension of oxygen in the joint at a low but physiologically critical level. One concern is the change in physical activity between day and night, with periods of joint hyperemia and ischemia, respectively. Increased oxygen and the resulting oxidative stress would lead to chondrocyte dysfunction and cartilage damage. A mechanism for keeping oxygen levels low is required. We postulate that a mechanism indeed exists for the removal of excess oxygen. High-molar-mass hyaluronan turnover in synovial fluid utilizes peroxidative degradation, during which oxygen is massively consumed. The peroxidation itself may be initiated by hydrogen peroxide, which is produced by chondrocyte mitochondria, that can diffuse into the synovial fluid. The resulting decrease in available oxygen down-regulates hyaluronan peroxidation. This in turn prevents excessive oxygen consumption. It appears that free radicals and reactive oxygen species may be components of normal physiology, particularly in the synovial fluid of joints and articular cartilage. It is suggested therefore that indiscriminate use of anti-oxidants, vigorously promoted currently by health professionals and the health industry, be approached with caution. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Endoscopic Resection of Lateral Synovial Cyst of the Knee.

    PubMed

    Lui, Tun Hing

    2015-12-01

    Synovial cysts on the lateral side of the knee can cause pain, limitation of joint mobility, compression of the neighboring neurovascular structures, rupture leading to compartment syndrome, infection, erosion of adjacent bone, and iliotibial band friction syndrome. Open resection is commonly performed for symptomatic cysts. We describe an alternative, endoscopic approach to cyst resection. This has the advantages of minimally invasive surgery of smaller wounds, better cosmesis, and less surgical trauma.

  19. Aerogenic Dissemination of Aphtae Epizooticae

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-14

    FTD-ID(RS)T-0112-80 FOREIGN TECHNOLOGY DIVISION AEROGENIC DISSEMINATION OF APHTAE EPIZOOTICAE by Jerzy Wisniewski DTIC A Approved for public release...0112-8o Date14 Mar 19.80 AEROGENIC DISSEMINATION oF APHTAE EPIZOOTICAE Jerzy Wisniewski During aphtae epizooticae the principal cause of the virus...8217 e saliva foam assists in spreading the virus nn the air. The aerosol containing the virus can also be found in evaporation from wet floors, as well

  20. Imatinib mesylate inhibits platelet derived growth factor stimulated proliferation of rheumatoid synovial fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Sandler, Charlotta; Joutsiniemi, Saima; Lindstedt, Ken A.; Juutilainen, Timo; Kovanen, Petri T.; Eklund, Kari K. . E-mail: kari.eklund@hus.fi

    2006-08-18

    Synovial fibroblast is the key cell type in the growth of the pathological synovial tissue in arthritis. Here, we show that platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) is a potent mitogen for synovial fibroblasts isolated from patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Inhibition of PDGF-receptor signalling by imatinib mesylate (1 {mu}M) completely abrogated the PDGF-stimulated proliferation and inhibited approximately 70% of serum-stimulated proliferation of synovial fibroblasts. Similar extent of inhibition was observed when PDGF was neutralized with anti-PDGF antibodies, suggesting that imatinib mesylate does not inhibit pathways other than those mediated by PDGF-receptors. No signs of apoptosis were detected in synovial fibroblasts cultured in the presence of imatinib. These results suggest that imatinib mesylate specifically inhibits PDGF-stimulated proliferation of synovial fibroblasts, and that inhibition of PDGF-receptors could represent a feasible target for novel antirheumatic therapies.

  1. Postlaminectomy synovial cyst formation: a possible consequence of ligamentum flavum excision.

    PubMed

    Walcott, Brian P; Coumans, Jean-Valery

    2012-02-01

    Ligamentum flavum is generally resected with impunity when a laminectomy is performed; it is a strong ligament and its removal may not be inconsequential. We sought to examine the consequence of resection of ligamentum flavum as it pertains to the formation of synovial cysts. Following IRB approval, we retrospectively reviewed the charts of consecutive patients who underwent a laminectomy for any diagnosis during the years 2009-2010. Exclusions were made for patients undergoing resection of a synovial cyst, laminectomy done as part of a fusion, and microdiscectomy. A total of 201 laminectomies were performed. 10 instances of post-laminectomy synovial cyst occurred in only the lumbar spine. Synovial cysts occurred exclusively after surgery for stenosis (n=10). Laminectomy and resection of the ligament flavum is a risk factor for the subsequent formation of a synovial cyst. Secondary synovial cyst formation should be suspected in individuals who develop radiculopathy after laminectomy for stenosis.

  2. Place of radiotherapy in the treatment of synovial sarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, J.H.; Harwood, A.R.; Cummings, B.J.; Fornasier, V.; Langer, F.; Quirt, I.

    1981-01-01

    This paper reviews 36 patients with synovial sarcoma; 18 were referred within three months of surgery. None had undergone en bloc excision and all were treated with post-operative radiotherapy. Local control and survival were analyzed with respect to Tumor Node Metastasis Classification, histology, site of primary and surgical procedure. Eight patients with T1-2N0M0 tumors were alive and well (minimum two year follow-up) following excision and radiotherapy; 7 had a normally functional extremity. In contrast, only one of 8 patients with T3N0M0 tumors is alive and well. Seven of 8 patients with well or moderately differentiated histology were alive and well whereas no patient with poorly differentiated histologies survived. Six of 7 patients were alive and well if their tumor was distal to the elbow or knee whereas none of those who had a primary thigh synovial sarcoma survived. Eighteen patients were referred with recurrent disease and 2 were salvaged. A management policy is proposed for synovial sarcoma with the integrated use of surgery, radiation and chemotherapy; it emphasizes optimal cure rates and a functional extremity reserving amputation for salvage.

  3. Synovial haemangioma of the knee: an under recognised condition.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Oliva, Clarissa Linda Liboro; Wang, Edward H M; Cañal, Johanna Patricia A

    2015-10-01

    Synovial haemangioma is a rare type of tumour for which only around 200 cases have been reported worldwide. It usually occurs in the female population during the second decade of life and most commonly affects the knee joint. Patients can complain of pain, recurrent knee swelling and limitation of motion. Since these lesions are uncommon and radilogical findings are nonspecific, physician awareness is low and diagnosis is often delayed, leading in turn to treatment delays and irreversible complications of the affected joint. We report four cases of synovial haemangioma of the knee seen over a period of 20 years (1993-2013). Age at presentation ranged from six to 43 years (mean of 22.7 years) with an equal male-to-female ratio. Average duration of symptoms prior to treatment was three years--patients were often misdiagnosed and appropriate treatment was subsequently delayed. Radiographs showed moderate to severe degenerative changes. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed poorly defined intra-articular contrast-enhancing lesions, all of which were of the localised type. Three patients underwent open synovectomy and en bloc excision of the lesion; the fourth deferred surgery but continues to be monitored. Follow-up ranged from one to 11 years; all four patients are doing well, with no signs of symptom recurrence or progression. Synovial haemangioma is a rare but treatable condition. It should remain a differential for any patient with recurrent knee-joint symptoms.

  4. Tribological and Rheological Properties of a Synovial Fluid Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klossner, Rebecca; Liang, Jing; Krause, Wendy

    2010-03-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) and the plasma proteins, albumin and globulins, are the most abundant macromolecules in synovial fluid, the fluid that lubricates freely moving joints. In previous studies, bovine synovial fluid, a synovial fluid model (SFM) and albumin in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) were observed to be rheopectic---viscosity increases over time under constant shear. Additionally, steady shear experiments have a strong shear history dependence in protein-containing solutions, whereas samples of HA in PBS behaved as a ``typical'' polyelectrolyte. The observed rheopexy and shear history dependence are indicative of structure building in solution, which is most likely caused by protein aggregation. The tribology of the SFM was also investigated using nanoindenter-based scratch tests. The coefficient of frictions (μ) between the diamond nanoindenter tip and a polyethylene surface was measured in the presence of the SFM and solutions with varied protein and HA concentrations. The lowest μ is observed in the SFM, which most closely mimics a healthy joint. Finally, an anti-inflammatory drug, hydroxychloroquine, was shown to inhibit protein interactions in the SFM in rheological studies, and thus the tribological response was examined. We hypothesize that the rheopectic behavior is important in lubrication regimes and therefore, the rheological and tribological properties of these solutions will be correlated.

  5. Synovial Sarcoma of the Larynx: Report of a Case and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Baby, Anto; Somanathan, Thara; Konoth, Sreedevi

    2017-01-01

    Sarcomas account for less than 1% of malignant neoplasms arising in the head and neck in adults. Laryngeal synovial sarcoma is an extremely rare form of laryngeal malignancy with less than 20 cases reported in the literature. We report the case of a 48-year-old man with synovial sarcoma of the larynx. He underwent excision of the tumor followed by radiation. He is alive in remission at 36 months. The literature on synovial sarcoma of the larynx is reviewed. PMID:28280643

  6. [The physical properties of the synovial fluid as a lubrication of joints].

    PubMed

    Tsvetkova, E A

    2005-01-01

    The properties of the synovial fluid and the results of the electrophysical studies of the fluid by the thermoelectret method are briefly described. The interrelation between current peaks on the thermostimulated current spectra of thermostimulated currents of the synovial fluid and the liguid-crystalline state of its components was established. The results can be used for developing the methods of diagnostics of synovial joint diseases and design of artificial joints.

  7. Articular Ankle Fracture Results in Increased Synovitis, Synovial Macrophage Infiltration, and Synovial Fluid Concentrations of Inflammatory Cytokines and Chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Furman, Bridgette D.; Kimmerling, Kelly A.; Zura, Robert D.; Reilly, Rachel M.; Zlowodzki, Michal P.; Huebner, Janet L.; Kraus, Virginia B.; Guilak, Farshid; Olson, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The inflammatory response following an articular fracture is thought to play a role in the development of posttraumatic arthritis (PTA) but has not been well characterized. The objective of this study was to characterize the acute inflammatory response, both locally and systemically, in joint synovium, synovial fluid (SF), and serum following articular fracture of the ankle. We hypothesized that intraarticular fracture would alter the synovial environment and lead to increased local and systemic inflammation. Methods Synovial tissue biopsy specimens, SF samples, and serum samples were collected from patients with an acute articular ankle fracture (n = 6). Additional samples (normal, ankle osteoarthritis [OA], and knee OA [n = 6 per group]) were included for comparative analyses. Synovial tissue was assessed for synovitis and macrophage count. SF and serum were assessed for cytokines (interferon-γ [IFNγ], interleukin-1β [IL-1β], IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12p70, and tumor necrosis factor α) and chemokines (eotaxin, eotaxin 3, IFNγ-inducible 10-kd protein, monocyte chemotactic protein 1 [MCP-1], MCP-4, macrophage-derived chemokine, macrophage inflammatory protein 1β, and thymus and activation–regulated chemokine). Results Synovitis scores were significantly higher in ankle fracture tissue compared with normal ankle tissue (P = 0.007), and there was a trend toward an increased abundance of CD68+ macrophages in ankle fracture synovium compared with normal knee synovium (P = 0.06). The concentrations of all cytokines and chemokines were elevated in the SF of patients with ankle fracture compared with those in SF from OA patients with no history of trauma. Only the concentration of IL-6 was significantly increased in the serum of patients with ankle fracture compared with normal serum (P = 0.027). Conclusion Articular fracture of the ankle increased acute local inflammation, as indicated by increased synovitis, increased macrophage infiltration into

  8. Magnetic particle translation as a surrogate measure for synovial fluid mechanics.

    PubMed

    Shah, Yash Y; Maldonado-Camargo, Lorena; Patel, Neal S; Biedrzycki, Adam H; Yarmola, Elena G; Dobson, Jon; Rinaldi, Carlos; Allen, Kyle D

    2017-07-26

    The mechanics of synovial fluid vary with disease progression, but are difficult to quantify quickly in a clinical setting due to small sample volumes. In this study, a novel technique to measure synovial fluid mechanics using magnetic nanoparticles is introduced. Briefly, microspheres embedded with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, termed magnetic particles, are distributed through a 100μL synovial fluid sample. Then, a permanent magnet inside a protective sheath is inserted into the synovial fluid sample. Magnetic particles translate toward the permanent magnet and the percentage of magnetic particles collected by the magnet in a given time can be related to synovial fluid viscosity. To validate this relationship, magnetic particle translation was demonstrated in three phases. First, magnetic particle translation was assessed in glycerol solutions with known viscosities, demonstrating that as fluid viscosity increased, magnetic particle translation decreased. Next, the relationship between magnetic particle translation and synovial fluid viscosity was assessed using bovine synovial fluid that was progressively degenerated via ultrasonication. Here, particle collection in a given amount of time increased as fluid degenerated, demonstrating that the relationship between particle collection and fluid mechanics holds in non-Newtonian synovial fluid. Finally, magnetic particle translation was used to assess differences between healthy and OA affected joints in equine synovial fluid. Here, particle collection in a given time was higher in OA joints relative to healthy horses (p<0.001). Combined, these data demonstrate potential viability of magnetic particle translation in a clinical setting to evaluate synovial fluid mechanics in limited volumes of synovial fluid sample. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Ethnicity and hazard information dissemination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Ronald W.; Nelson, Lisa

    1991-07-01

    Citizens from two communities were questioned regarding the sources from which they have previously obtained information about environmental hazards and their preferences for different communication channels. Three ethnic groups—whites, blacks, and Mexican-Americans—were represented among those questioned. While all three ethnic groups described similar patterns of past information receipt, it was found that Mexican-Americans obtained more information through social network contacts than whites or blacks. Ethnic differentials emerged when citizens were asked about preferred sources for information receipt. While radio was identified as desirable by all three groups, only minority citizens expressed a preference for local television as a dissemination mode and only Mexican-Americans favored neighborhood meetings. Mailed dissemination and newspapers were preferred primarily by whites and blacks. The implications of the results for the conduct of hazard information dissemination are examined.

  10. Kentucky Information Dissemination System. Fall Dissemination Conference Follow-Up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky State Dept. of Education, Frankfort. Office of Communication Services.

    Describing a state conference on information dissemination held in November 1979 in Frankfort, Kentucky, this report contains conference materials and evaluations of the mini-seminars and awareness sessions conducted there. Materials include a final agenda, seminar and roundabout topics, a description of the Kentucky Department of Education…

  11. [Latent-disseminated tuberculosis revealed by atypical skin ulcerations].

    PubMed

    Ferrati-Fidelin, G; Pham-Ledard, A; Fauconneau, A; Chauvel, A; Houard, C; Doutre, M-S; Beylot-Barry, M

    2016-10-01

    Cutaneous tuberculosis (CT) is rare in industrialized countries. Given the clinicopathological polymorphism and the difficulty of isolating the pathogen, diagnosis can be difficult. The condition may be associated with other known locations of the disease or in rare cases, it may be a tell-tale sign, as in our case, in which leg ulcers revealed paucisymptomatic disseminated tuberculosis. A 67-year-old man was referred for rapidly extensive ulcers of the right leg contiguous to debilitating arthritis of the knee of unknown aetiology for 18 months. Earlier investigations revealed thymoma and a pulmonary nodule considered to be sarcoidosis. A skin biopsy showed a granulomatous eosinophilic-rich infiltrate and vasculitis of the small vessels. Screening of the skin sample and gastric aspirate for Koch Bacillus (BK) was negative. A diagnosis of sarcoidosis was made. A positive QuantiFERON test eventually led to the correct diagnosis. On further testing of bronchoalveolar fluid and a synovial biopsy, culture for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MT) was positive. The PET scan showed high metabolism in the prostate, bone, spleen, liver, nodes and heart. The quad- and then dual-antibiotic antitubercular therapies produced a rapid improvement but treatment was continued over 12 months, given the persistence of high metabolism on PET-CT scan and the low blood rifampicin concentration. A CT should be considered in the presence of giant-cell granulomas, even in the absence of caseous necrosis, and where both direct examination and culture for the skin are negative. Our case also underlines the importance of an extensive workup to rule out disseminated disease even if the patient is not symptomatic. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Primary Metastatic Synovial Sarcoma: Experience of the CWS Study Group.

    PubMed

    Scheer, Monika; Dantonello, Tobias; Hallmen, Erika; Vokuhl, Christian; Leuschner, Ivo; Sparber-Sauer, Monika; Kazanowska, Bernarda; Niggli, Felix; Ladenstein, Ruth; Bielack, Stefan S; Klingebiel, Thomas; Koscielniak, Ewa

    2016-07-01

    Prognostic factors for localized synovial sarcoma are well defined. However, few data exist regarding patients with metastases at diagnosis. Poor outcome is described but the optimal therapeutic regimen remains unclear. Our aim was to assess the outcome, identify prognostic factors, and analyze treatment strategies. Patients <21 years with synovial sarcoma and primary distant metastases treated in the consecutive prospective European Cooperative Weichteilsarkom Studiengruppe trials 1980-2010 were analyzed. Twenty-nine of 296 patients had primary metastases. Twenty-seven could be included. Median age was 16.7 years. Primaries were mainly located in the limbs (78%) and 74% were ≥10 cm. Metastases involved the lungs in all patients. Two patients presented with synchronous bone metastases. Sixty-three percent of patients achieved a first remission, whereas only 26% maintained it. Relapses were metastatic with pulmonary metastases in nearly all patients. Five-year event-free survival and overall survival (OS) rates were 26% and 30%, respectively. Prognosis was best for patients with oligometastatic lung metastases (5-year OS probability 85%). Prognosis was worse for patients with multiple bilateral lung metastases (5-year OS 13%) and even poorer for those with concurrent bone metastases. Treatment elements associated with superior survival were adequate local therapy of the primary tumor and, if feasible, for metastases, chemotherapy with an ifosfamide/doxorubicin-based regimen. The use of whole lung irradiation was not correlated with better outcomes. The overall prognosis of primary metastatic synovial sarcoma is poor. However, individuals with oligometastatic lung metastases had very good chance for long-term survival when treated with adequate multimodal therapy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. MR evaluation of synovial injury in shoulder trauma.

    PubMed

    Chalian, Majid; Soldatos, Theodoros; Faridian-Aragh, Neda; Andreisek, Gustav; McFarland, Edward G; Carrino, John A; Chhabra, Avneesh

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings relevant to synovial injury of the shoulder in patients with and without acute shoulder trauma. Three hundred and nine consecutive shoulder MRI studies (185-male, 124-female, 50 ± 15 years old) were retrospectively evaluated for findings suggestive of synovial injury including rupture and/or diverticulum of the joint capsule, bursa, and biceps tendon sheath (BTS), ganglion/synovial cyst, geyser phenomenon, and sequel of previous shoulder dislocation (Hill-Sachs deformity). Patients with one or more of these findings were included in the MR-positive group, whereas the remaining subjects were used as MR negatives. Based on their medical records, patients were also divided into trauma and non-trauma groups, and statistical analysis was performed to evaluate the association between the aforementioned MRI findings and history of shoulder trauma. Fifty-six patients were included in the MR-positive group and 253 in the MR-negative group. In MR-positive group, the incidence of capsular rupture (CR) and subacromial/subdeltoid (SASD) bursal rupture was higher in trauma patients, whereas the incidence of BTS diverticulum and ganglion cyst was higher in subjects without trauma. Significant association was found between the history of acute trauma and CR, SASD bursal rupture, BTS rupture, and Hill-Sachs deformity. In shoulder MR examination, presence of CR and/or SASD bursal rupture is strongly suggestive of acute shoulder trauma. In addition, BTS rupture and Hill-Sachs deformity are more prevalent in patients with acute shoulder trauma. The presence of these features should alert MRI readers to assess for additional trauma-related internal derangements, if a respective history has not been provided.

  14. Synovial perlecan is required for osteophyte formation in knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Haruka; Ishijima, Muneaki; Futami, Ippei; Tomikawa-Ichikawa, Naoki; Kosaki, Keisuke; Sadatsuki, Ryo; Yamada, Yoshihiko; Kurosawa, Hisashi; Kaneko, Kazuo; Arikawa-Hirasawa, Eri

    2013-04-24

    The osteophyte associated with osteoarthritis (OA) is a bony outgrowth formed at the margins of the affected joint through endochondral ossification-like processes. However, the mechanism of osteophyte formation and its pathogenesis are unclear. Perlecan (Hspg2), a heparan sulfate proteoglycan, is expressed in many extracellular tissues and plays critical roles in skeletal development and diseases. The aim of the present study is to identify the role of synovial perlecan in osteophyte formation using perinatal lethality rescued perlecan-knockout mice (Hspg2(-/-)-Tg) wherein perlecan expression is lacking in the synovial and other tissues, except for cartilage. We analyzed the development of osteophytes in joints of Hspg2(-/-)-Tg mice in two different animal models: the surgical OA model, in which the medial collateral ligament was transected and the medial meniscus was resected, and the TGF-β-induced osteophyte formation model. In the surgical OA model, the osteophyte size and maturation were significantly reduced in the OA joints of Hspg2(-/-)-Tg mice compared with control mice, while OA developed on the medial side of the knee joints with no differences in the cartilage degradation score or synovitis score between control and Hspg2(-/-)-Tg mice. The reduced osteophyte formation in Hspg2(-/-)-Tg mice was associated with reduced cell proliferation and chondrogenesis. In the TGF-β model, the osteophyte size and maturation were also significantly reduced in Hspg2(-/-)-Tg mice compared with control mice. Our findings suggest that synovial perlecan plays an important role in osteophyte development in OA, and they provide insights that may facilitate the development of OA therapy.

  15. Matrix metalloproteinases in the formation of human synovial joint cavities.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, J C; Wilkinson, L S; Soothill, P; Hembry, R M; Murphy, G; Reynolds, J J

    1996-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have been implicated in tissue remodelling in growth and development. A histochemical study of human fetal limbs was undertaken to assess the presence, and consequently the possible role, of MMPs and their inhibitor TIMP-1 (tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1) in synovial joint cavity formation. Cryostat sections of fetal limbs from 7 to 14 wk gestation were stained with specific antibodies to collagenase (MMP-1), gelantinases A (MMP-2) and B (MMP-9), stromelysin (MMP-3) and TIMP-1. Immunoreactive (IR) MMP-1, MMP-2 and MMP-3 were seen chiefly in chondrocytes, but in all cases in zones distant from the joint line before cavity formation. IR-MMP-1 and MMP-2 were also localised both in synovium and on the articular surfaces of joints after cavity formation. In addition IR-MMP-2 was seen in a "collar' of perichondrium alongside the hypertrophic zone of chondrocytes and weakly in bone marrow spaces. IR-MMP-9 was seen in neutrophil leucocytes and in bone marrow spaces. IR-TIMP-1 was generally distributed in connective tissue cells. No IR-MMP (1, 2,3 or 9) was seen along potential joint lines before or at the time of cavity formation, nor was there aspecific decrease in IR-TIMP-1 at this site. These findings confirm a role for metalloproteinases in developmental processes such as cartilage remodelling and bone marrow space formation. MMP-1 and MMP-2 may be involved in the remodelling of developing synovial tissue and the articular surfaces subsequent to cavity formation. However, we have failed to find evidence to indicate that the loss of tissue strength at the joint line which allows synovial joint cavity formation relates to high local levels of MMPS. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8621334

  16. Auriculotemporal neuralgia secondary to TMJ synovial cyst: a rare presentation of a rare entity.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Hossein; Robertson, Carrie E; Lane, John I; Viozzi, Christopher F; Garza, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Synovial cysts of the temporomandibular joint are rare, and to our knowledge, only 14 cases have been reported. The most common presentation is local pain and swelling. We present a case of a synovial cyst presenting with neuralgia in the distribution of the auriculotemporal nerve, initially misdiagnosed as trigeminal neuralgia. © 2013 American Headache Society.

  17. Adrenomedullin Regulates IL-1β Gene Expression in F4/80+ Macrophages during Synovial Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Takano, Shotaro; Miyagi, Masayuki; Inoue, Gen; Aikawa, Jun; Iwabuchi, Kazuya; Takaso, Masashi

    2017-01-01

    Adrenomedullin (AM) plays an important role in the regulation of inflammatory processes; however, the role and expression of AM in synovial inflammation have not been determined. To investigate the expression and role of AM in inflamed synovial tissue (ST), the gene expression profiles of AM in the ST, including synovial macrophages and fibroblasts, of a murine patellar surgical dislocation model were characterized. In addition, the effects of interleukin- (IL-) 1β and AM in cultured synovial cells were also examined. CD11c+ macrophages were found to be elevated in ST of the surgically dislocated patella. Higher gene expression of CD11c, IL-1β, AM, receptor activity-modifying proteins 2 (RAMP2), and 3 (RAMP3) was also observed in ST obtained from the dislocated side. AM expression was also significantly increased in synovial fibroblasts and macrophages in response to IL-1β treatment. Synovial macrophages also highly expressed RAMP3 compared to fibroblasts and this expression was further stimulated by exogenously added IL-1β. Further, the treatment of the F4/80-positive cell fraction obtained from ST with AM inhibited IL-1β expression. Taken together, these findings demonstrated that AM was produced by synovial fibroblasts and macrophages in inflamed ST and that increased levels of AM may exert anti-inflammatory effects on synovial macrophages. PMID:28299347

  18. Proliferation of the synovial lining cell layer in suggested metal hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Burkandt, Andreas; Katzer, Alexander; Thaler, Karlheinz; Von Baehr, Volker; Friedrich, Reinhard E; Rüther, Wolfgang; Amling, Michael; Zustin, Jozef

    2011-01-01

    Synovial tissues in joints with prostheses display characteristic morphological changes in cases with aseptic failure, particularly macrophage infiltration. Since proliferation of the synovial lining cell layer represents a feature characteristic of autoimmune joint diseases, the possibility of morphological changes of the synovial lining cell layer in periprosthetic tissues was investigated. Synovial biopsies from five groups of morphologically well-defined lesions (osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, aseptic loosened metal-on-polyethylene and metal-on-metal arthroplasty and suggested metal hypersensitivity) were compared using a conventional staining method and immunohistochemistry. The synovial lining cell layer was substantially enlarged in both rheumatoid arthritis and cases suggestive of metal hypersensitivity. Macrophage infiltrates were apparent in rheumatoid arthritis and all specimens from retrieved hip arthroplasties. Although both synovial and subsynovial macrophages were positive for CD163 (indicating synovial M2 macrophages), the remaining fibroblast-like synoviocytes and scattered stromal fibroblasts showed a positive reaction with the D2-40 antibody (indicating fibroblast-like synoviocytes). Furthermore, in contrast to CD163-positive macrophages, the enlarged D2-40-positive fibroblast-like synoviocytes displayed cytoplasmatic tubular projections. Proliferation of the periprosthetic synovial lining cell layer occurred in cases with unexplained groin pain following metal-on-metal hip resurfacing arthroplasty, suggestive of hypersensitivity. Despite some important study limitations, the present observation adds to the evidence that metal hypersensitivity shares characteristic morphological features with autoimmune diseases of the joints.

  19. Rheologic behavior of osteoarthritic synovial fluid after addition of hyaluronic acid: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Pierre; Conrozier, Thierry; Vignon, Eric; Rozand, Yves; Rinaudo, Marguerite

    2009-11-01

    Viscosupplementation is a symptomatic treatment of osteoarthritis (OA) intended to restore rheologic homeostasis of the synovial fluid by injecting hyaluronic acid intraarticularly. Despite the long history of this therapy, little is known about its mechanisms of action and differences between commercial preparations. We investigated the rheologic behavior of OA synovial fluid with time, when stored at 4 degrees C, before and after the addition of two hyaluronic acid commercial preparations (linear and cross-linked). Thirteen OA synovial fluids were stored at 4 degrees C and assayed using steric exclusion chromatography, which allows hyaluronic acid to be separated from the remaining pool of proteins and its molecular weight and concentration to be determined without any pretreatment and calibration. The synovial fluid rheology also was studied in vitro, before and after addition of two viscosupplements, over 6 weeks. The non-Newtonian behavior of synovial fluid throughout followup appears to be the result of loose interactions between proteins and hyaluronic acid. When mixed with the linear hyaluronic acid, synovial fluid becomes less non-Newtonian whereas the non-Newtonian behavior was reinforced when mixed with the cross-linked hyaluronic acid. The rheology was nearly unchanged for all synovial fluids over 6 weeks. Our preliminary trial shows it is possible to study synovial fluid, stored at 4 degrees C, over a long time and suggests the enzymatic degradation of hyaluronic acid is negligible under these experimental conditions.

  20. Adiponectin stimulates IL-8 production by rheumatoid synovial fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Kitahara, Kanako; Kusunoki, Natsuko; Kakiuchi, Terutaka; Suguro, Toru; Kawai, Shinichi

    2009-01-09

    The adipokines are linked not only to metabolic regulation, but also to immune responses. Adiponectin, but not leptin or resistin induced interleukin-8 production from rheumatoid synovial fibroblasts (RSF). The culture supernatant of RSF treated with adiponectin induced chemotaxis, although adiponectin itself had no such effect. Addition of antibody against adiponectin, and inhibition of adiponectin receptor gene decreased adiponectin-induced IL-8 production. Nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-kappa B was increased by adiponectin. The induction of interleukin-8 was inhibited by mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitors. These findings suggest that adiponectin contributes to the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis.

  1. Trex-1 deficiency in rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Neidhart, Michel; Karouzakis, Emmanuel; Schumann, Gerald G; Gay, Renate E; Gay, Steffen

    2010-09-01

    To explore whether the increased expression of long interspersed nuclear element 1 (LINE-1; L1) messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein in rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts (RASFs) is associated with decreased expression of Trex-1, an exonuclease involved in the metabolization of L1 DNA:RNA hybrids. Chromatin immunoprecipitation was used to detect L1-related p40 protein (L1-ORF1p) binding sequences in RASFs. Luciferase activity was measured in the synovial fibroblasts following cotransfection of the episomal plasmid with pJM105 expressing L1-ORF1p and pGL3-TS3 carrying the target sequence for L1-ORF1p. This luciferase reporter assay was used to compare the activity between RASFs and osteoarthritis synovial fibroblasts (OASFs) and to assess correlations of luciferase activity with the expression of Trex-1 measured by flow cytometry. The expression of Trex-1 mRNA and protein was also compared using real-time polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry, and Western blot analyses. The role of Trex-1 in the L1-ORF1p-mediated luciferase activity assay was studied using interfering RNAs (iRNA) and a Trex-1 expression vector. Increased luciferase activity occurred after cotransfection of synovial fibroblasts with pJM105 and pGL3-TS3. L1-ORF1p activity was increased in RASFs as compared with OASFs, and this was correlated inversely with the expression of Trex-1. Levels of Trex-1 mRNA and protein were lower in RASFs than in OASFs. After transfection of the L1 expression plasmid, Trex-1 mRNA levels increased in OASFs, but not in RASFs. The addition of iRNA against Trex-1, however, resulted in an enhancement of L1-ORF1p activity in OASFs to the levels measured in RASFs. Overexpression of Trex-1 inhibited 5-azacytidine-induced expression of p38δ MAPK, a gene carrying the TS3 sequence. The deficiency of Trex-1 in RASFs allows a longer half-life of gene products encoded by active endogenous L1 retrotransposons. This pathway may play a role in diseases in which the cells

  2. GUYON'S CANAL SYNDROME DUE TO A SYNOVIAL CYST

    PubMed Central

    Ruas, Evandro Silva; Castilho, Rodrigo Simões; Maia, Philipe Eduardo Carvalho; Melo, Gustavus Lemos Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of Guyon's canal syndrome caused by a synovial cyst within the left wrist of a 48-year-old female patient. The patient presented pain and paresthesia in the region of the ulnar nerve, with loss of muscle strength and left-hand deformity. Electroneuromyography showed a compression of the ulnar nerve at the wrist level. Surgical decompression of the nerve at Guyon's canal with resection of the cyst was performed. After the surgery, the patient presented an improvement in the pain and paresthesia, as well as an increase in muscle trophism and correction of the deformity. PMID:27026975

  3. Successive synovial Mycoplasma hominis isolates exhibit apparent antigenic variation.

    PubMed Central

    Olson, L D; Renshaw, C A; Shane, S W; Barile, M F

    1991-01-01

    The expression of surface proteins by 14 successive Mycoplasma hominis isolates obtained from the synovial fluid of a chronically infected septic arthritis patient was examined. Marked differences in the expression of surface proteins, as determined by monoclonal antibodies raised against the first isolate, were observed. However, identical restriction patterns and virtually identical hybridization patterns with probes containing the conserved genes of the Mycoplasma capricolum rRNA operon and the Escherichia coli elongation factor Tu suggest that the protein differences might reflect antigenic variation by M. hominis during infection. Images PMID:1879948

  4. Innervation of the synovial membrane of the cats joint capsule.

    PubMed

    Halata, Z; Groth, H P

    1976-06-28

    Results of investigations on the occurrence of nerve fibres and endings in the synovial membrane of the knee and elbow joint in the cat are reported. The stratum synoviale contains only autonomic fibres, running in the adventitia of arteries. Free nerve endings are lacking in the stratum synoviale. Simple Pacinian corpuscles with an inner core are occasionally observed in the border zone between the stratum synoviale and fibrosum. The ultrastructure of these endorgans resembles that of Pacinian corpuscles in the hairless and hairy skin of the cat.

  5. Subcutaneous Phaeohyphomycosis Due to Pyrenochaeta romeroi Mimicking a Synovial Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Dinh, Aurélien; Levy, Bruno; Bouchand, Frédérique; Davido, Benjamin; Duran, Clara; Cristi, Marin; Felter, Adrien; Salomon, Jérôme; Ait Ammar, Nawel

    2016-01-01

    Opportunistic subcutaneous fungal infections are increasing nowadays due to the growing number of medical conditions causing immunosuppression, especially organ transplant. The incidence rate of subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis is very low. Most studies found are case reports. They showed a wide variation of clinical presentations. Pyrenochaeta romeroi, a fungus from the Dematiaceae group is a saprophyte found in soil and plants and a possible causative agent of phaeohyphomycosis. We present a rare case of subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis caused by P. romeroi mimicking a synovial cyst in a diabetic patient. PMID:27630637

  6. Cultured human synovial fibroblasts rapidly metabolize kinins and neuropeptides.

    PubMed Central

    Bathon, J M; Proud, D; Mizutani, S; Ward, P E

    1992-01-01

    Kinins and substance P have been implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory arthritis by virtue of their abilities to induce vasodilation, edema, and pain. The relative biological potencies of these peptides in vivo would depend at least in part upon their rates of catabolism in the joint. We hypothesized that human synovial lining cells may regulate intraarticular levels of kinins and neuropeptides via degradation by cell surface-associated peptidases. We exposed intact human synovial fibroblasts to kinins and substance P, in the presence or absence of specific peptidase inhibitors, and measured the amount of intact substrate remaining and degradation product(s) generated over time. Aminopeptidase M (AmM; EC 3.4.11.2), neutral endopeptidase-24.11 (NEP-24.11; EC 3.4.24.11), and dipeptidyl(amino)peptidase IV (DAP IV; EC 3.4.14.5) were identified on the cell surface of synovial cells. Bradykinin degradation was due entirely to NEP-24.11 (1.39 +/- 0.29 nmol/min per well). Lysylbradykinin was also degraded by NEP-24.11 (0.80 +/- 0.19 nmol/min per well); however, in the presence of phosphoramidon, AmM-mediated conversion to bradykinin (3.74 +/- 0.46 nmol/min per well) could be demonstrated. The combined actions of NEP-24.11 (0.93 +/- 0.15 nmol/min per well) and DAP IV (0.84 +/- 0.18 nmol/min per well) were responsible for the degradation of substance P. AmM (2.44 +/- 0.33 nmol/min per well) and NEP-24.11 (1.30 +/- 0.45 nmol/min per well) were responsible for the degradation of the opioid peptide, [Leu5]enkephalin. The identity of each of the three peptidases was confirmed via synthetic substrate hydrolysis, inhibition profile, and immunological identification. The profiles of peptidase enzymes identified in cells derived from rheumatoid and osteoarthritic joints were identical. These data demonstrate the human synovial fibroblast to be a rich source of three specific peptidases and suggest that it may play a prominent role in regulating peptide levels in the joint

  7. Disseminating an Effective Educational Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Axelrod, Saul

    1992-01-01

    Reasons for the failure to adopt behavior-analytic teaching strategies include the perception that behavior analysis is coercive and controlling, difficulties in implementation, university factors, and marketing problems. The goal of dissemination of these strategies could be met through creating motivational conditions and devising marketing…

  8. Disseminating Educational Research with IT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Niki

    Teachers and researchers need to use the research produced in education to improve their practice. However, the current modes of dissemination through journals and papers are often written for the expert community. The Telematics Centre at the University of Exeter (United Kingdom), School of Education provides creative solutions for the effective…

  9. The Dissemination of Pedagogical Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennedsen, Jens

    2006-01-01

    Pedagogical patterns have been around since 1995, but several authors claim their impact is limited. However, these claims are based on authors' own observations and not on methodical evaluations of the use and dissemination of pedagogical patterns. This claim is in contrast to the vision of the creators of pedagogical patterns--they think…

  10. The Dissemination of Pedagogical Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennedsen, Jens

    2006-01-01

    Pedagogical patterns have been around since 1995, but several authors claim their impact is limited. However, these claims are based on authors' own observations and not on methodical evaluations of the use and dissemination of pedagogical patterns. This claim is in contrast to the vision of the creators of pedagogical patterns--they think…

  11. Immunostaining for SYT protein discriminates synovial sarcoma from other soft tissue tumors: analysis of 146 cases.

    PubMed

    He, Rui; Patel, Rajiv M; Alkan, Serhan; Hammadeh, Rasheed; Weiss, Sharon W; Goldblum, John R; Venkataraman, Girish; Baila, Horea

    2007-05-01

    Synovial sarcoma in its classic biphasic form can be distinguished readily from other soft tissue lesions; however, monophasic and poorly differentiated forms are diagnostically more problematic. For this reason, we assessed the efficacy of immunostaining for SYT and SSX1 proteins, the gene products resulting from unique synovial sarcoma translocation, to distinguish synovial sarcoma from other soft tissue lesions. A total number of 146 cases were analyzed, including 47 synovial sarcoma cases (all of which were verified by FISH to have t(X; 18) translocation and SYT-SSX fusion gene) and 99 soft tissue tumors of various types. A polyclonal IgG antibody against SYT was used to stain formalin-fixed paraffin embedded tissues. Forty-one out of 47 (87%) synovial sarcoma displayed strong positive nuclear staining (ranging from 80 to 90% of the tumor cells) for SYT antibody. Nineteen of 99 (19%) non-synovial sarcoma cases showed variable nuclear and cytoplasmic staining with SYT, which ranged from 20 to 60% of tumor nuclei, and included malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (5/25), solitary fibrous tumor (2/14), Ewing sarcoma (2/6), low grade fibromyxoid tumor (2/4), extraskeletal mesenchymal chondrosarcoma (2/6), gastrointestinal tumor (4/17), epithelioid sarcoma (2/2). The remaining non-synovial sarcomas were negative. This is the first study demonstrating SYT protein expression in tissue sections of synovial sarcoma. This method could provide an easy, rapid and widely applicable means of assisting in the diagnosis of synovial sarcoma, particularly when material and/or resources are unavailable for PCR or FISH-based testing. However, as variable weak staining for SYT may be encountered in a small percentage of non-synovial sarcoma sarcomas, a positive interpretation should be made only when the staining is strong, nuclear and present in the majority of cells.

  12. Interleukin-17-positive mast cells contribute to synovial inflammation in spondylarthritis.

    PubMed

    Noordenbos, Troy; Yeremenko, Nataliya; Gofita, Ioana; van de Sande, Marleen; Tak, Paul P; Caňete, Juan D; Baeten, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    Studies comparing spondylarthritis (SpA) to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synovitis suggest that innate immune cells may play a predominant role in the pathogenesis of SpA. Recent observations have indicated a marked synovial mast cell infiltration in psoriatic SpA. We therefore undertook the present study to investigate the potential contribution of mast cells to synovial inflammation in SpA. Synovial tissue and fluid were obtained from patients with either nonpsoriatic or psoriatic SpA (n=82) and patients with RA (n=50). Synovial biopsy tissue was analyzed by immunostaining and used in ex vivo cultures. Synovial fluid was analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We observed a strong and specific increase of c-Kit-positive mast cells in the synovium from patients with SpA compared to the synovium from patients with RA synovitis, which was independent of disease subtype (nonpsoriatic versus psoriatic), disease duration, and treatment. Staining of mast cell granules, analysis of synovial fluid, and results in ex vivo tissue culture did not indicate increased degranulation in SpA synovitis. However, mast cells expressed significantly more interleukin-17 (IL-17) in SpA than in RA synovitis, and mast cells constituted the major IL-17-expressing cell population in the SpA synovium. Ex vivo targeting of synovial mast cells with the c-Kit inhibitor imatinib mesylate significantly decreased the production of IL-17 as well as other proinflammatory cytokines in synovial tissue cultures. Analysis of paired pre- and posttreatment synovial tissue samples indicated that the mast cell/IL-17 axis in SpA was not modulated by effective tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blockade. The specific and TNF-independent increase in IL-17-expressing mast cells may contribute to the progression of synovial inflammation in peripheral SpA. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  13. Fucosyltransferase 1 mediates angiogenesis, cell adhesion and rheumatoid arthritis synovial tissue fibroblast proliferation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction We previously reported that sialyl Lewisy, synthesized by fucosyltransferases, is involved in angiogenesis. Fucosyltransferase 1 (fut1) is an α(1,2)-fucosyltransferase responsible for synthesis of the H blood group and Lewisy antigens. However, the angiogenic involvement of fut 1 in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis synovial tissue (RA ST) has not been clearly defined. Methods Assay of α(1,2)-linked fucosylated proteins in RA was performed by enzyme-linked lectin assay. Fut1 expression was determined in RA ST samples by immunohistological staining. We performed angiogenic Matrigel assays using a co-culture system of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMVECs) and fut1 small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfected RA synovial fibroblasts. To determine if fut1 played a role in leukocyte retention and cell proliferation in the RA synovium, myeloid THP-1 cell adhesion assays and fut1 siRNA transfected RA synovial fibroblast proliferation assays were performed. Results Total α(1,2)-linked fucosylated proteins in RA ST were significantly higher compared to normal (NL) ST. Fut1 expression on RA ST lining cells positively correlated with ST inflammation. HMVECs from a co-culture system with fut1 siRNA transfected RA synovial fibroblasts exhibited decreased endothelial cell tube formation compared to control siRNA transfected RA synovial fibroblasts. Fut1 siRNA also inhibited myeloid THP-1 adhesion to RA synovial fibroblasts and RA synovial fibroblast proliferation. Conclusions These data show that α(1,2)-linked fucosylated proteins are upregulated in RA ST compared to NL ST. We also show that fut1 in RA synovial fibroblasts is important in angiogenesis, leukocyte-synovial fibroblast adhesion, and synovial fibroblast proliferation, all key processes in the pathogenesis of RA. PMID:24467809

  14. Genesis and morphogenesis of limb synovial joints and articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Rebekah S.; Koyama, Eiki; Pacifici, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    Limb synovial joints are intricate structures composed of articular cartilage, synovial membranes, ligaments and an articular capsule. Each joint has a unique shape, organization and biomechanical function, and articular cartilage itself is rather complex and organized in distinct zones, including the superficial zone that produces lubricans and contains stem/progenitor cells. There has been a great of interest for many years to decipher the mechanisms by which the joints form and come to acquire such unique structural features and diversity. Decades ago, classic embryologists discovered that the first overt sign of joint formation at each prescribed limb site is the appearance of a dense and compact population of mesenchymal cells collectively called the interzone. Work carried out since by several groups has provided evidence that the interzone cells do actively participate in joint tissue formation over developmental time. This minireview provides a succinct but comprehensive description of the many and important recent advances in this field of research. These includes: studies using various conditional reporter mice to genetically trace and track the origin, fate and possible function of joint progenitor cells; studies on the involvement and roles in signaling pathways and transcription factors in joint cell determination and functioning; and studies using advanced methods of gene expression analyses to uncover novel genetic determinants of joint formation and diversity. The overall advances are impressive, and the findings are not only of obvious interest and importance, but have major implications to conceive future translational medicine tools to repair and regenerate defective, overused or aging joints. PMID:25172830

  15. Calcium apatite crystals in synovial fluid rice bodies.

    PubMed

    Li-Yu, J; Clayburne, G M; Sieck, M S; Walker, S E; Athreya, B H; DeHoratius, R J; Schumacher, H R

    2002-05-01

    Rice bodies can occur in the joints in many rheumatic conditions, but they are most common in rheumatoid arthritis. They are generally believed to occur rarely in patients with osteoarthritis, but one study reported rice bodies with apatite crystals. To report on a series of joint fluids with rice bodies containing apatite clumps and examine their clinical pictures. All synovial fluid analysis reports for 10 years were reviewed for rice bodies and eight patients were reported on. A series of patients with a variety of diseases with synovial fluid rice bodies found to contain calcific material is described. All were examined by compensated polarised light and alizarin red stain, and four were examined by electron microscopy. The eight patients all had alizarin red S chunks embedded throughout the rice body. Transmission electron microscopy disclosed the presence of a matrix of collagen, fibrin, and amorphous materials containing typical apatite crystals. Clinical diagnoses, radiographic findings, and leucocyte counts varied, but six of the eight patients had had previous repeated corticosteroid injections into the joints. Aggregates of apatites may be more common than previously recognised in rice bodies as they are not routinely sought. Whether they are a result of joint damage or depot steroid injections and whether that might contribute to further joint injury now needs to be investigated.

  16. Calcium apatite crystals in synovial fluid rice bodies

    PubMed Central

    Li-Yu, J; Clayburne, G; Sieck, M; Walker, S; Athreya, B; DeHoratius, R; Schumacher, H

    2002-01-01

    Background: Rice bodies can occur in the joints in many rheumatic conditions, but they are most common in rheumatoid arthritis. They are generally believed to occur rarely in patients with osteoarthritis, but one study reported rice bodies with apatite crystals. Objective: To report on a series of joint fluids with rice bodies containing apatite clumps and examine their clinical pictures. Methods: All synovial fluid analysis reports for 10 years were reviewed for rice bodies and eight patients were reported on. A series of patients with a variety of diseases with synovial fluid rice bodies found to contain calcific material is described. All were examined by compensated polarised light and alizarin red stain, and four were examined by electron microscopy. Results: The eight patients all had alizarin red S chunks embedded throughout the rice body. Transmission electron microscopy disclosed the presence of a matrix of collagen, fibrin, and amorphous materials containing typical apatite crystals. Clinical diagnoses, radiographic findings, and leucocyte counts varied, but six of the eight patients had had previous repeated corticosteroid injections into the joints. Conclusion: Aggregates of apatites may be more common than previously recognised in rice bodies as they are not routinely sought. Whether they are a result of joint damage or depot steroid injections and whether that might contribute to further joint injury now needs to be investigated. PMID:11959760

  17. Phase-Sensitive X-ray Imaging of Synovial Joints

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Zhong, Zhong; Connor, Dean; Mollenhauer, Jorgen; Muehleman, Carol

    2009-01-01

    Objective To test the efficacy of phase-sensitive x-ray imaging for intact synovial joints, whereby refraction effects, along with the attenuation of conventional radiography, can be exploited. Design Intact cadaveric human knee joints were imaged, in the computed tomographic mode, using an analyzer based x-ray system at the National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory. A collimated fan beam of 51 keV X-rays was prepared by a silicon [1,1,1 reflection] double-crystal monochromator. The x-ray beam transmitted through the specimen was imaged after diffraction in the vertical plane by means of the analyzer crystal with the analyzer crystal tuned to its half-reflectivity point (6.5 microradians). A two-dimensional filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithm was used for reconstructing transverse slices of images. Results The resulting images demonstrate simultaneous soft-tissue and bone contrast at a level that has not been achieved previously. Identifiable structures include articular cartilage, cruciate ligaments, loose connective tissue, menisci, and chondrocalcinosis. Conclusion Phase-sensitive x-ray imaging using an analyzer-based system renders exceptionally high quality images of soft and hard tissues within synovial joints, with high contrast and resolution, and thus holds promise for the eventual clinical utility. PMID:19328880

  18. Inducible nitric oxide synthase is expressed in synovial fluid granulocytes.

    PubMed

    Cedergren, J; Forslund, T; Sundqvist, T; Skogh, T

    2002-10-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the NO-producing potential of synovial fluid (SF) cells. SF from 15 patients with arthritis was compared with blood from the same individuals and with blood from 10 healthy controls. Cellular expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was analysed by flow cytometry. High-performance liquid chromatography was used to measure l-arginine and l-citrulline. Nitrite and nitrate were measured colourimetrically utilizing the Griess' reaction. Compared to whole blood granulocytes in patients with chronic arthritis, a prominent iNOS expression was observed in SF granulocytes (P < 0.001). A slight, but statistically significant, increase in iNOS expression was also recorded in lymphocytes and monocytes from SF. l-arginine was elevated in SF compared to serum (257 +/- 78 versus 176 +/- 65 micro mol/l, P = 0.008), whereas a slight increase in l-citrulline (33 +/- 11 versus 26 +/- 9 micro mol/l), did not reach statistical significance. Great variations but no significant differences were observed comparing serum and SF levels of nitrite and nitrate, respectively, although the sum of nitrite and nitrate tended to be elevated in SF (19.2 +/- 20.7 versus 8.6 +/- 6.5 micro mol/l, P = 0.054). Synovial fluid leucocytes, in particular granulocytes, express iNOS and may thus contribute to intra-articular NO production in arthritis.

  19. Creating new realities: program development and dissemination.

    PubMed Central

    Fixsen, D L; Blase, K A

    1993-01-01

    Program development and dissemination in human services present challenges and opportunities for social scientists. Over the past 27 years the Teaching-Family Model of group home treatment has moved from prototype development to widespread dissemination across North America. Reviewing concepts in industry related to product development and dissemination, the application of these concepts to a human services delivery system, and program replication and dissemination data offer information about how innovative human services can be widely adapted and adopted. PMID:8307838

  20. Identification of α1-Antitrypsin as a Potential Candidate for Internal Control for Human Synovial Fluid in Western Blot.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaowei; Zhou, Jingming; Wei, Xiaochun; Li, Pengcui; Li, Kai; Wang, Dongming; Wei, Fangyuan; Zhang, Jianzhong; Wei, Lei

    Western blot of synovial fluid has been widely used for osteoarthritis (OA) research and diagnosis, but there is no ideal loading control for this purpose. Although β-actin is extensively used as loading control in western blot, it is not suitable for synovial fluid because it is not required in synovial fluid as a cytoskeletal protein. A good loading control for synovial fluid in OA studies should have unchanged content in synovial fluids from normal and OA groups, because synovial fluid protein content can vary with changes in synovial vascular permeability with OA onset. In this study, we explore the potential of using α1-antitripsin (A1AT) as loading control for OA synovial fluid in western blot. A1AT level is elevated in inflammatory conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Unlike RA, OA is a non-inflammation disease, which does not induce A1AT. In this study, we identified A1AT as an abundant component of synovial fluid by Mass Spectrometry and confirmed that the level of A1AT is relative constant between human OA and normal synovial fluid by western blot and ELISA. Hence, we proposed that A1AT may be a good loading control for western blot in human OA synovial fluid studies provided that pathological conditions such as RA or A1AT deficiency associated liver or lung diseases are excluded.

  1. Changing patterns of disseminated gonococcal infection in France: cross-sectional data 2009-2011.

    PubMed

    Belkacem, Anna; Caumes, Eric; Ouanich, Jocelyne; Jarlier, Vincent; Dellion, Sophie; Cazenave, Benoit; Goursaud, Régis; Lacassin, Flore; Breuil, Jacques; Patey, Olivier

    2013-12-01

    Disseminated gonococcal infections (DGIs) are rare. We describe the characteristics of DGIs in France. This is a 3-year retrospective analysis of DGI cases collected through two networks of microbiologists and infectious disease specialists in France between 2009 and 2011. DGI was defined either by the isolation of Neisseria gonorrhoeae from blood and synovial fluid or by the existence of a clinical syndrome consistent with DGI and the isolation of N gonorrhoeae from any site. We describe the epidemiological, clinical and microbiological characteristics and outcomes of DGIs. 21 patients (9 women, 12 men; 18-62 years old) were diagnosed with DGI. The number of DGI cases increased between 2009 and 2011. Two men who had sex with men were coinfected with HIV. We found 28 extragenital locations, including arthritis (14 cases), tenosynovitis (7), skin lesions (4), endocarditis (1), prostatitis (1) and pelvic inflammatory disease (1). Genital signs were present in five patients. The diagnosis was confirmed by cultures in 20 patients-blood (4), synovial fluid (11), genital (3), throat (1), urine (1)-and by molecular biology on a pharyngeal swab in 1 patient. Seven cases were resistant to fluoroquinolones. The patients were treated with ceftriaxone, associated with corticosteroids (two cases) and surgery (six cases). Four patients had joint sequelae. DGIs are increasing. Men seem to be at higher risk than women. Joint involvement was common. Microbiological diagnosis was based on culture, however molecular biology using pharyngeal swabs was helpful when cultures were negative.

  2. Plasma and synovial fluid microRNAs as potential biomarkers of rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction MicroRNAs (miRNAs), endogenous small noncoding RNAs regulating the activities of target mRNAs and cellular processes, are present in human plasma in a stable form. In this study, we investigated whether miRNAs are also stably present in synovial fluids and whether plasma and synovial fluid miRNAs could be biomarkers of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA). Methods We measured concentrations of miR-16, miR-132, miR-146a, miR-155 and miR-223 in synovial fluid from patients with RA and OA, and those in plasma from RA, OA and healthy controls (HCs) by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Furthermore, miRNAs in the conditioned medium of synovial tissues, monolayer fibroblast-like synoviocytes, and mononuclear cells were examined. Correlations between miRNAs and biomarkers or disease activities of RA were statistically examined. Results Synovial fluid miRNAs were present and as stable as plasma miRNAs for storage at -20°C and freeze-thawing from -20°C to 4°C. In RA and OA, synovial fluid concentrations of miR-16, miR-132, miR-146a, and miR-223 were significantly lower than their plasma concentrations, and there were no correlation between plasma and synovial fluid miRNAs. Interestingly, synovial tissues, fibroblast-like synoviocytes, and mononuclear cells secreted miRNAs in distinct patterns. The expression patterns of miRNAs in synovial fluid of OA were similar to miRNAs secreted by synovial tissues. Synovial fluid miRNAs of RA were likely to originate from synovial tissues and infiltrating cells. Plasma miR-132 of HC was significantly higher than that of RA or OA with high diagnosability. Synovial fluid concentrations of miR-16, miR-146a miR-155 and miR-223 of RA were significantly higher than those of OA. Plasma miRNAs or ratio of synovial fluid miRNAs to plasma miRNAs, including miR-16 and miR-146a, significantly correlated with tender joint counts and 28-joint Disease Activity Score. Conclusions Plasma miRNAs had

  3. Pemphigus vulgaris and disseminated nocardiosis.

    PubMed

    Martín, F J; Pérez-Bernal, A M; Camacho, F

    2000-09-01

    Infectious diseases, in particular septicaemia from Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus vulgaris and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, are the most severe and frequent complications for the immunosuppressive therapy of pemphigus. Infection by Nocardia asteroides in subjects with pemphigus vulgaris is rare. We report the sixth case found of such an association; the subject died of disseminated nocardiosis while receiving steroids and immunosuppressive drugs, 4 years after being diagnosed with chronic pemphigus vulgaris.

  4. The epigenome of synovial fibroblasts: an underestimated therapeutic target in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Frank-Bertoncelj, Mojca; Gay, Steffen

    2014-01-01

    Perturbed epigenetic landscape and deregulated microRNA networks are central to the permanent activation and aggressiveness of synovial fibroblasts in rheumatoid arthritis. Current anti-cytokine therapies, although effectively halting synovitis, cannot reverse the stably activated destructive phenotype of rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts,offering rather limited protection against ongoing joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis. Targeting the deregulated epigenome of rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts is key to developing joint-protective strategies in rheumatoid arthritis. To date, different pathogenic mechanisms have been identified that can profoundly impact the epigenetic derangements in rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts, including increased consumption of S-adenosylmethionine,a principal methyl donor in DNA methylation reactions, together with deregulation of crucial DNA- and histonemodifying enzymes. Re-establishing globally disturbed DNA methylation patterns in rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts by supplementing S-adenosylmethionine while preventing its leakage into polyamine cycles may bea promising therapeutic strategy in rheumatoid arthritis and the first epigenetic treatment to target rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts at the scene of the crime. Given the dynamic nature and reversibility of epigenetic modifications, their involvement in human diseases and recent perspectives on epigenetic therapies in cancer, epigenetic targeting of rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts should be within future reach.

  5. Gene Expression Profiling of IL-17A-Treated Synovial Fibroblasts from the Human Temporomandibular Joint

    PubMed Central

    Hattori, Toshio; Ogura, Naomi; Akutsu, Miwa; Kawashima, Mutsumi; Watanabe, Suguru; Ito, Ko; Kondoh, Toshirou

    2015-01-01

    Synovial fibroblasts contribute to the inflammatory temporomandibular joint under pathogenic stimuli. Synovial fibroblasts and T cells participate in the perpetuation of joint inflammation in a mutual activation feedback, via secretion of cytokines and chemokines that stimulate each other. IL-17 is an inflammatory cytokine produced primarily by Th17 cells which plays critical role in the pathogenesis of numerous autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Here, we investigated the roles of IL-17A in temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) using genome-wide analysis of synovial fibroblasts isolated from patients with TMD. IL-17 receptors were expressed in synovial fibroblasts as assessed using real-time PCR. Microarray analysis indicated that IL-17A treatment of synovial fibroblasts upregulated the expression of IL-6 and chemokines. Real-time PCR analysis showed that the gene expression of IL-6, CXCL1, IL-8, and CCL20 was significantly higher in IL-17A-treated synovial fibroblasts compared to nontreated controls. IL-6 protein production was increased by IL-17A in a time- and a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, IL-17A simulated IL-6 protein production in synovial fibroblasts samples isolated from three patients. Furthermore, signal inhibitor experiments indicated that IL-17-mediated induction of IL-6 was transduced via activation of NFκB and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt. These results suggest that IL-17A is associated with the inflammatory progression of TMD. PMID:26839464

  6. The epigenome of synovial fibroblasts: an underestimated therapeutic target in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Perturbed epigenetic landscape and deregulated microRNA networks are central to the permanent activation and aggressiveness of synovial fibroblasts in rheumatoid arthritis. Current anti-cytokine therapies, although effectively halting synovitis, cannot reverse the stably activated destructive phenotype of rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts, offering rather limited protection against ongoing joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis. Targeting the deregulated epigenome of rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts is key to developing joint-protective strategies in rheumatoid arthritis. To date, different pathogenic mechanisms have been identified that can profoundly impact the epigenetic derangements in rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts, including increased consumption of S-adenosylmethionine, a principal methyl donor in DNA methylation reactions, together with deregulation of crucial DNA- and histone-modifying enzymes. Re-establishing globally disturbed DNA methylation patterns in rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts by supplementing S-adenosylmethionine while preventing its leakage into polyamine cycles may be a promising therapeutic strategy in rheumatoid arthritis and the first epigenetic treatment to target rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts at the scene of the crime. Given the dynamic nature and reversibility of epigenetic modifications, their involvement in human diseases and recent perspectives on epigenetic therapies in cancer, epigenetic targeting of rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts should be within future reach. PMID:25165988

  7. Measurement of inflammatory biomarkers in synovial tissue extracts by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Rosengren, Sanna; Firestein, Gary S; Boyle, David L

    2003-11-01

    We developed methods for measuring inflammatory biomarkers (cytokines, chemokines, and metalloproteinases) in synovial biopsy specimens from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA). Soluble extracts of synovial fragments were prepared with mild detergent and analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for interleukin 1beta (IL-1beta), IL-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), and matrix metalloproteinase 3. The optimal detergent was 0.1% Igepal CA-630, which interfered minimally with ELISA detection but extracted 80% of IL-6 from synovial tissue. Upon spiking, 81 to 107% of added biomarkers could be recovered. To determine within-tissue variability, multiple biopsy specimens from each RA synovial extract were analyzed individually. A resulting coefficient of variation of 35 to 62% indicated that six biopsy specimens per synovial extract would result in a sampling error of < or = 25%. Preliminary power analysis suggested that 8 to 15 patients per group would suffice to observe a threefold difference before and after treatment in a serial biopsy clinical study. The previously described significant differences in IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-alpha levels between RA and OA could be detected, thereby validating the use of synovial extracts for biomarker analysis in arthritis. These methods allow monitoring of biomarker protein levels in synovial tissue and could potentially be applied to early-phase clinical trials to provide a preliminary estimate of drug efficacy.

  8. An altered repertoire of T cell receptor V gene expression by rheumatoid synovial fluid T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Lunardi, C; Marguerie, C; So, A K

    1992-01-01

    The pattern of T cell receptor V gene expression by lymphocytes from rheumatoid synovial fluid and paired peripheral blood samples was compared using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based assay. Eight rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients who had varying durations of disease (from 2 to 20 years) were studied. In all patients there was evidence of a different pattern of V gene expression between the two compartments. Significantly increased expression of at least one V alpha or V beta gene family by synovial fluid T cells was observed in all the patients studied. Three different V alpha (V alpha 10, 15 and 18) and three V beta (V beta 4, 5 and 13) families were commonly elevated. Sequencing of synovial V beta transcripts demonstrated that the basis of increased expression of selected V gene families in the synovial fluid was due to the presence of dominant clonotypes within those families, which constituted up to 53% of the sequences isolated from one particular synovial V gene family. There were considerable differences in the NDJ sequences found in synovial and peripheral blood T cell receptor (TCR) transcripts of the same V beta gene family. These data suggest that the TCR repertoire in the two compartments differs, and that antigen-driven expansion of particular synovial T cell populations is a component of rheumatoid synovitis, and is present in all stages of the disease. PMID:1458680

  9. Lysyl oxidase is involved in synovial hyperplasia and angiogenesis in rats with collagen‑induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fan; Wan, Juan; Li, Qiuyan; Zhang, Mingzhu; Wan, Qiaofeng; Ji, Chen; Li, Haibo; Liu, Rongqing; Han, Mei

    2017-09-07

    Lysyl oxidase (LOX) serves an important role in remodeling the extracellular matrix and angiogenesis in various types of cancer; however, whether LOX is involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis remains unknown. In order to investigate this in the present study, β‑aminopropionitrile, an inhibitor of LOX, was injected intraperitoneally into rats with type II collagen‑induced arthritis (CIA). Subsequently, synovial hyperplasia was examined by hematoxyl in and eosin staining, and the microvascular density (MVD) and expression levels of LOX, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)‑2 and MMP‑9 in the synovial membrane and fluid were determined by immunohistochemistry and ELISA, respectively. The enzyme activity of LOX was evaluated by the Amplex Red Hydrogen Peroxide method. The results demonstrated an increased amount of rough synovial membranes, higher MVD in these membranes and more synovial cell layers in CIA rats compared with in the control rats. In addition, higher enzymatic activity of LOX and higher expression levels of MMP‑2 and MMP‑9 were revealed in CIA rats compared with in the control rats. Notably, β‑aminopropionitrile inhibited paw swelling and the decreased the arthritis index, the MVD in the synovial membranes and the expression levels of MMP‑2 and MMP‑9. Furthermore, the expression level of LOX in the synovial membranes was positively associated with the MVD and the expression levels of MMP‑2 and MMP‑9, suggesting that LOX promotes synovial hyperplasia and angiogenesis and that LOX may be a potential therapeutic target for rheumatoid arthritis.

  10. Risk Factors for Disseminated Coccidioidomycosis, United States

    PubMed Central

    Odio, Camila D.; Marciano, Beatriz E.; Galgiani, John N.

    2017-01-01

    Of 150,000 new coccidioidomycosis infections that occur annually in the United States, ≈1% disseminate; one third of those cases are fatal. Immunocompromised hosts have higher rates of dissemination. We identified 8 patients with disseminated coccidioidomycosis who had defects in the interleukin-12/interferon-γ and STAT3 axes, indicating that these are critical host defense pathways. PMID:28098554

  11. Disseminated sporotrichosis in an immunocompetent patient

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Kareem; Turker, Tolga; Zangeneh, Tirdad

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Sporothrix schenckii, the causative agent of sporotrichosis, is a relatively rare infection. Local infection usually occurs through direct inoculation of the organism through the skin; disseminated disease is rarely seen. This article describes a case of disseminated sporotrichosis in a middle-aged man without the commonly seen risk factors for dissemination. PMID:27583270

  12. Quantification of cells expressing mesenchymal stem cell markers in healthy and osteoarthritic synovial membranes.

    PubMed

    Hermida-Gómez, Tamara; Fuentes-Boquete, Isaac; Gimeno-Longas, Maria José; Muiños-López, Emma; Díaz-Prado, Silvia; de Toro, Francisco Javier; Blanco, Francisco Javier

    2011-02-01

    To quantify cells expressing mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) markers in synovial membranes from human osteoarthritic (OA) and healthy joints. Synovial membranes from OA and healthy joints were digested with collagenase and the isolated cells were cultured. Synovial membrane-derived cells were phenotypically characterized for differentiation experiments using flow cytometry to detect the expression of mesenchymal markers (CD29, CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105, CD117, CD166, and STRO-1) and hematopoietic markers (CD34 and CD45). Chondrogenesis was assessed by staining for proteoglycans and collagen type II, adipogenesis by using a stain for lipids, and osteogenesis by detecting calcium deposits. Coexpression of CD44, CD73, CD90, and CD105 was determined using immunofluorescence. Cells expressing MSC markers were diffusely distributed in OA synovial membranes; in healthy synovial membrane these cells were localized in the subintimal zone. More numerous MSC markers in OA synovial membranes were observed in cells also expressing the CD90 antigen. FACS analysis showed that more than 90% of OA synovial membrane-derived cells were positive for CD44, CD73, and CD90, and negative for CD34 and CD45. OA synovial membrane-derived cells were also positive for CD29 (85.23%), CD117 (72.35%), CD105 (45.5%), and STRO-1 (49.46%). Micropellet analyses showed that the culture of cells with transforming growth factor-ß3 stimulated proteoglycan and collagen type II synthesis. Synovial membranes from patients with OA contain more cells positive for CD44, CD90, and CD105 antigens than those from joints with undamaged cartilage.

  13. Serum and Synovial Fluid Serum Amyloid A Response in Equine Models of Synovitis and Septic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Elsa K; Brandon Wiese, R; Graham, Megan R; Tyler, Amelia J; Settlage, Julie M; Werre, Stephen R; Petersson-Wolfe, Christina S; Kanevsky-Mullarky, Isis; Dahlgren, Linda A

    2016-10-01

    To investigate the serum and synovial fluid serum amyloid A (SAA) response in equine models of synovitis and septic arthritis and to compare handheld and validated immunoturbidometric assays for SAA quantification. Controlled, experimental study. Healthy adult horses (n = 9). Synovitis (n = 4) and septic arthritis (n = 5) were induced using lipopolysaccharide and Staphylococcus aureus, respectively, and serial serum and synovial fluid samples were collected. Serial synovial fluid cytology was performed for both models and synovial fluid from the septic arthritis model was submitted for bacterial culture. Serum and synovial fluid SAA were quantified by handheld test and immunoturbidometric assay. Cytologic and SAA data were compared within and between models (mixed model ANOVA) and results of SAA assays were compared using category-by-category analysis (weighted kappa coefficient). Synovial fluid total nucleated cell counts and total protein increased significantly following induction of both models. Serum and synovial fluid SAA remained normal in synovitis horses and increased significantly in septic arthritis horses. Serum SAA increased more rapidly than synovial fluid SAA. Agreement was 98% when SAA concentrations were low (<50 μg/mL) but the assays diverged when concentrations were greater than ∼100 μg/mL. Overall, there was good category-by-category agreement between SAA assays (weighted kappa = 0.824). Serum and synovial fluid SAA may be useful adjuncts in diagnosing septic arthritis in horses. SAA concentrations for the assays diverged and examination using a larger sample size is needed before direct numeric comparisons between the assays can be made. © Copyright 2016 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  14. Synovial membrane involvement in osteoarthritic temporomandibular joints: a light microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Dijkgraaf, L C; Liem, R S; de Bont, L G

    1997-03-01

    To study the light microscopic characteristics of the synovial membrane of osteoarthritic temporomandibular joints to evaluate synovial membrane involvement in the osteoarthritic process. Synovial membrane biopsies were obtained during unilateral arthroscopy in 40 patients. Thirty-one temporomandibular joints were diagnosed with osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis subgroups were defined on the basis of the presence of symptoms related to disk displacement and perforation. The control group consisted of nine temporomandibular joints that were not involved by osteoarthritis. During light microscopic examination of the synovial membranes, several light microscopic variables were recorded. Differences between groups and between subgroups were tested with chi 2 or Fisher's exact tests with Mann-Whitney U tests and with Student's t tests. In the osteoarthritis group, the number of synovial intima cell layers was significantly higher, and fibrous intima matrix and fibrous subintima were found significantly more frequently than in the control group. Moreover, in the osteoarthritis group, intima cell hypertrophy in combination with a closely packed cell composition was found significantly more often in the first year of clinical signs and symptoms, whereas intima hyperplasia, fibrous intima matrix, dense surface material, and subintima elastic fibers were found significantly more frequently in the first 2 years of clinical signs and symptoms. The findings in this study suggest that osteoarthritis of the temporomandibular joint may initially result in synovial intima hyperplasia and cell hypertrophy, and subsequently in deposition of fibrous material in the intima matrix. Eventually, fibrosis of the subintimal tissue may occur in combination with degeneration and subsequent normalization of the synovial intima cell layer. Overall, fibrosis was the most characteristic feature of synovial membranes of osteoarthritic temporomandibular joints. In conclusion, the involvement of the

  15. Editorial Commentary: Role of Synovial Biomarkers in Patient Outcomes After Knee Arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Brand, Jefferson C

    2016-03-01

    Humans are notably poor at predicting event outcomes. In "Correlation of Synovial Fluid Biomarkers With Cartilage Pathology and Associated Outcomes in Knee Arthroscopy," Cuellar, Cuellar, Kirsch, and Strauss show that some synovial fluid biomarkers (20 were sampled for the investigation) may predict operative findings at the time of arthroscopy and patient-reported outcome measures at follow-up. Further research will clarify the role of synovial biomarkers in knee pathology and, hopefully, narrow the choices to one or two pertinent markers that can be used to improve our ability to predict outcomes from arthroscopic knee surgery. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Development of Synovial Membrane in the Temporomandibular Joint of the Human Fetus

    PubMed Central

    Tedesco, R.C.; Arraéz-Aybar, L.A.; Klein, O.; Mérida-Velasco, J.R.; Alonso, L.G.

    2015-01-01

    The development of the synovial membrane was analyzed in serial sections of 21 temporomandibular joints of human fetuses at 9 to 13 weeks of gestation. Sections of two fetuses at 12 weeks of development were used to perform immunohistochemical expression of the markers CD68 and Hsp27 on the synovial lining. Macrophage-like type A and fibroblast-like type B cells, which express CD68 and Hsp27, respectively, were observed at the twelfth week of development. Our results suggest that the development of the synovial membrane is related to the vascularization of the joint and the formation of the articular cavities. PMID:26708184

  17. Effect of Tibial Plateau Fracture on Lubrication Function and Composition of Synovial Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Ballard, Brooke L.; Antonacci, Jennifer M.; Temple-Wong, Michele M.; Hui, Alexander Y.; Schumacher, Barbara L.; Bugbee, William D.; Schwartz, Alexandra K.; Girard, Paul J.; Sah, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Intra-articular fractures may hasten posttraumatic arthritis in patients who are typically too active and too young for joint replacement. Current orthopaedic treatment principles, including recreating anatomic alignment and establishing articular congruity, have not eliminated posttraumatic arthritis. Additional biomechanical and biological factors may contribute to the development of arthritis. The objective of the present study was to evaluate human synovial fluid for friction-lowering function and the concentrations of putative lubricant molecules following tibial plateau fractures. Methods: Synovial fluid specimens were obtained from the knees of eight patients (twenty-five to fifty-seven years old) with a tibial plateau fracture, with five specimens from the injured knee as plateau fracture synovial fluid and six specimens from the contralateral knee as control synovial fluid. Each specimen was centrifuged to obtain a fluid sample, separated from a cell pellet, for further analysis. For each fluid sample, the start-up (static) and steady-state (kinetic) friction coefficients in the boundary mode of lubrication were determined from a cartilage-on-cartilage biomechanical test of friction. Also, concentrations of the putative lubricants, hyaluronan and proteoglycan-4, as well as total protein, were determined for fluid samples. Results: The group of experimental samples were obtained at a mean (and standard deviation) of 11 ± 9 days after injury from patients with a mean age of 45 ± 13 years. Start-up and kinetic friction coefficients demonstrated similar trends and dependencies. The kinetic friction coefficients for human plateau fracture synovial fluid were approximately 100% higher than those for control human synovial fluid. Hyaluronan concentrations were ninefold lower for plateau fracture synovial fluid compared with the control synovial fluid, whereas proteoglycan-4 concentrations were more than twofold higher in plateau fracture synovial

  18. Can lumbar hemorrhagic synovial cyst cause acute radicular compression? Case report

    PubMed Central

    Timbó, Luciana Sátiro; Rosemberg, Laercio Alberto; Brandt, Reynaldo André; Peres, Ricardo Botticini; Nakamura, Olavo Kyosen; Guimarães, Juliana Frota

    2014-01-01

    Lumbar synovial cysts are an uncommon cause of back pain and radiculopathy, usually manifesting with gradual onset of symptoms, secondary to involvement of the spinal canal. Rarely, intracyst hemorrhage occurs, and may acutely present as radicular - or even spinal cord - compression syndrome. Synovial cysts are generally associated with degenerative facets, although the pathogenesis has not been entirely established. We report a case of bleeding complication in a synovial cyst at L2-L3, adjacent to the right interfacet joint, causing acute pain and radiculopathy in a patient on anticoagulation therapy who required surgical resection. PMID:25628207

  19. Sonographic synovial vascularity of synovitis in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Fukae, Jun; Tanimura, Kazuhide; Atsumi, Tatsuya; Koike, Takao

    2014-04-01

    RA is a condition of multiple synovitis. Abnormal synovial vascularity (SV) is evident with the onset of joint inflammation. The idea of estimating the level of joint inflammation by sonographic SV was conceived with the advancement of US. The ideal treatment strategy, called treat to target (T2T), requires early diagnosis and assessment of RA. Detection of positive SV can be useful for proving the presence of synovitis and finally diagnosing RA. In the assessment of RA, US-based global scores aimed at assessing overall disease activity have the potential to be useful for the achievement of T2T because US can directly detect changes in synovitis. Remaining SV in local joints increases the risk of structural deterioration. RA requires both improvement of overall disease activity and the disappearance of local SV for remission. The evaluation of SV provides various information and contributes to the clinical treatment of RA.

  20. Fluorescence and UV-vis Spectroscopy of Synovial Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinti, Marie J.; Stojilovic, Nenad; Kovacik, Mark W.

    2009-10-01

    Total joint arthroplasty involves replacing the worn cartilaginous surfaces of the joint with man-made materials that are designed to be biocompatible and to withstand mechanical stresses. Commonly these bearing materials consist of metallic alloys (TiAlV or CoCrMo) and UHMWPE. Following joint arthroplasty, the normal generation of micro-metallic wear debris particles that dislodge from the prosthesis has been shown to cause inflammatory aseptic osteolysis (bone loss) that ultimately results in the failure of the implant. Here we report our results on the novel use of Fluorescence and UV-vis spectroscopy to investigate the metallic content of synovial fluid specimens taken from postoperative total knee arthroplasties. Preliminary finding showed presence of alumina and chromium is some specimens. The ability to detect and monitor the wear rate of these implants could have far reaching implications in the prevention of metallic wear-debris induced osteolysis and impending implant failure.

  1. Genesis and morphogenesis of limb synovial joints and articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Decker, Rebekah S; Koyama, Eiki; Pacifici, Maurizio

    2014-10-01

    Limb synovial joints are intricate structures composed of articular cartilage, synovial membranes, ligaments and an articular capsule. Together, these tissues give each joint its unique shape, organization and biomechanical function. Articular cartilage itself is rather complex and organized in distinct zones, including the superficial zone that produces lubricants and contains stem/progenitor cells. For many years there has been great interest in deciphering the mechanisms by which the joints form and come to acquire such unique structural features and diversity. Decades ago, classic embryologists discovered that the first overt sign of joint formation at each prescribed limb site was the appearance of a dense and compact population of mesenchymal cells collectively called the interzone. Work carried out since then by several groups has provided evidence that the interzone cells actively participate in joint tissue formation over developmental time. This minireview provides a succinct but comprehensive description of the many important recent advances in this field of research. These include studies using various conditional reporter mice to genetically trace and track the origin, fate and possible function of joint progenitor cells; studies on the involvement and roles in signaling pathways and transcription factors in joint cell determination and functioning; and studies using advanced methods of gene expression analyses to uncover novel genetic determinants of joint formation and diversity. The overall advances are impressive, and the findings are not only of obvious interest and importance but also have major implications in the conception of future translational medicine tools to repair and regenerate defective, overused or aging joints. Copyright © 2014 International Society of Matrix Biology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Federal Mechanisms to Support Intervention Dissemination.

    PubMed

    Diana, Augusto; Bennett, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines federal mechanisms that support program developers and researchers in disseminating effective interventions for public benefit. The purpose of this paper is not to discuss the dissemination of intervention research (i.e., how to inform stakeholders about research findings), nor is it intended to discuss the research of intervention dissemination (i.e., what is the best approach to disseminate an intervention). Rather, the paper discusses the challenges specific to finding pathways to disseminate an intervention and describes federal opportunities to support intervention dissemination. Three specific mechanisms are discussed: Federal Registries of Evidence-Based Programs, the Tiered Evidence Grant Programs, and the Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) and the Small Technology Transfer Research (STTR) programs. The article presents some limitations associated with federal mechanisms for dissemination of effective interventions, but is intended to highlight current and future opportunities they may offer. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Borrelia burgdorferi migrates into joint capsules and causes an up-regulation of interleukin-8 in synovial membranes of dogs experimentally infected with ticks.

    PubMed Central

    Straubinger, R K; Straubinger, A F; Härter, L; Jacobson, R H; Chang, Y F; Summers, B A; Erb, H N; Appel, M J

    1997-01-01

    . Histologically, nonsuppurative arthritis was found in multiple joints, and mild to moderate cortical hyperplasia was found in draining lymph nodes. Five uninfected dogs without lameness (group C) had normal synovial fluids and tissues. In all infected dogs, live spirochetes were demonstrated more frequently in tissues of the somatic quadrant closest to the tick bite than in tissues further from the site of infection, suggesting that dissemination of B. burgdorferi occurs more by migration than by blood-borne spread. From these studies employing a canine model of B. burgdorferi infection, we conclude that IL-8 is involved in the pathogenesis of acute Lyme arthritis. PMID:9119462

  4. [Disseminated interdigitating dendritic cell sarcoma].

    PubMed

    Santarelli, Ignacio M; Veltri, Mariano; Manzella, Diego J; Avagnina, María Alejandra; Pereyra, Pablo M; Chavín, Hernán C

    2017-01-01

    A 70 year-old woman was admitted to our hospital with a 3-month history of abdominal pain, weight loss and night sweats. On physical examination, she presented with a 5 cm diameter abdominal mass extended from epigastrium to the left flank, and at least three bilateral supraclavicular adenopathies. A disseminated interdigitating dendritic cell sarcoma was diagnosed through a biopsy of the abdominal mass. After that, a CHOP regime (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone) was iniciated. She died after completion of the first cycle of treatment, six months after diagnosis.

  5. Cryptococcus neoformans myositis without dissemination.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Mamta; Khatib, Riad; Jones, Bruce A; Fakih, Mohamad G

    2002-01-01

    We report a case of isolated cryptococcal myositis involving the paraspinal muscle without evidence of disseminated disease in a patient with a large B-cell lymphoma diagnosed at the time of presentation. Biopsy of the muscle involved grew a pure culture of Cryptococcus neoformans and periodic acid-Schiff staining showed numerous budding yeast consistent with Cryptococcus spp. The patient responded to systemic antifungal therapy with complete resolution of his infection. We also present a review of 5 previously published cases of cryptococcal myositis.

  6. Disseminating best practice through teaching.

    PubMed

    Price, B

    A nurse may be invited to deliver teaching sessions to students at a local university, especially if he or she has a reputation as a practice innovator. These invitations are an opportunity for the nurse to disseminate practice wisdom to a wider audience. Planning the session so that it is educational, stimulating and represents the nurse's experience and expertise is crucial. While leading such a session may seem daunting, there are several strategies that can increase the chance of success, and these are discussed in this article.

  7. [Two cases of disseminated toxoplasmosis].

    PubMed

    Stief, B; Kiesow, C; Ellenberger, C

    2012-01-01

    Two cases of disseminated fatal toxoplasmosis of a pet mouse and a red panda are described. The pet mouse had a private owner; the red panda lived in a zoological garden in Saxony. At necropsy, both animals suffered from a systemic toxoplasmosis. A severe necrotizing hepatitis was the main histological feature in both animals. Parasitic cysts could be abundantly found in the liver, moderately in the brain and in a low number in other organs. With the PAS-reaction, cysts showed a weak staining in the mouse and a strong staining in the red panda. Diagnosis was confirmed by PCR and immunohistochemistry.

  8. Staphylococcal Persistence Due to Biofilm Formation in Synovial Fluid Containing Prophylactic Cefazolin

    PubMed Central

    Dastgheyb, Sana S.; Hammoud, Sommer; Ketonis, Constantinos; Liu, Andrew Yongkun; Fitzgerald, Keith; Parvizi, Javad; Purtill, James; Ciccotti, Michael; Shapiro, Irving M.; Otto, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic prophylaxis is standard for patients undergoing surgical procedures, yet despite the wide use of antibiotics, breakthrough infections still occur. In the setting of total joint arthroplasty, such infections can be devastating. Recent findings have shown that synovial fluid causes marked staphylococcal aggregation, which can confer antibiotic insensitivity. We therefore asked in this study whether clinical samples of synovial fluid that contain preoperative prophylactic antibiotics can successfully eradicate a bacterial challenge by pertinent bacterial species. This study demonstrates that preoperative prophylaxis with cefazolin results in high antibiotic levels. Furthermore, we show that even with antibiotic concentrations that far exceed the expected bactericidal levels, Staphylococcus aureus bacteria added to the synovial fluid samples are not eradicated and are able to colonize model implant surfaces, i.e., titanium pins. Based on these studies, we suggest that current prophylactic antibiotic choices, despite high penetration into the synovial fluid, may need to be reexamined. PMID:25624333

  9. Ceramic debris in hip prosthesis: correlation between synovial fluid and joint capsule.

    PubMed

    De Pasquale, Dalila; Stea, Susanna; Beraudi, Alina; Montesi, Monica; Squarzoni, Stefano; Toni, Aldo

    2013-05-01

    Detection of ceramic particles in synovial fluids allows early diagnosis of ceramic damage, but there is no evidence of a relationship between ceramic debris in the articular space and in the joint capsule. The aim of the present study is to verify if the particles isolated in the synovial fluid are comparable with those stored in the capsular tissue. Twenty-one patients were enrolled. Both synovial fluid and capsular samples were collected during revision surgery and ceramic particles were isolated and analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis. It resulted a significant correlation between the samples couples (18 out of 21). This study confirms that the synovial fluid analysis can give a clear definition of the presence of particles in the joint capsule. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Ganglion and Synovial Cyst of the Temporomandibular Joint: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Hofstede, Diederik J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Ganglion and synovial cysts of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are rare. Although histopathological findings differ, clinical presentation is comparable. This study adds a case report of a ganglion of the TMJ to existing literature and a review of all available case reports on ganglion and synovial cysts of the TMJ. Including our own case report, we reviewed 49 cases of ganglion and synovial cysts of the TMJ. They occurred in a female:male ratio of 3:1, at an median age of 46 years (range, 11–64 years). Patients mainly presented with preauricular swelling and pain. After imaging, the ganglion or synovial cyst was most commonly excised under general anesthesia. No recurrences were described. PMID:26495237

  11. The arterial blood supply for the synovial tendon sheaths of the hand.

    PubMed

    de la Garza, Oscar; Lierse, Werner; de los Angeles-García, Ma; Elizondo, Rodrigo; Guzmán, Santos

    2008-01-01

    The blood supply for the synovial tendon sheaths of the hand was carefully investigated. We show that the origin of those arteries, supplying the synovial tendon-sheaths of the Mm. flexor pollicis longus, flexor digitorum superficialis and profundus, lies in the Canalis carpi. We also describe that the branches of the Aa. digitales palmares propriae arise independently. We emphasize that the terminal branches of the A. interossea posterior and the Rete carpi dorsalis form an arterial network on the synovial tendon sheaths of the Dorsum manus. The synovial membranes of the proximal joints of the fingers receive an ample blood supply from the Rami ascendentes of the Aa. metacarpeae palmares and the Aa. digitales palmares propriae (Aa. recurrentes).

  12. [Synovial cyst of the hip: a misleading strangulated crural hernia diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Julien, Y; Favoulet, P; Mistrih, R; de Dompsure, R; Trouilloud, P; Cougard, P

    2003-10-01

    We report a case of crural tumefaction becoming rapidly painful revealing a synovial cyst of the hip. Literature data concerning differential diagnosis, pathogenesis, clinical varieties, diagnosis and treatments of this rare pathology are emphasized.

  13. A ganglion cyst derived from a synovial cyst: A case report.

    PubMed

    Kizilay, Zahir; Yilmaz, Ali; Gurcan, Sevilay; Berber, Osman; Ozsunar, Yelda; Eliyatkın, Nuket

    2015-01-01

    The synovial and ganglion cysts originating from the facet joint have been named under the name of the Juxtafacet cyst by the several researchers. They put forward that the synovial cyst originated from the synovial joint. But, they failed to clarify the pathophysiology of the formation of the ganglion cyst. In this case report, we reported a 67-year-old male patient was referred to the emergency from another center with the complaint of a left leg pain and weakness in the left foot and patient was treated with microchirurgical technique. His patological examination was evaluated a ganglion cyst. We have discussed and explained the pathophysiology of the formation of a ganglion cyst derivered from a synovial cyst. And separately, we have presented the spinal cysts by grouping them under a new classification called a cystic formation of the soft tissue attachments of the mobile spine as well as dividing them into sub-groups.

  14. Comparing the mechanical properties of the porcine knee meniscus when hydrated in saline versus synovial fluid.

    PubMed

    Lakes, Emily H; Kline, Courtney L; McFetridge, Peter S; Allen, Kyle D

    2015-12-16

    As research progresses to find a suitable knee meniscus replacement, accurate in vitro testing becomes critical for feasibility and comparison studies of mechanical integrity. Within the knee, the meniscus is bathed in synovial fluid, yet the most common hydration fluid in laboratory testing is phosphate buffered saline (PBS). PBS is a relatively simple salt solution, while synovial fluid is a complex non-Newtonian fluid with multiple lubricating factors. As such, PBS may interact with meniscal tissue differently than synovial fluid, and thus, the hydration fluid may be an important factor in obtaining accurate results during in vitro testing. To evaluate these effects, medial porcine menisci were used to evaluate tissue mechanics in tension (n=11) and compression (n=15). In all tests, two samples from the same meniscus were taken, where one sample was hydrated in PBS and the other was hydrated in synovial fluid. Statistical analysis revealed no significant differences between the mean mechanical properties of samples tested in PBS compared to synovial fluid; however, compressive testing revealed the variability between samples was significantly reduced if samples were tested in synovial fluid. For example, the compressive Young׳s Modulus was 12.69±7.49MPa in PBS versus 12.34±4.27MPa in synovial fluid. These results indicate testing meniscal tissue in PBS will largely not affect the mean value of the mechanical properties, but performing compression testing in synovial fluid may provide more consistent results between samples and assist in reducing sample numbers in some experiments.

  15. Development of a Lubricant Therapy to Prevent Development of Osteoarthritis after Acute Injury of Synovial Joints

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    changes in lubricant molecules and function of joint fluid post -injury in a rabbit model as well as early, mid, and late changes post -injury in human...determined. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Cartilage, Wear, Lubrication, Friction, Post -traumatic osteoarthritis, Injury, Blood, Synovial Fluid, Joint 16. SECURITY...synovial fluid after joint injury contributes to the development of post -traumatic OA and is due, in part, to the pathological accumulation of a

  16. OSTEOCHONDROMA OF THE PROXIMAL HUMERUS WITH FRICTIONAL BURSITIS AND SECONDARY SYNOVIAL OSTEOCHONDROMATOSIS.

    PubMed

    De Groote, J; Geerts, B; Mermuys, K; Verstraete, K

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of multiple hereditary exostosis in a 33-year old patient with clinical symptoms of pain and impression of a growing mass of the left shoulder alerting potential risk of malignant transformation of an osteochondroma. Imaging studies illustrated perilesional bursitis surrounding an osteochondroma of the proximal humerus. Malignant transformation was excluded with MRI. Fragments of the osteochondroma were dislocated in the inflammatory synovial bursa illustrating a case of secondary synovial osteochondromatosis.

  17. Acute synovial fluid eosinophilia associated with delayed pressure urticaria: a role for mast cells?

    PubMed

    Miossec, P; Sullivan, T J; Tharp, M D; Volant, A; Le Goff, P

    1987-04-01

    We report a case of exercise induced joint effusion with synovial fluid (SF) eosinophilia of 9,540/mm3 in a patient with delayed pressure urticaria. The SF eosinophilia was an acute but transient event associated with some evidence of local complement activation. Histologic assessment revealed a normal synovial membrane but with no detectable intact mast cells. These observations suggest that mast cells and eosinophils acting in concert can cause joint inflammation.

  18. Transforming growth factor-beta 1 in rheumatoid synovial membrane and cartilage/pannus junction.

    PubMed

    Chu, C Q; Field, M; Abney, E; Zheng, R Q; Allard, S; Feldmann, M; Maini, R N

    1991-12-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta has been shown to promote tissue repair and have immunosuppressive actions, and has been proposed to have a role in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Using immunohistochemical techniques with rabbit F(ab')2 antibodies raised against recombinant human TGF-beta 1, we have detected TGF-beta 1 in the synovial tissue and cartilage/pannus junction (CPJ) from 18/18 patients with RA. TGF-beta 1 was found predominantly in the thickened synovial lining layer in RA, but also detected in a perivascular pattern in the synovial interstitium as well as in occasional cells in the lymphoid aggregates. At the CPJ it was found both in cells at the distinct junction as well as in the transitional region of the diffuse fibroblastic zone. The cells staining for TGF-beta 1 were identified by double immunofluorescence staining as being from the monocyte/macrophage series as well as the type B synovial lining cells. TGF-beta 1 was also detected in the synovial membrane sections from 4/4 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus/mixed connective tissue disease and 5/8 patients with osteoarthritis, in a similar distribution to that seen in RA, and in the lining layer of 1/7 normal synovial membranes. These results add to histological evidence confirming that TGF-beta 1 is present in RA synovial cells and those from other arthritides. The distributions of TGF-beta 1 in RA synovial membrane reflects its known actions, as it can be detected at the CPJ, where it could induce repair, and close to activated cells upon which it may exert an immunosuppressive action.

  19. Synovial fluid findings in children with knee monoarthritis in lyme disease endemic areas.

    PubMed

    Deanehan, Julia K; Nigrovic, Peter A; Milewski, Matthew D; Tan Tanny, Sharman P; Kimia, Amir A; Smith, Brian G; Nigrovic, Lise E

    2014-01-01

    Although Lyme and septic arthritis of the knee may have similar clinical presentations, septic arthritis requires prompt identification and treatment to avoid joint destruction. We sought to determine whether synovial fluid cell counts alone can discriminate between Lyme, septic, and other inflammatory arthritis. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of children aged 1 to 18 years with knee monoarthritis who presented to 1 of 2 pediatric emergency departments located in Lyme endemic areas. We included children who had both a synovial fluid culture and an evaluation for Lyme disease. Septic arthritis was defined as a positive synovial fluid culture or synovial fluid pleocytosis (white blood cell [WBC] ≥40,000 cells/μL) with a positive blood culture. Lyme arthritis was defined as positive Lyme serology without a positive bacterial culture. All other children were considered to have other inflammatory arthritis. We compared the synovial fluid counts by arthritis type. We identified 384 children with knee monoarthritis, of whom 19 (5%) had septic arthritis, 257 (67%) had Lyme arthritis and 108 (28%) had other inflammatory arthritis. Children with other inflammatory arthritis had lower synovial WBC and absolute neutrophil count, as well as percent neutrophils, than those with either Lyme or septic arthritis. There were no significant differences in the synovial fluid WBC, absolute neutrophil count, and percent neutrophils for children with Lyme and septic arthritis. In Lyme endemic areas, synovial fluid results alone do not differentiate septic from Lyme arthritis. Therefore, other clinical or laboratory indicators are needed to direct the care of patients with knee monoarthritis.

  20. Recurrent Primary Synovial Sarcoma of Median Nerve: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Bhat, A K; Jayakrishnan, K N; Acharya, A M

    2016-10-01

    We report a case of intraneural synovial sarcoma of the median nerve in a 39 year old lady with multiple local recurrences over thirteen years with no distant metastasis. The diagnosis of biphasic type of synovial sarcoma was confirmed by histopathology and immunohistochemistry. At the time of the fourth recurrence below elbow amputation was performed. This case is being reported for its rarity and propensity for local recurrence without distant metastasis.

  1. Meniscal repair by synovial flap transfer. Healing of the avascular zone in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Cisa, J; Basora, J; Madarnas, P; Ghibely, A; Navarro-Quilis, A

    1995-02-01

    We studied repair of a longitudinal incision of the right medial meniscus in 44 rabbits after the transfer of a pedunculated synovial flap, without immobilization of the knee. The left medial meniscus was used as the control, after creating the same lesion without synovial flap. Healing was analyzed by histologic studies, including India ink perfusion after 8, 12, 24, and 48 weeks. In three quarters of the cases, the meniscus showed healing with vascularization of an originally avascular zone.

  2. Synovial inflammation does not change in the absence of effective treatment: implications for the use of synovial histopathology as biomarker in early phase clinical trials in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Baeten, D; Houbiers, J; Kruithof, E; Vandooren, B; Van den Bosch, F; Boots, A M; Veys, E M; Miltenburg, A M M; De Keyser, F

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To determine the impact on synovial histopathology of changes in clinical disease activity in the absence of effective treatment. Methods Twelve patients with active RA not receiving effective treatment were studied over a 14 week period. Synovial biopsy specimens obtained at baseline and week 14 were analysed by histology and immunohistochemistry. Results Over the course of 14 weeks, there was a trend towards a decrease of the DAS28, with 7/12 patients being good or moderate DAS28 responders despite the absence of effective treatment. Patients' assessment of global disease activity and swollen joint count both decreased significantly. Histologically, there was a decrease of lining layer hyperplasia and lymphoid aggregates, a similar trend for vascularity, but there was no effect on global synovial infiltration. Accordingly, there was no decrease of the cellular infiltration with T lymphocytes (CD3, CD4, CD8), B lymphocytes (CD20), plasma cells (CD38), dendritic cells (CD1a, CD83), and even an increase of CD163+ sublining macrophages, with a similar trend for CD68+ sublining macrophages. The changes in DAS28 scores in these patients did not correlate with changes in histological variables, with the exception of an inverse correlation with plasma cells. Remarkably, even in the DAS28 responders, no significant changes in synovial inflammatory infiltration were noted. Conclusions Despite variations in global disease activity, synovial inflammatory infiltration did not change significantly in the absence of effective treatment. The lack of a placebo effect on synovial markers of treatment response such as sublining macrophages can facilitate conclusive early phase trials with small numbers of patients with RA. PMID:16414969

  3. Online dissemination of probabilistic forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roulston, M. S.; Smith, L. A.

    2003-04-01

    Probabilistic weather forecasts intrinsically contain a much larger amount of information than traditional deterministic forecasts. This greatly increases their potential value to end-users, but also creates an obstacle to their dissemination. Traditional media, such as TV, radio and newspapers, are not suitable for presenting probabilistic forecasts to a large number of users who need predictions concerning a range of variables at a range of locations. The web has the potential to allow probabilistic forecasts to be communicated to users without having to make tacit assumptions about how their individual utility functions depend on weather variables. Unfortunately, the majority of weather forecasts currently available on the web are little more than online renditions of the type of forecasts found in more traditional media. We present a demonstration of how probabilistic forecasts might be effectively disseminated using the web. The graphical user interface allows users to view ensembles of the weather variables of interest to them without having to summarise the probabilistic information in the ensemble, and thus make implicit assumptions about the users weather risk exposure. Such a GUI can also be used to view "end-to-end" ensemble forecasts of non-weather, but weather dependent, variables of direct interest to users (e.g. wind power production).

  4. Clonal heterogeneity of synovial fluid T lymphocytes from patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Duby, A.D.; Sinclair, A.K.; Osborne-Lawrence, S.L. ); Zeldes, W.; Kan, Li; Fox, D.A. )

    1989-08-01

    Although substantial evidence suggests that synovial T lymphocytes are critical in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), little is known regarding their antigenic specificities, antigen receptor gene rearrangements, and mechanisms of activation. To assess the extend of expansion of specific clones among RA synovial fluid T cells, Southern blot analyses of T-cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangements were performed on 40 RA synovial fluid T-cell clones, as well as on fresh and polyclonally activated T cells from RA synovial fluid, RA peripheral blood, and normal peripheral blood. Two of the clones had identical TCR rearrangement patterns, but the remainder were unique. The nonclonal RA T-cell samples showed the same pattern of TCR {beta}-chain rearrangement that was observed among normal peripheral blood T cells, indicating no dominant clonal T-cell population in these samples. It was noted that with sufficient exposure of autoradiograms of the Southern blots, discrete TCR gene rearrangements, representing in some cases common D{sub {beta}}J{sub {beta}} (D, diversity; J, joining) rearrangements, were evident in T cells from peripheral blood of normal individuals and patients with RA, as well as T cells from RA synovial fluid. Taken together, the findings indicate that only a minor degree of oligoclonality can be demonstrated among T lymphocytes from RA synovial fluid.

  5. Novel Synovial Fluid Recovery Method Allows for Quantification of a Marker of Arthritis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Seifer, Daniel R; Furman, Bridgette D; Guilak, Farshid; Olson, Steve A; Brooks, S. Carroll; Kraus, Virginia Byers

    2008-01-01

    Objective We evaluated three methodologies - a calcium sodium alginate compound (CSAC), polyacrylate beads (PAB), and Whatman paper (WPR) - for the ability to recover synovial fluid from mouse knees in a manner that facilitated biochemical marker analysis. Methods Pilot testing of each of these recovery vehicles was conducted using small volumes of waste human synovial fluid. CSAC emerged as the method of choice, and was used to recover and quantify SF from the knees of C57BL/6 mice (n=12), six of which were given left-knee articular fractures. Synovial fluid concentrations of Cartilage Oligomeric Matrix Protein (COMP) were measured by ELISA. Results The mean concentration ratio ([COMP left knee] / [COMP right knee]) was higher in the mice subjected to articular fracture when compared to the non-fracture mice (p=0.026). The mean total COMP ratio (taking into account the quantitative recovery of synovial fluid) best discriminated between fracture and non-fracture knees (p=0.004). Conclusions Our results provide the first direct evidence of accelerated joint tissue turnover in a mouse model responding to acute joint injury. These data strongly suggest that mouse synovial fluid recovery is feasible and that biomarker analysis of collected synovial fluid samples can augment traditional histological analyses in mouse models of arthritis. PMID:18538588

  6. Feasibility of a tetracycline-binding method for detecting synovial fluid basic calcium phosphate crystals.

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, Ann K; Fahey, Mark; Gohr, Claudia; Burner, Todd; Konon, Irina; Daft, Laureen; Mattson, Eric; Hirschmugl, Carol; Ryan, Lawrence M; Simkin, Peter

    2008-10-01

    Basic calcium phosphate (BCP) crystals are common components of osteoarthritis (OA) synovial fluid. Progress in understanding the role of these bioactive particles in clinical OA has been hampered by difficulties in their identification. Tetracyclines stain calcium phosphate mineral in bone. The aim of this study was to investigate whether tetracycline staining might be an additional or alternative method for identifying BCP crystals in synovial fluid. A drop of oxytetracycline was mixed with a drop of fluid containing synthetic or native BCP, calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD), or monosodium urate (MSU) crystals and placed on a microscope slide. Stained and unstained crystals were examined by light microscopy, with and without a portable broad-spectrum ultraviolet (UV) pen light. A small set of characterized synovial fluid samples were compared by staining with alizarin red S and oxytetracycline. Synthetic BCP crystals in synovial fluid were quantified fluorimetrically using oxytetracycline. After oxytetracycline staining, synthetic and native BCP crystals appeared as fluorescent amorphous aggregates under UV light. Oxytetracycline did not stain CPPD or MSU crystals or other particulates. Oxytetracycline staining had fewer false-positive test results than did alizarin red S staining and could provide estimates of the quantities of synthetic BCP crystals in synovial fluid. With further validation, oxytetracycline staining may prove to be a useful adjunct or alternative to currently available methods for identifying BCP crystals in synovial fluid.

  7. Interferon-alpha and dexamethasone inhibit adhesion of T cells to endothelial cells and synovial cells

    PubMed Central

    Eguchi, K.; Kawakami, A.; Nakashima, M.; Ida, H.; Sakito, S.; Matsuoka, N.; Terada, K.; Sakai, M.; Kawabe, Y.; Fukuda, T.; Ishimaru, T.; Kurouji, K.; Fujita, N.; Aoyagi, T.; Maeda, K.; Nagataki, S.

    1992-01-01

    We investigated whether interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), interferon-alpha (IFN-α) and glucocorticoids affected the adhesion of T cells to human umbilical endothelial cells or human synovial cells. About 30% of peripheral blood T cells could bind to unstimulated endothelial cells, but only a few T cells could bind to unstimulated synovial cells. When both endothelial cells and synovial cells were cultured with recombinant IFN-γ (rIFN-γ), the percentage of T cell binding to both types of cells increased in a dose-dependent manner. rIFN-α and dexamethasone blocked the T cell binding to unstimulated endothelial cells. Furthermore, rIFN-α and dexamethasone suppressed T cell binding to both endothelial cells and synovial cells stimulated by IFN-γ, and also inhibited intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) expression on both endothelial cells and synovial cells stimulated by IFN-γ. These results suggest that IFN-α and glucocorticoids may inhibit T cell binding to endothelial cells or synovial cells by modulating adhesion molecule expression on these cells. PMID:1606729

  8. Primary pulmonary biphasic synovial sarcoma: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Alcaraz-García, Pedro; Díaz-Palacios, Salvador; Castillo-Canto, Carlos; Gatica-Pérez, Amancio; Sánchez-González, Jesús Armando

    2012-01-01

    Primary synovial sarcomas of the lung are extremely rare, constituting 0.1% to 0.5% of lung cancers. The first case was reported by Gaertner in 1996. We present the case of a 15-year-old female who presented with cough, white-colored secretions, right-sided chest pain and progressive dyspnea. Physical examination revealed increased exertion during breathing with no cyanosis. The presence of right scapular pulmonary condensation syndrome was observed. Chest x-ray demonstrated homogeneous opacity occupying the lower two thirds of the right hemithorax. Posterolateral thoracotomy with right lower and medium lobectomy was performed. Because there was evidence of upper lobe tumor, it was decided to carry out a right pneumonectomy. Histopathological diagnosis was biphasic synovial sarcoma. The presentation of pulmonary synovial sarcoma generally shows a peripheral location with a nonencapsulated and well-circumscribed tumor. Size ranges from 0.6 to 17 cm (mean: 5 cm). Histology is often characterized by a monophasic pattern. Diagnosis is difficult except for a uniform spindle cell pattern. Most synovial sarcomas show immunoreactivity for cytokeratin and/or epithelial membrane antigen. Cytogenetic characteristic of synovial sarcoma are t(X; 18)(p11, q11). Patient prognosis for pulmonary synovial sarcoma is poor with an overall 5-year survival rate of 50%.

  9. Influence of Anti-inflammatory Drugs on the Rheological Properties of Synovial Fluid and Its Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Wendy E.; Klossner, Rebecca R.; Liang, Jing; Colby, Ralph H.

    2006-03-01

    The polyelectrolyte hyaluronic acid (HA, hyaluronan), its interactions with anti-inflammatory drugs and other biopolymers, and its role in synovial fluid are being studied. We are investigating the rheological properties of sodium hyaluronate (NaHA) solutions and an experimental model of synovial fluid (comprised of NaHA, and the plasma proteins albumin and γ-globulins). Steady shear measurements on bovine synovial fluid, the synovial fluid model, and plasma protein solutions indicate that the fluids are rheopectic (stress increases with time under steady shear). In addition, the influence of anti-inflammatory agents on these solutions is being explored. Initial results indicate that D-penicillamine and hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) affect the rheology of the synovial fluid model and its components. While HCQ has no effect on the viscosity of NaHA solutions, it inhibits/suppresses the observed rheopexy of the synovial fluid model and plasma protein solutions. In contrast, D-penicillamine has a complex, time dependent effect on the viscosity of NaHA solutions,---reducing the zero shear rate viscosity of a 3 mg/mL NaHA (in phosphate buffered saline) by ca. 40% after 44 days. The potential implications of these results will be discussed.

  10. Synovial fluid lubrication of artificial joints: protein film formation and composition.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jingyun; Myant, Connor; Underwood, Richard; Cann, Philippa

    2012-01-01

    Despite design improvements, wear of artificial implants remains a serious health issue particularly for Metal-on-Metal (MoM) hips where the formation of metallic wear debris has been linked to adverse tissue response. Clearly it is important to understand the fundamental lubrication mechanisms which control the wear process. It is usually assumed that MoM hips operate in the ElastoHydrodynamic Lubrication (EHL) regime where film formation is governed by the bulk fluid viscosity; however there is little experimental evidence of this. The current paper critically examines synovial fluid lubrication mechanisms and the effect of synovial fluid chemistry. Two composition parameters were chosen; protein content and pH, both of which are known to change in diseased or post-operative synovial fluid. Film thickness and wear tests were carried out for a series of model synovial fluid solutions. Two distinct film formation mechanisms were identified; an adsorbed surface film and a high-viscosity gel. The entrainment of this gel controls film formation particularly at low speeds. However wear of the femoral head still occurs and this is thought to be due primarily to a tribo-corrosion mechanisms. The implications of this new lubrication mechanism and the effect of different synovial fluid chemistries are examined. One important conclusion is that patient synovial fluid chemistry plays an important role in determining implant wear and the likelihood of failure.

  11. Arthroscopic treatment of synovial osteochondromatosis of the elbow. Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Terra, Bernardo Barcellos; Moraes, Eduardo Wanzenboeck; de Souza, Alceuleir Cardoso; Cavatte, José Maria; Teixeira, João Carlos de Medeiros; De Nadai, Anderson

    2015-01-01

    Synovial osteochondromatosis is a benign proliferative disorder with metaplasia of the synovial membrane that affects the fibroblasts of the synovial joints, tendons and bursae. In literature, there are few descriptions of synovial osteochondromatosis of the elbow. The objective of this article was to report a case of synovial osteochondromatosis of the elbow in a patient aged 32, basketball athlete, in which surgical treatment was chosen because of the pain and functional limitation and stage of disease with multiple loose bodies. Patient 32, male, presented with pain and limitation of motion of the elbow. The range of passive motion was 100° of flexion and 30° extension. The range of active motion was 40-90°. Magnetic resonance observed many loose bodies mainly in the posterior compartment in the olecranon fossa plus some chondral lesions in the capitellum. The arthroscopic treatment was chosen with two anteriors portals (medial and lateral) and two posterior portals (standard posterior and posterolateral) for easing loose bodies and osteoplasty of the olecranon fossa. The visual analog scale pain was 9-3 and its arc of active motion was 110° to -20° of flexion and extension. On a scale of performance from Mayo Clinic patients was 65 points preoperatively to 90 postoperatively with 9 months follow-up and the patient was satisfied with the treatment outcome. Arthroscopic treatment of synovial osteochondromatosis of the elbow is an effective and safe therapeutic management with low morbidity and early return to activities.

  12. Synovial effusion and synovial fluid biomarkers in psoriatic arthritis to assess intraarticular tumor necrosis factor-α blockade in the knee joint

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study was theevaluation of synovial effusion (SE), synovial fluid (SF) and synovial tissue (ST) biomarkers in relation to disease activity indexes to assess the response to intraarticular (IA) tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α blockers in psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Methods Systemic and local disease activity indexes (disease activity score (DAS); the Ritchie articular index (mRAI), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP); Thompson articular (THOMP) and joint articular (KJAI)-Index ) and ST samples were assessed at baseline, throughout treatment, and during the follow-up in 14 patients affected with PsA who underwent IA injections (0.5 ml to 12.5 mg) in the knee joint of etanercept (E) or placebo (P) once every two weeks for a 10-week period. Total SF white blood cell (WBC) counts (WBC/μl) and SF cytokine/chemokine (CK/CCK) levels were measured before IA-E at baseline, after IA-E, and as long as there were adequate amounts of SF for knee aspiration (post). Characterization of synovial mononuclear cell infiltration and synovial vessels was carried out in 8 out of 14 knees by staining serial sections of synovial tissue biopsies for CD45, CD3, CD68, CD31 and CD105. Results At baseline, CRP and/or ESR were significantly correlated with SF-CK (interleukin- (IL-)1β, IL-1Ra, IL-6, IL-8) and CCK (CCL3). Post-IA injections, there was a decrease in SE in the knees in which aspiration following IA-E injection was possible as well as a significant reduction in SF WBC/μl and in SF-CK (IL-1β, IL-1Ra, IL-6 and IL-22). Pre- and post-IA-E injections, there were significant correlations between ST markers and SF-CK (IL-1β with CD45; IL-1β and IL-6 with CD31) and between SF-CCK (CCL4 and CCL3 with CD3). At the end of the study, there was a significant reduction in disease activity indexes (CRP, DAS, RAI, THOMP, KJAI) as well as in the ST markers (CD45; CD3). Conclusions Synovial effusion regression is a reliable indicator

  13. Bilateral pathological dislocation of the hip secondary to tuberculous arthritis following disseminated tuberculosis: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Tahasildar, Naveen; Sudesh, Pebam; Tripathy, Sujit Kumar; Shashidhar, B K

    2012-11-01

    Pathological dislocation of the hip has been reported as a complication in various hip disorders. Several pathomechanisms including capsular laxity, synovial hypertrophy, and acetabular and proximal femur destruction have been described. We report a case of bilateral pathological dislocation of the hip in a 6-year-old girl secondary to tuberculous arthritis following disseminated tuberculosis, which we managed operatively. At the 18-month follow-up, the child had a clinically stable left hip despite radiological subluxation. Bilateral pathological dislocation of the hip associated with tuberculous arthritis is a rare condition and has never been reported in the literature.

  14. Inhibition of forkhead box class O family member transcription factors in rheumatoid synovial tissue.

    PubMed

    Ludikhuize, J; de Launay, D; Groot, D; Smeets, T J M; Vinkenoog, M; Sanders, M E; Tas, S W; Tak, P P; Reedquist, K A

    2007-07-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-dependent activation of protein kinase B (PKB) has been observed in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synovial tissue, and mechanisms that interfere with this process are protective in animal models of arthritis. PKB can regulate cell survival and proliferation via phosphorylation-dependent inactivation of forkhead box class O (FoxO) transcription factors. The present study was undertaken to examine whether FoxO transcription factors are differentially inactivated in RA synovial tissue, and whether this inactivation correlates with laboratory and clinical parameters of disease activity. The expression and phosphorylation of FoxO family members were assessed in synovial biopsy tissue from 12 patients with RA and 9 patients with inflammatory osteoarthritis (OA), by immunohistochemistry and quantitative computer-assisted image analysis. Immunoblotting was used to assess the interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta)- and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha)-induced phosphorylation of FoxO1 and FoxO4 in cultured fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) and macrophages. FoxO1, FoxO3a, and FoxO4 were expressed and phosphorylated in synovial tissue from both RA patients and OA patients. In RA synovial tissue, phosphorylation of FoxO1 was observed in both FLS and macrophages, FoxO3a in T lymphocytes, and FoxO4 in macrophages alone. Following stimulation with IL-1beta and TNFalpha, FoxO1 and FoxO4 were phosphorylated in both RA and OA FLS and synovial macrophages, respectively. Inactivation of FoxO4 was significantly enhanced in the RA as compared with the OA synovial sublining. There was a strong negative correlation between inactivation of FoxO4 in RA synovial tissue and increased serum C-reactive protein levels and a raised erythrocyte sedimentation rate in RA patients. All 3 FoxO family members examined were phosphorylated in both RA and OA synovial tissue; in particular, inactivation of FoxO4 was significantly enhanced in macrophages from RA synovial tissue. Thus

  15. Elevated synovial fluid concentration of adenosine triphosphate in dogs with osteoarthritis or sodium urate-induced synovitis of the stifle.

    PubMed

    Torres, Bryan T; Jimenez, David A; Budsberg, Steven C

    2016-07-19

    Adenosine triphosphate has been shown to stimulate nociceptive nerve terminals in joints. Elevated synovial fluid adenosine triphosphate concentrations as well as a correlation between synovial fluid adenosine triphosphate concentrations and osteoarthritic knee pain has been demonstrated in humans, but not yet in dogs. This study documented elevated synovial fluid adenosine triphosphate concentrations in the stifles of dogs with secondary osteoarthritis and urate-induced synovitis, as compared to normal stifles.

  16. NIST Mechanisms for Disseminating Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Gills, T. E.; Dittman, S.; Rumble, J. R.; Brickenkamp, C. S.; Harris, G. L.; Trahey, N. M.

    2001-01-01

    The national responsibilities assigned to the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) early in the last century for providing measurement assistance and service are carried out today by the four programs that comprise the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Office of Measurement Services (OMS). They are the Calibration Program (CP), the Standard Reference Materials Program (SRMP), the Standard Reference Data Program (SRDP), and the Weights and Measures Program (W&MP). Organized when the U.S. Congress changed the NBS name to NIST, the OMS facilitates access to the measurement and standards activities of NIST laboratories and programs through the dissemination of NIST products, data, and services. A brief historical introduction followed by a perspective of pivotal measurement developments from 1901 to the present and concluding with a look to the future of NIST measurement services in the next decade of the new millennium are presented for each OMS program. PMID:27500025

  17. Weather dissemination and public usage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stacey, M. S.

    1973-01-01

    The existing public usage of weather information was examined. A survey was conducted to substantiate the general public's needs for dissemination of current (0-12 hours) weather information, needs which, in a previous study, were found to be extensive and urgent. The goal of the study was to discover how the general public obtains weather information, what information they seek and why they seek it, to what use this information is put, and to further ascertain the public's attitudes and beliefs regarding weather reporting and the diffusion of weather information. Major findings from the study include: 1. The public has a real need for weather information in the 0-6 hour bracket. 2. The visual medium is preferred but due to the lack of frequent (0-6 hours) forecasts, the audio media only, i.e., telephone recordings and radio weathercasts, were more frequently used. 3. Weather information usage is sporadic.

  18. Anomalies of intra-synovial citrullination: is there any interest in the diagnosis of early rheumatoid arthritis?

    PubMed

    Mrabet, Dalila; Laadhar, Lilia; Haouet, Slim; Sahli, Héla; Zouari, Béchir; Makni, Sondès; Sellami, Slaheddine

    2013-03-01

    Autoantibodies to citrullinated proteins (ACPA) are specifically associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and seem to play an important role in its pathogenesis. The specific immunological conflict between ACPA and citrullinated fibrin plays a major role in the self-maintenance of synovial inflammation by forming fibrin deposits in the synovial tissue. These deposits, secondarily citrullinated by a local peptidylarginine deiminase (PADI) enzyme activity, seem to maintain the immunological conflict and the inflammation. Our objective in this work is to study the anomalies of citrullination in a group of patients with early RA, in comparison with a control group of patients suffering from undetermined inflammatory arthritis, osteoarthritis and spondyloarthropathy. For this purpose, we used an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to determine the levels of ACPA in serum and synovial fluid. By immunohistochemistry, subtype 4 of PADI was also sought in the synovial biopsies taken from all our patients. We found that the ACPA levels in serum and synovial fluid were significantly higher in patients with RA. The enzyme PADI4 was found only in the group with RA and was statistically correlated with ACPA mean levels in sera and synovial fluid. The expression of PADI4 seems to correlate with intra-synovial deposits of fibrin in RA. However, determination of synovial ACPA levels and detection of intra-synovial PADI4 deposits are of no additional benefit compared with assessment of ACPA levels in serum for the diagnosis of early RA.

  19. Midline synovial and ganglion cysts causing neurogenic claudication

    PubMed Central

    Pindrik, Jonathan; Macki, Mohamed; Bydon, Mohamad; Maleki, Zahra; Bydon, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Typically situated posterolateral in the spinal canal, intraspinal facet cysts often cause radicular symptoms. Rarely, the midline location of these synovial or ganglion cysts may cause thecal sac compression leading to neurogenic claudication or cauda equina syndrome. This article summarizes the clinical presentation, radiographic appearance, and management of three intraspinal, midline facet cysts. Three patients with symptomatic midline intraspinal facet cysts were retrospectively reviewed. Documented clinical visits, operative notes, histopathology reports, and imaging findings were investigated for each patient. One patient presented with neurogenic claudication while two patients developed partial, subacute cauda equina syndrome. All 3 patients initially responded favorably to lumbar decompression and midline cyst resection; however, one patient required surgical stabilization 8 mo later. Following the three case presentations, we performed a thorough literature search in order to identify articles describing intraspinal cystic lesions in lateral or midline locations. Midline intraspinal facet cysts represent an uncommon cause of lumbar stenosis and thecal sac compression. Such entities should enter the differential diagnosis of midline posterior cystic lesions. Midline cysts causing thecal sac compression respond favorably to lumbar surgical decompression and cyst resection. Though laminectomy is a commonly performed operation, stabilization may be required in cases of spondylolisthesis or instability. PMID:24364023

  20. Loading-induced changes in synovial fluid affect cartilage metabolism.

    PubMed

    Van den Hoogen, B M; van de Lest, C H; van Weeren, P R; Lafeber, F P; Lopes-Cardozo, M; van Golde, L M; Barneveld, A

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether changes in the synovial fluid (SF) induced by in vivo loading can induce an alteration in the metabolic activity of chondrocytes in vitro. Therefore, SF was collected from ponies after a period of box rest and after they had exercise for a week. Normal, unloaded articular cartilage explants were cultured in 20% solutions of these SFs for 4 days and chondrocyte activity was determined by glycosaminoglycan (GAG) turnover. In explants cultured in post-exercise SF, GAG synthesis was enhanced and GAG release was diminished when compared to cultures in pre-exercise SF. SF analysis showed that levels of insulin-like growth factors (IGF-I and IGF-II) tended to be higher in post-exercise SF, while no differences were found in metalloproteinase activity, hyaluronic acid and protein concentrations. This study showed that anabolic effects of joint loading on cartilage are, at least partially, mediated by alterations in the SF.

  1. Primary synovial sarcoma of the lung as an incidental finding.

    PubMed

    Watzka, Stefan B; Setinek, Ulrike; Prosch, Helmut; Müller, Michael R

    2009-12-01

    Synovial sarcoma of the lung (SSL) is a very rare but aggressive primary lung tumor. Due to its unusual histological features, it can easily be misdiagnosed, if only small biopsies of the tumor are investigated. Here, we review two recent cases of SSL diagnosed and treated in our institution. The first case is a 37-year-old male with a round nodule in the right lower lobe; he underwent a lobectomy. Histologically, the nodule resembled a biphasic tumor. Cytogenetic analysis revealed a translocation t (X; 18), and the diagnosis of primary SSL could be established. The patient is alive and disease-free since 45 months following surgery. The second case is a 41-year-old male with a cystic lesion in the right lower lobe, removed by video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) segmentectomy. In the tumor tissue, spindle cell-rich and cystic structures could be found, together with epithelial elements. Because the tumor contained also a translocation t (X; 18), it could be diagnosed as monophasic SSL. The patient is alive and disease-free since 11 months. Since rare diseases of the lung may present as subtle and focal changes, complete removal of suspect pulmonary lesions is always advisable.

  2. A method for counting monosodium urate crystals in synovial fluid.

    PubMed

    Montagna, P; Brizzolara, R; Ferrone, C; Cutolo, M; Paolino, S; Cimmino, M A

    2015-06-30

    This study was aimed to standardize the technique for counting monosodium urate (MSU) crystals in the synovial fluid (SF) of patients with gout. A total of 52 SF specimens were examined under a polarized light microscope. The amount of SF ranged between 0.1 and 45 mL (median 3 mL). MSU crystals were counted in four areas with the same size at 400x magnification. Cytological examination of the same specimens was also performed. Median leukocyte count was 400 cells/mm3 (range 50-14,000 cells/mm3), with a median percentage of polymorphonuclear leukocytes of 9% (range 0%-98%). Median crystal count was 179.5 (range 3-1600). Inter- reader and intra-reader agreement in crystal counting were good with a weighed k of 0.89 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.85-0.94] and 0.89 (95% CI 0.84-0.93), respectively. Our data indicate that the SF MSU crystal count is a feasible and highly reliable technique.

  3. Synovial fluid dynamics with small disc perforation in temporomandibular joint.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y; Zhan, J; Zheng, Y; Han, Y; Zhang, Z; Xi, Y; Zhu, P

    2012-10-01

    The articular disc plays an important role as a stress absorber in joint movement, resulting in stress reduction and redistribution in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). The flow of synovial fluid in the TMJ may follow a regular pattern during movement of the jaw. We hypothesised that the regular pattern is disrupted when the TMJ disc is perforated. By computed tomography arthrography, we studied the upper TMJ compartment in patients with small disc perforation during jaw opening-closing at positions from 0 to 3 cm. Finite element fluid dynamic modelling was accomplished to analyse the pattern of fluid flow and pressure distribution during the movements. The results showed that the fluid flow in the upper compartment generally formed an anticlockwise circulation but with local vortexes with the jaw opening up to 2 cm. However, when the jaw opening-closing reached 3 cm, an abnormal flow field and the fluid pressure change associated with the perforation may increase the risk of perforation expansion or rupture and is unfavourable for self-repair of the perforated disc.

  4. Midline synovial and ganglion cysts causing neurogenic claudication.

    PubMed

    Pindrik, Jonathan; Macki, Mohamed; Bydon, Mohamad; Maleki, Zahra; Bydon, Ali

    2013-12-16

    Typically situated posterolateral in the spinal canal, intraspinal facet cysts often cause radicular symptoms. Rarely, the midline location of these synovial or ganglion cysts may cause thecal sac compression leading to neurogenic claudication or cauda equina syndrome. This article summarizes the clinical presentation, radiographic appearance, and management of three intraspinal, midline facet cysts. Three patients with symptomatic midline intraspinal facet cysts were retrospectively reviewed. Documented clinical visits, operative notes, histopathology reports, and imaging findings were investigated for each patient. One patient presented with neurogenic claudication while two patients developed partial, subacute cauda equina syndrome. All 3 patients initially responded favorably to lumbar decompression and midline cyst resection; however, one patient required surgical stabilization 8 mo later. Following the three case presentations, we performed a thorough literature search in order to identify articles describing intraspinal cystic lesions in lateral or midline locations. Midline intraspinal facet cysts represent an uncommon cause of lumbar stenosis and thecal sac compression. Such entities should enter the differential diagnosis of midline posterior cystic lesions. Midline cysts causing thecal sac compression respond favorably to lumbar surgical decompression and cyst resection. Though laminectomy is a commonly performed operation, stabilization may be required in cases of spondylolisthesis or instability.

  5. Interleukin-29 Enhances Synovial Inflammation and Cartilage Degradation in Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lingxiao; Peng, Qiuyue; Xuan, Wenhua; Feng, Xiaoke; Kong, Xiangqing; Zhang, Miaojia; Tan, Wenfeng; Xue, Meilang; Wang, Fang

    2016-01-01

    We have recently shown that IL-29 was an important proinflammatory cytokine in pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Inflammation also contributes to the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). The aim of this study was to investigate the effect and mechanism of IL-29 on cytokine production and cartilage degradation in OA. The mRNA levels of IL-29 and its specific receptor IL-28Ra in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were significantly increased in OA patients when compared to healthy controls (HC). In the serum, IL-29 protein levels were higher in OA patients than those in HC. Immunohistochemistry revealed that both IL-29 and IL-28Ra were dramatically elevated in OA synovium compared to HC; synovial fibroblasts (FLS) and macrophages were the main IL-29-producing cells in OA synovium. Furthermore, recombinant IL-29 augmented the mRNA expression of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and matrix-metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) in OA FLS and increased cartilage degradation when ex vivo OA cartilage explant was coincubated with OA FLS. Finally, in OA FLS, IL-29 dominantly activated MAPK and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), but not Jak-STAT and AKT signaling pathway as examined by western blot. In conclusion, IL-29 stimulates inflammation and cartilage degradation by OA FLS, indicating that this cytokine is likely involved in the pathogenesis of OA.

  6. Expression of MicroRNA-146 in Rheumatoid Arthritis Synovial Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Nakasa, Tomoyuki; Miyaki, Shigeru; Okubo, Atsuko; Hashimoto, Megumi; Nishida, Keiichiro; Ochi, Mitsuo; Asahara, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    Objective Several microRNA, which are ~22-nucleotide noncoding RNAs, exhibit tissue-specific or developmental stage–specific expression patterns and are associated with human diseases. The objective of this study was to identify the expression pattern of microRNA-146 (miR-146) in synovial tissue from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods The expression of miR-146 in synovial tissue from 5 patients with RA, 5 patients with osteoarthritis (OA), and 1 normal subject was analyzed by quantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry of tissue sections. Induction of miR-146 following stimulation with tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) of cultures of human rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts (RASFs) was examined by quantitative PCR and RT-PCR. Results Mature miR-146a and primary miR-146a/b were highly expressed in RA synovial tissue, which also expressed TNFα, but the 2 microRNA were less highly expressed in OA and normal synovial tissue. In situ hybridization showed primary miR-146a expression in cells of the superficial and sublining layers in synovial tissue from RA patients. Cells positive for miR-146a were primarily CD68+ macrophages, but included several CD3+ T cell subsets and CD79a+ B cells. Expression of miR-146a/b was markedly up-regulated in RASFs after stimulation with TNFα and IL-1β. Conclusion This study shows that miR-146 is expressed in RA synovial tissue and that its expression is induced by stimulation with TNFα and IL-1β. Further studies are required to elucidate the function of miR-146 in these tissues. PMID:18438844

  7. Cricothyroid Articulation in Elderly Japanese With Special Reference to Morphology of the Synovial and Capsular Tissues.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Ai; Honkura, Yohei; Suzuki, Ryoji; Abe, Hiroshi; Abe, Shin-Ichi; Murakami, Gen; Katori, Yukio

    2016-09-01

    The present study aimed to clarify individual variations in the cricothyroid joint (CT joint). Using 30 specimens of the CT joint obtained from elderly donated cadavers, we examined the composite fibers of the capsular ligament as well as the morphology of the synovial tissue. The capsular ligament consistently contained abundant thick elastic fiber bundles on the anterior side of the joint (anterior band) and an elastic fiber-made mesh on the posterior side (posterior mesh). The synovial membrane, lined by synovial macrophages, was usually restricted to the recesses in the medial or inferior end of the joint cavity. Without the synovial lining, elastic fibers of the capsular ligament were subsequently detached, dispersed, and exposed to the joint cavity. We also observed a folded and thickened synovial membrane and a hypertrophic protrusion of the capsular ligament. In six specimens, the joint cavity was obliterated by debris of synovial folds and elastic fiber-rich tissues continuous with the usual capsular ligament. Notably, with the exception of two specimens, we did not find lymphocyte infiltration in the degenerative synovial tissue. We considered the CT joint degeneration to be a specific, silent form of osteoarthritis from the absence of lymphocyte infiltration. For high-pitched phonation, the elderly CT joint seemed to maintain its anterior gliding and rotation with the aid of elastic fiber-rich tissues compensating for the loss of congruity between the joint cartilage surfaces. Conversely, however, high-pitched phonation may accelerate obliteration of the joint. Copyright © 2016 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Minimally invasive surgery for lumbar synovial cysts with coexisting degenerative spondylolisthesis

    PubMed Central

    Hirt, Daniel; Shah, Saumya; Lu, Daniel C.; Holly, Langston T.

    2016-01-01

    Background About one third of lumbar synovial cysts are associated with degenerative spondylolisthesis. Segmental instability is thought to contribute to the pathogenesis and recurrence of synovial cysts and lumbar fusion has been advocated as a treatment of choice in the presence of spondylolisthesis. In patients with spondylolisthesis, minimally invasive resection of lumbar synovial cysts, without fusion, could minimize surgically induced segmental instability while providing good pain relief. Methods Clinical and radiological outcomes of lumbar synovial cyst patients with and without spondylolisthesis were retrospectively compared. Pain outcomes were assessed with modified Macnab criteria. Results Fifty-three patients (18 with grade 1 spondylolisthesis) underwent minimally invasive synovial cyst resection and all had either excellent or good pain outcome at ≤ 8 post- operative weeks (P = 1.000, n = 53). At > 8 post-operative weeks (mean (SD) follow-up of 200 (175) weeks), excellent or good outcomes were noted in 89% of patients without spondylolisthesis and in 75% of patients with spondylolisthesis (P = 0.425, n = 40). Four patients developed a new grade 1 spondylolisthesis at a mean follow-up of 2.6 ± 2.1 years. Nine patients were assessed for spondylolisthesis measurements at 1.2 ± 1.3 years of follow up and no significant difference was observed (5 ± 0 vs 5 ± 1 mm; P = 0.791). Two patients without spondylolisthesis and none of the patients with spondylolisthesis had a synovial cyst recurrence. Conclusion Patients with concomitant lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis and synovial cyst can have good short- and long-term clinical outcomes with minimally invasive surgery without fusion. Post-operative segmental instability does not appear to be significant in patients with spondylolisthesis. All patients included in this article signed an informed consent for the use of their medical information for research. PMID:27909658

  9. Disseminated Mycobacterium chimaera Infection After Cardiothoracic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Tan, Nicholas; Sampath, Rahul; Abu Saleh, Omar M; Tweet, Marysia S; Jevremovic, Dragan; Alniemi, Saba; Wengenack, Nancy L; Sampathkumar, Priya; Badley, Andrew D

    2016-09-01

    Ten case reports of disseminated Mycobacterium chimaera infections associated with cardiovascular surgery were published from Europe. We report 3 cases of disseminated M chimaera infections with histories of aortic graft and/or valvular surgery within the United States. Two of 3 patients demonstrated ocular involvement, a potentially important clinical finding.

  10. Disseminated Mycobacterium chimaera Infection After Cardiothoracic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Nicholas; Sampath, Rahul; Abu Saleh, Omar M.; Tweet, Marysia S.; Jevremovic, Dragan; Alniemi, Saba; Wengenack, Nancy L.; Sampathkumar, Priya; Badley, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    Ten case reports of disseminated Mycobacterium chimaera infections associated with cardiovascular surgery were published from Europe. We report 3 cases of disseminated M chimaera infections with histories of aortic graft and/or valvular surgery within the United States. Two of 3 patients demonstrated ocular involvement, a potentially important clinical finding. PMID:27703994

  11. 34 CFR 75.192 - Dissemination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... of the Secretary, Department of Education DIRECT GRANT PROGRAMS How To Apply for a Grant Development of Curricula Or Instructional Materials § 75.192 Dissemination. If an applicant proposes to publish and disseminate curricula or instructional materials under a grant, the applicant shall include an...

  12. 34 CFR 75.192 - Dissemination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... of the Secretary, Department of Education DIRECT GRANT PROGRAMS How To Apply for a Grant Development of Curricula Or Instructional Materials § 75.192 Dissemination. If an applicant proposes to publish and disseminate curricula or instructional materials under a grant, the applicant shall include an...

  13. 34 CFR 75.192 - Dissemination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... of the Secretary, Department of Education DIRECT GRANT PROGRAMS How To Apply for a Grant Development of Curricula Or Instructional Materials § 75.192 Dissemination. If an applicant proposes to publish and disseminate curricula or instructional materials under a grant, the applicant shall include an...

  14. Wisconsin Dissemination Planning Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harmatuck, Loretta

    Activities of the final year are reported as they relate to the objectives of the Wisconsin Dissemination Planning (WDP) Project: (1) to develop a plan for coordination among the dissemination functions in the Department of Public Instruction (DPI) through a state-wide steering committee; (2) to complete a needs assessment for dissemination…

  15. 34 CFR 75.192 - Dissemination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of Curricula Or Instructional Materials § 75.192 Dissemination. If an applicant proposes to publish and disseminate curricula or instructional materials under a grant, the applicant shall include an assurance in its application that the curricula or materials will reach the populations for which...

  16. Federal Mechanisms to Support Intervention Dissemination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diana, Augusto; Bennett, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines federal mechanisms that support program developers and researchers in disseminating effective interventions for public benefit. The purpose of this paper is not to discuss the dissemination of intervention research (i.e., how to inform stakeholders about research findings), nor is it intended to discuss the research of…

  17. Federal Mechanisms to Support Intervention Dissemination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diana, Augusto; Bennett, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines federal mechanisms that support program developers and researchers in disseminating effective interventions for public benefit. The purpose of this paper is not to discuss the dissemination of intervention research (i.e., how to inform stakeholders about research findings), nor is it intended to discuss the research of…

  18. 14 CFR 1203.303 - Dissemination considerations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Dissemination considerations. 1203.303 Section 1203.303 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION INFORMATION SECURITY PROGRAM Classification Principles and Considerations § 1203.303 Dissemination considerations. The...

  19. 14 CFR 1203.303 - Dissemination considerations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Dissemination considerations. 1203.303 Section 1203.303 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION INFORMATION SECURITY PROGRAM Classification Principles and Considerations § 1203.303 Dissemination considerations. The...

  20. 14 CFR 1203.303 - Dissemination considerations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Dissemination considerations. 1203.303 Section 1203.303 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION INFORMATION SECURITY PROGRAM Classification Principles and Considerations § 1203.303 Dissemination considerations. The...

  1. National Dissemination Forum, 1977. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brickell, Henry M.

    Presented is an analysis of nine agreements focused on three areas of common concern to dissemination specialists involved in the 1977 National Dissemination Forum: resources, linkage, research, evaluation and quality control. FORUM participants represented the Education Resources Information Center (ERIC of the National Institute of Education…

  2. Disseminated Cryptococcosis in an Immunocompetent Toddler.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Neeraj; Sachdev, Anil; Gupta, Dhiren; Radhakrishnan, Nita

    2017-02-15

    Immunodeficient children are more prone for invasive cryptococcal infections. A 2-year-old boy with disseminated cryptococcosis was evaluated for underlying immunodeficiency without success. Child was managed successfully. Immunocompetent children with disseminated cryptococcosis can present diagnostic or therapeutic challenge in resource-limited settings.

  3. 34 CFR 75.192 - Dissemination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of Curricula Or Instructional Materials § 75.192 Dissemination. If an applicant proposes to publish and disseminate curricula or instructional materials under a grant, the applicant shall include an assurance in its application that the curricula or materials will reach the populations for which the...

  4. 14 CFR 1203.303 - Dissemination considerations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Dissemination considerations. 1203.303... PROGRAM Classification Principles and Considerations § 1203.303 Dissemination considerations. The degree... effective security control impractical are considerations during the classification process. These...

  5. The Tenth National Dissemination Conference. A Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herlig, Richard K.

    This report on the Tenth National Dissemination Conference of 1977 outlines the purposes of the conference and summarizes the present state of educational information dissemination. National programs are described, including the National Institute of Education State Capacity Building Program, the National Diffusion Network, the Dissemination…

  6. Curriculum Dissemination as Planned Cultural Diffusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudduck, Jean

    The author traces the change from the use of the term "diffusion" to the term "dissemination" with reference to curriculum projects in Britain and discusses implications of the change. Although at one time the two terms were used interchangeably, the term "dissemination" now emphasizes techniques of effective management rather than the educational…

  7. Producing Dissemination Materials. Final Draft Version.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Degener, David, Comp.; And Others

    This manual is intended to help projects approved by the Joint Dissemination Review Panel produce materials that will support their dissemination activities. Specifically directed toward career education projects, it should be equally useful for other projects. Section 1 discusses diffusion/adoption and these topics regarding materials: purpose,…

  8. Plasminogen activation in synovial tissues: differences between normal, osteoarthritis, and rheumatoid arthritis joints

    PubMed Central

    Busso, N.; Peclat, V.; So, A.; Sappino, A.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To analyse the functional activity of the plasminogen activators urokinase (uPA) and tissue type plasminogen activator (tPA) in human synovial membrane, and to compare the pattern of expression between normal, osteoarthritic, and rheumatoid synovium. The molecular mechanisms underlying differences in PA activities between normal and pathological synovial tissues have been further examined.
METHODS—Synovial membranes from seven normal (N) subjects, 14 osteoarthritis (OA), and 10 rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients were analysed for plasminogen activator activity by conventional zymography and in situ zymography on tissue sections. The tissue distribution of uPA, tPA, uPA receptor (uPAR), and plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) was studied by immunohistochemistry. uPA, tPA, uPAR, and PAI-1 mRNA values and mRNA distribution were assessed by northern blot and in situ hybridisations respectively.
RESULTS—All normal and most OA synovial tissues expressed predominantly tPA catalysed proteolytic activity mainly associated to the synovial vasculature. In some OA, tPA activity was expressed together with variable amounts of uPA mediated activity. By contrast, most RA synovial tissues exhibited considerably increased uPA activity over the proliferative lining areas, while tPA activity was reduced when compared with N and OA synovial tissues. This increase in uPA activity was associated with increased levels of uPA antigen and its corresponding mRNA, which were localised over the synovial proliferative lining areas. In addition, in RA tissues, expression of the specific uPA receptor (uPAR) and of the plasminogen activator inhibitor-type 1 (PAI-1) were also increased.
CONCLUSION—Taken together, these results show an alteration of the PA/plasmin system in RA synovial tissues, resulting in increased uPA catalytic activity that may play a part in tissue destruction in RA.

 PMID:9370880

  9. Raman spectroscopy of synovial fluid as a tool for diagnosing osteoarthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmonde-White, Karen A.; Mandair, Gurjit S.; Raaii, Farhang; Jacobson, Jon A.; Miller, Bruce S.; Urquhart, Andrew G.; Roessler, Blake J.; Morris, Michael D.

    2009-05-01

    For many years, viscosity has been the primary method used by researchers in rheumatology to assess the physiochemical properties of synovial fluid in both normal and osteoarthritic patients. However, progress has been limited by the lack of methods that provide multiple layers of information, use small sample volumes, and are rapid. Raman spectroscopy was used to assess the biochemical composition of synovial fluid collected from 40 patients with clinical evidence of knee osteoarthritis (OA) at the time of elective surgical treatment. Severity of knee osteoarthritis was assessed by a radiologist using Kellgren/Lawrence (K/L) scores from knee joint x rays, while light microscopy and Raman spectroscopy were used to examine synovial fluid (SF) aspirates (2 to 10 μL), deposited on fused silica slides. We show that Raman bands used to describe protein secondary structure and content can be used to detect changes in synovial fluid from osteoarthritic patients. Several Raman band intensity ratios increased significantly in spectra collected from synovial fluid in patients with radiological evidence of moderate-to-severe osteoarthritis damage. These ratios can be used to provide a ``yes/no'' damage assessment. These studies provide evidence that Raman spectroscopy would be a suitable candidate in the evaluation of joint damage in knee osteoarthritis patients.

  10. The effect of bacterial products on synovial fibroblast function: hypermetabolic changes induced by endotoxin

    PubMed Central

    Buckingham, Robert B.; Castor, C. William

    1972-01-01

    The effects of bacterial products on selected synovial fibroblast functions were studied. Extracts of commonly encountered microorganisms were prepared by sonic or mechanical disruption. “Purified” endotoxins were prepared from selected organisms, and in some cases were purchased commercially. Normal fibroblasts were derived from synovial connective tissue obtained from amputations or arthrotomy. The cells were grown as a monolayer on glass and were nourished by a semisynthetic nutrient medium. Extracts of Gram-negative bacteria, applied to fibroblast cultures, markedly increased hyaluronic acid production, glucose utilization, and lactate output. Treatment of the extracts with heat at 100°C for ½ hr decreased their effectiveness by approximately 40%. Purified Gram-negative bacterial endotoxin stimulated synovial fibroblasts to an extent comparable to that caused by heat-treated whole extracts. The lipid moiety of the endotoxin molecule appeared to account for much of the stimulatory activity of the endotoxin. Extracts of commonly encountered Gram-positive cocci, yeast, and Mycoplasma had no stimulating capabilities. Corynebacterial extracts, however, had definite stimulating potential. Endotoxin-synovial cell interaction experiments demonstrated that endotoxin was bound to fibroblasts. Reassay of the endotoxin after extraction from the cells showed that it retained its stimulatory potential. The metabolic phenomena stimulated by bacterial products duplicate the major known actions of connective tissue-activating peptide (CTAP). The observations made in this study suggest that bacterial products may participate in a fundamental way in the activation process, and indicate a possible role for bacterial products in synovial inflammation in humans. PMID:4259829

  11. The Zinc Finger Transcription Factors Osr1 and Osr2 Control Synovial Joint Formation

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yang; Lan, Yu; Liu, Han; Jiang, Rulang

    2011-01-01

    Synovial joints enable smooth articulations between different skeletal elements and are essential for the motility of vertebrates. Despite decades of extensive studies of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of limb and skeletal development, the molecular mechanisms governing synovial joint formation are still poorly understood. In particular, whereas several signaling pathways have been shown to play critical roles in joint maintenance, the mechanism controlling joint initiation is unknown. Here we report that Osr1 and Osr2, the mammalian homologs of the odd-skipped family of zinc finger transcription factors that are required for leg joint formation in Drosophila, are both strongly expressed in the developing synovial joint cells in mice. Whereas Osr1−/− mutant mice died at midgestation and Osr2−/− mutant mice had only subtle defects in synovial joint development, tissue-specific inactivation of Osr1 in the developing limb mesenchyme in Osr2−/− mutant mice caused fusion of multiple joints. We found that Osr1 and Osr2 function is required for maintenance of expression of signaling molecules critical for joint formation, including Gdf5, Wnt4 and Wnt9b. In addition, joint cells in the double mutants failed to upregulate expression of the articular cartilage marker gene Prg4. These data indicate that Osr1 and Osr2 function redundantly to control synovial joint formation. PMID:21262216

  12. Intra-Articular Synovial Sarcomas: Incidence and Differentiating Features from Localized Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis.

    PubMed

    Nordemar, D; Öberg, J; Brosjö, O; Skorpil, M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the incidence of intra-articular synovial sarcomas and investigate if any radiological variables can differentiate them from localized (unifocal) pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) and if multivariate data analysis could be used as a complementary clinical tool. Methods. Magnetic resonance images and radiographs of 7 cases of intra-articular synovial sarcomas and 14 cases of localized PVNS were blindedly reviewed. Variables analyzed were size, extra-articular growth, tumor border, blooming, calcification, contrast media enhancement, effusion, bowl of grapes sign, triple signal intensity sign, synovial low signal intensity, synovitis, age, and gender. Univariate and multivariate data analysis, the method of partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), were used. Register data on all synovial sarcomas were extracted for comparison. Results. The incidence of intra-articular synovial sarcomas was 3%. PLS-DA showed that age, effusion, size, and gender were the most important factors for discrimination between sarcomas and localized PVNS. No sarcomas were misclassified as PVNS with PLS-DA, while some PVNS were misclassified as sarcomas. Conclusions. The most important variables in differentiating intra-articular sarcomas from localized PVNS were age, effusion, size, and gender. Multivariate data analysis can be helpful as additive information to avoid a biopsy, if the tumor is classified as most likely being PVNS.

  13. Sulfated glycosaminoglycans and glucosamine may synergize in promoting synovial hyaluronic acid synthesis.

    PubMed

    McCarty, M F; Russell, A L; Seed, M P

    2000-05-01

    High-molecular-weight hyaluronic acid (HA) produced by the synovium may function physiologically to aid preservation of cartilage structure and prevent arthritic pain; both the size and concentration of HA in synovial fluid are diminished in osteoarthritis (OA). Glucosamine therapy for OA can be expected to increase synovial HA production by providing rate-limiting substrate. In addition, certain sulfated glycosaminoglycans and polysaccharides - including chondroitin sulfate (CS), dermatan sulfate, and pentosan polysulfate - stimulate synovial HA production, apparently owing to a hormone-like effect triggered by the binding of these polymers to membrane proteins of synovial cells. Surprisingly, a significant proportion of orally administered CS is absorbed as intact polymers - apparently by pinocytosis. These considerations may rationalize clinical studies concluding that oral CS provides slow-onset but durable pain relief and functional improvement in OA. The possibility that oral glucosamine and CS may interact in a complementary or synergistic fashion to improve synovial fluid HA content in OA should be assessed in clinical studies, and the potential of adjunctive CS administration to improve the clinical response achievable with optimal intakes of glucosamine should likewise be evaluated. In light of the fact that the synovium virtually functions as a 'placenta' for cartilage, focusing on synovium as the target for therapeutic intervention in OA may be a rational strategy.

  14. Enzymatic hydrolysis of indometacin farnesil, a prodrug of indomethacin, by carboxylesterase in cultured synovial cells.

    PubMed

    Mishima, M; Kobayashi, S; Hashida, R; Yuzuriha, T; Sato, T; Satoh, T

    1991-05-01

    The hydrolysis of indometacin farnesil (IMF) in the synovial cells of rat and human and the subcellular fractions of rat liver were investigated in relation to the inhibition of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) production in the synovial cells. The inhibition of PGE2 production in cultured human synovial cells by anti-inflammatory drugs was potent in the order of IND, IMF and acetyl salicylic acid. However, when the cells were pretreated with IMF, the inhibitory activity of IMF was retained even after the compound was washed out from the medium. No duration of the inhibition was seen in the pretreatment of the cells with IND or acetyl salicylic acid. These results suggest that IMF incorporated into the synovial cells was hydrolyzed gradually to IND. In fact, IMF was taken up by rat synovial cells in culture and considerable amount of IND, which increased with culture period, was found out in the cells. Furthermore, the IMF hydrolase activity was found in microsomal and lysosomal fractions of rat liver, and the hydrolase was identified as carboxylesterase by using bis-(p-nitrophenyl) phosphate, a specific inhibitor of carboxylesterase.

  15. Relevance of synovial fluid chondroitin sulphate as a biomarker to monitor polo pony joints.

    PubMed

    Baccarin, Raquel Y A; Rasera, Luciane; Machado, Thaís S L; Michelacci, Yara M

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the metacarpophalangeal joint is the most common articular disease in polo ponies leading to early retirement. A biomarker that would discriminate between pathological and physiological changes secondary to exercise could be helpful in OA prevention. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of polo training on synovial fluid biomarkers of inflammation and cartilage turnover in polo ponies of different skill levels. Synovial fluid samples were collected from metacarpophalangeal joints of polo ponies before and during the polo season (320 d). Nucleated cells, soluble protein, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), glycosaminoglycans (GAG), and urea were measured. The main synovial fluid GAG are chondroitin sulphate (CS, ~25 μg/mL) and hyaluronic acid (HA, ~400 μg/mL). After a polo match, a transitory increase in protein and PGE2, but not CS and HA, occurred (expressed as urea ratio), returning to basal levels in 24 h. During the polo season, the number of synovial fluid nucleated cells was always in the normal range. Increases in protein and HA occurred during the initial 40 to 80 d, returning to basal levels afterwards. In contrast, in polo prospects the concentration of CS steadily increased during the season. Long-term follow-up revealed that the synovial fluid CS was significantly higher in polo ponies that developed joint diseases within 24 months following our study. In conclusion, CS seems to be an early marker of articular cartilage damage.

  16. Differential expression of the urokinase receptor (CD87) in arthritic and normal synovial tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Szekanecz, Z; Haines, G K; Koch, A E

    1997-01-01

    AIM: To determine whether the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (u-PAR; CD87) exhibits a possible pathogenic role in rheumatoid and osteoarthritis. METHODS: A semiquantitative, indirect immunoperoxidase histochemical analysis was performed on frozen synovial tissue sections. The recently characterised monoclonal antibody 10G7 recognising transfectants bearing u-PAR was used. Synovial tissue was obtained from 10 patients with rheumatoid arthritis, 10 patients with osteoarthritis, and four normal subjects. RESULTS: u-PAR was expressed on 70-90% of synovial tissue lining cells and subsynovial, interstitial macrophages from the arthritis patients, but only on a few myeloid cells from the normal subjects. It was also present on more endothelial cells from the rheumatoid and osteoarthritis patients, than from normal synovial tissue. CONCLUSIONS: Plasminogen activators are important in joint destruction underlying arthritis. The up-regulated expression of u-PAR in diseased versus normal synovial tissue suggests a role for this antigen in the inflammatory and angiogenic mechanisms underlying rheumatoid and osteoarthritis. Images PMID:9215148

  17. Hypermethylated promoter region of DR3, the death receptor 3 gene, in rheumatoid arthritis synovial cells.

    PubMed

    Takami, Nozomi; Osawa, Kayo; Miura, Yasushi; Komai, Koichiro; Taniguchi, Mariko; Shiraishi, Masahiko; Sato, Keizo; Iguchi, Tetsuhiro; Shiozawa, Kazuko; Hashiramoto, Akira; Shiozawa, Shunichi

    2006-03-01

    To examine the promoter activity and protein expression of the death receptor 3 gene DR3, a member of the apoptosis-inducing Fas gene family, with particular reference to the methylation status of its promoter region in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Genomic DNA was prepared from peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from healthy individuals and from patients with RA and synovial cells obtained from patients with RA and osteoarthritis. The methylation status of the DR3 promoter was analyzed by bisulfite genomic sequencing and methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction techniques. Gene promoter activity and protein expression were examined using the luciferase reporter and Western blotting techniques. The promoter region of the DR3 gene contained many CpG motifs, including one CpG island that was specifically hypermethylated in synovial cells from patients with RA. Promoter assays showed that the promoter CpG island was essential for the transactivation of the DR3 gene and that forced hypermethylation of the CpG island with the bacterial methylase Sss I in vitro resulted in inhibition of the DR3 gene expression. Furthermore, the expression of DR-3 protein was down-modulated in association with methylation of the promoter CpG island in RA synovial cells. The CpG island in the DR3 gene promoter was specifically methylated to down-modulate the expression of DR-3 protein in rheumatoid synovial cells, which may provide resistance to apoptosis in RA synovial cells.

  18. Intra-Articular Synovial Sarcomas: Incidence and Differentiating Features from Localized Pigmented Villonodular Synovitis

    PubMed Central

    Nordemar, D.; Öberg, J.; Brosjö, O.; Skorpil, M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To determine the incidence of intra-articular synovial sarcomas and investigate if any radiological variables can differentiate them from localized (unifocal) pigmented villonodular synovitis (PVNS) and if multivariate data analysis could be used as a complementary clinical tool. Methods. Magnetic resonance images and radiographs of 7 cases of intra-articular synovial sarcomas and 14 cases of localized PVNS were blindedly reviewed. Variables analyzed were size, extra-articular growth, tumor border, blooming, calcification, contrast media enhancement, effusion, bowl of grapes sign, triple signal intensity sign, synovial low signal intensity, synovitis, age, and gender. Univariate and multivariate data analysis, the method of partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA), were used. Register data on all synovial sarcomas were extracted for comparison. Results. The incidence of intra-articular synovial sarcomas was 3%. PLS-DA showed that age, effusion, size, and gender were the most important factors for discrimination between sarcomas and localized PVNS. No sarcomas were misclassified as PVNS with PLS-DA, while some PVNS were misclassified as sarcomas. Conclusions. The most important variables in differentiating intra-articular sarcomas from localized PVNS were age, effusion, size, and gender. Multivariate data analysis can be helpful as additive information to avoid a biopsy, if the tumor is classified as most likely being PVNS. PMID:26819567

  19. The role of protein content on the steady and oscillatory shear rheology of model synovial fluids.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Z; Barman, S; Christopher, G F

    2014-08-28

    Recent studies have debated the role of protein content on the bulk rheology of synovial fluid; in particular, it has been questioned if proteins aggregate or interact with hyaluronic acid in synovial fluid to enhance bulk rheology, or if observed effects were due to systematic measurement error caused by interfacial rheology, stemming from protein adsorption to the interface. Utilizing several techniques to ensure results reflect only bulk rheology, an examination of the role of bovine serum albumin and γ-globulin on model synovial fluid rheology has been undertaken. When interfacial rheology caused by protein adsorption to the interface is abrogated, the bulk rheology of a model synovial fluid composed of bovine serum albumin, γ-globulin, and hyaluronic acid is found to be dominated solely by the hyaluronic acid over a wide range of shear rates, strains and frequencies. These results show that the previously reported enhanced rheological properties of model synovial fluids are solely due to interfacial rheology and not from any type of protein aggregation/interaction in bulk solution.

  20. Capsular synovial metaplasia mimicking silicone leak of a breast prosthesis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Krishnanandan, Sarah; Abbassian, Ali; Sharma, Anup K; Cunnick, Giles

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Synovial metaplasia around a prosthesis and in particular around silicone breast implants has been noted by various investigators, but has unknown clinical significance. We report on a patient where a large amount of synovial fluid mimicked rupture of an implant. We believe this to be an unusual clinical presentation of this phenomenon. Review of the English language literature failed to identify a comparable case. Case presentation A 25-year-old woman had undergone bilateral breast augmentation for cosmetic reasons. One implant was subsequently subjected to two attempts at expansion to correct asymmetry. The patient was later found to have a large quantity of viscous fluid around the port of that same prosthesis. Histological assessment of the implant had consequently confirmed capsular synovial metaplasia. This had initially caused the suspicion of a silicone 'bleed' from the implant and had resulted in an unnecessary explantation. Conclusion Capsular synovial metaplasia should be ruled out before the removal of breast implants where a leak is suspected. Manipulation and expansion of an implant may be risk factors for the development of synovial metaplasia. PMID:18706084

  1. Assessment of glycosaminoglycan concentration in equine synovial fluid as a marker of joint disease.

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, J L; Bertone, A L; McClain, H

    1995-01-01

    A modification of a colorimetric assay was used to determine synovial fluid total and individual sulphated-glycosaminoglycan concentration in various clinical presentations of joint disease in horses. Concentrations of synovial fluid and serum sulphated-glycosaminoglycan (GAG) were measured by the 1,9-dimethylmethylene blue (DMMB) dye assay in normal horses (n = 49), horses with acute (n = 26) or chronic (n = 27) joint disease (defined by clinical, radiographic, and clinicopathological parameters), and horses with cartilaginous lesions at diagnostic arthroscopy, but with normal radiographs and synovial fluid (n = 9). Horses with acute joint disease were subdivided into moderate acute (n = 21) and severe acute (n = 5) joint disease on the basis of synovial fluid analysis and clinical examination. Horses with chronic joint disease were subdivided into mild chronic (n = 9), moderate chronic (n = 10), and severe chronic (n = 8) joint disease on the basis of synovial fluid analysis, clinical examination, and radiographic findings. The concentrations of chondroitin sulphate (CS) and keratan sulphate (KS) were analyzed in each sample following sequential enzymatic digestion of the sample with chondroitinase or keratanase. In addition, the concentration of hyaluronate (HA) in each sample was determined by a colorimetric assay following digestion of the sample with microbial hyaluronidase.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8521354

  2. Raman Spectroscopy of Synovial Fluid as a Tool for Diagnosing Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Esmonde-White, Karen A.; Mandair, Gurjit S.; Raaii, Farhang; Jacobson, Jon A.; Miller, Bruce S.; Urquhart, Andrew G.; Roessler, Blake J.; Morris, Michael D.

    2009-01-01

    For many years, viscosity has been the primary method used by researchers in rheumatology to assess the physiochemical properties of synovial fluid in both normal and osteoarthritic patients. However, progress has been limited by the lack of methods that provide multiple layers of information, use small sample volumes, and are rapid. In this blinded study, Raman spectroscopy was used to assess the biochemical composition of synovial fluid collected from forty patients with clinical evidence of knee osteoarthritis at the time of elective surgical treatment. Severity of knee osteoarthritis was assessed by a radiologist using Kellgren/Lawrence (K/L) scores from knee joint x-rays, while light microscopy and Raman spectroscopy were used to examine synovial fluid aspirates (2–10 µL), deposited on fused silica slides. We show that Raman bands used to describe protein secondary structure and content can be used to detect changes in synovial fluid from osteoarthritic patients. Several Raman band intensity ratios increased significantly in spectra collected from synovial fluid in patients with radiological evidence of osteoarthritis damage. These ratios can be used to provide a “yes/no” damage assessment. Additionally, two ratios increased with K/L score and showed moderate correlative trends. These studies provide evidence that Raman spectroscopy would be a suitable candidate in the evaluation of joint damage in knee osteoarthritis patients. PMID:19566306

  3. Determination of lead in paired samples of human blood and synovial fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Villegas-Navarro, A.; Rosales, D.; Bustos, E.; Reyes, R.; Reyes, J.L.; Dieck, T.A.; Heredia, A. )

    1992-09-01

    In spite of the numerous papers published on the toxicity of lead in mammals, little is known about its effects in synovial fluid and bone joints. Our literature search showed a lack of quantitative studies regarding the concentration of lead in human synovial fluid; in addition, normal values regarding the threshold for poisoning by lead in that fluid are unknown. The available literature published corresponds to samples of human wounds by lead bullets localized close to or in a joint. Some of those papers dealing with lead-induced arthritis include symptoms of plumbism. They clearly demonstrate the ability of synovial fluid to dissolve lead and thereby make it available for systemic absorption. The molecular mechanism whereby this process is performed is still unknown, although it would be of interest because of its possible relationship with joint pain, a common problem in patients with lead poisoning that so far has not been fully explained. In a series of experiments with cattle, we found an average ratio of lead between synovial fluid and blood for paired observations of 4.2, although we have not found similar reports, and there is not sufficient information to make a total interpretation of these data. The purpose of this study was to determine the concentration of lead in synovial fluid and blood of corpses and to establish a possible numerical relationship between those two variables. 19 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  4. Lumbar synovial cysts: presentation of a series of 10 cases and literature review.

    PubMed

    Lista-Martínez, O; Moreno-Barrueco, V M; Castro-Castro, J; Varela-Rois, P; Pastor-Zapata, A

    Although they are freqqently described in the literature, lumbar synovial cysts are a relative uncommon cause of low back and radicular leg pain. To evaluate the treatment and surgical outcomes of the lumbar synovial cysts operated on in our hospital during a 5 year period. A retrospective study was conducted on patients surgically treated in our department from August 2009 to September 2014, using a visual analogue scale for the clinical follow-up in the first year after surgery. After the surgical treatment (surgical removal of the synovial cyst with or without instrumented arthrodesis with transpedicular screws) of 10 patients (5 female and 5 male) with a mean age of 70.2 years (range 50-80), the clinical outcome was satisfactory in 80% of the patients, with the resolving of their symptoms. Lumbar synovial cysts have to be considered in the differential diagnosis in patients with low back and radicular leg pain. The majority of the patients are in their sixties and have lumbar degenerative spondylopathy. Nowadays, surgical resection of the lumbar synovial cysts and spinal fusion are the recommended treatment, because it is thought that the increased movement of the spine is one to the causes of the cyst formation. More studies are still needed, hence the relevance of this article. Copyright © 2016 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Distribution of lymphatic vessels in normal and arthritic human synovial tissues

    PubMed Central

    Xu, H; Edwards, J; Banerji, S; Prevo, R; Jackson, D; Athanasou, N

    2003-01-01

    Methods: Synovial tissues from 5 normal controls, 14 patients with RA, and 16 patients with OA were studied. Lymphatic vessels were identified by immunohistochemistry using antibodies directed against the lymphatic endothelial hyaluronan receptor (LYVE-1) and recognised blood vessel endothelial markers (factor VIII, CD34, CD31). Results: Lymphatic vessels were found in all zones of the normal, OA, and RA synovial membrane. Few lymphatic vessels were seen in the sublining zone in normal and OA synovium which did not show villous hypertrophy. However, in both RA synovium and OA synovium showing villous hypertrophy and a chronic inflammatory cell infiltrate, numerous lymphatic vessels were seen in all zones of the synovial membrane, including the sublining zone of the superficial subintima. Conclusions: Lymphatic vessels are present in normal and arthritic synovial tissues and are more numerous and prominent where there is oedema and an increase in inflammatory cells in the subintima, particularly in RA. This may reflect increased transport of hyaluronan and leucocyte trafficking in inflamed synovial tissues. PMID:14644866

  6. Regulation and function of SIRT1 in rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Engler, Anna; Tange, Clare; Frank-Bertoncelj, Mojca; Gay, Renate E; Gay, Steffen; Ospelt, Caroline

    2016-02-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by inflammation and destruction of synovial joints. The function of sirtuin (SIRT)1 in RA is inconclusive. In human synovial cells, SIRT1 was shown to promote cytokine production and apoptosis resistance. However, deletion of SIRT1 aggravated inflammatory arthritis in mice and increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in murine macrophages. In the current study, we investigated the regulation, expression, and function of SIRT1 in RA, in particular its role in adhesion and proliferation of human RA synovial fibroblasts (RASF). We found that expression of SIRT1 was increased in vivo in synovial tissues of RA smokers and in vitro by stimulation of RASF with TNFα, but decreased upon treatment with cigarette smoke extract. Synovial tissues of RA smokers showed higher leukocytic infiltration that positively correlated with enhanced levels of SIRT1. Global transcriptome analysis revealed that SIRT1 modulates expression of genes involved in the regulation of inflammatory response and cell adhesion. In functional studies, silencing of SIRT1 reduced proliferation and leukocytic adhesion to RASF but showed inconsistent results in the regulation of adhesion to plastic. In conclusion, SIRT1 modulates the proliferative and potentially also adhesive properties of RASF and can therefore promote progression of RA. SIRT1 is upregulated by TNFα but decreased upon CSE treatment of RASF. Upregulation of SIRT1 in RA smokers correlates with increased leukocytic infiltration. SIRT1 modulates expression of genes regulating cell adhesion and inflammation. SIRT1 regulates proliferation of RASF.

  7. [Respiratory failure in disseminated sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Popova, L M; Avdiunina, I A; Alferova, V P

    2000-01-01

    The development and patterns of respiratory failure (RF) are analyzed in 9 patients with disseminated sclerosis (DS). Forced ventilation of the lungs was carried out with consideration for main location of the process. Relationship between patterns of respiratory disorders and neuroanatomy of respiratory regulation is discussed. Involvement of the corticospinal routes is paralleled by dissociation during functional pulmonary tests: spontaneous volumes are less than controlled inspirations. The most severe symptom complexes were observed in RF of predominantly bulbar localization: respiratory anarchy, blocking of airways caused by impaired swallowing, impaired mechanism of coughing reflex, loss of spontaneous respiration, sometimes apnea during sleeping. Involvement of the respiratory nuclei of medullary respiratory center and airways and of the corticonuclear routes of caudal cranial nerves causes the development of a triad of symptoms: glossopharyngolaryngeal paralysis, dysfunction of respiratory nuclei of medulla oblongata, and decreased sensitivity of respiratory center to CO2. Aspiration complications caused by dysphagia are characteristic of bulbar DS. Respiratory function in 5 patients without clinical picture of RF are specially discussed. The authors emphasize unfavorable prognostic significance of signs of extracorporeal obstruction indicating the probability of RF long before its manifestation. Special attention is paid to early diagnosis of symptoms of coming RF when evaluating the status of patients with DS during treatment. Timely use of respiratory resuscitation methods reduces the mortality and ensures a good chance for remissions with recovery of respiratory function, which are characteristic of RF.

  8. Disseminated typical bronchial carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Novković, Dobrivoje; Skuletić, Vesna; Vuković, Jelena; Cerović, Snezana; Tomić, Ilija; Karlicić, Vukojica; Stojisavljević, Marko

    2013-05-01

    Bronchial carcinoids belong to a rare type of lung tumors. If they do not expose outstanding neuroendocrine activity, they develop without clearly visible symptoms. They are often detected during a routine examination. According to their clinical pathological features, they are divided into typical and atypical tumors. Typical bronchial carcinoids metastasize to distant organs very rarely. Localized forms are effectively treated by surgery. The methods of conservative treatment should be applied in other cases. We presented a 65-year-old patient with carcinoid lung tumor detected by a routine examination. Additional analysis (chest X-ray, computed tomography of the chest, ultrasound of the abdomen, skeletal scintigraphy, bronhoscopy, histopathological analysis of the bioptate of bronchial tumor, as well as bronchial brushing cytology and immunohistochemical staining performed with markers specific for neuroendocrine tumor) proved a morphologically typical lung carcinoid with dissemination to the liver and skeletal system, which is very rarely found in typical carcinoids. The presented case with carcinoid used to be showed morphological and pathohistological characteristics of typical bronchial carcinoid. With its metastasis to the liver and skeletal system it demonstrated unusual clinical course that used to be considered as rare phenomenon. Due to its frequent asymptomatic course and varied manifestation, bronchial carcinoid could be considered as a diagnostic challenge requiring a multidisciplinary approach.

  9. GOES satellite time code dissemination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beehler, R. E.

    1983-01-01

    The GOES time code system, the performance achieved to date, and some potential improvements in the future are discussed. The disseminated time code is originated from a triply redundant set of atomic standards, time code generators and related equipment maintained by NBS at NOAA's Wallops Island, VA satellite control facility. It is relayed by two GOES satellites located at 75 W and 135 W longitude on a continuous basis to users within North and South America (with overlapping coverage) and well out into the Atlantic and Pacific ocean areas. Downlink frequencies are near 468 MHz. The signals from both satellites are monitored and controlled from the NBS labs at Boulder, CO with additional monitoring input from geographically separated receivers in Washington, D.C. and Hawaii. Performance experience with the received time codes for periods ranging from several years to one day is discussed. Results are also presented for simultaneous, common-view reception by co-located receivers and by receivers separated by several thousand kilometers.

  10. Survival changes in Patients with Synovial Sarcoma, 1983-2012.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuncong; Song, Rongfeng; Sun, Tiantian; Hou, Bingzong; Hong, Guobin; Mallampati, Saradhi; Sun, Hongliu; Zhou, Xiuling; Zhou, Cuiling; Zhang, Hongyu; Cheng, Zhibin; Li, Jie; Ma, Haiqing; Sun, Huanhuan

    2017-01-01

    Background: Synovial sarcoma (SyS) is a rare malignancy that typically invades the extremities and occurs predominantly in adolescents. Studies on incidence and survival in SyS that were based on a large population had not been reported yet. Methods: To evaluate changes in incidence and survival in SyS over three decades, we accessed data on SyS cases in each decade between 1983 and 2012 (1983-1992, 1993-2002, and 2003-2012) from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database. The survival difference between decades, age groups, sexes, race, pathologic types, sites, stages and socioeconomic status (SES) over three decades were accessed by comparing Kaplan-Meier curves. Results: We located 2,070 SyS cases in 18 SEER registry regions between 1983 and 2012. Our study demonstrated that the incidence of SyS per 1,000,000 continued to increase from 0.906 to 1.348 to 1.548 in the total population and in most age groups and that the age of incidence peak was 15-29 years in three decades. But, the survival of patients with SyS did not significantly improve throughout the three decades, with 5-year survival rates of 69.4%, 61.1% and 60.5% respectively (p > 0.05). Interestingly, the widening survival gaps among races, sexes, pathological types and various SES over time were observed, with narrowing p values. Conclusions: This study demonstrated the increasing incidence and unimproved survival rates across three decades in a large sample, indicating the urgency for further development of diagnosis, improving health care providers' awareness of SyS and lead to the development of novel treatments.

  11. Giant solitary synovial osteochondromatosis of the elbow causing ulnar nerve neuropathy: a case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Giant or solitary osteochondroma is part of a rare disorder known as synovial osteochondromatosis. It forms part of a spectrum of disease characterized by metaplastic changes within the joint synovium that are eventually extruded as loose bodies. It has been suggested that solitary synovial osteochondroma forms as progression of synovial osteochondromatosis through a process of either coalescence of multiple smaller bodies or the growth of a dominant synovial osteochondroma. Previous studies have shown that it occurs as a late phase of the disease. We report a rare case of giant synovial osteochondromatosis at the elbow causing ulnar nerve neuropathy and mechanical symptoms which has not been previously reported in the literature. Case report We report a case of a 56 year old Western European gentleman who presented with ulnar nerve neuropathy and swelling behind the elbow. The patient underwent MR imaging and subsequent biopsy that demonstrated synovial osteochondromatosis. Initially the patient declined surgery and opted for a watch and wait approach. Five years later he returned with worsening symptoms and underwent successful surgical resection of a giant solitary synovial osteochondroma. Conclusion The unique outcome in our patient despite the long interval between presentation and surgical treatment resulted in early full resolution of symptoms within a short period. It may suggest an improved prognosis as compared to multiple synovial osteochondromatosis in terms of mechanical and neurological outcomes. PMID:23351253

  12. Up-regulation of prostaglandin E receptor EP2 and EP4 subtypes in rat synovial tissues with adjuvant arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kurihara, Y; Endo, H; Akahoshi, T; Kondo, H

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate the role of the prostaglandin E receptor (EP) subtypes in the development of inflammatory synovitis, we examined EP subtype mRNA distribution in the synovial tissue of rats with adjuvant arthritis and the effect of selective EP agonists on cytokine production by cultured rat synovial cells. We used reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and in situ hybridization to measure the level of EP subtype (EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4) mRNA expression in synovial tissues and cultured synovial cells from the arthritic joints of rats. RT-PCR and ELISA were used to analyse the effects of two selective EP agonists on IL-6 production by cultured rat synovial cells. EP2 and EP4 mRNA expression in inflamed synovial tissues was up-regulated. EP2 and EP4 mRNA were co-expressed in synovial macrophages and fibroblasts in inflamed tissues. EP4 and EP2 agonists both inhibited IL-1-induced IL-6 production. Our results suggest that prostaglandin E2 regulates the functions of synovial macrophages and fibroblasts through EP2 and EP4, which are induced by inflammatory stimuli in rats with adjuvant arthritis. PMID:11207665

  13. Up-regulation of prostaglandin E receptor EP2 and EP4 subtypes in rat synovial tissues with adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Y; Endo, H; Akahoshi, T; Kondo, H

    2001-02-01

    To evaluate the role of the prostaglandin E receptor (EP) subtypes in the development of inflammatory synovitis, we examined EP subtype mRNA distribution in the synovial tissue of rats with adjuvant arthritis and the effect of selective EP agonists on cytokine production by cultured rat synovial cells. We used reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and in situ hybridization to measure the level of EP subtype (EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4) mRNA expression in synovial tissues and cultured synovial cells from the arthritic joints of rats. RT-PCR and ELISA were used to analyse the effects of two selective EP agonists on IL-6 production by cultured rat synovial cells. EP2 and EP4 mRNA expression in inflamed synovial tissues was up-regulated. EP2 and EP4 mRNA were co-expressed in synovial macrophages and fibroblasts in inflamed tissues. EP4 and EP2 agonists both inhibited IL-1-induced IL-6 production. Our results suggest that prostaglandin E2 regulates the functions of synovial macrophages and fibroblasts through EP2 and EP4, which are induced by inflammatory stimuli in rats with adjuvant arthritis.

  14. Pericardial synovial sarcoma: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Mitsuru; Sekine, Yasuo; Koh, Eitetsu; Kume, Yuta; Saito, Hiroyuki; Kimura, Sho; Hamada, Hiromichi; Wu, Di; Hiroshima, Kenzo

    2014-11-01

    Primary pericardial synovial sarcoma is a rare disease. We herein report a case of synovial sarcoma that originated in the epicardium. A 13-year-old male visited our hospital with a fever and chest pain. Copious pericardial effusion and a large intrapericardial tumor were detected. An open-chest tumor resection was performed. A solid nodular tumor was observed in the pericardial cavity. The tumor was a polypoid mass that was pedunculated and grew from the inner surface of the pericardium near the origin of the SVC and ascending aorta. Histologically, the tumor cells were uniformly spindle shaped, with an ovoid or oval nucleus, and formed solid, compact sheets and fascicles. A storiform pattern was also observed. Based on the histopathological and immunohistochemical findings, and the fluorescence in situ hybridization detection of rearrangement of the SYT gene, a monophasic synovial sarcoma was diagnosed. We discuss the diagnosis and treatment of this case and review the pertinent literature.

  15. Alizarin red S staining as a screening test to detect calcium compounds in synovial fluid.

    PubMed

    Paul, H; Reginato, A J; Schumacher, H R

    1983-02-01

    A simple, rapid screening method using alizarin red S stain and ordinary light microscopy to detect microcrystalline or noncrystalline calcium phosphate salts was used on wet drop preparations of synovial fluids. This proved to be helpful in detecting apatite crystal clumps and small calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystals missed by polarized light. The staining was positive in 100% of synovial fluids from patients later proven to have apatite and/or CPPD deposition diseases. Apatite and CPPD crystals were commonly found together in the same fluids. In addition, some synovial fluids from patients with osteoarthritis, renal failure dialysis, rheumatoid arthritis, and gout also exhibited positive staining. The correlation of positive alizarin red S staining with radiologic evidence of osteoarthritis suggests that apatite crystals might be related to articular cartilage degeneration in different rheumatic diseases.

  16. Surface fissures in articular cartilage: effect of pathological changes in synovial fluid.

    PubMed

    Kafka, Vratislav

    2002-01-01

    A unified mathematical model of two different modes of inception of fissures at the surface of articular cartilage in healthy and pathological joints. The superficial tangential zone of articular cartilage is modeled as a three-phase medium consisting of collagen fibers, matrix, and of infiltrated thin constituent of synovial fluid. The author's general mesomechanical concept is applied to the analysis of deterioration of articular cartilage. Theoretical analysis based on the results of the author's preceding paper. The presented analysis shows that superficial fissures in articular cartilage can also be caused by pathological thinning of synovial fluid. Whereas in healthy joints the probable cause of creation of fissures at the surface of cartilage was shown to be fast impact loading, in joints with inflammatory synovial fluid the fissures can be caused by plain walking. Appearance of surface fissures in articular cartilage is a serious, still not fully clarified problem that deserves attention.

  17. On the matter of synovial fluid lubrication: implications for Metal-on-Metal hip tribology.

    PubMed

    Myant, Connor; Cann, Philippa

    2014-06-01

    Artificial articular joints present an interesting, and difficult, tribological problem. These bearing contacts undergo complex transient loading and multi axes kinematic cycles, over extremely long periods of time (>10 years). Despite extensive research, wear of the bearing surfaces, particularly metal-metal hips, remains a major problem. Comparatively little is known about the prevailing lubrication mechanism in artificial joints which is a serious gap in our knowledge as this determines film formation and hence wear. In this paper we review the accepted lubrication models for artificial hips and present a new concept to explain film formation with synovial fluid. This model, recently proposed by the authors, suggests that interfacial film formation is determined by rheological changes local to the contact and is driven by aggregation of synovial fluid proteins. The implications of this new mechanism for the tribological performance of new implant designs and the effect of patient synovial fluid properties are discussed.

  18. Primary mediastinal synovial sarcoma: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Freund, Martin; Zelger, Bettina; Putzer, Daniel; Bonatti, Hugo; Müller, Ludwig; Fiegl, Michael; Geltner, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Primary mediastinal synovial sarcoma is a rare malignancy with only a few cases reported so far. A 56-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital for an investigation of a nodule in the left middle lung on chest radiography. Computed tomography revealed a mediastinal mass first described as a solitary fibrous tumor. The diagnosis of synovial sarcoma was established by computed tomography-guided percutaneous needle biopsy. Work up showed no metastasis to distant organs or contralateral pleural cavity. The mass was surgically resected; pathological and immunohistochemical analyses confirmed the diagnosis of a monophasic spindle cell synovial sarcoma probably originating from phrenic nerve. The patient received adjuvant chemotherapy and radiation and is free of recurrence after a follow up of 16 months. PMID:19918499

  19. Acute Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation in Neuroendocrine Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Teh, Ru-Wen; Tsoi, Daphne T.

    2012-01-01

    Malignancy is a common cause of disseminated intravascular coagulation and usually presents as a chronic disorder in solid organ tumours. We present a rare case of recurrent acute disseminated intravascular coagulation in neuroendocrine carcinoma after manipulation, firstly, by core biopsy and, later, by cytotoxic therapy causing a release of procoagulants and cytokines from lysed tumour cells. This is reminiscent of tumour lysis syndrome where massive quantities of intracellular electrolytes and nucleic acid are released, causing acute metabolic imbalance and renal failure. This case highlights the potential complication of acute disseminated intravascular coagulation after trauma to malignant cells. PMID:23139666

  20. [Alizarin red S staining of calcium compound crystals in synovial fluid].

    PubMed

    Shoji, K

    1993-04-01

    In order to study the clinical value of alizarin red S staining of calcium compound crystals in synovial fluid, the optimum conditions for staining and the detectable threshold of the crystals were examined. The staining of crystals was mainly affected by the concentration of the dye and pH of the solution. The best results were obtained with an alizarin red S concentration of 1.5-3.0% for hydroxyapatite (HA) and 2.0-3.0% for calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystal. The optimal pH of the solution was 4.0-6.0 for HA and 4.0-5.5 for CPPD crystal. For the detection of crystals phagocytosed by synovial fluid leukocytes, staining was enhanced by the addition of chloral hydrate to the dye solution which increased the permeability of the cell membrane. The detectable threshold levels of HA and CPPD crystal in synovial fluid by alizarin red S staining were 0.1 micrograms/ml and 0.5 micrograms/ml, respectively. These results suggest that alizarin red S staining is suitable for screening calcium compound crystals in synovial fluid, because it is more sensitive than other methods, such as polarized microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Alizarin red S staining was performed on 148 synovial fluids from patients with various joint diseases. The staining was positive in 100% of synovial fluids from patients with CPPD deposition disease, in 54% of fluids with osteoarthritis, and in 39% of fluids with rheumatoid arthritis. In osteoarthritis, the increase in the proportion of positive cases was found to be in accordance with the radiological grading of the joints.

  1. Upregulation of articular synovial membrane μ-opioid-like receptors in an acute equine synovitis model.

    PubMed

    van Loon, J P A M; de Grauw, J C; Brunott, A; Weerts, E A W S; van Weeren, P R

    2013-04-01

    Intra-articular injection of opioids provides analgesia in painful equine joints and μ-opioid receptors (MORs) have been demonstrated in equine synovial membranes. The aim of this study was to determine whether acute inflammatory conditions will lead to up-regulation of MOR in equine synovial membranes and whether anti-inflammatory treatment can prevent any such upregulation. In a two-period, blinded, placebo-controlled randomised cross-over design, lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 1.0 ng) was injected into the left or right middle carpal joint of seven healthy ponies. Arthroscopy and synovial membrane biopsy was performed under general anaesthesia at baseline, 48 h (T48) and 672 h (T672) after LPS injection, with ponies assigned to receive either phenylbutazone (PBZ 2.2mg/kg PO BID) or placebo from 2h post-LPS. Ponies were scored for pain and lameness. Repeated synovial fluid samples were obtained and the degree of synovitis scored both macroscopically and microscopically. The density and staining pattern of MOR-like protein in synovial membrane biopsies over the course of the synovitis with or without PBZ treatment was evaluated using immunohistochemical techniques. LPS injection consistently induced a severe transient synovitis. Pain and lameness were significantly attenuated by treatment with PBZ. Up-regulation of MOR-like protein in the inflamed equine synovial membrane could be demonstrated in the placebo treated animals, but not in the PBZ-treated animals overall, although there were no significant differences at any individual time-point between the two groups. It was concluded that acute inflammation will up-regulate MOR, while anti-inflammatory treatment will attenuate this response.

  2. Endometrial Synovial-like Metaplasia Associated With Levonorgestrel-releasing Intrauterine System.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Colin J R; Leake, Robyn

    2015-11-01

    The levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (L-IUS) is widely used in contraception and in the treatment of menorrhagia, dysmenorrhea, adenomyosis, and endometriosis. L-IUS is also increasingly considered in the management of endometrial neoplasia and its precursors. Histologic changes in the endometrium can be due to the effects of high-dose progestogen or may be caused by the local irritant or mechanical effects of an intrauterine foreign body. In the present study, we describe a novel endometrial alteration associated with L-IUS that most closely resembles synovial metaplasia reported at other extra-articular anatomic sites. Eleven cases were identified with a mean age of 49.6 yr. In most patients L-IUS was used for management of menorrhagia or endometrial hyperplasia. Endometrial synovial-like metaplasia was always a focal finding and was associated with areas of surface epithelial erosion. The synovial-like cells showed a distinctive palisaded arrangement with orientation perpendicular to the endometrial surface. Multinucleate cells were present in 2 cases, but granulomas were not identified. The synovial-like cells were vimentin immunoreactive and a variable proportion of cells expressed CD68. Only focal CD10 staining was seen and there was no expression of estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, or cytokeratin. In summary, L-IUS may be associated with a distinctive synovial-like metaplastic alteration which most likely represents a stromal reaction to an intrauterine foreign body following endometrial surface erosion. The synovial-like cells appear to comprise histiocytes and modified fibroblasts or stromal cells similar to this process in other sites.

  3. Osmolarity regulates chondrogenic differentiation potential of synovial fluid derived mesenchymal progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Bertram, Karri L; Krawetz, Roman J

    2012-06-08

    Cartilage is one of few tissues where adult stem/progenitor cells have not been putatively identified. Recent studies have provided strong evidence that a sub-population of mesenchymal progenitor cells (MPCs) derived from the synovial fluid may be able to affect some degree of cartilage repair both in vivo and in vitro/ex vivo, however this does not appear to be the case in patients with arthritis. Previously, it has been found that synovial fluid osmolarity is decreased in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) or Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and these changes in osmolarity have been linked to changes in chondrocyte gene regulation. However, it is yet unknown if changes in osmolarity regulate the gene expression in synovial fluid MPCs (sfMPCs), and by extension, chondrogenesis of this cell population. In the present study we have collected synovial fluid samples from normal, OA and RA knee joints, quantified the osmolarity of the fluid and modified the culture/differentiation media to span a range of osmolarities (264-375 mOsm). Chondrogenesis was measured with Alcian blue staining of cultures in addition to quantitative PCR (qPCR) using probes to Sox9, ACAN and Col2A1. Overall, sfMPCs from arthritic joints demonstrated decreased chondrogenic potential compared to sfMPCs isolated from normal synovial fluid. Furthermore, the sfMPCs retained increased chondrogenic potential if differentiated under the same osmolarity conditions for which they were initially derived within. In conclusion, it does appear the synovial fluid osmolarity regulates the chondrogenic potential of sfMPCs, however, further study is required to elucidate the mechanism by which the changes in osmolarity are sensed by the cells and regulate chondrogenic gene expression.

  4. Diffusion of mepivacaine to adjacent synovial structures after intrasynovial analgesia of the digital flexor tendon sheath.

    PubMed

    Jordana, M; Martens, A; Duchateau, L; Haspeslagh, M; Vanderperren, K; Oosterlinck, M; Pille, F

    2016-05-01

    Controversy exists about the specificity of diagnostic analgesia of the digital flexor tendon sheath (DFTS) in horses. To evaluate the degree of diffusion of mepivacaine from the equine DFTS to adjacent synovial structures. Crossover experiment. Under general anaesthesia, the DFTS of one front and one hindlimb of 8 horses were injected simultaneously with mepivacaine. Synovial fluid samples of the injected DFTS, the adjacent metacarpo-/metatarsophalangeal (MCP/MTP) joint, proximal interphalangeal joint, distal interphalangeal joint, navicular bursa and contralateral MCP/MTP joint were collected 15 min post injection (T15) from one of the injected limbs and 60 min post injection (T60) from the other limb. Venous blood samples were obtained at T0, T15 and T60 to evaluate systemic distribution of mepivacaine. After a 2-week washout period, the procedure was repeated using the same limbs but reversing the time of sampling (front vs. hindlimbs). The concentration of mepivacaine in samples was measured with a commercial ELISA kit. Mepivacaine concentrations in the DFTS samples, at both T15 (5077 mg/l) and T60 (3503 mg/l), exceeded those estimated sufficient to produce synovial analgesia (100 mg/l or 300 mg/l). Mepivacaine was found in all synovial structures adjacent to the injected DFTS and in the contralateral MCP/MTP joints, but concentrations were low, with a maximum value of only 3.2 mg/l. With the exception of the navicular bursa samples, the mepivacaine concentrations in the adjacent synovial structures were significantly higher at T60 than at T15 (P<0.03). Significantly higher mepivacaine concentrations were found in the ipsilateral than the contralateral MCP/MTP joints at T60 (P<0.001). Blood samples had significantly higher mepivacaine concentrations at T15 and T60 than at T0 (P<0.001). Mepivacaine injected into the DFTS of horses diffuses towards adjacent synovial structures without achieving clinically relevant concentrations. © 2015 EVJ Ltd.

  5. Lipid profile of human synovial fluid following intra-articular ankle fracture.

    PubMed

    Leimer, Elizabeth M; Pappan, Kirk L; Nettles, Dana L; Bell, Richard D; Easley, Mark E; Olson, Steven A; Setton, Lori A; Adams, Samuel B

    2017-03-01

    This study characterizes the metabolic profile of synovial fluid after intra-articular ankle fracture with an emphasis on changes in the lipid profile. Bilateral ankle synovial fluid from 19 patients with unilateral intra-articular ankle fracture was submitted for metabolic profiling. Contralateral ankle synovial fluid from each patient served as a matched control. Seven patients participated in a second bilateral synovial fluid collection after 6 months. Random forest classification, matched pairs t-tests (α < 0.01), repeated measures ANOVA with post-test contrasts (α < 0.01), correlation to cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases, and fracture and injury classification analyses yielded key lipid biomarkers in synovial fluid following intra-articular fracture. Free fatty acids, sphingomyelins, and lysolipids demonstrated significant elevation in fractured ankles at baseline. Fatty acids and sphingomyelins showed a significant decrease 6 months post-surgery. Random forest analysis showed predominantly fatty acids differentiating between groups. Significant correlations included fatty acids, sphingomyelins, and lysolipids with inflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases. Fracture classification showed increased fatty acids, lysolipids, and inositol metabolites as fracture severity increased. Fatty acid and sn-1 lysolipid elevation could be detrimental to the joint, as these strongly correlated with matrix metalloproteinases and TNF-α. This elevation also suggests involvement of phospholipase A2 , a potential target for therapeutic intervention. Together with elevated 2-hydroxyl fatty acids, these findings suggest elevated sn-1 lysolipids, sphingomyelins, and subsequent lipid metabolites in synovial fluid as biomarkers of ankle injury. Reversal of this signature after 6 months suggests temporary involvement of these metabolites in disease progression, although they may activate signaling pathways which drive progression to osteoarthritis. © 2016

  6. Gene Expression Profiling in Peripheral Blood Cells and Synovial Membranes of Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, Alessandro; Patuzzo, Giuseppe; Tinazzi, Elisa; Argentino, Giuseppe; Beri, Ruggero; Lunardi, Claudio; Puccetti, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Background Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is an inflammatory arthritis whose pathogenesis is poorly understood; it is characterized by bone erosions and new bone formation. The diagnosis of PsA is mainly clinical and diagnostic biomarkers are not yet available. The aim of this work was to clarify some aspects of the disease pathogenesis and to identify specific gene signatures in paired peripheral blood cells (PBC) and synovial biopsies of patients with PsA. Moreover, we tried to identify biomarkers that can be used in clinical practice. Methods PBC and synovial biopsies of 10 patients with PsA were used to study gene expression using Affymetrix arrays. The expression values were validated by Q-PCR, FACS analysis and by the detection of soluble mediators. Results Synovial biopsies of patients showed a modulation of approximately 200 genes when compared to the biopsies of healthy donors. Among the differentially expressed genes we observed the upregulation of Th17 related genes and of type I interferon (IFN) inducible genes. FACS analysis confirmed the Th17 polarization. Moreover, the synovial trascriptome shows gene clusters (bone remodeling, angiogenesis and inflammation) involved in the pathogenesis of PsA. Interestingly 90 genes are modulated in both compartments (PBC and synovium) suggesting that signature pathways in PBC mirror those of the inflamed synovium. Finally the osteoactivin gene was upregulared in both PBC and synovial biopsies and this finding was confirmed by the detection of high levels of osteoactivin in PsA sera but not in other inflammatory arthritides. Conclusions We describe the first analysis of the trancriptome in paired synovial tissue and PBC of patients with PsA. This study strengthens the hypothesis that PsA is of autoimmune origin since the coactivity of IFN and Th17 pathways is typical of autoimmunity. Finally these findings have allowed the identification of a possible disease biomarker, osteoactivin, easily detectable in PsA serum. PMID

  7. Terminal monosaccharide screening of synovial immunoglobulins G and A for the early detection of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kratz, Ewa Maria; Borysewicz, Krzysztof; Katnik-Prastowska, Iwona

    2010-08-01

    The expressions of some terminal glycotopes of synovial immunoglobulins G, A, and M were analysed in relation to rheumatoid arthritis (RA) progression defined according to early and advanced radiological changes in patients' hands. The relative amounts of terminal monosaccharides were determined by lectin-immunoblotting of immunoglobulin preparations using appropriate lectins able to recognize alpha2,6-linked (Sambucus nigra agglutinin) and alpha2,3-linked (Maackia amurensis agglutinin) sialic acid, galactose (Ricinus communis agglutinin I), N-acetylglucosamine (Griffonia simplicifolia agglutinin II) as well as alpha1,6-linked (Aleuria aurantia lectin), alpha1,3-linked (Lotus tetragonolobus agglutinin), and alpha1,2-linked (Ulex europaeus agglutinin) fucose. The results indicate differences between early and advanced RA stages in the terminal sugar exposition of synovial IgG and IgA, but not IgM. The galactose-deficient glycotope with exposed N-acetylglucosamine of the synovial 33.1-kDa IgG fragment appeared exclusively in the early stage of RA. In contrast, this glycotope of intact synovial IgG and IgA was present in both groups, although with higher proportions in advanced RA. The proportions of the sialyl and fucosyl determinants of intact synovial A and G immunoglobulins were clearly lower in the early RA group than in the advanced. The analysis of terminal oligosaccharide exposition in IgG, IgG fragments, and IgA present in the synovial fluid of RA patients might be applicable as a stage-specific marker in the diagnosis and therapy of RA patients.

  8. Expression of IL-19 and its receptors in RA: potential role for synovial hyperplasia formation.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, N; Kuroiwa, T; Ikeuchi, H; Hiramatsu, N; Maeshima, A; Kaneko, Y; Hiromura, K; Nojima, Y

    2008-06-01

    IL-19 is a novel cytokine of the IL-10 family. In this study, we sought to examine whether IL-19 plays a role in the pathogenesis of RA. Expression of IL-19, IL-20 receptor 1 (IL-20R1) and IL-20R2 was examined by RT-PCR and immunohistochemical analysis in rheumatoid synovium. The effects of IL-19 on synovial cells established from rheumatoid synovium (RASCs), with regard to IL-6 production and signal transducers and activators of transcription3 (STAT3) activation, were examined by ELISA and western blot analysis, respectively. The effect of IL-19 on RASC apoptosis was examined by Hoechst staining, flow cytometry analysis of annexin V binding and caspase-3 activity. IL-19, IL-20R1 and IL-20R2 mRNA were detected by RT-PCR in synovial tissues from RA patients. Immunohistochemical analysis showed IL-19 was predominantly expressed in the hyperplastic lining layers of RA synovial tissues. The majority of IL-19-positive cells were vimentin-positive and CD68-positive synovial cells, serving as markers of fibroblasts and macrophages, respectively. IL-20R1 and IL-20R2 (IL-20Rs) were expressed in both the lining and sublining layers of RA synovium. In RASC, IL-19 was induced by lipopolysaccharide stimulation and constitutive expression of IL-20Rs was observed, suggesting IL-19 has an autocrine action. In terms of this function, IL-19 induced STAT3 activation and increased IL-6 production by RASC above the medium control. Moreover, IL-19 significantly reduced RASC apoptosis induced by serum starvation. These data suggest that IL-19, produced by synovial cells, promotes joint inflammation in RA by inducing IL-6 production and decreasing synovial cell apoptosis.

  9. Serum-synovial gradient data of normouricemic patients with history of gout and acute knee effusion.

    PubMed

    Rozin, A P; Braun-Moscovici, Y; Balbir-Gurman, A

    2006-11-01

    The etiology of arthritis episodes in normouricemic patients with gout is still unclear. We propose that the fluctuation in synovial urate level, as well as pH, ion strength, albumin, and globulin values relative to serum levels, could be involved in crystal formation. To assess serum-synovial gradient (SSG), the sera and synovial fluid (SF) of six normouricemic patients (men, age 48-79) with a history of gout (American College of Rheumatology criteria) and acute knee effusion were screened for uric acid, pH, osmolality (Osm), P/Ca, albumin, globulin, and SSG. Monosodium urate monohydrate (MSUM) crystals were determined by polarized light (PL). Infectious arthritis was ruled out via Gram staining and synovial fluid culture. Negative X-ray and PL microscopy results excluded chondrocalcinosis. Five patients (1-5) had inflammatory knee effusion (WBC >2,000/mm(3)), and one (patient 6) had noninflammatory knee effusion (600 WBC/mm(3)). MSUM crystals were found in the WBC of patient 1 only. He had tophaceous gout with normal serum uric acid levels and showed significant negative Osm and P and positive Ca SSG. Two crystal negative patients had severe negative pH SSG with alkaline synovial fluid, significant P/Ca SSG, and high positive globulin SSG, while one of them had supersaturated SF uric acid content. The other patients displayed an increased Osm and P/Ca SSG. All SSG values were five to ten times higher than the coefficient of variance for used methods. Noninflammatory SF of patient 6 does not appear to be related to active gout. The data on SSG for MSUM, pH, Osm, Alb/Glob, and P/Ca in normouricemic patients with gout history and acute knee effusion was not homogeneous. We propose that acid-base and ionic-protein gradient may lead to instability of subsaturated urate solution, thereby predisposing to MSUM deposits within synovial membrane and inducing inflammation.

  10. Descriptions of therapeutic arthrocenthesis and of synovial fluid in a Nahuatl text from prehispanic Mexico.

    PubMed Central

    Alarcon-Segovia, D

    1980-01-01

    Paracelsus is considered to have been the first to record the viscid quality of the synovial fluid. However, his contemporary Bernardino de Sahagún, a Franciscan friar who came to Mexico shortly after the Spanish conquest, obtained from elderly Aztec Indians who spoke only Nahuatl the descriptions of therapeutic arthrocentesis and of the viscid nature of the synovial fluid. They compared the fluid from the knee joint to the viscid fluid from the leaves of the nopal cactus (Opuntia sp.). We here record their description and confirm the accuracy of their comparison. Images PMID:7416821

  11. Synovial Cyst: A Culprit for Recalcitrant Iliotibial Band Syndrome: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Yeoh, Csn; Lim, Ghj; Sathappan, S S

    2015-11-01

    We present the case of a 56-year old gentleman who presented with recalcitrant iliotibial band (ITB) friction syndrome which did not improve with various modalities of conservative treatment. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of the affected knee did not show pathology typical of ITB friction syndrome. However, open exploration revealed a synovial cyst deep to the iliotibial band, abutting against the anterolateral capsule. The presence of distinctive clinical signs on physical examination should alert clinicians to consider knee synovial cyst as a differential diagnosis when dealing with recalcitrant ITB syndrome.

  12. Synovial Cyst: A Culprit for Recalcitrant Iliotibial Band Syndrome: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Lim, GHJ; Sathappan, SS

    2015-01-01

    We present the case of a 56-year old gentleman who presented with recalcitrant iliotibial band (ITB) friction syndrome which did not improve with various modalities of conservative treatment. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of the affected knee did not show pathology typical of ITB friction syndrome. However, open exploration revealed a synovial cyst deep to the iliotibial band, abutting against the anterolateral capsule. The presence of distinctive clinical signs on physical examination should alert clinicians to consider knee synovial cyst as a differential diagnosis when dealing with recalcitrant ITB syndrome. PMID:28611916

  13. A giant pleural poorly differentiated synovial sarcoma (PDSS) in a 64-year-old woman

    PubMed Central

    Chabowski, Mariusz; Janczak, Dawid; Dorobisz, Tadeusz; Leśniak, Michał; Jeleń, Michal; Janczak, Dariusz

    2016-01-01

    The article presents the rare case of a 64-year-old woman, who was admitted to our thoracic surgery department with a giant tumor in a right hemithorax measuring 88 mm × 137 mm × 188 mm, revealed by a thoracic CT scan. An anterolateral thoracotomy with a radical tumor resection was performed. The final pathological diagnosis of the poorly differentiated synovial sarcoma (PDSS) was made. The adjuvant radiotherapy of 60 Gy in 30 fractions was applied postoperatively. One year after operation patient remains in good health. The literature review on pleural synovial sarcoma has been shortly presented. PMID:27747031

  14. Assessment of rheumatoid activity based on clinical features and blood and synovial fluid analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Farr, M; Kendall, M J; Young, D W; Meynell, M J; Hawkins, C F

    1976-01-01

    Joint inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis has been assessed, and the most useful guides to disease activity were determined by analysis of synovial fluid and blood together with the history of joint disability. The patient's own evaluation of the amount of pain suffered was the most useful clinical assessment. Differential cell count and glucose estimations were the most helpful guides in the synovial fluid, while C-reactive protein in the serum most accurately reflected disease activity. The effects of systemic steroids on these indices were studied, and the differences between seronegative and seropositive patients noted. PMID:942273

  15. Sudden onset of paraplegia secondary to an unusual presentation of pediatric synovial sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ailing; Guo, Fuyou

    2016-12-01

    Spinal synovial sarcoma (SS) is an extremely rare malignant tumor in children. We report an unusual pediatric synovial sarcoma located in the thoracic spine at T9-T10 levels. A 10-year-old boy was admitted with a 1-month history of progressive back pain and low fever for 7 days as well as sudden onset of paraplegia for 1 day. The primary diagnosis was considered for spinal inflammatory abscess; subsequently, the patient underwent total resection with a good recovery and confirmed SS by SYT-SSX gene translocation. The possibility of sudden paraplegia caused by unusual SS involved in the spine should be highlighted.

  16. Descriptions of therapeutic arthrocenthesis and of synovial fluid in a Nahuatl text from prehispanic Mexico.

    PubMed

    Alarcon-Segovia, D

    1980-06-01

    Paracelsus is considered to have been the first to record the viscid quality of the synovial fluid. However, his contemporary Bernardino de Sahagún, a Franciscan friar who came to Mexico shortly after the Spanish conquest, obtained from elderly Aztec Indians who spoke only Nahuatl the descriptions of therapeutic arthrocentesis and of the viscid nature of the synovial fluid. They compared the fluid from the knee joint to the viscid fluid from the leaves of the nopal cactus (Opuntia sp.). We here record their description and confirm the accuracy of their comparison.

  17. Response to pazopanib in two pediatric patients with pretreated relapsing synovial sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Casanova, Michela; Basso, Eleonora; Magni, Chiara; Bergamaschi, Luca; Chiaravalli, Stefano; Carta, Roberto; Tirtei, Elisa; Massimino, Maura; Fagioli, Franca; Ferrari, Andrea

    2017-01-21

    Pazopanib is an oral multikinase inhibitor that has proved effective in adults treated for relapsing soft tissue sarcoma and synovial sarcoma in particular. Two cases are reported here of pediatric patients with pretreated relapsing synovial sarcoma whose tumors showed a prolonged response to pazopanib given on compassionate grounds. These results suggest that new agents found effective in adult patients might achieve similar results in adolescents with the same disease. Facilitating the availability of new drugs for children and adolescents is a major challenge for pediatric oncologists.

  18. Primary Pulmonary Synovial Sarcoma Showing a Prolonged Survival with Multimodality Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Hirokazu; Hanibuchi, Masaki; Takizawa, Hiromitsu; Sakiyama, Shoji; Sumitomo, Hiroyuki; Iwamoto, Seiji; Ikushima, Hitoshi; Nakajima, Kohei; Nagahiro, Shinji; Yamago, Taito; Toyoda, Yuko; Bando, Yoshimi; Nishioka, Yasuhiko

    2016-01-01

    A 54-year-old man was referred to our hospital due to a mass shadow noted on a chest X-ray. Thoracoscopic lobectomy yielded a diagnosis of primary pulmonary synovial sarcoma according to the histology and SYT-SSX1 gene analyses. Five months after the thoracic surgery, he developed brain metastasis; therefore, we performed resection of the brain metastatic focus followed by radiotherapy. As a local recurrence in the thoracic cavity concurrently emerged, systemic chemotherapy was also administered. These observations indicated that a multidisciplinary approach may be useful against primary pulmonary synovial sarcoma, although there is presently no established therapeutic strategy due to its rarity and highly aggressive nature.

  19. Fatal disseminated toxoplasmosis during primary HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Signorini, Liana; Gulletta, Maurizio; Coppini, Davide; Donzelli, Carla; Stellini, Roberto; Manca, Nino; Carosi, Giampiero; Matteelli, Alberto

    2007-03-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a well recognized manifestation of AIDS, but the disseminated disease is a rare condition and it has not been associated to HIV seroconversion to our knowledge. We describe a fatal episode of disseminated T. gondii acute infection with massive organ involvement during primary HIV infection. The serological data demonstrate primary T. gondii infection. The avidity index for HIV antibodies supports recent HIV-1 infection.

  20. Fatal disseminated cryptococcosis following intraocular involvement.

    PubMed Central

    Schulman, J A; Leveque, C; Coats, M; Lawrence, L; Barber, J C

    1988-01-01

    A 33-year-old man was treated with systemic steroids for a retinal inflammatory lesion before the diagnosis of cryptococcal retinitis and meningitis was suspected. He died from central nervous system disease despite treatment with parenteral antifungals. Histopathological studies demonstrated ocular and disseminated systemic infection with Cryptococcus neoformans. Direct cryptococcal involvement of the eye is rare and is usually associated with disseminated disease. Systemic steroids must be used with caution, and patients who take these drugs require frequent monitoring. Images PMID:3355803

  1. Loading-induced changes in synovial fluid affect cartilage metabolism.

    PubMed

    van de Lest, C H; van den Hoogen, B M; van Weeren, P R

    2000-01-01

    The object of this study was to determine whether changes in the synovial fluid (SF) induced by in vivo loading can alter the metabolic activity of chondrocytes in vitro, and, if so, whether insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) is responsible for this effect. Therefore, SF was collected from ponies after a period of box rest and after they had been exercised for a week. Normal, unloaded articular cartilage explants were cultured in 20% solutions of these SFs for 4 days and chondrocyte bioactivity was determined by glycosaminoglycan (GAG) turnover (i.e., the incorporation of 35SO4 into GAG and the release of GAG into the medium). Furthermore, the extent to which the bioactivity is IGF-I-dependent was determined in a cartilage explant culture in 20% SF, in the presence and absence of anti-IGF-I antibodies. In explants cultured in post-exercise SF, GAG synthesis was enhanced and GAG release was diminished when compared to cultures in pre-exercise SF. SF analysis showed that IGF-I and IGFBP-3 levels were increased in post-exercise SF. There was a positive correlation between IGF-I levels and proteoglycan synthesis, but no correlation between IGF-I levels and proteoglycan release. Addition of anti-IGF-I antibodies significantly inhibited stimulation of proteoglycan synthesis in explants cultured in SF with 40%. However, there was no difference in inhibition of proteoglycan synthesis between pre- and post-exercise SF which indicated that the relative contribution of IGF-I in the stimulating effect of SF did not change. Proteoglycan release was not influenced by the presence of anti-IGF-I antibodies. It is concluded that chondrocyte metabolic activity is at least partially regulated by changes in the SF induced by in vivo loading. Exercise altered the SF in a way that it had a favourable effect on cartilage PG content by enhancing the PG synthesis and reducing the PG breakdown. IGF-I is an important contributor to the overall stimulating effect of SF on cartilage

  2. Detection of subclinical synovial inflammation by microwave radiometry.

    PubMed

    Zampeli, Evangelia; Raftakis, Ioannis; Michelongona, Archontoula; Nikolaou, Chara; Elezoglou, Antonia; Toutouzas, Konstantinos; Siores, Elias; Sfikakis, Petros P

    2013-01-01

    Microwave Radiometry is a non-invasive method which determines within seconds the in vivo temperature of internal tissues at a depth of 3-7 cm with an accuracy of ±0.2°C. In this proof-of-concept study, we tested the hypothesis that, in absence of relevant clinical signs, increased local temperature detected by microwave radiometry reflects subclinical synovial inflammation, using ultrasound as reference method. Knees of healthy controls, subjects with recent knee trauma and symptom-free patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or osteoarthritis were examined by placing the microwave radiometry sensor, a) at the upper one third of the anterior surface of the thigh (control-point), and b) over the suprapatellar recess. Ultrasound was performed immediately after and the possible presence of fluid and/or synovitis was correlated with microwave radiometry findings. In 30 healthy and 10 injured knees the temperature was always lower than thigh (32.3±1.1 and 31.8±1.4 versus 34.1±0.9 and 33.6±1.2°C with a difference (ΔΤ) of -1.8±0.2 and -1.9±0.4°C respectively). Of 40 RA and 20 osteoarthritis knees examined, ultrasound findings indicative of subclinical inflammation (fluid effusion and/or Doppler signal) were found in 24 and 12, respectively, in which the temperature was higher than healthy knees and ΔΤ was lower (-0.9±0.7 in RA and -1.0±0.5 in osteoarthritis versus -1.8±0.2°C, p<0.001). The 5 RA knees with power Doppler findings indicative of grade 2 inflammation had a ΔΤ 3 times lower compared to healthy (-0.6±0.6, p = 0.007), whereas the 9 RA and the 7 osteoarthritis knees with additionally fluid effusion, had even lower ΔΤ (-0.4±0.7, p<0.001). Using a safe, rapid and easy-to-perform method, such as microwave radiometry, thermal changes within the knee joint may reflect non-clinically apparent joint inflammation. Refinement of this method, including production of sensors for small joints, could result to the development of the ideal objective

  3. Detection of Subclinical Synovial Inflammation by Microwave Radiometry

    PubMed Central

    Zampeli, Evangelia; Raftakis, Ioannis; Michelongona, Archontoula; Nikolaou, Chara; Elezoglou, Antonia; Toutouzas, Konstantinos; Siores, Elias; Sfikakis, Petros P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Microwave Radiometry is a non-invasive method which determines within seconds the in vivo temperature of internal tissues at a depth of 3–7 cm with an accuracy of ±0.2°C. In this proof-of-concept study, we tested the hypothesis that, in absence of relevant clinical signs, increased local temperature detected by microwave radiometry reflects subclinical synovial inflammation, using ultrasound as reference method. Methods Knees of healthy controls, subjects with recent knee trauma and symptom-free patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or osteoarthritis were examined by placing the microwave radiometry sensor, a) at the upper one third of the anterior surface of the thigh (control-point), and b) over the suprapatellar recess. Ultrasound was performed immediately after and the possible presence of fluid and/or synovitis was correlated with microwave radiometry findings. Results In 30 healthy and 10 injured knees the temperature was always lower than thigh (32.3±1.1 and 31.8±1.4 versus 34.1±0.9 and 33.6±1.2°C with a difference (ΔΤ) of −1.8±0.2 and −1.9±0.4°C respectively). Of 40 RA and 20 osteoarthritis knees examined, ultrasound findings indicative of subclinical inflammation (fluid effusion and/or Doppler signal) were found in 24 and 12, respectively, in which the temperature was higher than healthy knees and ΔΤ was lower (−0.9±0.7 in RA and −1.0±0.5 in osteoarthritis versus −1.8±0.2°C, p<0.001). The 5 RA knees with power Doppler findings indicative of grade 2 inflammation had a ΔΤ 3 times lower compared to healthy (−0.6±0.6, p = 0.007), whereas the 9 RA and the 7 osteoarthritis knees with additionally fluid effusion, had even lower ΔΤ (−0.4±0.7, p<0.001). Conclusion Using a safe, rapid and easy-to-perform method, such as microwave radiometry, thermal changes within the knee joint may reflect non-clinically apparent joint inflammation. Refinement of this method, including production of sensors for small joints

  4. ESID, dissemination, and community psychology: a case of partial implementation?

    PubMed

    Gray, Denis O; Jakes, Susan S; Emshoff, James; Blakely, Craig

    2003-12-01

    Dissemination, the second stage of Experimental Social Innovation and Dissemination (ESID) is a critical, if not defining, element of this social change model. This paper attempts to assess the extent to which community psychology has adopted and implemented ESID's dissemination focus in its training and publications. We identify four levels of commitment to dissemination: dissemination advocate, dissemination activist, dissemination researcher, and experimental dissemination researcher. Content analyses of textbooks, journal publications, and conference papers and a brief survey of doctoral training in the field were conducted. Findings suggest that the dissemination aspects of ESID have been modestly and partially implemented within the field. That is, although there is some evidence of a commitment to dissemination practice (advocate, activist), there is much less evidence of a commitment to dissemination research. The implications of these findings for the effectiveness of the ESID model and for training and practice in community psychology are discussed.

  5. Differences in synovial fluid cytokine levels but not in synovial tissue cell infiltrate between anti-citrullinated peptide/protein antibody-positive and –negative rheumatoid arthritis patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Comparative data on synovial cell infiltrate and cytokine levels in anti citrullinated peptide/protein antibody (ACPA)-positive and ACPA negative rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients are scarce. Our aim was to analyze synovial cell infiltrate and synovial fluid (SF) levels of cytokines in patients with RA according to the presence or absence of ACPA in serum. Methods A cross-sectional study in a single center including consecutive RA patients was performed. Patients were defined as 'ACPA negative' if serum was negative to two different ACPAs [second generation commercial anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies (CCP2) and chimeric fibrin/filaggrin citrullinated antibodies]. Parallel synovial tissue (ST) biopsies and SF were obtained by knee arthroscopy. Synovial cell infiltrate and endothelial cells were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and SF levels of Th1, Th2, Th17 and pro-inflammatory cytokines by Quantibody(R) Human Array. Results A total of 83 patients underwent arthroscopy, with a mean age of 55.9 ± 12 years, and mean disease duration of 45 months (interquartile range, IQR 10.8 to 122). 62% were female and 77% were ACPA positive. No significant differences were found in clinical variables, acute phase reactants, synovial cell infiltrate or lymphoid neogenesis (LN) between ACPA positive and negative patients. However ACPA positive patients had significantly higher levels of IL-1β, IL-10, IL-17 F and CC chemokine ligand 20 (CCL-20) than ACPA negative patients. Conclusions In our cohort of patients with RA no significant differences were found in synovial cell infiltrate or synovial LN according to ACPA status. However, ACPA positive patients had higher levels of T-cell derived and pro-inflammatory cytokines than ACPA negative patients. As systemic and local inflammation was similar in the two groups, these findings support a distinct synovial physiopathology. PMID:24485167

  6. Secretory phospholipases A2 induce cytokine release from blood and synovial fluid monocytes.

    PubMed

    Triggiani, Massimo; Granata, Francescopaolo; Oriente, Alfonso; Gentile, Marco; Petraroli, Angelica; Balestrieri, Barbara; Marone, Gianni

    2002-01-01

    Secretory phospholipases A2 (sPLA2) are released in the blood of patients with various inflammatory diseases and exert proinflammatory activities by releasing arachidonic acid (AA), the precursor of eicosanoids. We examined the ability of four sPLA2 to activate blood and synovial fluid monocytes in vitro. Monocytes were purified from blood of healthy donors or from synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis by negative immunoselection and by adherence to plastic dishes, respectively. The cells were incubated with group IA, IB, IIA and III sPLA2 and the release of TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IL-12 was determined by ELISA. Group IA, IB and IIA sPLA2 induced a concentration-dependent release of TNF-alpha and IL-6 from blood monocytes. These sPLA2 activated IL-12 production only in monocytes preincubated with IFN-gamma. Group IA and IIA sPLA2 also induced TNF-alpha and IL-6 release from synovial fluid monocytes. TNF-alpha and IL-6 release paralleled an increase in their mRNA expression and was independent from the capacity of sPLA2 to mobilize AA. These results indicate that sPLA2 stimulate cytokine release from blood and synovial fluid monocytes by a mechanism at least partially unrelated to their enzymatic activity. This effect may concur with the generation of AA in the proinflammatory activity of sPLA2 released during inflammatory diseases.

  7. Magnetic Capture of a Molecular Biomarker from Synovial Fluid in a Rat Model of Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Yarmola, Elena G.; Shah, Yash; Arnold, David P.; Dobson, Jon; Allen, Kyle D.

    2015-01-01

    Biomarker development for osteoarthritis (OA) often begins in rodent models, but can be limited by an inability to aspirate synovial fluid from a rodent stifle (similar to the human knee). To address this limitation, we have developed a magnetic nanoparticle-based technology to collect biomarkers from a rodent stifle, termed magnetic capture. Using a common OA biomarker - the c-terminus telopeptide of type II collagen (CTXII) - magnetic capture was optimized in vitro using bovine synovial fluid and then tested in a rat model of knee OA. Anti-CTXII antibodies were conjugated to the surface of superparamagnetic iron oxide-containing polymeric particles. Using these anti-CTXII particles, magnetic capture was able to estimate the level of CTXII in 25 µL aliquots of bovine synovial fluid; and under controlled conditions, this estimate was unaffected by synovial fluid viscosity. Following in vitro testing, anti-CTXII particles were tested in a rat monoiodoacetate model of knee OA. CTXII could be magnetically captured from a rodent stifle without the need to aspirate fluid and showed 10 fold changes in CTXII levels from OA-affected joints relative to contralateral control joints. Combined, these data demonstrate the ability and sensitivity of magnetic capture for post-mortem analysis of OA biomarkers in the rat. PMID:26136062

  8. Canine intrathoracic sarcoma with ultrastructural characteristics of human synovial sarcoma - case report.

    PubMed

    Lovell, Ser; Burchell, R K; Roady, P J; Fredrickson, R L; Gal, A

    2017-08-16

    Canine joint sarcomas, designated synovial sarcomas, are uncommon malignant mesenchymal neoplasms that occur in the large joints of the extremities of middle-aged, large-breed dogs. We report the diagnosis of an intrathoracic sarcoma with ultrastructural characteristics reminiscent of human synovial sarcoma in a dog. A 7-year-old female spayed Tibetan terrier crossbred dog was presented for acute severe labored breathing and diagnosed with an intrathoracic neoplastic mass. The neoplasm resulted in the accumulation of substantial amounts of viscous pleural fluid that led to dyspnea. The neoplastic mass consisted of interweaving bundles of large pleomorphic mesenchymal cells, supported by an alcian blue positive myxomatous matrix. The neoplastic cells were immunohistochemically negative for cytokeratin and CD18. Transmission electron microscopy indicated that the neoplastic cells had desmosome junctions, short microvilli-like structures and ample amounts of rough endoplasmic reticulum resembling type B-like synoviocytes and synovial sarcoma as reported in people. Despite complete surgical excision of the neoplastic mass, clinical signs recurred after a month and led to the euthanasia of the dog. Currently, there are no immunohistochemical markers specific for synovial sarcoma. Canine neoplasms with transmission electron microscopy characteristics resembling type B-like synoviocytes should be considered similar to the human sarcomas that carry the specific translocations between chromosomes X and 18.

  9. Pulmonary synovial sarcoma with polypoid endobronchial growth: a case report, immunohistochemical and cytogenetic study.

    PubMed

    Niwa, Hideki; Masuda, Shinji; Kobayashi, Chikashi; Oda, Yoshinao

    2004-08-01

    A rare case of primary pulmonary synovial sarcoma with polypoid endobronchial growth in a 42-year-old Japanese woman is described. Left upper sleeve lobectomy was performed for the polypoid tumor measuring 2.5 cm in the left major bronchus and the patient was treated with adjuvant chemotherapy. Three years later, a recurrent tumor was discovered. Microscopically, this tumor was characterized by a proliferation of oval to spindle-shaped cells arranged in sheets and fascicles and covered by the thin normal bronchial epithelium. Immunohistochemically, tumor cells were positive for vimentin, and focally positive for pancytokeratin recognized by AE1/AE3, cytokeratin 7 and epithelial membrane antigen. A chimera gene, SYT-SSX1, was detected. Recently, primary pulmonary synovial sarcoma is an increasingly recognized clinical entity; however, most of these tumors present as a parenchymal mass. The present case is a unique example of primary synovial sarcoma of endobronchial polypoid type. This case suggests that pulmonary synovial sarcoma might originate from bronchial submucosal stromal tissue.

  10. HDAC and Proteasome Inhibitors Synergize to Activate Pro-Apoptotic Factors in Synovial Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Barrott, Jared J.; Yao, Ren Jie; Poulin, Neal M.; Brodin, Bertha A.; Jones, Kevin B.; Underhill, T. Michael; Nielsen, Torsten O.

    2017-01-01

    Conventional cytotoxic therapies for synovial sarcoma provide limited benefit, and no drugs specifically targeting its driving SS18-SSX fusion oncoprotein are currently available. Patients remain at high risk for early and late metastasis. A high-throughput drug screen consisting of over 900 tool compounds and epigenetic modifiers, representing over 100 drug classes, was undertaken in a panel of synovial sarcoma cell lines to uncover novel sensitizing agents and targetable pathways. Top scoring drug categories were found to be HDAC inhibitors and proteasomal targeting agents. We find that the HDAC inhibitor quisinostat disrupts the SS18-SSX driving protein complex, thereby reestablishing expression of EGR1 and CDKN2A tumor suppressors. In combination with proteasome inhibition, HDAC inhibitors synergize to decrease cell viability and elicit apoptosis. Quisinostat inhibits aggresome formation in response to proteasome inhibition, and combination treatment leads to elevated endoplasmic reticulum stress, activation of pro-apoptotic effector proteins BIM and BIK, phosphorylation of BCL-2, increased levels of reactive oxygen species, and suppression of tumor growth in a murine model of synovial sarcoma. This study identifies and provides mechanistic support for a particular susceptibility of synovial sarcoma to the combination of quisinostat and proteasome inhibition. PMID:28056055

  11. Cricoarytenoid Articulation in Elderly Japanese With Special Reference to Morphology of the Synovial Tissue.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto-Hirano, Ai; Honkura, Yohei; Shibata, Shunichi; Abe, Shin-ichi; Murakami, Gen; Katori, Yukio

    2016-03-01

    To clarify composite fibers and cells in the synovial tissues of the cricoarytenoid joint (CA joint). Routine histology and immunohistrochemistry using sagittal or nearly sagittal sections obtained from 18 elderly cadaveric specimens. The CA joint capsule was thin and contained few elastic fibers. A limited supportive ligament, namely, a thickened fascia of the posterior cricoarytenoid muscles, was sometimes evident on the lateral aspect of the CA joint. However, even in the weaker medial aspect of the joint, no marked destruction of the synovial tissues was found. The CA joint always contained synovial folds--a short medial fold and long lateral folds--but these contained no or few macrophages, lymphocytes, and blood capillaries. In 2 exceptional specimens showing inflammatory cell infiltration in the submucosal tissue of the larynx, the macrophage-rich area extended toward the capsule and medial synovial fold. The lateral aspect of the CA joint was likely to be supported mechanically by the muscle-associated tissues. Strong support of the arytenoid by muscles might reduce the degree of CA joint injury with age. However, some patients with hoarseness due to mucosal inflammation of the larynx might have accompanying synovitis and subsequent cartilage injury in the CA joint. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Localization of /sup 99m/Tc methylene disphosphonate within synovial fluid in osteosarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sandler, M.S.; Heyman, S.; Watts, H.

    1984-08-01

    Extraosseous uptake of /sup 99m/Tc phosphate bone scanning agents has been reported in a wide variety of lesions, including malignant effusions. A case of uptake of bone scanning agent within synovial fluid in a joint involved with osteosarcoma is reported.

  13. Diagnosis and surgical management of intraspinal synovial cysts: report of 19 cases

    PubMed Central

    Trummer, M; Flaschka, G; Tillich, M; Homann, C; Unger, F; Eustacchio, S

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—Synovial cysts of the vertebral facet joints are a source of nerve root compression. Different surgical procedures are in use, but no consensus has been formed so far as to which method should be used in synovial cysts. To clarify the role of surgical management, the efficacy of operative procedures and factors influencing the outcome in our own series of 19 patients treated between 1994and 1998 were analysed.
METHODS—Nineteen patients with a mean age of 65 years underwent surgery for medically intractable radicular pain or neurological deficits caused by synovial cysts. The patients' records were retrospectively analysed for neurological deficits, cysts diameter, operative approach, segmental hypermobility, and clinical outcome; CT and MRI were analysed for additional degenerative changes.
RESULTS—In 17 patients an excellent result and in two patients a good postoperative result was achieved. Twelve patients were found to have hypermobility of the facet joints and six had spondylolisthesis. There was no correlation between cyst diameter, operative approach, and outcome. No intraoperative or postoperative complications occurred.
CONCLUSIONS—Age and hypermobility may play a part in the aetiology of facet joint synovial cysts. As all operative strategies showed equally good clinical outcome, total excision via a small flavectomy as the least invasive approach should be considered therapy of choice in patients with cysts causing neurological deficits.

 PMID:11118251

  14. Raman spectroscopy of dried synovial fluid droplets as a rapid diagnostic for knee joint damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esmonde-White, Karen A.; Mandair, Gurjit S.; Raaii, Farhang; Roessler, Blake J.; Morris, Michael D.

    2008-02-01

    Human synovial fluid droplets were investigated using drop deposition in combination with Raman spectroscopy. Following informed consent, synovial fluid was obtained from forty human patients with various severities of knee pain and/or osteoarthritis at the time of knee arthroscopy or total joint replacement. Synovial fluid was aspirated from the knee joint of each patient and stored at -80°C until examination by near-infrared Raman spectroscopy. Synovial fluid aspirates from the knee joint of each patient were deposited onto a clean fused silica microscope slide and the droplet dried under ambient laboratory conditions. Each droplet was illuminated by a line-focused or a ring-focused 785 nm laser. As the droplet dries, biofluid components segregated based on solubility differences and a deposit that is spatially heterogeneous was made. Spectra taken from the droplet edges and center were dominated by protein bands and showed the presence of at least two protein moieties in the droplet. Band area and band height ratios (1410 cm -1/1450 cm -1) showed the greatest change between specimens from patients with mild/early osteoarthritis compared to those with severe/late stage osteoarthritis. The greatest differences were found in the center of the droplet, which contains more soluble protein components than the edges.

  15. Interleukin 35 Synovial Fluid Levels Are Associated with Disease Activity of Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Šenolt, Ladislav; Šumová, Barbora; Jandová, Romana; Hulejová, Hana; Mann, Heřman; Pavelka, Karel; Vencovský, Jiří; Filková, Mária

    2015-01-01

    To study the association of systemic and local interleukin-35 (IL-35) levels in rheumatoid arthritis. 37 patients with treatment naïve early RA, 49 with established RA and 29 control patients with osteoarthritis (OA) were studied. Serum and paired synovial fluid samples were analysed for IL-35. Disease activity of RA patients was assessed according to the 28-Joint Count Disease Activity Score (DAS28). The levels of serum IL-35 were significantly higher in patients with treatment naïve early RA compared to those with established disease and control OA subjects. In addition, serum levels of IL-35 significantly decreased 12 weeks after initiation of glucocorticoids and conventional synthetic disease modifying antirheumatic drugs in patients with treatment naïve early RA. Synovial fluid IL-35 levels were significantly higher in RA compared to OA patients, were significantly elevated compared to serum counterparts and correlated with synovial fluid leukocyte count (r=0.412; p<0.01), serum CRP levels (r=0.362; p<0.05) and DAS28 (r=0.430, p<0.01). This is the first study showing elevated circulating levels of IL-35 in treatment naïve early RA, its significant decrease after treatment initiation and positive association between increased synovial fluid IL-35 and disease activity in patients with long-lasting RA.

  16. Orally incoculated Salmonella typhimurium is detected in the lymph nodes and synovial fluid of swine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Salmonella is a foodborne pathogen that has been associated with illnesses from the consumption of meat products. Traditional carcass sampling techniques fail to account for contamination via atypical carcass reservoirs such as lymph nodes and synovial fluid that may harbor Salmonella. In this two-p...

  17. Global and targeted metabolomics of synovial fluid discovers special osteoarthritis metabolites.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Kaidi; Shen, Nianhan; Chen, Huaijun; Ni, Shanmin; Zhang, Tingting; Hu, Mengting; Wang, Jianguang; Sun, Li; Yang, Xinyu

    2017-09-01

    To identify special metabolites in synovial fluid of osteoarthritis (OA) via a metabolomics approach. Synovial fluid of 35 participants (25 OA patients and 10 controls) was detected by GC-TOF/MS and multivariate data analysis was applied to analyze correlation among the observations. Different metabolites were screened by VIP value (VIP > 1), student t-test (p < 0.05), and fold change (fold >1.5), and verified with the standard metabolites in the synovial fluid of 24 OA patients and 11 controls by LC/MS. The classification performance of different metabolites was analyzed by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. The results showed that six different metabolites (glutamine, 1,5-anhydroglucitol, gluconic lactone, tyramine, threonine, and 8-aminocaprylic acid) were strongly associated with OA in global metabolomics. Verified results of the first three metabolites were the same as the identified results using targeted metabolomics. ROC curve analysis demonstrated that their concentrations in synovial fluid were strongly correlated to OA. In addition, the concentrations of gluconic lactone were significantly different between OA and RA. Metabolites with altered levels may be contributors to OA pathogenesis and can be used as potential diagnosis criteria for OA. Gluconic lactone may prove to be a novel criterion for differential diagnosis of OA from RA. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:1973-1981, 2017. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Effect of Toll-Like Receptor 4 on Synovial Injury of Temporomandibular Joint in Rats Caused by Occlusal Interference

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Jingjing; Yang, Yingying; Sun, Shuzhen; Xie, Jianli; Lin, Xuefen; Ji, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Synovitis is an important disease that causes intractable pain in TMJ. Some investigations suggested that the increasing expression of IL-1β secreted by synovial lining cells plays an important role in synovial inflammation and cartilage destruction in TMJ. In our previous research, the results demonstrated that TLR4 is involved in the expression of IL-1β in SFs from TMJ with lipopolysaccharide stimulation. However, the inflammatory response that occurred in synovial membrane is not caused by bacterial infection. In the current study, we investigated whether or not TLR4 participates in the inflammatory responses and the expression of IL-1β in synovial membrane of rats induced by occlusal interference. The results showed that obvious inflammation changes were observed in the synovial membranes and the expression of TLR4 and IL-1β was increased at both mRNA and protein levels in the occlusal interference rats. In addition, the inflammation reactions and the increased expression of IL-1β could be restrained by treatment with TAK-242, a blocker of TLR4 signaling. The results prompted us that the activation of TLR4 may be involved in the inflammatory reactions and increased expression of IL-1β in patients with synovitis and participate in the mechanisms of the initiation and development of synovial injury by regulating the expression of inflammatory mediators like IL-1β in synovial membranes. PMID:27413256

  19. Discoidin domain receptor 2 is associated with the increased expression of matrix metalloproteinase-13 in synovial fibroblasts of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Su, Jin; Yu, Jiangtian; Ren, Tingting; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Yuanqiang; Liu, Xinping; Sun, Tiezheng; Lu, Houshan; Miyazawa, Keiji; Yao, Libo

    2009-10-01

    Regulation of matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) by collagen matrix in the synovial fibroblasts of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is critical event in the progressive joint destruction. Our previous study indicated that a collagen receptor, discoidin receptor 2 (DDR2), was highly expressed in the synovial fibroblasts of RA. However, the functional role of DDR2 in the regulation of MMP-13 production in synovial fibroblasts has not been elucidated. In this study, we initially demonstrated that the DDR2 and MMP-13 proteins are both highly expressed in the synovial lining layer of RA. MMP-13 mRNA and protein in synovial fibroblasts of RA were preferentially induced by collagen type II compared with MMP-1. Furthermore, stable overexpression of wild type DDR2 in murine synoviocytes dramatically augments the production of MMP-13. The activation of DDR2 also mediates the up-regulation of MMP-13 promoter activity in 293T cells. Inhibitor specific for extracellular signal-regulated kinase mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK MAPK) cascade was shown to decrease MMP-13 level induced by collagen II in RA synovial fibroblasts and DDR2-induced MMP-13 promoter activity. Runx2 and activator protein-1 (AP-1) binding sites in MMP-13 promoter region are required for DDR2-induced transcription. The data in this study suggest that DDR2-mediated MMP-13 induction by collagen matrix in synovial fibroblasts of RA contributed to articular cartilage destruction.

  20. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis: bacterial diversity in temporomandibular joint synovial fluid in comparison with immunological and clinical findings.

    PubMed

    Olsen-Bergem, H; Kristoffersen, A K; Bjørnland, T; Reseland, J E; Aas, J A

    2016-03-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) involvement in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) occurs in up to 80% of affected children. The purpose of this study was to investigate the presence of bacterial DNA in synovial fluid, and to compare this with clinical and immunological findings in children with JIA, adults with persistent JIA, and adults with rheumatoid arthritis, in order to detect whether bacteria contribute to inflammation in TMJ arthritis. Synovial fluid and skin swab samples were collected from 30 patients (54 TMJs). Bacterial detection was performed using 16S rRNA pyrosequencing. Bacterial DNA was detected in 31 TMJs (57%) in 19 patients (63%). A positive statistically significant correlation was registered between bacterial DNA detected in TMJ synovial fluid and the following factors: total protein concentration in synovial fluid, interleukin 1β, tumour necrosis factor alpha, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and adiponectin, as well as the duration of the general medical disease. Fourteen different bacterial species were detected in synovial fluid. Bacterial DNA in TMJ synovial fluid without contamination was detected in more than 50% of the patients. Studies are needed to evaluate the consequences of this bacterial DNA in synovial fluid with regard to TMJ arthritis.

  1. Amyloid arthropathy associated with multiple myeloma: polyarthritis without synovial infiltration of CD20+ or CD38+ cells.

    PubMed

    Pessler, Frank; Ogdie, Alexis R; Mayer, Christian T; Kretzschmar, Warren W; Dai, Lie; Elsaman, Ahmed M; Einhorn, Eugene; Krenn, Veit; Schumacher, H Ralph

    2014-03-01

    To describe histological, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural features of synovial biopsies of amyloid arthropathy associated with multiple myeloma (MM). Synovial biopsies from affected joints of two patients with MM and amyloid arthropathy were examined with light and electron microscopy, and immunohistochemically for expression of CD3, CD8, CD20, CD38, CD68, Ki-67 and vWF. Results were compared to values from osteoarthritis (OA, n = 26), rheumatoid arthritis (RA, n = 24) and normal (n = 15) synovial membranes. There was no or only mild lining hyperplasia. Vascular density was not elevated, and there were few Ki-67+ proliferating cells in the stroma. The Krenn synovitis score classified one specimen as "low-grade" and one as "high-grade" synovitis. CD68+ and CD3+ cells were the predominant mononuclear inflammatory cells, whereas CD20+ and CD38+ cells were absent from both synovial membrane and synovial fluid sediment. Electron microscopy demonstrated amyloid phagocytosis by synovial macrophages. In hierarchical clustering the two amyloid arthropathy specimens were more closely related to OA than to RA or normal synovium. This first detailed immunohistological analysis of MM-associated amyloid arthropathy suggests that it is a chronic synovitis that evolves despite the loss of humoral immunity seen in advanced MM. Instead, amyloid phagocytosis by synovial macrophages likely triggers and perpetuates local disease.

  2. Are serum amyloid A or D-lactate useful to diagnose synovial contamination or sepsis in horses?

    PubMed

    Robinson, Claire S; Singer, Ellen R; Piviani, Martina; Rubio-Martinez, Luis M

    2017-08-01

    Synovial sepsis in horses is life threatening and accurate diagnosis allowing prompt treatment is warranted. This study assessed the diagnostic value of serum amyloid A (SAA) and D-lactate in blood and synovial fluid (SF) as diagnostic markers of synovial sepsis in horses and correlated them with total nucleated cell count (TNCC), percentage of neutrophils (%N) and total protein (TP) in SF. Blood and SF SAA and D-lactate concentrations were determined in a case-control observational study including 112 horses (38 with synovial contamination or sepsis (SCS), 66 with non-septic intra-synovial pathology (NSISP) and 8 controls). Blood and SF SAA were significantly higher in SCS than in NSISP and control horses. SAA values were similar in NSISP and control horses. SF SAA was moderately correlated with synovial TNCC, TP and blood SAA. Blood and SF SAA were 82.4 per cent and 80 per cent sensitive and 88.9 per cent and 73 per cent specific for diagnosis of SCS, with cut-off values of 60.7 and 1.14 µg/ml, respectively. Blood and SF D-lactate concentrations were not significantly different between groups. This study shows that blood and SF SAA concentrations can aid to distinguish SCS from non-septic synovial pathology; however, D-lactate was not useful. © British Veterinary Association (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  3. Clitoria ternatea flower petals: Effect on TNFR1 neutralization via downregulation of synovial matrix metalloproteases.

    PubMed

    Adhikary, Rana; Sultana, Sahin; Bishayi, Biswadev

    2017-08-19

    Clitoria ternatea Linn. (C. ternatea) is a traditionally used herb in arthritis, and its anti-arthritic activity has been attributed to polyphenols (e.g. quercetins) from its flower petal. The present study was designed to investigate whether C. ternatea or quercetin-3ß-D-glucoside (QG) support the antibody mediated TNFα-receptor 1 (TNFR1) neutralization to ameliorate arthritis in mice. Development of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in male Swiss mice (20-22g, 3-4 weeks of age) was followed by estimation of synovial polymorphonuclear cell (PMN) accumulation (in terms of myeloperoxidase activity), synovial and systemic release of cytokines, chemokines and C-reactive protein (CRP) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), biochemical estimation of synovial free radical generation and antioxidant status, as well as immunoblot assessment of synovial TNFR1, toll-like receptor 2(TLR2), cyclooxygenase-2(COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression; and zymographic analysis of synovial matrix-metalloprotease-2 (MMP-2) activity. CIA was induced from day 2 post-secondary immunizations as evidenced from arthritic scores and joint swelling in parallel to increased inflammatory and oxidative stress parameters in synovial joints. Long term supplementation with extract from Clitoria ternatea flower petals CTE (50mg/kg) and QG (2.5mg/kg) upto 24 days post booster immunization augmented anti-arthritic potential of TNFR1 neutralization with anti-TNFR1 antibody (10μg per mice) in terms of reduced MPO activity, decrease in release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, reactive oxygen species (ROS)/ reactive nitrogen species (RNS) production in parallel to significant (p<0.05) reduction in TNFR1, TLR2, iNOS, COX-2 and MMP-2 expression. CTE and QG possess potential anti-arthritic activity which targets synovial MMP-2 in arthritic joints and TNFR1 targeting followed by CTE or QG treatment might become a combinatorial approach in future therapeutic research in

  4. [Analysis of factors related to the number of mesenchymal stem cells derived from synovial fluid of the temporomandibular joint].

    PubMed

    Sun, Y P; Zheng, Y H; Zhang, Z G

    2017-06-09

    Objective: To analyze related factors on the number of mesenchymal stem cells in the synovial fluid of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) and provide an research basis for understanding of the source and biological role of mesenchymal stem cells derived from synovial fluid in TMJ. Methods: One hundred and twenty-two synovial fluid samples from 91 temporomandibular disorders (TMD) patients who visited in Department of TMJ Center, Guanghua School of Stomatology, Hospital of Stomatology, Sun Yat-sen University from March 2013 to December 2013 were collected in this study, and 6 TMJ synovial fluid samples from 6 normal volunteers who were studying in the North Campus of Sun Yat-sen University were also collected, so did their clinical information. Then the relation between the number of mesenchymal stem cells derived from synovial fluid and the health status of the joints, age of donor, disc perforation, condylar bony destruction, blood containing and visual analogue scale score of pain were investigated using Mann-Whitney U test and Spearman rank correlation test. Results: The number of mesenchymal stem cells derived from synovial fluid had no significant relation with visual analogue scale score of pain (r=0.041, P=0.672), blood containing (P=0.063), condylar bony destruction (P= 0.371). Linear correlation between the number of mesenchymal stem cells derived from synovial fluid and age of donor was very week (r=0.186, P=0.043). The number of mesenchymal stem cells up-regulated when the joint was in a disease state (P=0.001). The disc perforation group had more mesenchymal stem cells in synovial fluid than without disc perforation group (P=0.042). Conclusions: The number of mesenchymal stem cells derived from synovial fluid in TMJ has no correlation with peripheral blood circulation and condylar bony destruction, while has close relation with soft tissue structure damage of the joint.

  5. Synovial expression of IL-15 in rheumatoid arthritis is not influenced by blockade of tumour necrosis factor

    PubMed Central

    Ernestam, Sofia; af Klint, Erik; Catrina, Anca Irinel; Sundberg, Erik; Engström, Marianne; Klareskog, Lars; Ulfgren, Ann-Kristin

    2006-01-01

    Blockade of tumour necrosis factor (TNF) is an effective treatment in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but both non-responders and partial responders are quite frequent. This suggests that other pro-inflammatory cytokines may be of importance in the pathogenesis of RA and as possible targets for therapy. In this study we investigated the effect of TNF blockade (infliximab) on the synovial expression of IL-15 in RA in relation to different cell types and expression of other cytokines, to elucidate whether or not IL-15 is a possible target for therapy, independently of TNF blockade. Two arthroscopies with multiple biopsies were performed on nine patients with RA and knee-joint synovitis before and after three infusions of infliximab (3 mg/kg). Synovial biopsies were analysed with immunohistochemistry for expression of IL-15, TNF, IL-1α, IL-1ß and IFN-γ, and for the cell surface markers CD3, CD68 and CD163. Stained synovial biopsy sections were evaluated by computerized image analysis. IL-15 expression was detected in all synovial biopsies taken at baseline. After infliximab therapy, the expression of IL-15 was increased in four patients and reduced in five. Synovial expression of IL-15 was not correlated with any CD marker or with the presence of any other cytokine. Synovial cellularity was decreased after 8 to 10 weeks of treatment with a significant reduction of the CD68-positive synovial cells, whereas no significant change was seen in the number of CD3-positive T cells and CD163-expressing macrophages. The number of TNF-producing cells in the synovial tissue at baseline was correlated with a good response to therapy. Thus, in this study the synovial expression of IL-15 in RA was not consistently influenced by TNF blockade, being apparently independent of TNF expression in the synovium. Consequently, we propose that IL-15 should remain as a therapeutic target in RA, regardless of the response to TNF blockade. PMID:16507118

  6. Synovial chemokine expression and relationship with knee symptoms in patients with meniscal tears

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Anjali; Gan, Justin; Bush-Joseph, Charles; Verma, Nikhil; Tetreault, Matthew W.; Saha, Kanta; Margulis, Arkady; Fogg, Louis; Scanzello, Carla R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective In patients with knee OA, synovitis is associated with knee pain and symptoms. We previously identified synovial mRNA expression of a set of chemokines (CCL19, IL-8, CCL5, XCL-1, CCR7) associated with synovitis in patients with meniscal tears but without radiographic OA. CCL19 and CCR7 were also associated with knee symptoms. This study sought to validate expression of these chemokines and association with knee symptoms in more typical patients presenting for meniscal arthroscopy, many who have pre-existing OA. Design Synovial biopsies and fluid (SF) were collected from patients undergoing meniscal arthroscopy. Synovial mRNA expression was measured using quantitative RT-PCR. The Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) was administered preoperatively. Regression analyses determined if associations between chemokine mRNA levels and KOOS scores were independent of other factors including radiographic OA. CCL19 in SF was measured by ELISA, and compared to patients with advanced knee OA and asymptomatic organ donors. Results 90% of patients had intra-operative evidence of early cartilage degeneration. CCL19, IL-8, CCL5, XCL1, CCR7 transcripts were detected in all patients. Synovial CCL19 mRNA levels independently correlated with KOOS Activities of Daily Living scores (95% CI [-8.071, -0.331], p= 0.036), indicating higher expression was associated with more knee-related dysfunction. SF CCL19 was detected in 7 of 10 patients, compared to 4 of 10 asymptomatic donors. Conclusion In typical patients presenting for meniscal arthroscopy, synovial CCL19 mRNA expression was associated with knee-related difficulty with activities of daily living, independent of other factors including presence of radiographic knee OA. PMID:25724256

  7. Synovial Fluid Response to Extensional Flow: Effects of Dilution and Intermolecular Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Haward, Simon J.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a microfluidic cross-slot device is used to examine the extensional flow response of diluted porcine synovial fluid (PSF) samples using flow-induced birefringence (FIB) measurements. The PSF sample is diluted to 10× 20× and 30× its original mass in a phosphate-buffered saline and its FIB response measured as a function of the strain rate at the stagnation point of the cross-slots. Equivalent experiments are also carried out using trypsin-treated PSF (t-PSF) in which the protein content is digested away using an enzyme. The results show that, at the synovial fluid concentrations tested, the protein content plays a negligible role in either the fluid's bulk shear or extensional flow behaviour. This helps support the validity of the analysis of synovial fluid HA content, either by microfluidic or by other techniques where the synovial fluid is first diluted, and suggests that the HA and protein content in synovial fluid must be higher than a certain minimum threshold concentration before HA-protein or protein-protein interactions become significant. However a systematic shift in the FIB response as the PSF and t-PSF samples are progressively diluted indicates that HA-HA interactions remain significant at the concentrations tested. These interactions influence FIB-derived macromolecular parameters such as the relaxation time and the molecular weight distribution and therefore must be minimized for the best validity of this method as an analytical technique, in which non-interaction between molecules is assumed. PMID:24651529

  8. Synovial fluid response to extensional flow: effects of dilution and intermolecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Haward, Simon J

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a microfluidic cross-slot device is used to examine the extensional flow response of diluted porcine synovial fluid (PSF) samples using flow-induced birefringence (FIB) measurements. The PSF sample is diluted to 10× 20× and 30× its original mass in a phosphate-buffered saline and its FIB response measured as a function of the strain rate at the stagnation point of the cross-slots. Equivalent experiments are also carried out using trypsin-treated PSF (t-PSF) in which the protein content is digested away using an enzyme. The results show that, at the synovial fluid concentrations tested, the protein content plays a negligible role in either the fluid's bulk shear or extensional flow behaviour. This helps support the validity of the analysis of synovial fluid HA content, either by microfluidic or by other techniques where the synovial fluid is first diluted, and suggests that the HA and protein content in synovial fluid must be higher than a certain minimum threshold concentration before HA-protein or protein-protein interactions become significant. However a systematic shift in the FIB response as the PSF and t-PSF samples are progressively diluted indicates that HA-HA interactions remain significant at the concentrations tested. These interactions influence FIB-derived macromolecular parameters such as the relaxation time and the molecular weight distribution and therefore must be minimized for the best validity of this method as an analytical technique, in which non-interaction between molecules is assumed.

  9. Elevated factor J levels in synovial fluid from patients with inflammatory arthropathies.

    PubMed

    González-Rubio, C; Saboya-Palero, A; Pascual-Salcedo, D; Balsa, A; Fontán, G; López-Trascasa, M

    1997-12-01

    Factor J (FJ) is a complement inhibitor that is able to regulate in vitro both the classical and alternative human complement pathways. In the search of its biological significance, we have analyzed FJ levels in synovial fluid from patients with different arthropathies, in which IL-6 levels had been previously measured. The pathologies included in this study were: rheumatoid arthritis (RA) (n = 21), crystal deposition diseases (CDD) (n = 6), osteoarthritis (OA) (n = 23), spondyloarthritis (SpA) (n = 3) and other inflammatory arthropathies (OIA) (n = 4). We found a good correlation between IL-6 and FJ levels (r = 0.33, p = 0.0132) in the 57 processed samples. Synovial fluids had high levels of IL-6 (median: 3000 pg/ml). Besides, we found that FJ levels were elevated (241 +/- 429 micrograms/ml) when compared with NHS (5.32 +/- 2.82 micrograms/ml). Considering OA patients as control group for non-inflammatory situation, we found that FJ levels were significantly elevated in inflammatory patients only if RA patients were excluded. Furthermore, there were also significant differences with CDD patients. In addition, we have examined the presence of this inhibitor in synovial fluid by Western blot after running gels at acid pH and electrophoretical transference at the same pH. In these experiments, we evidenced the presence of a cationic protein immunoreactive with polyclonal and monoclonal anti-FJ antibodies. In conclusion, FJ levels are elevated in pathological synovial fluids. FJ could be an acute phase reactant as other molecules present in the synovial fluid, or could be shed from extracellular matrix as a consequence of the high enzymatic activity present in the articular fluid or as a response to the inflammatory stimulus.

  10. Quantitative assessment of the rheumatoid synovial microvascular bed by gadolinium-DTPA enhanced magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Gaffney, K.; Cookson, J.; Blades, S.; Coumbe, A.; Blake, D.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To examine the relation between rate of synovial membrane enhancement, intra-articular pressure (IAP), and histologically determined synovial vascularity in rheumatoid arthritis, using gadolinium-DTPA enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).
METHODS—Dynamic gadolinium-DTPA enhanced MRI was performed in 31 patients with knee synovitis (10 patients IAP study, 21 patients vascular morphometry study). Rate of synovial membrane enhancement was quantified by line profile analysis using the image processing package ANALYZE. IAP was measured using an intra-compartmental pressure monitor system. Multiple synovial biopsy specimens were obtained by a blind biopsy technique. Blood vessels were identified immunohistochemically using the endothelial cell marker QBend30 and quantified (blood vessel numerical density and fractional area).
RESULTS—Median blood vessel numerical density and fractional area were 77.5/mm2 (IQR; 69.3-110.7) and 5.6% (IQR; 3.4-8.5) respectively. The rate of synovial membrane enhancement (median 2.74 signal intensity units/s, IQR 2.0-3.8) correlated with both blood vessel numerical density (r = 0.46, p < 0.05) and blood vessel fractional area (r = 0.55, p < 0.02). IAP did not influence the rate of enhancement.
CONCLUSIONS—Gadolinium-DTPA enhanced MRI may prove to be a valuable technique for evaluating drugs that influence angiogenesis.

 Keywords: magnetic resonance imaging; rheumatoid arthritis; synovitis; vascularity PMID:9640130

  11. Slit3 inhibits Robo3-induced invasion of synovial fibroblasts in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The repellent factor family of Slit molecules has been described to have repulsive function in the developing nervous system on growing axons expressing the Robo receptors. However, until today no data are available on whether these repellent factors are involved in the regulation of synovial fibroblast (SF) activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods mRNA expression in primary synovial fibroblasts was quantified by quantitative reverse transcription PCR and protein expression was measured by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis. Different functional assays were performed with rheumatoid arthritis synovial fibroblasts (RASF): proliferation, migration and a novel in-vitro cartilage destruction assay. Results First, we found increased expression of Robo3 expression in RASF compared to normal SF. Interestingly, analysis of data from a recently published genome-wide association study suggests a contribution of ROBO3 gene polymorphisms to susceptibility of RA. Functional assays performed with RASF revealed induction of migration and cartilage destruction by Robo3 and increased matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)1 and MMP3 expression. Treatment of RASF in early passages with Slit3 led to inhibition of migration whereas RASF in later passages, having reduced Robo3 expression in cell culture, were not inhibited by Slit3 treatment. Here, reduction of Robo3 expression from passage 3 to 10 might reflect an important step in losing repulsive activity of Slit3. Conclusions Taken together, our data showed that deregulation of the Robo3 receptor in synovial fibroblasts in RA correlates with aggressiveness of the fibroblasts. Slit3 reduces the migratory activity of synovial cells from patients with RA, potentially by repulsion of the cells in analogy to the neuronal system. Further studies will be necessary to prove Slit activity in vivo. PMID:20298552

  12. Differential proteomic analysis of synovial fluid from rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis are two common musculoskeletal disorders that affect the joints. Despite high prevalence rates, etiological factors involved in these disorders remain largely unknown. Dissecting the molecular aspects of these disorders will significantly contribute to improving their diagnosis and clinical management. In order to identify proteins that are differentially expressed between these two conditions, a quantitative proteomic profiling of synovial fluid obtained from rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis patients was carried out by using iTRAQ labeling followed by high resolution mass spectrometry analysis. Results We have identified 575 proteins out of which 135 proteins were found to be differentially expressed by ≥3-fold in the synovial fluid of rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis patients. Proteins not previously reported to be associated with rheumatoid arthritis including, coronin-1A (CORO1A), fibrinogen like-2 (FGL2), and macrophage capping protein (CAPG) were found to be upregulated in rheumatoid arthritis. Proteins such as CD5 molecule-like protein (CD5L), soluble scavenger receptor cysteine-rich domain-containing protein (SSC5D), and TTK protein kinase (TTK) were found to be upregulated in the synovial fluid of osteoarthritis patients. We confirmed the upregulation of CAPG in rheumatoid arthritis synovial fluid by multiple reaction monitoring assay as well as by Western blot. Pathway analysis of differentially expressed proteins revealed a significant enrichment of genes involved in glycolytic pathway in rheumatoid arthritis. Conclusions We report here the largest identification of proteins from the synovial fluid of rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis patients using a quantitative proteomics approach. The novel proteins identified from our study needs to be explored further for their role in the disease pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. Sartaj Ahmad and Raja Sekhar Nirujogi

  13. Staphylococcal Enterotoxin A Detection from Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients' Blood and Synovial Fluid.

    PubMed

    Ataee, Ramezan Ali; Kahani, Mahboobeh Sadat; Alishiri, Gholam Hossein; Ahamadi, Zyenab

    2016-02-01

    Direct detection of microbial super antigens in synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis may be able to guide to the design of cost-effective therapies. The purpose of this study was to assess the existence of Staphylococcal enterotoxin A (superantigen A) in the synovial fluid of patients with RA by the PCR and ELISA methods. This experimental study was conducted on the synovial fluid of 103 RA patients from Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences' Rheumatology Clinic in Tehran, Iran in 2011-2014. Bacterial cultures, polymerase chain reaction with specific primer pairs and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods were used. The PCR products were subjected to sequence as a confirmatory molecular method results. The data were descriptively analyzed by SPSS Version 19. The bacteriological study result indicated that, in four cases (3.8%) of the patients, bacterial strains were isolated. The result of PCR molecular method for staphylococcal enterotoxin A gene showed that, 42 of the patients (40.7%) tested positive for the ent A gene. The results of ELISA were positive for staphylococcal enterotoxin A (superantigen A) in 51 cases (49.51%) of the patients' synovial fluids. The results indicated that the possibility of detecting superantigen A in the SF of RA patients, but the origin of the enterotoxin A gene remained unknown. The findings of this study may be able to alter the actual theory on the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of RA patients. In addition, the results have shown the probability of an endogenous origin for the involved superantigen A in RA patients' synovial fluids.

  14. Local fibroblast proliferation but not influx is responsible for synovial hyperplasia in a murine model of rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuo, Yusuke; Mizoguchi, Fumitaka; Saito, Tetsuya; Kawahata, Kimito; Ueha, Satoshi; Matsushima, Kouji; Inagaki, Yutaka; Miyasaka, Nobuyuki; Kohsaka, Hitoshi

    2016-02-12

    Synovial fibroblasts play crucial roles in inflammation and joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). How they accumulate in the RA joints remains unclear. This study was conducted to discern whether cellular influx from the outside of the joints and local proliferation are responsible for synovial fibroblast accumulation in an animal model of RA. We found that synovial fibroblasts were identified as GFP+ cells using collagen type I alpha 2 (Col1a2)-GFP transgenic reporter mice. Then, bone marrow transplantation and parabiosis techniques were utilized to study the cellular influx. Irradiated wild-type mice were transplanted with bone marrow from Col1a2-GFP mice. Col1a2-GFP and wild-type mice were conjoined for parabiosis. The transplanted mice and the parabionts were subjected to collagen antibody-induced arthritis (CAIA). We found no GFP+ cells in the hyperplastic synovial tissues from the transplanted mice with CAIA and from the wild-type parabionts with CAIA. Furthermore, normal and CAIA synovial tissues from Col1a2-GFP mice and from fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (Fucci) transgenic mice, in which cells in S/G{sub 2}/M phases of the cell cycle express Azami-Green, were studied for Ki67, a cellular proliferation marker, and vimentin, a fibroblast marker, expression. The percentages of Ki67+/GFP+ and Azami-Green+/vimentin+ cells in the CAIA synovial tissues were higher than those in the untreated synovial tissues (34% vs. 0.40% and 19% vs. 0.26%, respectively). These findings indicate that local fibroblast proliferation but not cellular influx is responsible for the synovial hyperplasia in CAIA. Suppression of proliferation of the local synovial fibroblasts should be a promising treatment for RA. - Highlights: • We studied how synovial fibroblasts accumulate in joints in a murine model of RA. • Bone marrow-derived cells did not accumulate in arthritic joints. • Synovial fibroblasts did not accumulate in arthritic joints via

  15. A Rare Sequela of Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Kodadhala, Vijay; Kurukumbi, Mohankumar; Jayam-Trouth, Annapurni

    2014-01-01

    Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis is a demyelinating disease, typically occurring in children following a febrile infection or a vaccination. Primary and secondary immune responses contribute to inflammation and subsequent demyelination, but the exact pathogenesis is still unknown. Diagnosis of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis is strongly suggested by temporal relationship between an infection or an immunization and the onset of neurological symptoms. Biopsy is definitive. In general, the disease is self-limiting and the prognostic outcome is favorable with anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive agents. Locked-in syndrome describes patients who are awake and conscious but have no means of producing limb, speech, or facial movements. Locked-in syndrome is a rare complication of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. We present a case of incomplete locked-in syndrome occurring in a 34-year-old male secondary to acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. Our case is unique, as acute disseminated encephalomyelitis occurred in a 34-year-old which was poorly responsive to immunosuppression resulting in severe disability. PMID:24977089

  16. Reaching standards for dissemination: a case study.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Helen; Griffiths, Kathleen

    2007-01-01

    At what stage are web applications ready for dissemination? A set of standards for efficacy, effectiveness and readiness for dissemination of (prevention) interventions has been developed by the Society for Prevention Research (SPR) (Flay et al., 2005) [1]. In this case study paper, we examine these standards criteria with reference to MoodGYM, an automated web application designed to reduce depression symptoms using cognitive behaviour therapy training. We examine evidence for its efficacy, its effectiveness in real world situations, and its capacity to meet recommended standards for dissemination. We conclude that MoodGYM has substantially met the standards of evidence required for dissemination. This successful application of the SPR standards to the evaluation of a web application, suggests that these prevention standards might be usefully applied to web/Internet context. Web applications might be assessed for dissemination by the International Society for Research into Internet Interventions (ISRII), or some other professional organization to assist policy makers in making decisions about the funding, adoption and promotion of applications.

  17. Comprehensive analysis of information dissemination in disasters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, N.; Huang, H.; Su, Boni

    2016-11-01

    China is a country that experiences a large number of disasters. The number of deaths caused by large-scale disasters and accidents in past 10 years is around 900,000. More than 92.8 percent of these deaths could be avoided if there were an effective pre-warning system deployed. Knowledge of the information dissemination characteristics of different information media taking into consideration governmental assistance (information published by a government) in disasters in urban areas, plays a critical role in increasing response time and reducing the number of deaths and economic losses. In this paper we have developed a comprehensive information dissemination model to optimize efficiency of pre-warning mechanics. This model also can be used for disseminating information for evacuees making real-time evacuation plans. We analyzed every single information dissemination models for pre-warning in disasters by considering 14 media: short message service (SMS), phone, television, radio, news portals, Wechat, microblogs, email, newspapers, loudspeaker vehicles, loudspeakers, oral communication, and passive information acquisition via visual and auditory senses. Since governmental assistance is very useful in a disaster, we calculated the sensitivity of governmental assistance ratio. The results provide useful references for information dissemination during disasters in urban areas.

  18. Sharing Dissemination Responsibilities: A Guide for Articulating Vocational Education Disseminating Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hull, William L.; Oldsen, Carl F.

    Designed for state vocational education Research Coordinating Units (RCU) personnel who manage dissemination programs, this guide offers suggestions for sharing dissemination responsibility with other state programs. The guide examines the possibilities of integrating activities in a horizontal dimension, i.e., across state educational agency…

  19. Precise time dissemination via portable atomic clocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putkovich, K.

    1982-01-01

    The most precise operational method of time dissemination over long distances presently available to the Precise Time and Time Interval (PTTI) community of users is by means of portable atomic clocks. The Global Positioning System (GPS), the latest system showing promise of replacing portable clocks for global PTTI dissemination, was evaluated. Although GPS has the technical capability of providing superior world-wide dissemination, the question of present cost and future accessibility may require a continued reliance on portable clocks for a number of years. For these reasons a study of portable clock operations as they are carried out today was made. The portable clock system that was utilized by the U.S. Naval Observatory (NAVOBSY) in the global synchronization of clocks over the past 17 years is described and the concepts on which it is based are explained. Some of its capabilities and limitations are also discussed.

  20. Disseminated cutaneous sporotrichosis in an immunocompetent individual.

    PubMed

    Yap, Felix Boon-Bin

    2011-10-01

    Sporotrichosis is a subacute or chronic fungal infection caused by the ubiquitous fungus Sporothrix schenckii. Disseminated cutaneous sporotrichosis is an uncommon entity and is usually present in the immunosuppressed. Here, a case of disseminated cutaneous sporotrichosis in an immunocompetent patient is reported. This 70-year-old healthy woman presented with multiple painful ulcerated nodules on her face and upper and lower extremities of 6-month duration, associated with low-grade fever, night sweats, loss of appetite, and loss of weight. Histopathological examination of the skin biopsy revealed epidermal hyperplasia and granulomatous inflammation in the dermis, with budding yeast. Fungal culture identified S. schenckii. She had total resolution of the lesions after 2 weeks of intravenous amphotericin B and 8 months of oral itraconazole. All investigations for underlying immunosuppression and internal organ involvement were negative. This case reiterates that disseminated cutaneous sporotrichosis, although common in the immunosuppressed, can also be seen in immunocompetent patients.

  1. Public information, dissemination, and behavior analysis

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Edward K.

    1985-01-01

    Behavior analysts have become increasingly concerned about inaccuracies and misconceptions in the public, educational, and professional information portraying their activities, but have done little to correct these views. The present paper has two purposes in this regard. First, the paper describes some of the conditions that have given rise to these concerns. Second, and more important, the paper surveys various procedures and programs for the dissemination of public information that may correct inaccuracies and misconceptions. Special consideration is also given to issues involving (a) the assessment of the problem, (b) the content and means of dissemination, (c) the possible contributions of behavior analysts to current misunderstandings, and (d) relationships between behavior analysts and the media. The dissemination of accurate and unbiased information constitutes an important new undertaking for behavior analysis. The future of the field may depend in part on such activity. PMID:22478623

  2. Dissemination and Exploitation: Project Goals beyond Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, Kristin; Reitz, Anja

    2017-04-01

    Dissemination and Exploitation are essential parts of public funded projects. In Horizon 2020 a plan for the exploitation and dissemination of results (PEDR) is a requirement. The plan should contain a clear vision on the objectives of the project in relation to actions for dissemination and potential exploitation of the project results. The actions follow the basic idea to spread the knowledge and results gathered within the project and face the challenge of how to bring the results into potentially relevant policy circle and how they impact the market. The plan follows the purpose to assess the impact of the project and to address various target groups who are interested in the project results. Simply put, dissemination concentrates on the transfer of knowledge and exploitation on the commercialization of the project. Beyond the question of the measurability of project`s impact, strategies within science marketing can serve purposes beyond internal and external communication. Accordingly, project managers are facing the challenge to implement a dissemination and exploitation strategy that ideally supports the identification of all partners with the project and matches the current discourse of the project`s content within the society, politics and economy. A consolidated plan might unite all projects partners under a central idea and supports the identification with the project beyond the individual research questions. Which applications, strategies and methods can be used to bring forward a PEDR that accompanies a project successfully and allows a comprehensive assessment of the project afterwards? Which hurdles might project managers experience in the dissemination process and which tasks should be fulfilled by the project manager?

  3. Modes of invasion during tumour dissemination.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Pahini; Orgaz, Jose L; Sanz-Moreno, Victoria

    2017-01-01

    Cancer cell migration and invasion underlie metastatic dissemination, one of the major problems in cancer. Tumour cells exhibit a striking variety of invasion strategies. Importantly, cancer cells can switch between invasion modes in order to cope with challenging environments. This ability to switch migratory modes or plasticity highlights the challenges behind antimetastasis therapy design. In this Review, we present current knowledge on different tumour invasion strategies, the determinants controlling plasticity and arising therapeutic opportunities. We propose that targeting master regulators controlling plasticity is needed to hinder tumour dissemination and metastasis. © 2016 The Authors. Published by FEBS Press and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Immunolocalization of keratan sulfate, chondroitin-4-sulfate, and chondroitin-6-sulfate in periprosthetic breast capsules exhibiting synovial metaplasia.

    PubMed

    Raso, D S; Schulte, B A

    1996-07-01

    The distribution of various proteoglycans and basement membrane components within 10 breast capsules with synovial metaplasia was assessed immunohistochemically. Immunoreactive keratan sulfate and chondroitin-4-sulfate were present in many of the synovial metaplasia lining cells, suggesting active secretion of these proteoglycans into the intraprosthetic space. In contrast, chondroitin-6-sulfate was confined to the extracellular matrix of the underlying supporting fibrous capsule. Type IV collagen and laminin were not associated with the synovial metaplasia lining, thus confirming the absence of a basement membrane, as previously indicated by morphologic analysis. As with tendon reconstruction, the development and maintenance of a synovial metaplasia lining that secretes lubricating factors such as proteoglycans may be beneficial for decreased capsular contracture.

  5. Spontaneous recurrent hemarthrosis of the knee joint in elderly patients with osteoarthritis: an infrequent presentation of synovial lipoma arborescens.

    PubMed

    Ji, Jong-Hun; Lee, Yeon-Soo; Shafi, Mohamed

    2010-10-01

    Synovial lipoma arborescens (SLA) is a rare, benign, fat-containing synovial proliferative lesion that is typically known to affect the knee joint in adults, although it has also been described in other joints. SLA usually presents as a painless swelling and recurrent joint effusion, and the laboratory test results, including aspirated synovial fluid, are usually normal. We present here two cases of SLA of the knee, which presented as spontaneous recurrent hemarthroses in elderly patients with osteoarthritis (OA) with bloody aspirated synovial fluid. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and arthroscopic synovectomy suggested the diagnosis of SLA; the histopathologic examination confirmed the diagnosis. One year later, both patients remain symptom-free and report no new episodes of hemarthrosis. We postulate that SLA should be included in the differential diagnosis of patients with recurrent joint effusions with hemarthrosis in elderly patients with OA. The clinical presentation, MRI findings, and treatment of SLA are described, and the entity is briefly reviewed.

  6. Chemerin induces CCL2 and TLR4 in synovial fibroblasts of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Eisinger, Kristina; Bauer, Sabrina; Schäffler, Andreas; Walter, Roland; Neumann, Elena; Buechler, Christa; Müller-Ladner, Ulf; Frommer, Klaus W

    2012-02-01

    Chemerin stimulates migration of leukocytes to sites of inflammation and also increases inflammatory signaling in chondrocytes suggesting a function of chemerin in joint inflammation. Synovial fibroblasts (SF) are critically involved in synovitis and subsequent cartilage destruction. Here, we analyzed whether synovial fibroblasts express chemerin and its receptor CMKLR1. Further, the role of chemerin in synovial fibroblast chemotaxis, proliferation, insulin response and release of inflammatory proteins was studied. Synovial tissue sections were labeled with chemerin antibody and chemerin was measured in synovial fluid by ELISA. Chemerin mRNA and protein as well as CMKLR1 expression were determined in SFs from patients with osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Effects of chemerin on cytokines, chemokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP), and on proliferation, migration and insulin signaling were analyzed appropriately. SFs expressed CMKLR1 and chemerin mRNA, and chemerin protein was found in cell supernatants of synovial fibroblasts. Immunohistochemistry detected chemerin in synovial tissue predominantly localized within the lining layer. Chemerin was present in synovial fluids of RA, OA and psoriatic arthritis patients in similar concentrations. Chemerin neither increased IL-6 levels nor MMP-2 or -9 activity in SFs. Also, it did not act as a chemoattractant for these cells. With respect to intracellular signaling, neither basal nor insulin-mediated phosphorylation of Akt was affected. However, chemerin significantly increased TLR4 mRNA and synthesis of CCL2 in SFs while CCL4 and -5 were not altered. Cell proliferation of SFs, however, was modestly reduced by chemerin. These data show that human SFs express both chemerin and its receptor. As chemerin enhanced expression of TLR4 and induced release of CCL2 in SFs, a role of this protein in innate immune system-associated joint inflammation is proposed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  7. The effect of sodium hyaluronate treating knee osteoarthritis on synovial fluid interleukin -1β and clinical treatment mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yang, Libin; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Guodong

    2015-01-01

    In order to explore the influence of sodium hyaluronate on knee osteoarthritis (KOA) patients synovial fluid interleukin -1β (IL-1β) and analyze its clinical mechanism, this study analyzed 40 cases of KOA patients in our hospital's orthopaedic department, randomly divided them into two groups: Sodium hyaluronate group (group A) and normal saline group (group B), each consists 20 patients. Besides, we selected another 20 patients as normal control group. Group A treated knee joint cavity by injecting sodium hyaluronate, and group B injected knee joint cavity in equal amount of normal saline, once a week for five weeks. Collect respectively knee joint synovial fluid in patients of group A and group B before treatment and after five weeks of treatment, detect the content of knee joint synovial fluid IL-1βin of all the three groups by using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). We can conclude that (1) IL-1β content of knee joint synovial fluid in KOA patients before treatment was significantly higher than healthy people; (2) IL-1β content of group A knee joint synovial fluid after treatment was significantly reduced than before treatment, there was no significant difference for group BIL-1β content before and after treatment; (3) there was no significant difference between group A knee joint synovial fluid IL-1β content after treatment and healthy people. Thus it can be proved that content of IL-1β in knee joint synovial fluid KOA patients is higher than healthy people; sodium hyaluronate can reduce the content of IL-1β in synovial joints and can be effective in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis.

  8. Effects of salmon calcitonin treatment on serum and synovial fluid bone formation and resorption markers in osteoporosis patients.

    PubMed

    Atbinici, Hasan; Sipahioğlu, Serkan; Aksoy, Nurten; Baykara, İslam; Işıkan, Uğur Erdem

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of salmon calcitonin, and calcium and vitamin D treatment on bone mineral density, serum and synovial fluid bone formation and resorption markers in patients with osteoporosis. The study was completed with twenty-five osteoporosis patients divided into two groups: The 15 patients comprising Group I (1 male and 14 females; mean age: 67.0±12.0) were administered calcitonin treatment in addition to calcium and vitamin D. The 10 patients in Group II (3 males and 7 females; mean age 68.0±16.0) were administered calcium and vitamin D only. Serum and synovial fluid calcium phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, calcitonin, C-telopeptide (CTx), N-telopeptide (NTx) and sialoprotein levels, and bone densitometries were determined at the beginning and at the end of one year of treatment. In the calcitonin and calcium and vitamin D treatment group (Group I), femoral neck density scores were decreased and vertebrae scores were increased after one-year treatment. Both scores were increased in the non-calcitonin group (Group II). In Group I, synovial fluid levels of calcitonin, sialoprotein and NTx were decreased, and synovial fluid CTx levels showed no change. The only decrease that was statistically significant was that in calcitonin levels. In Group II, synovial fluid calcitonin levels were decreased, synovial fluid CTx levels were increased and synovial fluid NTx and sialoprotein level were unchanged. These changes were not statistically significant. Serum changes in the parameters were not statistically significant in either group. In osteoporosis, salmon calcitonin treatment affects synovial fluid bone formation and absorption marker levels. Advanced studies are needed to evaluate the mechanisms by which this takes place, and to explain the relationship between osteoporosis and articular cartilage metabolism.

  9. Btk inhibition suppresses agonist-induced human macrophage activation and inflammatory gene expression in RA synovial tissue explants.

    PubMed

    Hartkamp, Linda M; Fine, Jay S; van Es, Inge E; Tang, Man Wai; Smith, Michael; Woods, John; Narula, Satwant; DeMartino, Julie; Tak, Paul P; Reedquist, Kris A

    2015-08-01

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) is required for B lymphocyte and myeloid cell contributions to pathology in murine models of arthritis. Here, we examined the potential contributions of synovial Btk expression and activation to inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Btk was detected by immunohistochemistry and digital image analysis in synovial tissue from biologically naive RA (n=16) and psoriatic arthritis (PsA) (n=12) patients. Cell populations expressing Btk were identified by immunofluorescent double labelling confocal microscopy, quantitative (q-) PCR and immunoblotting. The effects of a Btk-specific inhibitor, RN486, on gene expression in human macrophages and RA synovial tissue explants (n=8) were assessed by qPCR, ELISA and single-plex assays. Btk was expressed at equivalent levels in RA and PsA synovial tissue, restricted to B lymphocytes, monocytes, macrophages and mast cells. RN486 significantly inhibited macrophage IL-6 production induced by Fc receptor and CD40 ligation. RN486 also reduced mRNA expression of overlapping gene sets induced by IgG, CD40 ligand (CD40L) and RA synovial fluid, and significantly suppressed macrophage production of CD40L-induced IL-8, TNF, MMP-1 and MMP-10, LPS-induced MMP-1, MMP-7 and MMP-10 production, and spontaneous production of IL-6, PDGF, CXCL-9 and MMP-1 by RA synovial explants. Btk is expressed equivalently in RA and PsA synovial tissue, primarily in macrophages. Btk activity is needed to drive macrophage activation in response to multiple agonists relevant to inflammatory arthritis, and promotes RA synovial tissue cytokine and MMP production. Pharmacological targeting of Btk may be of therapeutic benefit in the treatment of RA and other inflammatory diseases. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  10. Joint histology in Alligator mississippiensis challenges the identification of synovial joints in fossil archosaurs and inferences of cranial kinesis.

    PubMed

    Bailleul, Alida M; Holliday, Casey M

    2017-03-29

    Archosaurs, like all vertebrates, have different types of joints that allow or restrict cranial kinesis, such as synovial joints and fibrous joints. In general, synovial joints are more kinetic than fibrous joints, because the former possess a fluid-filled cavity and articular cartilage that facilitate movement. Even though there is a considerable lack of data on the microstructure and the structure-function relationships in the joints of extant archosaurs, many functional inferences of cranial kinesis in fossil archosaurs have hinged on the assumption that elongated condylar joints are (i) synovial and/or (ii) kinetic. Cranial joint microstructure was investigated in an ontogenetic series of American alligators, Alligator mississippiensis All the presumably synovial, condylar joints found within the head of the American alligator (the jaw joint, otic joint and laterosphenoid-postorbital (LS-PO) joint) were studied by means of paraffin histology and undecalcified histology paired with micro-computed tomography data to better visualize three-dimensional morphology. Results show that among the three condylar joints of A. mississippiensis, the jaw joint was synovial as expected, but the otherwise immobile otic and LS-PO joints lacked a synovial cavity. Therefore, condylar morphology does not always imply the presence of a synovial articulation nor mobility. These findings reveal an undocumented diversity in the joint structure of alligators and show that crocodylians and birds build novel, kinetic cranial joints differently. This complicates accurate identification of synovial joints and functional inferences of cranial kinesis in fossil archosaurs and tetrapods in general. © 2017 The Author(s).

  11. The FAIR-INNOVATION dissemination project.

    PubMed

    Gormley, R

    2001-08-01

    The goal of the FAIR-INNOVATION dissemination project (FLAIR-FLOW 3) (1997-2000) was to disseminate R&D results from the EU FAIR programme to small and medium-sized food enterprises (SMEs), health professionals (HPs) and consumer groups (CGs) in 19 European countries. The dissemination routes were: (i) one-page technical documents on research results; (ii) their reproduction on the internet; (iii) their reproduction in journals Europe-wide; (iv) workshops on results from EU-supported food research programmes; and (v) lectures and poster presentations by FLAIR-FLOW network personnel. Of the 135 one-pagers produced, 62% were targeted at SMEs, 18% at HPs and 5% at CGs. The remaining 15% were on food safety and were common to the three target groups. There were 1047 publications arising from one-pages in trade journals, and over 8000 requests (paper route) were received for follow-up information. These were in addition to 240 k downloads from the FLAIR-FLOW 3 web site (www.flair-flow.com). Initiatives for HPs included specially collated versions of the one-pagers for major conferences, 20 focused workshops, and interaction with the European Federation of Associations of Dieticians. Currently, dissemination is continuing through FLAIR-FLOW 4 (2001-2003) in 24 countries. FLAIR-FLOW 4 is co-ordinated by M. Jean François Quillien from INRA-CRIAA (FR) at criaa@rennes.inra.fr.

  12. A Primer on Disseminating Applied Quantitative Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Bethany A.; DiStefano, Christine; Morgan, Grant B.

    2010-01-01

    Transparency and replication are essential features of scientific inquiry, yet scientific communications of applied quantitative research are often lacking in much-needed procedural information. In an effort to promote researchers dissemination of their quantitative studies in a cohesive, detailed, and informative manner, the authors delineate…

  13. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis presenting with hypertensive emergency.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Samrat; Das, Mousumi; Bagchi, Nilay Ranjan

    2014-04-01

    We report a 12-year-old girl presenting with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) along with hypertensive emergency. Hypertension persisted for few weeks following recovery and subsided with oral clonidine. Although autonomic instability in ADEM has been reported before, hypertensive emergency was not previously documented as presenting feature of ADEM.

  14. Defining encephalopathy in acute disseminated encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Fridinger, S E; Alper, Gulay

    2014-06-01

    The International Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis Study Group requires the presence of encephalopathy to diagnose acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. Clinical characteristics of encephalopathy are inadequately delineated in the pediatric demyelinating literature. The authors' purpose was to better define encephalopathy in pediatric acute disseminated encephalomyelitis by describing the details of the mental status change. A retrospective chart review was conducted for 25 children diagnosed with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis according to the International Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis Study Group guidelines. Frequency of encephalopathy-defining features was determined. Clinical characteristics, cerebrospinal fluid findings, and electroencephalography (EEG) findings were compared between patients with different stages of encephalopathy. The authors found irritability (36%), sleepiness (52%), confusion (8%), obtundation (20%), and coma (16%) as encephalopathy-defining features in acute disseminated encephalomyelitis. Twenty-eight percent had seizures, and 65% demonstrated generalized slowing on EEG. Approximately half of the patients in this study were diagnosed with encephalopathy based on the presence of irritability and/or sleepiness only. Such features in young children are often subtle and transient and thus difficult to objectively determine.

  15. Factors that Influence Dissemination in Engineering Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazen, B. T.; Wu, Yun; Sankar, C. S.

    2012-01-01

    Although the need for new educational materials and methods in engineering education is increasing, the process of disseminating (making target groups become aware of, accept, and use) these innovations remains a challenge. A literature review shows that few studies have thoroughly investigated this area. The purpose of this article is to identify…

  16. Disseminated intravascular coagulation with Fusobacterium necrophorum septicaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Potter, M. N.; Drysdale, H. C.; Price, P. A.; Buck, A. C.

    1988-01-01

    A 23 year old woman died within six hours of admission from acute disseminated intravascular coagulation. Fusobacterium necrophorum, a Gram negative anaerobic organism, was isolated as a single pathogen from the blood cultures. This association has not previously been reported. PMID:3174529

  17. Indigenous Case of Disseminated Histoplasmosis, Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Chung-Hsu; Huang, Chun-Kai; Chin, Chuen; Yang, Ya-Ting

    2007-01-01

    We report the first indigenous case of disseminated histoplasmosis in Taiwan diagnosed by histopathology of bone marrow, microbiologic morphology, and PCR assay of the isolated fungus. This case suggests that histoplasmosis should be 1 of the differential diagnoses of opportunistic infections in immunocompromised patients in Taiwan. PMID:17370526

  18. A Proposed Framework for Educational Innovation Dissemination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazen, Benjamin T.; Wu, Yun; Sankar, Chetan S.; Jones-Farmer, L. Allison

    2012-01-01

    Although the need for new educational technologies is increasing, the process for disseminating these innovations remains a challenge. A literature review shows that few studies have thoroughly investigated this area. Furthermore, there is no comprehensive framework or coordinated research agenda that may be used to guide such investigation. This…

  19. A Primer on Disseminating Applied Quantitative Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Bethany A.; DiStefano, Christine; Morgan, Grant B.

    2010-01-01

    Transparency and replication are essential features of scientific inquiry, yet scientific communications of applied quantitative research are often lacking in much-needed procedural information. In an effort to promote researchers dissemination of their quantitative studies in a cohesive, detailed, and informative manner, the authors delineate…

  20. Knowledge Management and Global Information Dissemination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umunadi, Ejiwoke Kennedy

    2014-01-01

    The paper looked at knowledge management and global information dissemination. Knowledge is a very powerful tool for survival, growth and development. It can be seen as the information, understanding and skills that you gain through education or experience. The paper was addressed under the following sub-headings: Knowledge management knowledge…

  1. Active Tools for Better Knowledge Dissemination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mikulecky, Peter; Mikulecka, Jaroslava

    1999-01-01

    Suggests that a solution to the inadequacy and passivity problems with push and pull technologies could be in a combination of both, with an active component, adding more intelligence to the whole process of information and knowledge dissemination and supply. Describes basic principles of activity components in intelligent systems, and some…

  2. A case of disseminated blastomycosis in Vermont.

    PubMed

    Monaco, William E; Batsis, John A

    2013-04-01

    Blastomyces dermatitides is increasingly found in Canada along the St. Lawrence River. However, there are only rare reports of this disease in New England. We describe a case of disseminated blastomycosis in a patient from northern Vermont who acquired the fungus while gardening. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Disseminated Mycobacterium avium infection in a cat

    PubMed Central

    Barry, Maureen; Taylor, Judith; Woods, Paul

    2002-01-01

    A domestic shorthair cat was presented for lethargy and ataxia. Clinical findings included an abdominal mass, lumbosacral pain, ataxia. Aspirates from the liver and lymph nodes revealed intracellular, negative-staining rods. Treatment for presumptive mycobacterium infection was unsuccessful and the cat was euthanized. Disseminated Mycobacterium avium was confirmed on culture. PMID:12001504

  4. Measles with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM).

    PubMed

    Chowdhary, J; Ashraf, S M; Khajuria, K

    2009-01-01

    We report a seven year old male with measles associated acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) despite having received measles vaccination in infancy. The diagnosis was based on serum antimeasles antibodies and MRI brain. The patient was managed with high dose corticosteroids along with supportive measures. There was a complete neurologically and physica recovery.

  5. Disseminated granulomatous meningoencephalomyelitis in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Margaret

    2002-01-01

    A 6-year-old, intact, female miniature Doberman pinscher was evaluated for lethargy, intermittent back pain, and unstable gait. Physical and neurological findings included bradycardia, hypothermia, hyperesthesia, progressive and ascending ataxia, and proprioceptive deficits in all limbs. Laboratory findings and magnetic resonance imaging were consistent with disseminated granulomatous meningoencephalomyelitis, confirmed later by microscopy. PMID:11802671

  6. A Proposed Framework for Educational Innovation Dissemination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazen, Benjamin T.; Wu, Yun; Sankar, Chetan S.; Jones-Farmer, L. Allison

    2012-01-01

    Although the need for new educational technologies is increasing, the process for disseminating these innovations remains a challenge. A literature review shows that few studies have thoroughly investigated this area. Furthermore, there is no comprehensive framework or coordinated research agenda that may be used to guide such investigation. This…

  7. CHRONIC DISSEMINATED HISTOPLASMOSIS WITH PROLONGED LATENCY

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A case of chronic disseminated histoplasmosis in an ex-serviceman is described. Evidence is presented to support a latency period of over sixty years between acquisition of infection and clinical manifestation. This is the longest latency period for histoplasmosis described in the medical literature...

  8. Florida Dissemination Capacity Building Grant. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhn, G. Michael

    This report describes the goals, objectives, activities, and accomplishments of the Florida Capacity Building Project, which was undertaken to improve the information dissemination capabilities of the Florida educational community and which resulted in the establishment of the Florida Resources in Education Exchange (FREE). A detailed statement of…

  9. Computer software management, evaluation, and dissemination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The activities of the Computer Software Management and Information Center involving the collection, processing, and distribution of software developed under the auspices of NASA and certain other federal agencies are reported. Program checkout and evaluation, inventory control, customer services and marketing, dissemination, program maintenance, and special development tasks are discussed.

  10. Macrophages and the Viral Dissemination Super Highway

    PubMed Central

    Klepper, Arielle; Branch, Andrea D

    2016-01-01

    Monocytes and macrophages are key components of the innate immune system yet they are often the victims of attack by infectious agents. This review examines the significance of viral infection of macrophages. The central hypothesis is that macrophage tropism enhances viral dissemination and persistence, but these changes may come at the cost of reduced replication in cells other than macrophages. PMID:26949751

  11. Knowledge Management and Global Information Dissemination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Umunadi, Ejiwoke Kennedy

    2014-01-01

    The paper looked at knowledge management and global information dissemination. Knowledge is a very powerful tool for survival, growth and development. It can be seen as the information, understanding and skills that you gain through education or experience. The paper was addressed under the following sub-headings: Knowledge management knowledge…

  12. The Hawaii Educational Dissemination Diffusion System Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Min, Kellet; And Others

    Hawaii's endeavor to use information technology to improve educational practices within the state is described in four major sections: (1) the framework of the plan, including a brief history of dissemination, the goals of the plan, and philosophic statements on resources, linkages, and leadership; (2) the resource component, including an…

  13. ESEA III Evaluation and Dissemination: An Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balyeat, Ralph R.; Norman, C. Douglas

    This study surveyed evaluation and dissemination/diffusion practices of ESEA III projects funded in the 1969 fiscal year, which projects are nearing the end of their operations as federally supported programs. The study attempted to discover if (1) the projects were evaluated in accordance with generally accepted procedures, (2) the project…

  14. Evolution of diffusion and dissemination theory.

    PubMed

    Dearing, James W

    2008-01-01

    The article provides a review and considers how the diffusion of innovations Research paradigm has changed, and offers suggestions for the further development of this theory of social change. Main emphases of diffusion Research studies are compared over time, with special attention to applications of diffusion theory-based concepts as types of dissemination science. A considerable degree of paradigmatic evolution is observed. The classical diffusion model focused on adopter innovativeness, individuals as the locus of decision, communication channels, and adoption as the primary outcome measures in post hoc observational study designs. The diffusion systems in question were centralized, with fidelity of implementation often assumed. Current dissemination Research and practice is better characterized by tests of interventions that operationalize one or more diffusion theory-based concepts and concepts from other change approaches, involve complex organizations as the units of adoption, and focus on implementation issues. Foment characterizes dissemination and implementation Research, Reflecting both its interdisciplinary Roots and the imperative of spreading evidence-based innovations as a basis for a new paradigm of translational studies of dissemination science.

  15. Disseminated Tuberculosis Presenting as Baker's Cyst Infection

    PubMed Central

    Akram, Sami; Waqar, Sana

    2017-01-01

    In the absence of coexisting immunocompromised state and lack of specific symptoms a reactivation of treated mycobacterial tuberculosis (MTB) infection is generally not considered in the differential diagnosis of leg pain. We present a unique case of disseminated tuberculosis presenting as an infected Baker's cyst in a 73-year-old immunocompetent male. PMID:28163945

  16. Disseminated Enteroviral Infection Associated with Obinutuzumab.

    PubMed

    Dendle, Claire; Gilbertson, Michael; Korman, Tony M; Golder, Vera; Morand, Eric; Opat, Stephen

    2015-09-01

    Two cases of disseminated enteroviral infection occurred in patients who received the CD20 monoclonal antibody obinutuzumab. Clinical features included hepatitis, edema, and a dermatomyositis-like syndrome. These manifestations may be unfamiliar to clinicians and are possibly responsive to intravenous immunoglobulin. Clinicians should remain vigilant for enteroviral infections in patients receiving obinutuzumab.

  17. Factors that Influence Dissemination in Engineering Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hazen, B. T.; Wu, Yun; Sankar, C. S.

    2012-01-01

    Although the need for new educational materials and methods in engineering education is increasing, the process of disseminating (making target groups become aware of, accept, and use) these innovations remains a challenge. A literature review shows that few studies have thoroughly investigated this area. The purpose of this article is to identify…

  18. Identification of oral bacterial DNA in synovial fluid of arthritis patients with native and failed prosthetic joints

    PubMed Central

    Témoin, Stéphanie; Chakaki, Alia; Askari, Ali; El-Halaby, Ahmed; Fitzgerald, Steven; Marcus, Randall E.; Han, Yiping W.; Bissada, Nabil F.

    2013-01-01

    Objective We examined the presence of bacterial DNA in synovial fluids of native or aseptically failed prosthetic joints from patients having periodontal disease and arthritis to determine if there is bacterial spread from the oral cavity to the joints. Methods A total of 36 subjects were enrolled in the study. Among these, 11 were diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and 25 with osteoarthritis (OA). Eight patients with OA and are with RA had failed prostheses. Synovial fluid was aspirated from the affected hip or knee joint. Pooled subgingival plaque samples were collected followed by clinical periodontal examination. Bacterial DNA was extracted from the collected synovial fluid and dental plaque samples followed by polymerase chain reactions (PCR) and DNA sequence analysis of the 16S-23S rRNA genes. Results Of the 36 subjects, bacterial DNA was detected in the synovial fluid samples from five patients (13.9%), two with rheumatoid arthritis (one native and one failed prosthetic joints) and three with osteoarthritis (one native and two failed prosthetic joints). Of these five patients, two were diagnosed with periodontitis and had identical bacterial clones (Fusobacterium nucleatum and Serratia proteamaculans, respectively) detected in both the synovial fluid and dental plaque samples. Conclusions The present findings of this bacterial DNA in synovial fluid suggest the possibility of infection translocating from the periodontal tissue to the synovium. We suggest that patients with arthritis or failed prosthetic joints be examined for the presence of periodontal diseases and that be treated accordingly. PMID:22426587

  19. Synovial fluid and plasma selenium, copper, zinc, and iron concentrations in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Yazar, M; Sarban, S; Kocyigit, A; Isikan, U E

    2005-08-01

    In recent years, a great number of studies have investigated the possible role of trace elements in the etiology and pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoartritis (OA). We studied synovial fluid and plasma concentrations of selenium (Se), zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), and iron (Fe) in patients with RA and OA and compared them with sex- and age-matched healthy subjects. Plasma albumin levels were measured as an index of nutritional status. Plasma Se, Cu, and Zn concentrations were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry and Fe concentrations were determined by the colorimetric method. Although plasma and synovial fluid Se concentration were found to be significantly lower (p < 0.05, and p < 0.05, respectively), Cu concentrations were significantly higher in patients with RA than those of healthy subjects and OA (p < 0.05 and p < 0.05, respectively). There were no significant differences in plasma and synovial fluid Zn concentrations and albumin levels among three groups (p > 0.05). On the other hand, synovial fluid Cu and Fe concentrations were significantly higher in patients with OA than those of healthy subjects (p < 0.05). There was a significantly positive correlation between synovial fluid Se-Cu values and Zn-Fe values in patients with RA. Our results showed that synovial fluid and plasma trace element concentrations, excluding Zn, change in inflammatory RA, but not in OA. These alterations in trace element concentrations in inflammatory RA might be a result of the changes of the immunoregulatory cytokines.

  20. [In-vitro study on dissection of inflamed synovial tissue by hydro-jet cutting].

    PubMed

    Wagner, K-H; Tarner, I H; Lange, U

    2012-10-01

    Surgical synovectomy is a useful therapeutic option for rheumatoid arthritis patients with ongoing active synovitis despite optimal medical therapy. The present experimental study evaluated the novel, minimally invasive surgical technique of hydro-jet cutting in vitro using synovial biopsies. Depending on the selected water pressure (30-100 bar) it is possible to achieve precise and selective dissection of the synovial membrane. It was found that application of a water jet at 60 bar for 15 s is ideal for dissecting the stratum synoviale from the stratum fibrosum without any alteration of the joint capsule. This finding was confirmed by histological analyses. This novel and precise dissection technique promises to be an excellent alternative to the established techniques of synovectomy in the near future.

  1. Tribological performance of the biological components of synovial fluid in artificial joint implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Subir; Choudhury, Dipankar; Roy, Taposh; Moradi, Ali; Masjuki, H. H.; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda

    2015-08-01

    The concentration of biological components of synovial fluid (such as albumin, globulin, hyaluronic acid, and lubricin) varies between healthy persons and osteoarthritis (OA) patients. The aim of the present study is to compare the effects of such variation on tribological performance in a simulated hip joint model. The study was carried out experimentally by utilizing a pin-on-disk simulator on ceramic-on-ceramic (CoC) and ceramic-on-polyethylene (CoP) hip joint implants. The experimental results show that both friction and wear of artificial joints fluctuate with the concentration level of biological components. Moreover, the performance also varies between material combinations. Wear debris sizes and shapes produced by ceramic and polyethylene were diverse. We conclude that the biological components of synovial fluid and their concentrations should be considered in order to select an artificial hip joint to best suit that patient.

  2. Pulmonary Metastasectomy in Adult Patients with Synovial Sarcoma: A Single-Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kanghoon; Kang, Moon Chul; Lee, Hae Won; Park, Jong Ho; Baek, Hee Jong; Cho, Sung Joon; Jeon, Dae-Geun

    2016-01-01

    Background This study assessed the efficacy of pulmonary metastasectomy for synovial sarcoma in adult patients. Methods Fifty patients, diagnosed with pulmonary metastasis from June 1990 to August 2010, were reviewed retrospectively. Twenty-eight patients underwent complete pulmonary metastasectomy, and their survival was evaluated. Age, sex, time to metastatic progression, laterality, number of tumors, size of largest nodule, and number of metastasectomies were analyzed as potential prognostic factors. Results In all, 29 patients underwent at least one pulmonary metastasectomy, and 51 resections were performed. One intraoperative mortality occurred, and the 5-year survival rate was 58.4%. Bilateral metastases and early metastatic progression were associated with poor survival in multivariate analyses. Conclusion Surgical resection can be a good option for treating pulmonary metastasis in patients with synovial sarcoma. Repeated resection was feasible with low mortality and morbidity. PMID:27965922

  3. Synovial Sarcoma Associated With Indwelling Intramedullary Pin in a Peach-Faced Lovebird (Agapornis roseicollis).

    PubMed

    Nakano, Yumiko; Une, Yumi

    2016-03-01

    Sarcoma developing in association with a metallic orthopedic procedure is an uncommon but well-recognized complication in mammals. We report on a synovial sarcoma that developed at the site of an intramedullary pin after surgery to treat a bone fracture. A 17-year-old female peach-faced lovebird (Agapornis roseicollis) developed a spherical mass on the distal right dorsal wing at a site that was previously fractured and surgically repaired with an indwelling intramedullary pin. The right wing was amputated at the scapulohumeral joint. One year later, the bird died. Postmortem examination revealed metastases in the right lung, left thoracic wall, and proventricular serosa. Histologically, the tumor had a characteristic biphasic pattern. The tumor was immunohistologically and ultrastructurally identified as a synovial sarcoma. This is the first report of a suspected fracture-associated sarcoma in a bird.

  4. Tribological performance of the biological components of synovial fluid in artificial joint implants.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Subir; Choudhury, Dipankar; Roy, Taposh; Moradi, Ali; Masjuki, H H; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda

    2015-08-01

    The concentration of biological components of synovial fluid (such as albumin, globulin, hyaluronic acid, and lubricin) varies between healthy persons and osteoarthritis (OA) patients. The aim of the present study is to compare the effects of such variation on tribological performance in a simulated hip joint model. The study was carried out experimentally by utilizing a pin-on-disk simulator on ceramic-on-ceramic (CoC) and ceramic-on-polyethylene (CoP) hip joint implants. The experimental results show that both friction and wear of artificial joints fluctuate with the concentration level of biological components. Moreover, the performance also varies between material combinations. Wear debris sizes and shapes produced by ceramic and polyethylene were diverse. We conclude that the biological components of synovial fluid and their concentrations should be considered in order to select an artificial hip joint to best suit that patient.

  5. Oxytetracycline hydrochloride in the horse: serum, synovial, peritoneal and urine concentrations after single dose intravenous administration.

    PubMed

    Brown, M P; Stover, S M; Kelly, R H; Farver, T B; Knight, H D

    1981-03-01

    Six adult mares were given a single intravenous injection of oxytetracycline HCl (50 mg/ml) at a dosage of 5 mg/kg. Serum, synovial fluid, peritoneal fluid, and urine oxytetracycline concentrations were measured serially over a 48-h period. The highest measured serum oxytetracycline concentration was 8.01 mcg/ml at 1/2 h. Oxytetracycline was detected in synovial fluid and peritoneal fluid, which obtained mean peak oxytetracycline concentrations of 4.43 mcg/ml and 4.20 mcg/ml, at 1/2 h and 1 h, respectively. These concentrations steadily declined in parallel with serum concentrations and were not measurable at 48 h. Urine oxytetracycline concentration was relatively high, with a peak concentration of 1565.2 mcg/ml at 1/2 h after drug administration.

  6. The surprising outcome of a giant primary mediastinal synovial sarcoma treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Balieiro, Marcos Alexandre; Costa, Bruno Pinheiro; Veras, Gustavo Perissé Moreira; Perelson, Paulo Sergio; Acatauassú Nunes, Rodolfo; Saito, Eduardo Haruo

    2013-01-01

    There are only a few cases of primary mediastinal synovial sarcoma in the literature. Normally, they do not respond well to chemotherapy. In our case, a 30-year-old patient was admitted due to thoracic pain, dyspnea, orthopnea, cough, hoarseness and weight loss over a 3-month period as well as a dramatic worsening a week before the admission. A chest radiography showed a completely white left hemithorax and contralateral mediastinal shift; in addition, a chest tomography revealed a giant heterogeneous mediastinal mass, lung atelectasia and a small pleural effusion. The patient was submitted to Chamberlain procedure (biopsy) under local anesthesia and the diagnosis of a synovial sarcoma was obtained after immunohistochemical analysis. Due to his poor general condition, he received chemotherapy first, with a dramatic response, after what, the mass that had been reduced was removed surgically. After a 5-year- follow-up period there are no signs of disease recurrence. PMID:23372956

  7. The surprising outcome of a giant primary mediastinal synovial sarcoma treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Balieiro, Marcos Alexandre; Lopes, Agnaldo José; Costa, Bruno Pinheiro; Veras, Gustavo Perissé Moreira; Perelson, Paulo Sergio; Acatauassú Nunes, Rodolfo; Saito, Eduardo Haruo

    2013-02-01

    There are only a few cases of primary mediastinal synovial sarcoma in the literature. Normally, they do not respond well to chemotherapy. In our case, a 30-year-old patient was admitted due to thoracic pain, dyspnea, orthopnea, cough, hoarseness and weight loss over a 3-month period as well as a dramatic worsening a week before the admission. A chest radiography showed a completely white left hemithorax and contralateral mediastinal shift; in addition, a chest tomography revealed a giant heterogeneous mediastinal mass, lung atelectasia and a small pleural effusion. The patient was submitted to Chamberlain procedure (biopsy) under local anesthesia and the diagnosis of a synovial sarcoma was obtained after immunohistochemical analysis. Due to his poor general condition, he received chemotherapy first, with a dramatic response, after what, the mass that had been reduced was removed surgically. After a 5-year- follow-up period there are no signs of disease recurrence.

  8. Autotaxin expression from synovial fibroblasts is essential for the pathogenesis of modeled arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Nikitopoulou, Ioanna; Oikonomou, Nikos; Karouzakis, Emmanuel; Sevastou, Ioanna; Nikolaidou-Katsaridou, Nefeli; Zhao, Zhenwen; Mersinias, Vassilis; Armaka, Maria; Xu, Yan; Masu, Masayuki; Mills, Gordon B.; Gay, Steffen; Kollias, George

    2012-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a destructive arthropathy characterized by chronic synovial inflammation that imposes a substantial socioeconomic burden. Under the influence of the proinflammatory milieu, synovial fibroblasts (SFs), the main effector cells in disease pathogenesis, become activated and hyperplastic, releasing proinflammatory factors and tissue-remodeling enzymes. This study shows that activated arthritic SFs from human patients and animal models express significant quantities of autotaxin (ATX; ENPP2), a lysophospholipase D that catalyzes the conversion of lysophosphatidylcholine to lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). ATX expression from SFs was induced by TNF, and LPA induced SF activation and effector functions in synergy with TNF. Conditional genetic ablation of ATX in mesenchymal cells, including SFs, resulted in disease attenuation in animal models of arthritis, establishing the ATX/LPA axis as a novel player in chronic inflammation and the pathogenesis of arthritis and a promising therapeutic target. PMID:22493518

  9. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy in osteoarthritis: advanced tissue repair or intervention with smouldering synovial activation?

    PubMed

    van Lent, Peter L E M; van den Berg, Wim B

    2013-03-20

    Although it is generally accepted that osteoarthritis is a degenerative condition of the cartilage, other tissues such as synovium in which immunological and inflammatory reactions occur contribute to the development of joint pathology. This sheds new light on the potential mechanism of action of mesenchymal stem cell therapy in osteoarthritis. Rather than tissue repair due to local transformation of injected mesenchymal stem cells to chondrocytes and filling defects in cartilage, such treatment might suppress synovial activation and indirectly ameliorate cartilage damage. Desando and co-workers report in Arthritis Research & Therapy that intra-articular delivery of adipose-derived stem cells attenuates progression of synovial activation and joint destruction in osteoarthritis in an experimental rabbit model. Clinical studies are warranted to see whether this approach might be a novel way to combat development of joint destruction in inflammatory subtypes of osteoarthritis.

  10. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy in osteoarthritis: advanced tissue repair or intervention with smouldering synovial activation?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Although it is generally accepted that osteoarthritis is a degenerative condition of the cartilage, other tissues such as synovium in which immunological and inflammatory reactions occur contribute to the development of joint pathology. This sheds new light on the potential mechanism of action of mesenchymal stem cell therapy in osteoarthritis. Rather than tissue repair due to local transformation of injected mesenchymal stem cells to chondrocytes and filling defects in cartilage, such treatment might suppress synovial activation and indirectly ameliorate cartilage damage. Desando and co-workers report in Arthritis Research & Therapy that intra-articular delivery of adipose-derived stem cells attenuates progression of synovial activation and joint destruction in osteoarthritis in an experimental rabbit model. Clinical studies are warranted to see whether this approach might be a novel way to combat development of joint destruction in inflammatory subtypes of osteoarthritis. PMID:23521980

  11. Tribological performance of the biological components of synovial fluid in artificial joint implants

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Subir; Choudhury, Dipankar; Roy, Taposh; Moradi, Ali; Masjuki, H H; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda

    2015-01-01

    The concentration of biological components of synovial fluid (such as albumin, globulin, hyaluronic acid, and lubricin) varies between healthy persons and osteoarthritis (OA) patients. The aim of the present study is to compare the effects of such variation on tribological performance in a simulated hip joint model. The study was carried out experimentally by utilizing a pin-on-disk simulator on ceramic-on-ceramic (CoC) and ceramic-on-polyethylene (CoP) hip joint implants. The experimental results show that both friction and wear of artificial joints fluctuate with the concentration level of biological components. Moreover, the performance also varies between material combinations. Wear debris sizes and shapes produced by ceramic and polyethylene were diverse. We conclude that the biological components of synovial fluid and their concentrations should be considered in order to select an artificial hip joint to best suit that patient. PMID:27877822

  12. Involvement of chromosome X in primary cytogenetic change in human neoplasia: nonrandom translocation in synovial sarcoma

    SciTech Connect

    Turc-Carel, C.; Cin, P.D.; Limon, J.; Rao, U.; Li, F.P.; Corson, J.M.; Zimmerman, R.; Parry, D.M.; Cowan, J.M.; Sandberg, A.A.

    1987-04-01

    A translocation that involves chromosome X (band p11.2) and chromosome 18 (band q11.2) was observed in short-term in vitro cultures of cells from five synovial sarcomas and one malignant fibrous histiocytoma. In four of these tumors, the translocation t(X;18)(p11.2;q11.2) was reciprocal. The two other tumors had complex translocations: t(X;18;21)(p11.2;q11.2;p13) and t(X;15;18)(p11.2;q23;q11.2). A translocation between chromosomes X and 18 was not detected in other histological types of soft tissue sarcoma. The X;18 rearrangement appears to characterize the synovial sarcoma and is the first description of a primary, nonrandom change in the sex chromosome of a human solid tumor.

  13. Discrimination of osteoarthritic and rheumatoid human synovial cells in culture by nuclear image analysis.

    PubMed

    Delage, B; Giroud, F; Monet, J D; Ekindjian, O G; Cals, M J

    1999-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritic (RA) and osteoarthritic (OA) synovial cells in culture differ in their metabolic and proliferative behaviour. To assess links between these properties and nuclear changes, we used image analysis to study chromatin texture, together with nuclear morphometry and densitometry of OA and RA cells in primary culture. Chromatin pattern at the third day (D3) was heterogeneous and granular with chromatin clumps whereas at the final stage (D11) of culture a homogeneous and finely granular chromatin texture was observed. This evolution indicates global chromatin decondensation. These characteristics were more marked for RA than for OA nuclei. At each culture time, RA nuclei could be discriminated with high confidence from OA ones from parameters evaluating the organization of the chromatine texture. Nuclear image analysis is thus a useful tool for investigating synovial cell biology.

  14. Identification of cytotoxic agents disrupting synovial sarcoma oncoprotein interactions by proximity ligation assay

    PubMed Central

    Laporte, Aimée N.; Ji, Jennifer X.; Ma, Limin; Nielsen, Torsten O.; Brodin, Bertha A.

    2016-01-01

    Conventional cytotoxic therapies for synovial sarcoma provide limited benefit. Drugs specifically targeting the product of its driver translocation are currently unavailable, in part because the SS18-SSX oncoprotein functions via aberrant interactions within multiprotein complexes. Proximity ligation assay is a recently-developed method that assesses protein-protein interactions in situ. Here we report use of the proximity ligation assay to confirm the oncogenic association of SS18-SSX with its co-factor TLE1 in multiple human synovial sarcoma cell lines and in surgically-excised human tumor tissue. SS18-SSX/TLE1 interactions are disrupted by class I HDAC inhibitors and novel small molecule inhibitors. This assay can be applied in a high-throughput format for drug discovery in fusion-oncoprotein associated cancers where key effector partners are known. PMID:27120803

  15. Leonurine attenuates fibroblast-like synoviocyte-mediated synovial inflammation and joint destruction in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Xu, Qiang; Liu, Qingping; Pan, Dongmei; Jiang, Yubao; Liu, Minying; Liu, Mingling; Xu, Hanshi; Lin, Changsong

    2017-08-01

    To explore the role of leonurine in the regulation of synovial inflammation and joint destruction inRA. Fibroblast-like synoviocytes were isolated from synovial tissue from RA patients. Pro-inflammatory cytokine and MMP expression was evaluated using real-time PCR and a cytometric bead array. Cell migration and invasion in vitro were measured using the Boyden chamber method and the scratch assay, respectively. Protein expression was measured by western blotting. Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) nuclear translocation was detected by immunofluorescence. The in vivo effect of leonurine was evaluated in mice with CIA. Leonurine treatment significantly decreased the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8 and TNFα) and MMPs (MMP-1 and MMP-3) and suppressed the migration and invasion of RA fibroblast-like synoviocytes. The molecular analysis revealed that leonurine impaired TNFα-induced NF-κB signalling by inhibiting the phosphorylation and degradation of inhibitor of NF-κB alpha (IκBα) and subsequently preventing the nuclear translocation of the NF-κB p65 subunit. Leonurine also inhibited the p38 and Jun N-terminal kinase mitogen-activated protein kinases signalling pathways without affecting ERK signalling. Intraperitoneal injection of leonurine reduced synovial inflammation, joint destruction and the serum IL-1β, IL-6 and TNFα levels in mice with CIA. Our findings show that leonurine reduces synovial inflammation and joint destruction in RA through the NF-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinases pathways. Leonurine has potential as a therapeutic agent for RA.

  16. Establishing percentile charts for hip joint capsule and synovial cavity thickness in apparently healthy children.

    PubMed

    Żuber, Zbigniew; Owczarek, Aleksander; Sobczyk, Małgorzata; Migas-Majoch, Agata; Turowska-Heydel, Dorota; Sternal, Agnieszka; Michalczak, Justyna; Chudek, Jerzy

    2017-01-31

    The usefulness of musculoskeletal ultrasonography (MSUS) in paediatric population is limited by lack of reference values. One of such parameters is hip joint capsule thickness, postulated as an early measure for synovitis. However, the joint capsule is hardly a distinguished structure from slit synovial cavity in patients with little or no fluid collection. Therefore, in patients without effusion, it is more convenient to measure hip joint capsule thickness together with synovial cavity. The aim of the study was to establish percentile chart for hip joint capsule and synovial cavity thickness (HJC&SCT) in apparently healthy children. The analysis included 816 US of hip joint in 408 children without musculoskeletal disorders, distributed equally throughout the whole developmental period in 18 one-year subgroups. Hip joints US was performed according to standard protocol including measurement of HJC&SCT in a single rheumatology centre by three investigators. The 3rd, 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, 90th, and 97th HJC&SCT percentile curves were depicted in the age and height charts for the combined group of girls and boys. The median HJC&SCT values were increasing with age from 3.7 (C10 - C90: 3.3 - 4.2) mm in the first year of life up to 6.7 (5.8 - 7.3) in 16 years old, and above. In a similar way the increase was seen with height from 3.9 (3.5 - 4.7) mm in shorter than 95 cm to 6.9 (6.2 - 7.4) mm in taller than 169 cm subjects. Intra-observer and inter-observer mean precision was less than 1.8 and 12.5%, respectively. The developed centile chart for hip joint capsule and synovial cavity thickness in the paediatric population is expected to improve detection of hip joint capsule disorders, including synovitis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

  17. Identification of candidate synovial membrane biomarkers after Achyranthes aspera treatment for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wen; Lu, Xianghong; Fu, Zhirong; Zhang, Lin; Li, Ximin; Xu, Xiaobao; Ren, Yina; Lu, Yongzhuang; Fu, Hongwei; Tian, Jingkui

    2016-03-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease whose main symptom is a heightened inflammatory response in synovial tissues. To verify the anti-arthritic activities of Achyranthes aspera and its possible therapy-related factors on the pathogenesis of RA, the saponins in A. aspera root were isolated and identified to treat the collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) rats. Phytochemical analysis isolated and identified methyl caffeate, 25-S-inokosterone, 25-S-inokosterone β-D-glucopyranosyl 3-(O-β-D-glucopyranosyloxy)-oleanolate, and β-D-glucopyranosyl 3-(O-β-D-galactopyranosyl (1→2)(O-β-D-glucopyranosyloxy)-oleanolate as main compounds in the root of A. aspera. Proteomics was performed to determine the differentially expressed proteins in either inflamed or drug-treated synovium of CIA rats. Treatment resulted in dramatically decreased paw swelling, proliferation of inflammatory cells, and bone degradation. Fibrinogen, procollagen, protein disulfide-isomerase A3, and apolipoprotein A-I were all increased in inflamed synovial tissues and were found to decrease when administered drug therapy. Furthermore, Alpha-1-antiproteinase and manganese superoxide dismutase were both increased in drug-treated synovial tissues. The inhibition of RA progression shows that A. aspera is a promising candidate for future treatment of human arthritis. Importantly, the total saponins found within A. aspera are the active component. Finally, autoantigens such as fibrinogen and collagen could act as inducers of RA due to their aggravation of inflammation. Given this, it is possible that the vimentin and PDIA3 could be the candidate biomarkers specific to Achyranthes saponin therapy for rheumatoid arthritis in synovial membrane.

  18. Emerging role of metabolic signaling in synovial joint remodeling and osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    June, Ronald K; Liu-Bryan, Ru; Long, Fanxing; Griffin, Timothy M

    2016-12-01

    Obesity and associated metabolic diseases collectively referred to as the metabolic syndrome increase the risk of skeletal and synovial joint diseases, including osteoarthritis (OA). The relationship between obesity and musculoskeletal diseases is complex, involving biomechanical, dietary, genetic, inflammatory, and metabolic factors. Recent findings illustrate how changes in cellular metabolism and metabolic signaling pathways alter skeletal development, remodeling, and homeostasis, especially in response to biomechanical and inflammatory stressors. Consequently, a better understanding of the energy metabolism of diarthrodial joint cells and tissues, including bone, cartilage, and synovium, may lead to new strategies to treat or prevent synovial joint diseases such as OA. This rationale was the basis of a workshop presented at the 2016 Annual ORS Meeting in Orlando, FL on the emerging role of metabolic signaling in synovial joint remodeling and OA. The topics we covered included (i) the relationship between metabolic syndrome and OA in clinical and pre-clinical studies; (ii) the effect of biomechanical loading on chondrocyte metabolism; (iii) the effect of Wnt signaling on osteoblast carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism with respect to bone anabolism; and (iv) the role of AMP-activated protein kinase in chondrocyte energetic and biomechanical stress responses in the context of cartilage injury, aging, and OA. Although challenges exist for measuring in vivo changes in synovial joint tissue metabolism, the findings presented herein provide multiple lines of evidence to support a central role for disrupted cellular energy metabolism in the pathogenesis of OA. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:2048-2058, 2016.

  19. Acute Liver Failure Due to Budd-Chiari Syndrome in the Setting of Cardiac Synovial Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Stine, Jonathan G; Newton, Kelly; Vinayak, Ajeet G

    2015-04-01

    Primary malignant tumors of the heart, specifically cardiac sarcomas, are rare and mainly diagnosed at autopsy. Acute Budd-Chiari syndrome is a recognized cause of acute liver failure and has been associated with several rare cardiac tumors: atrial myxoma, caval rhabdomyosarcoma, and primary cardiac adenocarcinoma. We present the first case of a fatal, highly differentiated cardiac synovial sarcoma that presented as acute liver failure from Budd-Chiari syndrome.

  20. Variability in synovial inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis investigated by microarray technology

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, Johan; af Klint, Erik; Ulfgren, Ann-Kristin; Stark, André; Andersson, Tove; Nilsson, Peter; Klareskog, Lars; Lundeberg, Joakim

    2006-01-01

    In recent years microarray technology has been used increasingly to acquire knowledge about the pathogenic processes involved in rheumatoid arthritis. The present study investigated variations in gene expression in synovial tissues within and between patients with rheumatoid arthritis. This was done by applying microarray technology on multiple synovial biopsies obtained from the same knee joints. In this way the relative levels of intra-patient and inter-patient variation could be assessed. The biopsies were obtained from 13 different patients: 7 by orthopedic surgery and 6 by rheumatic arthroscopy. The data show that levels of heterogeneity varied substantially between the biopsies, because the number of genes found to be differentially expressed between pairs of biopsies from the same knee ranged from 6 to 2,133. Both arthroscopic and orthopedic biopsies were examined, allowing us to compare the two sampling methods. We found that the average number of differentially expressed genes between biopsies from the same patient was about three times larger in orthopedic than in arthroscopic biopsies. Using a parallel analysis of the tissues by immunohistochemistry, we also identified orthopedic biopsies that were unsuitable for gene expression analysis of synovial inflammation due to sampling of non-inflamed parts of the tissue. Removing these biopsies reduced the average number of differentially expressed genes between the orthopedic biopsies from 455 to 171, in comparison with 143 for the arthroscopic biopsies. Hierarchical clustering analysis showed that the remaining orthopedic and arthroscopic biopsies had gene expression signatures that were unique for each patient, apparently reflecting patient variation rather than tissue heterogeneity. Subsets of genes found to vary between biopsies were investigated for overrepresentation of biological processes by using gene ontology. This revealed representative 'themes' likely to vary between synovial biopsies affected by

  1. A case of synovial sarcoma with bone metastasis identified by bone marrow scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Otsuka, N.; Morita, R.; Yamamoto, T.; Muranaka, A.; Tomomitsu, T.; Yanagimoto, S.; Sone, T.; Fukunaga, M.

    1985-04-01

    In a patient with synovial sarcoma, routine bone survey showed no abnormality, while bone marrow scintigraphy with Tc-99m sulfur colloid revealed a defect in the fifth lumbar vertebra. At surgery, tumorous invasion was noted in the fifth lumbar vertebra and the surrounding tissues. It was suggested that the bone marrow scintigraphy was particularly useful in the detection of tumorous invasion into the bone marrow at the early stage before the destruction of skeletal tissue.

  2. Ion channel expression and function in normal and osteoarthritic human synovial fluid progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Bertram, Karri L; Banderali, Umberto; Tailor, Pankaj; Krawetz, Roman J

    2016-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a chronic disease affecting the cartilage of over 15% of Canadians. Synovial fluid mesenchymal progenitor cells (sfMPCs) are present in joints and are thought to contribute to healing. OA sfMPCs have a greater proliferative ability but decreased chondrogenic potential. However, little is known about the factors influencing/regulating the differences between normal and OA sfMPCs. Recently, our lab has shown that sfMPC chondrogenic differentiation in vitro is favorably biased toward a similar osmotic environment as they experience in vivo. The current study now examines the expression and functionality of a variety of ion channels in sfMPCs derived from normal individuals and early OA patients. Results indicated that there is differential ion channel regulation at the functional level and expression level in early OA sfMPCs. All ion channels were upregulated in early OA compared to normal sfMPCs with the exception of KCNMA1 at the mRNA level. At the protein level, TRPV4 was over expressed in early OA sfMPCs, while KCNJ12 and KCNMA1 were unchanged between normal and early OA sfMPCs. At the functional level, the inward rectifying potassium channel was under expressed in early OA sfMPCs, however the membrane potential was unchanged between normal and early OA sfMPCs. In the synovial environment itself, a number of differences in ion concentration between normal and early OA synovial fluid were observed. These findings suggest that normal and OA progenitor cells demonstrate functional differences in how they interact with the synovial ion environment.

  3. Cluster analysis of immunohistochemical profiles in synovial sarcoma, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor, and Ewing sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Stephen H; Thomas, Dafydd G; Lucas, David R

    2006-05-01

    As a result of overlapping morphologic and immunohistochemical features, it can be difficult to distinguish synovial sarcoma, malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor, and Ewing sarcoma/primitive neuroectodermal tumor in core biopsies. To analyze and compare immunohistochemical profiles, we stained tissue microarrays of 23 synovial sarcomas, 23 malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors, and 27 Ewing sarcomas with 22 antibodies potentially useful in the differential diagnosis, and analyzed the data with cluster analysis. Stain intensity was scored as none, weak, or strong. For CD99, tumors with membranous accentuation were independently categorized. Cluster analysis sorted five groups, with like tumors clustering together. Synovial sarcoma clustered into two groups: one cytokeratin and EMA positive (n = 11), the other mostly cytokeratin negative, EMA positive, bcl-2 positive and mostly CD56 positive (n = 9). Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor clustered into two groups: one S100 positive, with nestin and NGFR positivity in most (n = 10), the other mostly S100 negative, and variably but mostly weakly positive for nestin and NGFR (n = 11). Ewing sarcomas clustered into a single group driven by membranous CD99 staining. Thirteen cases failed to cluster (outliers), while three Ewing sarcomas clustered into groups of other tumor types. Paired antibodies for each tumor type determined by visual assessment of cluster analysis data and statistical calculations of specificity, sensitivity, and predictive values showed that EMA/CK7 for synovial sarcoma, nestin/S100 for malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor, and membranous CD99/Fli-1 for Ewing sarcoma yielded high specificity and positive predictive values. Cluster analysis also highlighted aberrant staining reactions and diagnostic pitfalls in these tumors. Hierarchical cluster analysis is an effective method for analyzing high-volume immunohistochemical data.

  4. High synovial expression of the inhibitory FcγRIIb in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Magnusson, Sofia E; Engström, Marianne; Jacob, Uwe; Ulfgren, Ann-Kristin; Kleinau, Sandra

    2007-01-01

    Activating Fc gamma receptors (FcγRs) have been identified as having important roles in the inflammatory joint reaction in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and murine models of arthritis. However, the role of the inhibitory FcγRIIb in the regulation of the synovial inflammation in RA is less known. Here we have investigated synovial tissue from RA patients using a novel monoclonal antibody (GB3) specific for the FcγRIIb isoform. FcγRIIb was abundantly expressed in synovia of RA patients, in sharp contrast to the absence or weak staining of FcγRIIb in synovial biopsies from healthy volunteers. In addition, the expression of FcγRI, FcγRII and FcγRIII was analyzed in synovia obtained from early and late stages of RA. Compared with healthy synovia, which expressed FcγRII, FcγRIII but not FcγRI, all activating FcγRs were expressed and significantly up-regulated in RA, regardless of disease duration. Macrophages were one of the major cell types in the RA synovium expressing FcγRIIb and the activating FcγRs. Anti-inflammatory treatment with glucocorticoids reduced FcγR expression in arthritic joints, particularly that of FcγRI. This study demonstrates for the first time that RA patients do not fail to up-regulate FcγRIIb upon synovial inflammation, but suggests that the balance between expression of the inhibitory FcγRIIb and activating FcγRs may be in favour of the latter throughout the disease course. Anti-inflammatory drugs that target activating FcγRs may represent valuable therapeutics in this disease. PMID:17521421

  5. Monophasic synovial sarcoma of the greater omentum: case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Alcalá Serrano, F J; Hernández Hernández, J R; Montenegro Dámaso, T; López-Tomassetti Fernández, E

    2017-07-01

    Synovial sarcoma is a malignant spindle cell neoplasm normally arising from tissues around joints, bursa and tendon sheaths. Several reports involving the gastrointestinal tract, mainly the oesophagus and stomach, have been documented; however, the omentum remains an extremely unusual location. Monophasic type is composed exclusively of spindle cells arranged in fascicles. Establishing the correct diagnosis of these tumours could be challenging because of the similarities with gastrointestinal stromal tumours and other mesenchymal tumours with similar histology.

  6. Identification of citrullinated cellular fibronectin in synovial fluid from patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Eri; Kanzaki, Takeyuki; Tahara, Koichiro; Hayashi, Haeru; Hashimoto, Shiori; Suzuki, Akari; Yamada, Ryo; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Sawada, Tetsuji

    2014-09-01

    Cellular fibronectin (cFn) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and we previously demonstrated the presence of citrullinated cFn in rheumatoid synovial tissues. The present study aimed to investigate whether citrullinated cFn can be detected in the plasma or synovial fluid of RA patients. Twenty-five rheumatoid arthritis synovial fluid (RASF), seven osteoarthritis synovial fluid (OASF) and 12 plasma samples from RA patients were examined. Citrullination of cFn was determined by immunoprecipitation (IP), western blotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), in which peptidyl-citrulline within cFn was detected using a specific anti-cFn monoclonal antibody in combination with anti-modified citrulline antibody after chemical modification. Levels of citrullination associated with cFn, as determined by ELISA, were significantly higher in RASF than in OASF samples. IP and western blotting detected citrullinated cFn in RASF but not in plasma samples from RA patients. Levels of total cFn were elevated in RASF compared with OASF, and 24 out of 25 RASF samples were positive for anti-CCP antibody. However, no correlation was observed between levels of citrullinated cFn and those of total cFn or anti-CCP antibody in RASF. On the other hand, a significant positive correlation was observed between the levels of matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) and cFn citrullination in RASF. Citrullinated cFn appears to be produced within the affected joint and might be involved in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid synovitis.

  7. The limitations of Gram-stain microscopy of synovial fluid in concomitant septic and crystal arthritis.

    PubMed

    Stirling, Paul; Tahir, Mohammed; Atkinson, Henry Dushan

    2017-03-29

    Rapid diagnosis of septic arthritis from Gram-stain microscopy is limited by an inherent false-negative rate of 25-78%. The presence of concomitant crystal arthritis in 5% of cases represents a particular diagnostic challenge. This study aims to investigate the effects that a concomitant crystal arthropathy have on the ability of Gram-stain microscopy of synovial fluid to diagnose a septic arthritis. This is a 12-year retrospective cohort study. Inclusion criteria were a positive synovial fluid culture result with a positive clinical diagnosis of septic arthritis. Results were correlated with presence or absence of urate and calcium pyrophosphate crystals, and Gram-stain result. During this time our collection and analysis methods remained unchanged. All samples were collected in Lithium Heparin containers. Chi-squared test with a p value < 0.05 was considered significant. 602 synovial fluid samples were included. 162 cases of concomitant crystal arthritis were identified (27%). Of these, 16 (10%) had an initial negative Gram-stain. Of the 440 samples with no crystals detected, 18 (4%) had an initial negative Gram-stain microscopy result (p < 0.05). The incidence of concurrent septic and crystal arthritis may be higher than previously thought. Synovial fluid samples in concomitant septic and crystal arthritis are significantly less likely to have a positive Gram-stain at microscopy than in cases of an isolated septic arthritis. We would advise the clinician to maintain a high index of suspicion for septic arthritis in these patients. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. Nitric Oxide-Driven Hypoxia Initiates Synovial Angiogenesis, Hyperplasia and Inflammatory Lesions in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Fei; Wu, Pei; Xiao, Na; Qiu, Frank; Zeng, Qing-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Background Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an inflammatory articular disease with cartilage and bone damage due to hyperplasic synoviocyte invasion and subsequent matrix protease digestion. Although monoclonal antibodies against tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) have been approved for clinical use in patients with RA, desired therapeutic regimens suitable for non-responders are still unavailable because etiological initiators leading to RA remain enigmatic and unidentified. Methodology/Principal Findings Bacteria-induced arthritis (BIA) that simulates collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) is developed in mice upon daily live bacterial feeding. The morphological lesions of paw erythema and edema together with the histological alterations of synovial hyperplasia and lymphocytic infiltration emerge as the early-phase manifestations of BIA and CIA. Bacteria- or collagen-mediated global upregulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines is accompanied by the burst of nitric oxide (NO). Elevation of the serum NO level is correlated with decline of the blood oxygen saturation percentage (SpO2), reflecting a hypoxic consequence during development towards arthritis. NO-driven hypoxia is further evident from a positive relationship between NO and lactic acid (LA), an end product from glycolysis. Upregulation of hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) validates hypoxia-induced angiogenesis in the inflamed synovium of modeling mice. Administration of the NO donor compound sodium nitroprusside (SNP) causes articular inflammation by inducing synovial hypoxia. Anti-bacteria by the antibiotic cefotaxime and/or the immunosuppressant rapamycin or artesunate that also inhibits nitric oxide synthase (NOS) can abrogate NO production, mitigate hypoxia, and considerably ameliorate or even completely abort synovitis, hence highlighting that NO may serve as an initiator of inflammatory arthritis. Conclusions/Significance Like collagen, bacteria also

  9. Synovial membrane protein expression differs between juvenile idiopathic arthritis subtypes in early disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common rheumatological disease of childhood with a prevalence of around 1 in 1,000. Without appropriate treatment it can have devastating consequences including permanent disability from joint destruction and growth deformities. Disease aetiology remains unknown. Investigation of disease pathology at the level of the synovial membrane is required if we want to begin to understand the disease at the molecular and biochemical level. The synovial membrane proteome from early disease-stage, treatment naive JIA patients was compared between polyarticular and oligoarticular subgroups. Methods Protein was extracted from 15 newly diagnosed, treatment naive JIA synovial membrane biopsies and separated by two dimensional fluorescent difference in-gel electrophoresis. Proteins displaying a two-fold or greater change in expression levels between the two subgroups were identified by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry with expression further verified by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Results Analysis of variance analysis (P ≤ 0.05) revealed 25 protein spots with a two-fold or greater difference in expression levels between polyarticular and oligoarticular patients. Hierarchical cluster analysis with Pearson ranked correlation revealed two distinctive clusters of proteins. Some of the proteins that were differentially expressed included: integrin alpha 2b (P = 0.04); fibrinogen D fragment (P = 0.005); collagen type VI (P = 0.03); fibrinogen gamma chain (P = 0.05) and peroxiredoxin 2 (P = 0.02). The identified proteins are involved in a number of different processes including platelet activation and the coagulation system. Conclusions The data indicate distinct synovial membrane proteome profiles between JIA subgroups at an early stage in the disease process. The identified proteins also provide insight into differentially perturbed pathways

  10. TNFα induces sustained signaling and a prolonged and unremitting inflammatory response in synovial fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Angela; Qiao, Yu; Grigoriev, Galina; Chen, Janice; Park-Min, Kyung-Hyun; Park, Sung Ho; Ivashkiv, Lionel B.; Kalliolias, George D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The non resolving character of synovial inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a conundrum. To identify the contribution of fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) to the perpetuation of synovitis, we investigated the molecular mechanisms that govern the TNFα-driven inflammatory program in human FLS. Methods FLS obtained from synovial tissues of patients with RA or osteoarthritis were stimulated with TNFα and assayed for gene expression and cytokine production by qPCR and ELISA. NF-κB signaling was evaluated using Western blotting. Histone acetylation, chromatin accessibility, and NF-κB p65 and RNA polymerase II (Pol II) occupancy at the IL6 promoter were measured by chromatin immunoprecipitation and restriction enzyme accessibility assays. Results In FLS, TNFα induced prolonged transcription of IL6 and progressive accumulation of IL-6 protein over four days. Similarly, induction of CXCL8/IL-8, CCL5/RANTES, MMP1 and MMP3 mRNA after TNFα stimulation was sustained for several days. This contrasted with the macrophage response to TNFα, which characteristically involved a transient increase in the expression of pro-inflammatory genes. In FLS, TNFα induced prolonged activation of NF-κB signaling and sustained transcriptional activity indicated by increased histone acetylation, chromatin accessibility, and p65 and Pol II occupancy at the IL6 promoter. Furthermore, FLS expressed low levels of the feedback inhibitors ABIN3, IRAK-M, SOCS3 and ATF3 that terminate inflammatory responses in macrophages. Conclusions TNFα signaling is not effectively terminated in FLS, leading to an uncontrolled inflammatory response. The results suggest that prolonged and sustained inflammatory responses by FLS, in response to synovial TNFα, contribute to the persistence of synovial inflammation in RA. PMID:23335080

  11. Pathologic finding of increased expression of interleukin-17 in the synovial tissue of rheumatoid arthritis patients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ning; Wang, Jun C; Liang, Toong H; Zhu, Ming H; Wang, Jia Y; Fu, Xue L; Zhou, Jie R; Zheng, Song G; Chan, Paul; Han, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common autoimmune disease of chronic systemic inflammatory disorder that will affect multiple tissues and organs such as skin, heart or lungs; but it principally attacks the joints, producing a nonsuppurative inflammatory and proliferative synovitis that often progresses to major damaging of articular cartilage and joint ankylosis. Although the definite etiology is still unknown, recent studies suggest that T-helper cells (Th17) may play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of RA. And interleukin-17 (IL-17), which is a cytokine of Th17 cells, may be a key factor in the occurrence of RA. The binding of IL-17 to specific receptor results in the expression of fibroblasts, endothelial and epithelial cells and also synthesis of several major factors such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), IL-1β that result in the structural damage of RA joints. Though some previous studies have shown that IL-17 exists in the synovium of RA, few has definite proof quantitatively by pathology about its existence in synovial membrane. This study comprised of 30 RA patients and 10 healthy control, pathologic study of the synovial membrane showed increased expression of IL-17 in the synovial tissue of RA patients, the intensity is compatible with clinical severity of disease as validated by DAS28 score and disease duration. Northern blot study also confirmed the increased expression of IL-17 in the synovial tissues. This study sheds further light that IL-17 may be a key factor in the pathogenesis of RA and a determinant of disease severity. PMID:23826419

  12. The effect of depth of centrifuged synovial fluid on leukocyte esterase test for periprosthetic joint infection.

    PubMed

    Ruangsomboon, Pakpoom; Chinprasertsuk, Sriprapa; Khejonnit, Varanya; Chareancholvanich, Keerati

    2017-03-17

    Centrifugation of aspirated synovial fluid before leukocytes esterase (LE) testing for diagnosing periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) may make blood tinged specimens interpretable. We aimed to establish the proper sampling depth of centrifuged specimens for LE testing as one diagnostic criterion and also AS-D chloroacetate esterase (CAE) staining testing as an adjunctive tool. A definite PJI knee joint group and an aseptic primary total knee arthroplasty control group were studied quasi-experimentally (N = 46). At 2000 g for 15 minutes, 3 ml of synovial fluid was centrifuged. LE strip testing and median synovial WBC count were performed at 2, 4, and 6 mm depths. CAE staining test characterized LE particles. ROC curve, area under the curve, and significant differences were determined. The proper predictive depth to diagnose PJI was sought by forward stepwise logistic regression. All fresh blood-tinged specimens had uncertain interpretations. Centrifugation increased interpretability (55% to 100%). ROC curve and area under the curve at 2, 4, and 6 mm depths were 0.822, 0.804, and 0.786, respectively. The cut point of ++ to diagnose PJI was statistically significant (p < 0.05) at all depths. P-values of forward stepwise logistic regression at 2, 4, and 6 mm were 0.001, 0.752, and 0.756, respectively. CAE staining confirmed extracellular LE release by polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN). A specimen at < 2 mm from the surface of centrifuged synovial fluid at a grading of ++ or more for PJI diagnosis is proper for LE testing. CAE staining testing adjunctively characterizes LE particles and cell morphology. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Alpinia galanga extracts downregulate interleukin-1β-induced matrix metalloproteinases expression in human synovial fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Pothacharoen, Peraphan; Choocheep, Kanyamas; Phitak, Thanyaluck; Pompimon, Wilart; Kongtawelert, Prachya

    2011-03-01

    Alpinia galanga has been used as alternative medicine for anti-rheumatic activities. However, the precise action of the extract on arthritic diseases is not yet fully understood. In this study, we investigated the effects of A. galanga extracts on the expression of genes involved in catabolic activities in an interleukin-1β (IL-1β)-induced human synovial fibroblast as an inflammatory model. Confluent primary human synovial fibroblasts were treated for 24 h with A. galanga hexane extracts in the presence of recombinant human IL-1β. MMPs in the culture medium were monitored by gelatin zymography. Total RNA was isolated from the cell lysate and analyzed via semi-quantitative RT-PCR. After treatment with A. galanga extracts, MMP-2 activity in the culture medium was significantly reduced. In addition, MMP-1, MMP-3, MMP-13, and Cox-2 expression were downregulated. These data suggest that the decrease of gene expression and production of MMPs in synovial fibroblasts against inflammatory stimuli could be due to the effects of the A. galanga extracts. Therefore, A. galanga extracts might be a promising therapeutic agent for arthritis.

  14. Relationship between the conformity and the lubricating ability of synovial joints.

    PubMed

    Mabuchi, K.; Ujihira, M.; Sasada, T.

    1998-06-01

    OBJECTIVE: To relate conformity of sliding surfaces with the lubricating ability of synovial joints. DESIGN: Measurement of start-up friction in the stifles of various animals. Assessment of conformity by Hertzian contact area. BACKGROUND: Past studies showed that the start-up friction in synovial joints sharply increased with the loading duration. The reasons why the friction increased and why the increasing rate is different in different joints were, however, not found. METHODS: Nine stifle joints from various animals were used. A robotic arm was used to give the compressive force and the sliding motion to the joint. Start-up friction was measured by a universal force sensor. The principal curvatures of the sliding surfaces were directly measured by a radius-gauge. Hertzian contact area was calculated from the principal curvatures of the sliding surfaces. RESULTS: The duration until the frictional coefficient reached 0.1 was related to the Hertzian contact area. CONCLUSION: The conformity of sliding surfaces is related to the lubrication ability in synovial joints. The squeeze-film mechanism plays an important role in joint lubrication.

  15. Inflammatory synovial fluid microenvironment drives primary human chondrocytes to actively take part in inflammatory joint diseases.

    PubMed

    Röhner, Eric; Matziolis, Georg; Perka, Carsten; Füchtmeier, Bernd; Gaber, Timo; Burmester, Gerd-Rüdiger; Buttgereit, Frank; Hoff, Paula

    2012-06-01

    The role of human chondrocytes in the pathogenesis of cartilage degradation in rheumatic joint diseases has presently gained increasing interest. An active chondrocyte participation in local inflammation may play a role in the initiation and progression of inflammatory joint diseases and in a disruption of cartilage repair mechanisms resulting in cartilage degradation. In the present study, we hypothesized that inflammatory synovial fluid triggers human chondrocytes to actively take part in inflammatory processes in rheumatic joint diseases. Primary human chondrocytes were incubated in synovial fluids gained from patients with rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis arthritis and reactive arthritis. The detection of vital cell numbers was determined by using Casy Cell Counter System. Apoptosis was measured by Annexin-V and 7AAD staining. Cytokine and chemokine secretion was determined by a multiplex suspension array. Detection of vital cells showed a highly significant decrease in chondrocyte numbers. Flow cytometry demonstrated a significant increase in apoptotic chondrocytes after the incubation. An active secretion of cytokines such as MCP-1 and MIF by chondrocytes was observed. The inflammatory synovial fluid microenvironment mediates apoptosis and cell death of chondrocytes. Moreover, in terms of cytokine secretion, it also induces an active participation of chondrocytes in ongoing inflammation.

  16. Synovial sarcoma presenting with huge mediastinal mass: a case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Synovial sarcoma presenting in the mediastinum is exceedingly rare. Furthermore, data addressing optimal therapy is limited. Herein we present a case where an attempt to downsize the tumor to a resectable state with chemotherapy was employed. Case presentation A 32 year female presented with massive pericardial effusion and unresectable huge mediastinal mass. Computed axial tomography scan - guided biopsy with adjunctive immunostains and molecular studies confirmed a diagnosis of synovial sarcoma. Following three cycles of combination Ifosfamide and doxorubicin chemotherapy, no response was demonstrated. The patient refused further therapy and had progression of her disease 4 months following the last cycle. Conclusion Synovial sarcoma presenting with unresectable mediastinal mass carry a poor prognosis. Up to the best of our knowledge there are only four previous reports where primary chemotherapy was employed, unfortunately; none of these cases had subsequent complete surgical resection. Identification of the best treatment strategy for patients with unresectable disease is warranted. Our case can be of benefit to medical oncologists and thoracic surgeons who might be faced with this unique and exceedingly rare clinical scenario. PMID:23800262

  17. [A synovial cyst accompanied by asymptomatic lumbar vertebral fracture requiring differentiation from spinal metastasis].

    PubMed

    Miura, Isamu; Ujiie, Hiroshi; Nakagawa, Masanori; Saito, Taiichi; Shiono, Saori; Okada, Yoshikazu

    2015-06-01

    We experienced a case with a synovial cyst accompanied by asymptomatic lumbar vertebral fracture that required differentiation from spinal metastasis. An 82-year-old man suffered from right leg and anal pain. Computed tomography (CT) showed L5 spondylolysis. Magnetic resonance images (MRI) revealed an intra spinal cyst and acute lumbar vertebral fracture of L5 vertebral body. The surrounding area of the cyst presented contrast enhancement, and the extradural mass compressed the dural sac. Bone scintigraphy with 99m technetium-MDP demonstrated intense uptake on the right first, fourth, fifth, and seventh ribs and L2, L3, and L5 vertebra. The F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) image demonstrated an increased radiotracer uptake in the L5 vertebra(standardized uptake value(SUV) max=3.5). Spinal metastasis was suspected. Because of the cauda equina compression syndrome, it was surgically removed. Intraoperatively, a well-demarcated extradural cyst was found and compressed the dural sac markedly. The cyst capsule was thin and contained clear, thin fluid with no signs of bleeding. The histological diagnosis was a synovial cyst. His neurological symptoms improved after the surgery. The synovial cyst may enlarge after asymptomatic vertebral fractures.

  18. Long-Term Outcomes for Synovial Sarcoma Treated With Conservation Surgery and Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Guadagnolo, B. Ashleigh Zagars, Gunar K.; Ballo, Matthew T.; Patel, Shreyaskumar R.; Lewis, Valerae O.; Pisters, Peter W.T.; Benjamin, Robert S.; Pollock, Raphael E.

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate prognostic factors and treatment outcomes in patients with localized synovial sarcoma treated with conservation surgery and radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Between 1960 and 2003, 150 patients with nonmetastatic synovial sarcoma were treated with conservation surgery and RT. The majority of patients (81%) were aged >20 years. Sixty-eight percent received postoperative RT, and 32% received preoperative RT. Forty-eight percent received adjuvant chemotherapy. Results: Median follow-up was 13.2 years. Overall survival (OS) rates at 5, 10, and 15 years were 76%, 57%, and 51%, respectively. Corresponding disease-free survival (DFS) rates were 59%, 52%, and 52%, respectively. Tumor size >5 cm predicted worse OS, DFS, disease-specific survival (DSS), and higher rate of distant metastases (DM). Age >20 years predicted worse DFS and DSS but not OS. Local control (LC) was 82% at 10 years. Positive or unknown resection margins predicted inferior LC rates. Forty-four percent developed DM by 10 years. Only 1% developed nodal metastases. Analysis of outcomes by treatment decade showed no significant differences with respect to LC and DM rates. Conclusions: Synovial sarcoma is adequately controlled at the primary site by conservation surgery and RT. Elective nodal irradiation is not indicated. Rates of development of DM and subsequent death from disease remain high, with no significant improvement in outcomes for this disease in the past four decades.

  19. Epigenetic modifications of interleukin-6 in synovial fibroblasts from osteoarthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fei; Zhou, Song; Wang, Chuandong; Huang, Yan; Li, Huiwu; Wang, You; Zhu, Zhenan; Tang, Jian; Yan, Mengning

    2017-03-06

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common degenerative disease of the synovial joint. The synovial membrane is responsible for the inflammatory reaction leading to the secretion of macrophage-derived pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6. Suppressing IL-6 over-expression in synovial fibroblasts (SF) is a promising method to prevent OA development and progression, in which the prerequisite is the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying IL-6 over-expression in SF. Currently, there are few reports concerning epigenetic modifications in IL-6 in OA SF. In the present study, we attempted to investigate this phenomenon. SF over-expressing IL-6 was collected from OA patients. DNA hypomethylation and histone hyperacetylation were observed in the IL-6 promoter regions in OA SF compared with normal SF. No differences in the status of H3K9 di-methylation, H3K27 tri-methylation and H3K4 tri-methylation were observed in the IL-6 promoter regions between normal and OA SF. DNA (cytosine-5-)-methyltransferase 3 alpha (Dnmt3a) overexpression and anacardic acid (histone acetyltransferase inhibitor) treatment increased DNA methylation and decreased histone acetylation in the IL-6 promoter, and IL-6 over-expression in OA SF was suppressed. These observations provide deeper insight into the pathogenesis of OA and can be used to design new drugs and develop new therapeutic methods to treat OA.

  20. Enantiospecific pharmacokinetics of ketoprofen in plasma and synovial fluid of horses with acute synovitis.

    PubMed

    Verde, C R; Simpson, M I; Frigoli, A; Landoni, M F

    2001-06-01

    Pharmacokinetic parameters were established for enantiomers of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) ketoprofen (KTP) administered as the racemic mixture at a dose of 2.2 mg/kg and as separate enantiomers, each at a dose of 1.1 mg/kg to a group of six horses (five mares and one gelding). A four-period cross-over study in a LPS-induced model of acute synovitis was used. After administration of the racemic mixture S(+)KTP was the predominant enantiomer in plasma as well as in synovial fluid. Unidirectional inversion of R(-) to S(+)KTP was demonstrated but the inversion was less marked than previously reported. It is suggested that this reduction could be because of the influence of the inflammatory reaction on hepatic metabolism. The disposition of KTP enantiomers after administration of the racemic mixture was similar to those observed after administration of S(+) and R(-)KTP. The S(+) and R(-)KTP concentrations in synovial fluid were low and short lasting. After administration of R(-)KTP significant concentrations of the optical antipode were detected in synovial fluid.

  1. Galectin-3 is a sensor-regulator of toll-like receptor pathways in synovial fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Arad, Uri; Madar-Balakirski, Noa; Angel-Korman, Avital; Amir, Sharon; Tzadok, Sharon; Segal, Ortal; Menachem, Aharon; Gold, Aviram; Elkayam, Ori; Caspi, Dan

    2015-05-01

    Galectin-3 is a β-galactoside-binding lectin that plays an important role in the modulation of immune responses. It has been shown to aggravate joint inflammation and destruction in experimental arthritis. We investigated the role of galectin-3 in TLR-induced cell activation in human synovial fibroblasts (SF) in order to better understand the mechanism(s) of the proinflammatory function of galectin-3 in arthritis. Galectin-3 expression in SF obtained from rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis patients was inhibited by siRNA mediated gene-knockdown. Galectin-3 was also inhibited with modified citrus pectin (MCP), a polysaccharide galectin-3 ligand. Galectin-3 knockdown inhibited TLR-2, -3 and -4-induced IL-6 secretion, but not TLR-2, -3 and -4-mediated matrix metalloproteinase-3 or CC chemokine ligand-5 secretion. When the SF were stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, a protein kinase C activator that bypasses the membranal receptors, galectin-3 knockdown no longer influenced IL-6 secretion. MCP reduced IL-6 levels in a dose-dependent manner. Our results indicate that galectin-3 is a positive sensor-regulator of TLR-induced IL-6 secretion in human synovial fibroblasts, thus adding new insights into the mechanisms by which galectin-3 augments synovial inflammation. These findings corroborate the potential role of glycan inhibitors of galectin-3 as a therapeutic approach for the treatment of inflammatory arthritis.

  2. HMGB1-mediated autophagy decreases sensitivity to oxymatrine in SW982 human synovial sarcoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yongsong; Xu, Peng; Yang, Le; Xu, Ke; Zhu, Jialin; Wu, Xiaoqing; Jiang, Congshan; Yuan, Qiling; Wang, Bo; Li, Yuanbo; Qiu, Yusheng

    2016-01-01

    Oxymatrine (OMT) is a type of alkaloid extracted from a traditional Chinese medicinal herb, Sophora flavescens. Although the antitumor activities of OMT have been observed in various cancers, there are no reports regarding the effects of OMT on human synovial sarcoma. In the present study, we analyzed the antitumor activities of OMT in SW982 human synovial sarcoma cells and determine whether high mobility group box protein 1 (HMGB1)-mediated autophagy was associated with its therapeutic effects. We found that OMT exhibited antitumor activity in SW982 cells and facilitated increases in autophagy. Inhibition of autophagy by 3-MA or ATG7 siRNA increased the level of apoptosis, which indicated that OMT-induced autophagy protected cells from the cytotoxicity of OMT. Administration of OMT to SW982 cells increased the expression of HMGB1. When HMGB1 was inhibited via HMGB1-siRNA, OMT-induced autophagy was decreased, and apoptosis was increased. Furthermore, we found that HMGB1-siRNA significantly increased the expression of p-Akt and p-mTOR. OMT-induced autophagy may be mediated by the Akt/mTOR pathway, and HMGB1 plays a vital role in the regulation of autophagy. Therefore, we believe that combining OMT with an inhibitor of autophagy or HMGB1 may make OMT more effective in the treatment of human synovial sarcoma. PMID:27897164

  3. HMGB1-mediated autophagy decreases sensitivity to oxymatrine in SW982 human synovial sarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yongsong; Xu, Peng; Yang, Le; Xu, Ke; Zhu, Jialin; Wu, Xiaoqing; Jiang, Congshan; Yuan, Qiling; Wang, Bo; Li, Yuanbo; Qiu, Yusheng

    2016-11-29

    Oxymatrine (OMT) is a type of alkaloid extracted from a traditional Chinese medicinal herb, Sophora flavescens. Although the antitumor activities of OMT have been observed in various cancers, there are no reports regarding the effects of OMT on human synovial sarcoma. In the present study, we analyzed the antitumor activities of OMT in SW982 human synovial sarcoma cells and determine whether high mobility group box protein 1 (HMGB1)-mediated autophagy was associated with its therapeutic effects. We found that OMT exhibited antitumor activity in SW982 cells and facilitated increases in autophagy. Inhibition of autophagy by 3-MA or ATG7 siRNA increased the level of apoptosis, which indicated that OMT-induced autophagy protected cells from the cytotoxicity of OMT. Administration of OMT to SW982 cells increased the expression of HMGB1. When HMGB1 was inhibited via HMGB1-siRNA, OMT-induced autophagy was decreased, and apoptosis was increased. Furthermore, we found that HMGB1-siRNA significantly increased the expression of p-Akt and p-mTOR. OMT-induced autophagy may be mediated by the Akt/mTOR pathway, and HMGB1 plays a vital role in the regulation of autophagy. Therefore, we believe that combining OMT with an inhibitor of autophagy or HMGB1 may make OMT more effective in the treatment of human synovial sarcoma.

  4. Antiarthritis Effect of Morin is Associated with Inhibition of Synovial Angiogensis.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Ni; Tong, Bei; Zhang, Xinyu; Dou, Yannong; Wu, Xin; Xia, Yufeng; Dai, Yue; Wei, Zhifeng

    2015-12-01

    Morin, a flavonoid isolated from Morus alba L. (Moraceae), possesses anti-inflammatory, antiangiogenic among other biological activities. This study investigated its effect on type II collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in rats and explored the underlying mechanisms in view of synovial angiogenesis. Morin administered po attenuated arthritic progression as indicated by reduction of arthritis scores and paw swelling. It also markedly reduced serum levels of the proinflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6), but increased the level of anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10, and ameliorated histopathological changes of joints. Morin markedly inhibited expression of CD31, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and basic fibroblast growth factor in synovial membrane tissues, and decreased serum levels of VEGF in CIA rats. In vitro, morin markedly inhibited VEGF-induced migration and tube formation in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. These results indicate that morin had antirheumatoid potential, and its mechanism might be associated with inhibition of synovial angiogenesis. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. A protocol for the culture and isolation of murine synovial fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jinjun; Ouyang, Qingqing; Hu, Ziyou; Huang, Qin; Wu, Jing; Wang, Ran; Yang, Min

    2016-01-01

    The culture of synovial fibroblasts (SFs) is one of the most effective tools for investigating the pathology and physiology of synovial tissues and should prove useful for identifying the importance of SFs in disease as well as for the development of novel therapeutic approaches for several chronic joint diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis. However, thus far, a detailed protocol for the primary culture and isolation of murine SFs has not been established. Therefore, the present study describes an easy and convenient method for isolating and culturing SFs from C57BL/6 mice. This protocol can be divided into 4 stages: Isolation of synovial tissues, isolation of SFs, seeding of SFs for growth in culture and purity analysis of SFs using the four cell markers, vimentin, cluster of differentiation 90.2 (CD90.2; Thy-1.2), intracellular adhesion molecule 1 (CD54) and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (CD106). This method is efficient and a purified population of SFs can be obtained 10 days after the initiation of culture. PMID:27446536

  6. Pre-tibial synovial cyst after reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament: case report.

    PubMed

    Bulisani, Luís Eduardo Pedigoni; Bulisani, Erickson

    2014-01-01

    Arthroscopic reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament has been modernized through new surgical techniques and new materials. When tibial fixation is performed using an absorbable screw, complications may occur, such as formation of a pre-tibial cyst. The case described here is about a patient who presented an anteromedial synovial cyst in his right knee, three years after having undergone ACL reconstruction. The patient did not present any pain nor any complaints other than a mass that progressively increased in size, worsened after physical activities. Imaging examinations were requested: simple radiography of the knee and magnetic resonance. Anteromedial imaging of the knee showed a mass with well-delimited borders and internal fluid content, suggestive of a synovial cyst, with communication with the joint cavity through the tibial tunnel, without presenting enlargement or absorption of the bone tunnel. The cyst was surgically resected and the tibial tunnel occlusion was performed using a bone plug. The diagnosis of a synovial cyst was subsequently confirmed through the results from the anatomopathological examination. The patient presented good clinical evolution, with disappearance of the symptoms and a return to physical activities.

  7. Targeting the synovial angiogenesis as a novel treatment approach to osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Pesesse, Laurence; Lambert, Cecile

    2014-01-01

    Synovitis is a key feature in osteoarthritis and is associated with symptom severity. Synovial membrane inflammation is secondary to cartilage degradation which occurs in the early stage and is located adjacent to cartilage damage. This inflammation is characterized by the invasion and activation of macrophages and lymphocytes, the release in the joint cavity of large amounts of pro-inflammatory and procatabolic mediators, and by a local increase of synovial membrane vascularity. This latter process plays an important role in the chronicity of the inflammatory reaction by facilitating the invasion of the synovium by immune cells. Therefore, synovial membrane angiogenesis represents a key target for the treatment of osteoarthritis. This paper is a narrative review of the literature referenced in PubMed during the past 5 years. It addresses in particular three questions. What are the mechanisms involved in synovium blood vessels invasion? Are current medications effective in controlling blood vessels formation and invasion? What are the perspectives of research in this area? PMID:24489612

  8. Epigenetic modifications of interleukin-6 in synovial fibroblasts from osteoarthritis patients

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fei; Zhou, Song; Wang, Chuandong; Huang, Yan; Li, Huiwu; Wang, You; Zhu, Zhenan; Tang, Jian; Yan, Mengning

    2017-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common degenerative disease of the synovial joint. The synovial membrane is responsible for the inflammatory reaction leading to the secretion of macrophage-derived pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6. Suppressing IL-6 over-expression in synovial fibroblasts (SF) is a promising method to prevent OA development and progression, in which the prerequisite is the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying IL-6 over-expression in SF. Currently, there are few reports concerning epigenetic modifications in IL-6 in OA SF. In the present study, we attempted to investigate this phenomenon. SF over-expressing IL-6 was collected from OA patients. DNA hypomethylation and histone hyperacetylation were observed in the IL-6 promoter regions in OA SF compared with normal SF. No differences in the status of H3K9 di-methylation, H3K27 tri-methylation and H3K4 tri-methylation were observed in the IL-6 promoter regions between normal and OA SF. DNA (cytosine-5-)-methyltransferase 3 alpha (Dnmt3a) overexpression and anacardic acid (histone acetyltransferase inhibitor) treatment increased DNA methylation and decreased histone acetylation in the IL-6 promoter, and IL-6 over-expression in OA SF was suppressed. These observations provide deeper insight into the pathogenesis of OA and can be used to design new drugs and develop new therapeutic methods to treat OA. PMID:28262826

  9. Impact of synovial fluid flow on temperature regulation in knee cartilage.

    PubMed

    Moghadam, Mohamadreza Nassajian; Abdel-Sayed, Philippe; Camine, Valérie Malfroy; Pioletti, Dominique P

    2015-01-21

    Several studies have reported an increase of temperature in cartilage submitted to cyclic sinusoidal loading. The temperature increase is in part due to the viscous behavior of this tissue, which partially dissipates the input mechanical energy into heat. While the synovial fluid flow within the intra-articular gap and inside the porous cartilage is supposed to play an important role in the regulation of the cartilage temperature, no specific study has evaluated this aspect. In the present numerical study, a poroelastic model of the knee cartilage is developed to evaluate first the temperature increase in the cartilage due to dissipation and second the impact of the synovial fluid flow in the cartilage heat transfer phenomenon. Our results showed that, the local temperature is effectively increased in knee cartilage due to its viscous behavior. The synovial fluid flow cannot significantly preventing this phenomenon. We explain this result by the low permeability of cartilage and the moderate fluid exchange at the surface of cartilage under deformation.

  10. Physiological compartmentation of fluid within the synovial cavity of the rabbit knee.

    PubMed Central

    Knight, A D; Levick, J R

    1982-01-01

    1. The relationship between pressure in the suprapatellar region (Psp) of the synovial cavity of the rabbit knee, and volume of fluid (oil or saline) infused into that region displayed a pressure plateau (15 . 5 cm H2O) between 1 . 2 and 2 . 0 ml. 2. No pressure plateau occurred when fluid was infused simultaneously into the suprapatellar and posteromedial regions of the synovial space. 3. Pressure in the posteromedial region (Ppm) did not respond to suprapatellar fluid infusions until onset of the suprapatellar pressure plateau. During the plateau phase, Ppm rose steadily towards Psp. At the end of the plateau phase the two pressures were almost equal and rose in parallel. 4. The plateau phenomen also occurred during aspiration of volume-expanded joints; and was present at all joint angles. 5. It was concluded that the joint space, although anatomically continuous, is divided into two hydraulically separate compartments at physiological pressures. 6. The sites of communication between the two compartments at pathological pressures were explored by casts of the synovial cavity. Images Fig. 9 PMID:7153903

  11. Serum and synovial fluid lipidomic profiles predict obesity-associated osteoarthritis, synovitis, and wound repair

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chia-Lung; Kimmerling, Kelly A.; Little, Dianne; Guilak, Farshid

    2017-01-01

    High-fat diet-induced obesity is a major risk factor for osteoarthritis (OA) and diminished wound healing. The objective of this study was to determine the associations among serum and synovial fluid lipid levels with OA, synovitis, adipokine levels, and wound healing in a pre-clinical obese mouse model of OA. Male C57BL/6 J mice were fed either a low-fat (10% kcal) or one of three high-fat (HF, 60% kcal) diets rich in saturated fatty acids (SFAs), ω-6 or ω-3 polyunsaturated FAs (PUFAs). OA was induced by destabilization of the medial meniscus. Mice also received an ear punch for evaluating wound healing. Serum and synovial fluid were collected for lipidomic and adipokine analyses. We demonstrated that the serum levels of ω-3 PUFAs were negatively correlated with OA and wound size, but positively correlated with adiponectin levels. In contrast, most ω-6 PUFAs exhibited positive correlations with OA, impaired healing, and inflammatory adipokines. Interestingly, levels of pentadecylic acid (C15:0, an odd-chain SFA) and palmitoleic acid were inversely correlated with joint degradation. This study extends our understanding of the links of FAs with OA, synovitis and wound healing, and reports newly identified serum and synovial fluid FAs as predictive biomarkers of OA in obesity. PMID:28317846

  12. 1H NMR investigation of normal and osteo-arthritic synovial fluid in the horse.

    PubMed

    Lacitignola, L; Fanizzi, F P; Francioso, E; Crovace, A

    2008-01-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H NMR) has been successfully used in the study of many biological fluids. The data presented here report on the metabolic profiles of normal equine synovial fluids compared with osteoarthritic (OA) fluids. Twenty-five OA synovial fluid samples and eight normal ones were collected from the forelimb fetlock joint in 22 horses, aged between five and 24 years. 1H NMR spectroscopy was carried out with a Bruker Avance DRX 500 equiped with a cryo-magnet working at 11 Tesla, and 'Mestre-C 4.9.9.6' software was used to analyze the spectra. The study assessed the increase of lactate, alanine, acetate, N-acetylglucosamine, pyruvate, citrate, creatine/creatinine, glycerol, HDL choline, and a-glucose in OA synovial fluid. The variations observed in samples from horses with OA compared to those in the control group, and similar data found in other studies, confirm that this technique may be useful in the study of joint metabolism. Its practical application may be in the evaluation of the treatment of OA in athletic horses.

  13. Neutral amino acid transport in human synovial cells: substrate specificity of adaptative regulation and transinhibition.

    PubMed

    Aussel, C; Rousseau-Loric, S; Cynober, L; Agneray, J; Ekindjian, O G

    1989-10-01

    Neutral amino acid transport was characterized in human synovial cells. The amino acids tested are transported by all three major neutral amino acid transport systems, that is, A, L, and ASC. The model amino acid 2-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) was found to be a strong specific substrate for system A in synovial cells. When cells were starved of amino acids, the activity of AIB transport increased, reaching a maximum within 1 h. The stimulation of transport activity was not blocked by cycloheximide and would thus appear to be related to a release from transinhibition. Similarly, the decrease in the activity of AIB transport observed after the addition of alpha-methyl-aminoisobutyric acid (meAIB) appeared to be related to transinhibition. However, using a different approach, that is, amino acid starvation followed by incubation with 10 mM meAIB and transfer to an amino acid-free medium with or without cycloheximide supplementation, a clear increase in AIB uptake, due both to derepression and a release from transinhibition, was observed. Unlike human fibroblasts, the depression of system A in these synovial cells was not serum-dependent. The process of derepression was observed only after preloading with meAIB. Neither AIB nor alanine produced this phenomenon. Moreover, alanine preloading led to a large increase in AIB transport activity due to a release from transinhibition. These observations indicate that the process of derepression and release from transinhibition are specific to the substrates present in the culture medium prior to amino acid starvation.

  14. Penetration of Daptomycin into Bone and Synovial Fluid in Joint Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Montange, D.; Berthier, F.; Leclerc, G.; Serre, A.; Jeunet, L.; Berard, M.; Muret, P.; Vettoretti, L.; Leroy, J.; Hoen, B.

    2014-01-01

    Daptomycin exhibits clinical activity in the treatment of infections with Gram-positive organisms, including infections due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. However, little is known about its penetration into bone and synovial fluid. The aim of our study was to assess the penetration of daptomycin into bone and synovial fluid after a single intravenous administration. This study was conducted in 16 patients who underwent knee or hip replacement and received a single intravenous dose of 8 mg of daptomycin per kg of body weight prior to surgery. Plasma daptomycin concentrations were measured 1 h after the end of daptomycin infusion and when bone fragments were removed. Daptomycin concentrations were also measured on bone fragments and synovial fluid collected at the same time during surgery. All samples were analyzed with a diode array–high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method. After a single-dose intravenous infusion, bone daptomycin concentrations were above the MIC of daptomycin for Staphylococcus aureus in all subjects, and the median bone penetration percentage was 9.0% (interquartile range [IQR], 4.4 to 11.4). These results support the use of daptomycin in the treatment of Staphylococcus aureus bone and joint infections. PMID:24798278

  15. Biphasic synovial sarcoma in a 19-year-old pregnant woman: a case report.

    PubMed

    Adameşteanu, Mădălina Olivia; Scurtu, Răzvan; Lascăr, Ioan; Vâlcu, Marek; Popescu, Şerban Arghir; Sebe, Ioana Teona

    2015-01-01

    Synovial sarcoma is a rare malignant tumor of mesenchymal multipotent cells. We hereby present a case of synovial sarcoma of the upper left thigh. A 19-year-old patient was referred to our clinic by another hospital in Bucharest, Romania, for a soft tissue mass in the left upper thigh. Local examination of the left thigh revealed a 15÷13 cm, ovoid, painful upon touch, soft tissue mass occupying the proximal-medial aspect of the thigh. Bilateral inguinal nodes' enlargement was noticed. Upon suspecting regional node involvement, the surgical team decided to perform left limb amputation due to tumor size and the proximity to major arterial and nervous trunks as well as the femoral shaft, making curative surgery and 'free of disease' resection margins improbable. The patient refused the operation. The surgical team (plastic surgeon, orthopedic surgeon) decided to attempt limb-sparing surgery. After tumor resection, free-of-disease surgical margins were achieved. The pathological examination as well as the immunohistochemistry (IHC) diagnosed a large biphasic synovial sarcoma warranting oncologic treatment. The association between tumor growth and pregnancy poses important therapeutic problems, such as the use of preoperative chemotherapy, potential pregnancy termination, limb amputation versus limb salvage intervention and types of protocols of chemotherapy or radiotherapy indicated.

  16. Antioxidant capacity of synovial fluid in the temporomandibular joint correlated with radiological morphology of temporomandibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Ishimaru, Kyoko; Ohba, Seigo; Yoshimura, Hitoshi; Matsuda, Shinpei; Ishimaru, Jun-Ichi; Sano, Kazuo

    2015-02-01

    We investigated the correlation between the antioxidant capacity of synovial fluid and radiological findings of intra-articular structures in patients with disorders of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). We recruited 21 patients (9 men and 12 women, aged 18-84 years of age) with such disorders, excluding myofascial pain and dysfunction syndrome, or other muscular disorders. The clinical variables recorded included age, sex, interincisal distance, and visual analogue pain scores (VAS). Radiological findings were obtained from diagnostic arthrogram and cone-beam computed tomography (CT). The antioxidant capacity of the synovial fluid was measured by chemiluminescence. Eleven patients were radiologically diagnosed with closed lock, and the remaining 10 with no closed lock. An anchored intra-articular disc was most often seen on cone-beam CT (n=19) followed by perforated disc (n=7), osteoarthrosis (n=7), and anterior disc displacement without reduction (n=5). Although there were no significant differences between antioxidant capacity and age, sex, VAS, or any findings on cone-beam CT, antioxidant capacity was significantly decreased in the patients with closed lock compared with those who did not have closed lock (p=0.02). The results suggest an association between the oxidative stress of the synovial fluid and closed-lock in disorders of the TMJ.

  17. A Case of Rheumatoid Arthritis with Unilateral Knee Synovial Hypertrophy in Hemiplegia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chan Woo; Kim, Mi Jung; Park, Si Bog

    2012-01-01

    A 64-year-old woman suffering right hemiplegia came in with pain and swelling on her left knee, general weakness and poor oral intake for 2 months. On physical examination we were able to palpate a mass with irregular margin around the left suprapatellar area. From the results of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), synovial proliferative disease, infectious arthritis, or gouty arthritis was suspected. We performed a blood laboratory test to detect rheumatologic diseases, knee joint aspiration, and bone scan for differential diagnosis, and were able to diagnose rheumatoid arthritis (RA) from the results of blood laboratory, physical examination, and bone scan. Consequently, we started medications for controlling RA. Herein, we report a case of rheumatoid arthritis with unilateral knee synovial hypertrophy in hemiplegia. If a right hemiplegic patient has recurrent pain on the left knee and synovial hypertrophy, and fails to respond to treatment for osteoarthritis, early detection by evaluation for rheumatic disease is crucial to prevent severe sequelae influencing rehabilitation of hemiplegia. PMID:22506248

  18. Anatomical Basis and Clinical Application of Synovial Flaps in the Wrist and Distal Forearm.

    PubMed

    Colen, David L; Yeh, Jiun-Ting; Colen, Lawrence B

    2017-01-12

    Neuropathic symptoms after median nerve repair at the wrist or secondary to refractory carpal tunnel syndrome may become debilitating. These symptoms develop due to perineural adhesions, intraneural fibrosis and fixation of the nerve to the transverse carpal ligament after surgery and often require neurolysis. Interposition of vascularized soft tissue over the median nerve at the time of neurolysis prevents recurrence of such adhesions. The synovial flap, fashioned from the synovial lining of the flexor tendon sheath, is an ideal tissue for this purpose. Previous authors have described the surgical technique of the synovial flap, but the anatomical basis and design of the flap have not been previously discussed.Twenty fresh cadaver upper extremities were injected with microfil in order to analyze the arterial anatomy, flap dimensions and arc of rotation of the flexor tendon synovium mobilized as a flap suitable for coverage of the median nerve at the wrist. We determined that both radial and ulnar based flaps are clinically useful for providing coverage in the wrist and distal forearm. This flap was used in eighteen patients with complicated median nerve lesions in this region. All patients had an uncomplicated postoperative course. Of thirteen patients treated for post-traumatic median nerve neuromas, all but two had significant resolution of symptoms. When used as a vascularized flap, the flexor tendon synovium provides adequate protection of the median nerve. Flap dimensions and vascularity of this tissue make it an ideal local flap option when performing reoperative surgery on the median nerve.

  19. Primary orbital synovial sarcoma: A clinicopathologic review with a differential diagnosis and discussion of molecular genetics.

    PubMed

    Stagner, Anna M; Jakobiec, Frederick A; Fay, Aaron

    Synovial sarcoma is a soft-tissue sarcoma of the extremities developing in young adults that has rarely been reported in the orbit. Synovial sarcoma is associated with a unique translocation, resulting in an SYT-SSX fusion gene. We analyze 7 published periocular cases, together with the current one, to gain a better appreciation of the features of the tumor in this location and to compare the findings with those derived from nonophthalmic studies. An inferior orbital mass developed in a 31-year-old woman after experiencing periorbital and hemifacial pain for more than a decade. Radiographically, the mass was circumscribed and displayed coarse internal calcifications. A large but subtotal excision with histopathologic examination disclosed a primitive tumor composed of spindled and ovoid cells. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated positivity for nuclear transducin-like enhancer of split 1 and membranous CD99, typical for synovial sarcoma. Fluorescence in situ hybridization identified a (X,18) translocation in the tumor cells. The patient underwent postoperative adjuvant proton beam radiotherapy with a good response that has been maintained during 1 year of follow-up. Orbital soft-tissue tumors of all types are increasingly identified by their distinctive genetic signatures that offer more specificity than standard immunohistochemical tests.

  20. 45 CFR 1388.7 - Program criteria-dissemination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    .... (a) Introduction to dissemination: The UAP disseminates information and research findings, including..., productivity, integration and inclusion of individuals with developmental disabilities and their families. (b) The UAP must be a resource for information for individuals with developmental disabilities and...

  1. 45 CFR 1388.7 - Program criteria-dissemination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    .... (a) Introduction to dissemination: The UAP disseminates information and research findings, including..., productivity, integration and inclusion of individuals with developmental disabilities and their families. (b... the knowledge base through publications and presentations, including those based on research...

  2. Synovial Sarcoma Microvesicles Harbor the SYT-SSX Fusion Gene Transcript: Comparison of Different Methods of Detection and Implications in Biomarker Research

    PubMed Central

    Fricke, A.; Ullrich, P. V.; Cimniak, A. F. V.; Follo, M.; Nestel, S.; Heimrich, B.; Nazarenko, I.; Stark, G. B.; Bannasch, H.; Braig, D.; Eisenhardt, S. U.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Synovial sarcoma is an aggressive soft-tissue malignancy. This study examines the presence of the SYT-SSX fusion transcript in synovial sarcoma microvesicles as well as its potential role as a biomarker for synovial sarcoma. Patients and Methods. Microvesicle release of synovial sarcoma cells was examined by transmission electron microscopy. RNA-content was analyzed by qPCR, nested PCR, nested qPCR, and droplet digital PCR to compare their sensitivity for detection of the SYT-SSX fusion gene transcript. Whole blood RNA, RNA of mononuclear cells, and microvesicle RNA of synovial sarcoma patients were analyzed for the presence of the fusion gene transcripts. Results. Electron microscopic analysis revealed synovial sarcoma cells releasing membrane-enclosed microvesicles. In vitro, the SYT-SSX fusion gene transcript was detected in both synovial sarcoma cells and microvesicles. Nested qPCR proved to be the most sensitive in detecting the SYT-SSX fusion gene mRNA. In contrast, the fusion gene transcript was not detected in peripheral blood cells and microvesicles of synovial sarcoma patients. Conclusion. Synovial sarcoma cells release microvesicles harboring the SYT-SSX fusion transcript. Nested qPCR proved to be the most sensitive in detecting the SYT-SSX fusion gene mRNA; however, more sensitive assays are needed to detect cancer-specific microvesicles in the peripheral blood of cancer patients. PMID:27069481

  3. Synovial Sarcoma Microvesicles Harbor the SYT-SSX Fusion Gene Transcript: Comparison of Different Methods of Detection and Implications in Biomarker Research.

    PubMed

    Fricke, A; Ullrich, P V; Cimniak, A F V; Follo, M; Nestel, S; Heimrich, B; Nazarenko, I; Stark, G B; Bannasch, H; Braig, D; Eisenhardt, S U

    2016-01-01

    Background. Synovial sarcoma is an aggressive soft-tissue malignancy. This study examines the presence of the SYT-SSX fusion transcript in synovial sarcoma microvesicles as well as its potential role as a biomarker for synovial sarcoma. Patients and Methods. Microvesicle release of synovial sarcoma cells was examined by transmission electron microscopy. RNA-content was analyzed by qPCR, nested PCR, nested qPCR, and droplet digital PCR to compare their sensitivity for detection of the SYT-SSX fusion gene transcript. Whole blood RNA, RNA of mononuclear cells, and microvesicle RNA of synovial sarcoma patients were analyzed for the presence of the fusion gene transcripts. Results. Electron microscopic analysis revealed synovial sarcoma cells releasing membrane-enclosed microvesicles. In vitro, the SYT-SSX fusion gene transcript was detected in both synovial sarcoma cells and microvesicles. Nested qPCR proved to be the most sensitive in detecting the SYT-SSX fusion gene mRNA. In contrast, the fusion gene transcript was not detected in peripheral blood cells and microvesicles of synovial sarcoma patients. Conclusion. Synovial sarcoma cells release microvesicles harboring the SYT-SSX fusion transcript. Nested qPCR proved to be the most sensitive in detecting the SYT-SSX fusion gene mRNA; however, more sensitive assays are needed to detect cancer-specific microvesicles in the peripheral blood of cancer patients.

  4. The use of native fluorescence analysis of synovial fluid in the diagnosis of medial compartment disease in medium- and large-breed dogs.

    PubMed

    Bilská, Kamila; Šteffeková, Zuzana; Birková, Anna; Mareková, Mária; Ledecký, Valent; Hluchý, Marián; Kisková, Terézia

    2016-05-01

    We assumed that proteins are most likely responsible for synovial fluid fluorescence and that changes detected in fluorescence intensity are most likely the result of changes in the concentration of fluorescent proteins. Synchronous fluorescent matrices from synovial fluid samples were measured in the excitation wavelength range of 200-350 nm using a luminescence spectrophotometer. The synchronous matrix of synovial fluid consists of 2 dominant fluorescent centers (F1 and F2) in the ultraviolet region. The fluorescence intensities of both centers were significantly higher in pathological samples, with p = 0.001 (a 59% increase of the median value) for the F1 center and p = 0.002 (a 52% increase of the median value) for the F2 center. Receiver operating characteristic analysis confirmed that synovial fluid autofluorescence is a significant predictor of medial compartment disease in dogs, with the area under the curve at 0.776 (F1) and 0.778 (F2). We did not detect any differences in the autofluorescence of synovial fluid between male and female, or any breed-based changes. No position changes of fluorescent centers were recorded in the synovial fluid in diseased dogs compared with healthy dogs. The synovial fluid metabolic fingerprint of canine patients with medial compartment disease differed from that of healthy dogs. Our study demonstrated the feasibility of synovial fluid fingerprinting to identify disease-specific profiles of synovial fluid metabolites.

  5. Hyaluronan secretion into the synovial cavity of rabbit knees and comparison with albumin turnover.

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, P J; Scott, D; Ray, J; Mason, R M; Levick, J R

    1997-01-01

    1. Hyaluronan is not only a lubricant but also enhances the synovial lining's resistance to fluid outflow. This finding led to the proposal that hyaluronan (> 2 x 10(6) Da, approximately 210 nm radius) may escape across the synovial lining less freely than smaller solutes (e.g. albumin, 6.7 x 10(4) Da, 3.6 nm radius) or water. Here multiple washouts were used to measure intraarticular hyaluronan mass and secretion rate in rabbit knees, leading to an estimate of hyaluronan turnover time. Plasma albumin permeation into the joint cavity was also measured to enable comparison of turnover times between molecules of very disparate size. 2. Endogenous hyaluronan mass in the joint cavity, analysed by high performance liquid chromatography of joint washes, was 182 +/- 9.9 micrograms (mean +/- S.E.M; n = 21). Since hyaluronan concentration in synovial fluid averages 3.62 +/- 0.19 micrograms microliters-1, the endogenous synovial fluid volume was calculated to be 50 microliters (mass/concentration), about double the aspiratable volume. 3. The hyaluronan secretion rate over 4 h was 4.80 +/- 0.77 micrograms h-1 (n = 5). The rate was significantly higher in contralateral joints expanded by 2 ml Ringer solution (5.80 +/- 0.84 micrograms h-1, n = 5, P = 0.01, Student's paired t test), indicating a stretch/hydration sensitive secretory mechanism. The newly secreted chains ((2.05-2.48) x 10(6) Da) were not significantly different in length from the endogenous chains (2.95 x 10(6) Da). 4. Hyaluronan turnover time, calculated as mass/secretion rate, was 31.4-37.9 h. This is more than an order of magnitude longer than turnover time for intra-articular albumin. The latter, determined from the intra-articular albumin mass and plasma-to-cavity permeation rate was 1.8 h (95% confidence intervals 1.2-3.5 h, n = 9). The big difference in turnover times support the view that, relative to albumin and water, hyaluronan is partially sieved out and retained in the joint cavity by the synovial

  6. Synovial explant inflammatory mediator production corresponds to rheumatoid arthritis imaging hallmarks: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Despite the widespread use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and Doppler ultrasound for the detection of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) disease activity, little is known regarding the association of imaging-detected activity and synovial pathology. The purpose of this study was to compare site-specific release of inflammatory mediators and evaluate the corresponding anatomical sites by examining colour Doppler ultrasound (CDUS) and MRI scans. Methods RA patients were evaluated on the basis of CDUS and 3-T MRI scans and subsequently underwent synovectomy using a needle arthroscopic procedure of the hand joints. The synovial tissue specimens were incubated for 72 hours, and spontaneous release of monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), interleukin 6 (IL-6), macrophage inflammatory protein 1β (MIP-1β) and IL-8 was measured by performing multiplex immunoassays. Bone marrow oedema (BME), synovitis and erosion scores were estimated on the basis of the rheumatoid arthritis magnetic resonance imaging score (RAMRIS). Mixed models were used for the statistical analyses. Parsimony was achieved by omitting covariates with P > 0.1 from the statistical model. Results Tissue samples from 58 synovial sites were obtained from 25 patients. MCP-1 was associated with CDUS activity (P = 0.009, approximate Spearman’s ρ = 0.41), RAMRIS BME score (P = 0.01, approximate Spearman’s ρ = 0.42) and RAMRIS erosion score (P = 0.03, approximate Spearman’s ρ = 0.31). IL-6 was associated with RAMRIS synovitis score (P = 0.04, approximate Spearman’s ρ = 0.50), BME score (P = 0.04, approximate Spearman’s ρ = 0.31) and RAMRIS erosion score (P = 0.03, approximate Spearman’s ρ = 0.35). MIP-1β was associated with CDUS activity (P = 0.02, approximate Spearman’s ρ = 0.38) and RAMRIS synovitis scores (P = 0.02, approximate Spearman’s ρ = 0.63). IL-8 associations with imaging outcome measures did not reach statistical significance. Conclusions The association between

  7. Differential regulation and expression of hyaluronan synthases in human articular chondrocytes, synovial cells and osteosarcoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Recklies, A D; White, C; Melching, L; Roughley, P J

    2001-01-01

    Recently three isoforms of hyaluronan synthase (HAS), the enzyme responsible for hyaluronate/hyaluronan (HA) biosynthesis, have been cloned, allowing us to study their expression pattern. Our objective was to determine which of the HAS isoenzymes were expressed in human articular chondrocytes, synovial fibroblasts and osteosarcoma cells, whether their expression could be modulated by growth factors (insulin-like growth factor-1, basic fibroblast growth factor and transforming growth factor (TGF-beta1) and cytokines [interleukin 1beta1 (IL-1beta)], and whether changes in the rate of HA synthesis by the cells correlated with changes in mRNA levels for one or more of the HAS isoforms. All three HAS isoforms were found to be expressed in the cultured cells analysed in this study, although the relative proportions varied for each cell type. HAS2 mRNA was usually predominant in chondrocytes, whereas synovial cells contained increased amounts of HAS1. HAS3 was always the least abundant message. The rapidly growing osteosarcoma cells contained almost exclusively HAS2 message. HAS usage in uncultured cartilage and synovial tissues was similar to that in the cultured cells, with HAS2 message being the predominant species in cartilage and HAS1 usually being the predominant species in synovium. HA synthesis was stimulated by the growth factors, but the extent of the response was cell-type specific. Synovial cells responded particularly well to IL-1beta, and showed a unique synergistic response when IL-1beta was used in combination with TGF-beta1. This response was much reduced in articular chondrocytes and absent in the osteosarcoma cells. Analysis of changes in HAS message levels indicated that there was often no correlation with the changes in HA secretion following exposure to growth factors. Although HAS-1 mRNA was increased in synovial cells after exposure to TGF-beta1/IL-1beta, the magnitude of the change was far less than the effect on HA synthesis. Our data thus

  8. Borrelia burgdorferi Induces the Production and Release of Proinflammatory Cytokines in Canine Synovial Explant Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Straubinger, Reinhard K.; Straubinger, Alix F.; Summers, Brian A.; Erb, Hollis N.; Härter, Luc; Appel, Max J. G.

    1998-01-01

    Canine synovial membrane explants were exposed to high- or low-passage Borrelia burgdorferi for 3, 6, 12, and 24 h. Spirochetes received no treatment, were UV light irradiated for 16 h, or were sonicated prior to addition to synovial explant cultures. In explant tissues, mRNA levels for the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-1α (IL-1α), IL-1β, and IL-8 were surveyed semiquantitatively by reverse transcription-PCR. Culture supernatants were examined for numbers of total and motile (i.e., viable) spirochetes, TNF-like and IL-1-like activities, polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) chemotaxis-inducing activities, and IL-8. During exposure to synovial explant tissues, the total number of spirochetes in the supernatants decreased gradually by ∼30%, and the viability also declined. mRNAs for TNF-α, IL-1α, IL-1β, and IL-8 were up-regulated in synovial explant tissues within 3 h after infection with untreated or UV light-irradiated B. burgdorferi, and mRNA levels corresponded to the results obtained with bioassays. During 24 h of coincubation, cultures challenged with untreated or UV light-irradiated spirochetes produced similar levels of TNF-like and IL-1-like activities. In contrast, explant tissues exposed to untreated B. burgdorferi generated significantly higher levels of chemotactic factors after 24 h of incubation than did explant tissues exposed to UV light-treated spirochetes. In identical samples, a specific signal for IL-8 was identified by Western blot analysis. High- and low-passage borreliae did not differ in their abilities to induce proinflammatory cytokines. No difference in cytokine induction between untreated and sonicated high-passage spirochetes was observed, suggesting that fractions of the organism can trigger the production and release of inflammatory mediators. The titration of spirochetes revealed a dose-independent cytokine response, where 103 to 107 B. burgdorferi organisms induced similar TNF

  9. Dissemination of Educational Tools and Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christian, C.

    1998-05-01

    The IDEAS program is oriented towards innovative approaches to education and therefore result in a wide range of programs including Astro Capella (the creation of a capella astronomy songs written and performed by a group from NASA/GSFC, Smale, Boyd, and Granger), video kiosks in the Air and Space Museum (SAO, Dow), teaching astronomy in the parks (U of Wisconsin, Bjorkman, Wilcots), as well as the more bread and butter programs of teacher training and curriculum development. In addition to describing some of the diverse programs to come out of the IDEAS programs, I will discuss the dissemination of the results of those programs, and especially the role of the broker/facilitator in that dissemination. The audience is invited to participate in this discussion.

  10. [Acute arterial occlusion associated disseminated hydatidosis].

    PubMed

    Somocurcio, Jose; Alvarez, Gamero; Lara Campos, Gloria; Cahuana Aparco, Judith; Calongos Porras, Estefanny; Bermejo Cataño, Pedro; Tejada Llacsa, Paul

    2014-04-01

    Hydatidosis or echinococcosis are terms used to denote the zoonotic infestation caused by adult and larval stages (metacestode) of the cestode from the genus Echinococcus (family tenidae). The term hydatidosis should be applied to the infestation caused by the metacestode while echinococcosis for the larval and adult stages. In Peru there is a high prevalence of this infection, liver and lung being the most affected organs. There are factors from the host and from the infectious agent that contribute to this infection, with the immune component of the host as an important infection and dissemination point. A case of acute arterial occlusion associated with disseminated hydatidosis in a 54 years old patient, born and from Huancavelica, with sudden onset of an acute arterial obstruction is reported. The patient did not improve after surgery and died within 48 hours of presentation.

  11. Disseminated nocardiosis masquerading as metastatic malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Arjun, Rajalakshmi; Padmanabhan, Arjun; Reddy Attunuru, Bhanu Prakash; Gupta, Prerna

    2016-01-01

    Nocardiosis is an uncommon gram-positive bacterial infection caused by aerobic actinomycetes of the genus Nocardia. It can be localized or systemic and is regarded as an opportunistic infection that is commonly seen in immunocompromised hosts. We report a case of disseminated nocardiosis caused by Nocardia cyriacigeorgica in a patient with underlying malignancy in whom the clinical presentation was highly suggestive of a metastatic disease. PMID:27578940

  12. Disseminated adiaspiromycosis in a patient with AIDS.

    PubMed

    Echavarria, E; Cano, E L; Restrepo, A

    1993-01-01

    A case of disseminated adiaspiromycosis in an AIDS patient is described. The most notable characteristic of the infection was the extensive osteomyelitis exhibited by the patient. Positive cultures for Chrysosporium parvum var. parvum were obtained from pus taken from a lesion of the wrist during surgery as well as from sputum samples and a bone marrow aspirate. Treatment with amphotericin B controlled the fungal infection.

  13. Dissemination and implementation: INQRI's potential impact.

    PubMed

    Titler, Marita G; Wilson, Deleise S; Resnick, Barbara; Shever, Leah L

    2013-04-01

    Application of research evidence in care delivery improves patient outcomes. Large gaps still exist, however, between recommended care and that used in practice. To increase the understanding of implementation studies, and dissemination of research findings, we present the perspective of investigators from seven Interdisciplinary Nursing Quality Research Initiative (INQRI)-funded studies. To describe implementation strategies, challenges, and lessons learned from conducting 5 INQRI-funded implementation studies, and present 2 case examples of other INQRI studies to illustrate dissemination strategies. Potential impact of study findings are set forth. Qualitative descriptive methods were used for the implementation studies. Case examples were set forth by investigators using reflection questions. Four of the 5 implementation studies focused on clinical topics and 1 on professional development of nurse managers, 4 were multisite studies. Common implementation strategies used across studies addressed education, ongoing interaction with sites, use of implementation tools, and visibility of the projects on the study units. Major challenges were the Institutional Review Board approval process and the short length of time allocated for implementation. Successes and lessons learned included creating excitement about research, packaging of study tools and resources for use by other organizations, and understanding the importance of context when conducting this type of research. Case examples revealed that study findings have been disseminated to study sites and to the health care community through publications and presentations. The potential impact of all 7 studies is far reaching. This study captures several nuanced perspectives from 5 Principal Investigators, who were completing INQRI-funded implementation studies. These nuanced perspectives are important lessons for other scientists embarking on implementation studies. The INQRI case examples illustrate important

  14. Antibody response that protects against disseminated candidiasis.

    PubMed Central

    Han, Y; Cutler, J E

    1995-01-01

    We previously showed that surface mannans of Candida albicans function as adhesins during yeast cell attachment to mouse splenic marginal zone macrophages. The mannan adhesin fraction was encapsulated into liposomes and used to vaccinate mice over a 5- to 6-week period. Circulating agglutinins specific for the fraction correlated with increased resistance to disseminated candidiasis. Antiserum from vaccinated animals protected naive BALB/cByJ mice against C. albicans serotype A and B strains and Candida tropicalis. Antiserum also protected SCID mice against disseminated disease. The serum protective ability was stable at 56 degrees C, but this ability was adsorbed by C. albicans cells. The antiserum was divided into three fractions after separation by high-performance liquid chromatography. One fraction contained all of the agglutinin activity and transferred resistance to naive mice. A second fraction also transferred resistance. Two monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for candidal surface determinants were obtained. MAb B6.1 is specific for a mannan epitope in the adhesin fraction, and MAb B6 is specific for a different epitope in the fraction. Both MAbs are immunoglobulin M, and both strongly agglutinate candidal cells, but only MAb B6.1 protected both normal and SCID mice against disseminated candidiasis. In one experiment, 10 normal mice were given MAb B6.1 and challenged with yeast cells. Six mice survived the 67-day observation period; 4 of the survivors were cured as evidenced by the lack of CFU in the kidney and spleen. Our studies show that antibodies against certain cell surface antigens of C. albicans help the host resist disseminated candidiasis. PMID:7790089

  15. Disseminated cryptococcosis in a diabetic patient.

    PubMed

    Poojary, Shital; Khatu, Swapna

    2014-08-01

    Cryptococcosis is an opportunistic infection caused by Cryptococcus neoformans that typically presents in immunocompromised patients, most commonly in those with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. It rarely has been described in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). Defects in the host defense mechanisms due to hyperglycemia predispose diabetic patients to opportunistic infections such as cryptococcosis. We present a rare case of disseminated cryptococcosis in a 48-year-old HIV-negative man with DM.

  16. Disseminated aspergillosis associated with tsunami lung.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Yutaka; Tagami, Takashi; Kusakabe, Takashi; Kido, Norihiro; Kawaguchi, Takanori; Omura, Mariko; Tosa, Ryoichi

    2012-10-01

    Many survivors of the tsunami that occurred following the Great East Japan Earthquake on March 11, 2011, contracted a systemic disorder called "tsunami lung," a series of severe systemic infections following aspiration pneumonia caused by near drowning in the tsunami. Generally, the cause of aspiration pneumonia is polymicrobial, including fungi and aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, but Aspergillus infection is rarely reported. Here we report a case of tsunami lung complicated by disseminated aspergillosis, as diagnosed during autopsy.

  17. Time dissemination in the Hydro Quebec network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Missout, G.; Lefrancois, W.; Laroche, L.

    1979-01-01

    The ever increasing complexity of electrical networks combined with the increasing cost of power losses during a network failure has led public utilities to become equipped with more powerful and precise tools for pinpointing the causes of such a fault. Hydro Quebec has developed and is now using a time dissemination system which uses a modified IRIG B code transmitted on its own telecommunication network. The reasons for using such a system and the way it was carried out are discrete.

  18. Genomic Responses of Mouse Synovial Fibroblasts During Tumor Necrosis Factor-Driven Arthritogenesis Greatly Mimic Those in Human Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ntougkos, Evangelos; Chouvardas, Panagiotis; Roumelioti, Fani; Ospelt, Caroline; Frank-Bertoncelj, Mojca; Filer, Andrew; Buckley, Christopher D; Gay, Steffen; Nikolaou, Christoforos; Kollias, George

    2017-08-01

    Aberrant activation of synovial fibroblasts is a key determinant in the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aims of this study were to produce a map of gene expression and epigenetic changes occurring in this cell type during disease progression in the human tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-transgenic model of arthritis and to identify commonalities with human synovial fibroblasts. We used deep sequencing to probe the transcriptome, the methylome, and the chromatin landscape of cultured mouse arthritogenic synovial fibroblasts at 3 stages of disease, as well as synovial fibroblasts stimulated with human TNF. We performed bioinformatics analyses at the gene, pathway, and network levels, compared mouse and human data, and validated selected genes in both species. We found that synovial fibroblast arthritogenicity was reflected in distinct dynamic patterns of transcriptional dysregulation, which was especially enriched in pathways of the innate immune response and mesenchymal differentiation. A functionally representative subset of these changes was associated with methylation, mostly in gene bodies. The arthritogenic state involved highly active promoters, which were marked by histone H3K4 trimethylation. There was significant overlap between the mouse and human data at the level of dysregulated genes and to an even greater extent at the level of pathways. This study is the first systematic examination of the pathogenic changes that occur in mouse synovial fibroblasts during progressive TNF-driven arthritogenesis. Significant correlations with the respective human RA synovial fibroblast data further validate the human TNF-transgenic mouse as a reliable model of the human disease. The resource of data generated in this work may serve as a framework for the discovery of novel pathogenic mechanisms and disease biomarkers. © 2017, American College of Rheumatology.

  19. Monocarboxylate transporter 4, associated with the acidification of synovial fluid, is a novel therapeutic target for inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Wataru; Kawahito, Yutaka; Nagahara, Hidetake; Kukida, Yuji; Seno, Takahiro; Yamamoto, Aihiro; Kohno, Masataka; Oda, Ryo; Taniguchi, Daigo; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Ejima, Akika; Kishida, Tsunao; Mazda, Osam; Ashihara, Eishi

    2015-11-01

    Synovial fluid pH is decreased in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA); however, the underlying mechanisms are unclear. We undertook this study to examine the mechanism by which synovial fluid pH is regulated and to explore the possibility of a therapeutic strategy by manipulating this mechanism. We determined the pH and lactate concentration in synovial fluid from 16 RA patients. Cultured synovial fibroblasts (SFs) from the inflamed joints of 9 RA patients (RASFs) were examined for the expression of ion transporters that regulate intracellular and extracellular pH. The ion transporter up-regulated in RASF lines was then suppressed in RASFs by small interfering RNA (siRNA), and the effect of transfection on viability and proliferation was investigated. Finally, we examined the therapeutic effect of electrotransfer of monocarboxylate transporter 4 (MCT4)-specific siRNA into the articular synovium of mice with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Synovial fluid pH correlated inversely with both the Disease Activity Score in 28 joints using the C-reactive protein level and the synovial fluid lactate levels. RASFs exhibited up-regulated transcription of MCT4 messenger RNA. MCT4 exported intracellular lactate into the extracellular space. RASFs had significantly higher MCT4 protein levels than did SFs from patients with osteoarthritis. Knockdown of MCT4 induced intrinsic apoptosis of RASFs, thereby inhibiting their proliferation. Moreover, electrotransfer of MCT4-specific siRNA into the articular synovium of mice with CIA significantly reduced the severity of arthritis. RA activity correlated with decreased synovial fluid pH. This may be due to increased MCT4 expression in RASFs. Silencing MCT4 induced apoptosis in RASFs and reduced the severity of CIA, suggesting that MCT4 is a potential therapeutic target for inflammatory arthritis. © 2015, American College of Rheumatology.

  20. Twiddlenet: Metadata Tagging and Data Dissemination in Mobile Device Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    METADATA TAGGING AND DATA DISSEMINATION IN MOBILE DEVICE NETWORKS by Christopher T. Clotfelter Jonathon E. Towle September 2007 Thesis...Metadata Tagging and Data Dissemination in Mobile Device Networks 6. AUTHOR(S) Clotfelter, Christopher T. Towle , Jonathon E. 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 7...DISSEMINATION IN MOBILE DEVICE NETWORKS Jonathan E. Towle Captain, United States Maine Corps B.S., California State University Humboldt