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Sample records for distal radius endoprosthesis

  1. [Fractures of the distal radius].

    PubMed

    Rueger, J M; Hartel, M J; Ruecker, A H; Hoffmann, M

    2014-11-01

    The most prevalent fractures managed by trauma surgeons are those involving the distal radius. The injury occurs in two peaks of prevalence: the first peak around the age of 10 years and the second peak around the age of 60 years. Distal radius fracture management requires sensitive diagnostics and classification. The objectives of treatment are the reconstruction of a pain-free unlimited durable functioning of the wrist and avoidance of typical fracture complications. Non-operative conservative management is generally employed for stable non-displaced fractures of the distal radius with the expectation of a good functional outcome. Unstable comminuted fractures with intra-articular and extra-articular fragment zones are initially set in a closed operation and finally by osteosynthesis. An armament of surgical implants is available for instable fractures requiring fixation. Palmar locked plate osteosynthesis has been established in recent years as the gold standard for operative management of distal radius fractures. Complex Working Group on Osteosynthesis (AO) classification type 3 fractures require extensive preoperative diagnostics to identify and treat typical associated injuries around the wrist.

  2. [Distal radius fractures in children].

    PubMed

    Otayek, S; Ramanoudjame, M; Fitoussi, F

    2016-12-01

    Metaphyseal and physeal fractures of the distal radius are common in children. Most cases are best treated with closed reduction and cast immobilization. Long-term outcomes of these injuries are excellent when specific treatment principles of reduction and casting are followed. Surgical indications are limited and include open fractures, intra-articular fractures, non-reducible fractures, unstable fractures, and the presence of associated nerve injury. Closed reduction and percutaneous pin fixation is the most commonly used surgical option. The clinician should be aware of delayed complications such as growth disturbance of the distal radius, and understand how to manage these problems to ensure successful long-term outcomes. Epiphysiodesis is uncommon but growth plate injuries need to be followed for one year.

  3. Outcomes of Limb-Sparing Surgery Using Two Generations of Metal Endoprosthesis in 45 Dogs With Distal Radial Osteosarcoma. A Veterinary Society of Surgical Oncology Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Katherine E; Boston, Sarah E; Kung, Marvin; Dry, Sarah; Straw, Rod C; Ehrhart, Nicole P; Ryan, Stewart D

    2016-01-01

    To report outcomes in dogs with distal radial osteosarcoma (OSA) treated with metal endoprosthesis limb-sparing surgery and compare outcomes between 2 generations of endoprosthesis. Multi-institutional retrospective case series. Forty-five dogs with distal radial OSA treated with endoprosthesis and chemotherapy. Data of dogs treated with either first-generation endoprosthesis (GEN1) or second-generation endoprosthesis (GEN2) were sourced from medical records and radiographs. Surgical outcomes included postoperative lameness assessment and the presence, severity, and time to onset of complications. Oncologic outcomes included presence of local recurrence or metastasis, time to onset of local recurrence, metastasis-free interval (MFI), and survival time. Results for surgical and oncologic outcomes were compared between GEN1 and GEN2. Twenty-eight dogs received GEN1 and 17 dogs received GEN2. There were 39 complications (96%, 14 minor, 29 major) including infection (78%), implant-related complication (36%), and local recurrence (24%). Metastatic frequency was 67% and median MFI was 188 days (95% confidence interval [CI]: 126-250 days). Survival time ranged from 34 days to 6.1 years with a median of 289 days (95% CI: 207-371 days). There was no significant difference in complication severity, frequency, time to complication, MFI, or survival time between dogs receiving GEN1 and GEN2. There was no significant difference in outcomes between dogs receiving GEN1 and GEN2 for limb-sparing surgery of the radius. Metastatic frequency and survival time for metal endoprosthesis were similar to that of amputation with curative intent chemotherapy. © Copyright 2015 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  4. Elbow dislocation with ipsilateral distal radius fracture

    PubMed Central

    Meena, Sanjay; Trikha, Vivek; Kumar, Rakesh; Saini, Pramod; Sambharia, Abhishek Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Elbow dislocation associated with ipsilateral distal radius fracture is a rare pattern of injury, although it is common for elbow dislocation and forearm fractures to occur separately. We report a rare case of a 20-year-old male who had a posterior elbow dislocation and ipsilateral distal radius fracture. Elbow dislocation was first reduced in extension and distal radius fracture was then reduced in flexion. Both the injuries were conservatively managed. At 6 months follow-up, the patient had no pain in his elbow and minimal pain in his wrist on heavy lifting and had resumed his work as a laborer. PMID:24082758

  5. Elbow dislocation with ipsilateral distal radius fracture.

    PubMed

    Meena, Sanjay; Trikha, Vivek; Kumar, Rakesh; Saini, Pramod; Sambharia, Abhishek Kumar

    2013-07-01

    Elbow dislocation associated with ipsilateral distal radius fracture is a rare pattern of injury, although it is common for elbow dislocation and forearm fractures to occur separately. We report a rare case of a 20-year-old male who had a posterior elbow dislocation and ipsilateral distal radius fracture. Elbow dislocation was first reduced in extension and distal radius fracture was then reduced in flexion. Both the injuries were conservatively managed. At 6 months follow-up, the patient had no pain in his elbow and minimal pain in his wrist on heavy lifting and had resumed his work as a laborer.

  6. Distal radius fractures in the athlete.

    PubMed

    Beleckas, Casey; Calfee, Ryan

    2017-03-01

    Distal radius fractures are one of the most common upper extremity fractures. Athletes with distal radius fractures are treated according to the same principles as non-athletes but present several unique considerations. At all levels of sport, injured athletes desire to return to play as rapidly as possible. Earlier operative fixation may allow an athlete to return to play more quickly. Volar locking plates are most commonly used for operative treatment of distal radius fractures due to their stability and low incidence of complications. Although the majority of distal radius fractures in athletes are treated non-operatively, operative intervention is offered when required to restore and maintain acceptable skeletal alignment. Return to sport is individualized guided by fracture stability, athlete age, and wrist-specific demands for competition.

  7. Partial distal deployment for precise placement of the GORE Thoracic Endoprosthesis.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Gregory A

    2017-08-01

    The GORE TAG Thoracic Endoprosthesis (TAG) device (W. L. Gore & Associates, Flagstaff, Ariz) and the GORE Conformable TAG Thoracic Endoprosthesis (CTAG) are commonly implanted and effective stent grafts for use during thoracic endovascular aortic repair. Precise placement of the endograft is paramount during thoracic endovascular aortic repair, but like all thoracic stent grafts, maldeployment with inaccurate landing has been reported. The partial distal deployment technique describes an alteration of the TAG and CTAG deployment mechanism to allow isolated deployment of the distal half of the graft, which provides stability during deployment. The graft can be safely repositioned after partial distal deployment, thus allowing precise positioning in the proximal landing zone. Similarly, this technique can be used for precision in the distal landing zone, making the TAG and CTAG devices the only thoracic endografts currently available in the United States with a distal-first deployment option. A discussion of the usefulness of this technique and potential pitfalls is included. Copyright © 2017 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Operative treatment of distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Vasenius, J

    2008-01-01

    The incidence of distal radius fractures is increasing together with the average age of population. Intra-articular incongruity is the most probable cause of unsatisfactory outcome of distal radius fractures in younger and more active patients. Thus, the main goal in the treatment of distal radius fractures should be restoration of articular congruence. A computed tomography (CT) is recommended to help surgeon in preoperative planning in the treatment of comminuted intra-articular fractures. New implants have been designed to provide stable enough fixation for early mobilisation after surgery and to lower rather high complication rates related to conventional fixation methods such as external fixation and dorsal plating. The most common complications related to volar fixed angle plating such as flexor and extensor tendon problems, median nerve neuropathy, and screw diplacement into the radiocarpal joint are surgeon related and are avoidable with proper education. More randomized prospective studies are needed to prove superiority of any fixation method to another.

  9. Topographic matching of distal radius and proximal fibula articular surface for distal radius osteoarticular reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Chen, S; Wang, Z; Guo, Y; Liu, B; Tong, D

    2016-07-01

    During osteoarticular reconstruction of the distal radius with the proximal fibula, congruity between the two articular surfaces is an important factor in determining the quality of the outcome. In this study, a three-dimensional model and a coordinate transformation algorithm were developed on computed tomography scanning. Articular surface matching was performed and parameters for the optimal position were determined quantitatively. The mean radii of best-fit spheres of the articular surfaces of the distal radius and proximal fibula were compared quantitatively. The radial inclination and volar tilt following reconstruction by an ipsilateral fibula graft, rather than the contralateral, best resembles the values of the native distal radius. Additionally, the ipsilateral fibula graft reconstructed a larger proportion of the distal radius articular surface than did the contralateral. The ipsilateral proximal fibula graft provides a better match for the reconstruction of the distal radius articular surface than the contralateral, and the optimal position for graft placement is quantitatively determined.

  10. Fractures of Distal Radius: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Meena, Sanjay; Sharma, Pankaj; Sambharia, Abhishek Kumar; Dawar, Ashok

    2014-01-01

    Fractures of distal radius account for up to 20% of all fractures treated in emergency department. Initial assessment includes a history of mechanism of injury, associated injury and appropriate radiological evaluation. Treatment options include conservative management, internal fixation with pins, bridging and non-bridging external fixation, dorsal or volar plating with/without arthroscopy assistance. However, many questions regarding these fractures remain unanswered and good prospective randomized trials are needed. PMID:25657938

  11. Physeal arrest of the distal radius.

    PubMed

    Abzug, Joshua M; Little, Kevin; Kozin, Scott H

    2014-06-01

    Fractures of the distal radius are among the most common pediatric fractures. Although most of these fractures heal without complication, some result in partial or complete physeal arrest. The risk of physeal arrest can be reduced by avoiding known risk factors during fracture management, including multiple attempts at fracture reduction. Athletes may place substantial compressive and shear forces across the distal radial physes, making them prone to growth arrest. Timely recognition of physeal arrest can allow for more predictable procedures to be performed, such as distal ulnar epiphysiodesis. In cases of partial arrest, physeal bar excision with interposition grafting can be performed. Once ulnar abutment is present, more invasive procedures may be required, including ulnar shortening osteotomy or radial lengthening.

  12. Triplane fracture of the distal radius.

    PubMed

    García-Mata, Serafín; Hidalgo-Ovejero, Angel

    2006-07-01

    A case of triplane fracture of the distal radius is reported in a 13-year-old boy. This exceptional fracture showed displacement, and was healed by closed reduction and 6 weeks of external immobilization. Eighteen months later, the patient showed complete physeal arrest of the distal radius, with radio-ulnar length discrepancy but without any repercussion on wrist mobility. The patient was declared asymptomatic 3 years after the injury. Prompt, physiological physeal arrest reduces the potential of growth deformity. These fractures must be treated conservatively by closed reduction (if displacement exists) and external immobilization, just like a normal one-plane fracture. We may suppose that final radio-ulnar discrepancy could lead to a painful and symptomatic ulno-carpal conflict in adult life. The following characteristics can be associated with this rare fracture: (1) occurrence close to the end of the growth period, as in other types of triplane fractures; (2) evolution towards partial or complete growth arrest of the physis, not requiring treatment and (3) stability of the fracture after closed reduction. In the present case, as in the other reported cases, it may also be added that orthopaedic treatment has been the rule, in contrast with triplane fractures occurring in the distal tibia, in which surgical treatment is indicated.

  13. [Vascularized iliac crest and distal radius reconstruction].

    PubMed

    Pic Gomis, L; Gomis, R

    2010-12-01

    The authors relate their experience concerning the vascularized iliac crest flap. In the first chapter, they detail the anatomic vascularized osteocutaneous iliac crest. Blood supply arises from the deep and superficial circonflexe iliac artery. Many anastomoses connect the two systems. In the second chapter, they detail the operative technique of free and pedicule hone iliac crest flap. Composite cutaneous bone flaps are also detailed. In the third chapter, they detail informations about treatment of distal radius bone defects with associated skeen flap if necessary.

  14. Distal radius fracture after proximal row carpectomy

    PubMed Central

    Igeta, Yuka; Naito, Kiyohito; Sugiyama, Yoichi; Obata, Hiroyuki; Aritomi, Kentaro; Kaneko, Kazuo; Obayashi, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction We encountered a patient with distal radius fracture (DRF) after proximal row carpectomy (PRC). The mechanism of the DRF after PRC is discussed in this report. Presentation of case The patient was a 73-year-old female who had undergone PRC due to Kienböck disease before. The wrist range of motion was: 45° on dorsiflexion and 20° on flexion. DRF has occurred at 3 years after PRC. The fracture type was extra-articular fracture. Osteosynthesis was performed using a volar locking plate. No postoperative complication developed, the Mayo score was excellent at 6 months after surgery, and the daily living activity level recovered to that before injury. Discussion Since the wrist range of motion decreased and the lunate fitted into the joint surface after PRC, making the forearm join with the hand like a single structure, pressure may have been loaded on the weak distal end of the radius from the dorsal side, causing volar displacement and fracture. Conclusion The pressure distribution and range of motion of the radiocarpal joint after PRC are different from those of a normal joint, and the mechanism of fracture also changes due to PRC. PMID:25623755

  15. Ultrasound-Assisted Distal Radius Fracture Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Socransky, Steve; Skinner, Andrew; Bromley, Mark; Smith, Andrew; Anawati, Alexandre; Middaugh, Jeff; Ross, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Closed reduction of distal radius fractures (CRDRF) is a commonly performed emergency department (ED) procedure. The use of point-of-care ultrasound (PoCUS) to diagnose fractures and guide reduction has previously been described. The primary objective of this study was to determine if the addition of PoCUS to CRDRF changed the perception of successful initial reduction. This was measured by the rate of further reduction attempts based on PoCUS following the initial clinical determination of achievement of best possible reduction. Methods  We performed a multicenter prospective cohort study, using a convenience sample of adult ED patients presenting with a distal radius fracture to five Canadian EDs. All study physicians underwent standardized PoCUS training for fractures. Standard clinically-guided best possible fracture reduction was initially performed. PoCUS was then used to assess the reduction adequacy. Repeat reduction was performed if deemed indicated. A post-reduction radiograph was then performed. Clinician impression of reduction adequacy was scored on a 5 point Likert scale following the initial clinically-guided reduction and following each PoCUS scan and the post-reduction radiograph. Results  There were 131 patients with 132 distal radius fractures. Twelve cases were excluded prior to analysis. There was no significant difference in the assessment of the initial reduction status by PoCUS as compared to the clinical exam (mean score: 3.8 vs. 3.9; p = 0.370; OR 0.89; 95% CI 0.46 to 1.72; p = 0.87). Significantly fewer cases fell into the uncertain category with PoCUS than with clinical assessment (2 vs 12; p = 0.008). Repeat reduction was performed in 49 patients (41.2%). Repeat reduction led to a significant improvement (p < 0.001) in the PoCUS determined adequacy of reduction (mean score: 4.3 vs 3.1; p < 0.001). In this group, the odds ratio for adequate vs. uncertain or inadequate reduction assessment using PoCUS was 12.5 (95% CI 3

  16. New concepts in the treatment of distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Taras, John S; Ladd, Amy L; Kalainov, David M; Ruch, David S; Ring, David C

    2010-01-01

    Fracture of the distal radius is the type of fracture most commonly seen in emergency departments. The understanding of nonsurgical and surgical care of distal radius fractures is evolving with recently developed methods of fixation. It is worthwhile to review some new methods of treatment, the role of bone grafting and synthetic substitutes, the principles of complex fracture management, and the treatment of common complications of distal radius fractures.

  17. Fracture of the distal radius: epidemiology and premanagement radiographic characterization.

    PubMed

    Porrino, Jack A; Maloney, Ezekiel; Scherer, Kurt; Mulcahy, Hyojeong; Ha, Alice S; Allan, Christopher

    2014-09-01

    Fractures of the distal radius are common and frequently encountered by the radiologist. We review the epidemiology, classification, as well as the concept of instability. Salient qualitative and quantitative features of the distal radius fracture identifiable on the routine radiography series are highlighted. We conclude with a synopsis of descriptors that are of greatest utility to the clinician for treatment planning and that should be addressed in the radiology report. A detailed understanding of the intricacies of the distal radius fracture is necessary for the radiologist to provide a clinically relevant description.

  18. An Asian Perspective on the Management of Distal Radius Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Sebastin, Sandeep J.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis There is little data with regards to the epidemiology, pathology, or management of distal radius fractures from centers in Asia. Asia includes five advanced economies, namely Hong Kong SAR, Japan, Korea, Singapore, and Taiwan and a number of emerging economies prominent among which are China, India, Malaysia, Philippines, and Thailand. This article examines the available epidemiological data from Asia, and compares the management of distal radius fractures in the advanced and emerging Asian economies and how they match up to the current management in the west. It concludes by offering solutions for improving outcomes of distal radius fractures in both the advanced and emerging economies of Asia. PMID:22554658

  19. Loss of distal femur combined with popliteal artery occlusion: reconstructive arthroplasty using modular segmental endoprosthesis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kang, Shin-Taeg; Hwang, Chan-Ha; Kim, Bo-Hyeon; Sung, Byung-Yoon

    2009-04-01

    Severe injury to the knee and the surrounding area is frequently associated with injury to ligaments of the knee joint and structures in the popliteal fossa. This case involved a popliteal artery occlusion, severe bone loss of distal femur, loss of collateral ligaments, and extensor mechanism destruction of the knee. Initially, prompt recognition and correction of associated popliteal artery injury are important for good results after treatment. After successful revascularization, treatment for severe bone loss of distal femur and injury of the knee joint must be followed. We treated this case by delayed reconstruction using modular segmental endoprosthesis after revascularization of the popliteal artery. This allowed early ambulation. At 36 months after surgery, the patient had good circulation of the lower limb and was ambulating independently.

  20. Correlation between obesity and severity of distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Acosta-Olivo, C; Gonzalez-Saldivar, J C; Villarreal-Villarreal, G; Torres-Botello, A; Gomez-Garcia, E; Tamez-Mata, Y; Peña-Martinez, V

    2017-04-01

    The incidence of obesity has increased significantly worldwide. Our hypothesis was that patients with obesity have a more severe distal radius fracture and we realized a study to evaluate this correlation between obesity and severity of distal radius fractures caused by low-energy injuries. A total of 114 patients with distal radius fracture were examined in a cross-sectional, observational study. Fractures were classified according to the international AO-Müller/Orthopedic Trauma Association (AO/OTA) classification in order to determine the severity. The patient's Body Mass Index (BMI) was calculated and a Pearson correlation was performed. The patients were predominantly female, and left side was more frequently affected. Most of the fractures were AO/OTA type A (71 patients). The majority of the involved patients in our study were overweighed or obese. We do not observe a direct correlation between grade of obesity and distal radius fracture severity. Based on the results of this study obesity and severity of distal radius fractures do not correlate. Prognostic. Level IV. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Distal Radius Radiographic Indices and Perilunate Fracture Dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Bagherifard, Abolfazl; Jafari, Davod; Keihan Shokouh, Hassan; Motavallian, Ebrahim; Najd Mazhar, Farid

    2016-01-01

    Background Distal radius radiographic indices may play a role as risk factors in pathogenesis of Kienbock’s disease, scaphoid fracture and nonunion. Perilunate fracture dislocations are devastating wrist injuries, and their relationship and distal radius indices have not been addressed in the literature. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible role of distal radius radiographic indices including radial height, radial inclination, ulnar variance and volar tilt as risk factors in the perilunate fracture dislocation injury of the wrist. Patients and Methods We studied distal radius radiographic indices including radial height, radial inclination, ulnar variance and volar tilt in 43 patients with perilunate fracture dislocations and compared them with 44 wrists in the control group. Results The mean values of the radial height, radial inclination, ulnar variance and volar tilt were 12.74 (5 - 18), 24.20 (7 - 35), -0.73 (-5 - 4) and 12.28 (2 - 20) in the patient group. These values were 12.68 (9 - 22), 23.22 (17 - 30), -0.11 (-4 - 3) and 11.05 (-3 - 20), respectively in the control group. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups. Conclusions This study did not show that distal radius anatomical indices including the radial height, radial inclination, ulnar variance and volar tilt influence perilunate fracture dislocation as risk factors. PMID:27626004

  2. Accuracy of distal radius positioning using an anatomical plate.

    PubMed

    Vroemen, Joy C; Dobbe, Johannes G G; Sierevelt, Inger N; Strackee, Simon D; Streekstra, Geert J

    2013-04-01

    Over the past decade, several anatomical plates have been introduced to improve the result of open reduction and internal fixation of the distal radius. Using 3-dimensional imaging techniques, the authors studied the accuracy and reproducibility of distal radius positioning using anatomical plates.Distal radius fractures and the correction of these fractures were simulated with plastic bone models of radii. The authors simulated a defect by removing an arbitrary wedge shape from the artificial radii. Two surgeons corrected these fractures by placing 2 anatomical plate types according to the plate manufacturers' instructions. The residual positioning errors of the distal segment in relation to the unaffected radii were determined using 3-dimensional imaging and were compared with naturally occurring bilateral radius differences in healthy individuals. In many cases, positioning does not agree with differences based on bilateral asymmetry in healthy patients.This study indicated the accuracy of anatomical plates. Positioning an anatomical plate may lead to considerable residual errors in individual patients. Volar distal radius plate shapes differ among plate manufacturers. Therefore, one plate may perform better than another in an individual.

  3. Predicting the failure load of the distal radius.

    PubMed

    Muller, Monique E; Webber, Colin E; Bouxsein, Mary L

    2003-06-01

    The distal radius is an important site for the early detection of patients at risk for fracture. Since measuring bone strength in vivo is not possible, we evaluated which bone assessment method of the forearm would best predict failure load of the distal radius and computed a factor of risk for wrist fracture (Phi wrist). Thirty-eight cadaveric forearm specimens were measured by five different techniques to assess bone density, bone mineral content, geometry and trabecular structure at the distal forearm. The bone assessment techniques included dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) of the radius, peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) of the 4% and 20% distal sites of the radius, DXA of the phalanges, digital X-ray radiogrammetry of the forearm (DXR-BMD), and quantitative ultrasound of the radius. The failure load of each excised radius was determined by simulating a fall on an outstretched hand. The pQCT measurements of polar stress-strain index and cortical content explained the greatest portion of variance in failure load (r2=0.82-0.85). Bone mineral content measures were generally better predictors of failure load (r2=0.53-0.85) than the corresponding volumetric or areal bone mineral density values (r2=0.22-0.69) measured by either pQCT or DXA. Multiple regression analysis showed that the addition of a bone geometry measure improved the ability of a bone density measure alone to predict failure load. There was high variability in the ability of different techniques and different variables within a given technique to predict failure load. Estimates of the factor of risk for wrist fracture (Phi wrist) revealed that the women in this study would have been likely to fracture their distal radius upon falling from a standing height (Phi wrist= 1.04), whereas the men would have likely withstood the impact without fracturing their wrist (Phi wrist= 0.79).

  4. Future treatment and research directions in distal radius fracture.

    PubMed

    Jupiter, Jesse

    2012-05-01

    Whether or not they will have their lives dramatically extended in the next few decades, it is clear that people are living longer, healthier, and more active lives. The two peak incidences of distal radius fractures will remain within the pediatric and geriatric age groups, with the latter experiencing a substantial increase in the coming years. This article attempts to project future developments with regard to epidemiology, risk and prevention, fracture assessment, and treatment of distal radius fractures, and the ever increasing concern for the economic impact of this prevalent injury. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Unstable Distal Radius Fractures Treated by Volar Locking Anatomical Plates

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Anto; Deniese, Pascal Noel; Babu, Abey Thomas; Rengasamy, Kanagasabai; Najimudeen, Syed

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Fracture of the distal end of radius represents the most common fracture of the upper extremity accounting for 16-20% of all fractures. Plating is now emerging as the gold standard for management of distal radius fractures due to increased rate of complications such as malunion, subluxation/dislocation of distal radio-ulnar joint or late collapse of fracture. Procedures such as closed reduction and cast immobilization, ligamentotaxis with external fixator and percutaneous pin fixation are no longer acceptable. Aim The purpose of the study was to evaluate the functional and radiological outcome of unstable distal radius fractures treated with the volar locking plate. Materials and Methods We reviewed 53 patients from January 2011 to December 2015, treated for unstable distal radius fractures using a volar locking compression plate. Standard radiographic and clinical assessment after 12 months (range 12-16 months) were measured and final functional and radiological outcome were assessed using the Modified Mayo wrist scoring system and Sarmiento’s modification of Lindstorm criteria respectively. Results There were 42 males and 11 females with an average age of 39.12±31.78 years (18-71 years). At the end of 12 months, 36 patients had an excellent radiological outcome and 10 patients had good radiological outcome as per Sarmiento’s modification of Lindstorm criteria. Eleven patients had an excellent functional outcome and 26 patients had a good functional outcome as per modified Mayo wrist scoring system. There was one case of superficial wound infection which subsided with intravenous antibiotics. Conclusion The volar locking plate fixation helps in early mobilization of the wrist, restores anatomy, allows early return to function, prevents secondary loss of reduction and hence is an effective treatment for unstable fractures of the distal radius. PMID:28274009

  6. Ultrasound-Guided Reduction of Distal Radius Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Sabzghabaei, Anita; Shojaee, Majid; Arhami Dolatabadi, Ali; Manouchehrifar, Mohammad; Asadi, Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Distal radius fractures are a common traumatic injury, particularly in the elderly population. In the present study we examined the effectiveness of ultrasound guidance in the reduction of distal radius fractures in adult patients presenting to emergency department (ED). Methods: In this prospective case control study, eligible patients were adults older than 18 years who presented to the ED with distal radius fractures. 130 consecutive patient consisted of two group of Sixty-Five patients were prospectively enrolled for around 1 years. The first group underwent ultrasound-guided reduction and the second (control group) underwent blind reduction. All procedures were performed by two trained emergency residents under supervision of senior emergency physicians. Results: Baseline characteristics between two groups were similar. The rate of repeat reduction was reduced in the ultrasound group (9.2% vs 24.6%; P = .019). The post reduction radiographic indices were similar between the two groups, although the ultrasound group had improved volar tilt (mean, 7.6° vs 3.7°; P = .000). The operative rate was reduced in the ultrasound groups (10.8% vs 27.7%; P = .014). Conclusion: Ultrasound guidance is effective and recommended for routine use in the reduction of distal radius fractures. PMID:27299141

  7. Intrafocal pinning for distal radius metaphyseal fractures in children.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Shital N; Jain, Viral V; Youngquist, Jeffrey

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this retrospective case control study was to evaluate the results of intrafocal pinning for distal radius metaphyseal fractures in children and to compare these results with conventional pinning. Data were collected from medical records and radiographs from patients who underwent closed reduction and percutaneous pinning for distal radius fracture in a Level I trauma center at the authors' institution between 2008 and 2010. Inclusion criteria included a dorsally angulated metaphyseal fracture without physeal involvement, an open distal radius physis, and a follow-up to radiographic union. A total of 10 patients with intrafocal pinning were compared to 26 patients with conventional pinning. Preoperatively, angulation was greater in patients who received intrafocal pinning than conventional pinning based on anteroposterior radiographs. Postoperatively, the 2 groups did not differ in angulation on either anteroposterior or lateral radiographs. One malunion and 2 pin-related complications occurred in the conventional pinning group, and 1 pin-related complication occurred in the intrafocal pinning group. The 2 groups did not differ by age, sex, side of injury, days to surgery, or initial shortening. This study affirms that the intrafocal pinning technique is an alternative to the conventional pinning technique for the stabilization of displaced metaphyseal distal radius fractures in children. Intrafocal pinning can also be used as a reduction tool for fractures that cannot be reduced by closed manipulation. The complications are comparable between the 2 techniques.

  8. Ulnar Shortening Versus Distal Radius Corrective Osteotomy in the Management of Ulnar Impaction After Distal Radius Malunion.

    PubMed

    Aibinder, William R; Izadpanah, Ali; Elhassan, Bassem T

    2017-01-01

    Distal radius malunions lead to functional deficits. This study compares isolated ulnar shortening osteotomy (USO) to distal radius osteotomy (DRO) for the treatment of ulnar impaction syndrome following distal radius malunion. We retrospectively reviewed 11 patients with extra-articular distal radius malunions treated for ulnar impaction with isolated USO. This group was compared to a 1:1 age- and sex-matched cohort treated with isolated DRO for the same indication. Pain visual analog scale (VAS), wrist motion, grip strength, radiographic parameters, and perioperative complications were analyzed. Mean follow-up was 14.8 months. VAS scores improved. Wrist range of motion improved in both cohorts with the exception of radial deviation, pronation, and supination in the USO cohort, which decreased from a mean of 17°-16°, 67°-57°, and 54°-52°, respectively. There was no significant difference between groups in regard to change in pain or range of motion, with the exception of pronation and ulnar deviation. The mean tourniquet time was shorter in the USO group. The final ulnar variance was 1.8 mm negative in the USO group and 1.1 mm positive in the DRO group. There was 1 reoperation following USO for painful nonunion, while there were 2 reoperations following DRO for persistent ulnar impaction. An improvement in range of motion, grip strength, and VAS with restoration of the radioulnar length relationship was observed in both cohorts. USO is a simpler procedure with a shorter tourniquet time that can be an attractive alternative to DRO for ulnar impaction syndrome after distal radius malunions.

  9. [Distal radius fractures: new concepts as basis for surgical treatment].

    PubMed

    Rikli, D A; Babst, R; Jupiter, J B

    2007-02-01

    New advances in the biomechanics and pathomechanics of distal radius fractures as well as new generations of plates and improved surgical approaches now make possible the stable management and early functional rehabilitation not only of simple but also of complicated distal radius fractures according to the principles for articular and juxta-articular fractures. Especially for complex articular fractures, the fracture patterns are so heterogeneous that an individual surgical treatment strategy must be developed for each case. The preoperative clarification of articular fractures with computed tomography is particularly useful for planning surgery. Mental exposition with the three-column model and pathomechanics is an important prerequisite for understanding this type of injury and the appropriate choice of operative technique. A decisive factor for success is the subtle surgical procedure in approaching and handling the fine plates.

  10. Medical management of fragility fractures of the distal radius.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Emily N; Crawford, David A; Scully, William F; Noce, Nicholas J

    2014-12-01

    Fragility fractures of the distal radius represent an opportunity to diagnose and treat osteoporosis before further fractures occur. The goal of this study was to determine the prevalence of prescriptions for calcium/vitamin D supplementation and the prevalence of dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) scans in patients who sustained fragility fractures of the distal radius. A further goal was to determine the prevalence of patients who received prescriptions for the treatment of osteoporosis after DEXA scans. The authors performed a retrospective review of all patients 50 years and older who sustained a fragility fracture of the distal radius and were treated by the orthopedic surgery service at the authors' institution from 2004 to 2010. After a fragility fracture of the distal radius, fewer than 25% of previously unidentified at-risk patients received a prescription for vitamin supplementation and underwent a DEXA scan. Women were 7 times more likely than men to receive calcium/vitamin D supplementation, 14 times more likely to undergo a DEXA scan for the evaluation of osteoporosis, and 25 times more likely to receive a prescription for bisphosphonates. Patients who underwent a DEXA scan were 9 times more likely to receive pharmacologic treatment than those who did not undergo this scan. More than half of patients did not receive a prescription for calcium/vitamin D supplementation and did not undergo DEXA scanning as recommended by current National Osteoporosis Foundation guidelines. Most patients who received prescriptions or underwent DEXA scans did so before rather than after fracture, indicating poor compliance with National Osteoporosis Foundation guidelines. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Complications of pediatric distal radius and forearm fractures.

    PubMed

    Chia, Benjamin; Kozin, Scott H; Herman, Martin J; Safier, Shannon; Abzug, Joshua M

    2015-01-01

    Distal radius and forearm fractures represent a large percentage of pediatric fractures. The most common mechanism of injury is a fall onto an outstretched arm, which can lead to substantial rotational displacement. If this rotational displacement is not adequately addressed, there will be resultant loss of forearm motion and subsequent limitations in performing the activities of daily living. Good initial reductions and proper casting techniques are necessary when treating distal radius and forearm fractures nonsurgically; however, maintaining an acceptable reduction is not always possible. Atraumatic reduction of a displaced physeal fracture should occur within 7 days of the injury. If an impending malunion presents at 2 weeks or later after injury, observation is warranted because of concerns about physeal arrest with repeated attempts at manipulation, and it should be followed by a later assessment of functional limitations. Pediatric patients and their parents have higher expectations for recovery, which has contributed to an increase in the surgical management of pediatric distal radius and forearm fractures. In addition, surgical interventions, such as intramedullary nailing, have their own associated complications.

  12. Comparison of gait parameters in distal femoral replacement using a metallic endoprosthesis versus allograft reconstruction.

    PubMed

    AlGheshyan, Fahad; Eltoukhy, Moataz; Zakaria, Khaled; Temple, Harry Thomas; Asfour, Shihab

    2015-10-01

    Restoration of gait mechanics after reconstruction have been associated with improved functional outcomes and increased longevity of the reconstruction. The goal of this study is to compare the gait mechanics of an allograft reconstruction of the distal femur to both metallic endoprosthetic reconstruction relative to normal control subjects. Gait parameters were captured using motion capture system, and then analyzed and compared for patients with metallic endoprosthetic reconstructions, and patients with allograft reconstructions of the distal femur following resection of malignant bone tumor, with subjects having no history of musculoskeletal disorders serving as a control group. All reconstructed distal femurs following tumor resection resulted in decreased range of motion reflected in observed flexion/extension angles compared to the normal limbs. The allograft reconstructed knees demonstrated normal patterns of rotation whereas the metal subjects had abnormal patterns of rotation and statistically significant differences in rotational moments. Allograft distal femoral reconstruction after malignant excision remains a viable option for surgeons faced with problems associated with iatrogenic muscle, bone and soft tissue defects.

  13. Comparison of gait parameters in distal femoral replacement using a metallic endoprosthesis versus allograft reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    AlGheshyan, Fahad; Eltoukhy, Moataz; Zakaria, Khaled; Temple, Harry Thomas; Asfour, Shihab

    2015-01-01

    Background/aim Restoration of gait mechanics after reconstruction have been associated with improved functional outcomes and increased longevity of the reconstruction. The goal of this study is to compare the gait mechanics of an allograft reconstruction of the distal femur to both metallic endoprosthetic reconstruction relative to normal control subjects. Methods Gait parameters were captured using motion capture system, and then analyzed and compared for patients with metallic endoprosthetic reconstructions, and patients with allograft reconstructions of the distal femur following resection of malignant bone tumor, with subjects having no history of musculoskeletal disorders serving as a control group. Results All reconstructed distal femurs following tumor resection resulted in decreased range of motion reflected in observed flexion/extension angles compared to the normal limbs. The allograft reconstructed knees demonstrated normal patterns of rotation whereas the metal subjects had abnormal patterns of rotation and statistically significant differences in rotational moments. Conclusion Allograft distal femoral reconstruction after malignant excision remains a viable option for surgeons faced with problems associated with iatrogenic muscle, bone and soft tissue defects. PMID:26719625

  14. Post-traumatic osteonecrosis of the lunate after fracture of the distal radius.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Akito; Yajima, Hiroshi; Kisanuki, Osamu

    2014-12-01

    We present a case of post-traumatic osteonecrosis of the lunate after fracture of the distal radius. Post-traumatic osteonecrosis of the carpal lunate after a fracture of the distal radius has, to our knowledge, not been reported previously. We treated the patient with vascularised bone graft from the distal radius, with a satisfactory result.

  15. Biomechanics and biology of plate fixation of distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Freeland, Alan E; Luber, Kurre T

    2005-08-01

    The fracture management principles of anatomic or near anatomic reduction, fracture stabilization, minimal operative trauma, and early joint motion are paramount in man-aging unstable distal radial fractures. The operative approach and plate selection should correlate with the fracture configuration. Plates have the advantages of providing secure fixation throughout the entire healing process without protruding wires or pins and allowing early and intensive forearm, wrist, and digital exercises. Disadvantages include additional operative trauma, including fragment devascularization; some additional risk of wrist stiffness; occasional tendon rupture; and at times, the need for plate removal. New developments in plate and screw design and operative strategies, fragment specific fixation, and plate strength have improved results with plate fixation. Fixed angle blades and locking screws and pegs enhance overall plate stability, support the articular surface of the distal radius, and are effective in fractures occurring in osteopenic bone.

  16. Radiographic Outcomes of Volar Locked Plating for Distal Radius Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Mignemi, Megan E.; Byram, Ian R.; Wolfe, Carmen C.; Fan, Kang-Hsien; Koehler, Elizabeth A.; Block, John J.; Jordanov, Martin I.; Watson, Jeffry T.; Weikert, Douglas R.; Lee, Donald H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To assess the ability of volar locked plating to achieve and maintain normal radiographic parameters for articular stepoff, volar tilt, radial inclination, ulnar variance, and radial height in distal radius fractures. Methods We performed a retrospective review of 185 distal radius fractures that underwent volar locked plating with a single plate design over a 5-year period. We reviewed radiographs and recorded measurements for volar tilt, radial inclination, ulnar variance, radial height, and articular stepoff. We used logistic regression to determine the association between return to radiographic standard norms and fracture type. Results At the first and final postoperative follow-up visits, we observed articular congruence less than 2 mm in 92% of fractures at both times. Normal volar tilt (11°) was restored in 46% at the first follow-up and 48% at the final one. Radial inclination (22°) was achieved in 44% at the first follow-up and 43% at the final one, and ulnar variance (01 ± 2 mm) was achieved in 53% at the first follow-up and 53% at the final one. In addition, radial height (14 ± 1mm) was restored in 14% at the first follow-up and 12% at the final one. More complex, intra-articular fractures (AO class B and C and Frykman types 3, 4, 7, and 8) were less likely to be restored to normal radiographic parameters. However, because of the small sample size for some fracture types, it was difficult to discover significant associations between fracture type and radiographic outcome. Conclusions Volar locked plating for distal radius fractures achieved articular stepoff less than 2 mm in most fractures but only restored and maintained normal radiographic measurements for volar tilt, radial inclination, and ulnar variance in 50% of fractures. The ability of volar locked plating to restore and maintain ulnar variance and volar tilt decreased with more complex intra-articular fracture types. PMID:23218558

  17. Fractal analysis of bone architecture at distal radius.

    PubMed

    Tomomitsu, Tatsushi; Mimura, Hiroaki; Murase, Kenya; Sone, Teruki; Fukunaga, Masao

    2005-12-20

    Bone strength depends on bone quality (architecture, turnover, damage accumulation, and mineralization) as well as bone mass. In this study, human bone architecture was analyzed using fractal image analysis, and the clinical relevance of this method was evaluated. The subjects were 12 healthy female controls and 16 female patients suspected of having osteoporosis (age range, 22-70 years; mean age, 49.1 years). High-resolution CT images of the distal radius were acquired and analyzed using a peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) system. On the same day, bone mineral densities of the lumbar spine (L-BMD), proximal femur (F-BMD), and distal radius (R-BMD) were measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). We examined the correlation between the fractal dimension and six bone mass indices. Subjects diagnosed with osteopenia or osteoporosis were divided into two groups (with and without vertebral fracture), and we compared measured values between these two groups. The fractal dimension correlated most closely with L-BMD (r=0.744). The coefficient of correlation between the fractal dimension and L-BMD was very similar to the coefficient of correlation between L-BMD and F-BMD (r=0.783) and the coefficient of correlation between L-BMD and R-BMD (r=0.742). The fractal dimension was the only measured value that differed significantly between both the osteopenic and the osteoporotic subjects with and without vertebral fracture. The present results suggest that the fractal dimension of the distal radius can be reliably used as a bone strength index that reflects bone architecture as well as bone mass.

  18. Three-dimensional in vivo kinematics of the distal radioulnar joint in malunited distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Moore, Douglas C; Hogan, Kathleen A; Crisco, Joseph J; Akelman, Edward; Dasilva, Manuel F; Weiss, Arnold-Peter C

    2002-03-01

    How malunion of the distal radius affects the kinematics of the distal radioulnar joint in vivo was evaluated. A novel computed tomography image-based technique was used to quantify radioulnar motion in both wrists of 9 patients who had unilateral malunited distal radius fractures. In the injured wrists dorsal angulation averaged 21 degrees +/- 6 degrees, radial inclination averaged 18 degrees +/- 5 degrees, and radial shortening averaged 21 +/- 3 mm. Clinically, the average range of motion of the injured wrists was 75 degrees +/- 25 degrees pronation and 73 degrees +/- 23 degrees supination. Kinematics of the radius during pronation and supination in the malunited forearms was indistinguishable from that in the uninjured forearms. In both the axis of rotation of the radius passed through the center of the ulnar head, although it shifted slightly ulnar and volar in supination and radial and dorsal during pronation. In contrast to previous in vitro biomechanical findings, there was no dorsovolar radial translation at the extremes of pronation or supination and no translation of the radius along the rotation axis. Soft tissues may play a larger role in limiting function than previously appreciated, and treatment may require correction of altered soft tissue structures as well as any abnormal bone anatomy.

  19. Stabilisation of distal radius fractures: Lessons learned and future directions.

    PubMed

    Horst, Taylor A; Jupiter, Jesse B

    2016-02-01

    Our understanding of the diagnosis and management of distal radius fractures has been a long developed over centuries. There has been a shift in treatment of these very common injuries from closed reduction and casting to internal fixation. The answer to the best method of treatment has yet to be found. Today, we have a multitude of treatment options available with varying degrees of evidence to support their use. This review helps to illustrate the lessons we have learned and future directions for treatment.

  20. Primary Combined Replacements for Treatment of Distal Radius Physeal Arrest

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Ingo

    2014-01-01

    This is a case report of a 59-year-old female patient with a posttraumatic growth arrest of the distal radius, leading to radioscaphoid osteoarthritis, carpal instability, and a symptomatic ulnocarpal impaction syndrome that was successfully treated with combined total wrist arthroplasty and ulnar head implant. One year postoperatively, there was no change in position without any signs of loosening of both implants. Both subjectively and functionally, all clinical parameters—Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH), visual analog scale (VAS), grip strength—had improved. Level of Evidence: IV PMID:25097815

  1. [Skeletal tuberculosis of the distal radius during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Sander, A L; Laurer, H; Sommer, K; Jakob, H; Lehnert, M; Marzi, I

    2012-02-01

    We present a case of a pregnant woman (32nd gestational week) that suffered from a chronic non-healing wound at the distal radius. Skeletal tuberculosis was finally diagnosed and treated successfully with staged surgical therapy combined with appropriate medication. One year after surgical treatment, the outcome of the mother was excellent and the baby did not suffer from any disease related to operative procedures or pharmacotherapy. Operative treatment of skeletal tuberculosis (especially osteoarticular and vertebral tuberculosis) in combination with tuberculostatic therapy during pregnancy and lactation seem to be the appropriate treatment with minimal risk for the child and excellent outcome for the mother.

  2. Biomechanical stability of four fixation constructs for distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Capo, John T; Kinchelow, Tosca; Brooks, Kenneth; Tan, Virak; Manigrasso, Michaele; Francisco, Kristin

    2009-09-01

    Implants available for distal radius fracture fixation include dorsal nonlocked plating (DNLP), volar locked plating (VLP), radial-ulnar dual-column locked plating (DCPs), and locked intramedullary fixation (IMN). This study examines the biomechanical properties of these four different fixation constructs. In 28 fresh-frozen radii, a wedge osteotomy was performed, creating an unstable fracture model and the four fixation constructs employed (DNLP, VLP, DCPs, and IMN). Dorsal bending loads were applied and bending stiffness, load to yield 5 mm displacement, and ultimate failure were measured. Bending stiffness for VLP (16.7 N/mm) was significantly higher than for DNLP (6.8 N/mm), while IMN (12.6 N/mm) and DCPs (11.8 N/mm) were similar. Ultimate load to failure occurred at 278.2 N for the VLP, 245.7 N for the IMN, and 52.0 N for the DNLP. The VLP was significantly stronger than the DNLP and DCPs, and the IMN and DCPs were stronger than the DNLP. The VLP has higher average bending stiffness, ultimate bending strength, and resistance to 5 mm displacement than the other constructs and significantly higher ultimate bending strength than the DCPs and DNLP. There was no statistically significant difference between the VLP and IMN. VLP and IMN fixation of distal radius fractures can achieve comparable stability.

  3. Complications of volar plating of distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Rampoldi, Michele; Marsico, Salvatore

    2007-12-01

    Open reduction and internal fixation has been shown to be effective in the treatment of unstable distal radius fractures. When a dorsal approach is used, extensor tendons rupture or irritation are frequent and well known complications. Complications associated with volar plate fixation have not been studied to the same extent. In this study a homogenous series of 90 patients treated by volar plate fixation were retrospectively evaluated, focusing on the complications observed. The overall rate of complications was 8% (7 cases). Tendon rupture or irritation of extensor (3 cases) and flexor tendons (2 cases) were the complications most frequently seen. All but one were clearly related to direct attritional damage of the tendon caused by the prominent edge of the plate or by protruding screw tips. Loss of reduction requiring repeat internal fixation was observed in one marginal shear fracture involving the lunate facet fragment. One patient had a carpal tunnel release owing to median nerve irritation. In this study, volar plate fixation appeared as a safe procedure in the management of unstable distal radius fractures, with a low rate of complications. Accurate placement of the plate and exact measurement of the screws may further minimize the incidence of complications. When radiographs reveal conditions that may predispose to tendon attritional lesions (prominent edge of the plate, dorsal protrusion of the screw tips) we strongly recommend early removal of the fixation device.

  4. Measurement of ulnar variance and radial inclination on X-rays of healed distal radius fractures. With the axis of the distal radius or ulna?

    PubMed

    Thuysbaert, Gilles; Ringburg, Akkie; Petronilia, Steven; Vanden Berghe, Alex; Hollevoet, Nadine

    2015-06-01

    Ulnar variance and radial inclination are radiological parameters frequently used to evaluate displacement of distal radius fractures. In most studies measurements are based on the long central axis of the distal radius, although the axis of the distal ulna can also be used. The purpose of this study was to determine which axis is more reliable. Four observers performed measurements on standard anteroposterior digital wrist X-rays of 20 patients taken 1 and 2 months after sustaining an extra-articular distal radius fracture. Intraobserver reliability was similar with both methods. No difference was found in interobserver reliability between both methods for ulnar variance, but for radial inclination it was better with the axis through the radius. Measurements on two X-rays of the same wrist taken at a different moment were similar with both methods. It can be concluded that the central axis of the distal radius can remain the basis to determine ulnar variance and radial inclination.

  5. Biomechanical comparison of osteoporotic distal radius fractures fixed by distal locking screws with different length.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiong; Wu, Wei-dong; Fang, Ya-feng; Zhang, Mei-chao; Huang, Wen-hua

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the postoperative stability of osteoporotic distal radius fractures fixed with distal locking screws with different length. A comminuted extra-articular dorsally unstable distal radius fracture, treated with volar locking plate system, was created. The 18 specimens were randomized into 3 groups based on distal locked screws with different length: Group A had unicortical screws with 50% length to the dorsal cortex. Group B had unicortical screws with 75% length to the dorsal cortex. Group C had bicortical screws. Axial compression and bending loads were imposed on the models before and after cycling testing as well as load to clinical and catastrophic failure. Minimum change in stiffness was observed before and after fatigue for all groups. The final stiffness to bending forces was statistically similar in all groups, but stiffness to axial compression was statistically significant different: Group A approached significance with respect to groups B and C (P = 0.017, 0.009), whereas stiffness in group B and C was statistically similar (P = 0.93). Load to clinical failure was significantly less for group A (456.54±78.59 N) compared with groups B (580.24±73.85 N) and C (591.07±38.40 N). Load to catastrophic failure was statistically similar between groups, but mean values for Group A were 18% less than means for Group C. The volar locking plate system fixed with unicortical locking screws with at least 75% length not only produced early stability for osteoporotic distal radius fractures, but also avoided extensor tendon complications due to dorsal screw protrusion.

  6. Biomechanical Comparison of Osteoporotic Distal Radius Fractures Fixed by Distal Locking Screws with Different Length

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiong; Wu, Wei-dong; Fang, Ya-feng; Zhang, Mei-chao; Huang, Wen-hua

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the postoperative stability of osteoporotic distal radius fractures fixed with distal locking screws with different length. Methods A comminuted extra-articular dorsally unstable distal radius fracture, treated with volar locking plate system, was created. The 18 specimens were randomized into 3 groups based on distal locked screws with different length: Group A had unicortical screws with 50% length to the dorsal cortex. Group B had unicortical screws with 75% length to the dorsal cortex. Group C had bicortical screws. Axial compression and bending loads were imposed on the models before and after cycling testing as well as load to clinical and catastrophic failure. Results Minimum change in stiffness was observed before and after fatigue for all groups. The final stiffness to bending forces was statistically similar in all groups, but stiffness to axial compression was statistically significant different: Group A approached significance with respect to groups B and C (P = 0.017, 0.009), whereas stiffness in group B and C was statistically similar (P = 0.93). Load to clinical failure was significantly less for group A (456.54±78.59 N) compared with groups B (580.24±73.85 N) and C (591.07±38.40 N). Load to catastrophic failure was statistically similar between groups, but mean values for Group A were 18% less than means for Group C. Conclusions The volar locking plate system fixed with unicortical locking screws with at least 75% length not only produced early stability for osteoporotic distal radius fractures, but also avoided extensor tendon complications due to dorsal screw protrusion. PMID:25080094

  7. [Manifestation of Dupuytren nodules following fracture of the distal radius].

    PubMed

    Wichelhaus, Alice; Wendt, M; Mielsch, N; Gradl, G; Mittlmeier, T

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the incidence of post-traumatic development of Dupuytren nodules in distal radius fractures treated operatively. In 2 prospective randomised studies for operative treatment of distal radius fractures, the formation of Dupuytren nodules was registered. One of the exclusion criteria was a pre-existing Dupuytren's disease at the date of trauma. In addition to the notification of the development of Dupuytren nodules, signs of a complex regional pain syndrome were registered as well as the wrist function, level of pain and grip strength. The Castaing and the Gartland and Werley scores were assessed. The clinical outcomes of patients with and without Dupuytren nodules were compared. 239 of 275 (87%) of the patients could be examined 1 year after the operation, consisting of 32 men and 207 women with a median age of 64.2 years. The patients with Dupuytren nodules were re-evaluated after 16-60 months (median 41.8) for progression of the disease. 21 patients (8.7%) developed changes of the palmar aponeurosis. In 20 patients nodules were stated, one patient showed a cord at the fourth ray of the injured hand. 19 out of 21 patients were female (90.5%). At re-evaluation after 41.8 months (16-60) progression could not be noted nor could similar changes be seen on the contralateral side. Patients with Dupuytren nodules were not handicapped in their hand function. 3 patients (14.3%) revealed a positive family history for Dupuytren's disease. Abuse of alcohol or diabetes was not present in any of the patients with Dupuytren nodules, 7 (33%) were smokers. The occurrence of Dupyutren nodules can be triggered by a trauma or operation. It may be speculated that these nodules are an entity of their own as no progression of the contracture could be seen during the follow-up period. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Pediatric distal radius fractures and triangular fibrocartilage complex injuries.

    PubMed

    Bae, Donald S; Waters, Peter M

    2006-02-01

    Management of distal radius fractures is guided by the pattern and location of injury, degree of deformity, and expectations of bony remodeling based on the amount of remaining skeletal growth.Indications for surgical treatment include unstable or irreducible fractures, open fractures, floating elbow injuries, and neurovascular or soft-tissue compromise precluding cast immobilization. Patients and families should be counseled regarding the potential for post-traumatic distal radial growth arrest following physeal fractures. In these cases, epiphysiodeses, ulnar shortening osteotomies, or corrective radial osteotomies may be performed, depending on the pattern of arrest,degree of deformity, and remaining skeletal growth.TFCC tears may be the source of ulnar-sided wrist pain in children and adolescents, though symptoms and physical examination findings maybe subtle. Patients who have persistent pain and functional limitations despite activity modification and therapy are candidates for surgical treatment. Appropriate repair of peripheral TFCC tears with correction of concomitant wrist pathology restores normal wrist anatomy, alleviates pain, and allows for return to functional activities.

  9. [Py-Desmanet pinning in distal radius fractures].

    PubMed

    Alexa, O; Popia, I

    2009-01-01

    Internal fixation by pinning is one of the most used methods of surgical treatment in fractures of the distal extremity of the radius. As in stable fractures a styloid pinning is satisfactory, in unstable fractures however we must resort to different patterns of pin insertion, in order to effectively prevent the secondary displacement of the fractured fragments. The elastic pinning described by Py and Desmanet is one of the possibilities of inserting the pins. The principle of this method is to use the bending-induced tension in the pins to counteract the postero-lateral displacing forces. The authors have treated by this technique five patients with distal radius fractures (3 women and 2 men) about 56 years of average age, all with good-quality bone, all with Colles' fracture pattern (2-4 cm above the radio-carpal articulation, no articular involvement, posterior displacement of the distal fragment). The reduction of the fractures was achieved by closed manipulation and controlled intraoperatively with the C-arm. We preferred to reduce the fractures before inserting the pins, although this is not compulsory, according to the authors of the technique. The approach was minimally-invasive, through two 1-cm long incisions. The pins, previously blunted and curved along the last centimeters, were introduced using a "T"-shaped handle. The potential complications, consisting of injuries of the many elements which cross the region, were avoided by sufficiently long incisions and identification and retraction of these elements (tendons, nervous branches) in order not to penetrate them with the pins. The aftertreatment consisted of immediate mobilization of the wrist in one patient, 21-day splinting in other two and 30-day splinting in the last two, depending on the intraoperative assessment of the stability of the fixation. The pins were removed at 45 days postoperatively in all cases. There were no complications such as loss of reduction or pin migration. In all cases

  10. A biomechanical approach to distal radius fractures for the emergency radiologist.

    PubMed

    Bunch, Paul M; Sheehan, Scott E; Dyer, George S; Sodickson, Aaron; Khurana, Bharti

    2016-04-01

    Distal radius fractures are the most common upper extremity fracture and account for approximately one sixth of all fractures treated in US emergency departments. These fractures are associated with significant morbidity and have a major economic impact. Radiographic evaluation of distal radius fractures is frequently performed in the emergency department setting, has a profound impact on initial management, and is essential to assessing the quality and relative success of the initial reduction. While the most appropriate definitive management of distal radius fractures remains controversial, overarching treatment principles reflect distal radius injury mechanisms and biomechanics. An intuitive understanding of the biomechanics of the distal radius and of common mechanisms of injury informs and improves the emergency radiologist's ability to identify key imaging findings with important management implications and to communicate the critical information that emergency physicians and orthopedic surgeons need to best manage distal radius fractures.

  11. AO Distal Radius Fracture Classification: Global Perspective on Observer Agreement.

    PubMed

    Jayakumar, Prakash; Teunis, Teun; Giménez, Beatriz Bravo; Verstreken, Frederik; Di Mascio, Livio; Jupiter, Jesse B

    2017-02-01

    Background The primary objective of this study was to test interobserver reliability when classifying fractures by consensus by AO types and groups among a large international group of surgeons. Secondarily, we assessed the difference in inter- and intraobserver agreement of the AO classification in relation to geographical location, level of training, and subspecialty. Methods A randomized set of radiographic and computed tomographic images from a consecutive series of 96 distal radius fractures (DRFs), treated between October 2010 and April 2013, was classified using an electronic web-based portal by an invited group of participants on two occasions. Results Interobserver reliability was substantial when classifying AO type A fractures but fair and moderate for type B and C fractures, respectively. No difference was observed by location, except for an apparent difference between participants from India and Australia classifying type B fractures. No statistically significant associations were observed comparing interobserver agreement by level of training and no differences were shown comparing subspecialties. Intra-rater reproducibility was "substantial" for fracture types and "fair" for fracture groups with no difference accounting for location, training level, or specialty. Conclusion Improved definition of reliability and reproducibility of this classification may be achieved using large international groups of raters, empowering decision making on which system to utilize. Level of Evidence Level III.

  12. Photogrammetric analysis of the articular surface of the distal radius.

    PubMed

    Ege, A; Seker, D Z; Tuncay, I; Duran, Z

    2004-01-01

    Three-dimensional measurements made using photogrammetry have recently gained popularity with the development of real-time detection facilities and up-to-date equipment. The modelling of human bones presents a particular challenge as the measurements required are difficult to obtain, especially from uneven surfaces. In this study, the articular surfaces of 12 radius bones were evaluated using photogrammetry to obtain three-dimensional coordinates of certain points. Morphometric characteristics of the digital topography of the articular surface were analysed using three-dimensional data from more than 200 points for each specimen. The coronal plane curve, from the tip of the styloid process to the centre of the distal radioulnar articular notch, was found to be similar to the fourth degree polynomial function. A mathematical expression representing the sagittal curve passing through scapholunate border could not be found. Close-range photogrammetry is a safe and precise technique that can provide reliable, reproducible and accurate data for evaluating complex morphological surfaces.

  13. Biomechanical analysis of distal radius fractures using intramedullary Kirschner wires.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wen-Chi; Lin, Shang-Chih; Hsiao, Chun-Ching; Lu, Tung-Wu; Chao, Ching-Kong; Liu, Hwa-Chang

    2009-03-01

    Colles's fracture is the most common type of distal radius fracture. Surgically, it remains a challenge to restore radial height and volar tilt in order to regain optimal wrist function. Ulson's procedure provides a dynamic effect on fixing fractured fragments and restoring joint function using two wires. However, the biomechanical influences of bone and wire remain critical issues for fracture reduction and bone union in Ulson's procedure. Based on elastic beam and foundation theory, this study formulated a closed-form mathematical model to investigate the effects of bone and wire parameters on wire deflection and bony reaction. The wire deflection and bony reaction were chosen as the indices of wrist stability and reduction within the post-operative period. The predicted results showed that greater bone strength, higher wire stiffness, and longer wire contact length provide a more stable wire-bone construct, thus facilitating fracture reduction and bone union. The wire stiffness had a much more significant effect on the construct stability compared with bone quality and contact length. In terms of entry point and insertion angle, surgical planning for the contact length was more important than bony quality for stabilizing the whole wire-bone construct.

  14. The Unstable Distal Radius Fracture—How Do We Define It? A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Walenkamp, Monique M. J.; Vos, Lara M.; Strackee, Simon D.; Goslings, J. Carel; Schep, Niels W. L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Unstable distal radius fractures are a popular research subject. However, to appreciate the findings of studies that enrolled patients with unstable distal radius fractures, it should be clear how the authors defined an unstable distal radius fracture. Questions In what percentage of studies involving patients with unstable distal radius fractures did the authors define unstable distal radius fracture? What are the most common descriptions of an unstable distal radius fracture? And is there one preferred evidence-based definition for future authors? Methods A systematic search of literature was performed to identify any type of study with the term unstable distal radius fracture. We assessed whether a definition was provided and determined the level of evidence for the most common definitions. Results The search yielded 2,489 citations, of which 479 were included. In 149 studies, it was explicitly stated that patients with unstable distal radius fractures were enrolled. In 54% (81/149) of these studies, the authors defined an unstable distal radius fracture. Overall, we found 143 different definitions. The seven most common definitions were: displacement following adequate reduction; Lafontaine's definition; irreducibility; an AO type C2 fracture; a volarly displaced fracture; Poigenfürst's criteria; and Cooney's criteria. Only Lafontaine's definition originated from a clinical study (level IIIb). Conclusion In only half of the studies involving patients with an unstable distal radius fracture did the authors defined what they considered an unstable distal radius fracture. None of the definitions stood out as the preferred choice. A general consensus definition could help to standardize future research. PMID:26649263

  15. Locking versus nonlocking palmar plate fixation of distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Osti, Michael; Mittler, Christoph; Zinnecker, Richard; Westreicher, Christoph; Allhoff, Clemens; Benedetto, Karl Peter

    2012-11-01

    This study compared functional and radiological outcomes after treatment of extension-type distal radius fractures with conventional titanium nonlocking T-plates or titanium 1.5-mm locking plates. A total of 60 patients were included and followed for 4 to 7 years after receiving nonlocking T-plates (group A; n=30) or locking plates (group B; n=30) with and without dorsal bone grafting. Bone grafting was significantly more often performed in the nonlocking group to increase dorsal fracture fixation and stability (P<.003). Pre- and postoperative and follow-up values for palmar tilt, radial inclination, radial shortening, and ulnar variance were recorded. Age, sex, and fracture type were similarly distributed between the 2 groups. Postoperative and follow-up evaluation revealed equal allocation of intra-articular step formation and osteoarthritic changes to both groups. The overall complication rate was 25%. Compared with the nonlocking system, patients undergoing locking plate fixation presented with statistically significantly better values for postoperative palmar tilt (5.53° vs 8.15°; P<.02) and radial inclination (22.13° vs 25.03°; P<.02). However, forearm pronation was significantly better in group A (P<.005). At follow-up, radial inclination tended to approach a statistically significant difference in favor of group B. All clinical assessment, including Mayo wrist score, Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand score, Green and O'Brien score, Gartland and Werley score, visual analog scale score, and grip strength, yielded no statistically significant difference between the 2 groups. Locking plates seem to provide benefits regarding surgical technique and comfort, improvement in implant anchorage (especially in osteoporotic bone), and reduce the necessity of additional bone grafting. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Conservative Treatment of Distal Radius Fractures: A Prospective Descriptive Study.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Pilar; Izquierdo, Óscar; Castellanos, Juan

    2017-06-01

    Disability of the upper limb is one of the consequences of distal radius fracture (DRF). The outcome of DRF treatment is based on objective clinical variables, as strength or range of movement (ROM); sometimes these variables do not correlate with the functional level of the patient. The principal objective of our study was to assess the repercussion of conservative treatment of DRF on upper limb disability. This is a retrospective review of prospectively collected data. We collected data of 61 nonconsecutive DRFs treated conservatively from July 2007 to August 2008. Average Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) score before fracture was 20.8 points; average DASH score after the fracture was 42.6. There was a significant increase in the upper limb disability after 1 year of follow-up in the patients treated conservatively ( P < .001; size effect, 1.06). Average radial inclination, radial tilt, and radial length were 18.18°, 3.35°, and 5.76 mm, respectively. Average ROM for flexion-extension was 100.6° and for pronation-supination 144.0°. ROM for flexion-extension of the unaffected wrist was 128.2° and for pronation-supination 172.4°. We did not find any significant statistical correlation between the increase in disability and the decrease in the ROM ( P > .05). We did not find any significant statistical correlation between the increase in the disability and the worsening in the radiological parameters ( P > .05). Our results confirm the hypothesis that the conservative treatment of DRF produced an increase in the upper limb disability after 1 year of follow-up. Our study does not show a correlation between the increase in upper limb disability and the decrease in wrist ROM. Our study did not find a correlation between radiological measures and DASH scores.

  17. Transverse ultrasound assessment of the flexor pollicis longus tendon movement on the distal radius during wrist and finger motion in distal radius fracture with volar plating.

    PubMed

    Nanno, Mitsuhiko; Kodera, Norie; Tomori, Yuji; Takai, Shinro

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the movement of the flexor pollicis longus (FPL) tendon on the distal radius during wrist and finger motions using transverse ultrasound in patients with distal radius fractures who underwent volar locking plating. Both wrists of 39 distal radius fracture patients with volar locking plate fixation were evaluated by transverse ultrasound to examine the location of the FPL tendon on the distal radius at varied wrist positions in full finger extension and flexion. At all wrist positions during finger motion, the FPL tendon shifted significantly more dorsally on the affected side than on the unaffected side. Additionally, at the wrist dorsal flexion position with finger flexion, the FPL tendon moved significantly the most dorsally, and the distance between the FPL tendon and the plate or the radius was the smallest among all wrist positions during finger motion. This study showed that the wrist dorsal flexion position with finger flexion could be the appropriate position to examine FPL tendon irritation after plating. Moreover, it would be effective for preventing FPL rupture to cover the FPL transverse gliding area approximately 10 mm radial to the vertex of the palmar bony prominence of the distal radius with the pronator quadratus and the intermediate fibrous zone.

  18. Volar morphology of the distal radius in axial planes: a quantitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Oura, Keiichiro; Oka, Kunihiro; Kawanishi, Yohei; Sugamoto, Kazuomi; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Murase, Tsuyoshi

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the cause of rupture of the flexor pollicis longus (FPL) after volar plate fixation of distal radius fractures, previous studies have examined the shape of the distal radius in the sagittal plane or in the lateral view. However, there are no reports on the anatomical shape of the volar surface concavity of the distal radius in the axial plane. We hypothesized that this concavity might contribute to the mismatch between the plate and the surface of the radius. To test this hypothesis, we constructed three-dimensional models of the radius and FPL based on computed tomography scans of 70 normal forearms. We analyzed axial cross-sectional views with 2 mm intervals. In all cases, the volar surface of the distal radius was concave in the axial plane. The concavity depth was maximum at 6 mm proximal to the palmar edge of the lunate fossa and progressively decreased toward the proximal radius. FPL was closest to the radius at 2 mm proximal to the palmar edge of the lunate fossa. The volar surface of the distal radius was externally rotated from proximal to distal. These results may help to develop new implants which fit better to the radius and decrease tendon irritation.

  19. Hand Surgeon Reporting of Tendon Rupture Following Distal Radius Volar Plating

    PubMed Central

    Monaco, Nathan A.; Dwyer, C. Liam; Ferikes, Alex J.; Lubahn, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Volar plate fixation with locked screws has become the preferred treatment of displaced distal radius fractures that cannot be managed nonoperatively. This treatment, however, is not without complication. The purpose of this study was to determine what percentage of hand surgeons, over a 12-month period, have experienced a tendon complication when using volar plates for the treatment of distal radius fractures. Methods: A total of 3022 hand surgeons were e-mailed a link to an online questionnaire regarding their observation and treatment of tendon injuries associated with volar plating of distal radius fractures. Responses were reported using descriptive statistics. Results: Of the 596 (20%) respondents, 199 (33%) surgeons reported encountering at least one flexor tendon injury after distal radius volar plating over the past year of practice. The flexor pollicis longus was the most commonly reported tendon injury (254, 75%). Palmaris longus grafting (118, 37%) and tendon transfer (114, 36%) were the most often reported treatments following this complication. A total of 216 respondents (36%) also encountered 324 cases of extensor tendon rupture after volar plating of distal radius fractures, with tendon transfer (88%) being the preferred treatment option. Conclusions: Both flexor and extensor tendon ruptures can be seen after volar plating of distal radius fractures. Surgeons should be aware of these complications. Critical assessment of hardware position at the time of index procedure is recommended to avoid complications. Long-term studies are needed to standardize approaches to managing tendon rupture following volar plating of distal radius fractures. PMID:27698628

  20. The Effect of Osteoporosis on Healing of Distal Radius Fragility Fractures.

    PubMed

    Tulipan, Jacob; Jones, Christopher M; Ilyas, Asif M

    2015-10-01

    Although the decision for operative versus nonoperative treatment of distal radius fractures remains subjective and is performed on a case-by-case basis, evaluation and treatment of patients with concomitant osteoporosis requires understanding of the behavior of this injury as a distinct subset of distal radius fractures. Age, infirmity, and osteoporosis affect every aspect of the fracture. Understanding what makes these fractures unique assists surgeons in more effective and efficient treatment. The authors present the current understanding of osteoporotic fragility fractures of the distal radius, focusing on epidemiology, biomechanics of bone healing, and its implication on strategies for management.

  1. The Evolution of Distal Radius Fracture Management – A Historical Treatise

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Garcia, Rafael J.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2012-01-01

    Distal radius fractures have been a common affliction for millennia, but their treatment is a more recent development as a result of human erudition. While immobilization has served as the only available treatment for most of our history, many advances have been made in the management of distal radius fractures over the last century as the field of orthopedics has grown. Yet, the topic remains hotly contested in the literature, and research continues to focus upon it given the frequency of the injury. In this article, we chronicle the evolution of distal radius fracture treatment in hopes of providing context for the future that lies ahead. PMID:22554653

  2. Use of High-Speed X ray and Video to Analyze Distal Radius Fracture Pathomechanics.

    PubMed

    Gutowski, Christina; Darvish, Kurosh; Liss, Frederic E; Ilyas, Asif M; Jones, Christopher M

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the failure sequence of the distal radius during a simulated fall onto an outstretched hand using cadaver forearms and high-speed X ray and video systems. This apparatus records the beginning and propagation of bony failure, ultimately resulting in distal radius or forearm fracture. The effects of 3 different wrist guard designs are investigated using this system. Serving as a proof-of-concept analysis, this study supports this imaging technique to be used in larger studies of orthopedic trauma and protective devices and specifically for distal radius fractures.

  3. Volar Locking Plate Breakage after Nonunion of a Distal Radius Osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Alabau, Sergi; Soldado, Francisco; Mir, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    We report a 38-year-old male with a nonunion followed by plate breakage after volar plating of a distal radius osteotomy. Volar locking plates have added a new approach to the treatment of distal radius malunions, due to a lower morbidity of the surgical approach and the strength of the final construction, allowing early mobilization and return to function. Conclusion. Plate breakage is an uncommon complication of volar locking plate fixation. To our knowledge, few cases have been described after a distal radius fracture and no case has been described after a distal radius corrective osteotomy. In the present case, plate breakage appears to have occurred as a result of a combination of multiple factors as the large corrective lengthening osteotomy, the use of demineralized bone matrix instead of bone graft, and the inappropriate fixation technique as an unfilled screw on the osteotomy site, rather than the choice of plate. PMID:28003828

  4. [Early corrective osteotomy after secondary displaced distal radius fractures in children].

    PubMed

    Boeckers, P; Gehrmann, S V; Wild, M; Schädel-Höpfner, M; Windolf, J

    2014-02-01

    Secondary fracture displacement before osseous consolidation of distal radius fractures in children occasionally leads to restricted forearm rotation. So far, there is no consistent treatment recommendation to correct this complication. We report on 5 children with an age of 8-13 years (mean age 12.3 years, 4 boys, 1 girl) with secondary displaced distal radius fractures and high functional deficits in forearm rotation (mean ROM for pro-/supination 70-0-30°) after osseous consolidation. We performed corrective osteotomies of the distal radius using a palmar approach after a mean of 38 days. Stabilisation was achieved with a fixed-angle plate system. At the final follow-up examination (mean 9 months) the forearm rotation was normal. No complications were observed. We consider corrective osteotomies of the distal radius in children with deficits of forearm rotation to be a possible strategy. Early corrective osteotomies can lead to a predictable increase of function through reestablishing normal articulation.

  5. Secondary displacement of distal radius fractures treated by bridging external fixation.

    PubMed

    Farah, N; Nassar, L; Farah, Z; Schuind, F

    2014-05-01

    Loss of reduction remains an important problem after treatment of distal radius fractures, whatever the type of bone fixation. We assessed retrospectively the rate of secondary displacement after external fixation of distal radius fractures in order to identify possible risk factors for instability. We reviewed the pre-operative and serial post-operative radiographs of a retrospective series of 35 distal radius fractures treated by bridging external fixation. When classified according to the Société Française d'Orthopédie et Traumatologie (SOFCOT) criteria, the rate of secondary displacement was 48.5%. At final follow up, the reduction was anatomical in 12% and acceptable in 83%. There was malunion in 5%. The loss of reduction concerned primarily the distal radius palmar tilt and was moderate. No correlation was found with age, gender, type of fracture, degree of initial displacement, associated ulnar fracture, or seniority of the treating surgeon.

  6. Physeal growth arrest of the distal radius treated by the Ilizarov technique. Report of a case.

    PubMed

    Aston, J W; Henley, M B

    1989-07-01

    Growth arrest of the distal radius may follow a severe injury to the growth plate. When the growth of the distal radius ceases in the child, continuing ulnar growth results in radial deviation of the hand and dislocation of the distal radioulnar joint. Treatment options in such a limb-length discrepancy are resection of the physeal bony bridge, lengthening of the shaft of the radius with bone graft using the principle of the Wagner technique, resection or epiphysiodesis of the distal ulna, and lengthening through a metaphyseal corticotomy without the use of bone graft. We report a case of metaphyseal lengthening of the radius employing the Ilizarov external fixator for controlled distraction osteogenesis.

  7. Distal radius fracture after Sauvé-Kapandji procedure in a rheumatoid arthritis patient.

    PubMed

    Ochi, Kensuke; Horiuchi, Yukio; Matsumura, Takashi; Nakamura, Mitsukazu; Takei, Terue; Yabe, Hiroki

    2012-04-01

    We report a case of distal radius fracture after a Sauvé-Kapandji procedure combined with synovectomy and tendon transfer in a rheumatoid arthritis patient. This case shared several unusual features that were also seen in a previously reported case. Based on these features, we discuss favorable surgical treatment for the rheumatoid wrist with extensor tendon rupture, and also the optimal treatment for distal radius fracture after such procedures.

  8. "Osteoporosis and orthopods" incidences of osteoporosis in distal radius fracture from low energy trauma.

    PubMed

    Bahari, Syah; Morris, Seamus; Lenehan, Brian; McElwain, John P

    2007-07-01

    Fracture of the distal radius from low energy trauma is a common presentation to orthopaedic trauma services. This fragility type fracture is associated with underlying osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is a 'silent disease' where fragility fracture is a common presentation. Orthopaedic surgeons may be the only physician that these patients encounter. We found a high percentage of female patients who sustained a fragility fracture of the distal radius have an underlying osteoporosis. Further management of osteoporosis is important to prevent future fragility fractures.

  9. Carpal tunnel syndrome: A rare manifestation of distal radius osteoid osteoma.

    PubMed

    Basran, Sukhvinder Singh; Kumar, Sandeep; Jameel, Javed; Sajid, Imran

    2015-09-01

    Osteoid Osteoma is a benign bone tumor that normally affects long bones and rarely affects distal radius. Because of its nonspecific presentation in the wrist, it remains a diagnostic challenge. We report an unusual case of Osteoid Osteoma at distal radius having symptoms resembling that of carpal tunnel syndrome. The diagnosis was confirmed preoperatively with X-rays; bone scintigraphy, CT, and MRI, later histological examination confirmed the diagnoses. Surgical excision lead to a dramatic improvement in the condition of the patient.

  10. Corrective distal radius osteotomy: including bilateral differences in 3-D planning.

    PubMed

    Dobbe, J G G; Vroemen, J C; Strackee, S D; Streekstra, G J

    2013-07-01

    After a fracture of the distal radius, the bone segments may heal in a suboptimal position. This condition may lead to a reduced hand function, pain and finally osteoarthritis, sometimes requiring corrective surgery. Recent studies report computer-assisted 3-D planning techniques in which the mirrored contralateral unaffected radius serves as reference for planning the position of the distal radius before corrective osteotomy surgery. Bilateral asymmetry, however, may introduce length errors into this type of preoperative planning that can be compensated for by taking into account the concomitant ulnae asymmetry. This article investigates a method for planning a correction osteotomy of the distal radius, while compensating for bilateral length differences using a linear regression model that describes the relationship between radii and ulnae asymmetry. The method is evaluated quantitatively using CT scans of 20 healthy individuals, and qualitatively using CT scans of patients suffering from a malunion of the distal radius. The improved planning method reduces absolute length deviations by a factor of two and markedly reduces positioning variation, from 2.9 ± 2.1 to 1.5 ± 0.6 mm. We expect the method to be of great value for future 3-D planning of a corrective distal radius osteotomy.

  11. Contact areas of the scaphoid and lunate with the distal radius in neutral and extension: correlation of falling strategies and distal radial anatomy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y R; Wu, Y F; Tang, J B; Giddins, G

    2014-05-01

    The functional neutral of wrist movement is about 10° extension yet the distal radius has a volar tilt. This has not previously been explained. Assuming that the contact area between the carpus and the distal radius increased in wrist extension this would also help stabilize the carpus on the distal radius in positions where typically there is greater loading. To test this hypothesis we reconstructed three-dimensional structures of the carpal bones and distal radius using computed tomography scans of 13 normal wrists. The contact areas of the scaphoid with the distal radius were measured and were found progressively increased from flexion 20°, neutral, extension 20°, to extension 40°. The maximal increases in the contact area of the scaphoid and the distal radius was at full wrist extension. No significant changes in the contact areas of the lunate with the distal radius were found between the different positions. The contact characteristics provide greater stability to the carpus on the distal radius, and to help spread forces from impact to the wrist reducing the transmitted peak forces and thus the risk of distal radius and carpal injuries.

  12. Reconstruction of the Distal Radius following Tumour Resection Using an Osteoarticular Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Maurer-Ertl, Werner; Pirker-Frühauf, Ulrike; Lovse, Thomas; Leithner, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Reconstruction of the distal radius following tumour resection is challenging and various techniques are recorded. We retrospectively analysed the outcome of five patients (one male and four females) after reconstruction of the distal radius with osteoarticular allograft, following tumour resection. Mean followup was 32 months (range, 4–121). In three of the five patients the dominant limb was affected. Mean bone resection length was 6.5 centimetres (range, 5–11.5). Two grafts developed nonunion, both successfully treated with autologous bone grafting. No infection, graft fracture, or failure occurred. Mean flexion/extension was 38/60 degrees and mean pronation/supination was 77/77 degrees. The mean Mayo wrist score was 84 and the mean DASH score was 8, both representing a good functional result. Therefore we state the notion that osteoarticular allograft reconstruction of distal radius provides good to excellent functional results. PMID:23690732

  13. Treatment of distal radius fractures with intrafocal (kapandji) pinning and supplemental skeletal stabilization.

    PubMed

    Weil, Wayne M; Trumble, Thomas E

    2005-08-01

    The technique of intrafocal pinning was originally described by Kapandji. This technique, along with the addition of supplemental external or internal bridging fixation, can be performed quickly with minimal soft tissue damage. This technique is indicated for the treatment of unstable extra-articular or minimally displaced intra-articular fractures of the distal radius. Studies demonstrate that young patients with displaced extra-articular distal radius fractures and minimal comminution can be treated by percutaneous intrafocal pin fixation alone, whereas, patients over 55 years of age and younger patients with comminution involving two or more surfaces of the radial metaphysis (or > 50% of the metaphyseal diameter) require bridging fixation besides percutaneous pin fixation. The use of this technique achieves the goal of surgical treatment of distal radius fractures: restoration of hand and wrist function through the restoration of alignment and articular surface congruity.

  14. The relationship between displacement and clinical outcome after distal radius (Colles') fracture.

    PubMed

    Finsen, V; Rod, O; Rød, K; Rajabi, B; Alm-Paulsen, P S; Russwurm, H

    2013-02-01

    We reviewed 260 patients who had been treated non-operatively for a dorsally displaced distal radius fracture a mean 6.3 (range 2.5-12.7) years earlier, in an attempt to find the limits of displacement compatible with a good clinical outcome. We excluded patients with previous or later injuries to the same limb. Bivariate analysis revealed a highly statistically significant relationship between radiographic displacement at review and clinical outcome scores. Correlation coefficients varied between 0.14 and 0.30. However, multiple linear regression analysis using most factors commonly thought to be of importance in determining the clinical outcome as independent variables explained only 23% of the variability of the clinical outcome. Dorsal angulation, ulnar variance, and radial inclination together accounted for only 11% of the variability. We conclude that the final alignment of the distal radius as shown radiologically has only a minor influence on the clinical outcome of Colles' type distal radius fractures.

  15. En bloc joystick reduction of a comminuted intra-articular distal radius fracture: a technical trick.

    PubMed

    Siegall, Evan; Ziran, Bruce

    2014-08-01

    A patient with a 1-month-old intra-articular distal radius fracture (treated closed in a splint) presented with an unacceptable degree of pain and stiffness caused by shortening and dorsal angulation of the distal radius. The fracture was comminuted with 4 or 5 distinct fragments, several involving the articular surface. Surgical correction was attempted. During the procedure, it was noted that, though the distal radius was shortened and angulated, there was actually acceptable congruity of the articular surface itself, despite the intra-articular nature of the fracture. Bone quality was poor and healing incomplete. Thus, we were concerned the currently congruous articular surface would fall apart with manipulation. Given this situation, we used a unique scaffolding technique with Kirschner wires placed in perpendicular fashion to both hold the articular surface intact and manipulate it en bloc. This technique is a simple way to turn a complex fracture into an easily reduced 2-part fracture.

  16. [Results of Kapandji-Sauvé operation after distal radius fractures].

    PubMed

    Borisch, N; Haussmann, P

    1998-11-01

    Incongruity of the distal radioulnar joint represents a major problem following malunited fractures of the distal radius. A useful solution is the arthrodesis of the distal radioulnar joint with distal ulnar pseudarthrosis as described by Kapandji-Sauvé. The results of this procedure are presented and the indication compared to alternative treatment options discussed. Between 1991 and 1997, 19 patients were treated with a Kapandji-Sauvé procedure, for rheumatoid arthritis in seven and for a malunited fracture of the distal radius in twelve patients. All of the patients with a malunion of the distal radius were followed up 5 to 70 months postoperatively by clinical and X-ray examination. For evaluation the protocol by Martini for malunited fractures of the distal radius was used. All but one patient agreed that the operation had been beneficial and would choose to undergo the same procedure again necessary. Mean forearm rotation improved from 99 to 166 degrees. Preoperative pain was reduced in eleven patients. Two patients were completely pain-free and seven noticed pain during heavy load only. Grip strength improved postoperatively in three patients, remained unchanged in four and was diminished in three. In two patients preoperative measurements were not available. Evaluation by the Martini protocol gave three very good, four good, four fair, and one poor result. In one patient, regeneration of the ulna across the resected segment occurred necessitating a secondary excision. This resulted in a return of forearm rotation of 140 degree and good patient satisfaction. Arthrodesis of the distal radioulnar joint with distal ulnar pseudarthrosis reliably reduces pain and improves forearm rotation after malunited fractures of the distal radius. However, it cannot influence pain originating from the radiocarpal joint. Therefore, patients with advanced radiocarpal arthrosis are not suitable for the operation. We consider the procedure to be indicated when the distal

  17. The strength of polyaxial locking interfaces of distal radius plates.

    PubMed

    Hoffmeier, Konrad L; Hofmann, Gunther O; Mückley, Thomas

    2009-10-01

    Currently available polyaxial locking plates represent the consequent enhancement of fixed-angle, first-generation locking plates. In contrast to fixed-angle locking plates which are sufficiently investigated, the strength of the new polyaxial locking options has not yet been evaluated biomechanically. This study investigates the mechanical strength of single polyaxial interfaces of different volar radius plates. Single screw-plate interfaces of the implants Palmar 2.7 (Königsee Implantate und Instrumente zur Osteosynthese GmbH, Allendorf, Germany), VariAx (Stryker Leibinger GmbH & Co. KG, Freiburg, Germany) und Viper (Integra LifeSciences Corporation, Plainsboro, NJ, USA) were tested by cantilever bending. The strength of 0 degrees, 10 degrees and 20 degrees screw locking angle was obtained during static and dynamic loading. The Palmar 2.7 interfaces showed greater ultimate strength and fatigue strength than the interfaces of the other implants. The strength of the VariAx interfaces was about 60% of Palmar 2.7 in both, static and dynamic loading. No dynamic testing was applied to the Viper plate because of its low ultimate strength. By static loading, an increase in screw locking angle caused a reduction of strength for the Palmar 2.7 and Viper locking interfaces. No influence was observed for the VariAx locking interfaces. During dynamic loading; angulation had no influence on the locking strength of Palmar 2.7. However, reduction of locking strength with increasing screw angulation was observed for VariAx. The strength of the polyaxial locking interfaces differs remarkably between the examined implants. Depending on the implant an increase of the screw locking angle causes a reduction of ultimate or fatigue strength, but not in all cases a significant impact was observed.

  18. The primary Sauve-Kapandji procedure--for treatment of comminuted distal radius and ulnar fractures.

    PubMed

    Horii, E; Ohmachi, T; Nakamura, R

    2005-02-01

    We have performed primary Sauve-Kapandji procedures on four patients with severe open comminuted fractures of both the distal radius and ulna. The fragmented distal ulna was fixed to the sigmoid notch in order to stabilize the ulnar side of the carpus, and a proximal pseudoarthrosis was maintained for forearm rotation. All the distal radial fractures united without major complications. The mean wrist flexion/extension arc was 76 degrees , the mean pronation/supination arc was 135 degrees, and grip strength was 64% of the contralateral side. All patients returned to their work or daily activities within short time period without any additional surgical treatment, except for removal of implants in three patients. The primary Sauve-Kapandji procedure is effective for the reconstruction of severely combined distal radius and ulnar fractures.

  19. Preferential distal radius fracture in right-handed individuals presenting to an ED.

    PubMed

    Pesola, Gene R; Feinberg, Gary A; Ahsan, Habibul

    2003-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether there is a lateralizing predisposition toward injury in right hand-dominant (RHD) individuals. The distal radius fracture was used as the injury for evaluation because it is easily defined and can be objectively documented by roentgenography. A prospective case-series design was used to include consecutive RHD patients with a distal radius fracture. There were 86 women with an average age of 63.1 +/- 17.9 years and 41 men with an average age of 44.0 +/- 17.6 years with a significant difference between ages (P <.01). Overall, there were 50 right and 77 left distal radius fractures, which was significantly different than a 50:50 split (P <.025). Stratification and logistic regression analysis revealed that age (dichotomized into age greater than 57 or other) and not gender was a significant factor in the determination of left versus right distal radius fracture. No interaction between age and gender was found. After adjustment for gender, the odds of developing a left compared with right distal radius fracture was 2.3-fold greater for the older compared with the younger age group (95% confidence interval, 1.0-5.2). Preliminary evidence suggests a lateralizing predisposition for left distal radius fractures in older compared with younger individuals who are RHD. If this data holds up, finding the etiology/mechanism of this predisposition might help in designing environments to minimize the impact of this injury pattern in the slightly older individual.

  20. Malpractice in distal radius fracture management: an analysis of closed claims.

    PubMed

    DeNoble, Peter H; Marshall, Astrid C; Barron, O Alton; Catalano, Louis W; Glickel, Steven Z

    2014-08-01

    Distal radius fractures comprise the majority of hand- and wrist-related malpractice claims. We hypothesized that a majority of lawsuits would be for malunions resulting from nonsurgical treatment. Additional goals of this study were to quantify costs associated with claims, determine independent risk factors for making an indemnity payment, and illustrate trends over time. Seventy closed malpractice claims filed for alleged negligent treatment of distal radius fractures by orthopedic surgeons insured by the largest medical professional liability insurer in New York State (NYS) from 1981 to 2005 were reviewed. We separately reviewed defendants' personal closed malpractice claim histories from 1975 to 2011. Overall incidence of malpractice claims among distal radius fractures treated in NYS was calculated using the NYS Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System database and the 2008 American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons census data. The overall incidence of malpractice claims for distal radius fracture management was low. Malunion was the most common complaint across claims regardless of treatment type. Claims for surgically treated fractures increased over time. A majority of claims documented poor doctor-patient relationships. Male plaintiffs in this group were significantly older than males treated for distal radius fractures in NYS. Most defendants had a history of multiple malpractice suits, all were male, and only a small percentage were fellowship-trained in hand surgery. Defendants lacking American Board of Orthopedic Surgery certification were significantly more likely to make indemnity payments. Thirty-eight of 70 cases resulted in an indemnity payment. Malunion and poor doctor-patient relationships are the major features of malpractice litigation involving distal radius fracture management. Older defendant age and lack of American Board of Orthopedic Surgery certification increase the likelihood of making an indemnity payment. Economic and

  1. Optimal Positioning for Volar Plate Fixation of a Distal Radius Fracture: Determining the Distal Dorsal Cortical Distance.

    PubMed

    Vosbikian, Michael M; Ketonis, Constantinos; Huang, Ronald; Ilyas, Asif M

    2016-01-01

    Distal radius fractures are currently among the most common fractures of the musculoskeletal system. With a population that is living longer, being more active, and the increasing incidence of osteoporosis, these injuries will continue to become increasingly prevalent. When operative fixation is indicated, the volar locking plate has recently become the treatment of choice. However, despite its success, suboptimal position of the volar locking plate can still result in radiographic loss of reduction. The distal dorsal cortical distance is being introduced as an intraoperative radiographic tool to help optimize plate position and minimize late loss of fracture reduction.

  2. Predicting initial treatment failure of fiberglass casts in pediatric distal radius fractures: utility of the second metacarpal-radius angle.

    PubMed

    Edmonds, Eric W; Capelo, Roderick M; Stearns, Philip; Bastrom, Tracey P; Wallace, C Douglas; Newton, Peter O

    2009-10-01

    Recent literature comparing the effectiveness of above-elbow and below-elbow plaster casts appears to suggest that either cast type offers adequate immobilization for distal radius and ulna fractures. The idea that an appropriate mold placed on the cast is the most significant determinant of successful immobilization and, thereby, patient outcome has also been elucidated. The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of above-elbow versus below-elbow fiberglass casts in maintaining distal radius/ulna fracture reduction and to identify factors associated with treatment failures. We reviewed the radiographs and clinical data of 253 children with distal third forearm fractures requiring reduction under conscious sedation or a hematoma block. Outcome measures included rates of re-manipulation, loss of reduction, and cast complications. One hundred and nineteen children were treated with below-elbow fiberglass casts and 134 were treated with above-elbow fiberglass casts based on a clinical pathway created before the study period. There were no differences between the two groups in age, weight, fracture pattern, percentage of both-bone fractures, and initial fracture angulation. Of the 253 fractures in the study, 38 (15%) were considered to have less than ideal outcomes. There were no differences between the 'ideal' and 'non-ideal' groups in age, fracture pattern, presence of ulna fracture, cast index, or cast type. All immediate post-reduction measures (anterior-posterior [AP] and lateral displacement/angulation) were significantly correlated with treatment outcome, except angulation on AP films. The magnitude of reduction as measured by a newly described variable, the angle between the second metacarpal and long axis of the radius in the AP projection, was significantly correlated with treatment failure (r = -0.139, P = 0.027). Binary logistic regression was performed and demonstrated that the success of the reduction, as determined by the AP radiograph

  3. The persistence of epiphyseal scars in the distal radius in adult individuals.

    PubMed

    Davies, Catriona; Hackman, Lucina; Black, Sue

    2016-01-01

    The use of radiographic imaging in the estimation of chronological age facilitates the analysis of structures not visible on gross morphological inspection. Following the completion of epiphyseal fusion, a thin radio-opaque band, the epiphyseal scar, may be observed at the locus of the former growth plate. The obliteration of this feature has previously been interpreted as the final stage of skeletal maturation and consequently has been included as a criterion in several methods of age estimation, particularly from the distal radius. Due to the recommendations relating to age estimation in living individuals, accurate assessment of age from the distal radius is of great importance in human identification; however, the validity of the interpretation of the obliteration of the epiphyseal scar as an age-related process has not been tested. A study was undertaken to assess the persistence of epiphyseal scars in adults between 20 and 50 years of age through the assessment of 616 radiographs of left and right distal radii from a cross-sectional population. This study found that 86% of females and 78% of males retained some remnant of the epiphyseal scar in the distal radius. The relationships between chronological age, biological sex and the persistence of the epiphyseal scar were not statistically significant. The findings of this study indicate that the epiphyseal scars may persist in adult individuals until at least 50 years of age. No maximum age should therefore be applied to the persistence of an epiphyseal scar in the distal radius.

  4. Korean Type Distal Radius Anatomical Volar Plate System: A Preliminary Report

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeong Hwan; Kim, Jihyeung; Kim, Min Bom; Rhee, Seung Hwan; Gong, Hyun Sik; Lee, Young Ho

    2014-01-01

    Background Distal radius fracture is the most common fracture of the upper extremity, and approximately 60,000 distal radius fractures occur annually in Korea. Internal fixation with an anatomical volar locking plate is widely used in the treatment of unstable distal radius fractures. However, most of the currently used distal radius anatomical plate systems were designed based on the anatomical characteristics of Western populations. Recently, the Korean-type distal radius anatomical volar plate (K-DRAVP) system was designed and developed based on the anatomical characteristics of the distal radius of Koreans. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the preliminary results of the new K-DRAVP system, and to compare its radiologic and functional results with those of the other systems. Methods From March 2012 to October 2012, 46 patients with acute distal radius fractures who were treated with the K-DRAVP system at three hospitals were enrolled in this study. Standard posteroanterior and lateral radiographs were obtained to assess fracture healing, and three radiographic parameters (volar tilt, radial inclination, and radial length) were assessed to evaluate radiographic outcomes. The range of motion and grip strength, the Gartland and Werley scoring system, and the disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand (DASH) questionnaire were used to assess clinical and functional outcomes. Results All radiologic parameters were restored to normal values, and maintained without any loosening or collapse until the time of final follow-up. Grip strength was restored to 84% of the value for the unaffected side. The mean range of motion of the wrist at final follow-up was restored to 77%-95% of the value for the unaffected side. According to the Gartland and Werley scoring system, there were 16 excellent, 26 good, and 4 fair results. The mean DASH score was 8.4 points. There were no complications after surgery. Conclusions The newly developed K-DRAVP system could be used to

  5. Internal plate fixation versus plaster in displaced complete articular distal radius fractures, a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Mulders, Marjolein A M; Walenkamp, Monique M J; Goslings, J Carel; Schep, Niels W L

    2016-02-09

    Of all distal radius fractures, 25 % are complete articular fractures (AO/OTA type C fractures). Two thirds of those fractures are displaced and require reduction. According to several International Guidelines, adequately reduced intra-articular distal radius fractures are best treated non-operatively with plaster immobilisation, while surgical fixation is suggested only when the articular step exceeds 2 mm after reduction. However, these recommendations are based on studies that did not differentiate between intra- and extra-articular distal radius fractures. Thus, no clear consensus about the best treatment for patients with displaced intra-articular distal radius fractures can be reached. Despite the lack of evidence, an increase in internal fixation of intra-articular distal radius fractures has been observed over the last decade. The aim of this study is to determine the difference in functional outcome following open reduction and plate fixation compared with non-operative treatment with closed reduction and plaster immobilisation in patients with a displaced intra articular distal radius fracture. This multicentre randomised controlled trial will randomise between open reduction and internal plate fixation (intervention group) and closed reduction and plaster immobilisation (control group). All consecutive adult patients from 18 to 65 years with a displaced intra-articular distal radius fracture (AO/OTA type C), which has been adequately reduced at the Emergency Department according to the Dutch National Guidelines, are eligible for inclusion in this study. The primary outcome is function and pain of the wrist assessed with the Patient-Rated Wrist Evaluation score (PRWE). Secondary outcomes are the Disability of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand score (DASH), pain, quality of life (SF-36), range of motion, grip strength, radiological parameters, complications, crossovers and cost-effectiveness of both treatments. A total of 90 patients will be included in this

  6. Acute Ulnar Shortening for Delayed Presentation of Distal Radius Growth Arrest in an Adolescent

    PubMed Central

    Ellanti, Prasad; Harrington, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Distal radius physeal fractures are common in children and adolescents. However, posttraumatic growth arrest is uncommon. The management of posttraumatic growth arrest is dependent on the severity of the deformity and the remaining growth potential of the patient. Various treatment options exist. We present a 17-year-old male with distal radius growth arrest who presented four years after the initial injury. He had a symptomatic 15 mm positive ulnar variance managed with an ulnar shortening osteotomy with the use of the AO mini distractor intraoperatively. To the best of our knowledge, an acute ulnar shortening of 15 mm is the largest reported. PMID:23227397

  7. Acute ulnar shortening for delayed presentation of distal radius growth arrest in an adolescent.

    PubMed

    Ellanti, Prasad; Harrington, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Distal radius physeal fractures are common in children and adolescents. However, posttraumatic growth arrest is uncommon. The management of posttraumatic growth arrest is dependent on the severity of the deformity and the remaining growth potential of the patient. Various treatment options exist. We present a 17-year-old male with distal radius growth arrest who presented four years after the initial injury. He had a symptomatic 15 mm positive ulnar variance managed with an ulnar shortening osteotomy with the use of the AO mini distractor intraoperatively. To the best of our knowledge, an acute ulnar shortening of 15 mm is the largest reported.

  8. OSTEOTOMY OF THE DISTAL RADIUS USING A FIXED-ANGLE VOLAR PLATE

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Ricardo Kaempf; Binz, Mário Arthur Rockenbach; Ferreira, Marco Tonding; Ruschel, Paulo Henrique; Serrano, Pedro Delgado; Praetzel, Rafael Pêgas

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Skewed consolidation of the distal radius, due to sequelae of fractures, may cause functional incapacity, thus leading such patients to present pain, loss of strength and diminished mobility. Based on the excellent results obtained from surgical treatment of unstable fractures of the distal radius through a volar approach and use of rigid fixation with a fixed-angle volar plate, we started to use the same method for osteotomy of the distal radius. Methods: A retrospective review was conducted, and 20 patients treated between February 2002 and October 2009 were found. The mean length of follow-up was 43.9 months (range: 12 to 96 months). The surgical indications were persistent pain, deformity and functional limitation subsequent to a dorsally displaced fracture. Results: The mean preoperative deformity was 27° of dorsal tilt of the distal radius, 87° of ulnar tilt, and 7.3 mm of shortening of the radius. All the osteotomies consolidated and the final mean volar tilt was 6.2°, with ulnar tilt of 69.3° and shortening of 1 mm. The mean mobility of the wrist increased by 19.9° (flexion) and by 24° (extension). Mean forearm supination increased by 23.5° and pronation by 21.7°. Grip strength increased from 13.4 to 34.5 pounds. Conclusion: Use of a fixed-angle volar plate for a volar approach towards osteotomy of the distal radius enables satisfactory correction of the deformities and eliminates the need for removal of the synthesis material caused by tendon complications PMID:27042618

  9. Classification of distal radius physeal fractures not included in the salter-harris system.

    PubMed

    Sferopoulos, Nikolaos K

    2014-01-01

    The most commonly used classification for pediatric physeal fractures has been proposed by Salter and Harris. Among the most suitable classification schemes are those proposed by Ogden and Peterson who added several new types of injuries. The purpose of this study was to examine the value of both schemes to classify all different types of physeal injuries of the distal radius that are not included in the Salter-Harris system and to test a new nomenclature to classify and guide treatment for the whole spectrum of these injuries. A total of 292 children who were admitted for a physeal fracture of the distal radius that could not be classified according to the Salter-Harris system were identified from the hospital database. All radiographs were carefully examined and classified according to the existing classifications of Ogden and Peterson and a modified classification scheme. The results of the treatment were also evaluated. Ninety-six physeal injuries could not be classified using the classification schemes of Ogden and Peterson. All injuries could be classified in five types using the new, modified nomenclature. Growth abnormalities of the distal radius were evaluated after an average follow-up time of 11 years. Growth arrest due to a physeal bar was detected only in one patient. The proposed modified scheme is practical, incorporates all previous classification systems, allows classification of all physeal injuries of the distal radius that are not included in the Salter-Harris system and may assist comparison of treatment outcomes.

  10. Remodeling of Salter-Harris type II epiphyseal plate injury of the distal radius.

    PubMed

    Houshian, Shirzad; Holst, Anette Koch; Larsen, Morten S; Torfing, Trine

    2004-01-01

    The authors studied the relation between residual angulation at the time of healing and final orientation of the distal radius as well as the clinical outcome in patients after Salter-Harris type II epiphyseal plate injury of the distal radius. Eighty-five patients were reviewed with a median follow-up of 8.5 years. Anteroposterior and lateral radiographs were taken at follow-up. The mobility of both wrists and forearms was examined, together with grip strength. Pain with activities and sports was evaluated. At follow-up, 73 patients (86%) were anatomically normal on radiographs; the remaining 12 patients had an incomplete remodeling of the volar and/or radial inclination of the distal radius. Premature closure of the growth plate in the distal radius or ulna did not occur in any of these children. Complete remodeling was seen in children aged up to 10 years in all but one patient. Remodeling after Salter-Harris type II epiphyseal plate injury occurs in all age groups, but the potential is greater in children up to 10 years of age. The incomplete remodeling does not seem to have any substantial long-term negative effect on mobility of the wrist and grip strength.

  11. Routine follow-up radiographs for distal radius fractures are seldom clinically substantiated.

    PubMed

    Weil, N L; El Moumni, M; Rubinstein, S M; Krijnen, P; Termaat, M F; Schipper, I B

    2017-07-22

    The value of routine radiographs during follow-up after distal radius fractures is unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether routine radiographs performed during the follow-up period in patients with a distal radius fracture influenced clinical decision making. This retrospective cohort study included patients aged ≥18 years who were treated for a distal radius fracture at four hospitals in The Netherlands in 2012. Demographic and clinical and radiographic characteristics were collected from medical records. 1042 patients were included. In 121 (14%) of the 841 radiographs, a clinical indication was reported. Treatment was affected by 22 (2.6%) radiographs, including 11 (1.5%) radiographs that were categorized as routine, 9 (1.2%) of which led to prolonged cast immobilization and 2 (0.2%) to surgery for conservatively treated patients. Although it is common practice to take radiographs after distal radius fractures, the study results indicate that routine radiographs seldom affect treatment. This finding should be weighed against the high health care costs associated with these fractures. We hope that the results of our study will trigger the awareness among surgeons that in the current practice, many radiographs are taken on routine without influencing clinical decision making and can probably be omitted. Level III.

  12. Failure characteristics of the isolated distal radius in response to dynamic impact loading.

    PubMed

    Burkhart, Timothy A; Andrews, David M; Dunning, Cynthia E

    2012-06-01

    We examined the mechanical response of the distal radius pre-fracture and at fracture under dynamic impact loads. The distal third of eight human cadaveric radii were potted and placed in a custom designed pneumatic impact system. The distal intra-articular surface of the radius rested against a model scaphoid and lunate, simulating 45° of wrist extension. The scaphoid and lunate were attached to a load cell that in turn was attached to an impact plate. Impulsive impacts were applied at increasing energy levels, in 10 J increments, until fracture occurred. Three 45° stacked strain gauge rosettes were affixed along the length of the radius quantifying the bone strains. The mean (SD) fracture energy was 45.5 (16) J. The mean (SD) resultant impact reaction force (IRFr) at failure was 2,142 (1,229) N, resulting in high compressive strains at the distal (2,718 (1,698) µε) and proximal radius (3,664 (1,890) µε). We successfully reproduced consistent fracture patterns in response to dynamic loads. The fracture energy and forces reported here are lower and the strains are higher than those previously reported and can likely be attributed to the controlled, incremental, dynamic nature of the applied loads.

  13. Team physician #5. Salter-Harris type I fracture of the distal radius due to weightlifting.

    PubMed

    Weiss, A P; Sponseller, P D

    1989-02-01

    A Salter-Harris Type I distal radius fracture was sustained by a skeletally immature adolescent while performing a supine bench press during weight training. Closed reduction was accomplished without difficulty. Fractures in adolescence due to weightlifting are rare but illustrate the need for proper instruction and supervision.

  14. [Reconstruction of a broad infected defect zone of the distal part of the radius by tractionosteogenesis].

    PubMed

    Szalay, G; Thormann, U; Boecker, W; Schleicher, I; Schnettler, R

    2013-10-01

    We report about a reconstruction of a broad infected defect zone by tractionosteogenesis and following implantation of a graft from the iliac crest and a plate fixation at the distal part of the radius after a gunshot injury by a high-velocity bullet. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Characteristics of distal radius speed of sound data in Chinese mainland men and women.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ligang; Pan, Jiafei; Jin, Hongting; Xiao, Luwei; Tao, Jing; Tong, Peijian

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) assessment of bone health status, as a reliable method, is rapidly gaining popularity. Speed of sound (SOS) is one parameter of skeletal status provided by QUS assessment. The objective of the present study was first to determine the normative distal radius SOS data on healthy Chinese mainland men and women and second to investigate the effects of sex, age, and body size on this parameter. A study cohort consisting of 19,980 healthy Chinese women and 8722 men aged 20-89 yr participated in this investigation. They answered a detailed questionnaire on their healthy condition, and their anthropometric measurements were taken. Their distal radius SOS values were evaluated using the Sunlight ultrasound systems. The distal radius SOS values exhibited a characteristic rise-then-fall pattern with increasing age in both sexes. The peak SOS value occurred at the age of 40-49 both in males and females. Age-related differences were both pronounced among males and females. Pearson correlation and regression analysis showed that age was a major determinant of SOS in both sexes. In females, SOS values had a much stronger correlation with age than male subjects. Body weight was also correlated with SOS but not as well as age. The SOS values of distal radius at present study may be used as normal reference data for Chinese mainland population and will be useful for comparing the results of individual studies and determining diagnostic criteria of osteoporosis by QUS.

  16. Exploring the relationship between bone density and severity of distal radius fragility fracture in women.

    PubMed

    Dhainaut, Alvilde; Daibes, Kamil; Odinsson, Adalsteinn; Hoff, Mari; Syversen, Unni; Haugeberg, Glenn

    2014-07-17

    Bone mineral density (BMD) has been shown to be a consistent and independent risk factor for distal radius fracture. Inconsistent data have been reported on the association between BMD and severity of distal radius fracture. Our primary aim was to explore if there is an association between cortical BMD at the hand and the severity of fragility distal radius fracture. Consecutively recruited females aged ≥ 50 years with fragility fracture at the distal radius (n = 110) from a county hospital were included. Cortical hand BMD was assessed by the digital X-ray radiogrammetry (DXR) method. X-rays of the fracture were scored by experienced orthopedic surgeons for fracture severity according to the Müller AO classification of long bones and radiographic parameters such as ulnar variance and dorsal angle. A weak association between lower DXR BMD and increased ulnar variance and dorsal angle was found but not with the AO scoring system for fracture type. A history of glucocorticoid (GC) use but not DXR-BMD was found to be significantly associated with the presence of having an intra- or extra-articular fracture. Our data indicate that bone material properties which are impaired by GC use are more important for fracture severity than BMD.

  17. Carpal Malalignment in Malunion of the Distal Radius and the Effect of Corrective Osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    De Smet, Luc; Verhaegen, Filip; Degreef, Ilse

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Malunions of the distal radius often induce carpal malalignment. Two different types can be distinguished: an adaptive midcarpal malalignment (so-called CIA wrist: carpal instability, adaptive) and a radiocarpal malalignment (dorsal translation of the whole carpus). The effect of distal radial osteotomy on the carpal alignment has hardly been studied. Material and Methods 31 wrists in 31 patients (mean age 44 years) with malunion of the distal radius after a Colles fracture were treated with a corrective osteotomy. The patients were divided on basis of effective radio-lunate flexion (ERLF) in the two patterns of carpal malalignment. The radiographic changes were evaluated. Results There were 20 patients with midcarpal malalignment (ERLF ≤ 25°) and 11 with radiocarpal malalignment (ERLF > 25°). There was a correction of radial tilt and ulnar variance in both groups. There was a significant improvement of the carpal alignment in the midcarpal malalignment group, up to normal parameters. Neither age nor delay between fracture and osteotomy correlated. In the radiocarpal malalignment group a significant effect on the ERLF was observed. In the patients with dorsal plating 70% of the hardware had to be removed. Conclusion Distal radial osteotomy is a reliable technique for correction of the deformity at the distal end of the radius and carpal malalignment. PMID:25097809

  18. Image-guided distal radius osteotomy using patient-specific instrument guides.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Manuela; Ma, Burton; Rudan, John F; Ellis, Randy E; Pichora, David R

    2013-08-01

    In this article, we describe a method for computer-assisted distal radius osteotomies in which computer-generated, patient-specific plastic guides are used for intraoperative guidance. Before surgery, the correction and plate location are planned using computed tomography scans for both radii and ulnae, and the planned locations of the distal and proximal drill holes for the plate are saved. A plastic, patient-specific instrument guide is created using a rapid prototyping machine into which a mirror image of intraoperative, accessible bone structure of the distal radius is integrated. This allows for unique positioning of the guide during surgery. For each planned drill location, a guidance hole is incorporated into the guide. During surgery, a conventional incision is made, and the guide is positioned on the radius. The surgeon drills the holes for the plate screws into the intact radius and performs the osteotomy using the conventional technique. Using the predrilled holes, the surgeon affixes the plate to the radius fragments. The guides are easy to integrate into the surgical workflow and minimize the need for intraoperative fluoroscopy for guidance of the procedure.

  19. Obesity Increases Complexity of Distal Radius Fracture in Fall From Standing Height.

    PubMed

    Ebinger, Thomas; Koehler, Daniel M; Dolan, Lori A; McDonald, Katelyn; Shah, Apurva S

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the relationship between obesity and distal radius fracture severity after low-energy trauma and to identify patient-specific risk factors predictive of increasing fracture severity. Retrospective review. Level 1 Trauma Center. Four hundred twenty-three adult subjects with a history of fracture of the distal radius resulting from a fall from standing height. Demographic data and injury characteristics were obtained. Preoperative wrist radiographs were reviewed and classified by the OTA classification system. Distal radius fractures were categorized as simple [closed and extra-articular (OTA 23-A)] and complex [intra-articular (OTA 23-B or 23-C) or open fracture or concomitant ipsilateral upper extremity fracture]. Multivariate logistic regression was completed to model the probability of incurring a complex fracture. Simple versus complex fracture pattern. Average age at the time of injury was 53.8 years (range, 18.9-98.4). Seventy-nine percent of subjects were female. The average body-mass index was 28.1 (range, 13.6-59.5). Two hundred forty-four patients (58%) suffered complex distal radius fractures per study criteria. Obese patients (body-mass index > 30) demonstrated increased fracture severity as per the OTA classification (P = 0.039) and were more likely to suffer a complex injury (P = 0.032). Multivariate regression identified male gender, obesity, and age ≥50 as independent risk factors for sustaining a complex fracture pattern. Obesity is associated with more complex fractures of the distal radius after low-energy trauma, particularly in elderly patients. This relationship may have important epidemiologic implications predictive of future societal fracture burden and severity in an obese, aging population. Prognostic Level III. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  20. Diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women with distal radius fracture in Germany.

    PubMed

    Endres, Heinz G; Dasch, Burkhard; Maier, Christoph; Lungenhausen, Margitta; Smektala, Rüdiger; Trampisch, Hans J; Pientka, Ludger

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate osteoporosis diagnosis and treatment on the basis of medical history, at hospital discharge, and 6-12 months after discharge, as well as to assess the frequency of subsequent fractures in postmenopausal women with distal radius fracture. A prospective, observational study of hospitalized women aged 55 years and older with an isolated distal radius fracture from minimal trauma. Subjects were recruited in 242 acute care hospitals in Germany. Potential risk factors for osteoporosis, frequency of osteoporosis assessment, frequency of medication treatment and subsequent fractures 6-12 months after discharge. Among 2031 patients we identified 652 appropriate postmenopausal women. Less than one-third of patient histories contained any bone density parameters, and only a minority of subjects (33%, 217) underwent bone density assessment while in hospital. Of these, 55% (119) were diagnosed with low bone density, yet only 30% of those were prescribed supplements (calcium/vitamin D) and/or specific osteoporosis medication (mostly bisphosphonates) at discharge. Six to twelve months after hospital discharge, the low rate of treatment had not changed substantially. In the interval, 4.3% had sustained a subsequent fracture from minimal trauma: 1.4% a distal radius fracture (0.3% a refracture) and 2.9% a hip joint or other fracture (not specified). A significant age difference between those with and without subsequent distal radius fractures was found (p = 0.01) but not a significant difference between patients with or without osteoporosis medication (p = 0.79), primarily because the case numbers were too small. A substantial proportion of postmenopausal women hospitalized with distal radius fracture were not sufficiently evaluated or treated for their potential risk of osteoporosis.

  1. Conversion of external fixation to open reduction and internal fixation for complex distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Natoli, R M; Baer, M R; Bednar, M S

    2016-05-01

    Distal radius fractures are common injuries treated in a multitude of ways. One treatment paradigm not extensively studied is initial treatment by external fixation (EF) followed by conversion to open reduction internal fixation (ORIF). Such a paradigm may be beneficial in damage control situations, when there is extensive soft tissue injury, or when appropriate personnel/hospital resources are not available for immediate internal fixation. There is no increased risk of infection when converting EF to ORIF in the treatment of complex distal radius fractures when conversion occurs early or if EF pin sites are overlapped by the definitive fixation. Using an IRB approved protocol, medical records over nine years were queried to identify patients with distal radius fractures that had undergone initial EF and were later converted to ORIF. Charts were reviewed for demographic data, injury characteristics, operative details, time to conversion from EF to ORIF, assessment of whether the EF pin sites overlapped the definitive fixation, presence of infection after ORIF, complications, and occupational therapy measurements of range of motion and strength. In total, 16 patients were identified, only one of which developed an infection following conversion to ORIF. Fisher's exact testing showed that infection did not depend on open fracture, time to conversion of one week or less, presence of EF pin sites overlapping definitive fixation, fracture classification, high energy mechanism of injury, or concomitant injury to the DRUJ. Planned staged conversion from EF to ORIF for complex distal radius fractures does not appear to result in an increased rate of infection if conversion occurs early or if the EF pin sites are overlapped by definitive fixation. This treatment paradigm may be reasonable for treating complex distal radius fractures in damage control situations, when there is extensive soft tissue injury, or when appropriate personnel/hospital resources are not available

  2. Multivariate injury risk criteria and injury probability scores for fractures to the distal radius.

    PubMed

    Burkhart, Timothy A; Andrews, David M; Dunning, Cynthia E

    2013-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to develop a multivariate distal radius injury risk prediction model that incorporates dynamic loading variables in multiple directions, and interpret the distal radius failure data in order to establish injury probability thresholds. Repeated impacts with increasing intensity were applied to the distal third of eight human cadaveric radius specimens (mean (SD) age=61.9 (9.7)) until injury occurred. Crack (non-propagating damage) and fracture (specimen separated into at least two fragments) injury events were recorded. Best subsets analysis was performed to find the best multivariate injury risk model. Force-only risk models were also determined for comparison. Cumulative distribution functions were developed from the parameters of a Weibull analysis and the forces and risk scores (i.e., values calculated from the injury risk models) from 10% to 90% probability were calculated. According to the adjusted R(2), variance inflation factor and p-values, the model that best predicted the crack event included medial/lateral impulse, Fz load rate, impact velocity and the natural logarithm of Fz (Adj. R(2)=0.698), while the best predictive model of the fracture event included medial/lateral impulse, impact velocity and peak Fz (Adj. R(2)=0.845). The multivariate models predicted injury risk better than both the Fz-only crack (Adj. R(2)=0.551) and fracture (Adj. R(2)=0.293) models. Risk scores of 0.5 and 0.6 corresponded to 10% failure probability for the crack and fracture events, respectively. The inclusion of medial/lateral impulse and impact velocity in both crack and fracture models, and Fz load rate in the crack model, underscores the dynamic nature of these events. This study presents a method capable of developing a set of distal radius fracture prediction models that can be used in the assessment and development of distal radius injury prevention interventions.

  3. Volar plate position and flexor tendon rupture following distal radius fracture fixation.

    PubMed

    Kitay, Alison; Swanstrom, Morgan; Schreiber, Joseph J; Carlson, Michelle G; Nguyen, Joseph T; Weiland, Andrew J; Daluiski, Aaron

    2013-06-01

    To determine whether there were differences between plate position in patients who had postoperative flexor tendon ruptures following volar plate fixation of distal radius fractures and those who did not. Three blinded reviewers measured the volar plate prominence and position on the lateral radiographs of 8 patients treated for flexor tendon ruptures and 17 matched control patients without ruptures following distal radius fracture fixation. We graded plate prominence using the Soong grading system, and we measured the distances between the plate and both the volar critical line and the volar rim of the distal radius. A higher Soong grade was associated with flexor tendon rupture. Patients with ruptures had plates that were more prominent volarly and more distal than matched controls without ruptures. Plate prominence projecting greater than 2.0 mm volar to the critical line had a sensitivity of 0.88, a specificity of 0.82, and positive and negative predictive values of 0.70 and 0.93, respectively, for tendon ruptures. Plate position distal to 3.0 mm from the volar rim had a sensitivity of 0.88, a specificity of 0.94, and positive and negative predictive values of 0.88 and 0.94, respectively, for tendon ruptures. We identified plate positions associated with attritional flexor tendon rupture following distal radius fracture fixation with volar plates. To decrease rupture risk, we recommend considering elective hardware removal after union in symptomatic patients with plate prominence greater than 2.0 mm volar to the critical line or plate position within 3.0 mm of the volar rim. Therapeutic III. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Growth arrest of the distal radius following a metaphyseal fracture: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chris W; Kay, Robert M; Skaggs, David L

    2002-01-01

    We report a 12-year-old girl who developed growth arrest of the distal radius physis 9 months after sustaining a complete fracture of the distal radial and ulnar metaphysis with no involvement of the physis evident at time of injury. The girl sustained a fracture of the metaphysis of her right distal radius and ulna after a fall. Anterior-posterior, lateral and oblique radiographs at injury, and during subsequent healing show no evidence of the fracture involving the physis. She was treated with closed reduction and casting for 6 weeks and healed uneventfully. She returned 4 month later concerned about distal ulnar prominence. Radiographs revealed a loss of radial tilt and with suspicion of a physeal bar. Magnetic resonance imaging confirmed a physeal bar located in the dorsal radial region. A literature search of the Medline database was used to obtain prior case reports for review purpose. The patient underwent an epiphysiodesis of the distal radius and ulna along with an opening wedge osteotomy and bone grafting of the distal radius to restore radial height and inclination. She healed without complication and with restoration of the normal relationship of the distal radius and ulna. A review of the literature reveals five reported case of distal radial metaphyseal fractures not invloving the physis leading to growth arrest. By comparison, there are 31 reported cases of distal radius physeal arrest following fractures involving the physis. The physician should be aware that common distal radius metaphyseal fractures may rarely lead to growth arrest.

  5. Resection-reconstruction arthroplasty for giant cell tumor of distal radius

    PubMed Central

    Saikia, Kabul C; Borgohain, Munin; Bhuyan, Sanjeev K; Goswami, Sanjiv; Bora, Anjan; Ahmed, Firoz

    2010-01-01

    Background: Giant cell tumor (GCT) of the distal radius poses problems for reconstruction after resection. Several reconstructive procedures like vascularized and non-vascularized fibular graft, osteo-articular allograft, ceramic prosthesis and megaprosthesis are in use for substitution of the defect in the distal radius following resection. Most authors advocate wrist arthrodesis following resection of distal radius and non vascularized fibular graft. Here we have analyzed the results of aggressive benign GCTs of the distal radius treated by resection and reconstruction arthroplasty using autogenous non-vascularized fibular graft. Materials and Methods: Twenty-four cases of giant cell tumor of the distal radius (mean age 32 years, mean follow-up 6.6 years) treated by en-bloc resection and reconstruction arthroplasty using autogenous non-vascularized ipsilateral fibular graft with a minimum followup of two years have been included in this retrospective study. Nineteen cases were of Campanacci grade III and five were of Grade II recurrence. The mean resected length of the radius was 9.5 (8-12) cm. Routine radiographs and clinical assessments regarding pain, instability, recurrence, hand grip strength and functional status were done at regular intervals and functional results were assessed using (musculoskeletal tumor society) MSTS-87 scoring. Results: Early radiological union at host-graft junction was achieved at mean 12.5 weeks, (range 12-14 weeks) and solid incorporation with callus formation was observed in mean 29 weeks (range 28-32 weeks) in all the cases. Satisfactory range of motion (mean 63%, range 52-78%) of the wrist was achieved in 18 cases. Grip strength compared to the contralateral hand was found to be 67% (range 58-74%). Functional results were excellent in six cases (25%), good in 14 cases (58.3%) and four (16.7%) cases had fair results. Soft tissue recurrence was seen in one patient. The most commonly encountered complication was fibulo

  6. Biomechanical Performance of Variable and Fixed Angle Locked Volar Plates for the Dorsally Comminuted Distal Radius

    PubMed Central

    Martineau, D; Shorez, J; Beran, C; Dass, A G; Atkinson, P

    2014-01-01

    Background The ideal treatment strategy for the dorsally comminuted distal radius fracture continues to evolve. Newer plate designs allow for variable axis screw placement while maintaining the advantages of locked technology. The purpose of this study is to compare the biomechanical properties of one variable axis plate with two traditional locked constructs. Methods Simulated fractures were created via a distal 1 cm dorsal wedge osteotomy in radius bone analogs. The analogs were of low stiffness and rigidity to create a worst-case strength condition for the subject radius plates. This fracture-gap model was fixated using one of three different locked volar distal radius plates: a variable axis plate (Stryker VariAx) or fixed axis (DePuy DVR, Smith & Nephew Peri-Loc) designs. The constructs were then tested at physiologic loading levels in axial compression and bending (dorsal and volar) modes. Construct stiffness was assessed by fracture gap motion during the different loading conditions. As a within-study control, intact bone analogs were similarly tested. Results All plated constructs were significantly less stiff than the intact control bone models in all loading modes (p<0.040). Amongst the plated constructs, the VariAx was stiffest axially (p=0.032) and the Peri-Loc was stiffest in bending (p<0.024). Conclusion In this analog bone fracture gap model, the variable axis locking technology was stiffer in axial compression than other plates, though less stiff in bending. PMID:25328471

  7. Biomechanical performance of variable and fixed angle locked volar plates for the dorsally comminuted distal radius.

    PubMed

    Martineau, D; Shorez, J; Beran, C; Dass, A G; Atkinson, P

    2014-01-01

    The ideal treatment strategy for the dorsally comminuted distal radius fracture continues to evolve. Newer plate designs allow for variable axis screw placement while maintaining the advantages of locked technology. The purpose of this study is to compare the biomechanical properties of one variable axis plate with two traditional locked constructs. Simulated fractures were created via a distal 1 cm dorsal wedge osteotomy in radius bone analogs. The analogs were of low stiffness and rigidity to create a worst-case strength condition for the subject radius plates. This fracture-gap model was fixated using one of three different locked volar distal radius plates: a variable axis plate (Stryker VariAx) or fixed axis (DePuy DVR, Smith & Nephew Peri-Loc) designs. The constructs were then tested at physiologic loading levels in axial compression and bending (dorsal and volar) modes. Construct stiffness was assessed by fracture gap motion during the different loading conditions. As a within-study control, intact bone analogs were similarly tested. All plated constructs were significantly less stiff than the intact control bone models in all loading modes (p<0.040). Amongst the plated constructs, the VariAx was stiffest axially (p=0.032) and the Peri-Loc was stiffest in bending (p<0.024). In this analog bone fracture gap model, the variable axis locking technology was stiffer in axial compression than other plates, though less stiff in bending.

  8. [Effect of age and anti-osteoporotic drugs on bone strength and structure of the distal radius].

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Shigeharu

    2013-07-01

    The distal radius constitutes a proximal part of the wrist joint, which bears axial load from the carpal bones. Based on the biomechanical experiments, the load transmitted from the carpal bones to the distal articular surface of the radius is greater to the lunate fossa than the scaphoid fossa. The findings are consistent with the results obtained from HR-pQCT analysis of the distal radius. As ageing, bone mineral densities of the distal radius decrease, and structures of the cortical and trabecular bones also deteriorate. Such deterioration can be prevented by osteoporotic medicines such as PTH or bisphosphonate. Denosumab has been shown to increase mechanical indices of the bone structure of the distal radius. The distal radius of the individual is fractured when the load over approximately 5 times (2.5SD) of the weight is applied. It is possible to predict load of fracture in the distal radius from the results of DXA derived BMD or HR-pQCT derived bone parameters. We should not miss the opportunity of treatment for osteoporosis when the patients with fragility distal radius fracture are seen.

  9. Type IIA Monteggia Fracture Dislocation with Ipsilateral Distal Radius Fracture in Adult – A Rare Association

    PubMed Central

    James, Boblee

    2016-01-01

    Monteggia fracture constitutes about 5-10% of the forearm fractures. Monteggia fracture by definition is proximal ulnar fracture with disruption of proximal radioulnar joint. Bado classified Monteggia fracture dislocation into four types and Jupiter subclassified type II Bado’s fractures into four types. The associated injury in the form of distal radial fractures and distal humerus fractures are rare though many cases of distal radial physeal injuries have been reported in paediatric population. Hereby we report a rare association of type IIA Monteggia fracture dislocation with ipsilateral distal radius fracture in an adult patient. This case report also highlights on proper examination and full length radiographs of forearm to avoid missing injury at wrist in cases of elbow injuries. Management of such complex injuries included open reduction and internal fixation of olecronon fracture, distal radius fracture and radial head resection. Functional outcome at six months was good at wrist whereas at elbow, stiffness was a major concern with elbow range of movement from 40°-110°. PMID:27656518

  10. A Comprehensive Study of Internal Distraction Plating, an Alternative Method for Distal Radius Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Mavani, Kinjal J

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The management of highly comminuted distal radius fractures still remains a major treatment challenge. Articular comminution and compromised bone quality are the culprits. One novel approach is the technique of Internal Distraction Plating which involves “bridging” the fracture with the use of a standard 3.5mm plate applied dorsally in distraction from the radius, proximal to the fracture, to the long finger metacarpal distally, bypassing the comminuted segment. The plate is removed once fracture union has been achieved. Aim The present study was conducted with the aim to evaluate the role of internal dorsal distraction plating as an alternative method in the treatment of fracture distal radius in terms of special indications, technique and outcome. Materials and Methods This study was a prospective longitudinal study on 20 patients (mean age 62 years) treated with internal distraction plating for comminuted distal radius fractures with specific indications. Regular follow-ups with standard radiographs and analysis were done upto 24 months. Functional outcome were assessed by DASH Score and the Gartland and Werley demerit score. Results At final follow-up, all fractures had united and X-rays showed mean palmar tilt of 7°, positive ulnar variance of 0.5mm, radial inclination of 18° and average loss of 2mm of radial height. Mean range of motion values for wrist flexion 46°, extension 50°, pronation 79° and supination 77° At final follow-up, the mean DASH score was 32. 85% patient had excellent to good result as per Gartland and Werley demerit score. This construct has yield satisfactory clinical and radiographic results with these very challenging injuries. Conclusion The purpose of this study was to report the radiographic and the functional outcomes of treatment with this technique. External fixator and volar plating in communited distal end radius fractures are not always satisfactory in old age with osteoporotic bone because of

  11. Comparison of three different plating techniques for the dorsum of the distal radius: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Peine, R; Rikli, D A; Hoffmann, R; Duda, G; Regazzoni, P

    2000-01-01

    Three different plating techniques were used on experimentally produced dorsally displaced distal radius fractures in cadavers and were tested in 4-point bending: a AO 3.5-mm T plate (group 1), two 2. 0-mm titanium plates 60 degrees to each other (group 2), and the AO pi plate (group 3). A metaphyseal defect was simulated by a dorsally open wedge osteotomy. The tests show that the 2-mm double-plating technique has superior stiffness and statistically equivalent bending and bone gap to failure compared with the AO 3.5-mm T plate or the pi plate when applied to the unstable distal radius fracture model. (J Hand Surg 2000; 25A:29-33. Copyright 2000 by the American Society for Surgery of the Hand.).

  12. [Complex regional pain syndrome following distal fractures of the radius : Epidemiology, pathophysiological models, diagnostics and therapy].

    PubMed

    Harhaus, L; Neubrech, F; Hirche, C; Schilling, T; Kohler, H; Mayr, A; Riesmeier, A; Bickert, B; Kneser, U

    2016-09-01

    The complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) still represents an incompletely etiologically understood complication following fractures of the distal radius. The incidence of CRPS following fractures of the distal radius varies between 1 % and 37 %. Pathophysiologically, a complex interaction of inflammatory, somatosensory, motor and autonomic changes is suspected, leading to a persistent maladaptive response and sensitization of the central and peripheral nervous systems with development of the corresponding symptoms. Decisive for the diagnostics are a detailed patient medical history and a clinical hand surgical, neurological and pain-related examination with confirmation of the Budapest criteria. Among the types of apparatus used for diagnostics, 3‑phase bone scintigraphy and temperature measurement have a certain importance. A multimodal therapy started as early as possible is the most promising approach for successful treatment. As part of a multimodal rehabilitation the main focus of therapy lies on pain relief and functional aspects.

  13. Triplane fracture of distal radius treated surgically: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Mingo-Robinet, Juan; Torres-Torres, Miguel; Gonzalez-Rodriguez, Manuel

    2014-05-01

    Only four cases of triplane distal radius fracture have been described in the literature. We report the first that has been treated with open reduction and internal fixation. A 15-year-old boy sustained a triplane fracture of the distal radius. After an unsuccessful attempt at closed reduction, open reduction and internal fixation were performed. Six months after injury, the patient is asymptomatic, but radiographs show a partial growth arrest. The goal of treatment is to achieve anatomic reduction of the articular surface. In this case interposed periosteum prevented anatomic reduction, requiring open reduction and internal fixation. Because of the patient's advanced age the partial physeal arrest should advance to complete arrest before length impairment or occurrence of angular deformity.

  14. Classification of Distal Radius Physeal Fractures Not Included in the Salter-Harris System

    PubMed Central

    Sferopoulos, Nikolaos K

    2014-01-01

    Introduction : The most commonly used classification for pediatric physeal fractures has been proposed by Salter and Harris. Among the most suitable classification schemes are those proposed by Ogden and Peterson who added several new types of injuries. The purpose of this study was to examine the value of both schemes to classify all different types of physeal injuries of the distal radius that are not included in the Salter-Harris system and to test a new nomenclature to classify and guide treatment for the whole spectrum of these injuries. Methods : A total of 292 children who were admitted for a physeal fracture of the distal radius that could not be classified according to the Salter-Harris system were identified from the hospital database. All radiographs were carefully examined and classified according to the existing classifications of Ogden and Peterson and a modified classification scheme. The results of the treatment were also evaluated. Results : Ninety-six physeal injuries could not be classified using the classification schemes of Ogden and Peterson. All injuries could be classified in five types using the new, modified nomenclature. Growth abnormalities of the distal radius were evaluated after an average follow-up time of 11 years. Growth arrest due to a physeal bar was detected only in one patient. Discussion : The proposed modified scheme is practical, incorporates all previous classification systems, allows classification of all physeal injuries of the distal radius that are not included in the Salter-Harris system and may assist comparison of treatment outcomes. PMID:25132871

  15. Volar plate fixation of intra-articular distal radius fractures: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Fok, Margaret W M; Klausmeyer, Melissa A; Fernandez, Diego L; Orbay, Jorge L; Bergada, Alex Lluch

    2013-08-01

    Background Intra-articular fractures of the distal radius represent a therapeutic challenge as compared with the unstable extra-articular fractures. With the recent development of specifically designed internal fixation materials for the distal radius, treatment of these fractures by fragment-specific implants using two or more incisions has been advocated. Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of a fixed-angle locking plate applied through a single volar approach in maintaining the radiographic alignment of unstable intra-articular fractures as well as to report the clinical outcomes. We only excluded those with massive comminution, as is discussed in greater detail in the text. Patients and Methods This is a multicentered, retrospective study involving three hospitals situated in Spain, Switzerland, and the United States. In the period between January 2000 and March 2006, 97 patients with 101 intra-articular distal radius fractures, including 13 volarly displaced and 88 dorsally angulated fractures were analyzed. Over 80% were C2/C3 fractures, based on the AO classification. 16 open fractures were noted. Results With an average follow-up of 28 months (range 24-70 months), the range of movement of the wrist was very satisfactory, and the mean grip strength was 81% of the opposite wrist. The Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) score was 8. The complications rate was < 5%, including loss of reduction in two patients. All fractures healed by 3 months postinjury. Conclusions Irrespective of the direction and amount of initial displacement, a great majority of intra-articular fractures of the distal radius can be managed with a fixed-angle volar plate through a single volar approach. Level IV retrospective case series.

  16. Risk factors for complications following open reduction internal fixation of distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jimmy J; Phillips, Craig S; Levitz, Seth P; Benson, Leon S

    2014-12-01

    A national surgical database was used to determine risk factors for complications in patients undergoing open reduction internal fixation (ORIF) for distal radius fractures. The American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database for the 2006-2012 years was queried to identify all patients who underwent an ORIF of a distal radius fracture based on Current Procedural Terminology codes 25607, 25608, or 25609. The database is a statistically representative sample of prospectively collected perioperative surgical data from hospitals primarily in the United States. Demographics, comorbidities, preoperative laboratory values, and 30-day complications were compared between the patient groups with and without a postoperative complication. Multivariate analysis was performed to identify patient characteristics and comorbidities that were independently associated with early postoperative complications. This retrospective analysis identified 3,003 patients who underwent an ORIF of the distal radius over 7 years. The number of patients with a complication within 30 days after surgery was 62 (2%), totaling 90 complications. Incidence of return to the operative room for the entire study population was 1.1%. Multivariate analysis, adjusting for confounding variables, showed that patients with a complication were more likely to have hypertension, congestive heart failure, preoperative chemotherapy or radiotherapy, longer operating time, and manifest preoperative impairment in independent living. Approximately 2% of patients sustained a complication within 30 days following ORIF of a distal radius fracture. Recognition of the risk factors may help avoid complications in the identified high-risk patients. Prognostic II. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Analysis of Publication Bias in the literature for Distal Radius Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Sando, Ian C; Malay, Sunitha; Chung, Kevin C

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Distal radius fractures are the most commonly treated fracture, and their management remains complex. We aim to evaluate the presence of publication bias in the literature on distal radius fracture management and identify specific study variables that may influence the reporting of positive outcomes. Methods We conducted a systematic review on all available journal articles to find primary articles reporting on the management of distal radius fractures. Data collected included the direction of study outcome (positive, neutral, and negative) and various study characteristics including sample size, geographic origin of the study, clinical setting, study design, type of treatment, analysis for statistical significance, evaluation of wrist function, presence of subjective outcome measures, mean follow-up time, adequacy of reduction, complications, mean patient age, and the presence of any extramural funding. Results We reviewed 215 journal articles and found that 70% of articles reported positive outcomes, 25% reported neutral outcomes, and 5% reported negative outcomes. Funnel plot analysis suggested the presence of publication bias due to the asymmetric distribution of studies. In addition, we found statistically significant differences between study outcomes with respects to treatment type, presence of external funding, reduction adequacy, hand/wrist functional assessment, and patient questionnaires for subjective assessment. Conclusions Publication bias likely exists in the literature for distal radius fracture management. Several study characteristics influence the reporting of positive outcomes, but whether or not the presence of these characteristics portends a greater chance of publication remains unclear. A standardized approach to measure and track results may improve evidence-based outcomes. PMID:23566720

  18. Solitary osteochondroma of the distal radius: a rare cause of carpal tunnel syndrome diagnosed using ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Franz, Torsten; Leclère, Franck Marie; Rees, Marcel Gregor

    2014-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome is the most common entrapment neuropathy in the upper extremity. A rare case of carpal tunnel syndrome due to solitary osteochondroma arising from the metaphysis of the distal radius is presented. Preoperative diagnosis was suspected by physical examination and high-resolution sonography and confirmed by radiographs. Surgical treatment consisted of extended open carpal tunnel release and excision of the tumor. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. The Impact of Patient Activity Level on Wrist Disability after Distal Radius Malunion in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Gregory N.; Stepan, Jeffrey G.; Osei, Daniel A.; Calfee, Ryan P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine if high-activity older adults are adversely affected by distal radius malunion. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Hand clinics at a tertiary institution. Participants 96 patients ≥60 years old at time of fracture evaluated at least 1 year following distal radius fracture. Intervention Physical Activity Scale of the Elderly (PASE) scores stratified participants into high- and low-activity groups. Malunions were defined radiographically by change of ≥20° of lateral tilt, ≥15° radial inclination, ≥4 mm of ulnar variance, or ≥4 mm intra-articular gap or step-off, compared to the uninjured wrist. Main Outcome Measure Patient-rated disability of the upper-extremity was measured by the QuickDASH and Visual Analog Scales (VAS) for pain/function. Strength and motion measurements objectively quantified wrist function. Results High-activity participants with a distal radius malunion were compared to high-activity participants with well-aligned fractures. There was no significant difference in QuickDASH scores, VAS function, strength, and wrist motion despite statistically, but not clinically relevant, increases in VAS pain scores (difference 0.5, p=0.04) between the groups. Neither PASE score (β= 0.001, 95%CI: −0.002 to 0.004) nor malunion (β=0.133, 95%CI: −0.26 to 0.52) predicted QuickDASH scores in regression modeling after accounting for age, sex, and treatment. Operative management failed to improve outcomes and resulted in decreased grip strength (p=0.05) and more frequent complications (26% vs 7%, p=0.01) when compared to nonoperatively management. Conclusion Even among highly active older adults, distal radius malunion does not impact functional outcomes. Judicious use of operative management is warranted provided heightened complication rates. PMID:25233158

  20. Citation analysis of the 100 most common articles regarding distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Jones, Richard; Hughes, Travis; Lawson, Kevin; DeSilva, Gregory

    2017-01-01

    Bibliometric studies are increasingly being utilized as a tool for gauging the impact of different literature within a given field. The purpose of this study was to identify the most cited articles related to the management of distal radius fractures to better understand how the evidence of this topic has been shaped and changed over time. We utilized the ISI web of science database to conduct a search for the term "distal radius fracture" under the "orthopaedics" research area heading, and sorted the results by number of times cited. The 100 most cited articles published in orthopedic journals were then analyzed for number of citations, source journal, year of publication, number of authors, study type, level of evidence, and clinical outcomes utilized. The 100 most cited articles identified were published between 1951 and 2009. Total number of citations ranged between 525 and 67, and came from ten different orthopedic journals. The largest number of articles came from J Hand Surg Am and J Bone Joint Surg Am, each with 32. Consistent with previous analyses of orthopedic literature, the articles were primarily clinical, and of these, 53/76 were case series. The vast majority were evidence level IV. Only a small percentage of articles utilized patient reported outcome measures. These data show that despite distal radius fractures being a common fracture encountered by physicians, very few of the articles were high quality studies, and only a low proportion of the studies include patient reported outcome measures. Surgeons should take this lack of high-level evidence into consideration when referencing classic papers in this field. Analysis of the 100 most cited distal radius fracture articles allows for delineation of which articles are most common in the field and if a higher level of evidence correlates positively with citation quantity.

  1. Primary hyperparathyroidism associated with a giant cell tumor: One case in the distal radius.

    PubMed

    Ouzaa, M R; Bennis, A; Iken, M; Abouzzahir, A; Boussouga, M; Jaafar, A

    2015-10-01

    Hyperparathyroidism can present itself as brown tumors (or osteolytic expansive lesions) that usually disappear after normalization of calcium and phosphate levels. It rarely occurs simultaneously with a giant cell tumor. The authors report one case of a localized form at the distal radius in a patient being followed for primary hyperparathyroidism. The diagnostic challenges related to the clinical and radiological similarities of these two pathological entities are discussed, as they can lead to delays in therapeutic management.

  2. [New minimally invasive approach for palmar plating in distal radius fractures].

    PubMed

    Chmielnicki, M; Prokop, A

    2015-02-01

    Distal radius fractures are among the most common fractures. Types A3 and C2 make up almost half of these. Volar fixed-angle plate fixation is the gold standard of treatment today. We wanted to minimise the approach to the distal radius through a transverse 2-3 cm incision in the wrist flexor fold, tunnelling beneath the pronator muscle. The operative technique is demonstrated here. 11 patients, averaging 70 years of age, underwent surgery for 7 A3 and 4 C2 type fractures. Average operating time was 50 minutes. Length of admission averaged 2.9 days. Using a visual analogue scale, pain decreased from 6/10 preoperatively to 3/10 on post-op day one and 2/10 on post-op day three. After 6 weeks, flexion and extension averaged 45-0-45°, and radial and ulnar deviation 20-0-20°. Pronation and supination averaged 85-0-85°. Grip strength with manometer averaged 90 % compared to the contralateral side at 6 weeks and 96 % at 3 months. As comparison, from 1 January 2008 until 31 May 2013, we treated 908 patients with distal radius fractures with volar fixed-angle plates through a conventional longitudinal incision of 5-8 cm. The average skin to skin time was 46 minutes, with an average length of admission of 5.6 days. A minimally invasive approach to treat distal radius fractures with volar plate fixation and sparing of the pronator muscle is possible. The initial patients treated with this approach experienced minimal post-operative pain, shorter hospital admissions, and rapid grip strength recovery with almost undisturbed rotational motion. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Distal radius fractures: Minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis with dorsal bicolumnar locking plates fixation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Alvin Chao-Yu; Chou, Ying-Chao; Cheng, Chun-Ying

    2017-01-01

    Background: Controversy still exists regarding the current treatment modalities for unstable distal radius fractures. There are yet few articles investigating the efficacy of bicolumnar dorsal plating technique, which is designed to minimize tissue dissection while providing sufficiently secure fixation. A clinical study was performed to evaluate the feasibility of the minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPO) technique using a modified dorsal approach for the treatment of distal radius fractures. Materials and Methods: Thirty patients with unilateral distal radius fracture who underwent bicolumnar plate fixation with a minimally invasive dorsal approach between September 2008 and December 2010 were included in this retrospective study. Twenty four patients (8 men and 16 women) with a mean age of 53 years (range 18-85 years) were available for followup of at least 1 year or more were included in final study. Herein, we report the functional radiological outcomes of the study. There were three cases of AO Type A fracture, five cases of AO Type B fracture, and 16 cases of AO Type C fracture. Results: The union was achieved in all the patients. The functional results at one-year followup, assessed using the modified Gartland and Werley scoring system, were excellent in 14 patients, good in seven patients, and fair in three patients. The average correction of deformity was 4.1 mm for radial height, 7.6° for radial inclination, and 20.7° for volar tilt. Conclusions: MIPO with a dorsal approach is a feasible option for the management of displaced distal radius fractures and can result in favorable surgical outcomes. PMID:28216757

  4. Strength prediction of the distal radius by bone densitometry--evaluation using biomechanical tests.

    PubMed

    Eckstein, Felix; Kuhn, Volker; Lochmüller, Eva-Maria

    2004-03-01

    Osteoporotic fractures represent an important medical problem as they are often early predictors of future fractures at other skeletal sites. The distal radius is one such fracture site. To determine the individual's risk of fracture, different measurement techniques have been developed. These methods differ in physical background, measurement site, output parameters, and cost. If correctly applied, biomechanical testing can be an efficient tool for the preclinical evaluation of these techniques. With biomechanical testing it is possible to determine the structural strength of bone which can then be correlated with various densitometric parameters. Here we will review experimental work performed in this context. Biomechanical testing conditions vary considerably from study to study with 3-point bending (shaft), axial compression (metaphysis), and fall simulations being some of the techniques used. Experimental evidence suggests that site-specific osteodensitometric measurements can predict the mechanical strength of the distal radius with moderate to high accuracy, but that measurements at remote sites display considerably lower predictive value. Geometry-based parameters of cortical bone are also good predictors, but have not been shown to offer significant advantage over measurement of bone mass. Some (but not all) studies have found that quantitative ultrasound and microstructural parameters contribute significant additional information to bone mass measurement. The most accurate prediction of distal radius fractures, however, appears to be (patient-specific) microstructural finite element modeling.

  5. External fixation for distal radius fractures: effect of distraction on outcome.

    PubMed

    Kaempffe, F A; Walker, K M

    2000-11-01

    Few studies have examined the potential adverse effects of excess distraction and prolonged duration of external fixation for the treatment of distal radius fractures. In this study, 19 patients with distal radius fractures treated with external fixation and supplemental Kirschner wire fixation between August 1991 and November 1997 were studied retrospectively. Patients were evaluated by questionnaire, chart review, radiographs, and clinical examination an average of 161 weeks after injury. Although no significant correlation was found between amount of distraction, as measured by carpal height index, and scores for pain, function, radiographs, motion, grip, strength, and final result, a negative correlation was found of all categories with increasing carpal height index. A significant negative correlation was seen between duration of external fixation and scores for pain, motion, and total score, with motion scores being most affected. New York Orthopaedic Hospital grades of good or excellent were attained by 89% of the patients. The data suggest that external fixation with supplemental pin fixation is a satisfactory method of treating severe fractures of the distal radius. Outcome likely is improved with shorter duration of external fixation.

  6. Corrective Osteotomy for Deformity of the Distal Radius Using a Volar Locking Plate

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Brett; Gajendran, Varun

    2007-01-01

    Dorsally angulated malunions of the distal radius have historically been corrected with an opening wedge osteotomy fixed with a dorsal plate. Volar locking plates may facilitate a less morbid approach to corrective osteotomies of the wrist. Eight consecutive patients with an average age of 40 years (range, 15–52 years) underwent correction of a distal radius deformity through a volar approach. Clinical follow-up averaged 17.4 months (range, 7–41 months). Preoperative radiographs revealed an average of 24° of dorsal tilt in patients with dorsal deformity. Postoperatively, their average measurement was <3° of volar tilt. Patients were initially ulnar-positive with an average of 4 mm ulnar-positive variance (range, 2–7 mm). This corrected to less than 1 mm postoperatively. Postoperative disabilities of the arm, shoulder, and hand (DASH), SF-12, and Mayo Wrist scores averaged 10.8, 40.5, and 82.5, respectively. There were no nonunions, and no plates required removal. Distal radius deformity can be effectively addressed through a volar approach with the use of a locking plate. PMID:18780123

  7. Complications following dorsal versus volar plate fixation of distal radius fracture: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jie; Yang, Tu-Bao; Luo, Wei; Qin, Jia-Bi; Kong, Fan-Jing

    2013-04-01

    A meta-analysis to compare complication rates following volar or dorsal surgical fixation of distal radius fracture. A detailed search of PubMed®/MEDLINE® was undertaken to identify randomized and nonrandomized controlled trials published before 25 August 2012 that compared volar with dorsal fixation, in patients with distal radius fracture. A quantitative meta-analysis of 12 trials (952 patients) was performed. There was no between-group difference in the overall rate of complications. Volar fixation was associated with significant increases in neuropathy (relative risk [RR] 2.19; 95% confidence intervals [CI] 1.27, 3.76) and carpal tunnel syndrome (RR 4.56; 95% CI 1.02, 20.44), and a reduction in tendon irritation, compared with the dorsal approach (RR 0.38; 95% CI 0.17, 0.86). Dorsal fixation offers a lower risk of neuropathy and carpal tunnel syndrome than the volar approach, but a higher risk of tendon irritation. Patients with a distal radius fracture can expect similar outcomes after volar or dorsal surgery.

  8. [Vitamin C and prevention of reflex sympathetic dystrophy following surgical management of distal radius fractures].

    PubMed

    Cazeneuve, J F; Leborgne, J M; Kermad, K; Hassan, Y

    2002-12-01

    Reflex sympathetic dystrophy is a major complication following surgical treatment of fractures of the distal radius. Its pathogenesis is related to lipid peroxidation which damages vascular endothelial cells, increasing capillary permeability. Vitamin C is a natural antioxidant. The authors have made a comparative study of two groups of patients with isolated closed displaced fractures of the distal radius, which were reduced and stabilized by intrafocal pinning. Group 1 included 100 patients who were treated from 1995 until 1998 and who did not receive any vitamin C supplementation; group 2 included 95 patients who were treated from 1999 to 2002 and who received daily administration of one gram vitamin C orally during 45 days, starting on the day of fracture. The incidence of reflex sympathetic dystrophy was five time times lower in group 2 (2.1% versus 10%). This is in line with previous observations and lends credit to the value of vitamin C administration as a prophylactic measure to prevent the occurrence of reflex sympathetic dystrophy in patients who undergo surgical treatment of a displaced fracture of the distal radius.

  9. Conventional bone plate fixation of distal radius and ulna fractures in toy breed dogs.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, J M; Macías, C

    2016-03-01

    To describe the outcome of bone plate fixation of distal radius and ulna fractures in toy breed dogs treated with conventional bone plates. Records of 15 toy breed dogs with distal radius and ulna fractures were retrospectively reviewed for signalment, method of fixation, complications and clinical and radiographic assessments. A telephone-based owner questionnaire was conducted to determine long-term function and client satisfaction. Age ranged from 4 months to 6 years. Body weight ranged from 1 to 4 kg. Dynamic compression plates were used in 13 dogs and veterinary cuttable plates were used in 2 dogs as the means of fixation. Full radiographic and clinical follow-up data were available for 10 dogs and follow-up was performed between 6 and 8 weeks postoperatively. At that time, all fractures had healed and return to function was considered excellent in all 10 dogs. Five dogs did not return for hospital evaluation because they were judged by their owners to be free of lameness. In two cases, owners could not be contacted by telephone, but the referring veterinarians reported the dogs to be asymptomatic. No major complications occurred. Conventional bone plates are suitable choices for stabilisation of distal radius and ulna fractures in toy breed dogs and are not necessarily correlated with high rates of complication. © 2016 Australian Veterinary Association.

  10. TRACE METAL ANALYSIS FOLLOWING LOCKED VOLAR PLATING FOR UNSTABLE FRACTURES OF THE DISTAL RADIUS

    PubMed Central

    Rylander, Lucas S; Milbrandt, Joseph C; Armington, Evan; Wilson, Marty; Olysav, David J

    2010-01-01

    An increase in the utilization of metallic devices for orthopaedic interventions from joint replacement to fracture fixation has raised concern over local metal ion release and possible systemic sequelae due to dissemination of these ions. Our purpose was to determine whether serum titanium concentrations were elevated in patients who had previously received a locked volar distal radius plate. Our hypothesis was that the simple presence of titanium alone in a relatively fixed implant was not enough to raise serum titanium levels. Twenty-two potential subjects who had received a volar locked distal radius plate were identified through review of a single surgeon's operative logs. Eleven met inclusion criteria. Serum titanium levels were measured in these subjects and compared to both current and historical control groups. We found no difference between controls and our study group with the exception of one control subject who is employed as a welder. This is in contrast to previous studies from our institution which found increases in titanium levels in hip and spine implants. We conclude that a locking titanium volar distal radius plate does not raise serum titanium levels in this population. PMID:21045978

  11. Treatment of Distal Radius Fracture Nonunion With Posterior Interosseous Bone Flap

    PubMed Central

    Saremi, Hossein; Shahryar-Kamrani, Reza; Ghane, Bahareh; Yavarikia, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background Nonunion of distal radius fractures is disabling. Treatment is difficult and the results are not predictable. However, posterior interosseous bone flap (PIBF) has been successful in treating forearm nonunion. Objectives To treat distal radius fracture nonunion with PIBF as a new procedure. Patients and Methods This prospective non-randomized cohort study was performed at two hospitals in Tehran between January 2011 and September 2015. PIBFs were applied in nine patients (10 nonunions) with a mean age of 55 years. Union success rate, grip strength, wrist range of motion, and forearm rotation were then evaluated. Results Although four of the patients had a history of infection, all participants achieved fracture union at a mean time of 3.8 months. Grip strength improved by 12.4 kg. There was also 36° improvement in wrist flexion, 20° improvement in wrist extension, 60° improvement in forearm supination, and 46° improvement in forearm pronation. The range of motion and grip strength improvements were significant. Conclusions Pedicled PIBF is a new option for treating distal radius fracture nonunion. The results are predictable in achieving union and good function, and this technique can be successfully used in cases with extensive soft-tissue damage or infection. PMID:27703802

  12. The Effect of Socioeconomic Factors on Outcomes of Distal Radius Fractures: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Truong, Jessica L; Doherty, Chris; Suh, Nina

    2017-10-01

    Socioeconomic factors are known to affect outcomes for both medical and surgical conditions. The purpose of this systematic review was to assess the current evidence regarding the effect of socioeconomic factors such as income, geographic location, educational level, and occupation on clinical outcomes after distal radius fractures. A systematic search strategy was performed to identify studies commenting on the effect of socioeconomic factors on clinical outcomes following open or closed distal radius fracture repair. Abstract and full-text screening was performed by 2 independent reviewers, and articles were evaluated by Structured Effectiveness Quality Evaluation Scale (SEQES). Treatment outcomes of interest included, but were not limited to, pain, function, range of motion, and grip strength. There were 1745 studies that met our inclusion and exclusion criteria for abstract screening. Of these, 48 studies met our inclusion criteria for full-text screening and 20 studies met our criteria for quality analysis with the SEQES score. There were 3 studies of high quality, 16 of moderate quality, and 1 of low quality. Meta-analyses were not possible due to the variability in outcomes of interest across papers. Patient factors indicative of socioeconomic status are relevant predictors of functional outcome after distal radius fractures. There is currently limited evidence in this area of research, and further examination should be considered to improve outcomes from a patient and system standpoint.

  13. Use of bone graft substitute in the treatment for distal radius fractures in elderly.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Chintan; Shetty, Vishvas; Wasnik, Sandeep; Ahammed, Imthiaz; Shetty, Vijay

    2013-08-01

    Fractures of the distal radius in elderly patients are often associated with metaphyseal defects that can lead to collapse, malunion and therefore decreased function. An alternative approach to simple reduction is to fill the defects with materials that can provide structural support. We used synthetic hydroxyapatite (HA) in unstable fractures of the distal radius in thirty-one elderly patients, of which four patients lost to follow-up, leaving twenty-seven patients for this study. All subjects underwent closed reduction with K-wire fixation and HA augmentation. They were followed up at 8- and 16-week intervals post-operatively to assess the functional outcome using patient-related wrist evaluation [PRWE], clinical outcome and radiological outcome. At mean 16 weeks, our results show that patients treated with this method showed no metaphyseal defect, no collapse and had satisfactory clinical outcome as assessed by PRWE. We believe that fixation with hydroxyapatite augmentation for fractures of the distal radius in elderly patients is an attractive therapeutic option. This experience has changed our clinical practice.

  14. Salter-Harris type-IV displaced distal radius fracture in a 5-year-old.

    PubMed

    Huntley, Samuel R; Summers, Spencer H; Stricker, Stephen J

    2016-03-01

    Displaced Salter-Harris type-IV fractures are rare in young children and can result in articular incongruity or premature physeal arrest. We describe a 5-year-old boy who sustained a displaced left distal radial Salter-Harris type-IV fracture. The patient had normal wrist function and physeal growth at the 3-year postoperative follow-up. Our patient is by far the youngest reported child with a displaced Salter-Harris type-IV fracture of the distal radius. Prompt anatomic reduction and fixation of a displaced distal radial Salter-Harris type-IV fracture can result in excellent short-term wrist motion with maintenance of physeal function.

  15. Treatment of physeal fractures of the distal radius by volar intrafocal Kapandji method: surgical technique.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Guy; Orbach, Hagay; Chezar, Avi; Rozen, Nimrod

    2017-01-01

    Distal radial physeal fractures with volar displacement are rare. Several methods of operative treatment include volar plate without inserting distal screws, percutaneous technique using two anterior skin incisions and reversed Kapandji technique with pins introduced through a posterior approach and locked at the anterior cortex of the fracture. We report three cases along with a literature review of the surgical techniques described in the past and a novel surgical technique for this uncommon fracture termed "Volar Kapandji". All patients had anatomic reduction at the last follow-up radiography, and all patients had a full range of motion and VAS 0 at the last follow-up. No complications were recorded. This case study presents the minimally invasive option for treating rare cases of physeal distal radius fractures with volar displacement. V.

  16. Fracture of the distal radius: risk factors for complications after locked volar plate fixation.

    PubMed

    Soong, Maximillian; van Leerdam, Roderick; Guitton, Thierry G; Got, Christopher; Katarincic, Julia; Ring, David

    2011-01-01

    To identify risk factors for complications after volar locking plate fixation of distal radius fractures. We assessed early postoperative complications in 594 patients with fracture of the distal radius repaired with a volar locking plate and a minimum 1-month evaluation in the medical record. Later complications were assessed among 321 patients as a subset of the original cohort with a minimum 6 months' evaluation. We compared patient demographics, fracture characteristics, and aspects of management between patients with and without complications in bivariate analysis. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was applied to identify the factors independently associated with complications. A total of 47 complications were documented in the medical record. Early complications occurred in 24 of 594, including 8 intra-articular screws and 7 patients with loss of fixation. Late complications occurred in 23 of 321, including 14 patients diagnosed with tendon irritation (one rupture of the flexor pollicis longus tendon) and 5 patients who had subsequent surgery to address dysfunction of the distal radioulnar joint (malunion, synostosis, and arthrofibrosis). Of the 47 complications, 26 were attributed to the plate, of which 9 were considered major (intra-articular screws and tendon rupture; 1.3% (8 out of 594) and less than 1% (1 out of 321) of the early and late groups, respectively). In the logistic regression models, fall from a height and an ipsilateral elbow injury were positive independent predictors of early complications, whereas high-volume surgeons and plates other than the most commonly used plate were positive independent predictors of later complications. Volar locking plate fixation of distal radius fractures was associated with relatively few plate-related complications in our institutions. Factors indicating higher energy or complexity predicted early complications. The most common late complication was tendon irritation, which is less discrete and

  17. Trabecular and cortical microstructure and fragility of the distal radius in women.

    PubMed

    Bala, Yohann; Bui, Quang Minh; Wang, Xiao-Fang; Iuliano, Sandra; Wang, Qingju; Ghasem-Zadeh, Ali; Rozental, Tamara D; Bouxsein, Mary L; Zebaze, Roger M D; Seeman, Ego

    2015-04-01

    Fragility fractures commonly involve metaphyses. The distal radius is assembled with a thin cortex formed by fusion (corticalization) of trabeculae arising from the periphery of the growth plate. Centrally positioned trabeculae reinforce the thin cortex and transfer loads from the joint to the proximal thicker cortical bone. We hypothesized that growth- and age-related deficits in trabecular bone disrupt this frugally assembled microarchitecture, producing bone fragility. The microarchitecture of the distal radius was measured using high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography in 135 females with distal radial fractures, including 32 girls (aged 7 to 18 years), 35 premenopausal women (aged 18 to 44 years), and 68 postmenopausal women (aged 50 to 76 years). We also studied 240 fracture-free controls of comparable age and 47 healthy fracture-free premenopausal mother-daughter pairs (aged 30 to 55 and 7 to 20 years, respectively). In fracture-free girls and pre- and postmenopausal women, fewer or thinner trabeculae were associated with a smaller and more porous cortical area (r = 0.25 to 0.71 after age, height, and weight adjustment, all p < 0.05). Fewer and thinner trabeculae in daughters were associated with higher cortical porosity in their mothers (r = 0.30 to 0.47, all p < 0.05). Girls and premenopausal and postmenopausal women with forearm fractures had 0.3 to 0.7 standard deviations (SD) fewer or thinner trabeculae and higher cortical porosity than controls in one or more compartment; one SD trait difference conferred odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for fracture ranging from 1.56 (1.01-2.44) to 4.76 (2.86-7.69). Impaired trabecular corticalization during growth, and cortical and trabecular fragmentation during aging, may contribute to the fragility of the distal radius.

  18. Geometric properties of distal radius and pathogenesis of Colles fracture: a peripheral quantitative computed tomography study.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, S P; Xie, X; Bärenholdt, O

    2001-01-01

    It is well known among clinicians that Colles fracture patients may have normal projected axial bone mineral density and that bone mass is not synonymous with bone strength. The aim of this work was to investigate whether cross-sectional properties of the distal radius in female patients with recent Colles fracture differ from those of a younger group of normal women without fracture. It was hypothesized that patients with Colles fracture had petite distal radii and that cortical thinning and reduced cortical and trabecular volumetric density are dominant features of this fracture type. We used a multilayer high-precision peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) device with a long-term precision error of 0.1% for a dedicated phantom during the measurement period (152 d). Clinical measurements were made at an ultradistal site rich in trabecular bone and a less ultradistal site rich in cortical bone. The results show that the following pQCT variables were significantly reduced in the nonfractured radius of the Colles fracture cases: mean ultradistal trabecular volumetric density, mean ultradistal and distal cortical volumetric density, mean ultradistal and distal cortical thickness (p < 0.001 for all differences). The outer cortical diameter, cross-sectional bone area, and cortical bending moment of inertia were not statistically different in the two groups. Thus, it would appear that Colles fracture cases did not have petite distal radii. The results suggest that the deforming force of Colles fracture has a transaxial direction (fall on outstretched arm), resulting in a crush fracture, and that it is not a bending force. We suggest that Colles fracture occurs as a result of the combined effect of a fall on the out-stretched arm, low trabecular and cortical volumetric bone density, and reduced cortical thickness.

  19. The mechanical stability of extra-articular distal radius fractures with respect to the number of screws securing the distal fragment.

    PubMed

    Crosby, Samuel N; Fletcher, Nicholas D; Yap, Erwin R; Lee, Donald H

    2013-06-01

    The treatment of distal radius fractures with volar locked plating (VLP) has gained popularity. Many different designs and sizes of plates afford a wide variety of configurations of locking screws that can be placed into the distal fracture fragment. The purpose of this study was to determine whether using half of the distal locking screws decreased stability when compared with using all possible distal locking screws with 4 different VLP systems. Twenty-four identical synthetic distal radius sawbone models were instrumented with 1 of 4 designs of VLP devices over a standardized dorsal wedge osteotomy to simulate a dorsally comminuted, extra-articular distal radius fracture. Distal locking screws were placed in varying configurations. Six radii per plate model with different screw configurations then underwent axial loading, volar bending, and dorsal bending using a servohydraulic machine. Distal fragment displacement was recorded using a differential variable reluctance transducer. There was no significant difference in fracture fragment displacement when using half of the distal locking screw set compared with using the full screw set. Mean differences in displacement between half and full screws were less than 0.1 mm. All configurations had the greatest magnitude of displacement during axial loading. Mean displacement was less in plates containing 2 rows of distal locking screws (-0.4 mm) compared with plates containing 1 row (-0.6 mm). Using half of the distal locking screws in VLP in an extra-articular, nonosteoporotic distal radial fracture model with noncyclical, nondestructive loading does not decrease construct stability compared with using all of the screws. Not filling all holes in VLP is more cost effective and does not sacrifice plate stiffness or construct stability. Plates with 2 rows of distal locking screws create more stable fixation than plates with 1 row of distal locking screws. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Surgery of the Hand

  20. [Alternative surgical method in malalignment of healed distal radius fracture: Kapandji-Sauvé procedure].

    PubMed

    Pechlaner, S

    1998-11-01

    Malunion after distal radius fracture with subluxation of the distal radioulnar joint can considerably limit the function of the hand. If the malunion cannot be eliminated by the corrective osteotomy of the radius, care must be taken not to additionally impair the stability of the wrist joint and the carpus, in the event of any necessary salvage procedure. In the Kapandji-Sauvé procedure, an arthrodesis is carried out after repositioning of the distal radioulnar joint. By segment resection of the ulnar shaft, a new joint is made to permit forearm rotation. Between 1984 and 1995, a total of 96 patients were treated with this procedure in our hospital. It was possible to re-examine 87 of those patients after an average period of 4 1/2 (1 to 11) years. The average age of the patients was 59 (14 to 72) years. In 25 cases the results were very good and in 52 cases good. In nine cases the results were poor. In one case the result was unsatisfactory.

  1. Arthroscopic knotless anchor repair of triangular fibrocartilage in distal radius fracture.

    PubMed

    García-Ruano, Á A; Najarro-Cid, F; Jiménez-Martín, A; Gómez de los Infantes-Troncoso, J G; Sicre-González, M

    2015-01-01

    Lesions of triangular fibrocartilage (TFC) are associated with distal radioulnar joint instability. Arthroscopic treatment of these lesions improves functional outcome of affected patients. The aim of the present work is to evaluate functional and occupational outcome of TCF repair using an arthroscopic knotless anchor device in patients with associated distal radius fracture. An observational, descriptive study was carried out between November 2011 and January 2014 including 21 patients with distal radius fracture and Palmer 1B lesions of TCF (Atzei class 2 and 3) that were treated by arthroscopic knotless anchor (PopLok® 2,8mm, ConMed, USA). Mean follow-up was 18 months. Functional (Mayo Wrist Score) and occupational outcome results were analyzed. Mean age of the group was 43.0±8.8 years, with 19% of the patients being female. There was an associated scapholunate lesion in 5 cases. Functional results reached a mean of 83.4±16.1 points onMayo Wrist Score. Mean sick-leave time was 153.16±48.5 days. Complete occupational reintegration was reached in 89.5% of cases. There were no postoperative complications. Arthroscopic knotless anchor repair of 1B TFC tears is a minimally invasive method of treatment that improves tension of fixation, avoiding subsequent loosen, in our experience, with few complications and good functional and occupational results. Copyright © 2014 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Treatment of unstable extra-articular distal radius fractures by modified intrafocal Kapandji method.

    PubMed

    Ruschel, Paulo Henrique; Albertoni, Walter Manna

    2005-03-01

    The authors prospectively assess the results of surgically treated, unstable extra-articular distal radius fractures from 29 patients with good bone quality. Mean age was 49 years, ranging from 22 to 69 years; the female gender was the most frequently affected (58.6% of the cases). Surgical fixation was indicated for fractures presenting an angulation above 20 degrees , marked dorsal comminution, and radius shortening in excess of 10 mm on initial x-rays (anteroposterior and lateral views). The Kapandji technique, with intrafocal, nonthreaded Kirschner wires, was employed. Clinical data assessed anatomic aspects according to Scheck, functional aspect after Gartland and Werley, strength by Scheck's methods, and esthetic by Frykman's criteria. Functional assessment, according to Gartland and Werley, revealed 72.1% of excellent and good results at 3 months; 89.7% at 6 months; and 96.6% at 12 months. Immediate postoperative reduction was not maintained at the final follow-up at 12 months; however, that loss was not severe, and the anatomic outcome was good and excellent in 96.6% of the cases. Six patients presented complications. Four patients presented reflex sympathetic dystrophy; 1 patient had a superficial Kirschner wire infection, and another patient had radial nerve superficial branch paresthesia. The employed technique showed to be effective in the treatment of unstable, extra-articular fractures of the distal radius. It is easy to learn and to perform. The device employed has a low cost and is widely available in operation rooms.

  3. [Osteoconductive behaviour of beta-tricalcium phosphate ceramics in osteoporotic, metaphyseal bone defects of the distal radius].

    PubMed

    Hainich, J; von Rechenberg, B; Jakubietz, R G; Jakubietz, M G; Giovanoli, P; Grünert, J G

    2014-02-01

    Surgical treatment of osteoporotic distal radius fractures with locking plates does not completely prevent loss of reduction. Additional bone deficit stabilisation with the use of bone substitute materials is receiving increased attention. Most knowledge on the in vivo behavior of bone substitutes originates from a small number of animal models after its implantation in young, good vascularized bone. This paper investigates the osteoconductivity, resorption and biocompatibility of beta-tricalcium phosphate as a temporary bone replacement in osteoporotic type distal radius fractures. 15 bone samples taken from the augmented area of the distal radius of elderly people during metal removal were examined. The material was found to be osteoconductive, good degradable, and biocompatible. Degrading process and remodelling to woven bone seem to require more time than in available comparative bioassays. The material is suitable for temporary replacement of lost, distal radius bone from the histological point of view. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. A Sandwich Method Using Kapandji Intrafocal Pinning to Facilitate Palmar Plating of Displaced Distal Radius Fractures.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hui-Kuang; Huang, Yi-Chao; Wang, Jung-Pan; Chang, Ming-Chau

    2017-09-01

    The use of palmar plating in the treatment of dorsally displaced distal radius fracture is very common, and can result in a good functional outcome. We present an easy "sandwich method" to reduce the fracture and to facilitate osteosynthesis. Firstly, the dorsal Kapandji intrafocal wire was applied to achieve the reduction of the dorsally displaced fracture and provide a volar-directed force. Then the intra-articular fractures were reduced or the metaphyseal defect is stuffed with bone graft if necessary. Finally, the anatomical plate is used to buttress and push back the distal fragment to complete the osteosynthesis. The postoperative radiographic parameters, comparing with the contralateral noninjured side, could achieve similar radial height, radial inclination, volar tilt, and ulnar variance without significant difference.

  5. Automated Classification of Epiphyses in the Distal Radius and Ulna using a Support Vector Machine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya-hui; Liu, Tai-ang; Wei, Hua; Wan, Lei; Ying, Chong-liang; Zhu, Guang-you

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to automatically classify epiphyses in the distal radius and ulna using a support vector machine (SVM) and to examine the accuracy of the epiphyseal growth grades generated by the support vector machine. X-ray images of distal radii and ulnae were collected from 140 Chinese teenagers aged between 11.0 and 19.0 years. Epiphyseal growth of the two elements was classified into five grades. Features of each element were extracted using a histogram of oriented gradient (HOG), and models were established using support vector classification (SVC). The prediction results and the validity of the models were evaluated with a cross-validation test and independent test for accuracy (PA ). Our findings suggest that this new technique for epiphyseal classification was successful and that an automated technique using an SVM is reliable and feasible, with a relative high accuracy for the models.

  6. Difficulty in Fixation of the Volar Lunate Facet Fragment in Distal Radius Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Obata, Hiroyuki; Futamura, Kentaro; Obayashi, Osamu; Mogami, Atsuhiko; Tsuji, Hideki; Kurata, Yoshiaki; Kaneko, Kazuo

    2017-01-01

    Recent reports suggest the presence of a rare fracture type for which reduction and fixation cannot be achieved with volar locking plate (VLP). In particular, it is difficult to achieve reduction and fixation with volar lunate facet (VLF) fragments present on the volar ulnar aspect of the lunate facet, because of the anatomical structure and biomechanics in this region. Herein, we report two challenging cases of difficulty in fixation of the VLF fragment in distal radius fracture. For this fracture type, it is most important to identify the volar ulnar bone fragment before surgery; it may also be necessary to optimize distal placement of the VLP via a dual-window approach and to apply additional fixations, such as a small plate, anchor, and/or external fixation. PMID:28255487

  7. Distal Radius Volar Rim Fracture Fixation Using DePuy-Synthes Volar Rim Plate

    PubMed Central

    Kachooei, Amir Reza; Tarabochia, Matthew; Jupiter, Jesse B.

    2016-01-01

    Background To assess the results of distal radius fractures with the involvement of the volar rim fixed with the DePuy-Synthes Volar Rim Plate. Case Description We searched for the patients with volar rim fracture and/or volar rim fractures as part of a complex fracture fixed with a volar rim plate. Ten patients met the inclusion criteria: three patients with type 23B3, six patients with type 23C, and one patient with very distal type 23A. The mean follow-up was 14 months (range: 2–26). Fractures healed in all patients. Of the three patients with isolated volar rim fractures (type 23B3), two patients had no detectable deficits in motion. These patients had an average Gartland and Werley score of 9 (range: 2–14). Of the other seven patients (six with type 23C and one with type 23A fracture), three patients healed with full range of motion and four had some deficits in range of motion. Two patients had excellent results, three had good results, and two had fair results using the Gartland and Werley categorical rating. One patient healed with a shortened radius and ulnar impingement requiring a second surgery for ulnar head resection arthroplasty. Literature Review Results after nonoperative treatment of volar rim fractures are not satisfactory and often require subsequent corrective osteotomy. Satisfactory outcomes are achieved when the fragments are well reduced and secured regardless of the device type. Clinical Relevance Volar rim plates give an adequate buttress of the volar radius distal to volar projection of the lunate facet and do not interfere with wrist mobility. Furthermore, the dorsal fragments can be fixed securely through the volar approach eliminating the need for a secondary posterior incision. However, patients should be informed of the potential problems and the need to remove the plate if symptoms develop. PMID:26855829

  8. Distal radius geometry and skeletal strength indices after peripubertal artistic gymnastics.

    PubMed

    Dowthwaite, J N; Scerpella, T A

    2011-01-01

    Development of optimal skeletal strength should decrease adult bone fragility. Nongymnasts (NON): were compared with girls exposed to gymnastics during growth (EX/GYM: ), using peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) to evaluate postmenarcheal bone geometry, density, and strength. Pre- and perimenarcheal gymnastic loading yields advantages in indices of postmenarcheal bone geometry and skeletal strength. Two prior studies using pQCT have reported bone density and size advantages in Tanner I/II gymnasts, but none describe gymnasts' bone properties later in adolescence. The current study used pQCT to evaluate whether girls exposed to gymnastics during late childhood growth and perimenarcheal growth exhibited greater indices of distal radius geometry, density, and skeletal strength. Postmenarcheal subjects underwent 4% and 33% distal radius pQCT scans, yielding: 1) vBMD and cross-sectional areas (CSA) (total bone, compartments); 2) polar strength-strain index; 3) index of structural strength in axial compression. Output was compared for EX/GYM: vs. NON: , adjusting for gynecological age and stature (maturity and body size), reporting means, standard errors, and significance. Sixteen postmenarcheal EX/GYM: (age 16.7 years; gynecological age 3.4 years) and 13 NON: (age 16.2 years; gynecological age 3.6 years) were evaluated. At both diaphysis and metaphysis, EX/GYM: exhibited greater CSA and bone strength indices than NON; EX/GYM: exhibited 79% larger intramedullary CSA than NON: (p < 0.05). EX/GYM: had significantly higher 4% trabecular vBMD; differences were not detected for 4% total vBMD and 33% cortical vBMD. Following pre-/perimenarcheal gymnastic exposure, relative to nongymnasts, postmenarcheal EX/GYM: demonstrated greater indices of distal radius geometry and skeletal strength (metaphysis and diaphysis) with greater metaphyseal trabecular vBMD; larger intramedullary cavity size was particularly striking.

  9. MRI of bone marrow in the distal radius: in vivo precision of effective transverse relaxation times

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grampp, S.; Majumdar, S.; Jergas, M.; Lang, P.; Gies, A.; Genant, H. K.

    1995-01-01

    The effective transverse relaxation time T2* is influenced by the presence of trabecular bone, and can potentially provide a measure of bone density as well as bone structure. We determined the in vivo precision of T2* in repeated bone marrow measurements. The T2* measurements of the bone marrow of the distal radius were performed twice within 2 weeks in six healthy young volunteers using a modified water-presaturated 3D Gradient-Recalled Acquisition at Steady State (GRASS) sequence with TE 7, 10, 12, 20, and 30; TR 67; flip angle (FA) 90 degrees. An axial volume covering a length of 5.6 cm in the distal radius was measured. Regions of interest (ROIs) were determined manually and consisted of the entire trabecular bone cross-section extending proximally from the radial subchondral endplate. Reproducibility of T2* and area measurements was expressed as the absolute precision error (standard deviation [SD] in ms or mm2) or as the relative precision error (SD/mean x 100, or coefficient of variation [CV] in %) between the two-point measurements. Short-term precision of T2* and area measurements varied depending on section thickness and location of the ROI in the distal radius. Absolute precision errors for T2* times were between 1.3 and 2.9 ms (relative precision errors 3.8-9.5 %) and for area measurements between 20 and 55 mm2 (relative precision errors 5.1-16.4%). This MR technique for quantitative assessment of trabecular bone density showed reasonable reproducibility in vivo and is a promising future tool for the assessment of osteoporosis.

  10. Responsiveness of EQ-5D in Patients With a Distal Radius Fracture.

    PubMed

    Rundgren, Johanna; Enocson, Anders; Mellstrand Navarro, Cecilia; Bergström, Gunnar

    2017-08-01

    The EuroQol Group 5-Dimension (EQ-5D) questionnaire is frequently used as an outcome measure of general patient-reported health-related quality of life (HRQoL). We evaluated the internal and external responsiveness of EQ-5D (specifically EQ-5Dindex score) in patients with a surgically treated distal radius fracture. Within the context of a randomized controlled trial (RCT), 132 patients with a surgically treated distal radius fracture filled out EQ-5D and Patient-Rated Wrist Evaluation (PRWE-Swe) at baseline (preinjury state), and at 3 and 12 months. Internal responsiveness was evaluated by calculating mean change score and standardized response mean (SRM) of the EQ-5Dindex scores. External responsiveness was evaluated with PRWE-Swe as the external criterion. PRWE-Swe was used to define 4 subgroups of patients with different clinical outcomes. The ability of EQ-5Dindex change score to discriminate between these subgroups was analyzed with logistic regression, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves, and area under the ROC curves (AUROCs). Correlation analysis was made with Spearman's ρ test. The mean change in EQ-5Dindex score from baseline to the 3-month follow-up was -16.1 and from the 3- to the 12-month follow-up was 7.6. The corresponding SRMs were large (0.93) and small to moderate (0.47). Analysis of external responsiveness displayed odds ratios >1 and AUROCs between 0.70 and 0.76 in all 4 subgroups. The proportion of patients correctly classified into the 4 subgroups by the EQ-5Dindex change scores was 78% to 94%. Spearman's ρ was 0.35. EQ-5D displayed an overall acceptable to good responsiveness in patients with a distal radius fracture. It may thus be used as a measure of HRQoL in this patient group.

  11. Distal radius geometry and skeletal strength indices after peripubertal artistic gymnastics

    PubMed Central

    Scerpella, T. A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Development of optimal skeletal strength should decrease adult bone fragility. Nongymnasts (NON) were compared with girls exposed to gymnastics during growth (EX/GYM), using peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) to evaluate postmenarcheal bone geometry, density, and strength. Pre- and perimenarcheal gymnastic loading yields advantages in indices of postmenarcheal bone geometry and skeletal strength. Introduction Two prior studies using pQCT have reported bone density and size advantages in Tanner I/II gymnasts, but none describe gymnasts’ bone properties later in adolescence. The current study used pQCT to evaluate whether girls exposed to gymnastics during late childhood growth and perimenarcheal growth exhibited greater indices of distal radius geometry, density, and skeletal strength. Methods Postmenarcheal subjects underwent 4% and 33% distal radius pQCT scans, yielding: 1) vBMD and cross-sectional areas (CSA) (total bone, compartments); 2) polar strength-strain index; 3) index of structural strength in axial compression. Output was compared for EX/GYM vs. NON, adjusting for gynecological age and stature (maturity and body size), reporting means, standard errors, and significance. Results Sixteen postmenarcheal EX/GYM (age 16.7 years; gynecological age 3.4 years) and 13 NON (age 16.2 years; gynecological age 3.6 years) were evaluated. At both diaphysis and metaphysis, EX/GYM exhibited greater CSA and bone strength indices than NON; EX/GYM exhibited 79% larger intramedullary CSA than NON (p<0.05). EX/GYM had significantly higher 4% trabecular vBMD; differences were not detected for 4% total vBMD and 33% cortical vBMD. Conclusions Following pre-/perimenarcheal gymnastic exposure, relative to nongymnasts, postmenarcheal EX/GYM demonstrated greater indices of distal radius geometry and skeletal strength (metaphysis and diaphysis) with greater metaphyseal trabecular vBMD; larger intramedullary cavity size was particularly striking. PMID

  12. Catastrophic Thinking Is Associated With Finger Stiffness After Distal Radius Fracture Surgery.

    PubMed

    Teunis, Teun; Bot, Arjan G J; Thornton, Emily R; Ring, David

    2015-10-01

    To identify demographic, injury-related, or psychologic factors associated with finger stiffness at suture removal and 6 weeks after distal radius fracture surgery. We hypothesize that there are no factors associated with distance to palmar crease at suture removal. Prospective cohort study. Level I Academic Urban Trauma Center. One hundred sixteen adult patients underwent open reduction and internal fixation of their distal radius fractures; 96 of whom were also available 6 weeks after surgery. None. At suture removal, we recorded patients' demographics, AO fracture type, carpal tunnel release at the time of surgery, pain catastrophizing scale, Whiteley Index, Patient Health Questionnaire-9, and disabilities of the arm, shoulder, and hand questionnaire, 11-point ordinal measure of pain intensity, distance to palmar crease, and active flexion of the thumb through the small finger. At 6 weeks after surgery, we measured motion, disabilities of the arm, shoulder, and hand, and pain intensity. Prereduction and postsurgery radiographic fracture characteristics were assessed. Female sex, being married, specific surgeons, carpal tunnel release, AO type C fractures, and greater catastrophic thinking were associated with increased distance to palmar crease at suture removal. At 6 weeks, greater catastrophic thinking was the only factor associated with increased distance to palmar crease. Catastrophic thinking was a consistent and major determinant of finger stiffness at suture removal and 6 weeks after injury. Future research should assess if treatments that ameliorate catastrophic thinking can facilitate recovery of finger motion after operative treatment of a distal radius fracture. Prognostic Level I. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  13. The Kapandji technique for fixation of distal radius fractures--a biomechanical comparison of primary stability.

    PubMed

    Mittelmeier, W; Braun, C; Schäfer, R

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this study was to compare Kapandji-K-wiring and established K-wiring techniques of the distal radius fracture for primary stability in a biomechanical model: dorsal K-wiring according to Kapandji using different angles of the K-wire, parallel and diagonal alignment of the K-wires. A new testing system which uses a synthetic material enabled us to carry out the cantilever bending test. By application of a lower load, the Kapandji procedure shows a higher reactive torque and stiffness. A higher reaction force of the other techniques, especially of the parallel wiring, are only observable under high-grade bending stress. Application of the Kapandji procedure with K-wires at a smaller angle to the axis of the radius results in the highest primary stability of the procedures investigated in the essential range of initial deformation.

  14. [A new external fixator for treatment of unstable distal radius fracture].

    PubMed

    Martini, A K

    1993-09-01

    Unstable distal radius fractures cannot be immobilized in a plaster cast: mal-unions (and later arthrosis of the wrist) are the result. Most symptoms are attributable to the shortening of the radius. Retention by means of an external fixator is the therapy of choice in such cases. Various fixator systems have become known. In this paper, a new fixator is presented which has the following advantages: It is very mobile and adaptable, and corrections are possible after attachment of the fixator. The screws can be inserted depending on the anatomical situation. The fixator is handy and light. The fixator has proved its effectiveness for a long time and is also suitable for complicated wrist injuries.

  15. Surgery versus conservative treatment in patients with type A distal radius fractures, a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Fractures of the distal radius are common and account for an estimated 17% of all fractures diagnosed. Two-thirds of these fractures are displaced and require reduction. Although distal radius fractures, especially extra-articular fractures, are considered to be relatively harmless, inadequate treatment may result in impaired function of the wrist. Initial treatment according to Dutch guidelines consists of closed reduction and plaster immobilisation. If fracture redisplacement occurs, surgical treatment is recommended. Recently, the use of volar locking plates has become more popular. The aim of this study is to compare the functional outcome following surgical reduction and fixation with a volar locking plate with the functional outcome following closed reduction and plaster immobilisation in patients with displaced extra-articular distal radius fractures. Design This single blinded randomised controlled trial will randomise between open reduction and internal fixation with a volar locking plate (intervention group) and closed reduction followed by plaster immobilisation (control group). The study population will consist of all consecutive adult patients who are diagnosed with a displaced extra-articular distal radius fracture, which has been adequately reduced at the Emergency Department. The primary outcome (functional outcome) will be assessed by means of the Disability Arm Shoulder Hand Score (DASH). Secondary outcomes comprise the Patient-Rated Wrist Evaluation score (PRWE), quality of life, pain, range of motion, radiological parameters, complications and cross-overs. Since the treatment allocated involves a surgical procedure, randomisation status will not be blinded. However, the researcher assessing the outcome at one year will be unaware of the treatment allocation. In total, 90 patients will be included and this trial will require an estimated time of two years to complete and will be conducted in the Academic Medical Centre Amsterdam and

  16. A case of osteoid osteoma in the distal radius epiphysis with atypical onset.

    PubMed

    Deveci, Alper; Fırat, Ahmet; Bozkurt, Murat; Hücümenoğlu, Sema

    2014-01-01

    We present a 16-year-old male patient, with a history of wrist trauma 3 months prior to admission, presented with widespread swelling, limitation of motion and pain that was unresponsive to anti-inflammatory drugs in the left wrist. A lesion compatible with osteoid osteoma in the distal epiphysis of the left radius was detected radiologically. Diagnosis of osteoid osteoma was confirmed with pathological examination of the lesion. Differential diagnosis is important as the atypical lesion occurred after trauma, making it difficult to distinguish from synovitis and infection in consideration of its location.

  17. Radial osteotomy and Sauvé-Kapandji procedure for deformities of the distal radius.

    PubMed

    Schroven, I; De Smet, L; Zachee, B; Steenwerckx, A; Fabry, G

    1995-01-01

    We treated 12 patients with a posttraumatic or congenital deformity of the distal radius. A radial osteotomy and a Sauvé-Kapandji procedure were carried out. In 9 patients the deformity was caused by a malunited fracture; the other 3 patients were referred to us with a Madelung deformity. We performed 6 open wedge osteotomies and 6 closing wedge osteotomies. All but one patient rated the result of the operation as good or excellent. The reason for the only failure could be carpal instability.

  18. Solid variant of aneurysmal bone cist on the distal extremity of the radius in a child.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Adriano Jander; de Almeida Leitão, Sebastião; Rocha, Murilo Antônio; Nascimento, Valdênia das Graças; Lima, Giovanni Bessa Pereira; de Meneses, Antonio Carlos Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    The solid variant of aneurismal bone cysts (ABC) is considered rare. It occurs with greater frequency in pediatric patients and in the tibia, femur, pelvis and humerus. We present a case of a metaphyseal lytic lesion on the distal extremity of the radius in a child whose radiograph was requested after low-energy trauma. The hypothesis of a pathological bone fracture secondary to an aneurysmal bone cyst was suggested. After biopsy, the child underwent intralesional excision without bone grafting and the histopathological findings were compatible with the solid variant of aneurysmal bone cyst.

  19. Wrist function in malunion: Is the distal radius designed to retain function in the face of fracture?

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, N

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Fractures of the distal radius are the most common fracture in humans and are the sempiternal hazard of 3.5 million years of bipedalism. Despite the antiquity of the injury, one of the most controversial topics in current orthopaedics is the management of distal radius fractures. It has been suggested that radiographic appearances rarely correlate with functional outcomes. As the success of the human species is predicated almost exclusively on its dexterity and intelligence, it is conceivable that the distal radius has evolved to preserve function even in the face of injury. We therefore hypothesise that the distal radius is designed to accommodate the possibility of fracture. Methods We conducted a review of studies comparing fracture pattern and form with function. We also explore the paleoanthropological evidence and comparative studies with other primates. Findings The evidence points to the human distal radius being highly tolerant of post-fracture deformity in terms of preservation of function. In addition, the distal radius appears to have apparently anatomically ‘redundant’ features that confer this capability. We believe these phenomena to be an evolved trait that developed with bipedalism, increasing the chances of survival for a species whose success depends upon its dexterity. PMID:27376442

  20. Clinical effects of three surgical approaches for a giant cell tumor of the distal radius and ulna

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Li, Yi; Li, Dongqi; Xia, Junfeng; Li, Su; Yu, Shunling; Liao, Yedan; Li, Xiaojuan; Li, Huilin; Yang, Zuozhang

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the curative effects of three surgical approaches for a giant cell tumor (GCT) of the distal radius and ulna. A total of 27 patients with GCT on distal radius and ulnas (7 and 20, respectively), confirmed by biopsy, were treated with individualized treatment regimens, according to the Campanacci's grade system: i) Curettage plus inactivated tumor bed and allogeneic bone graft/bone cement augmentation for Campanacci's grade I GCT of the distal radius and ulna (Group A); ii) simple en bloc resection for Campanacci's grade II and III GCT of the distal ulna (Group B); iii) en bloc resection and reconstruction with non-vascularized fibular autograft/allogeneic bone graft for Campanacci's II and III GCT of the distal radius (Group C). Postoperative recurrence and complications were recorded. The Musculoskeletal Tumor Society Score was used to assess functional results. The mean follow-up time was 25 months (range, 9–125 months). A total of 3 patients exhibited tumor recurrence at 9, 11 and 15 months following surgery (1 case succumbed to pulmonary metastasis at 27 months). Overall, the incidence of the postoperative recurrence of the GCT of the distal ulna and radius were 14.3 (1/7) and 10% (2/20), respectively, with a statistical P-value of 0.762. No statistically significant difference was observed regarding the incidence of the postoperative recurrence, postoperative complications and MSTS results among the three surgical approaches for the GCT on distal ulna and radius (all P>0.05). However, statistically significant differences were noted when the incidence of the postoperative recurrence of curettage (Group A) was compared with that of en bloc resection (Groups B and C) (P=0.024). In conclusion, in order to achieve the best clinical effects for patients with GCT on distal radius and ulna, individualized treatment regimens must be designed according to the different Campanacci's grades and tumor locations. PMID:27900098

  1. A new volar plate DiPhos-RM for fixation of distal radius fracture: preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Tarallo, Luigi; Mugnai, Raffaele; Adani, Roberto; Catani, Fabio

    2013-03-01

    We analyzed the efficiency of a new plate DiPhos-RM in CFR-PEEK [carbon-fiber-reinforced poly (etheretherketone)] for the volar fixation of distal radius fractures. The new plate's composition has the advantage of x-ray absolute transparency, therefore allowing to monitor the healing of the fracture. The desired combination of high strength and low rigidity is obtained through the use of the polymer composites CFR-PEEK. In this preliminary study (from March 2012 to June 2012), 10 cases of intra-articular distal radius fractures were treated with DiPhos-RM produced by Lima Corporate (Italy). The fractures were classified according to the AO classification, 4 fractures were type C1, 3 type C2, and 3 were A2. A preoperative computed tomography scan was carried out in all patients. One patient also underwent a postoperative computed tomography scan. Grip strength, range of motion, and DASH score were evaluated at follow-up. There were no cases of hardware failure. Specifically, no loss of position or alignment of fixed-angle locking screws or breakage of the plate were observed. Radiographic union was present at an average of 6 weeks (range, 5 to 8 wk). The overall preliminary experience with this new plate is favorable. The new plate is easy to apply and provides the surgeon dual options of fixed-angle or variable-angle screws. It was rigid enough to maintain the reduction also in AO type C articular fractures.

  2. Multiple ruptures of the extensor tendons after volar fixation for distal radius fracture: a case report.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Giancarlo; Vitali, Andrea; del Prete, Ferdinando

    2015-12-01

    A 62-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital after a bicycle accident with a displaced left (non-dominant) distal radius fracture. After closed reduction a long cast was applied. Due to loss of reduction, twenty-four days later open reduction internal fixation with locking compression plate (LCP) was performed. The patient returned to her normal activities but nineteen months after surgery showed functional impairment of the left thumb for Extensor Pollicis Longus (EPL) injury for which she necessitated transposition surgery. Twenty-six months after ORIF, functional deficit of the extension of the third and fourth left finger was noted secondary to injury of extensor tendons. Ultrasound and CT scan showed protrusion of the angular stability screws in LCP plate that caused a progressive wear resulting in rupture of the extensor tendons. Another tendon transposition surgery was performed with dorsal approach while the plate was removed utilising the original volar incision. Reconstruction of distal radius fractures with volar plating, requires accurate plate application with precise measurement of the length of the screws in order to prevent dorsal protrusion and thus avoiding tendon injuries. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Ulnar Shortening Osteotomy After Distal Radius Fracture Malunion: Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Barbaric, Katarina; Rujevcan, Gordan; Labas, Marko; Delimar, Domagoj; Bicanic, Goran

    2015-01-01

    Malunion of distal radius fracture is often complicated with shortening of the radius with disturbed radio- ulnar variance, frequently associated with lesions of triangular fibrocartilage complex and instability of the distal radioulnar joint. Positive ulnar variance may result in wrist pain located in ulnar part of the joint, limited ulnar deviation and forearm rotation with development of degenerative changes due to the overloading that occurs between the ulnar head and corresponding carpus. Ulnar shortening osteotomy (USO) is the standard procedure for correcting positive ulnar variance. Goal of this procedure is to minimize the symptoms by restoring the neutral radio - ulnar variance. In this paper we present a variety of surgical techniques available for ulnar shorthening osteotomy, their advantages and drawbacks. Methods of ulnar shortening osteotomies are divided into intraarticular and extraarticular. Intraarticular method of ulnar shortening can be performed arthroscopically or through open approach. Extraarticular methods include subcapital osteotomy and osteotomy of ulnar diaphysis, which depending on shape can be transverse, oblique, and step cut. All of those osteotomies can be performed along wrist arthroscopy in order to dispose and treat possibly existing triangular fibrocartilage complex injuries. At the end we described surgical procedures that can be done in case of ulnar shorthening osteotomy failure. PMID:26157524

  4. Enhancement of fracture healing by electrical stimulation in the comminuted intraarticular fracture of distal radius.

    PubMed

    Kohata, Kazuhiro; Itoh, Soichiro; Takeda, Shu; Kanai, Misa; Yoshioka, Taro; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; Yamashita, Kimihiro

    2013-01-01

    Effectiveness of an alternating electric current (AC) stimulation in prevention of bone deformity for comminuted intraarticular fracture of distal radius were verified by comparing postoperative results treated with a wrist-bridging external fixator combined with or without an AC stimulator (EF and NEF, respectively), and a palmar locking plate (LP). This study evaluated 92 cases (mean age 67.9 ± 11.4 years) of type C2 and 60 cases (mean age 69.7 ± 9.5 years) of type C3 distal radius fractures, as classified by the Association for Osteosynthesis. In total, 55 and 24 cases were treated with EF and NEF, respectively; and 73 cases were treated with LP. Callus appeared 27.5 ± 4.6 days postoperatively and the external skeletal fixation period was significantly shorter in the EF group than in the NEF group. The decrease in radial length was significantly lower in the EF group when compared to the LP group. There were no significant differences among the groups for the other radiographic and functional parameters. AC stimulation combined to the external fixation may be a promising method to prevent postoperative deformity in the severely comminuted intraarticular fractures by accelerating callus maturation and facilitating new bone bridging across the gap of fracture site.

  5. Double V-shaped cancellous osteotomy of the distal radius for Kienböck's disease.

    PubMed

    Aly, Tarek Ahmed

    2009-03-01

    Treatments of Kienböck's disease range from conservative measures-usually immobilization during the acute phase-to such procedures as joint leveling by radial shortening or ulnar lengthening, intercarpal fusion, silastic arthroplasty, and vascularized bone grafts. Joint-leveling procedures have many complications such as nonunion, hardware problems, and pain. In this study, 34 patients with Kienböck's disease, stage 1 through 3B in Lichtman's classification, were treated with a new technique: a double V-shaped metaphyseal osteotomy of the distal radius and dorsal tilt of the distal radius. The patients were evaluated clinically regarding pain, which decreased in 88% of patients; range of motion, which improved in all patients; and grip strength, which improved by 90%. Progression of the disease was assessed radiologically by determining the carpal height ratio and the carpal ulnar distance ratio. There were no cases with nonunion of the radial osteotomy at follow-up. This procedure is an effective treatment method for Kienböck's disease in wrists that do not have degenerative changes in the adjacent carpal joints.

  6. Prevent Collapse and Salvage Failures of the Volar Rim of the Distal Radius

    PubMed Central

    Orbay, Jorge L.; Rubio, Francisco; Vernon, Lauren L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Articular fractures of the distal radius may include a small fragment from the volar margin of the lunate fossa: volar marginal fragments (VMFs); these fragments are prone to loss of fixation and avascular necrosis, and often result in wrist subluxation. We present our experience managing acute and delayed VMFs. The first is treated using a hook plate extension to a volar locking plate and the latter using a volar opening wedge osteotomy to redistribute loads on the remaining articular surface. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the records of all patients treated at our facility with a hook plate extension for a VMF and for patients treated with a volar opening wedge osteotomy. Medical charts were examined for complications and functional results. Technique A hook plate extension was used to fix the VMF when plate buttressing was insufficient. For patients who presented a collapsed and reabsorbed VMF, a volar opening wedge osteotomy was used to reorient the articular surface, restoring joint stability. Results The hook plate extension was successful in managing 19 of the 21 acute VMFs. The volar opening wedge osteotomy provided concentric reduction and improved pain and motion in all treated patients. Conclusion We demonstrated that hook plate fixation of the VMF is an effective means of fixing the acute VMF and that a volar opening wedge osteotomy can be used to salvage a distal radius fracture with a collapsed VMF. PMID:26855831

  7. [Conservative treatment of distal radius fracture. Consequences of an uncritical follow-up].

    PubMed

    Huber-Wagner, S; Beirer, M; Neu, J

    2014-11-01

    A 74-year-old woman sustained a fracture of the distal radius with an additional fracture of the styloid process of the ulna due to a fall. After reduction under local anesthesia immobilization treatment in a forearm cast was initiated. Despite increasing secondary dislocation during radiological x-ray follow-up control, the bone was described as correctly aligned by the treating physician and non-operative treatment was continued. After a total treatment period of 9 months including 7 months of physiotherapy the patient still presented a limited range of motion and local soft tissue swelling of the right wrist. The patient filed a complaint for wrong treatment of the distal radius fracture resulting in severe pain and considerable deformity of the right wrist leading to a significant handicap during activities of daily living. The expert opinion of the arbitration board ascertained a case of medical malpractice in terms of the indications. Due to the initial presence of criteria of radiological instability, an operative treatment had already been indicated at the first presentation. In addition, secondary dislocation during radiological follow-up examination should have led to conversion of treatment in favor of surgery. The arbitration board furthermore concluded that iatrogenic malpractice led to a severe deformity of the right wrist which would result in a loss of grip strength and future arthritic deformation of the wrist. Legal aspects of the case are discussed.

  8. Non-union in 3 of 15 osteotomies of the distal radius without bone graft

    PubMed Central

    Scheer, Johan H; Adolfsson, Lars E

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Open-wedge osteotomies of the distal radius create a void that is usually filled with either iliac crest bone graft or bone substitute. Previous studies have suggested that this is unnecessary. We investigated the safety of omitting the filling procedure. Patients and methods We included 15 patients with a dorsal malunion of a distal radius fracture. A palmar approach and angle-stable plates were used. The patients were followed until there was radiographic and clinical healing. Results Non-union occurred in 3 of the 15 patients. The study, which had been planned to include 25 patients, was then discontinued. 6 osteotomies created a trapezoid void (no cortical contact); 3 of these did not unite after the index procedure (p = 0.04), but did subsequently, after autogenous bone grafting. A trapezoid void was significantly associated with non-union (p = 0.04). Interpretation When a trapezoid defect is created, one should consider bone substitute or autogenous bone graft. This has been shown to be safe in other studies. PMID:25619425

  9. The Use of a Custom-made Prosthesis in the Treatment of Chondrosarcoma of Distal Radius.

    PubMed

    Guzik, Grzegorz

    2016-01-01

    The most common neoplasms of the distal radius are primary tumors, of which aneurysmal bone cysts and giant cell tumors are seen almost exclusively. Chondrosarcomas are most commonly located in the pelvis, ribs and proximal segments of the extremities; they rarely occur in forearm bones. Bone defects after distal radial resection can be replaced with bone grafts, both autogenous and allogenic. There is always a risk of failure of the bones to mend or slower synostosis, which necessitates the search for new treatments. Recently, custom-made prostheses have been used with increasing frequency. In early 2015, a 25-year-old male patient was admitted to the Department of Orthopedic Oncology in Brzozów on account of a tumor involving the epiphysis and metaphysis of the right distal radius. Imaging studies confirmed that the lesion was a neoplasm and a biopsy revealed a chondrosarcoma. Radical resection of the tumor was attempted and a custom-made prosthesis was inserted in the place of the bone defect. The prosthesis was designed and manufactured over 4 weeks. No complications occurred during the surgery or in the postoperative period. After the surgery, the forearm and wrist were in a plaster splint for 6 weeks and then rehabilitation was started. The treatment outcome was good. Now, three months after the surgery, the patient has good wrist mobility and efficient grip. Surgical treatment of malignant tumors of the distal radius with extensive bone resection poses the challenge of bone replacement and recovery of fair hand function. Commonly known and practised, reconstructions with autogenous or allogenic bone grafts enable partial restoration of the radiocarpal joint surface and DRUJ. The use of large bone grafts is associated with a risk of non-union and limited hand function even if the grafts are vascularized. Arthrodesis of the radiocarpal joint is currently performed less and less frequently. Custom-made prostheses appear to be a good solution. This method makes

  10. Nonunion of distal radius fracture and distal radioulnar joint injury: a modified Sauvé-Kapandji procedure with a cubitus proradius transposition as autograft.

    PubMed

    Villamor, Angel; Rios-Luna, Antonio; Villanueva-Martínez, Manuel; Fahandezh-Saddi, Homid

    2008-12-01

    The Sauvé-Kapandji (SK) procedure is indicated in distal radius nonunion or malunion and distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) instability. It can also be used to treat the rheumatoid wrist with severe degenerative changes in the DRUJ. The main objective is to allow a pain-free range of movement. We present a patient with rheumatoid arthritis and distal radius nonunion who, after three operations, was treated with the SK procedure. The clinical and radiological results were excellent. A 53-year-old woman diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis fell on her forearm at home 2 years ago. Examination at an outpatient clinic revealed a distal radius fracture classified as type V according to the Frykman classification. She had been operated three times with open reduction internal fixation using a plate, screws, and bone allograft. She came to our institution with a distal radius nonunion, positive post-traumatic ulnar variance, and ulnar nerve paresis. The range of movements was 20 degrees -10 degrees flexion-extension and 40 degrees -30 degrees pronation-supination, and she needed daily fentanyl. We performed a modified SK procedure with an autologous iliac crest bone graft and ulnar bone graft from the osteotomy area (cubitus proradius), bone morphogenetic protein, and a low profile distal radius plate. After 1 year of follow-up, the distal radius fracture has healed and the wrist is pain-free with a complete range of movement in flexion-extension and pronation-supination. The main indication for the SK procedure is post-traumatic positive ulnar variance and associated ulnocarpal impaction. The cubitus proradius bone graft transposition is an interesting technical note that makes this case a challenge for skilled orthopedic hand surgeons.

  11. Teaching the Basics: Development and Validation of a Distal Radius Reduction and Casting Model.

    PubMed

    Seeley, Mark A; Fabricant, Peter D; Lawrence, J Todd R

    2017-09-01

    Approximately one-third of reduced pediatric distal radius fractures redisplace, resulting in further treatment. Two major modifiable risk factors for loss of reduction are reduction adequacy and cast quality. Closed reduction and immobilization of distal radius fractures is an Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education residency milestone. Teaching and assessing competency could be improved with a life-like simulation training tool. Our goal was to develop and validate a realistic distal radius fracture reduction and casting simulator as determined by (1) a questionnaire regarding the "realism" of the model and (2) the quantitative assessments of reduction time, residual angulation, and displacement. A distal radius fracture model was created with radiopaque bony segments and articulating elbows and shoulders. Simulated periosteum and internal deforming forces required proper reduction and casting techniques to achieve and maintain reduction. The forces required were estimated through an iterative process through feedback from experienced clinicians. Embedded monofilaments allowed for quantitative assessment of residual displacement and angulation through the use of fluoroscopy. Subjects were asked to perform closed reduction and apply a long arm fiberglass cast. Primary performance variables assessed included reduction time, residual angulation, and displacement. Secondary performance variables consisted of number of fluoroscopic images, casting time, and cast index (defined as the ratio of the internal width of the forearm cast in the sagittal plane to the internal width in the coronal plane at the fracture site). Subject grading was performed by two blinded reviewers. Interrater reliability was nearly perfect across all measurements (intraclass correlation coefficient range, 0.94-0.99), thus disagreements in measurements were handled by averaging the assessed values. After completion the participants answered a Likert-based questionnaire regarding the

  12. Salmonella osteomyelitis of the distal radius in a healthy young adult patient: report of a rare case and literature review.

    PubMed

    Tonogai, Ichiro; Hamada, Yoshitaka; Hibino, Naohito; Sato, Ryosuke; Henmi, Tatsuhiko; Sairyo, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella osteomyelitis of the radius in a healthy individual is very rare. We present such a case involving the distal radius of a healthy 23-year-old man without underlying disease or possible episode. He had right wrist pain for approximately 3 years, and osteolytic lesion was seen in the right distal radius. He underwent surgical treatment, and salmonella was isolated from pus in the lesion. Postoperative antibiotics successfully treated his infection. He had no sign of recurrence, but the point of entry for infection remains unknown.

  13. Comparative study of treatment for distal radius fractures with two different palmar locking plates.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, H; Hatta, T; Sasajima, K; Itoi, E; Aizawa, T

    2016-06-01

    Few randomized trials have shown how the placement of a palmar locking plate affects outcomes. The purpose of this study was to compare clinical and radiological outcomes of fixation using locking plates with different concepts for placement relative to the watershed line in a prospective randomized trial. Sixty-four patients with a displaced distal radius fracture were divided into two groups according to the plates used for fixation: distal-type (AcuLoc(TM), Group A) and proximal-type (VariAx(TM), Group V). Wrist function including the range of motion and grip strength was compared at 1, 2, 3 and 6 months postoperatively. Loss of reduction was assessed radiologically. Both groups demonstrated overall satisfactory function at 6 months with no significant difference found between the groups. Minimal loss of reduction was demonstrated in both groups. Internal fixation using the palmar locking plates with two different placements provided satisfactory outcomes at 6-month follow-up, but our results indicate that plates placed distal to the watershed line may delay recovery of wrist motion.

  14. Arthroscopic resection arthroplasty for malunited intra-articular distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    del Piñal, Francisco; Klausmeyer, Melissa; Thams, Carlos; Moraleda, Eduardo; Galindo, Carlos

    2012-12-01

    Cartilage damage of the carpals is a contraindication for corrective osteotomy of the malunited intra-articular distal radius fracture and typically is treated in the symptomatic patient with a salvage procedure. Here, we present our experience and early results with arthroscopic resection arthroplasty of the radiocarpal joint. We treated 10 patients (age, 17-68 y; average, 53 y) who had intra-articular malunion of the distal radius with mirror erosion on the carpals. The original fracture occurred 4 to 36 months (average, 9 mo) before our intervention. We performed arthroscopic arthrolysis and resected the offending portion of the radial malunited fragment, eliminating the stepoff and creating a smoother joint surface. Range of motion was started immediately after the operation, except in 2 patients. The locations of the malunions were evenly distributed between the scaphoid fossa, the lunate fossa, or both. Stepoffs varied from 2 to 6 mm. We resected up to 60% of the entire radial articular surface to obtain a smooth surface (average, 28%; range, 20% to 60%). All patients reported immediate relief of pain and improvement in motion (particularly extension). At the latest follow-up (average, 28 mo; range, 13-42 mo), average extension improved from 24° to 54°, average grip strength improved from 47% to 89% of the contralateral wrist, average Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand score improved from 74 to 18, and average Patient-Rated Wrist Hand Evaluation score improved from 79 to 15. The aim of the operation was to relieve patients' pain by providing a smooth, although fibrocartilaginous, surface for the carpus to glide on the radius. The follow-up was short and the results may be short-lived. However, for the younger patient, it may provide a temporary alternative to partial wrist arthrodesis with minimal morbidity, and for the less demanding patients, it may be a definitive procedure. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. All rights

  15. Devising for a distal radius fracture fixation focus on the intra-articular volar dislocated fragment

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, Yoichi; Naito, Kiyohito; Obata, Hiroyuki; Kinoshita, Mayuko; Aritomi, Kentaro; Kaneko, Kazuo; Obayashi, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Distal radius fracture (DRF) accompanied by intra-articular volar displaced fragment is difficult to reduce. This volar fragment remains when treated with a simple buttress effect alone, and V-shaped deformity may remain on the articular surface. We attempted to improve dorsal rotational deviation of volar fragment by osteosynthesis applying the condylar stabilizing technique. We report the surgical procedure and results. Materials and methods The subjects were 10 cases of DRF accompanied by intra-articular volar displaced fragments surgically treated (mean age: 69 years old). The fracture type based on the AO classification was B3 in 1 case, C1 in 4, C2 in 2, and C3 in 3 cases. All cases were treated with a volar locking plate. Reduction was applied utilizing the angle stability of the volar locking plate, similarly to the condylar stabilizing technique. On the final follow-up, we evaluated clinical and radiologic evaluation. To evaluate V-shaped valley deformity of the articular surface, the depth of the lunate fossa of the radius was measured using computed tomography (CT). Results The duration of postoperative follow-up was 11 (6–24) months. Mayo wrist score was 93 (Excellent in 10 cases). No general complication associated with a volar locking plate was noted in any case. Volar tilt on radiography were 11° (4–14). The depth of the lunate fossa on CT was 3.9 ± 0.7 mm in the patients. Conclusion This procedure may be useful for osteosynthesis of distal radius fracture accompanied by intra-articular volar displaced fragments. PMID:27144008

  16. Computer-assisted planning and navigation for corrective distal radius osteotomy, based on pre- and intraoperative imaging.

    PubMed

    Dobbe, J G G; Strackee, S D; Schreurs, A W; Jonges, R; Carelsen, B; Vroemen, J C; Grimbergen, C A; Streekstra, G J

    2011-01-01

    Malunion after a distal radius fracture is very common and if symptomatic, is treated with a so-called corrective osteotomy. In a traditional distal radius osteotomy, the radius is cut at the fracture site and a wedge is inserted in the osteotomy gap to correct the distal radius pose. The standard procedure uses two orthogonal radiographs to estimate the two inclination angles and the dimensions of the wedge to be inserted into the osteotomy gap. However, optimal correction in 3-Dspace requires restoring three angles and three displacements. This paper introduces a new technique that uses preoperative planning based on 3-D images. Intraoperative 3-D imaging is also used after inserting pins with marker tools in the proximal and distal part of the radius and before the osteotomy. Positioning tools are developed to correct the distal radius pose in six degrees of freedom by navigating the pins. The method is accurate ( d 1.2 mm, ϕ 0.9°, m TRE = 1.7 mm), highly reproducible (SE (d) < 1.0 mm, SE (ϕ) ≤ 1.4°, SE (m) (TRE) = 0.7 mm), and allows intraoperative evaluation of the end result. Small incisions for pin placement and for the osteotomy render the method minimally invasive.

  17. Sustentaculum Lunatum: Appreciation of the Palmar Lunate Facet in Management of Complex Intra-Articular Fractures of the Distal Radius.

    PubMed

    Paryavi, Ebrahim; Christian, Matthew W; Eglseder, W Andrew; Pensy, Raymond A

    2015-09-01

    Fracture of the distal radius is the most common wrist injury. Treatment of complex intra-articular fractures of the distal radius requires an accurate diagnosis of the fracture pattern and a thoughtful approach to fixation. We propose a new term, sustentaculum lunatum, for the palmar lunate facet. The sustentaculum lunatum deserves specific attention because of its importance in load transmission across the radiocarpal joint. It is also key to restoring the anatomy of the palmar distal radial metaphysis during internal fixation. We provide a review of the structure and function of the sustentaculum lunatum and describe fixation techniques. This article is intended to promote awareness of this fragment in the treatment of fractures of the distal radius.

  18. Corrective osteotomy for combined intra- and extra-articular distal radius malunion.

    PubMed

    Buijze, Geert A; Prommersberger, Karl-Josef; González Del Pino, Juan; Fernandez, Diego L; Jupiter, Jesse B

    2012-10-01

    This study evaluated the functional outcome of corrective osteotomy for combined intra- and extra-articular malunions of the distal radius using multiple outcome scores. We evaluated 18 skeletally mature patients at an average of 78 months after corrective osteotomy for a combined intra- and extra-articular malunion of the distal part of the radius. The indication for osteotomy in all patients was the combination of an extra-articular deformity (≥ 15° volar or ≥ 10° dorsal angulation or ≥ 3 mm radial shortening) and intra-articular incongruity of 2 mm or greater (maximum stepoff or gap), as measured on lateral and posteroanterior radiographs. The average interval from the injury to the osteotomy was 9 months. The average maximum stepoff or gap of the articular surface before surgery was 4 mm. All 18 patients healed uneventfully and the final articular incongruity was reduced to 2 mm or less. Final range of motion and grip strength significantly improved, averaging 89% and 84% of the uninjured side and 185% and 241% of the preoperative measures, respectively. The rate of excellent or good results was 72% according to the validated rating system Mayo Modified Wrist Score, and 89% according to the unvalidated system of Gartland and Werley. The mean Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand score was 11, which corresponds to mild perceived disability. Of the 18 cases, 11 normalized upper limb function. Five patients had complications; all were successfully treated. According to the rating system of Knirk and Jupiter, 4 had grade 1 and 1 had grade 2 osteoarthritis of the radiocarpal joint on radiographs. Two of those patients reported occasional mild pain. Radiographic osteoarthritis did not correlate with strength, motion, and wrist scores. Outcomes of corrective osteotomy for combined intra- and extra-articular malunions were comparable to those of osteotomy for isolated intra- and extra-articular malunions. A successful corrective osteotomy for the

  19. Primary Wrist Hemiarthroplasty for Irreparable Distal Radius Fracture in the Independent Elderly.

    PubMed

    Herzberg, Guillaume; Burnier, Marion; Marc, Antoine; Izem, Yadar

    2015-08-01

    Background Volar plating for acute distal radius fractures (DRF) in the elderly has been recommended. Some studies have suggested that open reduction with internal fixation (ORIF) in this situation results in frequent complications. Our purposes were to provide a definition of irreparable DRF in independent elderly patients and to review the results of a preliminary retrospective series of wrist hemiarthroplasty (WHA) in this patient population. Materials Between 2011 and 2014, 11 consecutive independent elderly patients (12 wrists) with irreparable intra-articular DRF were treated with primary WHA at the acute stage. A resection of the ulnar head was associated in nine wrists. A total of 11 wrists with more than 2 years of follow-up form the basis of this paper. Description of Technique The approach was dorsal longitudinal. An osteotome longitudinally entered the dorsal aspect of the fracture medial to the Lister tubercle. Two thick osteoperiosteal flaps were elevated radially and ulnarly in a fashion similar to opening a book. The distal radius articular surface was excised. The implant was pressed into the radial canal with attention to restoring distal radius length. The two osteoperiosteal flaps were brought back together and sutured so as to close, again like a book, the osseous and soft tissues around the implant. Results At mean follow-up of 30 months, average visual analog scale (VAS) pain was 1/10. Mean QuickDASH (Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand) score was 32, and mean Patient-Rated Wrist Evaluation (PRWE) score was 24. Mean forearm rotation arc was 151°. Mean active flexion-extension arc was 60°. Mean active extension was 34°. Mean grip strength was 14 kg (64% of contralateral wrist). Mean Lyon wrist score was 73%. Bone healing around the implants was satisfactory in all but one case. Conclusions Out data suggest that treatment of irreparable DRF in the independent elderly patient with a bone-preserving WHA may be a viable

  20. PRWE application in distal radius fracture: comparison and correlation with established outcomes.

    PubMed

    Paranaíba, Vinícius Ferreira; Santos, João Baptista Gomes Dos; Raduan Neto, Jorge; Moraes, Vinícius Ynoe; Belotti, João Carlos; Faloppa, Flávio

    2017-01-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the correlation between the PRWE score with other measurements that are already widely used. This was a prospective, cross-sectional, single-center study. Sixty-eight consecutive patients underwent surgical treatment for distal radius fractures (internal fixation by locked volar plate or transarticular external fixation). They were evaluated independently by PRWE, DASH, VAS range of motion, strength, and radiographic criteria, in one year of follow up. The Mann-Whitney test was used to compare continuous variables and the Spearman correlation to correlate the outcomes of interest. PRWE correlated significantly with DASH (p < 0.001) and VAS (p < 0.001). There were no significant correlations with other outcome measures. PRWE presents significant moderate correlation only with DASH and VAS. Range of motion, strength, and radiographic criteria do not interfere in the PRWE outcome.

  1. Kapandji pinning or closed reduction for extra-articular distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Stoffelen, D V; Broos, P L

    1998-10-01

    In a randomized prospective trial, closed reduction and plaster application was compared with Kapandji pinning. Closed reduction and plaster cast application was performed in 50 patients, Kapandji pinning in 48 patients. According to the Cooney score, good and excellent results were found in 74% of patients in the closed reduction and plaster cast group compared with 75% of patients in the Kapandji-pinning group. In terms of maintenance of reduction and functional outcome at 1-year follow-up, no statistically significant differences were found between the two groups. We conclude, therefore, that both techniques can be applied to extra-articular fractures of the distal radius according to the characteristics of the forearm and the surgeon's or the patient's need.

  2. Retrospective Comparison of Percutaneous Fixation and Volar Internal Fixation of Distal Radius Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Lozano-Calderón, Santiago A.; Doornberg, Job N.

    2007-01-01

    A change in the practice of a single surgeon provided an opportunity for retrospective comparison of comparable cohorts treated with percutaneous fixation (17 patients) or a volar plate and screws (23 patients) an average of 30 months after surgery. The final evaluation was performed according to the Gartland and Werley and Mayo rating systems and the DASH questionnaire. There were no significant differences on the average scores for the percutaneous and volar plating groups, respectively: Gartland and Werley, 4 vs 5; Mayo, 82 vs 83; and DASH score 13 for both cohorts. Motion, grip, and radiographical parameters were likewise comparable. Volar internal plate and screw fixation can achieve results comparable to percutaneous fixation techniques in the treatment of fractures of the distal radius. PMID:18780085

  3. Dorsal Plating of Distal Radius Fractures Historical Context and Appropriate Use.

    PubMed

    Ayalon, Omri; Paksima, Nader

    2017-01-01

    The management of distal radius fractures has evolved over time from a largely nonoperative paradigm to a more commonly performed operative procedures today. Surgical trends have similarly developed, with dorsal plating falling out of favor due to complications involving extensor tendon pathology as well as due to the ubiquity of the volar plate along with the advent of locking plate technology. However, with the improvement in design of newer generation dorsal plates, this technique should be used in the appropriate clinical situation, including dorsal comminution and angulation with concomitant carpal pathology. Outcome data supports dorsal plating and has been shown to be comparable to that of volar plating, with some unique advantages. As such, the technique of dorsal plating should have a role in surgical management of these injuries.

  4. Corrective distal radius osteotomy following fracture malunion using a fixed-angle volar locking plate.

    PubMed

    Opel, S; Konan, S; Sorene, E

    2014-05-01

    Post-traumatic distal radius deformity may cause severe morbidity, and corrective osteotomy is often necessary to realign the functional axis of the wrist to correct symptomatic malunion. The aim of this retrospective study was to review the short-term results of a single surgeon’s series of distalradius corrective osteotomies following fracture malunion using a fixed-angle volar locking plate for 20 patients(16 women) of an average age of 57 (range 19–83) years [corrected].At short-term follow up (average 14 months, range 12-15 months), no complications were noted and radiological union was confirmed in all cases at an average of 3 months. The average post-operative Disability of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand score was 13.48 (range 0-48.33) and an objective improvement was noted in movements at the wrist joint. A statistically significant improvement was achieved in ulnar variance, radial inclination, dorsal tilt, and supination.

  5. [Arthroscopically assisted osteosynthesis of dorsally tilted intraarticular distal radius fractures--technique and results].

    PubMed

    Lutz, M; Wieland, T; Deml, C; Erhart, S; Rudisch, A; Klestil, T

    2014-10-01

    The present paper describes the indication and application of an arthroscopically assisted osteosynthesis for distal radius fractures. Visualisation of articular incongruency is emphasised with special regard to articular fracture fragment reduction. In addition to that, classification of soft tissue injuries and treatment options are discussed. The final clinical and radiological results of 17 patients are presented: DASH and PRWE averaged 4.9 and 6.0 respectively. Active range of motion measured 123° for flexion/extension, 51° for radial and ulnar deviation and 163° for pronosupination, which is 87%, 98% and 97%, respectively, compared with the opposite wrist. Radial inclination at final follow-up was 23°, palmar tilt measured 6° and ulnar variance averaged -1.2 mm. The scapholunate gap at follow-up was 1.6 mm, and the scapholunate angle measured 57°.

  6. Pathological fracture of the right distal radius caused by Enterobacter aerogenes osteomyelitis in an adult.

    PubMed

    Lin, Te-Yu; Chi, Hung-Wei; Wang, Ning-Chi

    2010-05-01

    A pathological fracture is a break in a diseased bone caused by weakening of the bone structure by a pathological process with no identifiable trauma. Acute bacterial osteomyelitis that results in pathological fractures in the extremities is rare in adults. To our knowledge, we report the first case of Enterobacter aerogenes osteomyelitis of the right distal radius, complicated with a pathological fracture, in a 79-year-old man with diabetes, which was diagnosed by radiological, microbiological, and histopathological examinations. He recovered well after an 8-week course of antibiotics and surgical debridement. This highlights the fact that radial osteomyelitis should be included in the differential diagnosis when an elderly diabetic patient with no history of trauma presents with pain in the forearm.

  7. Outcomes of Nonoperative Treatment of Salter-Harris II Distal Radius Fractures: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Meredith C; Bohm, Kyle C; Rizkala, Amir R; Ward, Christina M

    2016-03-01

    Despite the frequent occurrence of these injuries, we know little about the natural history of Salter-Harris II (SH II) distal radius fractures. We conducted a systematic review of studies examining the radiographic and clinical outcomes of nonoperatively managed SH II distal radius fractures. Systematic searches of the MEDLINE and Cochrane computerized literature databases and manual searches of bibliographies were performed. We reviewed both descriptive and quantitative data. Seven studies including 434 SH II fractures were reviewed. Two studies reported clinical outcomes based on patient age, but neither study described a statistical correlation between patient age and outcome. Two studies discussed the effect of age on radiographic outcome and reported higher rates of anatomic remodeling in children 10 years or younger. Two studies with long-term (average follow-up greater than 8 years) clinical results reported complication rates of 5%. Long-term follow-up of radiographic outcomes appeared in 4 studies with variable results. Five studies reported the frequency of premature physeal arrest after SH II fractures, with results ranging from 0% to 4.3%. Based on this review, no recommendations can be made as to what defines an acceptable reduction or which fractures would benefit from surgical intervention. Angular deformity seems to correct to an acceptable alignment in patients less than 10 years of age, but these younger patients seem to be at higher risk for symptomatic shortening if a growth arrest occurs. Redisplacement after reduction is fairly common, and other more severe complications such as pain, loss of motion, and nerve injury can occur.

  8. Outcomes of Nonoperative Treatment of Salter-Harris II Distal Radius Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Meredith C.; Bohm, Kyle C.; Rizkala, Amir R.; Ward, Christina M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite the frequent occurrence of these injuries, we know little about the natural history of Salter-Harris II (SH II) distal radius fractures. We conducted a systematic review of studies examining the radiographic and clinical outcomes of nonoperatively managed SH II distal radius fractures. Methods: Systematic searches of the MEDLINE and Cochrane computerized literature databases and manual searches of bibliographies were performed. We reviewed both descriptive and quantitative data. Results: Seven studies including 434 SH II fractures were reviewed. Two studies reported clinical outcomes based on patient age, but neither study described a statistical correlation between patient age and outcome. Two studies discussed the effect of age on radiographic outcome and reported higher rates of anatomic remodeling in children 10 years or younger. Two studies with long-term (average follow-up greater than 8 years) clinical results reported complication rates of 5%. Long-term follow-up of radiographic outcomes appeared in 4 studies with variable results. Five studies reported the frequency of premature physeal arrest after SH II fractures, with results ranging from 0% to 4.3%. Conclusions: Based on this review, no recommendations can be made as to what defines an acceptable reduction or which fractures would benefit from surgical intervention. Angular deformity seems to correct to an acceptable alignment in patients less than 10 years of age, but these younger patients seem to be at higher risk for symptomatic shortening if a growth arrest occurs. Redisplacement after reduction is fairly common, and other more severe complications such as pain, loss of motion, and nerve injury can occur. PMID:27418886

  9. Assessment of "YouTube" Content for Distal Radius Fracture Immobilization.

    PubMed

    Addar, Abdullah; Marwan, Yousef; Algarni, Nizar; Berry, Gregory

    Distal radius fractures (DRFs) are the most common orthopedic fractures, with >70% of cases treated by closed immobilization using a short arm cast or a sugar tong splint. However, inadequate immobilization is a risk factor for loss of reduction requiring repeat reduction or surgical treatment. Therefore, education of clinical skills for appropriate immobilization of DRFs is important. With the increasing use of web-based information by medical learners, our aim was to assess the quality and quantity of videos regarding closed immobilization of DRFs on YouTube. Retrospective review of YouTube videos on distal radius fracture immobilization using specific search terms. Identified videos were analyzed for their educational value, quality of the technical skill demonstrated, and overall metrics. Educational value was scored on a 5-point scale, with "1" indicative of low quality and "5" of high quality. Not applicable. Among the 68,366 videos identified, 16 met our inclusion criteria of being in English; performed by a health care professional or institution; and with casting being the major theme of the educational information provided. Of these 16 videos, 6 had an educational value score of 4 or 5, with the remaining 10 having a score ≤3. Although immobilization was demonstrated by cast technician specialized in orthopedics, skills were also performed by orthopedic attendants, urgent care physicians, orthopedic residents, and nurse practitioners. The credentials of the performer in 3 videos were not identified. There is a need to promote high-quality educational videos produced by established medical school faculty members on open, web-based, portals. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Extensor Pollicis Longus Ruptures Following Distal Radius Osteotomy Through a Volar Approach.

    PubMed

    Rivlin, Michael; Fernández, Diego L; Nagy, Ladislav; Graña, Gabriel López; Jupiter, Jesse

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the cause and pathological process of extensor pollicis longus (EPL) ruptures after correction of distal radius malunion through a volar approach. We included patients with EPL ruptures who underwent distal radius osteotomies performed through a volar approach. Data were pooled from members of the International Wrist Investigators Workshop. Patient demographics, initial injury parameters, imaging studies, preoperative and postoperative examination, intraoperative findings, surgical technique, and outcomes were compared and analyzed. Preoperative and postoperative radiographic images were evaluated and compared. We evaluated 6 cases from 5 surgeons in 4 institutions. Length of follow-up ranged from 1 to 5 years. On initial radiographic evaluation all malunions were healed with dorsal angulation (20° to 60°) and with positive ulnar variance. Deformity correction in the sagittal plane was 25° to 55°. Osteotomies were fixed with volar locking plates with autologous bone graft except for one patient who received calcium phosphate-based bone void filler. Postoperative x-rays suggested prominent osteotomy resection edges, osteophytes, or dorsal bony prominence resulting from healed callus. Average time from osteotomy to EPL rupture was 10 weeks (range, 2-17 weeks). Two patients initially refused to undergo tendon transfers. One was pleased with the outcome despite the ruptured EPL. The other patient ruptured 2 more tendons and chose to have tendon transfers. One patient also ruptured the transferred tendon after 2 months and underwent successful tendon grafting. In the absence of screw prominence and technical flaws, it is likely that dorsal callus, prominent osteotomy resection edges, and osteophytes may contribute to attritional rupture of the EPL tendon after a corrective osteotomy through a volar approach. Exposure and debridement of excessive callus, dorsal ridge, or a prominent Lister tubercle performed during the osteotomy may reduce subsequent

  11. Opening Wedge Osteotomy for Distal Radius Malunion: Dorsal or Palmar Approach?

    PubMed Central

    Rothenfluh, Esin; Schweizer, Andreas; Nagy, Ladislav

    2013-01-01

    Background There are various technical variations to consider when performing a corrective osteotomy of a distal radius malunion. We chose two of the more commonly reported techniques and compared the results of volar (palmar) osteotomy and fixation with dorsal osteotomy and fixation. Method Within a continuous cohort of patients who had undergone corrective osteotomy for a malunited Colles fracture, two groups could be identified retrospectively. In 8 patients a dorsal approach was used. A structural trapezoidal graft, subtending the amount of correction, was inserted into the osteotomy gap and stabilization was performed with a thin round-hole mini-fragment plate. In 14 patients a palmar approach and a palmar fixed-angle plate was used for correction of the malunion and for angular stable rigid fixation of the two fragments. The osteotomy gap was loosely filled with nonstructural cancellous bone chips. A retrospective comparison of the two groups was performed to see whether the outcome was affected by the use of either operative technique.The demographics, the preoperative amount of deformity, range of motion, pain, and force were comparable for both groups. All osteotomies healed without loss of correction. After a minimal follow-up of one year, radiographic appearance, objective functional parameters were assessed and subjective data (Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand [DASH] score and special pain and function questionnaire) obtained. Results These data did not show statistical difference for the two groups except for the amount of final wrist flexion. This parameter was significantly better in patients who had palmar approaches and fixed-angle plates. Conclusion Corrective osteotomies of distal radius malunions can be done in either way. It might result in some better flexion, if performed volarly. PMID:24436789

  12. Vascularized Medial Femoral Condyle Bone Graft for Resistant Nonunion of the Distal Radius.

    PubMed

    Henry, Mark

    2017-03-01

    Nonunion involving the metaphyseal region of the distal radius is exceedingly rare, usually involving co-morbidity. Patients that have failed multiple prior conventional surgical interventions represent an even more difficult subset to treat; this investigation examined the utility of a specially designed free vascularized medial femoral condyle flap consisting of a central structural block graft with an extended corticoperiosteal sleeve to wrap around the junctions. Six patients (5 males, 1 female) with a mean age of 52 years had failed to achieve union involving the distal radius metaphysis after a mean of 3.7 prior surgeries occurring over a mean period of 24 months. Comorbidities included smoking, alcoholism, chronic nutritional deficiency, and prior osteomyelitis. The unique descending genicular artery medial femoral condyle flap designed to address these patients consisted of a central structural block graft in continuity with an extended corticoperiosteal sleeve. The structural block filled the bone defect, and the corticoperiosteal sleeve wrapped around the bone junctions and the neighboring bone margins. The mean flap size was 5.3 (+/- 1.3) cm long by 4.5 (+/- 0.9) cm wide. Pre-operative to post-operative DASH scores were compared using the paired student' s t-test, with p < 0.05. All flaps achieved union at a mean of 6.8 (+/- 2.1) weeks following surgery, using the criteria of bridging trabeculae on all 3 radiographs: coronal, sagittal, and oblique. The mean pre-operative DASH score of 63 (+/- 10) was statistically significantly different compared to the mean post-operative DASH score of 18 (+/- 8). With few alternative solutions able to address this unique and difficult problem, the structural block of vascularized bone with the extended corticoperiosteal sleeve proved able to achieve a union that had failed multiple previous attempts and able to resist reactivation of infection, in a challenging group of patients with comorbidities.

  13. Hand stiffness following distal radius fractures: who gets it and is it a functional problem?

    PubMed

    Egol, Kenneth A; Karia, Raj; Zingman, Allissa; Lee, Steve; Paksima, Nader

    2014-01-01

    In order to identify predictors for hand stiffness following distal radius fractures and understand the consequences of this common clinical finding, we studied 260 patients. Our null hypothesis was that we would find no predictors of post injury hand stiffness. Baseline demographics and injury characteristics were obtained at distal radius fracture presentation. Treatment and healing was documented. Stiffness was defined as tip to palm distance greater than 1 cm for any one finger. Outcome parameters obtained at regular intervals included wrist and hand range of motion, radiographs, visual analog pain scales, and Disability of the Arm Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaires. Forty-nine of 260 patients (19%) patients were considered to be "stiff" by our criteria. Grip strength was weaker for stiff patients as well. Patient demographics were similar in both groups with the "stiff" cohort having a greater mean age, p = 0.05. There was no significant difference in stiffness seen in operative cases versus nonoperative cases. Injury ulnar variance was 3.1mm (SD = 3.5) in the "stiff" cohort and 1.8 (SD = 2.9) in the "non-stiff" cohort (p= 0.02). Functional disability as measured by the DASH differed (p = 0.001) between stiff and non-stiff patients for both 6 month and 1 year follow-up time points. Stiff patients were more likely than non-stiff patients to have lower grip strength at 12-month post fracture (p = 0.001). Older patients who present with significant ulnar variance at injury are more likely to experience hand stiffness at some time during their recovery. The development of hand stiffness is associated with poorer functional outcome than those who do not develop stiffness.

  14. Quality of Plaster Molding for Distal Radius Fractures Is Improved Through Focused Tuition of Junior Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Ramoutar, Darryl N; Silk, Robert; Rodrigues, Jeremy N; Hatton, Mark

    2014-08-01

    Successful nonoperative management of distal radius fractures requires an adequately reduced fracture held in a well-molded cast. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a targeted teaching session to the same group of junior doctors led to objective improvement in fracture reduction and plaster molding and hence a decrease in the redisplacement of these fractures. Retrospective review. Level I academic trauma center. A retrospective review of all dorsally angulated distal radius fractures treated in plaster that presented to our plaster room over a 4-week period (group 1, n = 52). This was followed by the intervention and a subsequent 4-week prospective review (group 2, n = 36). Radiographs were reviewed before manipulation, after manipulation, and at follow-up by a single senior orthopaedic trainee using predetermined criteria. A targeted teaching session on fracture reduction and cast molding to the same group of junior doctors involved in managing all these cases. Adequate fracture reduction, plaster molding, redisplacement, and further intervention before and after the targeted intervention. In group 1, 85% had adequate fracture reduction but only 36% showed adequate molding. This was improved in group 2%-94% adequate reduction and 65% adequate molding (P = 0.022). The rate of redisplacement was improved from 65% to 44% in group 2. In both groups, the rate of redisplacement was around 20% for adequately reduced and molded fractures, compared with around 90% for adequately reduced but inadequately molded cases (P < 0.001). The rate of further intervention improved from 27% to 8% (P = 0.052). We recommend that specific teaching focusing on fracture reduction and molding techniques is included in orthopaedic juniors' induction teaching or as a separate session. Therapeutic Level III. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

  15. Routine Imaging after Operatively Repaired Distal Radius and Scaphoid Fractures: A Survey of Hand Surgeons

    PubMed Central

    Bohl, Daniel D.; Lese, Andrea B.; Patterson, Joseph T.; Grauer, Jonathan N.; Dodds, Seth D.

    2014-01-01

    Background There is currently no standard of care for imaging after hand and upper-extremity procedures, and current imaging practices have not been characterized. Questions/Purposes To characterize current imaging practices and to compare those practices to the best available evidence. Patients and Methods A survey was distributed to attending-level surgeons at a regional hand and upper-extremity surgery conference in the United States in 2013. 40 out of 75 surgeons completed the survey (53%). Results All results are presented for distal radius and scaphoid fractures, respectively. There was a high degree of variability between respondents in the number of radiographic series routinely ordered during follow-up of asymptomatic patients, with the number of series ranging from 1–6 and 1–6. On average, respondents did not order an excessive number of follow-up radiographs for asymptomatic patients, with means (± standard deviations) of 2.6 ± 1.0 and 3.3 ± 1.2 radiographic series. Radiographic series were taken at only 74% and 81% of postoperative visits with asymptomatic patients. Only 10% and 8% of respondents felt it was acceptable medical practice to save costs by ordering postoperative radiographs only when patients are symptomatic. Conclusions Among a sample of 40 fellowship-trained hand surgeons, these findings demonstrate a high degree of variability in number of radiographs obtained after operative repair of distal radius and scaphoid fractures. On average, respondents were relatively efficient with respect to total number of postoperative radiographs ordered. Level of Evidence Diagnostic study, level IV. PMID:25364636

  16. Characteristics of secondary arthrofibrosis after intra-articular distal radius fracture.

    PubMed

    Gabl, M; Arora, R; Klauser, A S; Schmidle, Gernot

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess characteristics of radiocarpal arthrofibrosis after intra-articular distal radius fractures (DRF). In this study 20 patients who underwent wrist arthroscopy at the time of implant removal after volar plating for intra-articular DRF were included retrospectively. The direction of fibrous tissue formation (FTF) and its rigidity were investigated. The findings were correlated to the course of intraarticular fracture lines seen in the preoperative CT, patient age and AO fracture types. In all patients FTF spanned the radiocarpal joint. Fibrous tissue formations extended from previous fracture gaps to the scapholunate interosseous ligament and/or capsule. Four basic types of FTF (Type 1-4) and two combination types (Type 1a, 2a) were found. Fibrotic fans with dorsal capsular attachment (Type 1, 30 %) and its combination with dorsal capsule obliteration (Type 1a, 40 %) were the most common findings. Mild rigidity was present in 3 (15 %), moderate in 7 (35 %), and severe rigidity in 10 cases (50 %). Fracture lines crossing the radius extensor compartments or interfacet ridge, cartilage defects and C3 fractures showed the highest risk to develop severely rigid fibrous tissue formations. In older patients and in more comminuted fractures the number of rigid fibrous tissue formations was higher. Fracture severity correlates with the development of rigid intra-articular FTF. In case of rigid FTF with restricted wrist motion arthroscopic debridement may be considered at the time of hardware removal.

  17. [Validity of modified radiological views to detect screw protrusion at the distal radius. A comparative study with computerized tomography].

    PubMed

    Mora-Pascual, F E; Aguilella-Fernández, L

    2013-01-01

    Volar fixed-angle plates (VFAP) are currently widely used for the treatment of extra-articular distal radius fractures. Using these plates has a high risk of articular and dorsal screw protrusion due to their special configuration. The aim of this study is to assess the validity of the standard X-rays, performed with the help of wedged supports, in order to detect articular and dorsal screw protrusion. A comparison with computed tomography (CT) scan imaging has been made. The outcome of 26 patients with distal radius articular fracture, treated with a VFAP, is reported. Good correlation between modified X-rays and CT scan was observed. A sensitivity of 100% for articular protrusion and 66% for dorsal have been obtained. When detecting screw protrusion at the distal radius, the use of wedged supports to perform special X-rays intraoperatively is an effective tool.

  18. Limb Preservation in Recurrent Giant Cell Tumour of Distal End of Radius with Fibular Graft Fracture: Role of Ulnocarpal Arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Narinder

    2015-01-01

    Giant cell tumors of distal radius are locally aggressive tumors with a high rate of recurrence. Though surgery remains the mainstay of treatment, reconstruction remains a challenge in cases of recurrence. Recurrences of GCT in autogenous fibular grafts have been rarely reported and pathological fractures through such grafts are even rarer. Ulnocarpal arthrodesis has never been described as a limb preservation procedure in such a recurrent lesion in distal radius with pathological fracture through a well incorporated fibular graft. A case of pathological fracture in a well incorporated autogenous non-vascularized fibular bone graft in recurrent GCT of distal radius and its successful management with ulnocarpal arthrodesis is reported. In such a scenario where other reconstructive options like allograft or prosthetic reconstructions are not likely to succeed, ulnocarpal arthrodesis may be considered as a salvage procedure.

  19. Mechanical consequences of different scenarios for simulated bone atrophy and recovery in the distal radius.

    PubMed

    Pistoia, W; van Rietbergen, B; Rüegsegger, P

    2003-12-01

    Metabolic bone diseases such as osteoporosis usually cause a decrease in bone mass and a deterioration of bone microarchitecture leading to a decline in bone strength. Methods to predict bone strength in patients are currently based on bone mass only. It has been suggested that an improved prediction of bone strength might be possible if structural changes are taken into account as well. In this study we evaluated which structural parameters (other than bone mass) are the best predictors for changes in bone mechanical properties of the human radius after different bone atrophy scenarios and whether the original strength of the affected bone can be recovered if bone loss is restored by thickening of the remaining structures. To answer these questions, a human radius was measured with a microcomputer tomography scanner to extract the full three-dimensional architecture of the distal radius at an isotropic resolution of 80 microm. Eight models with modified bone architecture were created and the mechanical variations due to these modifications were studied using microfinite element (micro-FE) simulations. In four models mass was lowered by 20%, either by reducing cortical thickness, trabecular thickness, or number of trabeculae or by overall thinning of structures. In the other four models bone mass was restored to the original value using a trabecular bone thickening procedure. The micro-FE analyses revealed that most load was carried by the cortical bone. For this reason, bone strength was affected most in the reduced cortical thickness model. For the same reason, the trabecular bone atrophy scenarios, all of which affected bone strength in a very similar way, resulted in less dramatic bone strength reduction. The restoration of bone mass did not recover the original bone strength. These findings demonstrate that the importance of different parameters for the prediction of bone strength also depends on the mechanical loading. This could explain why results of

  20. Pathologic fracture of the distal radius in a 25-year-old patient with a large unicameral bone cyst

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Distal radius fractures (DRF) are often referred to as osteoporosis indicator fractures as their incidence increases from age 45. In the group of young adults, distal radius fractures normally result from high-energy trauma. Wrist fractures in young patients without adequate trauma thus raise suspicion of a pathologic fracture. In this report we present the case of a fractured unicameral bone cyst (UBC) at the distal radius in a young adult. To the author’s best knowledge, this is the first detailed report in an UBC at the distal radius causing a pathologic DRF in an adult patient. Case presentation A 25-year-old otherwise healthy male presented to our Emergency Department after a simple fall on his right outstretched hand. Extended diagnostics revealed a pathologic, dorsally displaced, intra-articular distal radius fracture secondary to a unicameral bone cyst occupying almost the whole metaphysis of the distal radius. To stabilize the fracture, a combined dorsal and volar approach was used for open reduction and internal fixation. A tissue specimen for histopathological examination was gathered and the lesion was filled with an autologous bone graft harvested from the ipsilateral femur using a reamer-irrigator-aspirator (RIA) system. Following one revision surgery due to an intra-articular step-off, the patient recovered without further complications. Conclusions Pathologic fractures in young patients caused by unicameral bone cysts require extended diagnostics and adequate treatment. A single step surgical treatment is reasonable if fracture and bone cyst are treated appropriately. Arthroscopically assisted fracture repair may be considered in intra-articular fractures or whenever co-pathologies of the carpus are suspected. PMID:24925068

  1. [Postoperative morbidity in surgically treated extension fractures of the distal radius. A comparative study of dorsal and volar approach].

    PubMed

    Zettl, R P; Ruchholtz, S; Taeger, G; Obertacke, U; Nast-Kolb, D

    2001-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate perioperative morbidity in operative interventions in distal radiusfractures, comparing the operative approach from volar and dorsal. Only problems, resulting from the operative approach towards the distal aspect of the radius, were examined. In a Case-Control-Study, we investigated patients with operative by plate-osteosynthesis treated distal radius-extensions-fractures. During 3 years we investigated 92 patients. 49 were operated with a volar approach, and after changing the operative management, consecutive 43 patients with a dorsal approach to the distal radius. Indications for operative treatment were not changed. The approach to the distal aspect of the radius corresponded to the recent guidelines. Further perioperative procedures were identical, including procedures in anesthesiology. Datas of patients have been investigated for epidemiology, kind of operations, point of time in treatment, duration of operation, X-Ray, immobilisation and time of inhospital stay as well as all documented complications. It has been shown, that in respect of all criterias, concerning length of operation (106 vs. 83 min), intraoperative X-Ray (3.0 vs. 1.65 min) as well as postoperative immobilisation (33 vs. 25 days), and documented incidences of complications like secondary wound-healing (19/49 vs. 0/43) or nerval irritations (13/49 vs. 1/43), the dorsal osteosynthesis is definitively to be favored.

  2. Denosumab, a Potential Alternative to the Surgical Treatment of Distal Radius Giant Cell Tumor of Bone: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Park, Min Jung; Ganjoo, Kristen N; Ladd, Amy L

    2015-08-01

    Juxta-articular giant cell tumors can pose major surgical challenges. Aggressive distal radius giant cell tumors often require complex reconstructive procedures that are associated with numerous complications. We present a case of a 25-year old man with a Campanacci grade 3 giant cell tumor of the distal radius that was successfully treated with denosumab without complex reconstructive procedures. At 3.5-year follow-up and 1-year drug free period, the patient remained asymptomatic without histologic evidence of recurrent tumor. With denosumab therapy, patients can potentially avoid surgery and achieve a successful outcome.

  3. A Simple 3-Dimensional Printed Aid for a Corrective Palmar Opening Wedge Osteotomy of the Distal Radius.

    PubMed

    Honigmann, Philipp; Thieringer, Florian; Steiger, Regula; Haefeli, Mathias; Schumacher, Ralf; Henning, Julia

    2016-03-01

    The reconstruction of malunited distal radius fractures is often challenging. Virtual planning techniques and guides for drilling and resection have been used for several years to achieve anatomic reconstruction. These guides have the advantage of leading to better operative results and faster surgery. Here, we describe a technique using a simple implant independent 3-dimensional printed drill guide and template to simplify the surgical reconstruction of a malunited distal radius fracture. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Endoprosthesis and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Grubor, Predrag; Manojlovic, Slavko; Manojlovic, Nemanja; Grubor, Milan

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Obesity represents a significant risk factor in the pathophysiology of degenerative changes in coxarthrosis. Objective: The study aims to investigate obesity as a risk factor in the examined sample comprising 136 patients who underwent hip endoprothesis implantation. Material and methods: The series comprised 136 patients with a hip endoprosthesis implanted, where the patients’ BMI, amount of blood used, duration of surgery, number of assistants, and type of anaesthesia were observed. Wounds and late post-operative complications, infections, haemorrhage, vein thrombosis, endoprosthesis dislocations, length of inpatient stay, start of physical therapy and full weight-bearing were also observed. The observation period lasted six months on average. Discussion: In simple terms, the three greatest factors when implanting a hip endoprosthesis are as follows: properties of the endoprosthesis, the orthopaedic surgeon’s skill and experience, and individual characteristics of the patient, i.e. age, sex, health condition, body weight, BMI, adequate physical therapy. Conclusion: We believe that the implantation of a hip endoprosthesis should be postponed for patients with a BMI exceeding 29.99. Such patients should receive endocrine treatment, they should undergo a weight loss programme in order to reduce their body weight and in order to reduce their BMI to under 29.99. PMID:25568519

  5. Cross-education for improving strength and mobility after distal radius fractures: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Magnus, Charlene R A; Arnold, Cathy M; Johnston, Geoffrey; Dal-Bello Haas, Vanina; Basran, Jenny; Krentz, Joel R; Farthing, Jonathan P

    2013-07-01

    To evaluate the effects of cross-education (contralateral effect of unilateral strength training) during recovery from unilateral distal radius fractures on muscle strength, range of motion (ROM), and function. Randomized controlled trial (26-wk follow-up). Hospital, orthopedic fracture clinic. Women older than 50 years with a unilateral distal radius fracture. Fifty-one participants were randomized and 39 participants were included in the final data analysis. Participants were randomized to standard rehabilitation (Control) or standard rehabilitation plus strength training (Train). Standard rehabilitation included forearm casting for 40.4±6.2 days and hand exercises for the fractured extremity. Nonfractured hand strength training for the training group began immediately postfracture and was conducted at home 3 times/week for 26 weeks. The primary outcome measure was peak force (handgrip dynamometer). Secondary outcomes were ROM (flexion/extension; supination/pronation) via goniometer and the Patient Rated Wrist Evaluation questionnaire score for the fractured arm. For the fractured hand, the training group (17.3±7.4kg) was significantly stronger than the control group (11.8±5.8kg) at 12 weeks postfracture (P<.017). There were no significant strength differences between the training and control groups at 9 (12.5±8.2kg; 11.3±6.9kg) or 26 weeks (23.0±7.6kg; 19.6±5.5kg) postfracture, respectively. Fractured hand ROM showed that the training group had significantly improved wrist flexion/extension (100.5°±19.2°) than the control group (80.2°±18.7°) at 12 weeks postfracture (P<.017). There were no significant differences between the training and control groups for flexion/extension ROM at 9 (78.0°±20.7°; 81.7°±25.7°) or 26 weeks (104.4°±15.5°; 106.0°±26.5°) or supination/pronation ROM at 9 (153.9°±23.9°; 151.8°±33.0°), 12 (170.9°±9.3°; 156.7°±20.8°) or 26 weeks (169.4°±11.9°; 162.8°±18.1°), respectively. There were no

  6. Distal radius articular fractures: a comparison between ORIF with angular stability plate and percutaneous Kirschner wires.

    PubMed

    Tronci, Vincenzo; Campochiaro, Gabriele; Gazzotti, Gabriele; Rebuzzi, Manuela; Tsatsis, Christos; Catani, Fabio

    2013-06-01

    To analize and compare vantages and disadvantages in long-term of two different  techniques to treat distal radius articular fractures: ORIF with plate versus percutaneous pinning with K-wires. We reviewed 77 distal radial articular fractures treated surgically from 2005 to 2009. Fractures were divided in two homogeneous groups according to patient age, gender, fracture-type and follow-up. The first group was treated with ORIF using angular stability volar plate, while the second one with closed reduction, K-wires percutaneous pinning and ante-brachial plaster casting. Functional outcomes were assessed with MAYO and DASH score, wrist range-of-movement and handgrip. Radiographic parameters were calculated in the post-operative and long-term x-rays. ORIF group showed better mean DASH and MAYO score, range of movement and handgrip strength compare to K-wires group. Expecially in type C fractures and in younger patients (<65 years). Minor differences were observed in type B fractures. About complications: two cases of surgically-treated medial nerve compression in ORIF group and one in K-wire group, one case of algodystrophy in K-wire group. Referring to radiographic parameters, long term values show data positive for ORIF. Though several studies about these techniques has been performed, but no scientific evidence proves the superiority of one surgical treatment. C-type need to be treated with plate in young patients or in elderly patients with high functional demand. Elderly patients with low functional demand can achieve satisfactory results also with percutaneous pinning, especially in Btype fractures.

  7. Effect of health literacy on adherence to osteoporosis treatment among patients with distal radius fracture.

    PubMed

    Roh, Young Hak; Koh, Young Do; Noh, Jung Ho; Gong, Hyun Sik; Baek, Goo Hyun

    2017-12-01

    Patients with inadequate health literacy, those with medical comorbidities, or those with a previous history of adverse drug events have a higher likelihood of non-adherence to osteoporosis treatment after sustaining a distal radius fracture. Patients with a distal radial fracture (DRF) have a higher risk of subsequent fractures, which provides an important opportunity to begin treatment for osteoporosis. This study assessed the effect that health literacy of patients suffering from a DRF has on the subsequent adherence to osteoporosis treatment. A total of 116 patients (female, over 50 years of age) presenting a DRF caused by low-energy trauma were enrolled. Their health literacy was measured using the Newest Vital Sign (NVS). Alendronate (70 mg, orally, once weekly) was prescribed to all patients for 1 year, and adherence was defined as taking at least 80% of the tablets for 12 months and returning for the visit on month 12. Multivariable analyses were conducted to determine whether the patients' clinical, demographic, and health literacy factors influenced their adherence to osteoporosis treatment. About half (52%) of the participants who sustained a DRF exhibited an inadequate health literacy, and the rate of non-adherence to osteoporosis treatment was 38%. The rate of non-adherence for patients with inadequate literacy was significantly higher than for those with appropriate literacy (47 vs. 29%, p = 0.04). The results of the regression analysis indicate that limited health literacy, the presence of comorbidities, and prior history of adverse drug events are associated with a higher likelihood of non-adherence to osteoporosis treatment after sustaining a DRF. Patients with inadequate health literacy, adverse drug events, or medical comorbidities had higher rates of non-adherence with alendronate treatment after sustaining a DRF. Further research is needed to show whether improvements in patient comprehension via informational intervention in patients

  8. Reliability and clinical importance of teardrop angle measurement in intra-articular distal radius fracture.

    PubMed

    Fujitani, Ryotaro; Omokawa, Shohei; Iida, Akio; Santo, Shigeru; Tanaka, Yasuhito

    2012-03-01

    The teardrop angle (TDA) is a newly characterized radiographic parameter that some authors propose as an indicator of articular incongruity of the lunate facet. The purposes of this study were to investigate intra-observer and interobserver reliability of the measurements of the TDA and to determine whether the TDA is a reliable indicator of articular step and gap formation after distal radius fracture. We studied radiographs of 24 uninjured wrists and 24 wrists with intra-articular distal radius fractures. On standard and 10° tilt views of lateral wrist radiographs, the teardrop represents the volar rim of the lunate facet, and the TDA is defined as the angle between the central axis of the teardrop and the radial shaft. We examined interobserver and intra-observer reliability for 3 observers using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for measurements of the uninjured and fractured wrists. For subjects with fractures, we determined correlation of the TDA-volar tilt with the articular step and gap measured by computed tomography using simple linear regression. There was almost perfect intra-observer (ICC = 0.95) and interobserver (ICC = 0.93) reliability in the fractured wrists. We observed substantial intra-observer (ICC = 0.64) and fair interobserver (ICC = 0.28) reliability in the uninjured wrists on the standard lateral radiographs. On the 10° tilt views, intra-observer and interobserver reliability in the uninjured wrists increased to substantial levels (ICC = 0.76 and 0.61, respectively). The TDA-volar tilt was significantly associated with articular step and gap on computed tomography. The TDA, measured on the lateral radiograph of the wrist, exhibits higher intra-observer and interobserver reliability in fractured wrists compared with uninjured wrists. On the 10° tilt views, the reliability increased in the uninjured wrists. Measurement of the TDA in plain radiographs may allow direct estimation of articular incongruity as seen on sagittal

  9. [Possible applications of pedicled vascularized bone transplants of the distal radius].

    PubMed

    Sauerbier, M; Bishop, A T

    2001-11-01

    Reverse-flow pedicle vascularized bone grafts (VBGs) from the distal radius may be used for the surgical treatment of carpal fracture nonunions and avascular necrosis. Such grafts remain viable with quantifiable blood flow as demonstrated in a recent canine experiment. In this paper, the vascular anatomy of the distal radius is demonstrated and the surgical technique of VBG harvest is described. Our indications and results for treatment of scaphoid nonunion and Kienböck's disease are discussed and compared with the current literature. Fifteen patients with scaphoid nonunion and nine patients with Kienböck's disease stage IIIa were treated by reverse-flow pedicled VBG. Range of motion and grip strength were measured postoperatively and compared to the contralateral hand in all patients. An outcome questionnaire was used to measure patient's satisfaction and ADL's in the patients with Kienböck's disease. The radiologic diagnostic was performed with conventional X-rays, trispiral tomograms and MRI. In the scaphoid nonunion group, all patients were male, with an average age of 27.6 years. Five patients had prior attempts of autogenous bone grafting which failed. Six patients had a radiographic suggestion of proximal fragment avascular necrosis. All scaphoids healed. Time to union was 11.1 weeks on average. Average follow-up was 36.2 months. Pain relief, range of motion and grip strength were very promising. The treatment of Kienböck's disease was also promising in nine patients. Mean patient age was 31 years, and follow-up averaged 32 months. Six patients had complete pain relief, and three had occasional pain. Grip strength reached 86% of the contralateral side (a 25% improvement from preoperative values). Postoperative MRI demonstrated progressive revascularization with time. The results of treating scaphoid nonunions are promising. The use of vascularized bone graft facilitates rapid, reliable union of established scaphoid nonunion, even with proximal location

  10. Outcomes of pin and plaster versus locking plate in distal radius intraarticular fractures.

    PubMed

    Bahari-Kashani, Mahmoud; Taraz-Jamshidy, Mohammad Hosein; Rahimi, Hassan; Ashraf, Hami; Mirkazemy, Masoud; Fatehi, Amirreza; Asadian, Mariam; Rezazade, Jafar

    2013-01-01

    Distal radius fractures are among the most prevalent fractures predictive of probable occurrence of other osteoporotic fractures. They are treated via a variety of methods, but the best treatment has not been defined yet. This study was performed to compare the results of open reduction and internal fixation with locking plates versus the pin and plaster method. In this prospective study, 114 patients aged 40 to 60 years with Fernandez type III fracture referring to Imam-Reza and Mehr hospitals of Mashhad from 2009 to 2011, were selected randomly; after obtaining informed consent, they were treated with pin and plaster fixation (n = 57) or internal fixation with the volar locking plate (n = 57). They were compared at the one year follow up. Demographic features and standard radiographic indices were recorded and MAYO, DASH and SF - 36 tests were performed. Data was analyzed by SPSS software version 13, with descriptive indices, Mann-Whitney and Chi-square tests. SF-36 test demonstrated a better general health (P < 0.001), mental health (P = 0.006), physical functioning (P < 0.001), social functioning (P < 0.001) and energy/fatigue (P < 0.001) in LCP group. However, pain (P = 0.647) was not significantly different between the groups. Physical limitation (P < 0.001) and emotional limitation (P < 0.001) were greater in the pin and plaster group. Also, in the LCP group mean MAYO score (P < 0.001) was more than pin and plaster group. Mean DASH score was not different between the groups (P = 0.218). The rate of acceptable results of radiographic indices (P < 0.001), grip strength (P < 0.001) and range of motion in supination-pronation (P < 0.001) in LCP method were better than the pin and plaster method. In treatment of intra-articular distal radius fractures in middle-aged patients internal fixation with locking plates may be prefered to pin and plaster as the treatment of choice.

  11. Variation in practice habits in the treatment of pediatric distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Bernthal, Nicholas M; Mitchell, Scott; Bales, Joshua G; Benhaim, Prosper; Silva, Mauricio

    2015-09-01

    Distal radius fractures are widespread in the pediatric population. Standardized treatment protocols have not been well defined. We sought to examine the diversity of current practice patterns in the treatment of these fractures by surveying hand, pediatric, and general orthopedic surgeons. Hand, pediatric, and general orthopedic surgeons were surveyed using an internet-based questionnaire on the management of pediatric distal radius fractures. Each surgeon was asked to select a criterion from among choices of 'acceptable' alignment criteria at the onset of the survey. Ten cases were then provided to represent a broad spectrum of injuries from minimally angulated torus fractures to complete, displaced fractures. In addition to the variation in injury pattern, the patients in the survey differed in age at the time of injury (3-15 years of age). For each case, surgeons were asked to select a preferred treatment, first on the basis of injury films, and then again after reviewing 1-week follow-up radiographs. A total of 781 surgeons completed the survey. In patients younger than 9 years of age, a residual sagittal angulation of 20° or less, coronal angulation of 10° or less, and 1 cm or less of bayonet apposition was deemed 'acceptable' by 88, 90, and 69% of respondents, respectively. In older patients, these percentages were 58, 64, and 29%, respectively. When specific cases were reviewed, 20.3% of surgeons recommended treatment different from their own theoretical 'acceptable' criteria. When subspecialty training was analyzed, hand surgeons and general orthopedic surgeons were 2.9 and 1.6 times more likely to recommend surgery, respectively, as compared with pediatric surgeons after viewing the initial radiograph. Private practice surgeons were 1.5 times more likely to recommend surgery compared with academic surgeons based on the initial injury radiographs. Our survey highlights the discordance between theoretical acceptable criteria of surgeons and their

  12. Interindividual anatomical variations affect the plate-to-bone fit during osteosynthesis of distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Hidemasa; Iwatsuki, Katsuyuki; Hara, Tatsuya; Kurimoto, Shigeru; Yamamoto, Michiro; Hirata, Hitoshi

    2016-06-01

    We hypothesized that interindividual variations in the teardrop, which represents the volar projection of the lunate facet of the distal radius, cause unsatisfactory fitting of the volar locking plate to the bone. This can cause flexor tendon ruptures. Herein, we conducted a cross-sectional study and measured the ratio of teardrop height and the teardrop inclination angle as parameters of teardrop configuration for 200 standardized lateral radiographs (average age of the patients, 51 years). We also quantified the influence of the teardrop morphology by analyzing the fit of three locking plates to three radii with differing teardrop inclination angles using a three-dimensional computer-aided design system. The average ratios of the teardrop height and teardrop inclination angle were 0.42° (0.30-0.56°) and 28.8° (9.9-44.9°), respectively. The teardrop inclination angle was moderately correlated with age in men but not in women. In the plate-to-bone fit analyses, the fit of all the plates was significantly different between bones, with the configuration of the radius with the lowest teardrop inclination angle being the closest approximation to that of each plate. We demonstrated the interindividual variation in the shape of the teardrop and its influence on the fit of the volar plate, highlighting the importance of careful plate selection for achieving osteosynthesis of bones with a high teardrop inclination angle. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:953-960, 2016. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Migration of the Nellix endoprosthesis.

    PubMed

    England, Andrew; Torella, Francesco; Fisher, Robert K; McWilliams, Richard G

    2016-08-01

    This study reports the incidence and sequelae of migration of the Nellix (Endologix Inc, Irvine, Calif) endoprosthesis after endovascular aneurysm sealing. A review was performed of the follow-up imaging of all endovascular aneurysm sealing patients in a university hospital endovascular program who had a minimum follow-up of 1 year. The first postoperative and latest follow-up computed tomography scans were used to measure the distances between the proximal and distal borders of the stent grafts relative to reference vessels using a previously validated technique. Device migration was based on previously established criteria and defined as any stent graft movement of ≥4 mm related to a predefined reference vessel. Device movement in a caudal direction was given a positive value, and movement in a cranial direction was denoted by a negative value. Eighteen patients (35 stent grafts) were eligible for inclusion in this retrospective review. The mean preoperative abdominal aortic aneurysm diameter was 57 mm (standard deviation [SD], 5; range, 50-67 mm) and aortic neck length was 30 mm (SD, 16; range, 6-62 mm). Proximal migration, according to study definitions, was identified in six stent grafts (17%), all in a caudal direction. At 1 year the mean proximal migration distance was +6.6 mm (SD, 1.6; range, +4.7-+9.2 mm). Migration occurred in a single stent graft in four patients and bilaterally in one. No distal migration occurred. Proximal migration of the Nellix endoprosthesis does occur and was without any sequelae in our series. Further investigations into the long-term positional stability of the Nellix device, together with a more thorough understanding of the etiology and consequences of migration, are required. Copyright © 2016 Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Quantitative analyses of cross-sectional shape of the distal radius in three species of macaques.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Yasuhiro

    2004-04-01

    I conducted quantitative analyses of the cross-sectional shape of the distal radial shaft in three species of macaques, which differ in locomotor behavior: semi-terrestrial Japanese macaques ( Macaca fuscata), arboreal long tailed macaques ( M. fascicularis), and relatively terrestrial rhesus macaques ( M. mulatta). I took CT scans of the distal radial shafts of a total of 180 specimens at the level of the inferior radio-ulnar articulation. From each CT image, the periosteal outline of the radius was traced automatically by a digital imaging technique. I determined five points (landmarks) on the outline by developing a standardized morphometric technique. Bone surface lengths were measured by using these landmarks and their soft tissue correlates were investigated. The results of this study were as follows: (1) Semi-terrestrial M. fuscata has features that are approximately intermediate between those of the other two species. M. fuscata has a relatively small groove for M. abductor pollicis longus and a large groove for Mm. extensor carpi radialis longus et brevis. These characters resemble those of M. fascicularis. On the other hand, the ulnar notch of M. fuscata is relatively large, a character which is similar to that of M. mulatta. Moreover, compared to the other two macaques, the surface of the flexor muscles of M. fuscata is intermediate in size. (2) The more terrestrial M. mulatta has a relatively large groove for M. abductor pollicis longus and a small groove for Mm. extensor carpi radialis longus et brevis. Moreover, M. mulatta has a relatively large ulnar notch and a small surface for the flexor muscles. (3) The arboreal M. fascicularis has similar features to those of M. fuscata for the first and second relative size index. However, in the ulnar notch, M. fascicularis has a peculiar character and the surface for the flexor muscles is relatively large compared to those of the other two species. These results can be interpreted in terms of positional

  15. Comparison of conservative and operative treatment for distal radius fracture: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jian; Yu, Ai-Xi; Li, Zong-Huan

    2015-01-01

    Background: The authors conducted a meta-analysis to compare the effectiveness and safety of conservative and operative treatment for distal radius fracture. Methods: PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library were searched to identify the relevant studies published up to February of 2015. All randomized controlled trials published to compare the conservative and operative treatment were included in the study. Results were pooled using meta-analysis to compare the efficacy and safety of conservative and operative treatment for distal radius fracture. Results: The databases were derived from seven qualified studies that included a total of 523 patients in which 269 cases adopted conservative treatment while 253 cases adopted operative treatment. Overall, compared with the conservative treatment- treated the distal radius fracture, operative therapies resulted in significantly better radiographic (P<0.05), however, no significant differences of the functional outcomes and complication rate were observed between the two methods (P>0.05). Conclusion: Surgical treatment seems to be more effective distal radius fracture compared with conservative treatment when the radiographic outcomes were analyzed, and no significant differences were deteched in the functional outcomes and complication rate. PMID:26770293

  16. Single-incision open reduction and internal fixation of comminuted trapezium fractures with distal radius cancellous autograft.

    PubMed

    Matzon, Jonas L; Reb, Christopher W; Danowski, Ryan M; Lutsky, Kevin

    2015-03-01

    Trapezium fractures comprise approximately 3% to 5% of all hand fractures. Although operative management of intra-articular trapezium fractures can result in good functional outcomes, there is very little literature addressing specific operative techniques. We describe a technique for open reduction and internal fixation of severely comminuted, intra-articular trapezium fractures, utilizing autogenous cancellous bone graft from the distal radius.

  17. Early breakage of a titanium volar locking plate for fixation of a distal radius fracture: case report.

    PubMed

    Yukata, Kiminori; Doi, Kazuteru; Hattori, Yasunori; Sakamoto, Soutetsu

    2009-01-01

    This report presents a case demonstrating the early breakage of a titanium volar locking plate implanted for internal fixation of a dorsally displaced distal radius fracture in which the dorsal cortex was severely comminuted. Careful selection of the proper plate and appropriate surgical technique and postoperative management are necessary to avoid this complication.

  18. Structure and strength of the distal radius in female patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Tracy Y; Griffith, James F; Qin, Ling; Hung, Vivian W Y; Fong, Tsz-Ning; Au, Sze-Ki; Tang, Xiao Lin; Kwok, Anthony W; Leung, Ping-Chung; Li, Edmund K; Tam, Lai-Shan

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD), bone microstructure, and mechanical indices of the distal radius in female patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We report a cross-sectional study of 66 middle-aged female RA patients and 66 age-matched healthy females. Areal BMD (aBMD) of the hip, lumbar spine, and distal radius was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). High-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) was performed at the distal radius, yielding vBMD, bone microstructure, and mechanical indices. Cortical and trabecular vBMD were 3.5% and 10.7% lower, respectively, in RA patients than controls, despite comparable aBMD. Trabecular microstructural indices were -5.7% to -23.1% inferior, respectively, in RA patients compared to controls, with significant differences in trabecular bone volume fraction, separation, inhomogeneity, and structural model index. Cortical porosity volume and percentage were 128% and 93% higher, respectively, in RA patients, with stress being distributed more unevenly. Fourteen RA patients had exaggerated periosteal bone apposition primarily affecting the ulnovolar aspect of the distal radius. These particular patients were more likely to have chronic and severe disease and coexisting wrist deformity. The majority of the differences in density and microstructure between RA patients and controls did not depend on menstrual status. Recent exposure to glucocorticoids did not significantly affect bone density and microstructure. HR-pQCT provides new insight into inflammation-associated bone fragility in RA. It detects differences in vBMD, bone microstructure, and mechanical indices that are not captured by DXA. At the distal radius, deterioration in density and microstructure in RA patients involved both cortical and trabecular compartments. Excessive bone resorption appears to affect cortical more than trabecular bone at distal radius, particularly

  19. Variation in the Use of Therapy following Distal Radius Fractures in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Waljee, Jennifer F.; Zhong, Lin; Shauver, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    Background: Distal radius fractures (DRFs) are one of the most common injuries among the elderly, resulting in significant expense and disability. The specific aims of this study are (1) to examine rates of therapy following DRFs and (2) to identify those factors that influence utilization of therapy and time span between DRF treatment and therapy among a national cohort of elderly patients. Methods: We examined national use of physical and occupational therapy among all Medicare beneficiaries who suffered DRFs between January 1, 2007, and October 1, 2007, and assessed the effect of treatment, patient-related, and surgeon-related factors on utilization of therapy. Results: Overall, 20.6% of patients received either physical or occupational therapy following DRF. Use of therapy varied by DRF treatment, and patients who underwent open reduction and internal fixation were more likely to receive therapy compared with patients who received closed reduction. Patients who received open reduction and internal fixation were also referred to therapy earlier compared with patients who received external fixation, percutaneous pinning, and closed reduction. Surgeon specialization is associated with greater use of postoperative therapy. Patient predictors of therapy use include younger age, female sex, higher socioeconomic status, and fewer comorbidity conditions. Conclusion: Use of therapy following DRF varies significantly by both patient- and surgeon-related factors. Identifying patients who benefit from postinjury therapy can allow for better resource utilization following these common injuries. PMID:25289323

  20. Arthroscopic study of injuries in articular fractures of distal radius extremity

    PubMed Central

    Araf, Marcelo; Mattar, Rames

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the incidence of wrist ligament and cartilage associated fractures of the distal radius, through arthroscopy, correlating with AO/ASIF classification. METHODS: Thirty patients aged between 20 and 50 years old, with closed fracture from groups B and C according to AO/ASIF classification were selected. All of them were submitted to wrist arthroscopy to address intra-articular injuries and reduction and osteosynthesis of the fracture. RESULTS: A high incidence of intra-articular injuries was noticed, and 76.6% of them presented injury of the triangular fibrocartilage complex, 36.6% of the intrinsic scapholunate ligament, 6.6% of the intrinsic triquetrolunate ligament, and 33% articular cartilage injury larger than three millimeters. Patients with fractures from type C according to AO/ASIF classification presented a higher incidence of ligament injuries. CONCLUSION: There is no relationship between the presence of chondral injury and the AO/ASIF classification of the fractures in the cases reported in this study. Level of Evidence III, Non Randomized Controlled Trial. PMID:25061421

  1. Image classification for Die-punch fracture of intermediate column of the distal radius.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yunhong; Yin, Qudong; Rui, Yongjun; Gu, Sanjun; Yang, Ying

    2017-08-03

    The aim of the study was to analyze the imaging findings of Die-punch fracture of intermediate column of the distal radius, and to explore the clinical application value of image classification. The clinical data of 45 patients who were admitted to our hospital from May 2010 to October 2016 were analyzed retrospectively. All patients met the inclusion criteria for Die-punch fracture. X-ray and CT scan were performed to examine the fracture, and the results were assessed by two doctors in a double blind method. Finally, the image classification of Die-punch fracture was formulated. According to the imaging features of Die-punch fracture, it was divided into four types: type I (dorsal type, 15 cases), type II (volar type, 8 cases), type III (splitting type, 10 cases), type IV (collapsed type, 12 cases). The accuracy rate of CT was 100% (45/45). The misclassification rate of X-ray was 15.6% (7/45) and the missed diagnosis rate was 11.1% (5/45). CT examination could accurately diagnose Die-punch fracture and perform preoperative image classification.

  2. How Should the Treatment Costs of Distal Radius Fractures Be Measured?

    PubMed

    Swart, Eric; Tulipan, Jacob; Rosenwasser, Melvin P

    Distal radius fractures (DRFs) are common, but the best way to measure the total cost of treating these injuries is not known. We conducted a study to measure the total treatment cost of DRFs to identify which items should be measured, and for how long, to capture all major cost-drivers. Eighty-two patients with DRFs were included in this prospective, observational study. All costs, both direct and indirect, were measured. Direct costs were measured for each patient from internal billing records. Indirect costs were obtained with a customized questionnaire. The major contributors to overall cost were physician fees, operating room costs, occupational therapy, and missed work, which together accounted for 92% of total cost. Recurring indirect costs largely resolved within 3 months for nonoperative management and within 6 months for operative management. Physician fees, operating room costs, occupational therapy, and missed work are the major cost-drivers for DRFs and should be measured for at least 6 months after injury. Indirect costs, particularly those associated with missed work, represent a significant amount of the total overall cost.

  3. The effect of search term on the quality and accuracy of online information regarding distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Dy, Christopher J; Taylor, Samuel A; Patel, Ronak M; Kitay, Alison; Roberts, Timothy R; Daluiski, Aaron

    2012-09-01

    Recent emphasis on shared decision making and patient-centered research has increased the importance of patient education and health literacy. The internet is rapidly growing as a source of self-education for patients. However, concern exists over the quality, accuracy, and readability of the information. Our objective was to determine whether the quality, accuracy, and readability of information online about distal radius fractures vary with the search term. This was a prospective evaluation of 3 search engines using 3 different search terms of varying sophistication ("distal radius fracture," "wrist fracture," and "broken wrist"). We evaluated 70 unique Web sites for quality, accuracy, and readability. We used comparative statistics to determine whether the search term affected the quality, accuracy, and readability of the Web sites found. Three orthopedic surgeons independently gauged quality and accuracy of information using a set of predetermined scoring criteria. We evaluated the readability of the Web site using the Fleisch-Kincaid score for reading grade level. There were significant differences in the quality, accuracy, and readability of information found, depending on the search term. We found higher quality and accuracy resulted from the search term "distal radius fracture," particularly compared with Web sites resulting from the term "broken wrist." The reading level was higher than recommended in 65 of the 70 Web sites and was significantly higher when searching with "distal radius fracture" than "wrist fracture" or "broken wrist." There was no correlation between Web site reading level and quality or accuracy. The readability of information about distal radius fractures in most Web sites was higher than the recommended reading level for the general public. The quality and accuracy of the information found significantly varied with the sophistication of the search term used. Physicians, professional societies, and search engines should consider

  4. Outcomes using an internal osteotomy and distraction device for corrective osteotomy of distal radius malunions requiring correction in multiple planes.

    PubMed

    Sammer, Douglas M; Kawamura, Kenji; Chung, Kevin C

    2006-12-01

    Many different methods have been proposed for correction of distal radius malunions; however, precise correction of a severe malunion that requires simultaneous adjustment of displacement, angulation, and rotation in multiple planes is difficult. This prospective study measured radiographic and functional outcomes using an adjustable osteotomy, distraction, and fixation system for distal radius malunions that required correction in multiple planes. Five consecutive patients with symptomatic distal radius malunions requiring correction in multiple planes were recruited into this study. All patients had correction of the malunion with an adjustable osteotomy, distraction, and fixation device. Radiographic parameters and objective and subjective functional outcomes were measured before surgery and at 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year after surgery. All radiographic measurements improved after surgery. Grip strength, pinch strength, and the Jebsen-Taylor test showed only marginal improvement. Ulnar deviation of the wrist and forearm pronation-supination improved, but the wrist extension-flexion arc did not. The Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire showed improvement in all domains, and significant improvement was seen in the overall, work, aesthetic, and satisfaction domains. The Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire, however, also indicated a substantial amount of residual impairment in all domains, including activities of daily living and pain. Corrective osteotomy with the adjustable osteotomy, distraction, and fixation device resulted in improvement in distal radius anatomy and function. However, not all improvements were statistically significant, and anatomy and function did not returned to baseline levels. Despite residual disability, patients noted substantial improvement in subjective outcomes. This system is useful for improving anatomy and function in distal radius malunions that require correction in multiple planes, but patients should be informed that they

  5. Clinical effects of internal fixation for ulnar styloid fractures associated with distal radius fractures: A matched case-control study.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Hideyoshi; Shinohara, Takaaki; Natsume, Tadahiro; Hirata, Hitoshi

    2016-11-01

    Ulnar styloid fractures are often associated with distal radius fractures. However, controversy exists regarding whether to treat ulnar styloid fractures. This study aimed to evaluate clinical effects of internal fixation for ulnar styloid fractures after distal radius fractures were treated with the volar locking plate system. We used prospectively collected data of distal radius fractures. 111 patients were enrolled in this study. A matched case-control study design was used. We selected patients who underwent fixation for ulnar styloid fractures (case group). Three control patients for each patient of the case group were matched on the basis of age, sex, and fracture type of distal radius fractures from among patients who did not undergo fixation for ulnar styloid fractures (control group). The case group included 16 patients (7 men, 9 women; mean age: 52.6 years; classification of ulnar styloid fractures: center, 3; base, 11; and proximal, 2). The control group included 48 patients (15 men, 33 women; mean age: 61.1 years; classification of ulnar styloid fractures: center, 10; base, 31; and proximal, 7). For radiographic examination, the volar tilt angle, radial inclination angle, and ulnar variance length were measured, and the union of ulnar styloid fractures was judged. For clinical examination, the range of motions, grip strength, Hand20 score, and Numeric Rating Scale score were evaluated. There was little correction loss for each radiological parameter of fracture reduction, and these parameters were not significantly different between the groups. The bone-healing rate of ulnar styloid fractures was significantly higher in the case group than in the control group, but the clinical results were not significantly different. We revealed that there was no need to fix ulnar styloid fractures when distal radius fractures were treated via open reduction and internal fixation with a volar locking plate system. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Orthopaedic Association

  6. Risk factors for 30-day postoperative complications and mortality following open reduction internal fixation of distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Schick, Cameron W; Koehler, Daniel M; Martin, Christopher T; Gao, Yubo; Pugely, Andrew J; Shah, Apurva; Adams, Brian D

    2014-12-01

    To identify the incidence and risk factors for 30-day postoperative morbidity and mortality following operative treatment of distal radius fractures in a multicenter cohort. We retrospectively queried the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database for the years 2005-2011 for cases of closed distal radius fractures treated operatively with internal fixation. Patient demographics, comorbidities, and operative characteristics were analyzed. Thirty-day postoperative complications were identified and separated into categories of major morbidity or mortality, minor morbidity, and any complication. Risk factors were identified using univariate and multivariate analyses. We identified 1,673 cases of closed distal radius fractures managed with internal fixation. The overall incidence of having any early complication was 3%. Major morbidity was 2.1%, which included 4 patient deaths, and minor morbidity was 1%. The most common major morbidity was a return to the operating room (16 patients). The most common minor morbidity was urinary tract infection (6 patients). The multivariate analysis demonstrated ASA class III or IV, dependent functional status, hypertension, and myocardial infarction/congestive heart failure to be significant risk factors for any early complication. There was a 10.0% complication rate in the inpatient group and a 1.3% complication rate in the outpatient group. The incidence of early complications following internal fixation for closed distal radius fractures was low, especially in the outpatient group. In the setting of an isolated injury to the distal radius, the data presented here can provide prognostic information for patients during informed consent for what is considered to be an elective procedure. Surgeons should consider risk of morbidity and mortality when considering surgery for patients with noteworthy cardiopulmonary disease, increased ASA class, or poor functional status. Prognostic II. Copyright

  7. Long Volar Plating for Metadiaphyseal Fractures of Distal Radius: Study Comparing Minimally Invasive Plate Osteosynthesis versus Conventional Approach.

    PubMed

    Pire, Emilie; Hidalgo Diaz, Juan José; Salazar Botero, Santiago; Facca, Sybille; Liverneaux, Philippe A

    2017-08-01

    Background  Minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPO) has been used in wrist surgery for several years. The purpose of this retrospective study was to compare clinical and radiologic outcomes of MIPO technique with those of a conventional approach in the treatment of metadiaphyseal distal radius fracture by long volar plating. Materials and Methods  Our series consisted of 32 fractures in 31 patients, mean age 63.9 years, including 16 men and 15 women. MIPO technique was used in 15 wrists (group 1) and conventional approach (> 60 mm of skin incision) in 17 wrists (group 2). In group 1, a long volar plate was inserted under pronator quadratus through a 15- to 30-mm distal incision then fixed to the epiphysis of the distal radius. Then, through a 15- to 30-mm proximal incision, the plate was fixed to the diaphysis of the radius, thus reducing the fracture. Results  In group 1, mean distal incision size was 23.5 and 16.9 mm for proximal one. Mean total scar size (sum of both distal and proximal incisions) was 40.0 mm in group 1 and 84.1 mm in group 2. Mean tourniquet time was 58.4 minutes in group 1 and 68.9 minutes in group 2. At latest follow-up, no significant difference was noted in both the groups concerning pain, quick-DASH score, grip strength, ROM, and radiologic data. One extensor pollicis longus rupture treated by tendon transfer was done in group 1. Conclusion  The MIPO technique for metadiaphyseal fractures of the distal radius by long volar plating has cosmetic and economic advantages compared with the conventional approach. Conversion to conventional approach is possible at any time in case of technical difficulties. Level of Evidence  III.

  8. Stabilization of Volar Ulnar Rim Fractures of the Distal Radius: Current Techniques and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    O'Shaughnessy, Maureen A.; Shin, Alexander Y.; Kakar, Sanjeev

    2016-01-01

    Background Distal radius fractures involving the lunate facet can be challenging to manage. Reports have shown the volar carpal subluxation/dislocation that can occur if the facet is not appropriately stabilized. Literature Review Recent emphasis in the literature has underscored the difficulty in managing this fracture fragment, suggesting standard volar plates may not be able to adequately stabilize the fragment. This article reviews the current literature with a special emphasis on fixation with a specifically designed fragment-specific hook plate to secure the lunate facet. Case Description An extended flexor carpi radialis volar approach was made which allows access to the distal volar ulnar fracture fragment. Once provisionally stabilized with Kirschner wire fixation, a volar hook plate was applied to capture this fragment. Additional fracture stabilization was used as deemed necessary to stabilize the remaining distal radius fracture. Clinical Relevance The volar marginal rim fragment remains a challenge in distal radius fracture management. Use of a hook plate to address the volar ulnar corner allows for stable fixation without loss of reduction at intermediate-term follow-up. PMID:27104076

  9. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS ON FUNCTIONAL AND RADIOGRAPHIC RESULTS AFTER USE OF LOCKED VOLAR PLATE FOR FRACTURES OF THE DISTAL RADIUS

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Daniel Gonçalves; da Cruz Cerqueira, Sergio Auto; Rodarte, Rodrigo Ribeiro Pinho; de Souza Araújo Netto, Carlos Alberto; de Mathias, Marcelo Bezerra

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the functional results from using a fixed-angle locked volar plate for treating fractures of the distal extremity of the radius, using the DASH (disorders of the arm, shoulder and hand) questionnaire and its radiographic correlation with the Lidström classification. Methods: Thirty patients with unstable fractures of the distal extremity of the radius were evaluated after they had undergone a surgical procedure consisting of open reduction and internal fixation using a fixed-angle locked volar plate, at the Military Police Central Hospital of Rio de Janeiro between 2008 and 2009. The results were assessed based on range of motion, DASH protocol scores and radiographies with the Lidström classification. Results: The mean age of the patients in the study was 51 years. The mean DASH score was 11.9 points. It was observed that the radiographic findings did not influence the DASH score. It was found that flexion, pronation, supination and radial deviation correlated with the DASH score. Conclusions: The study showed that subjective functional outcomes using the DASH protocol, obtained from using a locked volar plate to treat fractures of the distal extremity of the radius, are influenced by the range of motion, and especially by the flexion, supination, pronation and radial deviation of the wrist after surgery. There is no correlation between the radiological parameters of either the normal or the operated radius, and the subjective functional outcomes assessed using the DASH protocol. PMID:27042637

  10. SURGICAL TREATMENT OF DISTAL RADIUS FRACTURES WITH A VOLAR LOCKED PLATE: CORRELATION OF CLINICAL AND RADIOGRAPHIC RESULTS

    PubMed Central

    Xavier, Claudio Roberto Martins; Dal Molin, Danilo Canesin; dos Santos, Rafael Mota Marins; dos Santos, Roberto Della Torre; Neto, Julio Cezar Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To analyze and correlate the clinical and radiographic results from patients with distal radius fractures who underwent surgical treatment with a fixed-angle volar locked plate. Methods: Sixty-four patients with distal radius fractures were evaluated. They all underwent surgical treatment with a volar locked plate for the distal radius, with a minimum of six months of postoperative follow-up. They underwent a physical examination that measured range of motion and grip strength, answered the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) questionnaire and underwent radiographic examination. Results: In the physical examination on the patients, all the range-of-motion measurements were reduced. Grip strength measured in kgf was on average 85.8% of the strength on the unaffected side. The mean DASH score was 15.99. A significant relationship was found between lower DASH scores and losses of extension and grip strength. On the radiographs, the mean values in relation to the unfractured side were 84.0% for radial inclination, 85.4% for radial length and 86.8% for volar deviation of the radius. Loss of radial length was correlated with losses of extension and grip strength. PMID:27027046

  11. Biomechanical Assessment of the Dorsal Spanning Bridge Plate in Distal Radius Fracture Fixation: Implications for Immediate Weight-Bearing.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jerry I; Peterson, Bret; Bellevue, Kate; Lee, Nicolas; Smith, Sean; Herfat, Safa

    2017-04-01

    The goal of this study was to compare the biomechanical stability of a 2.4-mm dorsal spanning bridge plate with a volar locking plate (VLP) in a distal radius fracture model, during simulated crutch weight-bearing. Five paired cadaveric forearms were tested. A 1-cm dorsal wedge osteotomy was created to simulate an unstable distal radius fracture with dorsal comminution. Fractures were fixed with a VLP or a dorsal bridge plate (DBP). Specimens were mounted to a crutch handle, and optical motion-tracking sensors were attached to the proximal and distal segments. Specimens were loaded in compression at 1 mm/s on a servohydraulic test frame until failure, defined as 2 mm of gap site displacement. The VLP construct was significantly more stable to axial load in a crutch weight-bearing model compared with the DBP plate (VLP: 493 N vs DBP: 332 N). Stiffness was higher in the VLP constructs, but this was not statistically significant (VLP: 51.4 N/mm vs DBP: 32.4 N/mm). With the crutch weight-bearing model, DBP failed consistently with wrist flexion and plate bending, whereas VLP failed with axial compression at the fracture site and dorsal collapse. Dorsal spanning bridge plating is effective as an internal spanning fixator in treating highly comminuted intra-articular distal radius fracture and prevents axial collapse at the radiocarpal joint. However, bridge plating may not offer advantages in early weight-bearing or transfer in polytrauma patients, with less axial stability in our crutch weight-bearing model compared with volar plating. A stiffer 3.5-mm DBP or use of a DBP construct without the central holes may be considered for distal radius fractures if the goal is early crutch weight-bearing through the injured extremity.

  12. Incidence of Hardware Removal Following Volar Plate Fixation of Distal Radius Fracture.

    PubMed

    Lutsky, Kevin F; Beredjiklian, Pedro K; Hioe, Stephen; Bilello, Justin; Kim, Nayoung; Matzon, Jonas L

    2015-12-01

    To assess the risk of tendon rupture or plate removal after volar plate fixation of distal radius fractures and to determine the incidence of hardware removal. We searched the surgical database of 5 attending hand surgeons at a single institution from 2009 to 2014. All patients who had undergone volar plate fixation were included. Patients were excluded if they underwent an alternate form of fixation, had less than 1 year of follow-up, or could not be reached for follow-up. Postoperative radiographs were examined for Soong grade, plate distance to the critical line, and plate distance to the volar rim. If patients had hardware removed, the reason for plate removal was identified. For all patients who did not have documented hardware removal at our institution, we placed a follow-up call to determine whether they had hardware removed elsewhere. A total of 517 patients underwent volar plate fixation, 143 of whom did not have their hardware removed at our institution but could not be reached for follow-up. Of the remaining 374 patients, 37 (10%) had hardware removed. For group 1 (hardware retained), Soong grades were 13% grade 0, 85% grade 1, and 2% grade 2. For group 2 (hardware removed) the proportions were 11%, 76%, and 5%, respectively, and 8% undetermined. Mean plate distance to the critical line was significantly greater for group 2 (1.9 mm) compared with group 1 (1.2 mm). Mean plate distance to the volar rim did not differ (5.1 mm vs 5.3 mm). The incidence of hardware removal in our series was 10%. The vast majority of patients had Soong grade 1 prominence. Patients who had hardware removed had a greater plate prominence volar to the critical line. Plate distance to the volar rim was not associated with removal. Prognostic II. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Costs Associated With Single-Use and Conventional Sets for Distal Radius Plating.

    PubMed

    Fugarino, Bryce; Fox, Mary Patricia; Terhoeve, Cristina; Pappas, Nicholas

    2017-09-09

    Volar plating of distal radius fractures is an increasingly common procedure. Presterilized, single-use volar plate fixation sets have been purported to increase operating room efficiency and decrease cost. The purpose of this study was to compare the actual cost of using a conventional set compared with the projected cost of using its single-use counterpart. We retrospectively analyzed 30 consecutive cases of volar plate fixation in which conventional instrument sets were used. Hardware and processing costs were calculated for the conventional sets and compared with the projected cost of using single-use sets. The mean total cost of hardware and processing for the conventional sets was $2,728, whereas the projected cost for the single-use sets was slightly higher at $2,868. Twenty-three of the 30 cases would have required additional screws not available in the single-use set. The cost of the additional screws needed to supplement the single-use set would have added an average of $282/case. Overall, the combined hardware and processing cost was lower for conventional sets in 25 of the 30 cases. Although the price of the single-use set is less than the mean charge for use of a conventional set, additional screws not available in the single-use set were required in 77% of cases and consequently rendered the conventional set cheaper in 83% of cases. Stocking the single-use sets with additional screws to reflect the most commonly used screw lengths could make these sets more cost effective in the future. Economic and decision analysis IV. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparing Morbidities of Bone Graft Harvesting from the Olecranon Process and the Distal Radius.

    PubMed

    Micev, Alan J; Kalainov, David M; Slikker, William; Ma, Madeleine; Richer, Ross J; Cohen, Mark S

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study is to compare donor-site morbidities between patients who underwent bone graft harvesting from either the olecranon process (OP) or the distal radius (DR). We evaluated 44 patients who underwent bone graft harvesting from the OP (25 cases) or the DR (19 cases) for various procedures in the ipsilateral upper extremity. Follow-up averaged 14 (OP group) and 19 months (DR group). Outcome measures included visual analog scales (VAS) for graft harvest-site pain and scar appearance, joint motion, and x-rays of the graft harvest and recipient sites. The VAS scores ranged from 0 to 10 with a low score reflecting no pain and excellent satisfaction and a high score reflecting severe pain and poor satisfaction. The VAS scores for pain averaged 0.4 (OP) and 0.5 (DR), and the VAS scores for scar appearance averaged 0.3 (OP) and 0.7 (DR). These differences were not significant. Within each group, there were no significant differences between the operative and nonoperative limbs for elbow or wrist motion. Early graft harvest-site complications involved 1 superficial wound infection (OP) and 1 wound dehiscence (DR). A graft harvest-site defect was detected by x-ray in 84% of OP cases and in 67% of DR cases. Bone healing at the graft recipient sites was observed in more than 87% of cases in both groups. Bone graft harvesting from either the OP or the DR led to comparable patient- and evaluator-determined outcomes with low risks of complications. Surgeons can safely use either option.

  15. Comparing Morbidities of Bone Graft Harvesting from the Olecranon Process and the Distal Radius

    PubMed Central

    Micev, Alan J.; Slikker, William; Ma, Madeleine; Richer, Ross J.; Cohen, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study is to compare donor-site morbidities between patients who underwent bone graft harvesting from either the olecranon process (OP) or the distal radius (DR). Methods: We evaluated 44 patients who underwent bone graft harvesting from the OP (25 cases) or the DR (19 cases) for various procedures in the ipsilateral upper extremity. Follow-up averaged 14 (OP group) and 19 months (DR group). Outcome measures included visual analog scales (VAS) for graft harvest-site pain and scar appearance, joint motion, and x-rays of the graft harvest and recipient sites. The VAS scores ranged from 0 to 10 with a low score reflecting no pain and excellent satisfaction and a high score reflecting severe pain and poor satisfaction. Results: The VAS scores for pain averaged 0.4 (OP) and 0.5 (DR), and the VAS scores for scar appearance averaged 0.3 (OP) and 0.7 (DR). These differences were not significant. Within each group, there were no significant differences between the operative and nonoperative limbs for elbow or wrist motion. Early graft harvest-site complications involved 1 superficial wound infection (OP) and 1 wound dehiscence (DR). A graft harvest-site defect was detected by x-ray in 84% of OP cases and in 67% of DR cases. Bone healing at the graft recipient sites was observed in more than 87% of cases in both groups. Conclusions: Bone graft harvesting from either the OP or the DR led to comparable patient- and evaluator-determined outcomes with low risks of complications. Surgeons can safely use either option. PMID:27014552

  16. Morphometry of distal end radius in the Indian population: A radiological study

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Pankaj Kumar; Nagar, Manoj; Gaur, Suresh Chandra; Gupta, Anuj

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The morphometry of distal end radius (DER) comprises the four necessary parameters: radial inclination, palmer tilt, radial height, and ulnar variance. The unblemished intellect about the morphometry is urged for the management of fracture of DER. The goal of our study was to determine the values of morphometric parameters of the DER from the adult Indian. Materials and Methods: It was a single hospital- based observational cross-sectional, prospective study. Radial inclination, radial height, and ulnar variance were measured on posteroanterior view, and the measurement of palmer tilt was accomplished on the lateral view. All the statistical analysis was done by Microsoft XL 2007 (data add in function were installed for data analysis). T-test was used for comparing the means of the parameters. Results: Two hundred and forty two (n = 242) X-rays were included in this study to analyze. The mean value (n = 242) of radial inclination was 23.27°± (standard deviation [SD]) 7.42° (range: 11.3–42.1°), palmer tilt 10.07° ± (SD) 5.28° (range: 1–16.9°), radial height 11.31 mm ± (SD) 4.9 mm (range: 7.1–30.4 mm), and ulnar variance 0.66 mm ± (SD) 2.46 mm (range: −2.4 to +4.1). Conclusion: This study may provide an inauguratory plinth to prosecute the further analytical research in the Indian population. Moreover, the data may also be used as a reference data for the anatomical alignment while treating the injuries of the DER in the Indian population. PMID:27904215

  17. Number and locations of screw fixation for volar fixed-angle plating of distal radius fractures: biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Mehling, Isabella; Müller, Lars P; Delinsky, Katharina; Mehler, Dorothea; Burkhart, Klaus J; Rommens, Pol M

    2010-06-01

    To compare the biomechanical properties of different numbers and locations of screws in a multidirectional volar fixed-angle plate in a distal radius osteotomy cadaver model. We created an extra-articular fracture in 16 pairs of fresh-frozen human cadaver radiuses. The 32 specimens were randomized into 4 groups. All fractures were fixated with a multidirectional volar fixed-angle plate. We tested 4 different screw-placement options in the distal fragment. The distal fragment was fixed with 4 locking screws in the distal row of the plate in group a, and with 4 locking screws alternately in the distal and proximal rows in group b. In group c, 3 locking screws were used in the proximal row; in group d, 7 locking screws were used, filling all screw holes in the distal and proximal rows of the plate. The proximal fragment was fixed with 3 screws. The specimens were loaded with 80 N under dorsal and volar bending and with 250 N axial loading. Finally, load to failure tests were performed. Group d had the highest mean stiffness, 429 N/mm under axial compression, and was statistically significantly stiffer than the other groups. Group b had a mean stiffness of 208 N/mm, followed by group a, with 177 N/mm. Group c showed only a mean stiffness of 83 N/mm under axial compression. There were no statistically significant differences under dorsal and volar bending. In this model of distal radial fractures, there was a difference regarding the stiffness and the placement of screws in the distal rows of a volar fixed-angle plate. Inserting screws in all available holes in the distal fragment offered the highest stability. Using only the proximal row with 3 screws created an unstable situation. Based on these findings, we recommend placing at least 4 screws in the distal fragment and assigning at least 2 screws to the distal row of the multidirectional screw-holes. Copyright 2010 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [An inveterate fracture of the barton type of the distal radius with dislocation in the radiocarpal joint--case history].

    PubMed

    Bednarenko, Marcin; Kotela, Ireneusz; Bołtuć, Witold; Jakubowski, Lukasz

    2006-01-01

    Barton's fracture was first described and isolated as a disease entity in 1839. It is a quite rare fracture constituting, according to various authors 1.5-2.3% of the distal radius fractures. It is usually accompanied with subluxation or luxation in the radiocarpal joint. In the study we present treatment, dealing with operative difficulties and rehabilitation in a 52-year-old patient with an inveterate fracture of the Barton type of the distal radius with dislocation in the radiocarpal joint. He was previously treated by a local quack. The patient underwent an operative treatment; fragments were anatomically repositioned and a stable fixation was applied. As a result of treatment and intensive rehabilitation, we achieved synostosis and functionality of the wrist and left hand.

  19. Functional outcome of en bloc excision and custom prosthetic replacement for giant cell tumor of the distal radius.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuai; Xu, Mei-Tao; Wang, Xu-Quan; Wang, Jia-Jia

    2015-11-01

    Giant cell tumors (GCT) of the distal radius at Campanacci grade II/III are particularly challenging to treat. Wide excision is the management of choice, but this creates a defect at the distal end of radius. We treated 11 cases of GCT of the distal radius by en bloc excision and custom prosthetic replacement. The purpose of this study was to present our experience and assess the functional outcomes of all patients treated with this surgery. Between 2005 and 2014, we followed up 11 patients with GCT of the distal radius who were treated with en bloc excision and custom prosthetic replacement. All cases were evaluated based on clinical and radiological examinations, passive range of motion (ROM) of the wrist joint, complications, and Musculoskeletal Tumor Society (MSTS) score. Mean follow-up period was 55.5 months (24-83 months); mean resected length of the radius was 7.9 cm. One patient had tumor recurrence in the soft tissues after 15 months (recurrence rate 9.09 %). No patient had fracture, recurrence in the bone, metastases, or immune rejection. No complications were seen, such as loosening, rupture, or dislocation of the custom prosthesis. One patient developed superficial infection at the operative site which resolved after a course of antibiotics for 4 weeks. One patient experienced pain, which could be endured without the need for analgesics. Average ROM was 40.9° of dorsiflexion, 30.0° of volar flexion, 46.4° of supination, and 38.2° of pronation. Mean grip strength was 71 % (42-86 %). Overall revised MSTS score averaged 80.3 % (63.3-93.3 %) with one being excellent, five good, and five satisfactory. En bloc excision and custom prosthetic replacement for a Campanacci grade II/III GCT of the distal radius results in reasonable functional outcome at intermediate follow-up evaluation. Although average ROM of the ipsilateral wrist is poorer than some studies with other techniques, this method can be considered a reasonable option.

  20. Open Reduction and Volar Plate Fixation of Dorsally Displaced Distal Radius Fractures: A Prospective Study of Functional and Radiological Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Sadasivan, Anand Kumar; Hegde, Anoop; Shetty, Ashwin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The fractures of the distal radius have always posed a unique challenge to the orthopaedic fraternity. The complex ligamentous and bony anatomy offers a wide variety of fractures to be dealt with around this zone. Over the years these injuries have become common especially in the elderly age group as well as the implants and surgical techniques have improved. Aim To assess the radiological and functional outcome after fixation of intra-articular dorsally displaced distal radius fractures with open reduction and volar Locking Compression Plate fixation (LCP). To study the complications occurring with this technique. Materials and Methods A prospective study was conducted in the Department of Orthopaedics at ARS Hospital, Tirupur, Tamil Nadu, from June 2015 to June 2016. A total of 20 skeletally mature patients with Lidstrom class 2D and 2E fresh closed distal radius fractures were enrolled in the study. All the patients underwent open reduction with locking compression plating with titanium LCPs using the volar approach. The patients were reviewed regularly at three, six, 12 and 24 weeks. Final assessment of radiographic fracture union was done and scored as per the ‘Radiographic Scoring System to Evaluate Union of Distal Radius Fractures {Radius Union Scoring System (RUSS)}’ and the functional assessment of the wrist was done using the Mayo wrist score. The final results were tabulated and calculated statistically using ‘frequency and proportions’ and ‘Chi-square tests’ were used to assess the test of association. Results Of the 20 patients reviewed, one patient had excellent Mayo wrist score, five had good scores, 12 had satisfactory and two patients had poor results. Seven patients had a RUSS score less than five points and four patients had RUSS score of five points, four patients had six points, two patients had seven points and three patients had eight points. One patient was noted to have dorsal collapse of the fracture during the

  1. Nonunion in a distal radius metaphyseal fracture in a child: Role of intact periosteal sleeve in management

    PubMed Central

    Sivashanmugam, Raju; Vijay, Sriram; Balakumar, Balasubramanian

    2015-01-01

    We present an adolescent with distal radius nonunion following an open fracture and failed surgery which eventually united when the length and stability was restored for eight weeks duration. The intact periosteal sleeve at the nonunion site formed new bone when its tension was restored by gradual differential distraction. This case report highlights the possibility of stimulating bony union in an established atrophic nonunion by distracting the minimally disturbed soft tissue and thick osteogenic periosteal envelope in the paediatric age group. PMID:25593362

  2. Tendon and neurovascular injuries of the distal radius after pinning with Kirschner wires: A meta-analysis of cadaveric studies.

    PubMed

    Yammine, Kaissar; Rafi, Sidiqa M; Furhad, Sadia

    2015-05-01

    Tendon and nerve structures are at risk when displaced fractures of the distal radius are pinned using K-wires. The aim of this meta-analysis (MA) is to examine the published evidence of such complications in cadavers. Eight studies met our inclusion criteria. The meta-analytical results were as follows: (a) 2.87% and 30.5% tendon involvement at the radial styloid process (RSP) and the dorso-radial area of the distal radius, respectively; (b) 3.5% and 1.1% tendon involvement when the percutaneous pinning (PP) and the limited open pinning (LOP) techniques were used, respectively; (c) 16.1% and 3.4% nerve involvement at the RSP and the dorso-radial area of the distal radius, respectively; (d) in 35.7% the nerve was speared and in 64.3% it touched the K-wire at the styloid area; (e) 61.3% cephalic vein involvement in the styloid area; (f) the second branch of the sensitive branch of the radial nerve (SBRN) was the closest to a wire inserted into the RSP; (g) the mean (±SD) distance between a branch of the SBRN and a styloid wire was 2.17 ± 0.82 mm. Our results for nerve and tendon injury frequencies in the RSP were close to those in clinical meta-analytical studies, offering an excellent statistical model of evidence synthesis based on cadaveric studies to assess the frequency of such injuries in clinical practice. However, this cadaveric MA yielded more accurate data than the previously reported clinical MA in assessing the real risk of injury of such structures in the distal radius in terms of their proximity to the inserted K-wires. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Osteosynthesis in Distal Radius Fractures with Conventional Bridging External Fixator; Tips and Tricks for Getting Them Right

    PubMed Central

    Chilakamary, Vamshi Krishna; Koppolu, Kiran Kumar; Rapur, Shivaprasad

    2016-01-01

    Background Distal radius fractures are the commonest fractures occurring in the upper extremity, accounting for 15-20% of patients treated in emergency department. Although distal radial fractures were described 200 years ago, they still remain as unsolved fractures with no clear guidelines. It is often reported that anatomical reduction has a bearing on the functional outcome. Aim To study the management of distal end radius fracture by utilizing the principle of ligamentotaxis where in the reduction obtained by closed means is maintained by external fixator till solid bony union occurs. Materials and Methods A total of 26 cases were selected for study by scrutiny of the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Most of our cases were treated with external fixator within 8 hrs of injury. Small A.O external fixator (bridging ex-fix) with 2 pins each in radius and 2nd metacarpal percutaneously was used for all the cases. Selective k wire fixation was done in cases of instability. Fixator was removed after 6 weeks. Guided physiotherapy was ensured in all the cases. Patients were followed up for an average of 9 months. Results Modified Gartland and Werley scoring system was used to evaluate the overall functional results. Excellent to good results were achieved in 88.45% of our cases while fair result was in 11.54 %. One case had pin loosening and two other cases had malunion. Conclusion External fixator used for ligamentotaxis is an effective method of treating unstable extraarticular and complex intraarticular fractures of distal radius. Improved anatomical restoration with early rehabilitation has produced favourable functional outcome in our series. The complications like pin tract infection is rare due to the availability of superior antibiotics and sterile surgical technique. complications like wrist and finger stiffness has improved with physiotherapy. PMID:26894133

  4. Distal Radius Fractures Do Not Displace following Splint or Cast Removal in the Acute, Postreduction Period: A Prospective, Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Foster, Brock D; Sivasundaram, Lakshmanan; Heckmann, Nathanael; Pannell, William C; Alluri, Ram K; Ghiassi, Alidad

    2017-02-01

    Background Displacement of distal radius fractures has been previously described in the literature; however, little is known about fracture displacement following splint or cast removal at the initial clinic visit following reduction and immobilization. Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate risk factors for fracture displacement following splint or cast removal and physical examination in the acute postinjury period. Methods All patients with a closed distal radius fracture who presented to our orthopedic hand clinic within 3 weeks of injury were prospectively enrolled in our study. Standard wrist radiographs were obtained prior to splint or cast removal. A second wrist series was obtained following physical exam and application of immobilization at the end of the clinic visit. Radiographic parameters for displacement were measured by two independent reviewers and included dorsal angulation, radial inclination, articular step-off, radial height, and ulnar variance. Displacement was assessed using predefined, radiographic criteria for displacement. Results A total of 64 consecutive patients were enrolled over a period of 12 weeks. Of these, 37.5% were classified as operative according to American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons guidelines and 37.5% met LaFontaine instability criteria. For each fracture, none of the five measurements exceeded the predefined clinically or statistically significant criteria for displacement. Conclusion Splint removal in the acute postinjury period did not result in distal radius fracture displacement. Clinicians should feel comfortable removing splints and examining underlying soft tissue in the acute setting for patients with distal radius fractures after closed reduction. Level of Evidence Level II, prospective comparative study.

  5. Stainless steel versus titanium volar multi-axial locking plates for fixation of distal radius fractures: a randomised clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Couzens, Gregory B; Peters, Susan E; Cutbush, Kenneth; Hope, Benjamin; Taylor, Fraser; James, Christopher D; Rankin, Carly R; Ross, Mark

    2014-03-11

    Distal radius fractures are among the most common fractures seen in the hospital emergency department. Of these, over 40% are considered unstable and require some form of fixation. In recent years with the advent of low profile plating, open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) using volar plates has become the surgical treatment of choice in many hospitals. However, it is currently unknown which plating system has the lowest complication rate and/or superior clinical and radiological outcomes following surgery. Few studies have compared different types of plates, which may have various features, different plate and screw designs or may be manufactured from different materials (for example, stainless steel or titanium). This study will specifically investigate and compare the clinical and radiological outcomes and complication rates of two commonly used volar plating systems for fixation of distal radius fractures: one made from stainless steel (Trimed™ Volar Plate, Trimed™, California, USA) and the other made from titanium (Medartis® Aptus Volar Plate, Medartis®, Basel, Switzerland). The primary aim of this study is to determine if there is a difference on the Patient Reported Wrist Evaluation six months following ORIF using a volar plate for adult patients with a distal radius fracture. This study will implement a randomized prospective clinical trial study design evaluating the outcomes of two different types of volar plates: one plate manufactured from stainless steel (Trimed™ Volar Plate) and one plate manufactured from titanium (Medartis® Aptus Volar Plate). The surgery will be performed at a major trauma hospital in Brisbane, Australia. Outcome measures including function, adverse events, range of movement, strength, disability, radiological findings and health-related quality of life will be collected at 6 weeks, 3, 6, 12 and 24 months following surgery. A parallel economic analysis will also be performed. This randomized clinical trial is due to

  6. Surgical Treatment of Unstable Distal Radius Fractures With a Volar Variable-Angle Locking Plate: Clinical and Radiological Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Khatri, Kavin; Sharma, Vijay; Farooque, Kamran; Tiwari, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Background Unstable distal end radius fractures are difficult to manage and so various treatment modalities have been described. The use of variable-angle locking plates is promoted for the management of these fractures. Objectives This study aimed to evaluate the functional and radiological outcomes in unstable distal end radius fractures treated with variable-angle locking plates. Patients and Methods We reviewed 23 unstable distal end radius fractures that were treated at our institution with volar variable-angle locking plates. The mean age of the patients was 32.82 ± 11.81 years (range 19 to 62) and the mean duration of follow-up was 11.04 ± 2.47 months (range 6 to 15). All of the patients underwent open reduction and internal fixation with a variable-angle locking plate. Radiological parameters such as radial inclination, length, tilt, and ulnar variance were measured at six weeks and at the final follow-up. The functional evaluation was conducted by measuring the range of motion at the wrist joint as well as the grip strength. Gartland and Werley’s demerit scoring system was used to assess the final outcome. Results There were two cases of superficial infection that responded to oral antibiotics. One patient had developed a hypertrophic scar, while another had carpal tunnel syndrome that was conservatively managed. There was a significant improvement in the functional indices from six weeks to the final follow-up, while the radiological parameters were maintained. According to Gartland and Werley, excellent results were reported in 65.2% cases, while good results were present in 35% cases. Conclusions The use of variable-angle locking plates in treating unstable distal end radius fractures is associated with excellent to good functional outcomes with minimal complications. PMID:27679785

  7. Minimally Displaced Distal Radius Fracture Treated with Closed Reduction and Percutaneous Fixation Resulting in an Iatrogenic Galeazzi Lesion.

    PubMed

    Compagnone, Luce; Ghazal, Rakan; Canavese, Federico

    2016-12-01

    Galeazzi fracture in skeletally immature patients is a relatively uncommon injury. No previously published case has been associated with an iatrogenic mechanism. Here, we report a case of a 10-year-old boy with a minimally displaced distal radius fracture evolving into a Galeazzi lesion after unnecessary surgical treatment. Unnecessary surgical procedure associated with poor knowledge of bone growth and physiology contributed significantly to the reported condition.

  8. Effect and nursing study of traditional Chinese medicine preparation huayu zhitong powder in the treatment of distal radius fracture.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun; Ning, Huaxiu; Wang, Zhigang

    2015-03-01

    This paper aims to discuss the effect of traditional Chinese medicine preparation Huayu Zhitong powder in the treatment of distal radius fracture. In this paper, 200 patients with distal radius fracture were randomly divided into treatment group and control group. Patients in treatment group orally took Huayu Zhitong powder, while patients in control group were treated with traditional Shangke Jiegu tablets with traditional Chinese medicine composition. After fixed in a cast plaster, patients in the two groups were supervised the disappearance time of pain by adopting NRS (Numerical rating scale) from scale 0 to 10. Besides, they returned at day 5 and day 8 respectively, and then they were observed the swelling affected part. At day 14, day 28, and day 56 after reduction they respectively took an x-ray. Then they would be graded according to the growth of osteotylus and the clinical effects were evaluated based on the grade. Finally, the treatment group worked better in relief effect than the control group. At day 8, the treatment group worked better in detumescence than the control group. At day 28, the recovery effect in treatment group was found to be better than the other. From these, it is shown that the traditional Chinese medicine works much better in the treatment of distal radius fracture than traditional treatment medicine. Thus it is of great worth spreading for use.

  9. FIXATION OF FRACTURES OF THE DISTAL EXTREMITY OF THE RADIUS USING THE MODIFIED KAPANDJI TECHNIQUE: EVALUATION OF THE RADIOLOGICAL RESULTS

    PubMed Central

    Neto, Antonio Piva; Lhamby, Fabio Colla

    2015-01-01

    To demonstrate a simple and efficacious option for treating fractures of the distal extremity of the radius using Kirschner wires. Methods: Between September 2008 and April 2009, 48 patients with fractures of the distal extremity of the radius, classified as A3 according to the AO classification, were treated surgically using a modification of the Kapandji technique. Results: Out of the 48 wrists operated, 42 (87.5%) presented postoperative measurements within the acceptable limits. We used the parameters of McQuenn and Caspers who considered that the radial angulation should be wider than 19° and the volar angulation should be narrower than -12°. All the postoperative volar inclination measurements were narrower than -3°. The mean preoperative radial inclination was 13.14° and the mean postoperative value was 21.18°. The mean preoperative volar inclination was 28.75° and the mean postoperative value was 3.31°. The mean preoperative radial height was 5.25 mm and the mean postoperative value was 9.48 mm. Conclusion: The technique described here had excellent stability for treating fractures of the distal extremity of the radius classified as A3. It was easy to implement and minimally invasive, with minimal surgical complications, and it was inexpensive. PMID:27027023

  10. FIXATION OF FRACTURES OF THE DISTAL EXTREMITY OF THE RADIUS USING THE MODIFIED KAPANDJI TECHNIQUE: EVALUATION OF THE RADIOLOGICAL RESULTS.

    PubMed

    Neto, Antonio Piva; Lhamby, Fabio Colla

    2011-01-01

    To demonstrate a simple and efficacious option for treating fractures of the distal extremity of the radius using Kirschner wires. Between September 2008 and April 2009, 48 patients with fractures of the distal extremity of the radius, classified as A3 according to the AO classification, were treated surgically using a modification of the Kapandji technique. Out of the 48 wrists operated, 42 (87.5%) presented postoperative measurements within the acceptable limits. We used the parameters of McQuenn and Caspers who considered that the radial angulation should be wider than 19° and the volar angulation should be narrower than -12°. All the postoperative volar inclination measurements were narrower than -3°. The mean preoperative radial inclination was 13.14° and the mean postoperative value was 21.18°. The mean preoperative volar inclination was 28.75° and the mean postoperative value was 3.31°. The mean preoperative radial height was 5.25 mm and the mean postoperative value was 9.48 mm. The technique described here had excellent stability for treating fractures of the distal extremity of the radius classified as A3. It was easy to implement and minimally invasive, with minimal surgical complications, and it was inexpensive.

  11. A prospective study of a modified pin-in-plaster technique for treatment of fractures of the distal radius

    PubMed Central

    Mirghasemi, S. A.; Rashidinia, S.; Sadeghi, M. S.; Talebizadeh, M.; Rahimi, N.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives There are various pin-in-plaster methods for treating fractures of the distal radius. The purpose of this study is to introduce a modified technique of ‘pin in plaster’. Methods Fifty-four patients with fractures of the distal radius were followed for one year post-operatively. Patients were excluded if they had type B fractures according to AO classification, multiple injuries or pathological fractures, and were treated more than seven days after injury. Range of movement and functional results were evaluated at three and six months and one and two years post-operatively. Radiographic parameters including radial inclination, tilt, and height, were measured pre- and post-operatively. Results The average radial tilt was 10.6° of volar flexion and radial height was 10.2 mm at the sixth month post-operatively. Three cases of pin tract infection were recorded, all of which were treated successfully with oral antibiotics. There were no cases of pin loosening. A total of 73 patients underwent surgery, and three cases of radial nerve irritation were recorded at the time of cast removal. All radial nerve palsies resolved at the six-month follow-up. There were no cases of median nerve compression or carpal tunnel syndrome, and no cases of tendon injury. Conclusion Our modified technique is effective to restore anatomic congruity and maintain reduction in fractures of the distal radius. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2015;4:176–180 PMID:26541833

  12. Reconstruction of Scaphoid Nonunion Fractures of the Proximal One Third With a Vascularized Bone Graft From the Distal Radius

    PubMed Central

    Jaminet, Patrick; Naegele, Beate; Pfau, Matthias; Schaller, Hans-Eberhard

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The treatment of proximal located scaphoid nonunion is a well-known and common problem. For these patients, we used a vascular pedicled bone graft of the distal radius. Methods: In the last 7 years, 75 patients were treated with the vascular pedicled bone graft. Retrospectively, patients’ data, healing rates, and factors influencing scaphoid healing were analyzed. Results: The overall healing rate in cases with proximal located nonunions (n = 54) was approximately 70%. Out of these 54 patients, 47 patients showed avascular proximal fragments. Multivariate analysis showed no significant impact for the factors age, smoking, duration of disease, or previous operation. Conclusions: In our negative selected patient group, we were able to achieve good results with the usage of a pedicled vascularized bone graft of the distal radius. Our results indicate a favorable outcome for the use of a pedicled vascularized distal radius bone graft in both scaphoid nonunion fractures of the proximal third, with or without an avascular proximal pole. PMID:25165493

  13. The International Classification of Functioning as an explanatory model of health after distal radius fracture: a cohort study.

    PubMed

    Harris, Jocelyn E; MacDermid, Joy C; Roth, James

    2005-11-16

    Distal radius fractures are common injuries that have an increasing impact on health across the lifespan. The purpose of this study was to identify health impacts in body structure/function, activity, and participation at baseline and follow-up, to determine whether they support the ICF model of health. This is a prospective cohort study of 790 individuals who were assessed at 1 week, 3 months, and 1 year post injury. The Patient Rated Wrist Evaluation (PRWE), The Wrist Outcome Measure (WOM), and the Medical Outcome Survey Short-Form (SF-36) were used to measure impairment, activity, participation, and health. Multiple regression was used to develop explanatory models of health outcome. Regression analysis showed that the PRWE explained between 13% (one week) and 33% (three months) of the SF-36 Physical Component Summary Scores with pain, activities and participation subscales showing dominant effects at different stages of recovery. PRWE scores were less related to Mental Component Summary Scores, 10% (three months) and 8% (one year). Wrist impairment scores were less powerful predictors of health status than the PRWE. The ICF is an informative model for examining distal radius fracture. Difficulty in the domains of activity and participation were able to explain a significant portion of physical health. Post-fracture rehabilitation and outcome assessments should extend beyond physical impairment to insure comprehensive treatment to individuals with distal radius fracture.

  14. The International Classification of Functioning as an explanatory model of health after distal radius fracture: A cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Jocelyn E; MacDermid, Joy C; Roth, James

    2005-01-01

    Background Distal radius fractures are common injuries that have an increasing impact on health across the lifespan. The purpose of this study was to identify health impacts in body structure/function, activity, and participation at baseline and follow-up, to determine whether they support the ICF model of health. Methods This is a prospective cohort study of 790 individuals who were assessed at 1 week, 3 months, and 1 year post injury. The Patient Rated Wrist Evaluation (PRWE), The Wrist Outcome Measure (WOM), and the Medical Outcome Survey Short-Form (SF-36) were used to measure impairment, activity, participation, and health. Multiple regression was used to develop explanatory models of health outcome. Results Regression analysis showed that the PRWE explained between 13% (one week) and 33% (three months) of the SF-36 Physical Component Summary Scores with pain, activities and participation subscales showing dominant effects at different stages of recovery. PRWE scores were less related to Mental Component Summary Scores, 10% (three months) and 8% (one year). Wrist impairment scores were less powerful predictors of health status than the PRWE. Conclusion The ICF is an informative model for examining distal radius fracture. Difficulty in the domains of activity and participation were able to explain a significant portion of physical health. Post-fracture rehabilitation and outcome assessments should extend beyond physical impairment to insure comprehensive treatment to individuals with distal radius fracture. PMID:16288664

  15. A prospective study of a modified pin-in-plaster technique for treatment of fractures of the distal radius.

    PubMed

    Mirghasemi, S A; Rashidinia, S; Sadeghi, M S; Talebizadeh, M; Rahimi, N

    2015-11-01

    There are various pin-in-plaster methods for treating fractures of the distal radius. The purpose of this study is to introduce a modified technique of 'pin in plaster'. Fifty-four patients with fractures of the distal radius were followed for one year post-operatively. Patients were excluded if they had type B fractures according to AO classification, multiple injuries or pathological fractures, and were treated more than seven days after injury. Range of movement and functional results were evaluated at three and six months and one and two years post-operatively. Radiographic parameters including radial inclination, tilt, and height, were measured pre- and post-operatively. The average radial tilt was 10.6° of volar flexion and radial height was 10.2 mm at the sixth month post-operatively. Three cases of pin tract infection were recorded, all of which were treated successfully with oral antibiotics. There were no cases of pin loosening. A total of 73 patients underwent surgery, and three cases of radial nerve irritation were recorded at the time of cast removal. All radial nerve palsies resolved at the six-month follow-up. There were no cases of median nerve compression or carpal tunnel syndrome, and no cases of tendon injury. Our modified technique is effective to restore anatomic congruity and maintain reduction in fractures of the distal radius. Cite this article: Bone Joint Res 2015;4:176-180. ©2015 Mirghasemi et al.

  16. Bone Mineral Density and Prevalence of Osteoporosis in Postmenopausal Korean Women with Low-Energy Distal Radius Fractures.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hong Jun; Park, Ho Youn; Kim, Jin Sam; Yoon, Jun-O; Jeon, In-Ho

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the bone mineral density and the prevalence of osteoporosis in postmenopausal Korean women with low-energy distal radius fractures and compared with those of aged-matched normal Korean women. Two hundred and six patients with distal radius fractures between March 2006 and March 2010 were included in this study. Patients were divided into three groups by age; group 1 (50-59 years), group 2 (60-69 years), and group 3 (70-79 years). Controls were age-matched normal Korean women. The bone mineral density values at all measured sites, except for the spine, were significantly lower in group 1 than those of control. While the bone mineral density values in group 2 and 3 were lower than those of controls, these differences were not statistically significant. All groups had significantly higher prevalence of osteoporosis at the Ward's triangle; however, at the spine, femoral neck and trochanteric area it was not significantly different from those of age-matched controls. Although the prevalence of osteoporosis of the postmenopausal women with low-energy distal radius fractures may not be higher than that of the control, osteoporosis should be evaluated especially in younger postmenopausal patients to prevent other osteoporotic hip and/or spine fractures.

  17. Bone Mineral Density and Prevalence of Osteoporosis in Postmenopausal Korean Women with Low-Energy Distal Radius Fractures

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the bone mineral density and the prevalence of osteoporosis in postmenopausal Korean women with low-energy distal radius fractures and compared with those of aged-matched normal Korean women. Two hundred and six patients with distal radius fractures between March 2006 and March 2010 were included in this study. Patients were divided into three groups by age; group 1 (50-59 years), group 2 (60-69 years), and group 3 (70-79 years). Controls were age-matched normal Korean women. The bone mineral density values at all measured sites, except for the spine, were significantly lower in group 1 than those of control. While the bone mineral density values in group 2 and 3 were lower than those of controls, these differences were not statistically significant. All groups had significantly higher prevalence of osteoporosis at the Ward’s triangle; however, at the spine, femoral neck and trochanteric area it was not significantly different from those of age-matched controls. Although the prevalence of osteoporosis of the postmenopausal women with low-energy distal radius fractures may not be higher than that of the control, osteoporosis should be evaluated especially in younger postmenopausal patients to prevent other osteoporotic hip and/or spine fractures. PMID:27247508

  18. Statistical analysis on the concordance of the radiological evaluation of fractures of the distal radius subjected to traction☆

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Daniel Gonçalves; da Cruz Cerqueira, Sergio Auto; de Lima, Alexandre Fernandes; de Mathias, Marcelo Bezerra; Aramburu, José Paulo Gabbi; Rodarte, Rodrigo Ribeiro Pinho

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the current classifications for fractures of the distal extremity of the radius, since the classifications made using traditional radiographs in anteroposterior and lateral views have been questioned regarding their reproducibility. In the literature, it has been suggested that other options are needed, such as use of preoperative radiographs on fractures of the distal radius subjected to traction, with stratification by the evaluators. The aim was to demonstrate which classification systems present better statistical reliability. Results In the Universal classification, the results from the third-year resident group (R3) and from the group of more experienced evaluators (Staff) presented excellent correlation, with a statistically significant p-value (p < 0.05). Neither of the groups presented a statistically significant result through the Frykman classification. In the AO classification, there were high correlations in the R3 and Staff groups (respectively 0.950 and 0.800), with p-values lower than 0.05 (respectively <0.001 and 0.003). Conclusion It can be concluded that radiographs performed under traction showed good concordance in the Staff group and in the R3 group, and that this is a good tactic for radiographic evaluations of fractures of the distal extremity of the radius. PMID:26962498

  19. Use of the volar fixed angle plate for comminuted distal radius fractures and augmentation with a hydroxyapatite bone graft substitute.

    PubMed

    Goto, Akira; Murase, Tsuyoshi; Oka, Kunihiro; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of distal radius fractures with a volar fixed angle plate achieves sufficient stabilisation and permits early physical exercise. However, secondary displacement after surgery sometimes occurs in elderly patients with a metaphyseal comminution and/or cases in which the subchondral support pegs were not placed immediately below the subchondral zone. We treated elderly patients suffering from distal radius fractures with metaphyseal comminution, using both volar fixed angle plate with or without augmentation with a hydroxyapatite bone graft substitute to investigate the benefit of augmentation for maintaining a fracture reduction. We evaluated the differences among radiographic parameters including palmar tilt, radial inclination, and ulnar variance on immediate postoperative and final follow-up radiographs to analyse the maintenance of the initial reduction. There were no significant differences between the two groups in terms of palmar tilt (P = 0.80) and radial inclination (P = 0.17); however, ulnar variance increased significantly in the group treated with a volar fixed angle plate without augmentation (P < 0.05). It might be useful to use a combination technique of a locking plate system and the hydroxyapatite bone graft substitute as augmentation to treat distal radius comminuted fractures in elderly patients.

  20. Limb-salvage treatment of en-block resected distal femoral tumors with endoprosthesis of all-polyethylene tibial component: a 9-year follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Fan; Zhou, Yong; Min, Li; Zhang, Wenli; Shi, Rui; Luo, Yi; Duan, Hong; Tu, Chongqi

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the medium-term outcome of limb-salvage surgery using all-polyethylene tibial endoprosthetic replacement following en-block resection for distal femoral tumors. Methods Forty-nine patients with distal femoral tumor were treated between June 2006 and June 2012. The follow-up period was 6–110 months (average 53.4 months). The prosthetic survival was analyzed using the Kaplan–Meier method. The classification of failure of limb salvage after reconstructive surgery for bone tumors was adapted. Limb function was evaluated with the scoring system of the Musculoskeletal Tumor Society (MSTS). Results Complications were observed in six cases (12.2%). Four suffered infection around the prosthesis, of which two cases were treated with debridement, drainage, and antibiotics without removal of the prosthesis, and the other two cases underwent amputation. Two cases were identified as radiographically loose at 7 year follow-up and did not require revision surgery. One patient underwent amputation due to local recurrence. Failure of limb salvage occurred in nine cases (18.4%), of which two cases were of type 1A, two cases of type 2B, three cases of type 4A, one case of type 4B, and one case of type 5A. The mean MSTS score was 84.3%. Twelve cases died due to distant metastases (24.5%), and the average survival time for these patients was 13.5 months. Thirty-seven patients survived (75.5%), for whom the average follow-up time was 66.3 months and the 5-year prosthetic survival rate was 88.2%. Conclusion The outcome of medium-term and long-term clinical follow-up was satisfactory. All-polyethylene tibial endoprosthetic replacement following en-block resection can be an alternative method of limb salvage for distal femoral tumors. PMID:27695342

  1. Early posttraumatic physeal arrest in distal radius after a compression injury.

    PubMed

    Valverde, J A; Albiñana, J; Certucha, J A

    1996-01-01

    Early posttraumatic arrest of the distal radial physis is an uncommon complication and usually appears after type II physeal injury. We report a 13-year-old boy who sustained an injury to his right wrist, incurring an avulsion fracture of ulnar styloid process. Twenty-one months later, a uniform closure of the distal radial physis was observed. An ulnar shortening osteotomy and distal ulnar epiphysiodesis were performed. We discuss different factors of this complication, but crush injury of germinal cells of the growthplate is considered the main etiology.

  2. Distal radioulnar joint instability (Galeazzi type injury) after internal fixation in relation to the radius fracture pattern.

    PubMed

    Korompilias, Anastasios V; Lykissas, Marios G; Kostas-Agnantis, Ioannis P; Beris, Alexandros E; Soucacos, Panayiotis N

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to classify Galeazzi type injuries and determine the association of residual instability after rigid fixation with the fracture pattern of the shaft of the radius, using a system that is based on anatomic landmarks of the radial shaft. The clinical records of 95 patients (72 men and 23 women) with Galeazzi type injuries requiring open reduction and internal fixation of the fractures were retrospectively reviewed. The mean follow-up was 6.8 years (range, 18 mo to 11 y) after injury. Sixty-nine fractures occurred in the distal third of the radial shaft (type I), 17 fractures were in the middle third (type II), and 9 fractures were in the proximal third of the shaft of the radius (type III). Gross instability of the distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) was determined intraoperatively by manipulation after radial fixation as compared to the uninjured side. Forty patients had DRUJ instability after internal fixation and were treated with temporary pinning with a K-wire placed transversely proximal to the sigmoid notch. Distal radioulnar joint instability after internal fixation was recorded in 37 type I fractures, 2 type II fractures, and 1 type III fracture. Distal radioulnar joint instability following radial shaft fracture fixation is significantly higher in patients with type I fractures than in patients with type II or type III fractures. The location of the radius fracture can be sufficiently used for preoperative estimation of percentage chance of potential DRUJ instability after fracture fixation. Copyright © 2011 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Reproducibility of direct quantitative measures of cortical bone microarchitecture of the distal radius and tibia by HR-pQCT.

    PubMed

    Burghardt, Andrew J; Buie, Helen R; Laib, Andres; Majumdar, Sharmila; Boyd, Steven K

    2010-09-01

    Quantitative cortical microarchitectural end points are important for understanding structure-function relations in the context of fracture risk and therapeutic efficacy. This technique study details new image-processing methods to automatically segment and directly quantify cortical density, geometry, and microarchitecture from HR-pQCT images of the distal radius and tibia. An automated segmentation technique was developed to identify the periosteal and endosteal margins of the distal radius and tibia and detect intracortical pore space morphologically consistent with Haversian canals. The reproducibility of direct quantitative cortical bone indices based on this method was assessed in a pooled data set of 56 subjects with two repeat acquisitions for each site. The in vivo precision error was characterized using root mean square coefficient of variation (RMSCV%) from which the least significant change (LSC) was calculated. Bland-Altman plots were used to characterize bias in the precision estimates. The reproducibility of cortical density and cross-sectional area measures was high (RMSCV <1% and <1.5%, respectively) with good agreement between young and elder medians. The LSC for cortical porosity (Ct.Po) was somewhat smaller in the radius (0.58%) compared with the distal tibia (0.84%) and significantly different between young and elder medians in the distal tibia (LSC: 0.75% vs. 0.92%, p<0.001). The LSC for pore diameter and distribution (Po.Dm and Po.Dm.SD) ranged between 15 and 23 microm. Bland-Altman analysis revealed moderate bias for integral measures of area and volume but not for density or microarchitecture. This study indicates that HR-pQCT measures of cortical bone density and architecture can be measured in vivo with high reproducibility and limited bias across a biologically relevant range of values. The results of this study provide informative data for the design of future clinical studies of bone quality.

  4. Lower limb salvage surgery: modular endoprosthesis in bone tumour treatment.

    PubMed

    Orlic, D; Smerdelj, M; Kolundzic, R; Bergovec, M

    2006-12-01

    We retrospectively analysed 90 patients who underwent "en bloc" resection and modular endoprosthesis reconstruction in the lower limbs between 1987-2003. After proximal femur resection, reconstruction was performed with a modular endoprosthesis by Howmedica (KFTR, designed by Kotz) and modular revision endoprosthesis by W. Link or Lima-Lto (Revision system, designed by Wagner). The knee joint was reconstructed with a modular endoprosthesis (Howmedica, KFTR designed by Kotz) after distal femur or proximal tibia resection. Malignant bone tumours were present in 58 patients (64.5%), benign tumours in 16 (17.8%), metastases in 8 (8.9%), tumour-like lesions in 4 (4.4 %) and non-tumour-related destruction of the femur in 4 patients (4.4%). High-grade tumours were found in the majority of malignant bone tumours (70.7%). Treatment complications, which occurred in 26 patients, were: local recurrence of the tumour, deep infection, acetabular destruction following hemiarthroplasty, recurrent dislocations of endoprosthesis, periprosthetic fracture and hardware problems. In total, 23 patients (25.6%) died due to tumours. Endoprostheses should be considered as a treatment of choice for bone tumours in the hip and knee joint region. Advances in limb salvage surgery are, and will long continue to be, a great challenge for orthopaedic oncologists of the 21st century.

  5. [Outcomes of minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPO) with volar locking plates in distal radius fractures: A review].

    PubMed

    Liverneaux, P; Ichihara, S; Facca, S; Hidalgo Diaz, J J

    2016-12-01

    Minimally invasive plate osteosynthesis (MIPO) has been used in recent years to treat fractures of the distal radius with volar locking plates. Its advantages are the preservation of the pronator quadratus and good esthetics. The MIPO technique was described originally with two incisions: one distal transverse or longitudinal incision and one proximal longitudinal incision. The trend is now to use a single longitudinal incision less than 20mm long. Functional and radiological outcomes are comparable to those of conventional techniques. The MIPO technique is indicated for extra-articular and intra-articular fractures. Arthroscopy may be used concurrently in the latter case. When the distal radius fracture is associated with a proximal shaft fracture, a double incision is needed to introduce a longer plate. The relative contraindications of the MIPO technique are comminuted intra-articular fractures in osteoporotic elderly patients. If reduction is problematic, a larger incision can easily be made. Copyright © 2016 SFCM. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Use of mineralized collagen bone graft substitutes and dorsal locking plate in treatment of elder metaphyseal comminuted distal radius fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ke-Bin; Huang, Kui; Teng, Yu; Qu, Yan-Zheng; Cui, Wei; Huang, Zhen-Fei; Sun, Ting-Fang; Guo, Xiao-Dong

    2014-03-01

    Bone graft may be needed to fill bone defect in elderly patients with a metaphyseal comminuted distal radius fracture. In this retrospective, nonrandomized, single-surgeon study, we evaluated the clinical and radiologic outcomes of using both dorsal locking plates with or without augmentation with mineralized collagen (MC) bone graft for elderly patients with dorsally metaphyseal comminuted radius fractures. Patients in group 1 ( n = 12) were treated with dorsal locking plates with MC bone graft application into the metaphyseal bone defect, and those in group 2 ( n = 12) only with dorsal locking plates. Clinical and radiologic parameters were determined at three and 12 months after surgery. At final follow-up, no significant difference was noted between the 2 groups in terms of palmar tilt and radial inclination ( p = 0.80); however, ulnar variance increased significantly in the group 2 treated with dorsal locking plates without augmentation ( p < 0.05). Functionally, there was no significant difference between the groups. Our preliminary study suggests that combination of MC as bone-graft substitutes and dorsal locking plates may be a usefully alternative for elderly patients with metaphyseal comminuted distal radius fracture.

  7. Standing placement of transphyseal screw in the distal radius in 8 Thoroughbred yearlings.

    PubMed

    Modesto, Rolf B; Rodgerson, Dwayne H; Masciarelli, Amanda E; Spirito, Michael

    2015-06-01

    This retrospective study describes placement of distal radial transphyseal screws in Thoroughbred yearlings with carpal varus deformities while standing, and identifes short- and long-term complications following the procedure. Data gathered from 2009 to 2013 identified 8 yearlings that met the inclusion criteria. Horses were sedated intravenously and a single 4.5-mm cortical screw was placed in the distal lateral radial physis following application of local anesthetic and surgical preparation of a pre-placed hole. All horses were evaluated weekly after surgery and screw removal was performed standing and under sedation when correction of the angular limb deformity was achieved. The mean time for screw removal was 46 days. No short- or long-term complications were identified. Findings indicate that placing a single transphyseal screw in the lateral aspect of the distal radial physis with the horse standing is a viable option to treat varus angular limb deformity of the carpus in horses.

  8. Standing placement of transphyseal screw in the distal radius in 8 Thoroughbred yearlings

    PubMed Central

    Modesto, Rolf B.; Rodgerson, Dwayne H.; Masciarelli, Amanda E.; Spirito, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This retrospective study describes placement of distal radial transphyseal screws in Thoroughbred yearlings with carpal varus deformities while standing, and identifes short- and long-term complications following the procedure. Data gathered from 2009 to 2013 identified 8 yearlings that met the inclusion criteria. Horses were sedated intravenously and a single 4.5-mm cortical screw was placed in the distal lateral radial physis following application of local anesthetic and surgical preparation of a pre-placed hole. All horses were evaluated weekly after surgery and screw removal was performed standing and under sedation when correction of the angular limb deformity was achieved. The mean time for screw removal was 46 days. No short- or long-term complications were identified. Findings indicate that placing a single transphyseal screw in the lateral aspect of the distal radial physis with the horse standing is a viable option to treat varus angular limb deformity of the carpus in horses. PMID:26028683

  9. Secondary prevention of osteoporosis following fragility fractures of the distal radius in a large health maintenance organization.

    PubMed

    Benzvi, Lior; Gershon, Adam; Lavi, Idit; Wollstein, Ronit

    2016-01-01

    A retrospective study evaluated a large health maintenance organization for secondary prevention of osteoporosis following fragility fractures of the distal radius. Our population remained undiagnosed and untreated despite the ability of the system to provide adequate care. These patients specifically should be targeted for a comprehensive multidisciplinary effort at prevention. Osteoporotic wrist fractures carry a high risk for subsequent fragility fractures. Despite therapeutic options and systems that can provide secondary prevention, patients are not always treated appropriately. Our purpose was to evaluate the treatment afforded following a distal radius fragility fracture in our health system. A retrospective review of fractures following surgery was performed. Radiographs and mechanism of injury defined fragility fractures. Demographic data, other fractures, and secondary prevention measures were documented. Eighty-two patients were evaluated. The average age was 64 (10.2) years. The follow-up period following the index fracture was 25.2 months (SD = 4.6). Twenty-eight percent of patients had a second fragility fracture. Seven sustained a subsequent fracture within the follow-up period (8.5 %), and 16 (19.5 %) fractured prior to the index fracture. Mean time from primary to index fracture was 50 (42) months. Forty-seven percent of patients with an additional fracture carried the chart diagnosis of osteoporosis or osteopenia while 24.6 % of patients without an additional fracture carried this diagnosis (p = 0.049). No patients were referred for prevention or an endocrinologist at discharge. Twenty-one percent of patients were treated for osteoporosis at any point. Patients were unlikely to receive appropriate evaluation and treatment for secondary prevention of fragility fractures in our system. A system-based treatment plan for the prevention of osteoporosis should be implemented. Since distal radius fractures occur early in osteoporosis, these

  10. The outcomes of displaced paediatric distal radius fractures treated with percutaneous Kirschner wire fixation: a review of 248 cases.

    PubMed

    Ramoutar, D N; Shivji, F S; Rodrigues, J N; Hunter, J B

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of manipulation under anaesthesia (MUA) and Kirschner wire (K-wire) fixation of displaced, paediatric distal radius fractures on residual radiological angulation, displacement, and shortening, as well as functional outcomes, including complication rates. A retrospective review was conducted of all paediatric patients undergoing MUA and K-wire fixation for an extra-articular distal radius fracture over a period of 5 years. A total of 248 patients were included in the study with a mean age of 9.9 years (3-15). Mean follow-up was 6.6 weeks (4-156). There was a statistically significant increase in median dorsal angulation (p<0.0001) between initial post-operative and follow-up radiographs at the time of K-wire removal. The number of K-wires used did not have a significant effect on dorsal angulation (p=0.9015) at time of K-wire removal, nor did the use of an above or below elbow cast (p=0.3883). Seventeen patients required a further general anaesthetic (5 revision operations, 12 removal of migrated K-wires). Eighty-seven percentage of (215 patients) of patients had normal function at follow-up post-K-wire removal. Angulation at time of K-wire removal of more than 15° was significantly associated with reduced functional outcome (p=0.0377). A total of 41 patients (17%) had complications associated with K-wire use. We conclude that though K-wire fixation is an effective technique, it does not prevent re-angulation of the fracture and is associated with a significant complication rate. Given the remodelling potential and tolerance to deformity in children, surgeons should give careful thought before utilising this technique for all displaced or angulated paediatric distal radius fractures. If used, 1 K-wire with immobilisation in a below elbow cast is sufficient in most cases.

  11. Radiological Outcomes of Distal Radius Fractures Managed with 2.7mm Volar Locking Plate Fixation-A Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kotian, Prem; Mudiganty, Srikanth; Annappa, Rajendra

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Distal radius fractures accounts for around 15% of all fractures diagnosed and treated in the emergency rooms. These fractures usually result secondary to high velocity injury such as a motor vehicle accident or fall on an out stretched hand. In the elderly, it is a common fragility fracture. Volar Locking Compression Plates (LCP) is effective devices for fixation of the distal radius fractures. There is a lacuna with regard to literature on the 2.7 mm volar LCP and the current study retrospectively assesses the postoperative radiological outcomes. Aim To measure the radiological outcomes in patients with displaced distal radius fractures managed with 2.7 mm volar LCP fixation using Sarmiento’s Modification of Lindstorm Criteria. Materials and Methods A retrospective study was conducted in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Kasturba Medical College Allied Hospitals, Mangalore from May 2014 to July 2016. All displaced distal radius fractures of skeletally mature patients who underwent volar locking plate fixation between May 2014 to July 2016 and follow up with X-rays at six weeks and three months were included as part of the study. The study comprised of 20 patients and fractures were classified using the AO and Melone’s classification systems. The radiological outcome was scored based on Sarmiento’s Modification of Lindstorm Criteria. Results Post operative check X-rays were analysed at immediate post operative, six weeks and three months. The mean immediate post operative radial shortening, decrease in radial deviation and loss of palmar tilt were 4.08±2.23, 5.91±4.01and 4.11±3.29 respectively. The corresponding values at last follow up were 4.71±2.31, 7.9±5.13 and 4.91±3.32 respectively. No statistically significant difference (p=0.930;874;716) in radial shortening, decrease in palmar angulation and loss of radial deviation was seen till the final follow up. Sarmiento’s Modification of Lindstorm Criteria showed a good

  12. Percutaneous pinning of distal radius fractures: an anatomic study demonstrating the proximity of K-wires to structures at risk.

    PubMed

    Chia, Benjamin; Catalano, Louis W; Glickel, Steven Z; Barron, O Alton; Meier, Kristen

    2009-01-01

    Closed reduction and percutaneous pinning is a reliable technique for treating 2- and 3-part distal radius fractures. There are currently no data that demonstrate the proximity of at-risk nerves and tendons during percutaneous placement of 5 commonly used K-wires. Whereas the previous literature notes the risk of superficial radial nerve injury with K-wire insertion into the radial styloid, the current study provides specific distances, not only to the superficial radial nerve (SRN) but also to the tendons of the first through fifth extensor compartments during K-wire insertion. K-wires (1.5 mm or 0.059 in) were placed percutaneously into the distal radius of 15 cadaver specimens, simulating fixation of a distal radius fracture. After dissection, the distance from the K-wires to the extensor tendons and branches of the SRN were measured and tabulated. The volar radial styloid K-wire was an average distance of 1.47 mm +/- 1.7 from the closest branch of the SRN. One penetrated a branch of the SRN. The dorsal radial styloid K-wire was an average distance of 0.35 mm +/- 0.64 from the closest branch of the SRN. No tendons in the first compartment were found penetrated by or touching the K-wires. The transverse radial K-wire was an average distance of 1.07 mm +/- 1.57 from the branches or trunk of the SRN. One K-wire was found piercing the volar branch of the SRN, and 1 K-wire was found piercing the abductor pollicis longus. The dorsal rim K-wire was an average of 2.94 mm +/- 2.11 from the ulnar aspect of the extensor pollicis longus and an average of 1.44 mm +/- 1.65 from the radial aspect of the extensor digitorum communis. The dorsoulnar K-wire was an average distance of 1.88 mm +/- 1.6 ulnar or radial to the extensor digiti quinti proprius and penetrated it in three specimens. The volar radial styloid, transverse radial, and dorsoulnar K-wires all penetrated either tendons or nerves. It is therefore prudent to make a small incision to identify and protect the

  13. Titanium integration with bone, welding, and screw head destruction complicating hardware removal of the distal radius: report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Van Nortwick, Sara S; Yao, Jeffrey; Ladd, Amy L

    2012-07-01

    Increasingly, surgeons treat distal radius fractures with locking plate systems. Recent case reports have focused on technical insertion errors resulting in removal difficulties: poor drilling orientation or cross-threading, destruction of the screw head, and filling of the screw recess with tissue. We report 2 complications of titanium locked plate removal secondary to in vivo reactions including titanium integration with bone and mechanical binding between the titanium screw and plate. We clarify and discuss terminology relevant to implant removal, including cold-welding, galling, fretting, and anodization. Even with optimal technique, in situ reactions can complicate titanium implant removal.

  14. Sex- and Maturity-Related Differences in Cortical Bone at the Distal Radius and Midshaft Tibia Evaluated by Quantitative Ultrasonography.

    PubMed

    Baptista, Fátima; Rebocho, Lurdes M; Cardadeiro, Graça; Zymbal, Vera; Rosati, Nicoletta

    2016-09-01

    Boys usually have higher values of bone mineral density measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry than girls, but contradictorily also have a greater incidence of fractures during growth. The purpose of this study was to investigate sex- and maturity-related differences in bone speed of sound (SoS) at the radius and tibia in a sample of 625 healthy children aged 10-14 y and to analyze the contributions of physical activity (PA) to possible dissimilarities. Radial and tibial SoS was evaluated by quantitative ultrasound, maturity was estimated as the years of distance from the peak height velocity age, and PA was assessed by accelerometry. Comparisons between sexes and maturity groups (low: below average [<-2.5 y], high: average or above [≥-2.5 y]) were made by two-sample t-tests with unequal variances. Girls in the high-maturity group had higher SoS at the radius and tibia compared with girls in the low-maturity group (p < 0.001). There were no SoS differences at the radius or tibia between the high- and low-maturity groups in boys. Within high-maturity children, girls had higher SoS than boys at the radius and tibia (p < 0.001). There were no differences at the radius and tibia between girls and boys with low maturity. The results were not modified after controlling for PA. Regardless of PA, the results provide insight into sex- and maturity-related differences in bone SoS at the distal radius and midshaft tibia from maturity less than 2.5 y from the peak height velocity age, with boys having lower SoS. Copyright © 2016 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Image-based micro-finite-element modeling for improved distal radius strength diagnosis: moving from bench to bedside.

    PubMed

    Pistoia, W; van Rietbergen, B; Lochmüller, E-M; Lill, C A; Eckstein, F; Rüegsegger, P

    2004-01-01

    Although osteoporosis is characterized by quantitative (mass) and qualitative (structural) changes, standard clinical techniques (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, DXA) only measure the former. Three-dimensional micro-finite-element (micro-FE) models based on high-resolution images can account for structural aspects as well, and it has recently been shown that an improved prediction of distal radius strength is possible with micro-FE analysis. A clinical application of this technique, however, is limited by its high imaging and computational demands. The objective of this study is to investigate if an improved prediction of bone strength can be obtained as well when only a small part of the radius is used for micro-FE modeling. Images of a 1-cm region of the metaphysis of the distal radius of 54 cadaver arms (mean age: 82 +/- 9 SD) made with a three-dimensional peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) device at 165- micro m resolution formed the basis for micro-FE models that were used to predict the bone failure load. Following imaging, specimens were experimentally compressed to failure to produce a Colles'-type fracture. Failure loads predicted from micro-FE analyses agreed well with those measured experimentally (R2 = 0.66, p < 0.001). Lower correlations were observed with bone mass (R2 = 0.48, p < 0.001) and microstructural parameters (R2 = 0.47, p < 0.001). Hence, even when only a small region is modeled, micro-FE analysis provides an improved prediction of radius strength.

  16. [Clinical results following conservative and surgical treatment of osteoporotic distal radius fractures in the elderly : Overview of best available evidence].

    PubMed

    Bartl, C; Stengel, D; Gülke, J; Gebhard, F

    2016-09-01

    Fractures of the distal radius in elderly patients increasingly contribute to the workload in emergency departments worldwide. There is still no consensus about the best treatment option, e. g. closed reduction and cast stabilization, percutaneous pinning, external fixation or open reduction and internal fixation with volar locking plates (ORIF). In addition, the influence of pharmacological antiosteoporotic treatment (e. g. bisphosphonates) is unclear. In this overview five comparative studies were analyzed, which had been identified in a previous systematic review. The evaluation included 3 cohort studies and 2 randomized trials enrolling a total of 515 patients. A clinical or statistical advantage of ORIF over conservative treatment with respect to DASH scores 12 months after the index fracture event could not be demonstrated with a mean difference of 0.25 (95 % confidence interval CI -0.57-1.07). According to current best scientific evidence from preclinical and clinical investigations, antiosteoporotic medication does not have an unfavorable influence on fracture healing and should be continued due to its proven effectiveness in reducing subsequent osteoporotic fractures. Following distal radius fractures in elderly patients with clinical risk factors, an osteoporosis screening should be routine practice and a specific therapy should be initiated if the fracture risk is increased.

  17. Treatment of fractures of the distal radius with a remodellable bone cement: a prospective, randomised study using Norian SRS.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Sotelo, J; Munuera, L; Madero, R

    2000-08-01

    We performed a prospective, randomised study on 110 patients more than 50 years old with fractures of the distal radius to compare the outcome of conservative treatment with that using remodellable bone cement (Norian skeletal repair system, SRS) and immobilisation in a cast for two weeks. Patients treated with SRS had less pain and earlier restoration of movement and grip strength. The results at one year were satisfactory in 81.54% of the SRS patients and 55.55% of the control group. The rates of malunion were 18.2% and 41.8%, respectively. There was a significant relationship between the functional and radiological results. Soft-tissue extrusion was present initially in 69.1% of the SRS patients; most deposits disappeared progressively, but persisted in 32.73% at one year. We conclude that the injection of a remodellable bone cement into the trabecular defect of fractures of the distal radius provides a better clinical and radiological result than conventional treatment.

  18. Reduction of multi-fragment fractures of the distal radius using atlas-based 2D/3D registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Ren Hui; Stewart, James; Abolmaesumi, Purang

    2009-02-01

    We describe a method to guide the surgical fixation of distal radius fractures. The method registers the fracture fragments to a volumetric intensity-based statistical anatomical atlas of distal radius, reconstructed from human cadavers and patient data, using a few intra-operative X-ray fluoroscopy images of the fracture. No pre-operative Computed Tomography (CT) images are required, hence radiation exposure to patients is substantially reduced. Intra-operatively, each bone fragment is roughly segmented from the X-ray images by a surgeon, and a corresponding segmentation volume is created from the back-projections of the 2D segmentations. An optimization procedure positions each segmentation volume at the appropriate pose on the atlas, while simultaneously deforming the atlas such that the overlap of the 2D projection of the atlas with individual fragments in the segmented regions is maximized. Our simulation results shows that this method can accurately identify the pose of large fragments using only two X-ray views, but for small fragments, more than two X-rays may be needed. The method does not assume any prior knowledge about the shape of the bone and the number of fragments, thus it is also potentially suitable for the fixation of other types of multi-fragment fractures.

  19. A prospective comparison between Kapandji and percutaneous extra-focal fixation in extra articular distal radius fractures

    PubMed Central

    Mirhamidi, Seyed Mehdi; Bayat, Farzad Merrikh

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: there are multiple methods of distal radius fractures treatments. Of these percutaneous wire insertion has yielded popular acceptance. These percutaneous wire insertions can be done through many different ways with their own advantages and disadvantages. One of these methods is Kapandji method and because of its inherent stability in biomechanical examinations we suppose that we can begin the range of motion sooner than other methods with the hope of better outcome. Patients and methods: From 2010 to 2012 we studied 45 patients, of these 23 went under extra-focal technique and 22 went under Kapandji technique. After Kapandji we immobilized the limb in splint for 4 weeks and started partial motion thereafter and in the extra-focal group we immobilized them in for 6 weeks in long arm casts. Results: After 3 months and 6 months we assess the Gartland and Warley score and find 39% and 73% excellent and good result in extra-focal and 45% and 86% excellent and good result in Kapandji group after 3 and 6 months, respectively. Although there were about 0.22 mm collapse in both groups, here were no statistically significant differences in functional score or radiologic and anatomic parameters between groups. Conclusion: we have find Kapandji technique a suitable method of distal radius fracture fixation in cases with no articular involvement and we think it is better to immobilize the limb for at least 6 weeks after Kapandji fixation, in order to better control the pain. PMID:23386917

  20. Radiographic Outcomes of Percutaneous Pinning for Displaced Extra-Articular Fractures of the Distal Radius: A Time Course Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tien-Yu; Shen, Shih-Hsun

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Although not all malunited distal radius fractures are symptomatic, the goal of treatment for displaced extra-articular fractures of the distal radius should be to restore and to maintain the radial geometry until bone healing. However, the time course change after surgery for these fractures is unclear. Methods. We, therefore, performed a retrospective cohort study on patients who sustained such fractures treated with percutaneous pinning. The main outcome measures in this study included four radiographic measurements: radial height, radial inclination, radial tilt, and ulnar variance. Results. Assessment of the monthly changes in these measurements revealed that early fracture collapse with loss of the reduced radial tilt occurred. Besides, among the 4 measurements, the normal radial tilt was the most difficult to be achieved when repositioning and pinning the fractured fragments. Conclusions. Even though the modified Kapandji technique provided a superior ability to maintain the reduced position until bone healing over the Willenegger method, we recommended that refinement of surgical techniques and postoperative hand care program may be necessary to fulfill the treatment objectives of stable surgical fixation and early joint motion. PMID:24883316

  1. A prospective comparison between Kapandji and percutaneous extra-focal fixation in extra articular distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Mirhamidi, Seyed Mehdi; Bayat, Farzad Merrikh

    2013-01-01

    there are multiple methods of distal radius fractures treatments. Of these percutaneous wire insertion has yielded popular acceptance. These percutaneous wire insertions can be done through many different ways with their own advantages and disadvantages. One of these methods is Kapandji method and because of its inherent stability in biomechanical examinations we suppose that we can begin the range of motion sooner than other methods with the hope of better outcome. From 2010 to 2012 we studied 45 patients, of these 23 went under extra-focal technique and 22 went under Kapandji technique. After Kapandji we immobilized the limb in splint for 4 weeks and started partial motion thereafter and in the extra-focal group we immobilized them in for 6 weeks in long arm casts. After 3 months and 6 months we assess the Gartland and Warley score and find 39% and 73% excellent and good result in extra-focal and 45% and 86% excellent and good result in Kapandji group after 3 and 6 months, respectively. Although there were about 0.22 mm collapse in both groups, here were no statistically significant differences in functional score or radiologic and anatomic parameters between groups. we have find Kapandji technique a suitable method of distal radius fracture fixation in cases with no articular involvement and we think it is better to immobilize the limb for at least 6 weeks after Kapandji fixation, in order to better control the pain.

  2. Complication rates and reduction potential of palmar versus dorsal locking plate osteosynthesis for the treatment of distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Wichlas, F; Haas, N P; Disch, A; Machó, D; Tsitsilonis, S

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the complication rates of volar versus dorsal locking plates and postoperative reduction potential after distal radius fractures. For this study 285 distal radius fractures (280 patients/59.4 % female) treated with locked plating were retrospectively evaluated. The mean age of the patients was 54.6 years (SD 17.4) and the mean follow-up was 33.2 months (SD 17.2). The palmar approach was used in 225 cases and the dorsal approach in 60 cases (95 % type C fractures). Adequate reduction was achieved with both approaches, regardless of fracture severity. In the dorsal group, the complications and implant removal rates were significantly higher and the operative time was also longer. Based on these facts, we advocate the palmar locking plate for the vast majority of fractures. In cases of complex multifragmentary articular fractures where no compromise in reduction is acceptable, and with the biomechanical equality of palmar and dorsal plating remaining unproven, dorsal plating may still be considered. Therapeutic level IV.

  3. Comparative clinical study of locking screws versus smooth locking pegs in volar plating of distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Boretto, J G; Pacher, N; Giunta, D; Gallucci, G L; Alfie, V; De Carli, P

    2014-09-01

    The present study was performed to test the null hypothesis on no difference in stability of fixation after volar plating of intra-articular distal radius fractures (AO C2-C3) with either locking smooth pegs or locking screws in a clinical setting. A retrospective evaluation included adult patients with C2-C3 AO fractures treated with a volar plate with locking smooth pegs or locking screws. Radiographic assessment was performed to evaluate extra- and intra-articular parameters in the early postoperative period and after bone union. Twenty-seven consecutive patients were included. Thirteen cases had fixation with locking screws and 14 had fixation with locking smooth pegs. Both groups had bone fragment displacement after fixation. However, there were no significant differences between the groups either in extra- or intra-articular parameters defined by Kreder et al. (1996). Our study shows that, in a clinical setting, there is no difference in stability fixation between locking screws or smooth locking pegs in C2-C3 distal radius fractures.

  4. Treatment of Preiser disease with vascularized bone graft from the distal radius: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    da Gama, Sérgio Augusto Machado; de Rezende, Marcelo Rosa; Ribak, Samuel

    2015-09-01

    The authors report two cases of women with Preiser disease treated with dorsal distal radius vascularized grafts. In the first case, after minor trauma, the patient had pain in the left wrist of insidious onset and evolution with significant worsening. The radiographic examination showed increased density of the proximal pole of the scaphoid, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed partial necrosis. Intraoperatively, as the integrity of the cartilage of the proximal pole of the scaphoid was observed, dorsal vascularized distal radius graft was performed using the 1,2 intercompartmental supraretinacular artery. In 4 months postoperatively, MRI showed almost total integration of the graft, and 1 year after surgery, the patient was asymptomatic, with normal mobility of the operated wrist and imaging showing a normal scaphoid. The second case had similar history and clinical picture, but the radiographs showed narrowing and diffuse sclerosis and also osteolytic areas in the proximal pole of the scaphoid; MRI showed diffuse necrosis. The same graft technique was used, considering that there was a good cartilaginous coverage of the scaphoid. After 9 years of follow-up, the patients remain free of pain or functional limitations. In such cases, the vascularized graft technique was effective and, therefore, a good therapeutic option, provided that there is no degenerative changes in the carpus and, especially, the cartilage of the proximal pole is viable.

  5. [Complications of open reduction and internal fixation versus external fixation for unstable distal radius fractures: a meta-analysis].

    PubMed

    Yang, Z; Yuan, Z Z; Ma, J X; Ma, X L

    2016-12-20

    Objective: To make a systematic assessment of the complications of open reduction and internal fixation versus external fixation for unstable distal radius fractures. Method: A computer-based online search of PubMed, ScienceDirect, EMBASE, BIOSIS, Springer and Cochrane Library were performed.The randomized and controlled trials of open reduction and internal fixation versus external fixation for unstable distal radius fractures were collected.The included trials were screened out strictly based on the criterion of inclusion and exclusion.The quality of included trials was evaluated.RevMan 5.0 was used for data analysis. Result: A total of 17 studies involving 1 402 patients were included.There were 687 patients with open reduction and internal fixation and 715 with external fixation.The results of Meta-analysis indicated that there were statistically significant differences with regard to the postoperatively total complications, infection, malunion, tendon rupture (I(2)=8%, RR=0.77(95%CI 0.65-0.91, Z=3.10, P<0.05). There were no statistically significant differences observed between two approaches with respect to nounion, re-operation, complex regional pain syndrome, carpal tunnel syndrome, neurapraxia, tendonitis, painful hardware, scar(P>0.05). Conclusion: Postoperative complications are present in both open reduction and internal fixation and external fixation.Compared with external fixation, open reduction and internal fixation is lower in total complications postoperatively, infection and malunion, but external fixation has lower tendon rupture incidence.

  6. Classification of distal radius fractures in children: good inter- and intraobserver reliability, which improves with clinical experience

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background We wanted to test the reliability of a commonly used classification of distal radius fractures in children. Methods 105 consecutive fractures of the distal radius in children were rated on two occasions three months apart by 3 groups of doctors; 4 junior registrars, 4 senior registrars and 4 orthopedic consultants. The fractures were classified as buckle, greenstick, complete or physeal. Kappa statistics were used to analyze inter- and intraobserver reliability. Results The kappa value for interobserver agreement at the first reading was 0.59 for the junior registrars, 0.63 for the senior registrars and 0.66 for the consultants. The mean kappa value for intraobserver reliability was 0.79 for the senior registrars, 0.74 for the consultants and 0.66 for the junior registrars. Conclusions We conclude that the classification tested in this study is reliable and reproducible when applied by raters experienced in fracture management. The reliability varies according to the experience of the raters. Experienced raters can verify the classification, and avoid unnecessary follow-up appointments. PMID:22269925

  7. Prediction of bone mechanical properties using QUS and pQCT: study of the human distal radius.

    PubMed

    Muller, M; Mitton, D; Moilanen, P; Bousson, V; Talmant, M; Laugier, P

    2008-07-01

    The objective was to compare the prediction of bone mechanical properties provided by axial transmission to that provided by peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) at the distal radius. The distal radius is the location for Colles' fractures, a common osteoporosis related trauma situation. Measurements of the radial speed of sound were performed using three axial transmission devices: a commercial device (Sunlight Omnisense, 1.25 MHz), a bi-directional axial transmission prototype (1 MHz), both measuring the velocity of the first arriving signal (FAS), and a low frequency (200 kHz) device, measuring the velocity of a slower wave. Co-localized pQCT measurements of bone mineral density and cortical thickness were performed. Ultrasound and pQCT parameters were compared to mechanical parameters such as failure load and Young's modulus, obtained using quasistatic compressive mechanical testing and finite elements modelling (FEM). Correlations of the ultrasound and pQCT parameters to mechanical parameters were comparable. The best predictor of failure load was the pQCT measured cortical thickness. The best predictor of Young's modulus was the bi-directional SOS. The low frequency device significantly correlated to cortical thickness and failure load. The results suggest that different axial transmission approaches give access to different bone mechanical parameters. The association of different axial transmission techniques should be able to provide a good prediction of bone mechanical parameters, and should therefore be helpful for fracture risk prediction.

  8. Is external fixation a better way than plaster to supplement K-wires in non-comminuted distal radius fractures?

    PubMed

    Athar, Sajjad M; Ashwood, Neil; Aerealis, George; Bain, Gregory I

    2017-09-05

    Distal radius fractures represent about one-sixth of all fractures. There is still no consensus on the treatment of this fracture. We have several issues to assess and address; one of them is the fixation method. We tried to compare the effectiveness of two methods of stabilisation of distal radial fracture. Comparison between the techniques of Kirschner wire (K-wire) fixation with plaster and K-wire fixation with external fixation (Ex-Fix) was undertaken to assess which treatment modality gives better results in patients with distal radius fracture Frykman VII and VIII with no metaphyseal comminution. Fifty-six patients were chosen randomly and then allocated to two different modalities of stabilisation randomly as well, they were followed up; three of them were lost to follow-up because of death and two moved away from the area. Fifty-one patients were randomised in two groups: 24 were treated with K-wire and spanning Ex-Fix supplementation and 27 were treated with K-wires and plaster. Patients were prospectively monitored following the operation with a minimum follow-up of 1 year. Measurement of range of motion was obtained after surgery. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) scores for pain and satisfaction levels were also recorded. There was statistically significant difference in favour of the Ex-Fix patient group for pain (VAS, Ex-Fix group: mean 14.9; plaster group: mean 28.1) and satisfaction (Ex-Fix group: mean 89.7;plaster group: mean 76.3). Although one would expect that range of motion would be reduced in the Ex-Fix group, there were no statistically significant differences found, with the exception of supination where results were in favour of the Ex-Fix group (mean 54.4; plaster group: mean 45.2). In our study, xternal fixator (Ex-Fix) supplementation of K-wiring favoured patients with distal radius fracture, even though there was no metaphyseal comminution, and therefore is suggested in contrast to plaster supplementation. © Article author(s) (or their

  9. Gender differences in trabecular bone architecture of the distal radius assessed with magnetic resonance imaging and implications for mechanical competence.

    PubMed

    Hudelmaier, Martin; Kollstedt, A; Lochmüller, E M; Kuhn, V; Eckstein, F; Link, T M

    2005-09-01

    High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (hrMRI) has recently made it possible to evaluate trabecular bone structure in vivo. Despite obvious gender differences in fracture incidence at the distal radius, little is known about gender differences in trabecular bone microarchitecture and its relationship to the structural strength of the forearm. The aim of this study was to determine trabecular bone structure in the distal radius of elderly women and men and its correlation with failure loads of the distal radius as determined in a fall configuration. Specifically, we tested the hypotheses that structural indices differ between women and men and that they offer information that is independent from BMD for predicting structural strength. Intact right arms were obtained from 73 formalin-fixed cadavers (age 80+/-11 years, 43 women, 30 men). Trabecular structural indices (apparent bone volume fraction [app. BV/TV], trabecular number [app. Tb.N], trabecular separation [app. Tb.Sp], trabecular thickness [app. Tb.Th] and fractal dimension [Frac.Dim]) were assessed in the distal metaphysis, using hrMRI with 156 microm in-plane resolution and proprietary digital image analysis, while BMD was measured with dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Women displayed significantly lower BMD (-29.8%, p <0.001), app. BV/TV (-8.2%, p <0.05) and app. Tb.Th (-10.2%, p <0.001) than men, whereas app. Tb.N, app. Tb.Sp. and fractal dimension did not differ significantly. Structural parameters differed between normal and osteopenic women (BV/TV: -11%, p <0.01; Tb.Th: -8%, p <0.001) and between normal and osteoporotic women BV/TV: -21%, p <0.001; Tb.Th: -16%, p <0.001). App. BV/TV, app. Tb.Th and fractal dimension provided information independent from BMD in the prediction of radial failure loads in multiple regression models. These findings imply that it should be of clinical interest to monitor both bone mass and trabecular microstructure for predicting osteoporotic fracture risk.

  10. Are Volar Locking Plates Superior to Percutaneous K-wires for Distal Radius Fractures? A Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chaudhry, Harman; Kleinlugtenbelt, Ydo V; Mundi, Raman; Ristevski, Bill; Goslings, J C; Bhandari, Mohit

    2015-09-01

    Distal radius fractures are common, costly, and increasing in incidence. Percutaneous K-wire fixation and volar locking plates are two of the most commonly used surgical treatments for unstable dorsally displaced distal radius fractures. However, there is uncertainty regarding which of these treatments is superior. We performed a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials to determine whether patients treated with volar locking plates (1) achieved better function (2) attained better wrist motion, (3) had better radiographic outcomes, and (4) had fewer complications develop than did patients treated with K-wires for dorsally displaced distal radius fractures. We performed a comprehensive search of MEDLINE (inception to 2014, October Week 2), EMBASE (inception to 2014, Week 42), and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials to identify relevant randomized controlled trials; we supplemented these searches with manual searches. We included studies of extraarticular and intraarticular distal radius fractures. Adjunctive external fixation was acceptable as long as the intent was to use only K-wires where possible and external fixation was used in less than 25% of the procedures. We considered a difference in the DASH scores of 10 as the minimal clinically important difference. We performed quality assessment with the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool and evaluated the strength of recommendations using the Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) approach. Seven randomized trials with a total of 875 participants were included in the meta-analysis. Patients treated with volar locking plates had slightly better function than did patients treated with K-wires as measured by their DASH scores at 3 months (mean difference [MD], 7.5; 95% CI, 4.4-10.6; p < 0.001) and 12 months (MD, 3.8; 95% CI, 1.2-6.3; p = 0.004). Neither of these differences exceeded the a priori-determined threshold for clinical importance (10 points). There was a small

  11. Ten Years' Follow-Up on Combined Palmar and Dorsal Internal Fixation of Complex Distal Radius Fractures.

    PubMed

    Iselin, Lukas Daniel; Massy-Budmiger, Anne-Sophie; Droeser, Raoul A; Mett, Tobias R; Babst, Reto; Rikli, Daniel A

    2016-05-01

    Complex distal intra-articular radial fractures (AO Type C3) are rare, but are life-changing injuries. They are usually related to high-velocity trauma mechanisms in a working male population.We surveyed a cohort of these fractures treated in our institution to assess the functional long-term outcome.Twelve consecutive patients with comminuted intra-articular distal radial fractures were treated at our institution. Osteosynthesis was performed by a single senior surgeon with volar and dorsal extended approaches. The intermediate and final control included conventional X-ray, range of motion (ROM), grip strength, and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand index (DASH), as well as the Patient-rated Wrist Evaluation (PRWE) score for functional outcome at 1 and 10 years' of follow-up.At 10 years' follow-up, anatomic reconstruction with a step or gap of <1 mm was achieved in 10 of the 12 above-mentioned patients, whereas 2 patients were lost to follow-up. ROM was good to excellent in 8 patients. Median grip strength was 107% of the contralateral side. Median DASH-Index and PRWE were 2.3 and 6 respectively, at 10 years. Eight patients returned to premorbid heavy labor. One patient was retired at the time of injury.Combined volar and dorsal approaches allow achieving anatomical reconstruction in comminuted intra-articular distal radius fractures and reveal good functional outcomes at intermediate and long-time follow-up.

  12. Distinctive metaphyseal chondrodysplasia with severe distal radius and ulna involvement (upper extremity mesomelia) and normal height.

    PubMed

    Camera, Andrea; Camera, Gianni

    2003-10-01

    Metaphyseal chondrodysplasias (MCD) are skeletal disorders characterized by metaphyseal irregularities and, usually, by short stature. In MCD, wide heterogeneity exists with regard to clinical and radiological changes. We report on a patient with clinical and radiological findings of MCD who had coxa valga and normal height with metaphyseal involvement of the long bones. The short radii and ulnae showed a very severe change in their distal metaphyses, leading to mesomelic shortening confined to the upper limbs. Hematological, ophthalmological, and hearing examinations were normal. This type of MCD appears to represent a yet undescribed syndrome.

  13. Outcome Analysis of Intra-Articular Scapula Fracture Fixation with Distal Radius Plate: A Multicenter Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Panigrahi, Ranajit; Madharia, Divya; Das, Dibya Singha; Samant, Saswat; Biswal, Manas Ranjan

    2016-01-01

    Background Scapula fractures occur in approximately 1% of all fractures and constitute about 3% - 5% of all injuries of the shoulder joint. Objectives This study aimed to evaluate the clinical outcomes of 20 surgically treated patients with displaced glenoid fractures after stabilization with distal radius plate. Methods Between 2012 and 2015, at 2 centers (HMCH & SHCE) of Bhubaneswar Odisha, we stabilized 20 scapular intra-articular fractures surgically with distal radius locking plate and studied the outcome of the surgeries. The outcome of the 20 fractures was determined using the Constant and Murley score. Both shoulders were assessed and the score on the injured side was given as a percentage of that on the uninjured side. Results The median score was 88% (mean 65%, range 30 to 100). The median score for strength was 21/25 (mean 19, range 0 to 25) and that for pain 11/15 (mean 11, range 5 to 15). The median functional score was 16/20 (mean 15, range 0 to 20). The mean range of active abduction of the shoulder was 135° (20 to 180), the mean range of flexion 138° (20 to 180) and the mean range of external rotation 38° (0 to 100). Five patients showed excellent result; 11 patients showed good result; three patients showed fair result and one patient had poor outcome according to the Constant-Murley score. A superficial infection settled with antibiotics after operation in one patient whose score at final follow-up was 96%. In one patient, delayed healing was reported because of infection. One patient with stiffness of the shoulder at six weeks underwent manipulation under anesthesia with a follow-up score of 81%. Conclusions Various fixation modalities have been described in the literature, however fixation of intra-articular fracture of glenoid with distal radius locking plate for articular reconstruction in the presented series provides good functional outcome with early restoration of the range of motion of the shoulder. PMID:28144606

  14. The role of post-operative radiographs in predicting risk of flexor pollicis longus tendon rupture after volar plate fixation of distal radius fractures - a case control study.

    PubMed

    Selvan, D R; Perry, D; Machin, D G; Brown, D J

    2014-12-01

    Volar plating of distal radius fractures is one of the common procedures performed in trauma surgery. Flexor pollicis longus (FPL) rupture has been described as complication following volar plating of distal radius fractures. The aim of our study was to investigate the possible relation between parameters measured on post-operative radiographs and the occurrence of FPL ruptures. This was a case control study. The post-operative radiographs of 11 FPL rupture, and 22 non-FPL rupture patients were reviewed with respect to fracture reduction and plate position and the various parameters were calculated by five independent people. Logistic regression was used to examine the importance of the variables. We identified two significant factors to predict FPL rupture after volar plating of distal radial fractures. These were radial tilt and plate distance from the joint line. The odds ratio of ruptures was 0.74 (95% CI 0.57-0.95) for every degree of radial tilt <25° and 0.50 (95% CI 0.28-0.88) for every millimetre that the distal end of the plate was away from the volar lip of the distal radius at the wrist joint. Post-operative radiographs could help us predict FPL rupture after distal radius volar plating. The findings also highlight the need for good fracture reduction and thoughtful placement of the volar plate intraoperatively to minimise the risk of FPL tendon rupture. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Hip fractures, preceding distal radius fractures and screening for osteoporosis: should we be screening earlier? A minimum 10-year retrospective cohort study at a single centre.

    PubMed

    Daruwalla, Z J; Huq, S S; Wong, K L; Nee, P Y; Leong, K M; Pillay, K R; Murphy, D P

    2016-01-01

    Both men and women who sustain a fracture of the distal forearm run an increased risk of sustaining a subsequent hip fracture. Our study implies that these patients may not necessarily constitute a group in which osteoporosis screening is warranted. People who sustain a distal radius fracture run an increased risk of sustaining a subsequent hip fracture. However, many institutions only screen for osteoporosis at the time of a hip fracture. We aimed to determine the true incidence of preceding distal radius fractures in an Asian population of patients with a hip fracture aged 60 years or older and whether screening for osteoporosis earlier would be beneficial. We reviewed 22 parameters of 572 patients aged 60 years or older admitted after sustaining a hip fracture over a 3-year period. This included the occurrence or absence of a distal radius fracture in the 10 years preceding their hip fracture. Twenty-nine patients (5 %) had a fracture of the distal radius in the preceding decade. Univariate analyses suggested that hip fracture patients who had preceding distal radius fractures were older, female, have lower mean haemoglobin levels, and right-sided hip fractures. Of these factors, only age was found to have significant predictive value in a multivariate analysis. A number of institutions have started to screen for osteoporosis when a patient presents with a fracture of the distal radius because these patients may have an increased risk of a subsequent hip fracture. Our study implies that this may not be warranted. Implementing such a screening service from both cost and resource utilization point of view must be studied prospectively and in greater detail considering earlier screening may only be beneficial to a very small percentage of patients.

  16. Intraarticular fractures of the distal radius in young adults--a review of the outcome of treatment.

    PubMed

    Pan, K L; Masbah, O; Ali, M

    2001-06-01

    A retrospective review of 30 intraarticular fractures of the distal radius in 27 patients was done. Only young adults aged between 18 and 40 were included. Road traffic accidents accounted for 25 of the cases (23 motorcyclists). Fourteen fractures were treated by closed reduction and a plaster cast. Sixteen fractures were treated by open reduction with internal fixation using a buttress plate or multiple Kirschner wires. At a mean follow-up of 17 months, 63% of the wrists had a satisfactory result and 37% unsatisfactory result. The main adverse factor was intraarticular congruity. The grip strength on the injured side averaged 56% of that of the uninjured side and the pinch strength averaged 73%. Most of the patients were able to return to their former occupation in an average of four months.

  17. Outcomes After Distal Radius Fracture Treatment With Percutaneous Wire Versus Plate Fixation: Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Mark S; Ghamsary, Mark; Guillen, Phillip T; Wongworawat, Montri D

    Multiple methods for surgical fixation of distal radius fractures exist, including percutaneous pinning with Kirschner wires and open reduction volar plating. Despite increased costs, the hypothesis of this study was that open reduction and volar plating does not provide improved outcomes over wire fixation. Following Transparent Reporting of Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials was conducted comparing these two methods with regard to clinical outcomes, radiographic parameters, and complications. Seven trials with a total of 858 patients were included. Plating was not favored over pinning with regard to clinical outcomes and radiographic parameters. Pinning was associated with a higher superficial infection risk compared with plating, though the risk of repeat surgery was not different. It was concluded that Kirschner wire fixation, which may be associated with lower costs, is associated with similar clinical and radiographic outcomes when compared with volar plate fixation, although wire fixation is associated with higher superficial infection risk.

  18. [Fixed angle carbon fiber reinforced polymer composite plate for treatment of distal radius fractures : Pilot study on clinical applications].

    PubMed

    Behrendt, P; Kruse, E; Klüter, T; Fitschen-Oestern, S; Weuster, M; Menzdorf, L; Finn, J; Varoga, D; Seekamp, A; Müller, M; Lippross, S

    2017-02-01

    The clinical implementation of a new carbon-fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketon (PEEK) plate for distal radius fractures might offer advantageous properties over the conventional metallic devices. This includes similar elastic modulus to cortical bone, radiolucency, low artifacts on MRI scans and the lack of metal allergies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical results at 6-week and 12-month follow-up using either a new fixed angle (monoaxial) PEEK plate system or a fixed angle (polyaxial) titanium plate. We included 26 patients (mean age 59.3) with displaced fractures of the distal radius (all AO types). Radiological and functional outcomes were measured prospectively at a 6-week and 12 month follow-up. We documented no cases of hardware breakage or significant loss of the surgically achieved fracture reduction with the usage oft the new PEEK device. Operating time was 101.0 min using PEEK versus 109.3 min in titanium plates, recorded times were including preparation, draping, and postoperative processing (ns, p 0.156). At the 6-week follow up the PEEK plate showed a trend for better range of motion and functional results (DASH-score, Mayo-wrist score, VAS) with no statistical significance. Results of 12 month follow up with PEEK showed comparable results with corresponding studies examining titanium plate after this period. First experience with PEEK plate osteosynthesis demonstrate quick clinical implementation with good clinical outcome and the advantage of excellent postoperative radiological assessment. At early follow-up PEEK even showed a trend for improved functional results.

  19. Efficacy of combined physical and occupational therapy in patients with conservatively treated distal radius fracture: randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Filipova, Verica; Lonzarić, Dragan; Jesenšek Papež, Breda

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of combined physical and occupational therapy in comparison with physical therapy alone in patients with conservatively treated distal radius fracture. Sixty-one participants, conservatively treated after a distal radius fracture, were included in a randomized and single-blind trial. Group A had physical therapy only (n = 31) and group B had physical and occupational therapy (n = 30). The assessment was performed three times: upon inclusion in the study in the first week after removal of the cast (T1), immediately after the end of the rehabilitation (T2), and 1 month after completing the rehabilitation (T3). The passive wrist range-of-motion, grip strength, and Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) score were used as rehabilitation outcomes. Rehabilitation outcomes were analyzed using two-way mixed analysis of variance. The effect of time was statistically significant (p < 0.001) for all outcomes. The group (therapy) factor was statistically significant for grip strength only (p = 0.038). The interaction effect was statistically significant for rotation (p = 0.034) and grip strength (p = 0.021). A comparison between time points T3:T1 showed statistically significant difference in grip strength in favor of group B 67 % (95 % CI 60-74 %) versus group A 53 % (95 % CI 45-61 %), p = 0.024. The combined therapy resulted in a statistically significant increase of grip strength in comparison with isolated physical therapy in the period of 12-16 weeks after the fracture. This effectiveness was not confirmed with DASH score results.

  20. “Sandwich” Plating for Intra-articular Distal Radius Fractures with Volar and Dorsal Metaphyseal Comminution

    PubMed Central

    Kamath, Atul F.; Makhni, Eric; Jean-Gilles, Jerome; Zurakowski, David

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Intra-articular distal radius fractures with volar and dorsal comminution present a special challenge to the hand surgeon. Methods Ten patients formed the study cohort. All plates were low profile and stainless steel. Radiographic parameters, range of motion, and strength compared to the uninjured side were recorded. Functional outcome was evaluated by Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire and Gartland and Werley scoring system. Results Median age at surgery was 58 years (range, 24 to 86). Mean follow-up was 17 months (range, 12 to 28). According to the AO classification system, there were three type C2 and seven type C3 fractures. Median preoperative dorsal angulation was 24 deg; median postoperative dorsal angulation was 3 deg. Eighty percent (8) of the fractures also had an intra-articular step-off or gap, all of which were corrected to neutral by the procedure. Compared with the contralateral side, mean extension and flexion were 73 and 75%, respectively, pronation and supination were 95 and 88%, respectively, and grip strength and thumb pinch were 72 and 87%, respectively. Mean postoperative DASH score was 16 points, and 70% (7) of the patients had Gartland and Werley scores of good or excellent. None of the patients needed to have their plates removed, and no extensor tendon rupture was reported. Conclusions The “sandwich” plating technique is an effective method of regaining near-anatomic reconstruction of intra-articular, volarly and dorsally comminuted distal radius fractures. Results from this study demonstrate that patients can expect to regain about 80% of their range of motion and strength. Moreover, 70% of the patients will have good to excellent functional outcomes. This is the first study to examine range of motion and functional outcome of low-profile “sandwich” plating without plate removal. PMID:18780121

  1. Does Brachial Plexus Blockade Result in Improved Pain Scores After Distal Radius Fracture Fixation? A Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Galos, David K; Taormina, David P; Crespo, Alexander; Ding, David Y; Sapienza, Anthony; Jain, Sudheer; Tejwani, Nirmal C

    2016-05-01

    Distal radius fractures are very common injuries and surgical treatment for them can be painful. Achieving early pain control may help improve patient satisfaction and improve functional outcomes. Little is known about which anesthesia technique (general anesthesia versus brachial plexus blockade) is most beneficial for pain control after distal radius fixation which could significantly affect patients' postoperative course and experience. We asked: (1) Did patients receiving general anesthesia or brachial plexus blockade have worse pain scores at 2, 12, and 24 hours after surgery? (2) Was there a difference in operative suite time between patients who had general anesthesia or brachial plexus blockade, and was there a difference in recovery room time? (3) Did patients receiving general anesthesia or brachial plexus blockade have higher narcotic use after surgery? (4) Do patients receiving general anesthesia or brachial plexus blockade have higher functional assessment scores after distal radius fracture repair at 6 weeks and 12 weeks after surgery? A randomized controlled study was performed between February, 2013 and April, 2014 at a multicenter metropolitan tertiary-care referral center. Patients who presented with acute closed distal radius fractures (Orthopaedic Trauma Association 23A-C) were potentially eligible for inclusion. During the study period, 40 patients with closed, displaced, and unstable distal radius fractures were identified as meeting inclusion criteria and offered enrollment and randomization. Three patients (7.5%), all with concomitant injuries, declined to participate at the time of randomization as did one additional patient (2.5%) who chose not to participate, leaving a final sample of 36 participants. There were no dropouts after randomization, and analyses were performed according to an intention-to-treat model. Patients were randomly assigned to one of two groups, general anesthesia or brachial plexus blockade, and among the 36 patients

  2. [The MEU classification system for distal radius fractures: Prognostic and therapeutic value of an independent assessment of various fracture parameters].

    PubMed

    Laulan, J; Marteau, E; Bacle, G

    2016-12-01

    Distal radius fractures (DRF) are often complex injuries that can impact the radial metaphysis (M), the radial epiphysis (E) and the distal ulna (U). Each of these parameters can influence the outcome. In a given injury, these three DRF components are involved to a varying degree and are variably associated. The MEU classification independently analyzes the three main bone components of the fracture; thus, all possible combinations and each specific injury can be described. It accurately depicts the type and severity of the DRF. Our results show that this classification is useful for both prognosis and treatment. The criteria are simple and easy to determine, making the system reliable and reproducible. The classification system uses rigorous and validated criteria to define fracture instability: any fracture for which M>2 and/or E>2 (severe fracture) is more likely to be associated with secondary displacement, DRUJ pain, and patient dissatisfaction. Furthermore, a metaphyseal fracture entering the DRUJ (M') and the presence of a displaced ulnar fracture (U>1) affect the functional outcome, thus these two features must also be included in the classification system. Copyright © 2016 SFCM. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparison of osteoarticular allograft reconstruction with and without the Sauvé-Kapandji procedure following tumour resection in distal radius.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Jiao, Y; Guo, Z; Ji, Ch; Wang, Z

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the midterm functional and oncological outcomes of patients with distal radial tumours treated with en bloc tumour excision and osteoarticular allograft reconstruction with or without a Sauvé-Kapandji (S-K) procedure. All cases of osteoarticular allograft reconstruction with or without the S-K procedure following resection of distal radial tumours (giant-cell tumour in 13, desmoplastic fibroma in two, osteosarcoma in one and malignant fibrous histiocytoma in one) performed from 2000 to 2009 were evaluated by clinical and radiologic examinations; the complications, functional outcomes and Musculoskeletal Tumor Society (MSTS) score were recorded. Seventeen patients (seven with the S-K procedure and 10 without the S-K procedure) with an average age of 31.8 years formed the study population. The follow-up time averaged 84.7 months. All patients continued to be disease-free except one with a local relapse. The reconstructive complications included non-union of radio allograft in one, allograft fracture in five, rupture of tendon in two and degenerative joint disease in all cases. Patients with the S-K procedure had better range of rotation (P = 0.040), greater grip power (P = 0.028) and less degenerative changes (P = 0.014) than those without the S-K procedure. Patients with additional S-K procedure tended to have a higher MSTS score (P = 0.073). En bloc resection of tumour in the distal radius followed by reconstruction with an osteoarticular allograft results in satisfactory oncologic and functional outcomes. Addition of the S-K procedure could improve functional outcomes with regard to allograft reconstruction. Evidence Rating Scale for Therapeutic Studies: Level III. Copyright © 2015 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Surgical Technique of Corrective Osteotomy for Malunited Distal Radius Fracture Using the Computer-Simulated Patient Matched Instrument.

    PubMed

    Murase, Tsuyoshi

    2016-06-01

    The conventional corrective osteotomy for malunited distal radius fracture that employs dorsal approach and insertion of a trapezoidal bone graft does not always lead to precise correction or result in a satisfactory surgical outcome. Corrective osteotomy using a volar locking plate has recently become an alternative technique. In addition, the use of patient-matched instrument (PMI) via computed tomography simulation has been developed and is expected to simplify surgical procedures and improve surgical precision. The use of PMI makes it possible to accurately position screw holes prior to the osteotomy and simultaneously perform the correction and place the volar locking plate once the osteotomy is completed. The bone graft does not necessarily require a precise block form, and the problem of the extensor tendon contacting the dorsal plate is avoided. Although PMI placement and soft tissue release technique require some degree of specialized skill, they comprise a very useful surgical procedure. On the other hand, because patients with osteoporosis are at risk of peri-implant fracture, tandem ulnar shortening surgery should be considered to avoid excessive lengthening of the radius.

  5. Volar locking distal radius plates show better short-term results than other treatment options: A prospective randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Drobetz, Herwig; Koval, Lidia; Weninger, Patrick; Luscombe, Ruth; Jeffries, Paula; Ehrendorfer, Stefan; Heal, Clare

    2016-01-01

    AIM To compare the outcomes of displaced distal radius fractures treated with volar locking plates and with immediate postoperative mobilisation with the outcomes of these fractures treated with modalities that necessitate 6 wk wrist immobilisation. METHODS A prospective, randomised controlled single-centre trial was conducted with 56 patients who had a displaced radius fracture were randomised to treatment either with a volar locking plate (n = 29), or another treatment modality (n = 27; cast immobilisation with or without wires or external fixator). Outcomes were measured at 12 wk. Functional outcome scores measured were the Patient-Rated Wrist Evaluation (PRWE) Score; Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand and activities of daily living (ADLs). Clinical outcomes were wrist range of motion and grip strength. Radiographic parameters were volar inclination and ulnar variance. RESULTS Patients in the volar locking plate group had significantly better PRWE scores, ADL scores, grip strength and range of extension at three months compared with the control group. All radiological parameters were significantly better in the volar locking plate group at 3 mo. CONCLUSION The present study suggests that volar locking plates produced significantly better functional and clinical outcomes at 3 mo compared with other treatment modalities. Anatomical reduction was significantly more likely to be preserved in the plating group. Level of evidence: II. PMID:27795951

  6. Assessment of volume fraction and fabric in the distal radius using HR-pQCT.

    PubMed

    Varga, P; Zysset, P K

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the capabilities of the state of the art HR-pQCT technique to predict mineral content, volume fraction and fabric of trabecular bone structure compared to the gold standard microCT. Four cadaveric human forearms were scanned with HR-pQCT and the dissected radius epiphyses with microCT. After registering the images, bone mineral density (BMD), volume fraction (BV/TV) and fabric were computed on corresponding cubical regions of interest for both image sources. In particular, the effect of the segmentation procedure on BV/TV was analyzed. Assessment of fabric was performed with three different methods comparing their efficiency and robustness against resolution change. The results showed that in order to achieve optimal results at the lower image resolution, different filtering and thresholding approaches needed to be selected for different tasks. Therefore, to preserve BV/TV, the BMD-based volume fraction provided best match with the reference values of microCT, while in case of Mean Intercept Length (MIL) fabric a Gaussian filter and a histogram-based threshold were optimal. Using the latter, MIL was found to be more robust against resolution change than the other approaches. Additionally, we proposed a linear model for describing the mathematical transformation that the second order fabric tensor undergoes when the resolution of the input images changes. As a conclusion, we found that the investigated properties of trabecular bone structure can be adequately predicted from the lower resolution technique that is available in vivo for peripheral bones, when proper image processing and corrections are applied.

  7. Elbow dislocation with ipsilateral fracture of the distal radius associated with a brachial artery injury: A new pathological condition of traumatic origin.

    PubMed

    Trigo Lahoz, L; Lamas Gomez, C; Sarasquete Reiriz, J; de Caso Rodriguez, J; Proubasta Renart, I

    2016-11-25

    Elbow dislocation associated with ipsilateral fracture of the distal radius and a brachial artery injury is an uncommon traumatic entity. The two references of this injury combination appeared in 2015, although both authors did not realise that they were the first two cases published in the medical literature. Although mentioned in the text of the articles, no mention was made of the fracture of the distal radius in the titles. The purpose of this paper is to present three cases with this new traumatic pathological entity, explaining its pathogenetic mechanism, the treatment used, and the results obtained.

  8. External Fixator for Maintaining Reduction Before Volar Plating: A Simple Treatment Method for Association of Osteosynthesis Type C3 Distal Radius Fracture.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chun-Hao; Hsu, Chin-Jung; Wang, Ta-I; Fong, Yi-Chin; Hsu, Horng-Chaung; Lin, Tsung-Li

    2016-03-01

    Volar plating for Association of Osteosynthesis type C3 distal radius fractures involves more time and more radiation exposure because it is extremely difficult to simultaneously maintain the reduction and restore the congruity of the articular surface. The authors present a technique of maintaining the acceptable reduction by using an external fixator followed by open volar plating for restoring articular congruity. A consecutive series of 96 Association of Osteosynthesis type C3 distal radius fractures treated with the technique were retrospectively reviewed between January 2004 and December 2012. The technique makes surgery simpler and more effective, and reduces radiation exposure.

  9. Irreducible dorsal distal radius fracture-dislocation with accompanying dorsal displacement of flexor tendons and median nerve: A rare type of injury.

    PubMed

    Songür, Murat; Şahin, Ercan; Zehir, Sinan; Kalem, Mahmut

    2014-01-01

    High energy distal radius fractures may cause significant soft tissue injuries. Dorsal displacement of median nerve and flexor tendons to dorsal compartment between distal radioulnar joint was an unreported type of soft tissue injury. 35-Year male admitted following fall from height diagnosed as closed distal radius fracture with dorsal displacement. The patient had no flexion and extension of all fingers with loss of sensation. Radial artery pulse was not palpable. Radiography and CT imaging revealed distal radius fracture with dorsal displacement with dorsal carpal dislocation. After failure of closed reduction, operative treatment was performed. At surgery, flexor tendons and median nerve was found to be placed at dorsal compartment. Reduction of the soft tissues was facilitated by distraction of distal radioulnar joint. Dorsal displacement of volar structures as the result of fracture dislocation was found to be an unreported type of injury. Difficulty during reduction of dorsally displaced structures is an important feature of the case. For severely displaced and deformed distal radial fractures and fracture dislocations, threshold for operative treatment should be kept low. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. En bloc excision and autogenous fibular reconstruction for aggressive giant cell tumor of distal radius: a report of 12 cases and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Giant cell tumor (GCT) of distal radius follows a comparatively aggressive behaviour. Wide excision is the management of choice, but this creates a defect at the distal end of radius. The preffered modalities for reconstruction of such a defect include vascularized/non-vascularized bone graft, osteoarticular allografts and custom-made prosthesis. We here present our experience with wide resection and non-vascularised autogenous fibula grafting for GCT of distal radius. Materials and methods Twelve patients with a mean age of 34.7 years (21-43 years) with Campanacci Grade II/III GCT of distal radius were managed with wide excision of tumor and reconstruction with ipsilateral nonvascularised fibula, fixed with small fragment plate to the remnant of the radius. Primary autogenous iliac crest grafting was done at the fibuloradial junction in all the patients. Results Mean follow up period was 5.8 years (8.2-3.7 years). Average time for union at fibuloradial junction was 33 weeks (14-69 weeks). Mean grip strength of involved side was 71% (42-86%). The average range of movements were 52° forearm supination, 37° forearm pronation, 42° of wrist palmerflexion and 31° of wrist dorsiflexion with combined movements of 162°. Overall revised musculoskeletal tumor society (MSTS) score averaged 91.38% (76.67-93.33%) with five excellent, four good and three satisfactory results. There were no cases with graft related complications or deep infections, 3 cases with wrist subluxation, 2 cases with non union (which subsequently united with bone grafting) and 1 case of tumor recurrence. Conclusion Although complication rate is high, autogenous non-vascularised fibular autograft reconstruction of distal radius can be considered as a reasonable option after en bloc excision of Grade II/III GCT. PMID:21385393

  11. Distal radius plate of CFR-PEEK has minimal effect compared to titanium plates on bone parameters in high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Joost J A; Lataster, Arno; van Rietbergen, Bert; Arts, Jacobus J; Geusens, Piet P; van den Bergh, Joop P W; Willems, Paul C

    2017-02-27

    Carbon-fiber-reinforced poly-ether-ether-ketone (CFR-PEEK) has superior radiolucency compared to other orthopedic implant materials, e.g. titanium or stainless steel, thus allowing metal-artifact-free postoperative monitoring by computed tomography (CT). Recently, high-resolution peripheral quantitative CT (HRpQCT) proved to be a promising technique to monitor the recovery of volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD), micro-architecture and biomechanical parameters in stable conservatively treated distal radius fractures. When using HRpQCT to monitor unstable distal radius fractures that require volar distal radius plating for fixation, radiolucent CFR-PEEK plates may be a better alternative to currently used titanium plates to allow for reliable assessment. In this pilot study, we assessed the effect of a volar distal radius plate made from CFR-PEEK on bone parameters obtained from HRpQCT in comparison to two titanium plates. Plates were instrumented in separate cadaveric human fore-arms (n = 3). After instrumentation and after removal of the plates duplicate HRpQCT scans were made of the region covered by the plate. HRpQCT images were visually checked for artifacts. vBMD, micro-architectural and biomechanical parameters were calculated, and compared between the uninstrumented and instrumented radii. No visible image artifacts were observed in the CFR-PEEK plate instrumented radius, and errors in bone parameters ranged from -3.2 to 2.6%. In the radii instrumented with the titanium plates, severe image artifacts were observed and errors in bone parameters ranged between -30.2 and 67.0%. We recommend using CFR-PEEK plates in longitudinal in vivo studies that monitor the healing process of unstable distal radius fractures treated operatively by plating or bone graft ingrowth.

  12. Bone quality parameters of the distal radius as assessed by pQCT in normal and fractured women.

    PubMed

    Schneider, P; Reiners, C; Cointry, G R; Capozza, R F; Ferretti, J L

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the ability of some indicators of different aspects of bone quality (assessed by peripheral quantitative computed tomography in the distal radius) to discriminate between fractured and nonfractured individuals. The study compared 214 women aged 45-85 years, free of any bone-affecting treatment, of whom 107 had suffered a Colles' fracture in the previous 6 months and 107 did not. The determinations included bone tissue or mineral 'mass' indicators (trabecular, cortical and total volumetric mineral content, cortical bone area); bone 'density' estimates (trabecular, cortical and total volumetric mineral density), and the Cartesian (rectangular) and polar moments of inertia as influences of cross-sectional architecture on resistance to bending and torsional loads, respectively. The influences of body height, weight and age on the tomographic indicators were minimized by adjusting the data according to the partial coefficients of multiple stepwise regressions. The adjusted values of all the indicators were lower in fractured than in nonfractured groups. The prevalence of fractures was directly related to the actual values of the indicators, rather than the age or body habitus of the individuals. The significance of these differences between the assessed indicators decreased in the following order: trabecular 'mass' > trabecular 'density' > cortical or total 'mass' > cortical architecture > total or cortical 'density' indicators. Within the same type of bone, the tissue or mineral 'mass' indicators performed better than the 'density' indicators. The cortical bone density did not give useful information, probably because of technical difficulties. Odds-ratios and receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analyses confirmed those features. The selected 'cut-off' values of the indicators as determined by the ROC curves (very close to those determined by the inflexion points of the logistic reression curves) may indicate reference limits to

  13. It is not just comfort: waterproof casting increases physical functioning in children with minimally angulated distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Silva, Mauricio; Avoian, Tigran; Warnock, Robert Sean; Sadlik, Gal; Ebramzadeh, Edward

    2017-09-01

    Waterproof casting has been reported to increase patient comfort and satisfaction, and decrease skin irritation. There are no available data on the influence of waterproof casting materials on physical function in pediatric patients. Our aim was to determine whether the use of waterproof casting would result in faster recovery of physical function while maintaining similar clinical outcomes as those obtained with nonwaterproof materials. Twenty-six children with nonangulated or minimally angulated distal radius fractures were assigned randomly to initially receive a short-arm cast made of one of two optional materials: a hybrid mesh material with a waterproof lining or fiberglass with a nonwaterproof skin protector. Two weeks later, the initial cast was removed and replaced with a short-arm cast made of the alternative option. We compared the rate of fracture displacement, physical function, pain, skin changes, itchiness, and patient satisfaction. No evidence of displacement was found in either group. The mean Activities Scale for Kids - Performance (ASK-P) (physical function) score was 10% higher during the period of time when a waterproof cast was used (P=0.04). When a waterproof cast was used during the first 2 weeks of treatment, the mean total ASK-P scores were 23% higher than that when a nonwaterproof one was used during the same period of time (P=0.003). Patients who received a waterproof cast as the initial treatment reported lower functional scores overall and in almost every domain of the ASK-P once they were in a nonwaterproof one; similarly, those who received a nonwaterproof cast as the initial treatment reported higher functional scores overall and in every domain of the ASK-P once they were in a waterproof cast. Compared with a nonwaterproof cast, the use of waterproof casting resulted in comparable levels of pain, itchiness, skin irritability, and overall patient satisfaction. The results of this randomized, cross-over trial suggest that the use of

  14. Quantitative characterization of subject motion in HR-pQCT images of the distal radius and tibia.

    PubMed

    Sode, Miki; Burghardt, Andrew J; Pialat, Jean-Baptiste; Link, Thomas M; Majumdar, Sharmila

    2011-06-01

    Image quality degradation due to subject motion is a common artifact affecting in vivo high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) of bones. These artifacts confound the accuracy and reproducibility of bone density, geometry, and cortical and trabecular structure measurements. Observer-based systems for grading image quality and criteria for deciding when to repeat an acquisition and post hoc data quality control remain highly subjective and non-standardized. This study proposes an objective, quantitative technique for measuring subject motion in HR-pQCT acquisitions from raw projection data, using image similarity measures applied to parallelized projections at 0° and 180°. A total of 88 HR-pQCT exams with repeated acquisitions of the distal radius (N = 54) or distal tibia (N = 34) of 49 women (age = 59 ± 14 year) and 3 men (46 ± 2 year) were retrospectively evaluated. All images were graded from 1 (no visible motion artifacts) to 5 (severe motion artifacts) according to the manufacturer-suggested image quality grading system. In addition, to serve as the reference case without motion artifacts, two cadaveric wrist and two ankle specimens were imaged twice with repositioning. The motion-induced error was calculated as the percent difference in each bone parameter for the paired scans with and without visually apparent motion artifacts. Quantitative motion estimates (QMEs) for each motion-degraded scan were calculated using two different image similarity measures: sum of squared differences (SSD) and normalized cross-correlation (NCC). The mean values of QME(SSD) and QME(NCC) increased with the image quality grade for both radius and tibia. Quality grades were differentiated between grades 2 and 3 using QME(SSD), but not with QME(NCC), in addition to between grades 4 and 5. Both QMEs correlated significantly to the motion-induced errors in the measurements and their empirical relationship was derived. Subject motion had greater impact

  15. Success Rate and Complications of Comminuted Intra-Articular Distal Radius Fracture Treatment via Closed Reduction and Use of a Mini-External Fixator

    PubMed Central

    Karimi Nasab, Mohammad Hossein; Shayesteh Azar, Masoud; Fazel Moghaddam, Samira; Taghipour, Mehrdad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Intra-articular fracture of the distal radius is extremely common; however, the management of this fracture is controversial. Objectives: With regard to the importance of intra-articular fracture of the distal radius and the best treatment method for the fracture, we sought to assess the success rate following the treatment of comminuted intra-articular fractures of the distal radius via closed reduction and use of a mini-external fixator. Patients and Methods: This longitudinal retrospective study was undertaken at our department of orthopedics via assessment of radiographs and patient files of those referred from 2006 to 2013. Radiographic criteria included the degree of angulation and shortening of the radius. Data were analyzed using SPSS 18 software and were presented as mean ± standard deviation (SD). The significance level was set at P ≤ 0.05. Results: Overall, ≥ 2 mm shortening of the radius was seen in 28% of the patients, 53% had 2 - 5 mm radial shortening and 19% of the patients had more than 5 mm shortening of the radius. Most of the participants had acceptable outcomes. The mean angulation was 6.28 ± 2.85 degrees and the mean shortening was 3.92 ± 2.22. Thirty-nine percent of the patients had an angulation of less than 5 mm, 56% and 5% had an angulation of 5 - 10 mm and more than 10 mm, respectively. Conclusions: The results of our study showed that the mini-external fixator is a good and effective treatment option for obtaining radial length, angulation and bony union in intra-articular fractures of the distal radius. PMID:26839853

  16. Biomechanical Properties of 3-Dimensional Printed Volar Locking Distal Radius Plate: Comparison With Conventional Volar Locking Plate.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Jae; Jo, Young-Hoon; Choi, Wan-Sun; Lee, Chang-Hun; Lee, Bong-Gun; Kim, Joo-Hak; Lee, Kwang-Hyun

    2017-09-01

    This study evaluated the biomechanical properties of a new volar locking plate made by 3-dimensional printing using titanium alloy powder and 2 conventional volar locking plates under static and dynamic loading conditions that were designed to replicate those seen during fracture healing and early postoperative rehabilitation. For all plate designs, 12 fourth-generation synthetic composite radii were fitted with volar locking plates according to the manufacturers' technique after segmental osteotomy. Each specimen was first preloaded 10 N and then was loaded to 100 N, 200 N, and 300 N in phases at a rate of 2 N/s. Each construct was then dynamically loaded for 2,000 cycles of fatigue loading in each phase for a total 10,000 cycles. Finally, the constructs were loaded to a failure at a rate of 5 mm/min. All 3 plates showed increasing stiffness at higher loads. The 3-dimensional printed volar locking plate showed significantly higher stiffness at all dynamic loading tests compared with the 2 conventional volar locking plates. The 3-dimensional printed volar locking plate had the highest yield strength, which was significantly higher than those of 2 conventional volar locking plates. A 3-dimensional printed volar locking plate has similar stiffness to conventional plates in an experimental model of a severely comminuted distal radius fracture in which the anterior and posterior metaphyseal cortex are involved. These results support the potential clinical utility of 3-dimensional printed volar locking plates in which design can be modified according the fracture configuration and the anatomy of the radius. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Relationship between Bone Mineral Density and Serum Vitamin D with Low Energy Hip and Distal Radius Fractures: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Tahririan, Mohammad Ali; Motififard, Mehdi; Omidian, Ali; Aghdam, Hossein Akbari; Esmaeali, Amir

    2017-01-01

    Background: The main purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between serum vitamin D and the status of bone mineral density in patients with low-energy hip and distal radius fracture. Methods: This retrospective case-control study was performed between January 2013 and January 2014. Participants aged 55 years or older were divided to case group including 85 patients with low-energy hip fracture and 83 patients with low-energy distal radius fractures, and 82 subjects as a matched control group. Bone mineral density was measured with dual energy X-ray absorptiometry and serum sample was obtained to check vitamin D, calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase, and protein. Results: Study subjects for final evaluation consisted of 78 in hip and distal radius fracture groups and 80 in control group. There were no significant differences in the mean serum levels of calcium, phosphorus and alkaline phosphatase between the three groups. The overall mean serum level of vitamin D3 was significantly different among the three groups. Similar results were observed with hip and spine t-score between the groups. Conclusion: There is not only a direct relation between serum vitamin D and the risk of low energy hip and distal radius fractures, but also a significant relation between low bone density in hip and spine area with low serum calcium was observed. PMID:28271083

  18. Alterations of bone density, microstructure, and strength of the distal radius in male patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a case-control study with HR-pQCT.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Tracy Y; Griffith, James F; Qin, Ling; Hung, Vivian W; Fong, Tsz-Ning; Au, Sze-Ki; Li, Martin; Lam, Yvonne Yi-On; Wong, Chun-Kwok; Kwok, Anthony W; Leung, Ping-Chung; Li, Edmund K; Tam, Lai-Shan

    2014-09-01

    In this cross-sectional study, we investigated volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD), bone microstructure, and biomechanical competence of the distal radius in male patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The study cohort comprised 50 male RA patients of average age of 61.1 years and 50 age-matched healthy males. Areal BMD (aBMD) of the hip, lumbar spine, and distal radius was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. High-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) of the distal radius provided measures of cortical and trabecular vBMD, microstructure, and biomechanical indices. aBMD of the hip but not the lumbar spine or ultradistal radius was significantly lower in RA patients than controls after adjustment for body weight. Total, cortical, and trabecular vBMD at the distal radius were, on average, -3.9% to -23.2% significantly lower in RA patients, and these differences were not affected by adjustment for body weight, testosterone level, or aBMD at the ultradistal radius. Trabecular microstructure indices were, on average, -8.1% (trabecular number) to 28.7% (trabecular network inhomogeneity) significantly inferior, whereas cortical pore volume and cortical porosity index were, on average, 80.3% and 63.9%, respectively, significantly higher in RA patients. RA patients also had significantly lower whole-bone stiffness, modulus, and failure load, with lower and more unevenly distributed cortical and trabecular stress. Density and microstructure indices significantly correlated with disease activity, severity, and levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin [IL] 12p70, tumor necrosis factor, IL-6 and IL-1β). Ten RA patients had focal periosteal bone apposition most prominent at the ulnovolar aspect of the distal radius. These patients had shorter disease duration and significantly higher cortical porosity. In conclusion, HR-pQCT reveals significant alterations of bone density, microstructure, and strength of the distal radius in

  19. Use of the AO veterinary mini 'T'-plate for stabilisation of distal radius and ulna fractures in toy breed dogs.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, M H; Langley Hobbs, S J

    2005-01-01

    The use of the AO (Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen) veterinary mini 'T'-plate for stabilisation of distal radius and ulna fractures in toy breed dogs was evaluated in a retrospective study. All of the 14 dogs in the study weighed 3.5 kg or less. The AO mini 'T'-plate was used as the final means of fixation in all cases. It was used as the primary form of stabilisation in ten dogs, and in four dogs it was used at revision surgery. In all cases, of the fractures healed. Return to function was graded 'as excellent' in six cases, 'good' in four and 'fair' in two. Two dogs were lost to long-term follow up. It was concluded that the AO veterinary mini 'T'-plate is a suitable choice of implant for stabilisation of distal radius and ulna fractures in toy breed dogs, especially when the distal fragment is very small.

  20. Oldest biliary endoprosthesis in situ

    PubMed Central

    Consolo, Pierluigi; Scalisi, Giuseppe; Crinò, Stefano F; Tortora, Andrea; Giacobbe, Giuseppa; Cintolo, Marcello; Familiari, Luigi; Pallio, Socrate

    2013-01-01

    The advantages of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography over open surgery have made it the predominant method of treating patients with choledocholithiasis. After sphincterotomy, however, 10%-15% of common bile duct stones cannot be removed with a basket or balloon. The methods for managing “irretrievable stones” include surgery, mechanical lithotripsy, intraductal or extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy and biliary stenting. The case presented was a referred 82-year-old Caucasian woman with a 7-year-old plastic biliary endoprosthesis in situ. To the best of our knowledge the examined endoprosthesis is the oldest endoprosthesis in situ reported in the literature. Endoscopic biliary endoprosthesis placement remains a simple and safe procedure for patients with stones that are difficult to manage by conventional endoscopic methods and for patients who are unfit for surgery or who are high surgical risks. To date no consensus has been reached regarding how long a biliary prosthesis should remain in situ. Long-term biliary stenting may have a role in selected elderly patients if stones extraction has failed because the procedure may prevent stones impaction and cholangitis. PMID:23858381

  1. Treatment of intra-articular distal radius fractures by the volar intrafocal Kapandji method: a case series.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Guy; Chezar, Avi; Rinott, Micha; Bor, Noam; Rozen, Nimrod

    2013-06-01

    At present, the most common treatment for intra-articular fractures with a volar fragment is open reduction and internal fixation with a volar locking plate. This manuscript describes and evaluates the safety and efficacy of a modified Kapandji technique with insertion of a volar Kirschner wire for osteosynthesis of intra-articular distal radius fractures with a volar fragment. Four patients treated with the "volar Kapandji technique" completed follow-up of at least 12 (12 to 54) months. The mean age was 43 (23 to 53) years. The mean Disability of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand score was 21.7 (0 to 41) and the mean Patient-Rated Wrist Evaluation score was 12.9 (0 to 25.8). The mean loss of flexion was 13.7 (0 to 30) degrees, the mean loss of extension was 10 (0 to 30) degrees, the mean loss of supination was 0 degrees, and the mean loss of pronation was 10 (0 to 20) degrees. There was no loss in dorsal angulation, radial inclination, or radial length compared with the other hand. No early or late complications were recorded.

  2. [Stress osteotomy of the distal radius- and ulna metaphysis (Illarramendi procedure): an alternative treatment method in lunate necrosis].

    PubMed

    Schulz, C; De Carli, P; Anetzberger, H; Illarramendi, A

    1998-05-01

    The etiology of Kienböck's disease is still unknown. Many operative procedures, usually based on biomechanical considerations, are recommended. Based on known effects of core decompression procedures on bone, we present a technique of core decompression of the metaphysis of the distal radius and ulna (MCD) as an easy, alternative biologic treatment. Ten cases with a mean follow-up of 10.8 years are analyzed. All patients had significant postoperative pain relief and returned to their previous activities. At the time of follow-up, comparative motion of flexion-extension of the wrist averaged 74%, mean grip strength was 81% of the nonaffected side. Radiographic follow-up did not slow significant postoperative collapse of the lunate (p > 0.05). No correlation was observed between post-operative results and ulnar variance. MCD is a simple, low-risk procedure. Clinical and radiological outcome supports a theory of biologic rather than biomechanic mechanisms related to fracture healing, that stimulate regeneration of the avascular lunate and relieve symptoms. A primary vascular etiology of idiopathic avascular necrosis of the lunate seems to be likely.

  3. Titanium versus Stainless-Steel Plating in the Surgical Treatment of Distal Radius Fractures: A Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Shakir, Sameer; Naran, Sanjay; Neral, Mithun; Wollstein, Ronit

    2016-12-01

    Our purpose was to compare postoperative complications and rate of plate removal in titanium and stainless-steel plating of distal radius fractures (DRF). Patients following DRF were randomly fixed with titanium or stainless-steel plates using the same plating system. Complications, second surgeries, and plate prominence were documented. A total of 41 patients were treated with stainless-steel and 22 with titanium plates. Average follow-up was 60 ± 5.6 months. There was no difference in demographics, fracture characteristics, or follow-up between the groups. Plate prominence was found in 50% of radiographs (mean distance: 1.4 mm). Four titanium plates and three stainless-steel plates were removed (11%). Mean time to plate removal was 18.4 ± 4.6 months. There was no difference in removal rates between the groups. Plate material and prominence, age, fracture comminution and smoking status were not associated with plate removal. Our results support using volar and dorsal plates regardless of the plate material.

  4. Distal radius bone mineral density estimation using the filling factor of trabecular bone in the x-ray image.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sooyeul; Jeong, Ji-Wook; Lee, Jeong Won; Yoo, Done-Sik; Kim, Seunghwan

    2006-01-01

    Osteoporosis is characterized by an abnormal loss of bone mineral content, which leads to a tendency to non-traumatic bone fractures or to structural deformations of bone. Thus, bone density measurement has been considered as a most reliable method to assess bone fracture risk due to osteoporosis. In past decades, X-ray images have been studied in connection with the bone mineral density estimation. However, the estimated bone mineral density from the X-ray image can undergo a relatively large accuracy or precision error. The most relevant origin of the accuracy or precision error may be unstable X-ray image acquisition condition. Thus, we focus our attentions on finding a bone mineral density estimation method that is relatively insensitive to the X-ray image acquisition condition. In this paper, we develop a simple technique for distal radius bone mineral density estimation using the trabecular bone filling factor in the X-ray image and apply the technique to the wrist X-ray images of 20 women. Estimated bone mineral density shows a high linear correlation with a dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (r=0.87).

  5. The metaphyseal bone defect in distal radius fractures and its implication on trabecular remodeling-a histomorphometric study (case series).

    PubMed

    Lutz, Martin; Steck, Roland; Sitte, Ingrid; Rieger, Michael; Schuetz, Michael; Klestil, Thomas

    2015-05-09

    The invention of the locking plate technology leads to alterations of treatment strategies at metaphyseal fracture sites with the concept of spontaneous remodeling of trabecular bone voids. Whereas trabecular regeneration has been proven in experimental animal studies, no histologic data exist on human fracture healing with special emphasis on bone voids. In order to qualify the trabecular bone remodeling capacity in vivo, bone specimens from the metaphyseal bone void were analyzed 14 months after trauma using quantitative histomorphometry. Twenty-five patients with an unstable dorsally displaced distal radius fracture were fixed with a palmar locking plate without additional bone graft or substitute. At implant removal, specimens from the previous compression void were harvested with a trephine in a volar-dorsal direction. In 16 patients, histomorphometric analysis could be performed, comparing the dorsal trabecular network with the volar, non-compressed ultrastructure. Significant differences for bone volume/total volume (BV/TV), trabecular number (TbN) and trabecular separation (TbSp), but not for trabecular thickness (TbTh) and osteoid volume/total volume (OV/TV), were detected. Neither patient age, defect size nor gender had a significant influence on bone remodeling. The results of this study indicate that trabecular bone remodeling does not lead to pre-trauma bone quality in metaphyseal bone compression voids following reduction and application of a locking plate.

  6. Functional outcome of en bloc excision and osteoarticular allograft replacement with the Sauve-Kapandji procedure for Campanacci grade 3 giant-cell tumor of the distal radius.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Robert M; Anderson, Kurt A; Chen, James L

    2006-10-01

    Multiple options have been reported for reconstruction of Campanacci grade 3 giant-cell tumor of the distal radius after resection. In 1990, the senior author described an allograft reconstruction combined with a Sauve-Kapandji procedure after distal radius resection and reported preliminary results in 3 patients. The purpose of this study was to assess with validated patient outcome surveys the intermediate to long-term outcomes of all patients treated with this surgery and to analyze their functional results and document tumor control. All cases of distal radius osteoarticular allograft combined with the Sauve-Kapandji reconstruction for Campanacci grade 3 giant-cell tumors performed from 1986 to 2000 by a single surgeon were evaluated by clinical and radiologic examinations; the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire; the Short Form-36; and Mayo Wrist scores. Nine consecutive patients (7 women, 2 men) with an average age at follow-up evaluation of 42 years and with a Campanacci grade 3 giant-cell tumor of the distal radius formed the study population. Clinical follow-up time after reconstruction averaged 7 years. Examination showed an average of 51 degrees of extension and 19 degrees of flexion of the wrist and 63 degrees of supination and 79 degrees of pronation of the forearm. Grip strength measured in 5 patients averaged 23 kg. The Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire; the Short Form-36; and the Mayo Wrist scores averaged 15, 72, and 73, respectively. These scores indicate modest functional impact. No patient had tumor recurrence, metastases, nonunion, or proximal ulna instability. En bloc resection of a Campanacci grade 3 giant-cell tumor of the distal radius followed by reconstruction with an osteoarticular allograft and a Sauve-Kapandji procedure with autogenous bone graft results in a reasonable functional outcome at intermediate to long-term follow-up evaluation. Therapeutic IV.

  7. Clinical outcome of en-block resection and reconstruction with nonvascularized fibular autograft for the treatment of giant cell tumor of distal radius

    PubMed Central

    Taraz-Jamshidi, Mohammad H; Gharadaghi, Mohammad; Mazloumi, Seyed Mahdi; Hallaj-Moghaddam, Mohammad; Ebrahimzadeh, Mohammad H

    2014-01-01

    Background: Although giant cell tumor (GCT) is considered to be a primary benign bone tumor, its aggressive behavior makes its diagnosis and treatment, difficult and challenging. This is especially true in distal radius where GCT appears to be more aggressive and difficult to control locally. We report our clinical outcome of en-block resection and reconstruction with non-vascularized fibular autograft in 15 patients with distal radius GCT. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 15 patients with GCT (Grade 2 and 3) of distal radius who were treated with en-block resection and non-vascularized fibular autograft. Five of 15 were recurrent GCT treated initially with extended curettage; local adjuvant therapy and filling the cavity with cement or bone graft. We followed the patients for mean 7.2 years post operation (range: 4-11 years). Patients were evaluated post operation with clinical examination, plain radiography of distal radius and chest X-ray and/or computed tomography scan. Furthermore pain, function, range of motion and grip strength of the affected limb were evaluated and mMayo wrist score was assessed. Results: A total of 11 patients were women and 4 were men. Mean age of patients was 29 years (range: 19-48). We had no lung metastasis and bony recurrence occurred in one patient (6.6%). Nearly 53.3% of patients had excellent or good functional wrist score, 80% of the patients were free of pain or had only occasional pain and 80% of patients returned to work. Mean range of motion of the wrist was 77° of flexion-extension and mean grip strength was 70% of the normal hand. Conclusion: En-block resection of distal radius GCT and reconstruction with non-vascularized fibular autograft is an effective technique for treatment in local control of the tumor and preserving function of the limb. PMID:24778664

  8. Insufficiency fracture at the distal diaphysis of the radius after synovectomy combined with the Sauvé-Kapandji procedure in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Nagira, Keita; Hagino, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Yasutsugu; Kishimoto, Yuji; Teshima, Ryota

    2010-10-01

    We report here a rare case of insufficiency fracture at the distal diaphysis of the radius in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) after synovectomy combined with the Sauvé-Kapandji procedure. A 71-year-old woman who had been diagnosed with RA had been consecutively treated with several disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. She had undergone synovectomy of the right wrist combined with the Sauvé-Kapandji procedure, due to a tendon rupture, 2 years before the current presentation (first visit). Although she had not experienced any recent trauma, the wrist pain had increased after she had lifted up the bedding at the funeral of her friend about 1 month prior to her first visit. Radiographs of her right wrist taken at the second visit showed a fracture at the distal diaphysis of the radius at the level of the excision osteotomy of the distal ulna; however, no displacement of the distal fragment was observed. We immobilized her forearm in a long-arm cast. However, after 3 weeks of cast immobilization, a displacement of the distal fragment was observed. A manual reduction of the displacement was performed and the arm was again immobilized in a long-arm cast. However, 1 week later, a displaced distal fragment was again observed. Subsequently, she received an open reduction and internal fixation using a volar locking plate and screws with an autologous iliac crest bone graft. Bone union was completed by 8 months following the operation.

  9. Responsiveness of the Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire and physical measurements in outcome studies of distal radius fracture treatment.

    PubMed

    Kotsis, Sandra V; Lau, Frank H; Chung, Kevin C

    2007-01-01

    Outcomes study of distal radius fracture (DRF) treatment has been hampered by an uncertainty regarding the most appropriate outcomes assessment tool to evaluate the effectiveness of treatment. This study aimed to measure the responsiveness of the Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire (MHQ) and physical measurements to assess the value of these outcomes tools for DRF studies. Forty-seven patients prospectively completed the MHQ and physical testing at 3 months and 6 months (period 1) after open reduction and internal fixation of unstable DRFs. Thirty-seven patients prospectively completed the MHQ and physical testing at 6 months and 1 year after open reduction and internal fixation (period 2). Responsiveness to clinical change within each period was calculated with standardized response means (SRMs). In period 1, all domains of the MHQ except aesthetics significantly improved. The SRMs were large for the overall score and for the work domain. The SRMs were medium for the pain, function, and activities of daily living domains. In period 1, the grip strength, pinch strength, and active wrist range of motion measurements significantly improved and had large SRMs. In period 2, the grip- and pinch-strength tests significantly improved and the SRMs were medium, whereas the active wrist range of motion had a small SRM. Unlike other conditions such as carpal tunnel syndrome, for which the outcomes questionnaire is the most responsive measure, in DRF treatment both the MHQ and physical tests are responsive in measuring outcomes and should be reported for outcomes studies of DRFs. The MHQ and physical tests can be used for outcomes research related to DRF with the advantage of also being useful for assessing and comparing outcomes for other hand disorders.

  10. Variation in the Incidence of Distal Radius Fractures in the US Elderly as Related to Slippery Weather Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Giladi, Aviram M.; Shauver, Melissa J.; Ho, Allison; Zhong, Lin; Kim, H. Myra; Chung, Kevin C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Distal radius fractures (DRFs) are costly and debilitating injuries, especially for the elderly. DRFs often occur from falls and more commonly occur outdoors. Inclement weather, especially in the winter, may increase the risk of fall-related injuries. Small community studies have reported increased risk of DRF due to inclement winter weather; however, larger studies are lacking. Methods We analyzed a sample of 2007 Medicare claims for DRF. Weather data were collected for the date and location of each DRF in our analysis cohort. A novel slipperiness score (0–7, 7 indicates the most slippery weather) was used as a measure of the severity of slippery outdoor conditions. Negative binomial regression models evaluated the correlation between slipperiness and DRF occurrence. Results Risk of DRF was higher in winter months (Incidence Rate Ratio=1.2, 95%CI 1.14–1.26, p<0.001). Days with average temperature ≤ 32°F (IRR=1.36, 95%CI 1.19–1.54, p<0.001), snow/ice on ground at the start of the day (IRR=1.45, 95%CI 1.25–1.68, p<0.001), and freezing rain (IRR=1.24, 95%CI 1.03–1.49, p=0.025) all had an increased risk of DRF. Risk of sustaining a DRF was increased 21% on days with a slipperiness score of 5 or above (IRR=1.21, 95%CI 1.08–1.20, p=0.007). Additionally, for each increase in slipperiness score above 4, the IRR of DRF increased as well. Conclusions Weather events that create slippery walking conditions, most often occurring in winter months, result in an increased risk of DRF in the US elderly. This finding can be used to support resource allocation as well as awareness and prevention campaigns. Level of Evidence IV; retrospective cohort PMID:24469166

  11. External fixation is more suitable for intra-articular fractures of the distal radius in elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chuang; Deng, Qiang; Pu, Hongwei; Cheng, Xinchun; Kan, Yuhua; Yang, Jing; Yusufu, Aihemaitijiang; Cao, Li

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the functional outcomes, psychological impact, and complication rates associated with external fixation and volar or dorsal plating in relation to the functional parameters following treatment of intra-articular fractures of the distal radius (IFDR) in patients older than 65 years. We hypothesized that using volar or dorsal plating would improve functional outcomes, but that it would be associated with more complications and equivalent functional outcomes when compared with the external fixation group. A total of 123 consecutive patients suffering from IFDR were recruited into the study. The patients were measured for clinical, radiological, and psychosocial functioning outcomes and were followed up after 1 week and 3, 6 and 12 months. After 3 months, the plating group had better pronation (P=0.001), supination, (P=0.047) and extension (P=0.043) scores. These differences were somewhat attenuated by 6 months and disappeared at 1 year. The plating group had a greater occurrence of wound infection (P=0.043), tendonitis, (P=0.024) and additional surgery compared with the external fixation group. The only TNO-AZL Adult Quality of Life scores in the plating group that were lower than those in the external fixation group were in the “gross motor” category (walking upstairs, bending over, walking 500 yards; P=0.023). Internal fixation was more advantageous than external fixation in the early rehabilitation period; after 1 year the outcomes were similar. The plating group showed significantly higher levels of wound infection and tendonitis and had a greater need for additional surgeries. PMID:27408765

  12. The results of volar locking plate fixation for the fragility fracture population with distal radius fracture in Japanese women.

    PubMed

    Kato, Shuichi; Tatebe, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Michiro; Iwatsuki, Katsuyuki; Nishizuka, Takanobu; Hirata, Hitoshi

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether volar locking plate fixation for distal radius fracture benefits the fragility fracture population as much as it benefits the non-fragility fracture population. This matched case-control study was conducted based on a multi-center clinical prospective cohort. A comparison of treatment outcomes after volar locking plate fixation was made between females 55 years of age and older (fragility fracture population) and males less than 75 years of age (non-fragility fracture population) by evaluating clinical, radiological, and subjective outcomes using Hand20, a validated patient-rated disability instrument. A total of 170 patients were enrolled in this study. The two cohorts were matched in terms of AO fracture type. The fragility fracture population group and the non-fragility fracture population group each consisted of 50 patients. All objective measurements including wrist range of motion and radiological evaluations, but excluding grip strength, were not significantly different between the two groups. However, the Hand20 at 18 months after surgery was worse in the fragility fracture population group than in the non-fragility fracture population group. Carpal tunnel syndrome was the most frequently encountered complication in the fragility fracture population group, with one case (2%) in the non-fragility fracture population group and six cases (12%) in the fragility fracture population group, but the difference was not significant. In conclusion, there was a significant deficit in the improvement in disability despite favorable radiological and functional outcomes in fragility fracture population patients. Therefore, the fragility fracture population, especially middle-aged or older women, needs to be informed about prolonged disability and the higher risk of upper extremity disorders prior to surgery.

  13. Comparison of effects of seven treatment methods for distal radius fracture on minimizing complex regional pain syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Using network meta-analysis, we evaluated the adverse effects of the seven most common treatment methods, i.e., bridging external fixation, non-bridging external fixation, K-wire fixation, plaster fixation, dorsal plating, volar plating, and dorsal and volar plating, by their associated risk of developing complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) in distal radius fracture (DRF) patients. Material and methods Following an exhaustive search of scientific literature databases for high quality studies, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) related to our study topic were screened and selected based on stringent predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Data extracted from the selected studies were used for statistical analyses using Stata 12.0 software. Results A total of 17 RCTs, including 1658 DRF patients, were enrolled in this network meta-analysis. Among the 1658 DRF patients, 452 received bridging external fixation, 525 received non-bridging external fixation, 154 received K-wire fixation, 84 received plaster fixation, 132 received dorsal plating, 123 received volar plating, and 188 received dorsal and volar plating. When compared to bridging external fixation patients, there was no marked difference in the CRPS risk in DRF patients receiving different treatments (all p > 0.05). However, the surface under the cumulative ranking curves (SUCRA) for plaster fixation (77.0%) and non-bridging external fixation (71.3%) were significantly higher compared with the other five methods. Conclusions Our findings suggest that compared with bridging external fixation, K-wire fixation, dorsal plating, volar plating, dorsal and volar plating, plaster fixation and non-bridging external fixation might be the better treatment methods to reduce the risk of CRPS in DRF patients. PMID:28144268

  14. Computer-assisted versus non-computer-assisted preoperative planning of corrective osteotomy for extra-articular distal radius malunions: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Malunion is the most common complication of distal radius fracture. It has previously been demonstrated that there is a correlation between the quality of anatomical correction and overall wrist function. However, surgical correction can be difficult because of the often complex anatomy associated with this condition. Computer assisted surgical planning, combined with patient-specific surgical guides, has the potential to improve pre-operative understanding of patient anatomy as well as intra-operative accuracy. For patients with malunion of the distal radius fracture, this technology could significantly improve clinical outcomes that largely depend on the quality of restoration of normal anatomy. Therefore, the objective of this study is to compare patient outcomes after corrective osteotomy for distal radius malunion with and without preoperative computer-assisted planning and peri-operative patient-specific surgical guides. Methods/Design This study is a multi-center randomized controlled trial of conventional planning versus computer-assisted planning for surgical correction of distal radius malunion. Adult patients with extra-articular malunion of the distal radius will be invited to enroll in our study. After providing informed consent, subjects will be randomized to two groups: one group will receive corrective surgery with conventional preoperative planning, while the other will receive corrective surgery with computer-assisted pre-operative planning and peri-operative patient specific surgical guides. In the computer-assisted planning group, a CT scan of the affected forearm as well as the normal, contralateral forearm will be obtained. The images will be used to construct a 3D anatomical model of the defect and patient-specific surgical guides will be manufactured. Outcome will be measured by DASH and PRWE scores, grip strength, radiographic measurements, and patient satisfaction at 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. Discussion Computer

  15. Computer-assisted versus non-computer-assisted preoperative planning of corrective osteotomy for extra-articular distal radius malunions: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Leong, Natalie L; Buijze, Geert A; Fu, Eric C; Stockmans, Filip; Jupiter, Jesse B

    2010-12-14

    Malunion is the most common complication of distal radius fracture. It has previously been demonstrated that there is a correlation between the quality of anatomical correction and overall wrist function. However, surgical correction can be difficult because of the often complex anatomy associated with this condition. Computer assisted surgical planning, combined with patient-specific surgical guides, has the potential to improve pre-operative understanding of patient anatomy as well as intra-operative accuracy. For patients with malunion of the distal radius fracture, this technology could significantly improve clinical outcomes that largely depend on the quality of restoration of normal anatomy. Therefore, the objective of this study is to compare patient outcomes after corrective osteotomy for distal radius malunion with and without preoperative computer-assisted planning and peri-operative patient-specific surgical guides. This study is a multi-center randomized controlled trial of conventional planning versus computer-assisted planning for surgical correction of distal radius malunion. Adult patients with extra-articular malunion of the distal radius will be invited to enroll in our study. After providing informed consent, subjects will be randomized to two groups: one group will receive corrective surgery with conventional preoperative planning, while the other will receive corrective surgery with computer-assisted pre-operative planning and peri-operative patient specific surgical guides. In the computer-assisted planning group, a CT scan of the affected forearm as well as the normal, contralateral forearm will be obtained. The images will be used to construct a 3D anatomical model of the defect and patient-specific surgical guides will be manufactured. Outcome will be measured by DASH and PRWE scores, grip strength, radiographic measurements, and patient satisfaction at 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. Computer-assisted surgical planning, combined with

  16. What are the Functional Results, Complications, and Outcomes of Using a Custom Unipolar Wrist Hemiarthroplasty for Treatment of Grade III Giant Cell Tumors of the Distal Radius?

    PubMed

    Wang, Baichuan; Wu, Qiang; Liu, Jianxiang; Chen, Songfeng; Zhang, Zhicai; Shao, Zengwu

    2016-12-01

    A giant cell tumor (GCT) of bone presenting in the distal radius is rare, however, when they occur, Campanacci Grade III tumors can present formidable reconstructive challenges. They are associated with a high local recurrence rate with intralesional treatment, therefore approaches to reconstruct the wrist after en bloc resection warrant study. We asked: (1) What are the functional outcomes after en bloc resection and reconstruction of the wrist with a unipolar prosthesis in patients with Grade III GCT of the distal radius? (2) What complications occur with use of a unipolar prosthesis in these patients? (3) What are the oncologic outcomes with using en bloc resection and reconstruction with a custom unipolar wrist hemiarthroplasty for Grade III GCTs of the distal radius? We retrospectively analyzed 10 patients with Campanacci Grade III GCTs of the distal radius treated by a unipolar prosthesis after wide resection of the tumor between January 2008 and October 2013. During that period, all patients at our medical group who presented with a Grade III GCT of the distal radius were treated with wide resection and reconstruction using a custom unipolar implant. Pre- and postoperative pain at rest were assessed according to a 10-cm VAS score. The functional outcomes of the wrist were assessed using the modified Mayo wrist score, and the degenerative changes were evaluated radiographically by a new rating system based on the Knirk and Jupiter scale. We also analyzed tumor recurrence, metastases, and complications associated with the reconstruction procedure. All patients were available for followup at a mean of 52 months (range, 24-90 months). Although the complication rate associated with prosthetic arthroplasty was relatively high (six of 10), none of our patients experienced severe complications. Two patients reported having occasional pain of the involved wrist at the time of final followup (VAS, preoperative versus postoperative: 0 versus 3; 5 versus 2, respectively

  17. A NEW APPROACH TO PARTIALKNEE ENDOPROSTHESIS IN PRIMARY BONE SARCOMAS

    PubMed Central

    Penna, Valter; Toller, Eduardo Areas; Pinheiro, Carla; Becker, Ricardo Gehrke

    2015-01-01

    Partial knee endoprosthesis to bone sarcomas resections seems to be a good solution to treat this immature skeletal patients. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the functional score in fourteen patients, advantages and the technique indications. Methods: Retrospective analysis was done to assess in this group of patients the functional evolution and the possible complications of the procedure. 14 patients between 10 and 22 years functionally evaluated in Ennekin/ISOLS (International Society of Limb Salvage) criteria, being all of them operated in the same institution by the same surgeon. Were used distal femur and proximal tibia partial endoprosthesis. Results: General analysis demonstrated that the functional results were over than 67 percent (ISOLS criteria) in 78,6 percent of the patients, being considered excellent. 21,4 percent were considered good results, being between 50 and 66 percent. Bone storage was preserved when avoiding the adjacent segment resection. Surgery time was not prolonged in ligament reconstruction. Conclusion: Knee partial endoprosthesis are less damage to bone storage in young patients. The critics about the bad functional results are being supplied by new surgical techniques, excellent rehabilitation protocols, implants technology and the consequent learning curve. This option of treatment permits the preservation of healthy bone and provides the possibility of a revision replacement less aggressive. PMID:26998452

  18. HR-pQCT based FE analysis of the most distal radius section provides an improved prediction of Colles' fracture load in vitro.

    PubMed

    Varga, Peter; Pahr, Dieter H; Baumbach, Sebastian; Zysset, Philippe K

    2010-11-01

    The remarkable performances of high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) make the distal radius a favorable site for early diagnosis of osteoporosis and improved Colles' fracture risk assessment. The goal of this study was to investigate if the HR-pQCT-based micro finite element (μFE) method applied on specific sections of the distal radius provides improved predictions of Colles' fracture load in vitro compared to bone mineral content (BMC), bone mineral density (BMD), or histomorphometric indices. HR-pQCT based BMC, BMD, histomorphometric parameters, and μFE models of 9-mm-thick bone sections were used to predict fracture load of 21 distal radii assessed in an experimental model of Colles' fracture reported in a previous study. The analysis was performed on two bone sections: a standard one recommended by the HR-pQCT manufacturer and a second one defined just proximal to the distal subchondral plate. For most of the investigated parameters, significant differences were found between the values of the two sections. Correlations with experimental fracture load and strength were higher in the most distal section, and the difference was statistically significant for μFE strength. Furthermore, the most distal section was computed to have significantly lower ultimate force and strength by 13% and 35%, respectively, than the standard section. BMC provided a better estimation of Colles' fracture load (R(2)=0.942) than aBMD or any other histomorphometric indices. The best prediction was achieved with μFE analyses of the most distal slice (R(2)=0.962), which provided quantitatively correct ultimate forces.

  19. Type III monteggia injury with ipsilateral type II Salter Harris injury of the distal radius and ulna in a child: a case report.

    PubMed

    Williams, Huw L M; Madhusudhan, Thayur R; Sinha, Amit

    2014-03-17

    Although previously reported, ipsilateral Monteggia fracture dislocation and distal radius fracture in a child is still a rare occurrence. A full clinical examination may be difficult but should not be ignored. Full length forearm radiographs are ideal but proper limb positioning may be difficult. The injury pattern can be easily missed. A five-year-old right hand dominant Caucasian male presented with a history of fall on outstretched hand. Clinical examination was difficult and X-rays confirmed type III Monteggia fracture with an ipsilateral Type II Salter Harris injury of the distal radius and ulna. This report highlights the need for relevant examination of the wrist and elbow in young children. Appropriate radiographs must also be performed to prevent missing these injuries.

  20. Type III monteggia injury with ipsilateral type II Salter Harris injury of the distal radius and ulna in a child: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Although previously reported, ipsilateral Monteggia fracture dislocation and distal radius fracture in a child is still a rare occurrence. A full clinical examination may be difficult but should not be ignored. Full length forearm radiographs are ideal but proper limb positioning may be difficult. The injury pattern can be easily missed. Case presentation A five-year- old right hand dominant Caucasian male presented with a history of fall on outstretched hand. Clinical examination was difficult and X - rays confirmed type III Monteggia fracture with an ipsilateral Type II Salter Harris injury of the distal radius and ulna. Conclusion This report highlights the need for relevant examination of the wrist and elbow in young children. Appropriate radiographs must also be performed to prevent missing these injuries. PMID:24642065

  1. Vascularized bone grafting from the dorsal distal radius for Kienböck's disease: technique, indications and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Kakar, S; Shin, A Y

    2010-12-01

    The goals of surgical procedures in Kienböck's disease are to preserve wrist function, revascularize the necrotic lunate and maintain normal wrist kinematics when possible. Of the various treatment options, pedicled vascularized bone grafts from the dorsal distal radius permit the transfer of vascularized osseous tissue to the necrotic lunate in order to revascularize it. Vascularized bone grafting is an attractive alternative to conventional bone grafting by improving the local biological environment and thereby promoting revascularization. Recent advances in the anatomy and physiology of vascularized pedicled bone grafts have increased our ability to apply them to the treatment of Kienböck's disease. The purpose of this article is to describe the detailed vascular anatomy of the dorsal distal radius, the surgical technique, indications as well as contraindications of our preferred method of pedicled vascularized bone grafts of Kienböck's disease.

  2. Unicompartmental isoelastic resurfacing prosthesis for malignant tumor of the distal radius: A case report with a 3-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Ichihara, S; Hidalgo-Diaz, J J; Facca, S; Liverneaux, P

    2015-12-01

    We report a case of 74-year-old man in whom a unicompartmental isoelastic resurfacing prosthesis was used to reconstruct the distal radius after en-bloc resection of a malignant tumor. Thirty-nine months after the operation, on a visual analogic scale, pain score was 0/10 and range of motion was 25° of flexion, 5° of extension, 70° of pronation, 45° of supination, 20° of radial deviation, and 30° of ulnar deviation. The Quick DASH functional score was 72.72/100. With radiographic finding, the prosthesis was well-aligned, with no evidence of loosening but with slightly implant conflict with the lunate. This case report indicates that unicompartmental isoelastic resurfacing prosthesis seems a simple and reliable technique for distal radius reconstruction after en-bloc resection of malignant tumor.

  3. Deterioration of Trabecular Plate-Rod and Cortical Microarchitecture and Reduced Bone Stiffness at Distal Radius and Tibia in Postmenopausal Women with Vertebral Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ji; Stein, Emily M.; Zhou, Bin; Nishiyama, Kyle K.; Yu, Y. Eric; Shane, Elizabeth; Guo, X. Edward

    2016-01-01

    Postmenopausal women with vertebral fractures have abnormal bone microarchitecture at the distal radius and tibia by HR-pQCT, independent of areal BMD. However, whether trabecular plate and rod microarchitecture is altered in women with vertebral fractures is unknown. This study aims to characterize the abnormalities of trabecular plate and rod microarchitecture, cortex, and bone stiffness in postmenopausal women with vertebral fractures. HR-pQCT images of distal radius and tibia were acquired from 45 women with vertebral fractures and 45 control subjects without fractures. Trabecular and cortical compartments were separated by an automatic segmentation algorithm and subjected to individual trabecula segmentation (ITS) analysis for measuring trabecular plate and rod morphology and cortical bone evaluation for measuring cortical thickness and porosity, respectively. Whole bone and trabecular bone stiffness were estimated by finite element analysis. Fracture and control subjects did not differ according to age, race, body mass index, osteoporosis risk factors, or medication use. Women with vertebral fractures had thinner cortices, and larger trabecular area compared to the control group. By ITS analysis, fracture subjects had fewer trabecular plates, less axially aligned trabeculae and less trabecular connectivity at both the radius and the tibia. Fewer trabecular rods were observed at the radius. Whole bone stiffness and trabecular bone stiffness were 18% and 22% lower in women with vertebral fractures at the radius, and 19% and 16% lower at the tibia, compared with controls. The estimated failure load of the radius and tibia were also reduced in the fracture subjects by 13% and 14%, respectively. In summary, postmenopausal women with vertebral fractures had both trabecular and cortical microstructural deterioration at the peripheral skeleton, with a preferential loss of trabecular plates and cortical thinning. These microstructural deficits translated into lower

  4. Relationship between distal radius fracture malunion and arm-related disability: A prospective population-based cohort study with 1-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Distal radius fracture is a common injury and may result in substantial dysfunction and pain. The purpose was to investigate the relationship between distal radius fracture malunion and arm-related disability. Methods The prospective population-based cohort study included 143 consecutive patients above 18 years with an acute distal radius fracture treated with closed reduction and either cast (55 patients) or external and/or percutaneous pin fixation (88 patients). The patients were evaluated with the disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand (DASH) questionnaire at baseline (concerning disabilities before fracture) and one year after fracture. The 1-year follow-up included the SF-12 health status questionnaire and clinical and radiographic examinations. Patients were classified into three hypothesized severity categories based on fracture malunion; no malunion, malunion involving either dorsal tilt (>10 degrees) or ulnar variance (≥1 mm), and combined malunion involving both dorsal tilt and ulnar variance. Multivariate regression analyses were performed to determine the relationship between the 1-year DASH score and malunion and the relative risk (RR) of obtaining DASH score ≥15 and the number needed to harm (NNH) were calculated. Results The mean DASH score at one year after fracture was significantly higher by a minimum of 10 points with each malunion severity category. The RR for persistent disability was 2.5 if the fracture healed with malunion involving either dorsal tilt or ulnar variance and 3.7 if the fracture healed with combined malunion. The NNH was 2.5 (95% CI 1.8-5.4). Malunion had a statistically significant relationship with worse SF-12 score (physical health) and grip strength. Conclusion Malunion after distal radius fracture was associated with higher arm-related disability regardless of age. PMID:21232088

  5. A combined randomised and observational study of surgery for fractures in the distal radius in the elderly (CROSSFIRE)—a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Ian, A; Naylor, Justine, M; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Ivers, Rebecca; Balogh, Zsolt; Smith, Paul; Mittal, Rajat; Xuan, Wei; Howard, Kirsten; Vafa, Arezoo; Yates, Piers; Rieger, Bertram; Smith, Geoff; Elkinson, Ilia; Kim, Woosung; Chehade, Mellick; Sungaran, Jai; Latendresse, Kim; Wong, James; Viswanathan, Sameer; Richardson, Martin; Shrestha, Kush; Drobetz, Herwig; Tran, Phong; Loveridge, Jeremy; Page, Richard; Hau, Raphael; Bingham, Roger; Mulford, Jonathan; Incoll, Ian

    2017-01-01

    Fractures of the distal radius are common and occur in all age groups. The incidence is high in older populations due to osteoporosis and increased falls risk. Considerable practice variation exists in the management of distal radius fractures in older patients ranging from closed reduction with cast immobilisation to open reduction with plate fixation. Plating is currently the most common surgical treatment. While there is evidence showing no significant advantage for some forms of surgical fixation over conservative treatment, and no difference between different surgical techniques, there is a lack of evidence comparing two of the most common treatments used: closed reduction and casting versus plating. Surgical management involves significant costs and risks compared with conservative management. High-level evidence is required to address practice variation, justify costs and to provide the best clinical outcomes for patients. Methods and analysis This pragmatic, multicentre randomised comparative effectiveness trial aims to determine whether plating leads to better pain and function and is more cost-effective than closed reduction and casting of displaced distal radius fractures in adults aged 60 years and older. The trial will compare the two techniques but will also follow consenting patients who are unwilling to be randomised in a separate, observational cohort. Inclusion of non-randomised patients addresses selection bias, provides practice and outcome insights about standard care, and improves the generalisability of the results from the randomised trial. Ethics and dissemination CROSSFIRE(Combined Randomised and Observational Study of Surgery for Fractures In the distal Radius in the Elderly) was reviewed and approved by The Hunter New England HREC (HNEHREC Reference No: 16/02/17/3.04). The results of the trial will be published in a peer-reviewed journal and will be disseminated via various forms of media. Results will be incorporated in clinical

  6. Clinical outcome after plaster cast fixation for 10 days versus 1 month in reduced distal radius fractures: A prospective randomized study.

    PubMed

    Christersson, A; Larsson, S; Sandén, B

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate clinical results after plaster cast fixation for 10 days versus 1 month of moderately displaced and reduced distal radius fractures. In a prospective randomized study, 109 patients with moderately displaced and conservatively treated distal radius fractures (age ≥50 years) were randomized 10 days after reduction to either removal of the plaster cast and immediate mobilization (active group) or to continued plaster cast fixation for another 3 weeks (control group). Grip strength, pincer strength, range of motion, and pain were assessed at 1, 4, and 12 months after reduction. Clinical outcome was evaluated using three functional assessment scores at 12 months. Treatment failed in 3/54 (6%) patients in the active group. One of these patients had the plaster cast reinstituted because of feelings of instability. The fractures in the other two patients displaced severely after mobilization and were therefore treated surgically. For the remaining 51 patients in the active group, the range of wrist motion was slightly better at 1 month compared with the controls, but there were no differences in grip or pincer strength or pain at the 1-month follow-up. There were no differences between the active and control group in any outcome at 4 or 12 months, including functional assessment scores at 12 months. Treatment with mobilization 10 days after reduction of moderately displaced distal radius fractures resulted in a few treatment failures compared with none among controls. The only functional benefit for the remaining patients was a small and transient increase in range of motion at the 1-month follow-up. Plaster cast removal 10 days after reduction in moderately displaced distal radius fractures is therefore not recommended.

  7. Radiographic results after plaster cast fixation for 10 days versus 1 month in reduced distal radius fractures: a prospective randomised study.

    PubMed

    Christersson, Albert; Larsson, Sune; Östlund, Bengt; Sandén, Bengt

    2016-11-21

    The aim of this study was to examine whether reduced distal radius fractures can be treated with early mobilisation without affecting the radiographic results. In a prospective randomised study, 109 patients (mean age 65.8 (range 50-92)) with moderately displaced distal radius fractures were treated with closed reduction and plaster cast fixation for about 10 days (range 8-13 days) followed by randomisation to one of two groups: early mobilisation (n = 54, active group) or continued plaster cast fixation for another 3 weeks (n = 55, control group). For three patients in the active group (6%), treatment proved unsuccessful because of severe displacement of the fracture (n = 2) or perceived instability (n = 1). From 10 days to 1 month, i.e. the only period when the treatment differed between the two groups, the active group displaced significantly more in dorsal angulation (4.5°, p < 0.001), radial angulation (2.0°, p < 0.001) and axial compression (0.5 mm, p = 0.01) compared with the control group. However, during the entire study period (i.e. from admission to 12 months), the active group displaced significantly more than the controls only in radial angulation (3.2°, p = 0.002) and axial compression (0.7 mm, p = 0.02). Early mobilisation 10 days after reduction of moderately displaced distal radius fractures resulted in both an increased number of treatment failures and increased displacement in radial angulation and axial compression as compared with the control group. Mobilisation 10 days after reduction cannot be recommended for the routine treatment of reduced distal radius fractures. ClinicalTrail.gov, NCT02798614 . Retrospectively registered 16 June 2016.

  8. Non-operative treatment of displaced distal radius fractures leads to acceptable functional outcomes, however at the expense of 40% subsequent surgeries.

    PubMed

    Mulders, M A M; van Eerten, P V; Goslings, J C; Schep, N W L

    2017-10-01

    Although secondary displacement following closed reduction and plaster immobilisation is high, several guidelines still recommend non-operative treatment for displaced distal radius fractures with an adequate closed reduction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate functional outcomes, measured with the Disability of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire, in non-operative treated patients with displaced distal radius fractures and an adequate closed reduction confirmed on radiograph. From a retrospective database, we reviewed non-operative treated adult patients with an unilateral displaced distal radius fracture and adequate closed reduction confirmed on radiograph. The primary outcome was the DASH score at 12months. DASH scores were prospectively collected pre-trauma and at three, six and 12months. Secondary outcome was the number of subsequent surgeries due to secondary displacement or a symptomatic malunion, and their possible predictors. Additionally, the difference in DASH scores between patients who were treated due to secondary displacement and asymptomatic malunion was compared. One-hundred and sixteen patients were included. The median age was 62 years and 79% was female. Fractures were classified according to the AO/OTA classification as follows: AO/OTA type A (49%), AO/OTA type B (3%), AO/OTA type C (48%). After 12months the median DASH score was 15. Forty-six (40%) patients underwent subsequent surgery due to a secondary displacement or symptomatic malunion. No significant differences in DASH scores between patients who were treated non-operatively and patients who received subsequent surgery were found. Younger patients were more likely to undergo subsequent surgery. Patients with a symptomatic malunion had significant higher DASH scores compared to patients with secondary displacement. Non-operative treatment of displaced distal radius fractures after adequate closed reduction confirmed on radiograph leads to acceptable functional

  9. [Case-control study on transverse carpal ligament resection for the prevention of delayed carpal tunnel syndrome after distal radius fracture].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-jie; Wang, Shi-gang; Miao, Shu-juan; Su, Xia

    2011-06-01

    To investigate the effects of open reduction by palm side for the distal radius fracture and T shape plate internal fixation with simultaneous anterior transverse carpal ligament resection for the prevention of delayed carpal tunnel syndrome after operation. From March 2000 to March 2007, 32 patients (8 males and 24 females, ranging in age from 46 to 66 years) with distal radius fracture were treated with open reduction by palm side and T shape plate internal fixation with simultaneous anterior transverse carpal ligament resection; while 30 patients (7 males and 23 females,ranging in age from 45 to 65 years) only with open reduction by palm side and T shape plate internal fixation. The incidences of delayed carpal tunnel syndrome between the two groups were compared. Among 32 patients treated with open reduction by palm side and T shape plate internal fixation with anterior transverse carpal ligament resection, 3 patients had delayed carpal tunnel syndrome; while in 30 patients treated with open reduction by palm side and T shape plate internal fixation, 10 patients had delayed carpal tunnel syndrome. There was significant statistically difference (P < 0.05%). Simultaneous anterior transverse carpal ligament resection can effectively prevent the delayed carpal tunnel syndrome occurrence for the distal radius fracture with open reduction by palm side.

  10. Functional outcome of en bloc resection of a giant cell tumour of the distal radius and arthrodesis of the wrist and distal ulna using an ipsilateral double barrel segmental ulna bone graft combined with a modified Sauve-Kapandji procedure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W; Zhong, J; Li, D; Sun, C; Zhao, H; Gao, Y

    2017-05-01

    Giant cell tumour of the distal radius is a locally aggressive lesion. In this study, we performed a wrist arthrodesis reconstruction with an ipsilateral double barrel segmental ulnar bone graft combined with a modified Sauve-Kapandji procedure for a giant cell tumour of the distal radius. From January 2007 to September 2013, we followed eight patients for a mean duration of 36 months. One patient developed a recurrence and was treated by amputation; the other seven patients achieved radiological union in about 8 months. There was no wrist instability, deformation or dislocation; the mean range of motion of the forearm achieved 75° of supination and 70° of pronation. The patients could recover reasonable grip strength. This new operative procedure can excise the tumour with a low rate of recurrence, fewer functional deficits and fewer complications than reported for other procedures. IV, therapeutic.

  11. Meta-analysis for dorsally displaced distal radius fracture fixation: volar locking plate versus percutaneous Kirschner wires.

    PubMed

    Zong, Shuang-Le; Kan, Shi-Lian; Su, Li-Xin; Wang, Bin

    2015-07-15

    Dorsally displaced distal radius fractures (DDDRF) are frequent injuries in clinical practice. Traditional percutaneous Kirschner wires (K-wire) and open reduction with volar locking plate (VLP) are the two most common surgical fixation techniques used to manage DDDRF. However, there is no current consensual evidence to guide the selection of one technique over the other. Therefore, we undertook a systematic search and meta-analysis to compare clinical outcomes and complications of these two treatment approaches for DDDRF. The following electronic databases were searched by two independent reviewers, up to April 2015: PubMed, ScienceDirect and Wiley Online Library. High-quality randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing VLP and percutaneous K-wire fixation for DDDRF were identified. Pooled mean differences were calculated for the following continuous outcome variables: disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand (DASH) score, grip strength and wrist range of motion. Pooled odds ratios were calculated for rates of total postoperative complications, including superficial infection, deep infection, complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), neurological injury, tendon rupture, tenosynovitis, loss of reduction and additional surgery to remove hardware. The meta-analysis was completed using RevMan 5.3 software. Seven RCTs, with a total of 875 patients, were included in our meta-analysis. Open reduction internal fixation (ORIF) with VLP fixation provided statistically lower DASH scores, reduced the incidence of total postoperative complications and specifically lowered the rate of superficial infection, when compared, over a 1-year follow-up, to percutaneous K-wire fixation. VLP fixation also provided significantly better grip strength and range of wrist flexion and supination in the early 6-month postoperative period, compared with percutaneous K-wire fixation. ORIF with VLP fixation provided lower DASH scores and reduced total postoperative

  12. Distal radius fractures: Should we use supplemental bone grafts or substitutites in cases of severe osteoporotic or conminution?

    PubMed

    Garcés-Zarzalejo, C; Sánchez-Crespo, M R; Peñas-Díaz, F; Ayala-Gutiérrez, H; Sanz Giménez-Rico, J R; Alfonso-Fernández, A; Burgos-Palacios, V; del Canto-Álvarez, F

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the need of bone graft or bone substitutes in unstable distal radius fractures (DRF) treated with locking compression plates (LCP) PATIENTS AND METHODS: An observational and prospective study was conducted on 60 patients with DRF AO-type A3 and AO-type C3, treated surgically by LCP plates without bone grafts or substitutes. Ranges of motion in flexion (F), extension (E), pronation (P), and supination (S) were measured in the injured wrist and compared with the healthy contralateral wrist. X-ray parameters: palmar tilt (PT), radial inclination (RI), ulnar variance (UV), and radial height (RH) were calculated in the injured wrist one year after surgery and then compared, with those parameters in the healthy contralateral wrist and in the follow-up postoperative x-ray of the injured wrist. PRWE and DASH scores were used to evaluate patient satisfaction. The range of motion loss was F 12° ± 16.1°, E 9° ± 13.1°, P 2.5° ± 7.5°, and S 5°±10°, but they remained within functional parameters. Good results were also obtained in the PRWE and DASH scores (DASH 12.6 ± 14.16 and PRWE 9.5 ± 9.5). All the fractures were healed without significant collapse (IP 0.55 ± 1.7°, IR 0.31 ± 1.5°, VC 0.25±0.8mm, and AR 0.1 ± 0.9 mm). All fractures healed without problems or with significant loss of reduction. Bone graft and bone substitutes are not mandatory for treatment of unstable DRF with LCP plates. Their use increases the cost and is not exempt of morbidities. This study also reinforces the role of LCP plates in surgical treatment of unstable DRF. Copyright © 2014 SECOT. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. A distinctive type of metaphyseal chondrodysplasia with characteristic thickening of the distal ulna and radius: possible metaphyseal chondrodysplasia-Rosenberg.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yung-Seng; Elliott, Alison M; Loke, Kah-Yin; Lachman, Ralph S

    2003-05-15

    We report an 8-year-old boy with a distinctive form of metaphyseal chondrodysplasia (MCD). He presented with moderate disproportionate short stature and bony swelling of his wrists, knees, and ankles. There were severe metaphyseal abnormalities with a honeycomb appearance affecting the distal tibiae and fibulae, proximal tibiae, distal femurs, distal ulnae and radii, and both hands. His thoracolumbar spine was normal. Radiological examination of the mother's forearms revealed widening of the distal radii and short ulnae with hypoplastic distal ends. Rosenberg and Löhr [1986: Eur J Pediatr 145:40-45] reported a four-generational kindred in which affected members had thickening of the wrist proximal to the styloid process of the ulna and thickening of the dorsum sellae. Although many of the radiographic features of this patient are those of MCD-Rosenberg, the skeletal features of our patient do not appear to represent any known classified forms of MCD.

  14. The prevalence of pain and disability one year post fracture of the distal radius in a UK population: A cross sectional survey

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Catherine M; Leonardi-Bee, Jo

    2008-01-01

    Background A fracture of the distal radius is a commonly occurring fracture and accounts for a third of all fractures in the elderly. Thus far, one year estimates of pain and disability following a fracture of the distal radius have been reported on Canadian populations. The primary aim of this study is to investigate the prevalence of pain and disability in a UK population one year post fracture of the distal radius. Methods A cross-sectional survey was undertaken, of all subjects suffering a fracture of the distal radius between October 2005 and February 2006 in Nottingham, UK. Primary outcomes used were the VAS for pain and the DASH for disability. Prevalence of pain and disability were calculated and odds ratios presented for associations between demographics, pain and disability. Results 93/264 (35%) subjects responded to the questionnaire. 6 subjects did not fulfill the inclusion criteria and were excluded from further analysis. 11% of subjects reported moderate to very severe pain. 16% of subjects reported moderate to very severe disability. Statistically significant associations were found between pain medication usage for the wrist fracture and moderate to very severe pain (OR 11.20, 95% CI 2.05 – 61.23). Moderate to very severe disability was associated with older age (OR 6.53, 95%CI 1.65 – 25.90) and pain medication usage for the wrist fracture (OR 4.75, 95% CI 1.38 – 16.37). Working was associated with a reduction in risk of moderate to very severe disability (OR 0.14, 95% CI 0.03 – 0.67). Conclusion This study demonstrates that there are a small proportion of patients who are still suffering moderate to very severe pain and disability one year post fracture of the distal radius. The study also demonstrates that there are significant associations between characteristics of the patients and the level of pain and disability. This highlights the need for further research into the most appropriate management of these patients in order to reduce this

  15. Use of Relative vs Fixed Offset Distance to Define Region of Interest at the Distal Radius and Tibia in High-Resolution Peripheral Quantitative Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Shanbhogue, Vikram V; Hansen, Stinus; Halekoh, Ulrich; Brixen, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Although the region of interest in high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography, defined based on the manufacturer's protocol for in vivo scanning, provides consistency and is practically convenient, it does not take into account possible variation in morphology in the regions adjacent to the measurement site. This study aimed at compare the morphologic variation in measurements using the standard fixed offset distance to define the distal starting slice against those obtained by using a relative measurement position scaled to the individual bone length at the distal radius and tibia in normal healthy adult subjects. A total of 40 healthy adult subjects (median height, 175.3 cm; range: 150.0-196.0 cm) were included in the study. High-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography at the distal radius and tibia was performed in all subjects, the region of interest defined by, first, the standard measurement protocol, where the most distal CT slice was 9.5 mm and 22.5 mm from the end plate of the radius and tibia, respectively, and second, the relative measurement method, where the most distal CT slice was at 4% and 7% of the radial and tibial lengths, respectively. Volumetric densities and microarchitectural parameters were compared between the 2 methods. Measurements of the total and cortical volumetric density and cortical thickness at the radius and tibia and cortical porosity, trabecular volumetric density, and trabecular number at the tibia were significantly different between the 2 methods (all p < 0.001). The predicted morphologic variation with varying measurement position was substantial at both the radius (up to 34%) and the tibia (up to 36%). A lack of consideration to height (and in turn the bone lengths) in the standard patient protocol could lead to the introduction of systematic errors in radial and tibial measurements. Although this may not be of particular significance in longitudinal studies in the same individual, it

  16. Precision of bone density and micro-architectural properties at the distal radius and tibia in children: an HR-pQCT study.

    PubMed

    Kawalilak, C E; Bunyamin, A T; Björkman, K M; Johnston, J D; Kontulainen, S A

    2017-09-18

    Precision errors need to be known when monitoring bone micro-architecture in children with HR-pQCT. Precision errors for trabecular bone micro-architecture ranged from 1 to 8% when using the standard evaluation at the radius and tibia. Precision errors for cortical bone micro-architecture ranged from 1 to 11% when using the advanced cortical evaluation. Our objective was to define HR-pQCT precision errors (CV%RMS) and least significant changes (LSCs) at the distal radius and tibia in children using the standard evaluation and the advanced cortical evaluation. We scanned the distal radius (7% of ulnar length) and tibia (8% of tibia length) of 32 children (age range 8-13; mean age 11.3; SD 1.6 years) twice (1 week apart) using HR-pQCT (XtremeCT1). We calculated root-mean-squared coefficients of variation (CV%RMS) to define precision errors and LSC to identify differences required to detect change. Precision errors ranged between 1-8 and 1-5% for trabecular bone outcomes (obtained with standard evaluation) and between 1.5-11 and 0.5-6% for cortical bone outcomes (obtained with advanced cortical evaluation) at the distal radius and tibia, respectively. Related LSCs ranged between 3-21 and 3-14% for trabecular bone outcomes and between 4-30 and 2-16% for cortical bone outcomes at the distal radius and tibia, respectively. HR-pQCT precision errors were between 1 and 8% (LSC 3-21%) for trabecular bone outcomes and 1 and 11% (LSC 2-30%) for cortical bone outcomes at the radius and tibia in children. Cortical bone outcomes obtained using the advanced cortical evaluation appeared to have lower precision errors than cortical outcomes derived using the standard evaluation. These findings, combined with better-defined cortical bone contours with advanced cortical evaluation, indicate that metrics from advanced cortical evaluation should be utilized when monitoring cortical bone properties in children.

  17. Is intralesional treatment of giant cell tumor of the distal radius comparable to resection with respect to local control and functional outcome?

    PubMed

    Wysocki, Robert W; Soni, Emily; Virkus, Walter W; Scarborough, Mark T; Leurgans, Sue E; Gitelis, Steven

    2015-02-01

    A giant cell tumor is a benign locally aggressive tumor commonly seen in the distal radius with reported recurrence rates higher than tumors at other sites. The dilemma for the treating surgeon is deciding whether intralesional treatment is adequate compared with resection of the primary tumor for oncologic and functional outcomes. More information would be helpful to guide shared decision-making. We asked: (1) How will validated functional scores, ROM, and strength differ between resection versus intralesional excision for a giant cell tumor of the distal radius? (2) How will recurrence rate and reoperation differ between these types of treatments? (3) What are the complications resulting in reoperation after intralesional excision and resection procedures? (4) Is there a difference in functional outcome in treating a primary versus recurrent giant cell tumor with a resection arthrodesis? Between 1985 and 2008, 39 patients (39 wrists) were treated for primary giant cell tumor of the distal radius at two academic centers. Twenty patients underwent primary intralesional excision, typically in cases where bony architecture and cortical thickness were preserved, 15 underwent resection with radiocarpal arthrodesis, and four had resection with osteoarticular allograft. Resection regardless of reconstruction type was favored in cases with marked cortical expansion. A specific evaluation for purposes of the study with radiographs, ROM, grip strength, and pain and functional scores was performed at a minimum of 1 year for 21 patients (54%) and an additional 11 patients (28%) were available only by phone. We also assessed reoperations for recurrence and other complications via chart review. With the numbers available, there were no differences in pain or functional scores or grip strength between groups; however, there was greater supination in the intralesional excision group (p=0.037). Tumors recurred in six of 17 wrists after intralesional excision and none of the 15

  18. Reproducibility of Direct Quantitative Measures of Cortical Bone Micro-architecture of the Distal Radius and Tibia by HR-pQCT

    PubMed Central

    Burghardt, Andrew J.; Buie, Helen R.; Laib, Andres; Majumdar, Sharmila; Boyd, Steven K.

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative cortical micro-architectural endpoints are important for understanding structure-function relations in the context of fracture risk and therapeutic efficacy. This technique study details new image-processing methods to automatically segment and directly quantify cortical density, geometry, and micro-architecture from HR-pQCT images of the distal radius and tibia. An automated segmentation technique was developed to identify the periosteal and endosteal margins of the distal radius and tibia, and detect intra-cortical pore space morphologically consistent with Haversian canals. The reproducibility of direct quantitative cortical bone indices based on this method was assessed in a pooled dataset of 56 subjects with two repeat acquisitions for each site. The in vivo precision error was characterized using root mean square coefficient of variation (RMSCV%) from which, the least significant change (LSC) was calculated. Bland-Altman plots were used to characterize bias in the precision estimates. The reproducibility of cortical density and cross-sectional area measures was high (RMSCV <1% and <1.5%, respectively) with good agreement between young and elder medians. The LSC for cortical porosity (Ct.Po) was somewhat smaller in the radius (0.58%) compared with the distal tibia (0.84%) and significantly different between young and elder medians in the distal tibia (LSC: 0.75% vs. 0.92%; p<0.001). The LSC for pore diameter and distribution (Po.Dm and Po.Dm.SD) ranged between 15 and 23μm. Bland-Altman analysis revealed moderate bias for integral measures of area and volume, but not density nor microarchitecture. This study indicates HR-pQCT measures of cortical bone density and architecture can be measured in vivo with high reproducibility and limited bias across a biologically relevant range of values. The results of this study provide informative data for the design of future clinical studies of bone quality. PMID:20561906

  19. The proximal and distal position of the radius relative to the ulna through a full range of elbow flexion and forearm rotation.

    PubMed

    Quigley, R J; Robicheaux, G W; Lee, T Q

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the position of the radius relative to the ulna through a complete range of elbow flexion and forearm rotation. Twenty cadaveric upper extremities were mounted on a testing jig that allowed simultaneous control of elbow flexion and forearm rotation. The longitudinal position of the radius relative to the ulna was measured using a three-dimensional digitizer at full pronation, mid-pronation (45°), neutral (0°), mid-supination (45°) and full supination at 10°, 30°, 60°, 90° and 120° of elbow flexion. Our results showed that the radius is located distally when in supination and is located more proximally as it is rotated into pronation. The longitudinal position of the radius changes over 9 mm when moving through a complete arc of forearm rotation. The angle of elbow flexion had a secondary effect on the longitudinal position of the radius, causing changes of less than 0.8 mm.

  20. A Comparative Study between Closed Reduction and Cast Application Versus Percutaneous K- Wire Fixation for Extra-Articular Fracture Distal end of Radius

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, Raghu Begur; Narayanappa, Roshan Kumar Bangalore

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In extra-articular distal radius fractures closed reduction and casting has been the mainstay of treatment, difficulty lies in predicting and maintaining the proper reduction at final union. Percutaneous K-wire stabilization is also a widely accepted treatment option, but there is no consensus on its outcome in comparison to closed reduction and casting. Aim To evaluate the results of closed reduction and casting versus closed reduction with percutaneous K wire fixation and casting in the treatment of the distal radius extra-articular fracture with reference to the restoration of radial height, radial inclination, volar tilt of the distal articular surface and to assess the functional outcome of the same measured by the Gartland and Werley demerit scoring system. Materials and Methods Prospective study was conducted on 60 patients attending the Department of Orthopaedics, from December 2013 to May 2015 with extra-articular fractures (AO type 23-A2 and 23-A3) of distal radius and fulfilling all the inclusion and exclusion criteria. The cases were randomly divided into two equal groups of 30 patients, the first group treated by closed reduction and below elbow cast application, while the second group were treated by closed reduction percutaneous K-wire application and below elbow cast application. The radiological outcome of both groups were evaluated by measuring the Volar inclination, Radial inclination and Radial height, while the functional outcome was evaluated by the demerit scoring system of Gartland and Werley. Results The Cast application group had 13 excellent, 9 good, 7 fair and 1 poor result the mean outcome score of the group was 5.2. The K wiring group had 11 excellent, 13 good, 5 fair and 1 poor result, the mean score of the group was 5.17. The unpaired student’s t-test on the values obtained from both groups yielded a p-value of 0.9816. The mean radial height in the Cast application group was 8.033mm while the mean in the k wiring group

  1. Initial shortening and internal fixation in combination with a Sauvé-Kapandji procedure for severely comminuted fractures of the distal radius in elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Arora, R; Gabl, M; Pechlaner, S; Lutz, M

    2010-11-01

    We identified 11 women with a mean age of 74 years (65 to 81) who sustained comminuted distal radial and ulnar fractures and were treated by volar plating and slight shortening of the radius combined with a primary Sauvé-Kapandji procedure. At a mean of 46 months (16 to 58), union of distal radial fractures and arthrodesis of the distal radioulnar joint was seen in all patients. The mean shortening of the radius was 12 mm (5 to 18) compared to the contralateral side. Flexion and extension of the wrist was a mean of 54° and 50°, respectively, and the mean pronation and supination of the forearm was 82° and 86°, respectively. The final mean disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand score was 26 points. According to the Green and O'Brien rating system, eight patients had an excellent, two a good and one a fair result. The good clinical and radiological results, and the minor complications without the need for further operations related to late ulnar-sided wrist pain, justify this procedure in the elderly patient.

  2. Ilizarov hybrid external fixation for fractures of the distal radius: Part II. Internal fixation versus Ilizarov hybrid external fixation: Stability as assessed by cadaveric simulated motion testing.

    PubMed

    Dunning, C E; Lindsay, C S; Bicknell, R T; Johnson, J A; King, G J; Patterson, S D

    2001-03-01

    The in vitro stability of an Ilizarov hybrid external fixator was compared with that of a dorsal 3.5-mm AO T-plate in 8 unpaired, fresh-frozen upper extremities. A specially designed testing device that used computer-controlled pneumatic actuators was used to simulate active finger, wrist, and forearm motions by applying loads to relevant tendons. A comminuted extra-articular distal radius fracture was modelled using a dorsally based wedge osteotomy. Fracture stability was assessed using an electromagnetic tracking device to measure motion across the fracture site after randomized application of the plate and the hybrid fixator. During simulated finger and wrist motions with the forearm pronated or supinated, motion of the distal fragment with the hybrid fixator applied was comparable to or statistically less than with the AO plate applied. During simulated forearm rotation, the stability provided by the 2 fixation types was similar, although the plate allowed statistically less radial-ulnar deviation of the fragment. In this model of a 2-part extra-articular distal radius fracture, the clinically meaningful stability of the Ilizarov hybrid external fixator was comparable to that of the dorsal AO plate.

  3. Correlation between dorsovolar translation and rotation of the radius on the distal radioulnar joint during supination and pronation of forearm.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Ki; Song, Young Dong; Choy, Won Sik

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to describe the patterns of movements about radius and ulna in individual degrees of forearm rotation. And, we also determined the effect of forearm rotation on translation and rotation of the radius with reference to the ulna, and to measure the relationship between forearm rotation, translation and rotation of the radius. Computed tomography of multiple, individual forearm positions, from 90° pronation to 90° supination, was conducted in 26 healthy volunteers (mean age, 43.9 years) to measure dorsovolar translation and rotation of the radius in the DRUJ in each forearm position. The mean dorsovolar translations were within 1.99 mm at 90° pronation to -2.03 mm at 90° supination. The rotations of the radius were 71.20° at 90° pronation and -46.63° at 90° supination. There were strong correlations between degrees of forearm rotation and dorsovolar translation (r=0.861, p<0.001) and rotation of the radius (r=0.960, p<0.001), suggesting that the DRUJ, carpal joints, and rotatory laxity of the carpal ligament, especially in supination, contribute to forearm supination and pronation. These findings provide an understanding of wrist kinematics, are may be useful in reconstructive wrist surgery to achieve normal range of motion, and are may be helpful for the design of DRUJ reconstruction using prostheses.

  4. Radiographic evaluation of acute distal radius fracture stability: A comparative cadaveric study between a thermo-formable bracing system and traditional fiberglass casting.

    PubMed

    Santoni, Brandon G; Aira, Jazmine R; Diaz, Miguel A; Kyle Stoops, T; Simon, Peter

    2017-08-01

    Distal radius fractures are common musculoskeletal injuries and many can be treated non-operatively with cast immobilization. A thermo-formable brace has been developed for management of such fractures, but no data exist regarding its comparative stabilizing efficacy to fiberglass casting. A worst-case distal radius fracture was created in 6 cadaveric forearms. A radiolucent loading fixture was created to apply cantilever bending/compression loads ranging from 4.5N to 66.7N across the simulated fracture in the: (1) non-stabilized, (2) braced; and (3) casted forearms, each forearm serving as its own control. Fracture fragment translations and rotations were measured radiographically using orthogonal radiographs and a 2D-3D, CT-based transformation methodology. Under 4.5N of load in the non-stabilized condition, average sagittal plane rotation and 3D center of mass translation of the fracture fragment were 12.3° and 5.3mm, respectively. At the 4.5N load step, fragment rotation with the brace (avg. 0.0°) and cast (0.1°) reduced sagittal plane rotation compared to the non-stabilized forearm (P<0.001). There were no significant differences in measured sagittal plane fracture fragment rotations or 3D fragment translations between the brace or cast at any of the four load steps (4.5N, 22.2N, 44.5N, and 66.7N, P≥0.138). In this in vitro radiographic study utilizing 6 cadaveric forearms with simulated severe-case, unstable and comminuted distal radius fractures, the thermo-formable brace stabilized the fracture in a manner that was not radiographically or biomechanically different from traditional fiberglass casting. Study results support the use of the thermo-formable brace clinically. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The effect of local bone mineral density on the rate of mechanical failure after surgical treatment of distal radius fractures: a prospective multicentre cohort study including 249 patients.

    PubMed

    Rikli, Daniel; Daniel, Rikli; Goldhahn, Joerg; Joerg, Goldhahn; Käch, Kurt; Kurt, Käch; Voigt, Christine; Christine, Voigt; Platz, Andreas; Andreas, Platz; Hanson, Beate; Beate, Hanson

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this prospective, multicentre study was to evaluate the influence of local bone mineral density (BMD) on the rate of mechanical failure after locking plate fixation of closed distal radius fractures. Between June 2007 and April 2010, 230 women and 19 men with a mean age of 67 years were enrolled. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry measurements for BMD of the contralateral distal radius were made at 6 weeks post-surgery. Follow-up evaluations at 6 weeks, 3 months and 1 year included wrist mobility and strength as well as standard radiographs. Any local bone/fracture or implant/surgery-related complications were documented. The Disability of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH), Patient Rated Wrist Evaluation (PRWE), and EuroQol-5D scores were also recorded at the nominated time points. Nine patients were reported with mechanical failure at an estimated risk of 3.6 %. The BMD measurements were generally low for the study population with no difference between patients with (0.561 g/cm(2)) and without (0.626 g/cm(2)) mechanical failure (p = 0.148). None of the patients achieved their pre-injury functional level and quality of life status after 1 year. 1-year DASH and PRWE scores as well as the difference in maximum grip strength of the affected wrist relative to the contralateral side were significantly higher for patients with mechanical failure (p ≤ 0.036). Our study could not identify a clear association between bone mineral density status and the risk of mechanical failure. Although the risk for mechanical failure after treatment of distal radius fractures with palmar locking plates is low, these complications must be avoided to prevent negative impact on long-term patient functional and quality of life outcome.

  6. A biomechanical comparison of a biodegradable volar locked plate with two titanium volar locked plates in a distal radius fracture model.

    PubMed

    Klos, Kajetan; Rausch, Sascha; Löffler, Mike; Fröber, Rosemarie; Hofmeier, Konrad; Lenz, Mark; Hofmann, Gunther O; Mückley, Thomas

    2010-04-01

    Volar plating is commonly used in the management of distal radius fractures; bioresorbable plates have attractive features. We compared a bioresorbable plate with a latest generation and an established locked titanium plate. Twenty-four fresh-frozen radii (12 pairs) were assigned to three mean bone mineral density-matched groups of eight radii each. A standardized extraarticular distal radius fracture was created and plated using one implant type per group. Postplating stiffness and displacement were studied in a first axial-loading test (15 cycles at 250 N). Next, biodegradation was simulated by 4 weeks' immersion in phosphate-buffered saline, followed by a second axial test. Finally, the specimens underwent cyclic loading (2,400 cycles at 250 N). It is clear from the initial test that the LCP plate was significantly stiffer and displaced less than the bioresorbable plate. The outcome of the postimmersion tests is that one bioresorbable plate failed early on after 4 weeks' immersion, and the remaining bioresorbable plates and the T plates did not differ significantly. Cyclic tests conclude that the LCP plate was significantly superior to the other systems. One T plate and four of the bioresorbable plates failed, but none of the LCP plates failed. In the bioresorbable constructs, stability, time to failure, and bone mineral density were significantly correlated. The LCP plate was biomechanically superior and may be generally recommended for the volar plating of distal radius fractures. Except one plate failure, the bioresorbable plate was similar to the T plate in the quasi-static tests and should, therefore, be considered for clinical studies, with patient selection confined, initially, only to candidates with good bone stock quality.

  7. Significance of a Pronator Quadratus–Sparing Approach for Volar Locking Plate Fixation of Comminuted Intra-articular Fractures of the Distal Radius

    PubMed Central

    Itoh, Soichiro; Yumoto, Myu; Kanai, Misa; Yoshida, Wataru; Yoshioka, Taro

    2016-01-01

    Background: The preservation of the integrity of the pronator quadratus (PQ) muscle is expected to have many benefits, particularly in cases of highly comminuted intra-articular fractures of the distal radius. Therefore, we examined the significance of a PQ muscle–sparing approach for volar locking plate (VLP) fixation of these types of fractures. Methods: Sixty-five patients who sustained AO Foundation and Orthopaedic Trauma Association (AO/OTA) type C2 and C3 distal radius fractures were treated with VLP fixation using either a PQ muscle release and repair (PQ-releasing group, n = 30) or a PQ muscle–sparing approach (PQ-sparing group, n = 35). Radiographic parameters, active range of motion (ROM), percentage of the grip power of the injured hand compared with that of the opposite hand, wrist pain visual analog scale (VAS) score, and Quick Disability of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) score (disability/symptom) were evaluated monthly up to 12 months after surgery. Results: The mean VAS score was significantly lower in the PQ-sparing group at 2, 3, and 4 months postoperatively than in the PQ-releasing group. Furthermore, the mean Quick DASH score in the PQ-sparing group was significantly lower than that in the PQ-releasing group at 1 and 2 months postoperatively. There were no significant differences, however, in the other functional parameters in the groups through the observation period. Conclusions: The PQ muscle–sparing approach appears to achieve satisfactory results in patients undergoing VLP fixation of comminuted intra-articular fractures of the distal radius. PMID:27418895

  8. Outcomes and financial implications of intra-articular distal radius fractures: a comparative study of open reduction internal fixation (ORIF) with volar locking plates versus nonoperative management.

    PubMed

    Toon, Dong Hao; Premchand, Rex Antony Xavier; Sim, Jane; Vaikunthan, Rajaratnam

    2017-02-02

    To evaluate the functional and radiographic outcomes, as well as the treatment costs, of closed displaced intra-articular distal radius fractures treated with either open reduction internal fixation (ORIF) with volar locking plates or nonoperative treatment with plaster cast immobilisation. A total of 60 patients (32 receiving ORIF, 28 receiving nonoperative treatment) with closed intra-articular distal radius fractures were included. The mean age was 52.1 and 57.4, respectively. Functional and radiographic assessments were carried out at 12 months post-injury. Patients' treatment costs, median salaries and lengths of medical leave were obtained. DASH and MAYO wrist score in the ORIF group did not differ significantly from those in the nonoperative group. Apart from superior ulnar deviation in the ORIF group (p = 0.0096), differences in the range of motion of the injured wrists were not significant. Similarly, there were no significant differences in grip strength and visual analog scale for pain. Volar tilt (p = 0.0399), radial height (p = 0.0087), radial inclination (p = 0.0051) and articular step-off (p = 0.0002) were all significantly superior in the ORIF group. There was a 37-fold difference in mean treatment costs between ORIF (SGD 7951.23) and nonoperative treatment (SGD 230.52). Our study shows no difference in overall functional outcomes at 12 months for closed displaced intra-articular distal radius fractures treated with either ORIF with volar locking plates or plaster cast immobilisation, and this is independent of radiographic outcome. A longer follow-up, nevertheless, is needed to determine whether the development of post-traumatic arthritis will have an effect on function. The vast difference in treatment costs should be taken into consideration when deciding on the treatment option. Level 3.

  9. Percutaneous fixation with Kirschner wires versus volar locking plate fixation in adults with dorsally displaced fracture of distal radius: randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Costa, Matthew L; Achten, Juul; Parsons, Nick R; Rangan, Amar; Griffin, Damian; Tubeuf, Sandy; Lamb, Sarah E

    2014-08-05

    To compare the clinical effectiveness of Kirschner wire fixation with locking plate fixation for patients with a dorsally displaced fracture of the distal radius. A multicentre two arm parallel group assessor blind randomised controlled trial with 1:1 treatment allocation. 18 trauma centres in the United Kingdom. 461 adults with a dorsally displaced fracture of the distal radius within 3 cm of the radiocarpal joint that required surgical fixation. Patients were excluded if the surgeon thought that the surface of the wrist joint was so badly displaced it required open reduction. Kirschner wire fixation: wires are passed through the skin over the dorsal aspect of the distal radius and into the bone to hold the fracture in the correct anatomical position. Locking plate fixation: a locking plate is applied through an incision over the volar (palm) aspect of the wrist and secured to the bone with fixed angle locking screws. validated patient rated wrist evaluation (PRWE). This rates wrist function in two (equally weighted) sections concerning the patient's experience of pain and disability to give a score out of 100. disabilities of arm, shoulder, and hand (DASH) score, the EuroQol (EQ-5D), and complications related to the surgery. The baseline characteristics of the two groups were well balanced, and over 90% of patients completed follow-up. The wrist function of both groups of patients improved by 12 months. There was no clinically relevant difference in the patient rated wrist score at three, six, or 12 months (difference in favour of the plate group was -1.3, 95% confidence interval -4.5 to 1.8; P=0.40). Nor was there a clinically relevant difference in health related quality of life or the number of complications in each group. Contrary to the existing literature, and against the rapidly increasing use of locking plate fixation, this trial found no difference in functional outcome in patients with dorsally displaced fractures of the distal radius treated with

  10. Percutaneous fixation with Kirschner wires versus volar locking plate fixation in adults with dorsally displaced fracture of distal radius: randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Achten, Juul; Parsons, Nick R; Rangan, Amar; Griffin, Damian; Tubeuf, Sandy; Lamb, Sarah E

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To compare the clinical effectiveness of Kirschner wire fixation with locking plate fixation for patients with a dorsally displaced fracture of the distal radius. Design A multicentre two arm parallel group assessor blind randomised controlled trial with 1:1 treatment allocation. Setting 18 trauma centres in the United Kingdom. Participants 461 adults with a dorsally displaced fracture of the distal radius within 3 cm of the radiocarpal joint that required surgical fixation. Patients were excluded if the surgeon thought that the surface of the wrist joint was so badly displaced it required open reduction. Interventions Kirschner wire fixation: wires are passed through the skin over the dorsal aspect of the distal radius and into the bone to hold the fracture in the correct anatomical position. Locking plate fixation: a locking plate is applied through an incision over the volar (palm) aspect of the wrist and secured to the bone with fixed angle locking screws. Main outcome measures Primary outcome measure: validated patient rated wrist evaluation (PRWE). This rates wrist function in two (equally weighted) sections concerning the patient’s experience of pain and disability to give a score out of 100. Secondary outcomes: disabilities of arm, shoulder, and hand (DASH) score, the EuroQol (EQ-5D), and complications related to the surgery. Results The baseline characteristics of the two groups were well balanced, and over 90% of patients completed follow-up. The wrist function of both groups of patients improved by 12 months. There was no clinically relevant difference in the patient rated wrist score at three, six, or 12 months (difference in favour of the plate group was −1.3, 95% confidence interval −4.5 to 1.8; P=0.40). Nor was there a clinically relevant difference in health related quality of life or the number of complications in each group. Conclusions Contrary to the existing literature, and against the rapidly increasing use of locking plate

  11. A rare combined injury of dorsal fracture-dislocation of four carpometacarpal joints and trapezium, trapezoid and distal radius bone fractures.

    PubMed

    Touloupakis, Georgios; Stuflesser, Wilfried; Antonini, Guido; Ferrara, Fabrizio; Crippa, Cornelio; Lettera, Maria Gabriella

    2016-05-06

    Incorrect or delayed diagnosis and treatment of the carpometacarpal fracture-dislocations is often associated with poor prognosis. We present a rare case of unusual pattern of injury, involving dorsal dislocation of four ulnar carpometacarpal joints, associated with fracture of the trapezium, a burst fracture of the trapezoid  bone and an extra-articular fracture of the third distal  of the radius. The first surgical intervention was followed by unsatisfactory results, confirmed by the CT scans. A second surgery followed and an open reduction and pinning with K wires performed. Post-operative follow up lasting for nine months revealed a very good surgical outcome.

  12. Trabecular microarchitecture in established osteoporosis: relationship between vertebrae, distal radius and calcaneus by X-ray imaging texture analysis.

    PubMed

    Mallard, F; Bouvard, B; Mercier, P; Bizot, P; Cronier, P; Chappard, D

    2013-02-01

    Osteoporosis is an alteration of bone mass and microarchitecture leading to an increased risk of fractures. A radiograph is a 2D projection of the 3D bone network exposing a texture, that can be assessed by texture analysis. We compared the trabecular microarchitecture of the spine, radius and calcaneus in a series of osteoporotic cadavers. Thirty-four cadavers (11 men, 23 women), mean age 85.2±2.1years, were radiographed from T4 to L5 to identify those with vertebral fractures (FV). Non-fractured vertebrae (NFV), radius and calcaneus were taken and analyzed by densitometry, radiography and texture analysis under run-length, skeletonization of the trabeculae, and fractal geometry. Six subjects (five women, one man) were selected, mean age 82.5±5.5years. Twelve calcanei and 10 radii were taken. Two radii were excluded. The texture of NFV was significantly correlated (P<0.01) with that of the radius for horizontal run-lengths. No relationship between the texture of NFV and calcaneus was found. In the horizontal direction (perpendicular to the stress lines), the microarchitecture of NFV and radius showed a disappearance of the transverse rods anchoring the plates. Due to its particular microarchitecture, the calcaneus is not representative of the vertebral status. Bone densitometry provides no information about microarchitecture. Texture analysis of X-ray images of the radius would be a minimally invasive tool, providing an early detection of microarchitectural alterations. IV retrospective study. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Are there any differences in various polyaxial locking systems? A mechanical study of different locking screws in multidirectional angular stable distal radius plates.

    PubMed

    Mehling, Isabella; Scheifl, Rebekka; Mehler, Dorothea; Klitscher, Daniela; Hely, Hans; Rommens, Pol M

    2013-04-01

    Numerous angular stable plates for the distal radius exist, and technically based comparisons of the polyaxial locking interfaces are lacking. The aim of this mechanical study was to investigate three different locking interfaces of angular stable volar plates by cantilever bending: VA-LCP Two-Column Distal Radius Plates 2.4 mm (Synthes® GmbH, Oberdorf, Switzerland), IXOS® P4 (Martin, Tuttlingen, Germany) and VariAX™ (Stryker®, Duisburg, Germany). We assessed the strength of 0°, 5°, 10° and 15° screw locking angles and tested the bending strength from 10° to 5° angles by cyclic loading until breakage. The final setup repeated the above assessments by inclusion of four locking screws. The single screw-plate interfaces of the VA-LCP showed the highest bending moment at an angle of 0° and 5°, the IXOS® P4 at an angle of 10° and 15° and the VariAX™ when changing the insertion angle from 10° into 5°. The strength of polyaxial locking interfaces and mechanism of failure proved to be different among the examined plates.

  14. Is minimally invasive application by intramedullary osteosynthesis in comparison with volar plating real benefit in the treatment of distal radius fractures?

    PubMed Central

    Vlček, Martin; Jaganjac, Edib; Pech, Jan; Jonáš, David; Kebrle, Radek

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of the study: Can minimally invasive intramedullary osteosynthesis of distal radius fractures provide better therapeutic results than multidirectional locking plates. Retrospective study of 68 patients operated for distal radius fractures, 18 were treated with intramedullary X-screw (XSCR) fixation and 50 with the multidirectional angle-stable plate system (APTUS). The evaluation at 1-year follow-up included functional status of the wrist and hand, and radiographic findings. In the XSCR group, the functional outcomes of the treated extremity did not achieve values comparable with those of the uninjured side in any of the parameters measured. The radiographic findings did not meet the requirements of successful healing due to failure to restore an anatomical volar tilt in 22.2% cases. In the APTUS group, comparable values of the injured and the uninjured side were achieved in radial deviation, ulnar deviation, pronation, supination and grip strength. The radiographic criteria of successful healing were met by all fractures treated by locking plate osteosynthesis. Implant migration associated with secondary displacement of bone fragments was recorded in 33.3 % of the XSCR patients and only in 4.0 % of the APTUS patients. The overall evaluation show that intramedullary osteosynthesis does not produce better treatment outcomes compared with plate osteosynthesis in indicated types of fractures. PMID:24856379

  15. Risk Assessment of Tendon Attrition Following Treatment of Distal Radius Fractures With Volar Locking Plates Using Audible Crepitus and Placement of the Plate: A Prospective Clinical Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Uchiyama, Shigeharu; Komatsu, Masatoshi; Hashimoto, Shun; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2015-08-01

    To identify risk factors for tendon attrition after volar locking plate fixation of distal radius fractures. We prospectively assessed attrition of the flexor pollicis longus tendon at volar plate removal in 127 hands in 126 patients. We also evaluated preoperative lateral wrist radiographs, sonographs, and crepitus with flexor pollicis longus tendon motion and compared the demographic and radiographic characteristics of patients with and without tendon attrition. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was employed to identify the factors independently associated with tendon attrition. We found 12 cases of tendon attrition (10%) and 1 that presented with tendon rupture in our cohort. Crepitus was recognized in 14 patients (11%): 6 cases (50%) were among the 12 hands in 12 patients with tendon attrition whereas 8 (7%) were detected in the remaining 114 hands in 113 patients. Logistic regression examination revealed that audible crepitus and volar placement of the plate in lateral radiographs were independent predictors of tendon attrition. Crepitus and volar placement of hardware in lateral radiographs were independent risk factors for flexor tendon attrition after volar plating for distal radius fracture. These results may facilitate surgical decisions regarding early plate removal to prevent possible tendon rupture. Diagnostic II. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A Critical Comparison Between Two Scanning Protocols of High-Resolution Peripheral Quantitative Computed Tomography at the Distal Radius in Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Cheuk, Ka-Yee; Tam, Elisa Man-Shan; Yu, Fiona Wai-Ping; Yip, Benjamin Hon-Kei; Hung, Vivian Wing-Yin; Wang, Xiaofang; Ghasem-Zadeh, Ali; Zhu, Tracy Y; Qin, Ling; Cheng, Jack Chun-Yiu; Lam, Tsz-Ping

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) is a unique technology for assessing bone mineral density and bone microarchitecture. Currently, no universally accepted protocol for selecting the region of interest (ROI) at the distal radius has been established for growing subjects. This study aimed (1) to investigate the differences in HR-pQCT measurements of 2 different ROI protocols applied to the distal radius of healthy adolescents and (2) to identify the least common area of ROI (the least common ROI) between the protocols. Twenty-six boys and 26 girls aged between 13 and 16 yr old were recruited. Nondominant distal radius was scanned by 2 HR-pQCT protocols, namely, the "5-mm protocol," where the distal end of ROI started at 5 mm proximal to a reference line, and the "4% protocol," where the ROI started at 4% of the ulnar length proximal to another reference line. The least common ROI between the 2 protocols was identified and the slice numbering within the common ROI was determined. Bland-Altman plots were used to check the agreement of the least common ROIs between the 2 protocols. Paired t-test and Wilcoxon signed-rank test were used for analysis. In boys, significant differences between protocols were found in most parameters with the maximum difference observed in the cortical area (25.0%, p < 0.001). In girls, differences were observed only for total volumetric bone mineral density (3.6%, p = 0.032). The number of slices in the least common ROI was 66 (60.0%) and 57 (51.8%) in boys and girls, respectively. Good agreements on all HR-pQCT parameters from the least common ROI between the 2 protocols were found. Significant differences in bone parameters were noted between the 2 protocols. When comparing the 2 protocols, observed gender differences could reflect the differences in skeletal growth at the peripubertal period between genders. Least common ROI could be useful for cross-center comparisons and when merging

  17. Osteosarcoma of the distal radius treated with segmental forearm resection, hand replantation, and subsequent limb lengthening: case report.

    PubMed

    Hatano, Hiroshi; Morita, Tetsuro; Kobayashi, Hiroto; Iwabuchi, Yasuhiro

    2014-06-01

    A 9-year-old girl with osteosarcoma of the radius was treated with segmental forearm resection and replantation followed by forearm lengthening of 11 cm. At 9-year follow-up, she had recovered sensory function, and her pinch and grasp were sufficient for performing daily activities. Functional outcomes evaluated by the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire and International Society of Limb Salvage functional score system were 4/100 and 23/30, respectively.

  18. Arthroscopically assisted reduction and immobilization of intraarticular fracture of the distal end of the radius: several options of reduction and immobilization.

    PubMed

    Guofen, Chen; Doi, Kazuteru; Hattori, Yasunori; Kitajima, Izuru

    2005-06-01

    On the basis of preoperative computerized tomography scanning and newly developed 3-dimensional reconstruction technique, Doi classified intraarticular distal radial fracture to 2-, 3-, and 4-part type, according to the number of main fracture fragments in distal radial aspect. This classification system simply, as well as perspicuously, describes the status of joint surface, thereby providing an intuitionist and practical guideline for arthroscopy procedure. Between 1992 and 2003, 91 patients ranged from 21 to 79 years of age with intraarticular distal radius fracture were treated with an arthroscopically assisted operation at our department. Among these patients, 42, 34, and 15 cases were 2-, 3-, and 4-part type, accounting for 46%, 37%, and 17% respectively. Wrist arthroscopy was applied individually according to the different type, with the purpose of achieving <1mm reduction. Role of arthroscopy was postreduction examination for 14 cases, as K-wire guider in 13 cases, assisting reduction, and immobilization in 61 cases. Four of the 61 cases changed to ORIF. Immobilization methods include external fixator combined with K-wire or plate combined with pullout wire or screw. K-wire without other implant was applied to 6 cases. In 1 case, a screw was the only implant.

  19. Can Total Wrist Arthroplasty Be an Option for Treatment of Highly Comminuted Distal Radius Fracture in Selected Patients? Preliminary Experience with Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    We present two case reports of successful primary shortening of the forearm and total wrist arthroplasty (TWA) using the new angle-stable Maestro Wrist Reconstructive System (WRS) for treatment of highly comminuted distal radius fracture in selected autonomous patients. In a 56-year-old male patient with adequate bone stock, insertion of the noncemented Maestro WRS was combined with ulnar shortening osteotomy. In an 84-year-old female patient with poor osteoporotic bone stock, insertion of the radial cemented Maestro WRS was combined with ulnar head resection. Both patients could resume their work without additional surgery after TWA. At the 1-year follow-up, there were no changes in position of either implant without signs of loosening, no impingement, and no instability of the distal radioulnar joint or the distal ulna stump. All clinical parameters (DASH score, pain through VAS, and grip strength) were satisfactory. Both patients reported that they would have the same procedure again. Further experience is needed to validate this concept. PMID:26491587

  20. A trans-ethnic genome-wide association study identifies gender-specific loci influencing pediatric aBMD and BMC at the distal radius.

    PubMed

    Chesi, Alessandra; Mitchell, Jonathan A; Kalkwarf, Heidi J; Bradfield, Jonathan P; Lappe, Joan M; McCormack, Shana E; Gilsanz, Vicente; Oberfield, Sharon E; Hakonarson, Hakon; Shepherd, John A; Kelly, Andrea; Zemel, Babette S; Grant, Struan F A

    2015-09-01

    Childhood fractures are common, with the forearm being the most common site. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified more than 60 loci associated with bone mineral density (BMD) in adults but less is known about genetic influences specific to bone in childhood. To identify novel genetic factors that influence pediatric bone strength at a common site for childhood fractures, we performed a sex-stratified trans-ethnic genome-wide association study of areal BMD (aBMD) and bone mineral content (BMC) Z-scores measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry at the one-third distal radius, in a cohort of 1399 children without clinical abnormalities in bone health. We tested signals with P < 5 × 10(-6) for replication in an independent, same-age cohort of 486 Caucasian children. Two loci yielded a genome-wide significant combined P-value: rs7797976 within CPED1 in females [P = 2.4 × 10(-11), β =- 0.30 standard deviations (SD) per T allele; aBMD-Z] and rs7035284 at 9p21.3 in males (P = 1.2 × 10(-8), β = 0.28 SD per G allele; BMC-Z). Signals at the CPED1-WNT16-FAM3C locus have been previously associated with BMD at other skeletal sites in adults and children. Our result at the distal radius underscores the importance of this locus at multiple skeletal sites. The 9p21.3 locus is within a gene desert, with the nearest gene flanking each side being MIR31HG and MTAP, neither of which has been implicated in BMD or BMC previously. These findings suggest that genetic determinants of childhood bone accretion at the radius, a skeletal site that is primarily cortical bone, exist and also differ by sex.

  1. Bone geometry, density, and microarchitecture in the distal radius and tibia in adults with osteogenesis imperfecta type I assessed by high-resolution pQCT.

    PubMed

    Folkestad, Lars; Hald, Jannie Dahl; Hansen, Stinus; Gram, Jeppe; Langdahl, Bente; Abrahamsen, Bo; Brixen, Kim

    2012-06-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a hereditary disorder characterized by decreased biosynthesis or impaired morphology of type I collagen that leads to decreased bone mass and increased bone fragility. We hypothesized that patients with OI have altered bone microstructure and bone geometry. In this cross-sectional study we compared patients with type I OI to age- and gender-matched healthy controls. A total of 39 (13 men and 26 women) patients with OI, aged 53 (range, 21-77) years, and 39 controls, aged 53 (range, 21-77) years, were included in the study. Twenty-seven of the patients had been treated with bisphosphonates. High-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) at the distal radius and distal tibia and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry of total hip, femoral neck, trochanteric region, and the lumbar spine (L1-L4) were performed. The patients were shorter than the controls (159 ± 10 cm versus 170 ± 9 cm, p < 0.001), but had similar body weight. In OI, areal bone mineral density (aBMD) was 8% lower at the hip (p < 0.05) and 13% lower at the spine (p < 0.001) compared with controls. The trabecular volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) was 28% lower in radius (p < 0.001) and 38% lower in tibia (p < 0.001) in OI compared with controls. At radius, total bone area was 5% lower in OI than in controls (p < 0.05). In the tibia, cortical bone area was 18% lower in OI (p < 0.001). In both radius and tibia the number of trabeculae was lower in patients compared to the controls (35% and 38%, respectively, p < 0.001 at both sites). Furthermore, trabecular spacing was 55% higher in OI in both tibia and radius (p < 0.001 at both sites) when compared with controls. We conclude that patients with type I OI have lower aBMD, vBMD, bone area, and trabecular number when compared with healthy age- and gender-matched controls.

  2. Intra-articular Fractures of the Sigmoid Notch of the Distal Radius: Analysis of Progression to Distal Radial Ulnar Joint Arthritis and Impact on Upper Extremity Function in Surgically Treated Fractures.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Mark A; Brogan, David M; Shin, Alexander Y; Berger, Richard A

    2016-03-01

    Background Studies have established an increased risk of radiocarpal joint posttraumatic arthritis in patients with displaced intra-articular fractures of the distal radius, although this phenomenon has yet to be evaluated in the distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ). Purpose We hypothesized that patients with displaced intra-articular fractures of the sigmoid notch would have a higher prevalence of DRUJ arthritis and greater upper extremity dysfunction after operative treatment of distal radius fractures compared with fractures without sigmoid notch involvement. We also hypothesized that the degree of sigmoid notch incongruity would be correlated with the grade of DRUJ arthritis and the severity of upper extremity dysfunction. Patients and Methods A retrospective review was conducted on surgically treated patients with distal radius fractures with pre- and/or postoperative computed tomography (CT) scans. Patients were divided into groups based on presence or absence of fracture extension into the sigmoid notch. Within the sigmoid notch group, postoperative CT scans were used to measure sigmoid notch fracture step-off and diastasis (mm), as well as volar or dorsal DRUJ subluxation (%). Patients were administered Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) questionnaires and radiographs were obtained to grade DRUJ arthritis using the Kellgren-Lawrence (KL) radiographic criteria. Results Thirty-three patients were included (19 with sigmoid notch involvement and 14 without) with an average radiographic follow-up of 6.3 years (range: 3.5-10.1 years). DASH scores were available for all patients, and radiographic follow-up was available in 24 patients (73%). A trend toward higher grade of DRUJ arthritis and poorer average DASH was found in those with sigmoid notch involvement, but was not statistically different. In the sigmoid notch group there were poorer DASH scores in patients with coronal step-off > 1.0-mm (p < 0.05). There were no significant

  3. Local topological analysis at the distal radius by HR-pQCT: Application to in vivo bone microarchitecture and fracture assessment in the OFELY study.

    PubMed

    Pialat, J B; Vilayphiou, N; Boutroy, S; Gouttenoire, P J; Sornay-Rendu, E; Chapurlat, R; Peyrin, F

    2012-09-01

    High-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) is an in-vivo technique used to analyze the distal radius and tibia. It provides a voxel size of 82μm. In addition to providing the usual microarchitecture parameters, local topological analysis (LTA) depicting rod- and plate-like trabeculae may improve prediction of bone fragility. Thirty-three women with prevalent wrist fractures from the OFELY cohort were compared with age-matched controls. Bone microarchitecture, including the structural model index (SMI), was assessed by HR-pQCT, and micro-finite element analysis (μFE) was computed on trabecular bone images of the distal radius (XtremeCT, Scanco Medical AG). A new LTA method was applied to label each bone voxel as a rod, plate or node. Then the bone volume fraction (BV/TV*), the rod, plate and node ratios over bone volume (RV/BV*, PV/BV*, NV/BV*) or total volume (RV/TV*, PV/TV*, NV/TV*) and the rod to plate ratio (RV/PV*) were calculated. Associations between LTA parameters and wrist fractures were computed in a conditional logistic regression model. Multivariate models were tested to predict the μFE-derived trabecular bone stiffness. RV/TV* (OR=4.41 [1.05-18.62]) and BV/TV* (OR=6.45 [1.06-39.3]), were significantly associated with prevalent wrist fracture, after adjustment for ultra distal radius aBMD. Multivariate linear models including PV/TV* or BV/TV*+RV/PV* predicted trabecular stiffness with the same magnitude as those including SMI. Conversion from plates into rods was significantly associated with bone fragility, with a negative correlation between RV/PV* and trabecular bone stiffness (r=-0.63, p<0.0001). We conclude that our local topological analysis is feasible for a voxel size of 82μm. After further validation, it may improve bone fragility description.

  4. Biomechanical Comparison of Volar Fixed-Angle Locking Plates for AO C3 Distal Radius Fractures: Titanium Versus Stainless Steel With Compression.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Tyler; Momaya, Amit; Eberhardt, Alan; Chaudhari, Nilesh; Hunt, Thomas R

    2015-10-01

    To determine biomechanical differences between a fixed-angle locking volar titanium plate (VariAx; Stryker, Kalamazoo, MI) and a fixed-angle compression locking volar stainless steel plate (CoverLoc Volar Plate; Tornier, Amsterdam, Netherlands) in the fixation of simulated AO C3 distal radius fractures. Eighteen cadaveric upper extremities (9 matched pairs) with an average age of 54 years were tested. A 4-part AO C3 fracture pattern was created in each specimen. The fractures were reduced under direct vision and fixed with either the fixed-angle locking volar titanium plate or the fixed-angle compression locking volar stainless steel plate. Motion tracking analysis was then performed while the specimens underwent cyclic loading. Changes in displacement, rotation, load to failure, and mode of failure were recorded. The fragments, when secured with the fixed-angle compression locking stainless steel construct, demonstrated less displacement and rotation than the fragments secured with the fixed-angle locking titanium plate under physiological loading conditions. In the fixed-angle compression locking stainless steel group, aggregate displacement and rotation of fracture fragments were 5 mm and 3° less, respectively, than those for the fixed-angle locking titanium group. The differences between axial loads at mechanical failure and stiffness were not statistically significant. The compression locking stainless steel group showed no trend in mode of failure, and the locking titanium plate group failed most often by articular fixation failure (5 of 9 specimens). The fixed-angle compression locking stainless steel volar plate may result in less displacement and rotation of fracture fragments in the fixation of AO C3 distal radius fractures than fixation by the fixed-angle locking volar titanium plate. However, there were no differences between the plates in mechanical load to failure and stiffness. Fixation of distal radius AO C3 fracture patterns with the fixed

  5. Tuberculosis of Distal Radius Presenting as Cystic Lesion in a Nine-Month-Old Infant: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Anant Kumar; Bandyopadhyay, Abhishek; Kumar, Sanjay; Pal, Sumanta

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculous osteomyelitis affecting long bones is a rare form of tuberculosis. Among infants born in endemic region, often it is difficult to diagnose owing to its subtle clinical features. Here, a case of tuberculous osteomyelitis affecting the distal radial metaphysis is reported, presenting as a cystic lesion in a nine-month-old male infant. Open biopsy with curettage was performed followed by filling of the cavity with synthetic bone substitute (beta tricalcium phosphate granules). The diagnosis was confirmed by histopathological examination and demonstration of acid fast bacilli. Further treatment with anti-tubercular drugs led to clinical and radiological improvement. This case report highlights the importance of keeping tuberculosis as a differential diagnosis while dealing with cases with similar presentation in an endemic region. PMID:27790537

  6. Desmoplastic fibroma of the distal radius: an interesting case and a review of the literature and therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    Beebe, Kathleen S.; Ippolito, Joseph A.

    2016-01-01

    Desmoplastic fibromas are rare, benign, locally aggressive bone tumors, which arise primarily in patients younger than 30 years old. Historically, even with greater functional loss, en bloc or wide resection of the tumors to prevent local recurrence has been the method of choice in treatment. This article discusses the presentation of a 10-year-old male who presented with a mass in the distal forearm, after reporting difficulty in pronation and supination. The patient was ultimately treated with wide resection and allo-arthrodesis with allograft. Post-operatively, the patient has exhibited excellent recovery, including normal range of motion at the shoulder and elbow, and ability to perform all activities of daily livings despite reduced grip strength compared with the contralateral side. PMID:26767767

  7. Percutaneous Kirschner Wire fixation in distal radius metaphyseal fractures in children: does it change the overall outcome?

    PubMed Central

    Ozcan, M; Memisoglu, S; Copuroglu, C; Saridogan, K

    2010-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the effect of Kirschner wire fixation after closed reduction of radial metaphyseal fractures with high risk of redisplacement. Patients and Methods: In this retrospective study 40 cases were studied in two groups. In group 1 (n=20, average age 11.2 years), K-wire fixation was performed after closed reduction. In group 2 (n=20 average age 10.1 years), only plaster immobilization was applied following closed reduction. The compared clinical and radiological parameters were, pain, limb deformitiy, range of motion of the wrist, angulation of the fracture site, radial distal epipihyseal angle and severity of translation. Results:Redisplacement rate was 10% in group 1 and 50% in group 2. This shows, Kirschner wire fixation has a positive effect in the maintanence of the initial reduction (p<0.05). Age, gender, reduction quality had no effect on redisplacement (p>0.05). Concerning the severity of translation, the risk of redisplacement increases in stage 3 (50%- 100%) and stage 4 (>100%) fractures (p<0,05). Concomitant complete ulnar fracture has also redisplacement risk (p<0.05). Redisplacement risk increases when the distance of fracture line to epiphyseal line was between 11-20 mm (p<0.05). There was no significiant difference between two groups after last evaluation based on radiological parameters and clinical results (p>0.05). Conclusions:This study shows that Kirschner wire fixation prevents redisplacement in early follow-up of first three weeks but there is no superiority after 20 months follow-up in distal metaphyseal fractures of children. PMID:21311635

  8. Fast estimation of Colles' fracture load of the distal section of the radius by homogenized finite element analysis based on HR-pQCT.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Hadi S; Dünki, Andreas; Fabech, Jonas; Stauber, Martin; Vilayphiou, Nicolas; Pahr, Dieter; Pretterklieber, Michael; Wandel, Jasmin; Rietbergen, Bert van; Zysset, Philippe K

    2017-04-01

    Fractures of the distal section of the radius (Colles' fractures) occur earlier in life than other osteoporotic fractures. Therefore, they can be interpreted as a warning signal for later, more deleterious fractures of vertebral bodies or the femoral neck. In the past decade, the advent of HR-pQCT allowed a detailed architectural analysis of the distal radius and an automated but time-consuming estimation of its strength with linear micro-finite element (μFE) analysis. Recently, a second generation of HR-pQCT scanner (XtremeCT II, SCANCO Medical, Switzerland) with a resolution beyond 61 μm became available for even more refined biomechanical investigations in vivo. This raises the question how biomechanical outcome variables compare between the original (LR) and the new (HR) scanner resolution. Accordingly, the aim of this work was to validate experimentally a patient-specific homogenized finite element (hFE) analysis of the distal section of the human radius for the fast prediction of Colles' fracture load based on the last generation HR-pQCT. Fourteen pairs of fresh frozen forearms (mean age = 77.5±9) were scanned intact using the high (61 μm) and the low (82 μm) resolution protocols that correspond to the new and original HR-pQCT systems. From each forearm, the 20mm most distal section of the radius were dissected out, scanned with μCT at 16.4 μm and tested experimentally under compression up to failure for assessment of stiffness and ultimate load. Linear and nonlinear hFE models together with linear micro finite element (μFE) models were then generated based on the μCT and HR-pQCT reconstructions to predict the aforementioned mechanical properties of 24 sections. Precision errors of the short term reproducibility of the FE analyses were measured based on the repeated scans of 12 sections. The calculated failure loads correlated strongly with those measured in the experiments: accounting for donor as a random factor, the nonlinear hFE provided a

  9. Correction of severe wrist deformity following physeal arrest of the distal radius with the aid of a three-dimensional computer simulation.

    PubMed

    Murase, Tsuyoshi; Oka, Kunihiro; Moritomo, Hisao; Goto, Akira; Sugamoto, Kazuomi; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2009-11-01

    Growth arrest following physeal injury may result in severe limb deformity. We report a case of complex wrist deformity caused by injury to the distal radial physis resulting in radial shortening and abnormal inclination of the radial articular surface, which was successfully treated by gradual correction after computer simulation. The simulation enabled us to develop an appropriate operative plan by accurately calculating the axis of the three-dimensional (3D) deformity using computer bone models. In the simulative surgery with a full-size stereolithography bone model, an Ilizarov external fixator was applied to the radius such that its two hinges were located on the virtual axis of the deformity, which was reproduced in the actual surgery. This technique of 3D computer simulation is a useful alternative to plan accurate correction of complex limb deformities following growth arrest.

  10. Tangential View and Intraoperative Three-Dimensional Fluoroscopy for the Detection of Screw-Misplacements in Volar Plating of Distal Radius Fractures.

    PubMed

    Rausch, Sascha; Marintschev, Ivan; Graul, Isabel; Wilharm, Arne; Klos, Kajetan; Hofmann, Gunther O; Florian Gras, Marc

    2015-06-01

    Volar locking plate fixation has become the gold standard in the treatment of unstable distal radius fractures. Juxta-articular screws should be placed as close as possible to the subchondral zone, in an optimized length to buttress the articular surface and address the contralateral cortical bone. On the other hand, intra-articular screw misplacements will promote osteoarthritis, while the penetration of the contralateral bone surface may result in tendon irritations and ruptures. The intraoperative control of fracture reduction and implant positioning is limited in the common postero-anterior and true lateral two-dimensional (2D)-fluoroscopic views. Therefore, additional 2D-fluoroscopic views in different projections and intraoperative three-dimensional (3D) fluoroscopy were recently reported. Nevertheless, their utility has issued controversies. The following questions should be answered in this study; 1) Are the additional tangential view and the intraoperative 3D fluoroscopy useful in the clinical routine to detect persistent fracture dislocations and screw misplacements, to prevent revision surgery? 2) Which is the most dangerous plate hole for screw misplacement? A total of 48 patients (36 females and 13 males) with 49 unstable distal radius fractures (22 x 23 A; 2 x 23 B, and 25 x 23 C) were treated with a 2.4 mm variable angle LCP Two-Column volar distal radius plate (Synthes GmbH, Oberdorf, Switzerland) during a 10-month period. After final fixation, according to the manufactures' technique guide and control of implant placement in the two common perpendicular 2D-fluoroscopic images (postero-anterior and true lateral), an additional tangential view and intraoperative 3D fluoroscopic scan were performed to control the anatomic fracture reduction and screw placements. Intraoperative revision rates due to screw misplacements (intra-articular or overlength) were evaluated. Additionally, the number of surgeons, time and radiation-exposure, for each step of the

  11. The short-term effects of hot packs vs therapeutic whirlpool on active wrist range of motion for patients with distal radius fracture: A randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Szekeres, Mike; MacDermid, Joy C; Grewal, Ruby; Birmingham, Trevor

    2017-09-08

    Blinded randomized controlled trial. It is generally accepted that heat is beneficial for improving range of motion (ROM). However, the mechanism of action is not clearly understood, and the optimal method of heat application has not been established. To investigate the immediate effects of using a moist hot pack (MHP) vs therapeutic whirlpool bath (WB) for improving wrist ROM during a therapy session for patients with distal radius fracture. About 60 adult patients, with a mean age of 54 years in the MHP group and 53 years in the WB group, with healed distal radius fracture were randomized into 2 groups of 30. Patients in group 1 were placed in an MHP for 15 minutes during therapy. Patients in group 2 had their arm placed in a WB and were asked to perform active wrist ROM exercises for the same period. This occurred for 3 consecutive therapy visits, with wrist and forearm ROM being measured before and after heat during each visit. The multivariate analysis of variance demonstrated that the canonical variate for ROM was significantly different between groups (F[6,53] = 6.01; P < .05), indicating that patients in the WB group had a significantly larger increase in ROM than patients receiving MHP application. Both WB and MHP improved wrist ROM during therapy sessions in this study, making both these acceptable options for clinical use when the goal is to precondition a patient for other treatments. Individuals who received WB showed a statistically greater increase in wrist ROM than those receiving MHP during a therapy session, although the difference between groups may or may not be clinically important considering the small changes in ROM observed in this study. Level II. Copyright © 2017 Hanley & Belfus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Fracture severity of distal radius fractures treated with locking plating correlates with limitations in ulnar abduction and inferior health-related quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Tsitsilonis, Serafim; Machó, David; Manegold, Sebastian; Krapohl, Björn Dirk; Wichlas, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Introduction/background: The operative treatment of distal radius fractures has significantly increased after the introduction of locking plates. The aim of the present study was the evaluation of health-related quality of life, functional and radiological outcome of patients with distal radius fractures treated with the locking compression plate (LCP). Materials and methods: In the present study 128 patients (130 fractures) that were operatively treated with the LCP (2.4 mm/3.5 mm, Synthes®) were retrospectively evaluated. Mean follow-up was 22.7 months (SD 10.6). The fractures were radiographically evaluated (radial inclination, palmar tilt, ulnar variance) pre-, postoperatively and at the last follow-up visit. Range of motion (ROM) was documented. Grip strength was assessed with the use of a JAMAR dynamometer. The score for disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand (DASH) and the Gartland-Werley score (GWS) were evaluated. Health-associated quality of life was assessed with use of SF-36 Health Survey. Results: Postoperative reduction was excellent; at the last follow-up visit only minimal reduction loss was observed. Except for pronation, a statistically significant decrease of ROM was present; in most cases that was not disturbing for the patients. The injured side achieved 83.9% of grip strength of the intact side. Mean DASH was 18.9 and mean GWS was 3.5. Health-associated quality of life was generally not compromised. However, limitations in ulnar abduction correlated with inferior quality of life. Fracture severity correlated with inferior quality of life, despite the absence of correlation with the functional and radiological outcome. Complication rate was low. Conclusions: Fracture severity seems to affect ulnar abduction and therefore patient quality of life, despite almost anatomical reduction; the objective and subjective scores were in most cases excellent. Modern everyday activities, such as keyboard typing, could be associated with the present

  13. No long-term impact of low-energy distal radius fracture on health-related quality of life and global quality of life: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Rohde, Gudrun; Haugeberg, Glenn; Mengshoel, Anne Marit; Moum, Torbjorn; Wahl, Astrid K

    2009-01-01

    Background Changes in patient-reported outcomes like health related quality of life (HRQOL) and global quality of life (GQOL) in patients with low-energy distal radius fracture might be related to fracture, or be within the normal range of variation in an elderly population. Hence, the present study aims to examine: Whether patients with low-energy distal radius fracture attain their pre-fracture levels in HRQOL and GQOL one year after the fracture and compare these levels with age- and sex-matched controls; and whether objective factors predict changes in HRQOL and GQOL during the same one year period. Methods We examined 160 patients and 169 age- and sex matched controls, respectively (mean ± SD) 67 ± 9 and 66 ± 9 years of age. HRQOL was assessed by the Modified Health Assessment Questionnaire (MHAQ) and the Short–Form 36 (SF-36). The Quality of Life Scale (QOLS) assessed GQOL. Paired sample t-tests and multiple linear regression analyses were applied. Results After one year no differences were found in HRQOL (assessed as arm functions, physical health and mental health) compared to pre-fracture level in the patient group. Both patients with distal radius fracture and controls reported a reduced GQOL after one year (p < 0.001). Low-energy distal radius fracture did not predict worsened HRQOL or GQOL one year after inclusion, and few predictors of changes were identified. Worsened arm function was predicted by low BMI (B = -0.20, p = 0.019) at baseline, worsened physical health was predicted by low education (B = 1.37, p = 0.017) at baseline, and living with someone predicted worsened mental health (B = 2.85, p = 0.009) Conclusion Patients with a distal radius fracture seem to manage well despite the fracture, and distal radius fracture is not an independent predictor of worsened HRQOL and GQOL. PMID:19706174

  14. [The Effect of Activation of the Shoulder Girdle Muscles on Functional Outcomes of Rehabilitation in Patients with Surgically Treated Distal Radius Fractures].

    PubMed

    Jančíková, V; Opavský, J; Dráč, P; Krobot, A; Čižmář, I

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY The aim of the study was to assess the functional outcomes of rehabilitation in patients with surgically treated distal radius fractures in the early postoperative period. We compared the functional outcomes of patients undergoing standard rehabilitation with the group of patients whose postoperative rehabilitation was extended with shoulder girdle exercises of the affected upper limb while the wrist was immobilized. Several indices and variables were used for the assessment of the functional therapeutic outcomes of the affected wrist. MATERIAL AND METHODS Forty patients (32 females and 8 males, the mean age 60.5 years) with distal radius fractures treated by internal fixation using volar surgical approach were involved in the study between 2013-2016. The tested subjects were randomized and split into two groups according to the selected method of rehabilitation. The tested subjects with standard rehabilitation extended with shoulder girdle muscles activation were labelled as group I. It included patients (n = 20) of the mean age 59.8 (age range 42-73 years) with immobilized wrist (i.e. for 3-4 weeks) performing shoulder girdle muscles exercises at the same time. Furthermore, standard kinesiotherapy continued after their fixation was removed. The other tested group, labelled as group II (n = 20), the mean age 61.3 (variation 40-74 years of age) involved patients with distal radius fractures. Only standard rehabilitation was performed in this group as late as their forearm fixation was removed. The following indices and parameters were assessed in the early postoperative period (i.e. by 8 weeks after the fixation removal): wrist and fingers range of motion (ROM), hand grip strength (dynamometry), local swelling, pain, scores of a nine hole peg test (NHPT), and a DASH score. RESULTS After the fixation had been removed, the group I reported statistically significantly higher values of movement compared to the values of the contralateral limb in

  15. Can the use of variable-angle volar locking plates compensate for suboptimal plate positioning in unstable distal radius fractures? A biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    Hart, Adam; Collins, Melissa; Chhatwal, Dane; Steffen, Thomas; Harvey, Edward J; Martineau, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    To compare the biomechanical stability under load-to-failure conditions of optimally placed fixed-angle volar locking plates versus suboptimally placed variable-angle volar locking plates in unstable, intraarticular distal radius fractures. A Melone type 1 (AO 23-C3) fracture was created in 25 sawbone radii and plated with either a fixed-angle or variable-angle Synthes plate with identical profile. Four plate positions were tested: distal ulnar (DU, positioned distally to obtain subchondral support and ulnar to hold the lunate facet fragments), distal radial (DR, 3 mm radial to DU), proximal ulnar (PU, 3 mm proximal to DU), and proximal radial (PR, 3 mm proximal and 3 mm radial to DU). The specimens were loaded until failure as defined by a 2-mm displacement of any fracture fragment. The fixed-angle plates were tested in the DU position, whereas the variable-angle plates were tested in all 4 positions. The dorsal lunate fragment was the first to fail in every group followed by the radial styloid and volar lunate fragments, respectively. Load-to-failure, from greatest to least, occurred at the DR (278 ± 56 N), PR (277 ± 68 N), DU fixed-angle (277 ± 68 N), DU variable-angle (236 ± 31 N), and PU (202 ± 75 N) positions, respectively. Rigidity was calculated using the slope of the dorsal lunate force-displacement curve before failure (at loads 100-150 N). Rigidity was greatest at the PU position (126 ± 60 N/mm) followed by PR (125 ± 30 N/mm), DU fixed-angle (125 ± 25 N/mm), DR (122 ± 66 N/mm), and DU variable-angle (101 ± 35) positions, respectively. Univariate analysis of rigidity and load-to-failure was not significantly different between groups. In this experimental model, variable-angle screws provided a leeway of 3 mm in both the sagittal and coronal directions without sacrificing construct strength, which may considerably facilitate fixation of these difficult fractures.

  16. A comparative study of functional outcome of treatment of intra articular fractures of distal radius fixed with percutaneous Kirschner's wires vs T-plate.

    PubMed

    Khan, Jahangir Iqbal; Hussain, Faisal Nazeer; Mehmood, Tahir; Adil, Omer

    2017-01-01

    Fractures of the distal radius are common with a variable prognosis in case of intra articular extension. The available options include Plaster, External fixation, Prefabricated Splintage using Ligamentotaxis, K-wire fixation, and open reduction internal fixation with T-plate without an as yet clear advantage of one over the others. If these fractures are allowed to collapse, radial shortening, angulation and articular incongruity may cause permanent deformity and loss of function. This limited small scale study was intended to compare the functional results of treatment of these fractures with a T plate and K-wires. This was a prospective experimental study conducted at department of Orthopedics of PGMI/Lahore General Hospital, Lahore. Total 30 patients were included and randomized into two groups of 15 patients each. Group-A patients were treated with Krischner's wires and Group-B patients were treated with a T-Plate with open reduction. Informed consent was taken. Post operative follow up was done for 12 weeks for the outcome parameters (Green and O'Brien score). Mean age of patients in Group-A and B was 36.13±9.81 and 44.73±7.86 years respectively. In Group-A there were 10 male and 5 female patients and in Group-B there were 8 male and seven female patients respectively. In Group-A nine patients presented with Fernandez type-II and six patients presented with Fernandez type-III fracture. While in Group-B 10 patients presented with Fernandez type-II and five patients presented with Fernandez type-III fracture. Among Group-A patient's final outcome was excellent in 86.67% patients while in Group-B only 53.33% patients had excellent outcome at three months follow up. Percutaneous Kirschner's wires appeared to be more effective as compared to T-Plate fixation in terms of functional outcome for treating intra-articular distal radius fractures.

  17. Volar locking plate (VLP) versus non-locking plate (NLP) in the treatment of die-punch fractures of the distal radius, an observational study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiong; Hu, Chunhe; Yu, Kunlun; Bai, Jiangbo; Tian, Dehu; Xu, Yi; Zhang, Bing

    2016-10-01

    This study aims to evaluate whether volar locking plate was superior over non-locking plate in the treatment of die-punch fractures of the distal radius. A total of 57 patients with closed die-punch fractures of the distal radius were included and analyzed. Of them, 32 were treated by non-locking plate (NLP) and the remaining 25 were treated by volar locking plate (VLP). Preoperative radiographs, computer tomographs and three-dimensional reconstruction, radiographs taken at immediate postoperation and at last follow-up were extracted and evaluated. Patients' electronic medical records were inquired and related demographic and medical data were documented. The documented contents were volar tilt, radial inclination, ulnar variance, grip strength, Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) and visual analog scale (VAS) scores and complications. VLP group demonstrated a significantly reduced radial subsidence of 1.5 mm (0.7 versus 2.2 mm), during the interval of bony union (P < 0.001), compared to NLP group. Larger proportion of patients (88% versus 62.5%) in VLP group gained acceptable joint congruity (step-off <2 mm) at the final follow-up (P = 0.037). No significant differences were observed between the groups in the measurements of volar tilt, radial inclination, DASH, VAS and grip strength recovery at the last follow-up. There was a trend of fewer overall complications (5/25 versus 10/32) and major complications that required surgery interventions (1/25 versus 4/32) in VLP than NLP groups, although the difference did not approach to significance (P = 0.339, 0.372). VLP leaded to significantly better results of reduction maintainance and the final joint congruity than NLP, while reducing overall and major complications. However, the results should be treated in the context of limitations and the clinical significance of the difference required further studies to investigate. Copyright © 2016 IJS Publishing Group Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd

  18. Treatment of reducible unstable fractures of the distal radius: randomized clinical study comparing the locked volar plate and external fixator methods: study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Various treatments are available for reducible unstable fractures of the distal radius, such as closed reduction combined with fixation by external fixator (EF), and rigid internal fixation using a locked volar plate (VP). Although there are studies comparing these methods, there is no conclusive evidence indicating which treatment is best. The hypothesis of this study is that surgical treatment with a VP is more effective than EF from the standpoint of functional outcome (patient-reported). Methods/Design The study is randomized clinical trial with parallel groups and a blinded evaluator and involves the surgical interventions EF and VP. Patients will be randomly assigned (assignment ratio 1:1) using sealed opaque envelopes. This trial will include consecutive adult patients with an acute (up to 15 days) displaced, unstable fracture of the distal end of the radius of type A2, A3, C1, C2 or C3 by the Arbeitsgemeinschaft für Osteosynthesefragen–Association for the Study of Internal Fixation classification and type II or type III by the IDEAL32 classification, without previous surgical treatments of the wrist. The surgical intervention assigned will be performed by three surgical specialists familiar with the techniques described. Evaluations will be performed at 2, and 8 weeks, 3, 6 and 12 months, with the primary outcomes being measured by the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire and measurement of pain (Visual Analog Pain Scale and digital algometer). Secondary outcomes will include radiographic parameters, objective functional evaluation (goniometry and dynamometry), and the rate of complications and method failure according to the intention-to-treat principle. Final postoperative evaluations (6 and 12 months) will be performed by independent blinded evaluators. For the Student’s t-test, a difference of 10 points in the DASH score, with a 95% confidence interval, a statistical power of 80%, and 20% sampling error

  19. Effect of low appendicular lean mass, grip strength, and gait speed on the functional outcome after surgery for distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Roh, Young Hak; Noh, Jung Ho; Gong, Hyun Sik; Baek, Goo Hyun

    2017-12-01

    Patients with low appendicular lean mass plus slow gait speed or weak grip strength are at risk for poor functional recovery after surgery for distal radius fracture, even when they have similar radiologic outcomes. Loss of skeletal muscle mass and consequent loss in muscle function associate with aging, and this condition negatively impacts the activities of daily living and increases elderly individuals' frailty to falls. Thus, patients with low appendicular lean mass would show different functional recovery compared to those without this condition after surgery for distal radius fracture (DRF). This study compares the functional outcomes after surgery for DRF in patients with or without low appendicular lean mass plus slowness or weakness. A total of 157 patients older than 50 years of age with a DRF treated via volar plate fixation were enrolled in this prospective study. A definition of low appendicular lean mass with slowness or weakness was based on the consensus of the Asian Working Group for Sarcopenia. The researchers compared functional assessments (wrist range of motion and Michigan Hand Questionnaire [MHQ]) and radiographic assessments (radial inclination, volar tilt, ulnar variance, and articular congruity) 12 months after surgery between patients with and without low appendicular lean mass plus slowness or weakness. Multivariable regression analyses were performed to determine whether appendicular lean mass, grip strength, gait speed, patient demographic, or injury characteristics accounted for the functional outcomes. Patients with low appendicular lean mass plus slowness or weakness showed a significantly lower recovery of MHQ score than those in the control group throughout 12 months. There was no significant difference in the range of motion between the groups. The radiologic outcomes showed no significant difference between groups in terms of volar tilt, radial inclination, or ulnar variance. According to multivariable regression analysis

  20. Early changes in bone density, microarchitecture, bone resorption, and inflammation predict the clinical outcome 12 weeks after conservatively treated distal radius fractures: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Ursina; de Jong, Joost J; Bours, Sandrine G P; Keszei, András P; Arts, Jacobus J; Brink, Peter R G; Menheere, Paul; van Geel, Tineke A C M; van Rietbergen, Bert; van den Bergh, Joop P W; Geusens, Piet P; Willems, Paul C

    2014-09-01

    Fracture healing is an active process with early changes in bone and inflammation. We performed an exploratory study evaluating the association between early changes in densitometric, structural, biomechanical, and biochemical bone parameters during the first weeks of fracture healing and wrist-specific pain and disability at 12 weeks in postmenopausal women with a conservatively treated distal radius fracture. Eighteen patients (aged 64 ± 8 years) were evaluated at 1 to 2 and 3 to 4 weeks postfracture, using high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT), micro-finite element analysis, serum procollagen type-I N-terminal propeptide (P1NP), carboxy-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP), and high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP). After 12 weeks, patients rated their pain and disability using Patient Rated Wrist Evaluation (PRWE) questionnaire. Additionally, Quick Disability of the Arm Shoulder and Hand (QuickDASH) questionnaire and active wrist range of motion was evaluated. Linear regression models were used to study the relationship between changes in bone parameters and in hsCRP from visit 1 to 2 and PRWE score after 12 weeks. A lower PRWE outcome, indicating better outcome, was significantly related to an early increase in trabecular bone mineral density (BMD) (β -0.96 [95% CI -1.75 to -0.16], R(2)  = 0.37), in torsional stiffness (-0.14 [-0.28 to -0.004], R(2)  = 0.31), and to an early decrease in trabecular separation (209 [15 to 402], R(2)  = 0.33) and in ICTP (12.1 [0.0 to 24.1], R(2)  = 0.34). Similar results were found for QuickDASH. Higher total dorsal and palmar flexion range of motion was significantly related to early increase in hsCRP (9.62 [3.90 to 15.34], R(2)  = 0.52). This exploratory study indicates that the assessment of early changes in trabecular BMD, trabecular separation, calculated torsional stiffness, bone resorption marker ICTP, and hsCRP after a distal radius fracture provides

  1. Deficits in distal radius bone strength, density and microstructure are associated with forearm fractures in girls: an HR-pQCTstudy

    PubMed Central

    Määttä, M.; Macdonald, H. M.; Mulpuri, K.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Forearm fractures are common during growth. We studied bone strength in youth with a recent forearm fracture. In girls, suboptimal bone strength was associated with fractures. In boys, poor balance and physical inactivity may lead to fractures. Prospective studies will confirm these relationships and identify targets for prevention strategies. Introduction The etiology of pediatric forearm fractures is unclear. Thus, we examined distal radius bone strength, microstructure, and density in children and adolescents with a recent low- or moderate-energy forearm fracture and those without forearm fractures. Methods We assessed the non-dominant (controls) and non-fractured (cases) distal radius (7 % site) using high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) (Scanco Medical AG) in 270 participants (girls: cases n=47, controls n=61 and boys: cases n=88, controls n=74) aged 8–16 years. We assessed standard anthropometry, maturity, body composition (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), Hologic QDR 4500 W) physical activity, and balance. We fit sex-specific logistic regression models for each bone outcome adjusting for maturity, ethnicity, height, and percent body fat. Results In girls, impaired bone strength (failure load, ultimate stress) and a high load-to-strength ratio were associated with low-energy fractures (odds ratios (OR) 2.8–4.3). Low total bone mineral density (Tt.BMD), bone volume ratio, trabecular thickness, and cortical BMD and thickness were also associated with low-energy fractures (ORs 2.0–7.0). In boys, low Tt.BMD, but not bone strength, was associated with low-energy fractures (OR=1.8). Boys with low-energy fractures had poor balance and higher percent body fat compared with controls (p<0.05). Boys with fractures (both types) were less active than controls (p<0.05). Conclusions Forearm fracture etiology appears to be sex-specific. In girls, deficits in bone strength are associated with fractures. In boys, a

  2. Deficits in distal radius bone strength, density and microstructure are associated with forearm fractures in girls: an HR-pQCT study.

    PubMed

    Määttä, M; Macdonald, H M; Mulpuri, K; McKay, H A

    2015-03-01

    Forearm fractures are common during growth. We studied bone strength in youth with a recent forearm fracture. In girls, suboptimal bone strength was associated with fractures. In boys, poor balance and physical inactivity may lead to fractures. Prospective studies will confirm these relationships and identify targets for prevention strategies. The etiology of pediatric forearm fractures is unclear. Thus, we examined distal radius bone strength, microstructure, and density in children and adolescents with a recent low- or moderate-energy forearm fracture and those without forearm fractures. We assessed the non-dominant (controls) and non-fractured (cases) distal radius (7% site) using high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) (Scanco Medical AG) in 270 participants (girls: cases n = 47, controls n = 61 and boys: cases n = 88, controls n = 74) aged 8-16 years. We assessed standard anthropometry, maturity, body composition (dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), Hologic QDR 4500 W) physical activity, and balance. We fit sex-specific logistic regression models for each bone outcome adjusting for maturity, ethnicity, height, and percent body fat. In girls, impaired bone strength (failure load, ultimate stress) and a high load-to-strength ratio were associated with low-energy fractures (odds ratios (OR) 2.8-4.3). Low total bone mineral density (Tt.BMD), bone volume ratio, trabecular thickness, and cortical BMD and thickness were also associated with low-energy fractures (ORs 2.0-7.0). In boys, low Tt.BMD, but not bone strength, was associated with low-energy fractures (OR = 1.8). Boys with low-energy fractures had poor balance and higher percent body fat compared with controls (p < 0.05). Boys with fractures (both types) were less active than controls (p < 0.05). Forearm fracture etiology appears to be sex-specific. In girls, deficits in bone strength are associated with fractures. In boys, a combination of poor balance, excess body fat, and

  3. Reliability and validity of selected measures associated with increased fall risk in females over the age of 45 years with distal radius fracture - A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Saurabh P; MacDermid, Joy C; Richardson, Julie; MacIntyre, Norma J; Grewal, Ruby

    2015-01-01

    Clinical measurement. This study examined test-retest reliability and convergent/divergent construct validity of selected tests and measures that assess balance impairment, fear of falling (FOF), impaired physical activity (PA), and lower extremity muscle strength (LEMS) in females >45 years of age after the distal radius fracture (DRF) population. Twenty one female participants with DRF were assessed on two occasions. Timed Up and Go, Functional Reach, and One Leg Standing tests assessed balance impairment. Shortened Falls Efficacy Scale, Activity-specific Balance Confidence scale, and Fall Risk Perception Questionnaire assessed FOF. International Physical Activity Questionnaire and Rapid Assessment of Physical Activity were administered to assess PA level. Chair stand test and isometric muscle strength testing for hip and knee assessed LEMS. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) examined the test-retest reliability of the measures. Pearson correlation coefficients (r) examined concurrent relationships between the measures. The results demonstrated fair to excellent test-retest reliability (ICC between 0.50 and 0.96) and low to moderate concordance between the measures (low if r ≤ 0.4; moderate if r = 0.4-0.7). The results provide preliminary estimates of test-retest reliability and convergent/divergent construct validity of selected measures associated with increased risk for falling in the females >45 years of age after DRF. Further research directions to advance knowledge regarding fall risk assessment in DRF population have been identified. Copyright © 2015 Hanley & Belfus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Is there a safe zone to avoid superficial radial nerve injury with Kirschner wire fixation in the treatment of distal radius? A cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ayman M; El-Alfy, Barakat; Attia, Hamdino

    2014-12-01

    To determine the relation of the superficial radial nerve to bony land-marks and to identify a safe zone for K-wire pinning in the distal radius. The superficial radial nerve was dissected in sixteen upper extremities of preserved cadavers. We found that the superficial radial nerve emerged from under brachioradialis at a mean distance of 8.45 (±1.22) cm proximal to the radial styloid. The mean distance from the first major branching point of the superficial radial nerve to the radial styloid were 4.8 ± 0.4 cm. All branches of the superficial radial nerve were found to lie in the radial half of an isosceles triangle formed by the radial styloid, Lister's tubercle and the exit point of the superficial radial nerve. There is an elliptical area just proximal to the Lister's tubercle. This area is not crossed by any tendons or nerve. It is bounded by the extensor carpiradialis brevis, extensor pollicis longus. Pinning through the radial styloid is unsafe as the branches of the superficial radial nerve passé close to it. The ulnar half of the isosceles triangle is safe regarding the nerve. The elliptical zone just proximal to the Lister's tubercle is safe regarding the tendons and nerve.

  5. Distal Radius Fracture (Broken Wrist)

    MedlinePlus

    ... choice depends on many factors, such as the nature of the fracture, your age and activity level, ... causing the cast to loosen. Depending on the nature of the fracture, your doctor may closely monitor ...

  6. Effect of a Cast on Short-Term Reproducibility and Bone Parameters Obtained from HR-pQCT Measurements at the Distal End of the Radius.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Joost J A; Arts, Jacobus J; Meyer, Ursina; Willems, Paul C; Geusens, Piet P; van den Bergh, Joop P W; van Rietbergen, Bert

    2016-03-02

    High-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) is a promising tool to assess the fracture-healing process at the microscale in vivo. Since casts are often used during fracture treatment, they might affect the assessment of bone density, microarchitectural, and biomechanical parameters and the short-term reproducibility of those parameters, e.g., as a result of beam-hardening. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of a plaster-of-Paris and/or fiberglass cast on bone parameters and on the short-term reproducibility of the HR-pQCT measurements of those parameters. The effects of a cast on HR-pQCT-derived bone parameters were evaluated by comparing HR-pQCT scans of fifteen human cadaveric distal radial specimens from one male and fourteen female donors (median age, eighty-four years [range, sixty-two to ninety years] at the time of death) in three conditions: with a plaster-of-Paris cast, with a fiberglass cast, or without a cast. Short-term reproducibility was assessed using duplicate scans of the distal end of the radius in sixteen healthy volunteers without a fracture (nine men and seven women with a median age of twenty-six years; range, twenty-two to thirty-nine years) while wearing and not wearing a fiberglass cast. Compared with measurements made with no cast, the plaster-of-Paris cast introduced a systematic error in the bone parameters ranging from -2.6% in trabecular separation to -9.8% in cortical thickness. Bone parameters were affected only marginally by fiberglass, with errors between -0.6% and -1.6% in trabecular separation and cortical thickness, respectively. Short-term reproducibility with a fiberglass cast was similar to that with no cast: approximately 1% for bone density parameters, 4% to 5% for microarchitectural parameters, and 3% to 4% for biomechanical parameters. A plaster-of-Paris cast has a considerable effect on HR-pQCT measurements. A fiberglass cast only marginally affects the bone parameters, and the short

  7. Treatment of reducible unstable fractures of the distal radius in adults: a randomised controlled trial of De Palma percutaneous pinning versus bridging external fixation

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background At present, there is no conclusive evidence regarding the best treatment method for reducible unstable fractures of the distal radius. This study compared the effectiveness of two methods used in surgical treatment of such fractures: percutaneous pinning and external fixation. Methods We randomly allocated 100 patients into two groups treated surgically with modified De Palma percutaneous pinning and bridging external fixation. Independent but not blinded evaluators administered the DASH quality-of-life questionnaire at postoperative months 6 and 24, performed functional assessment of pain, range of motion, and palm grip strength, and radiographic examinations (volar and radial angle, and height of the radius) before the operation, immediately afterwards, and at 6 and 24 months postoperative. Modified De Palma percutaneous pinning patients used an above-elbow cast whereas external fixation group had unrestricted elbow motion after surgery. Patients who for any reason demonstrated treatment failure or required additional interventions were followed up and their results were included in the group into which these patients had initially been randomised according to the intention-to-treat principle. A significance level of 5% (alpha = 0.05). was used for all statistical tests, such that tests presenting a p-value less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results Ninety one (58.8 mean age and 66 participants were female) were included in the final assessment at 24 months. The DASH questionnaire evaluation showed a statistically significant result favouring the De Palma group (mean difference = -7.1 p = 0.044) after six months, but this was not maintained at 24 months. There were no statistically differences between the groups with respect to palm grip strength. Analysis of the range-of-motion limitation index (uninjured side minus affected side motion of) showed a statistical difference (mean difference = 2.4 p = 0.043) favoring the external

  8. Treatment of reducible unstable fractures of the distal radius in adults: a randomised controlled trial of De Palma percutaneous pinning versus bridging external fixation.

    PubMed

    Belloti, João C; Tamaoki, Marcel J S; Atallah, Alvaro N; Albertoni, Walter M; dos Santos, João B G; Faloppa, Flavio

    2010-06-29

    At present, there is no conclusive evidence regarding the best treatment method for reducible unstable fractures of the distal radius. This study compared the effectiveness of two methods used in surgical treatment of such fractures: percutaneous pinning and external fixation. We randomly allocated 100 patients into two groups treated surgically with modified De Palma percutaneous pinning and bridging external fixation. Independent but not blinded evaluators administered the DASH quality-of-life questionnaire at postoperative months 6 and 24, performed functional assessment of pain, range of motion, and palm grip strength, and radiographic examinations (volar and radial angle, and height of the radius) before the operation, immediately afterwards, and at 6 and 24 months postoperative. Modified De Palma percutaneous pinning patients used an above-elbow cast whereas external fixation group had unrestricted elbow motion after surgery. Patients who for any reason demonstrated treatment failure or required additional interventions were followed up and their results were included in the group into which these patients had initially been randomised according to the intention-to-treat principle. A significance level of 5% (alpha = 0.05). was used for all statistical tests, such that tests presenting a p-value less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Ninety one (58.8 mean age and 66 participants were female) were included in the final assessment at 24 months. The DASH questionnaire evaluation showed a statistically significant result favouring the De Palma group (mean difference = -7.1 p = 0.044) after six months, but this was not maintained at 24 months. There were no statistically differences between the groups with respect to palm grip strength. Analysis of the range-of-motion limitation index (uninjured side minus affected side motion of) showed a statistical difference (mean difference = 2.4 p = 0.043) favoring the external fixator group with regard to

  9. A Comparative Outcomes Study Using the Volar Locking Plating System for Distal Radius Fractures in both Young Adults and Adults Older than 60 Years

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kevin C.; Squitieri, Lee; Kim, H. Myra

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Despite the high prevalence and impact of distal radius fractures (DRFs) on older patients, the current available literature regarding DRFs in older adults lacks adequate comparative treatment data. The purpose of this prospective, controlled outcomes study is to compare outcomes using the volar locking plating system (VLPS) for DRFs in both older and younger adults. Methods Consecutive, eligible patients were enrolled into our prospective study over a two-year period on the basis of strict inclusion/exclusion criteria. Subjects were entered into two cohorts based on age: 20–40 years and ≥ 60 years. Patient outcomes and complication rates were evaluated at three, six and twelve months after surgery. Outcome measures included the Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire (MHQ), grip strength, active wrist and forearm range of motion, the Jebsen-Taylor test, and radiographic parameters. Results 55 patients (30 young and 25 older adults) with unilateral, inadequately reduced DRFs were enrolled and received surgical treatment with the VLPS. We observed no statistically significant difference in any of the outcomes for all three follow-up periods. While older age patients continued to improve throughout their twelve month postoperative visits, younger patients achieved their maximum recovery during the six month follow-up period, suggesting different recovery patterns. At the twelve-month assessment, older patients were able to achieve a higher mean MHQ score than their younger counterparts (normalized mean: 85% and 82%, respectively). Complication rates were similar between the two groups for all three time periods, with most occurring on or before the three month postoperative visit. Conclusions This study indicates that the VLPS is successful in managing DRFs in older patients and without increased complications compared to younger patients. For the older patients without prohibitive surgical risks, internal fixation using the VLPS yields comparable outcomes

  10. Reducing the risk of flexor pollicis longus tendon rupture after volar plate fixation for distal radius fractures: validation of the tendon irritation test.

    PubMed

    Suganuma, Seigo; Tada, Kaoru; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki

    2014-12-01

    We have proposed that a positive tendon irritation test is suggestive of flexor pollicis longus (FPL) tendon damage that can lead to tendon rupture after volar plate fixation for distal radius fractures. We investigated cases of postsurgical hardware removal and validated the tendon irritation test as a way to elicit a sign of FPL tendon irritation. We performed hardware removal from 30 wrists in 28 consecutive patients after volar plate fixation. Subjects included 9 men and 19 women with an average age of 58.8 years. The duration of internal fixation averaged 14.5 months. We investigated the efficacy of the tendon irritation test to elicit a sign of tendon irritation before hardware removal, and we intraoperatively evaluated the presence of FPL tendon injuries. Twenty-four of 30 wrists exhibited a sign of tendon irritation. There was no statistical correlation between a sign of tendon irritation and patient age or the duration of internal fixation. We diagnosed 10 wrists with tenosynovitis and 8 frayed tendons. The sensitivity of the tendon irritation test to identify a sign of tendon irritation that was associated with FPL tendon injuries was 80.0%, and its specificity to correctly identify non-injured FPL tendons was 40.0%. The duration of internal fixation associated with tendon fraying was significantly longer than it was in cases of non-injured tendons and tenosynovitis. Our results suggest that subsequent examinations should be performed when the tendon irritation test is positive for signs of tendon irritation that may require plate removal.

  11. Early functional postoperative therapy of distal radius fracture with a dynamic orthosis: results of a prospective randomized cross-over comparative study.

    PubMed

    Stuby, Fabian M; Döbele, Stefan; Schäffer, Susanne-Dorothea; Mueller, Simon; Ateschrang, Atesch; Baumann, Matthias; Zieker, Derek

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted according to GCP criteria as a prospective randomized cross-over study. The primary goal of the study was to determine clinical findings and patient satisfaction with postoperative treatment. 29 patients with a distal radius fracture that was surgically stabilized from volar and who met the inclusion criteria were enrolled over a 12-month period. Each patient randomly received either a dorsal plaster splint or a vacuum-fit flexible but blocked orthosis applied postoperatively in the operating theatre to achieve postoperative immobilization. After one week all patients were crossed over to the complementary device maintaining the immobilization until end of week 2. After week 2 both groups were allowed to exercise wrist mobility with a physiotherapist, in the orthosis group the device was deblocked, thus allowing limited wrist mobility. After week 4 the devices were removed in both groups. Follow-up exams were performed after postoperative weeks 1, 2, 4 and 12. Results were determined after week 1 and 2 using SF 36 and a personally compiled questionnaire; after weeks 4 and 12 with a clinical check-up, calculation of ROM and the DASH Score. Comparison of the two groups showed a significant difference in ROM for volar flexion after 4 weeks, but no significant differences in DASH Score, duration of disability or x-ray findings. With regard to satisfaction with comfort and hygiene, patients were significantly more satisfied with the dynamic orthosis, and 23 of the 29 patients would prefer the flexible vacuum orthosis in future. German Clinical Trials Register (DRKS) DRKS00006097.

  12. Design and evaluation of a new synthetic wrist procedural simulator (Wristsim(®)) for training of distal radius fracture fixation by volar plating.

    PubMed

    Lazarus, P; Pire, E; Sapa, C; Ruffenach, L; Saur, M; Liverneaux, P; Hidalgo Diaz, J J

    2017-09-01

    Legislation concerning workload of surgical trainees and pressure to reduce learning curves have forced us reconsider surgical training. Our goal was to evaluate a synthetic procedural simulator for teaching open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) of distal radius fractures (DRF). Twenty surgeons used a synthetic procedural simulator (Wristsim(®)) made by 3D printing for ORIF of DRF with a volar plate (Newclip Technics(®)). The evaluation consisted of grading the simulator's realism compared to the surgeons' own experience with surgery on cadavers. The Wristsim(®) was graded 5.10/10, compared to 8.18/10 for the cadaver specimen for introduction of the plate under pronator quadratus. For fracture reproduction, Wristsim(®) scored 6.40/10, with the cadaver specimen scoring 7.15/10. For fracture reduction, Wristsim(®) scored 5.62/10, with the cadaver specimen scoring 7.38/10. Plate application was scored 7.05/10 for Wristsim(®) and 8.23/10 for the cadaver. Drilling was scored 6.60/10 for the Wristsim(®) and 8.23/10 for the cadaver. Screw fixation was scored 7.40/10 for the Wristsim(®) and 8.12/10 for the cadaver. Our results demonstrated that Wristsim(®) is still inferior to a cadaver specimen for teaching ORIF by volar plating of DRF. A new model of Wristsim(®) is being developed that will address shortcomings in pronator quadratus thickness, passive ROM in flexion/extension and bone size. Copyright © 2017 SFCM. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Early Functional Postoperative Therapy of Distal Radius Fracture with a Dynamic Orthosis: Results of a Prospective Randomized Cross-Over Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Stuby, Fabian M.; Döbele, Stefan; Schäffer, Susanne-Dorothea; Mueller, Simon; Ateschrang, Atesch

    2015-01-01

    Introduction This study was conducted according to GCP criteria as a prospective randomized cross-over study. The primary goal of the study was to determine clinical findings and patient satisfaction with postoperative treatment. 29 patients with a distal radius fracture that was surgically stabilized from volar and who met the inclusion criteria were enrolled over a 12-month period. Each patient randomly received either a dorsal plaster splint or a vacuum-fit flexible but blocked orthosis applied postoperatively in the operating theatre to achieve postoperative immobilization. After one week all patients were crossed over to the complementary device maintaining the immobilization until end of week 2. After week 2 both groups were allowed to exercise wrist mobility with a physiotherapist, in the orthosis group the device was deblocked, thus allowing limited wrist mobility. After week 4 the devices were removed in both groups. Follow-up exams were performed after postoperative weeks 1, 2, 4 and 12. Results and Discussion Results were determined after week 1 and 2 using SF 36 and a personally compiled questionnaire; after weeks 4 and 12 with a clinical check-up, calculation of ROM and the DASH Score. Comparison of the two groups showed a significant difference in ROM for volar flexion after 4 weeks, but no significant differences in DASH Score, duration of disability or x-ray findings. With regard to satisfaction with comfort and hygiene, patients were significantly more satisfied with the dynamic orthosis, and 23 of the 29 patients would prefer the flexible vacuum orthosis in future. Trial Registration German Clinical Trials Register (DRKS) DRKS00006097 PMID:25822197

  14. Low-energy distal radius fractures in middle-aged and elderly men and women--the burden of osteoporosis and fracture risk : A study of 1794 consecutive patients.

    PubMed

    Øyen, J; Gjesdal, C G; Brudvik, C; Hove, L M; Apalset, E M; Gulseth, H C; Haugeberg, G

    2010-07-01

    One third of 218 men and half of 1,576 women with low-energy distal radius fractures met the bone mineral density (BMD) criteria for osteoporosis treatment. A large proportion of patients with increased fracture risk did not have osteoporosis. Thus, all distal radius fracture patients >or=50 years should be referred to bone densitometry. Main objectives were to determine the prevalence of patients with a low-energy distal radius fracture in need of osteoporosis treatment according to existing guidelines using T-score or=50 years were included. BMD was assessed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) at femoral neck, total hip, and lumbar spine (L2-L4). The WHO fracture risk assessment tool (FRAX(R)) was applied to calculate the 10-year fracture risk. T-scores distal radius fracture patients with a high 10-year FRAX risk did not have osteoporosis. Every second to every third fracture patient met the present BMD criteria for osteoporosis treatment. Because a large proportion of distal radius fracture patients did not have osteoporosis, treatment decisions should not be based on fracture risk assessment without bone densitometry. Thus, all distal radius fracture patients >or=50 years should be referred to bone densitometry, and if indicated, offered medical treatment.

  15. UK DRAFFT - A randomised controlled trial of percutaneous fixation with kirschner wires versus volar locking-plate fixation in the treatment of adult patients with a dorsally displaced fracture of the distal radius

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Fractures of the distal radius are extremely common injuries in adults. However, the optimal management remains controversial. In general, fractures of the distal radius are treated non-operatively if the bone fragments can be held in anatomical alignment by a plaster cast or orthotic. However, if this is not possible, then operative fixation is required. There are several operative options but the two most common in the UK, are Kirschner-wire fixation (K-wires) and volar plate fixation using fixed-angle screws (locking-plates). The primary aim of this trial is to determine if there is a difference in the Patient-Reported Wrist Evaluation one year following K-wire fixation versus locking-plate fixation for adult patients with a dorsally-displaced fracture of the distal radius. Methods/design All adult patients with an acute, dorsally-displaced fracture of the distal radius, requiring operative fixation are potentially eligible to take part in this study. A total of 390 consenting patients will be randomly allocated to either K-wire fixation or locking-plate fixation. The surgery will be performed in trauma units across the UK using the preferred technique of the treating surgeon. Data regarding wrist function, quality of life, complications and costs will be collected at six weeks and three, six and twelve months following the injury. The primary outcome measure will be wrist function with a parallel economic analysis. Discussion This pragmatic, multi-centre trial is due to deliver results in December 2013. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN31379280 UKCRN portfolio ID 8956 PMID:21914196

  16. UK DRAFFT - a randomised controlled trial of percutaneous fixation with kirschner wires versus volar locking-plate fixation in the treatment of adult patients with a dorsally displaced fracture of the distal radius.

    PubMed

    Costa, Matthew L; Achten, Juul; Parsons, Nick R; Rangan, Amar; Edlin, Richard P; Brown, Jaclyn; Lamb, Sarah E

    2011-09-13

    Fractures of the distal radius are extremely common injuries in adults. However, the optimal management remains controversial. In general, fractures of the distal radius are treated non-operatively if the bone fragments can be held in anatomical alignment by a plaster cast or orthotic. However, if this is not possible, then operative fixation is required. There are several operative options but the two most common in the UK, are Kirschner-wire fixation (K-wires) and volar plate fixation using fixed-angle screws (locking-plates). The primary aim of this trial is to determine if there is a difference in the Patient-Reported Wrist Evaluation one year following K-wire fixation versus locking-plate fixation for adult patients with a dorsally-displaced fracture of the distal radius. All adult patients with an acute, dorsally-displaced fracture of the distal radius, requiring operative fixation are potentially eligible to take part in this study. A total of 390 consenting patients will be randomly allocated to either K-wire fixation or locking-plate fixation. The surgery will be performed in trauma units across the UK using the preferred technique of the treating surgeon. Data regarding wrist function, quality of life, complications and costs will be collected at six weeks and three, six and twelve months following the injury. The primary outcome measure will be wrist function with a parallel economic analysis. This pragmatic, multi-centre trial is due to deliver results in December 2013. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN31379280 UKCRN portfolio ID 8956.

  17. Open reduction and cranial bone plate fixation of fractures involving the distal aspect of the radius and ulna in miniature- and toy-breed dogs: 102 cases (2008-2015).

    PubMed

    De Arburn Parent, Rebecca; Benamou, Jérôme; Gatineau, Matthieu; Clerfond, Pierre; Planté, Jérôme

    2017-06-15

    OBJECTIVE To determine outcomes and complication rates of open reduction and cranial bone plate fixation of fractures involving the distal aspect of the radius and ulna in miniature- and toy-breed dogs. DESIGN Retrospective case series. ANIMALS 102 miniature- and toy-breed dogs (105 fractures) weighing ≤ 7 kg (15.4 lb) that had undergone open reduction and cranial bone plate fixation of a fracture involving the distal aspect of the radius and ulna from 2008 through 2015. PROCEDURES Medical records were reviewed and information extracted regarding dog and fracture characteristics, surgical variables, and follow-up examination data (including postoperative complications). Postoperative radiographs were examined for distal fragment size, implant placement, apposition, alignment, and healing stage. A long-term follow-up questionnaire was completed by telephone interview with dog owners at least 6 months after surgery. RESULTS Mean length of the distal bone fragment in all fractures was 19.2 mm, with a mean distal-to-total radial length ratio of 0.21. At last follow-up examination (typically 6 weeks after surgery), 97 (95%) dogs had no signs of lameness; minor lameness was identified in 5 (5%) dogs. Complications developed in 26 (25%) fractures (23 [22%] minor and 3 [3%] major complications). Sixty-eight of 71 (96%) owners rated the overall and long-term outcome as excellent and 3 (4%) as good; 68 of 71 (96%) dogs reportedly had no signs of residual lameness. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Open reduction and cranial bone plate fixation for the treatment of radius-ulna fractures in miniature- and toy-breed dogs provided an excellent outcome with a low complication rate.

  18. New quantitative ultrasound techniques for bone analysis at the distal radius in hip fracture cases: differences between femoral neck and trochanteric fractures.

    PubMed

    Horii, Motoyuki; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Sakai, Ryo; Sawada, Koshiro; Mikami, Yasuo; Toyama, Syogo; Ozaki, Etsuko; Kuriyama, Nagato; Kurokawa, Masao; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2017-01-01

    cases, even at the distal radius. There might be systemic differences between them, in addition to localized factors at the proximal femur.

  19. Treatment of unstable distal radius fractures: non-invasive dynamic external fixator versus volar locking plate – functional and radiological outcome in a prospective case-controlled series

    PubMed Central

    Bajwa, Ali S.; Rammappa, Manju; Lee, Ling; Nanda, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Distal radius fracture (DRF) is a common injury and various treatment modalities including open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) with volar locking plate are available. More recently, a non-invasive external fixator has been used. Aims: To prospectively compare the use of a non-invasive external fixator with early dynamisation for DRF against ORIF with volar locking plate control group. Methods: Consecutive patients with closed DRF were included in a prospective case-controlled study. Patients were assigned to non-invasive external fixator or ORIF. Minimum follow-up was two years. Follow-up was at weeks 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, 26 and at one and two-year post-operatively. The outcome measures included demographic details, injury mechanism, AO fracture type, risk factors, body mass index (BMI), ulnar styloid fracture and dorsal comminution, radiographs, grip strength and DASH score. Results: Consecutive 50 patients were treated either with non-invasive external fixator (25/50) or with ORIF (25/50) and the mean age of the two groups was 53 years (SD 17.1) and 49 years (SD 19.5), respectively. Demographics were matched in two groups. In the non-invasive external fixator group, there were 10 AO Type-A, 5 Type-B and 10 Type-C fractures. The ORIF group included 8 Type-A, 6 Type-B and 11 Type-C fractures. The mean DASH score at three-months and one-year post-injury in non-invasive fixator group was 12.2 (SD 3.1) and 3.5 (SD 0.7), respectively, significantly greater than those of ORIF group 14.5 (SD 5.6) and 11.2 (SD 4.4), respectively (p < 0.05). Conclusion: DRF treated with non-invasive external fixator can give functional results superior to ORIF at three-months and the trend is maintained at one and two-year post-operatively. PMID:27163089

  20. Reference values for digital X-ray radiogrammetry parameters in children and adolescents in comparison to estimates in patients with distal radius fractures.

    PubMed

    Renz, Diane M; Malich, Ansgar; Ulrich, Andreas; Pfeil, Alexander; Mentzel, Hans-Joachim; Streitparth, Florian; Maurer, Martin H; Teichgräber, Ulf K; Böttcher, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    The first objective of this study was to determine normative digital X-ray radiogrammetry (DXR) values, based on original digital images, in a pediatric population (aged 6-18 years). The second aim was to compare these reference data with patients suffering from distal radius fractures, whereas both cohorts originated from the same geographical region and were evaluated using the same technical parameters as well as inclusion and exclusion criteria. DXR-BMD and DXR-MCI of the metacarpal bones II-IV were assessed on standardized digital hand radiographs, without printing or scanning procedures. DXR parameters were estimated separately by gender and among six age groups; values in the fracture group were compared to age- and gender-matched normative data using Student's t tests and Z scores. In the reference cohort (150 boys, 138 girls), gender differences were found in bone mineral density (DXR-BMD), with higher values for girls from 11 to 14 years and for boys from 15 to 18 years (p < 0.05). Girls had higher normative metacarpal index (DXR-MCI) values than boys, with significant differences at 11-14 years (p < 0.05). In the case-control investigation, the fracture group (95 boys, 69 girls) presented lower DXR-BMD at 15-18 years in boys and 13-16 years in girls vs. the reference cohort (p < 0.05); DXR-MCI was lower at 11-18 years in boys and 11-16 years in girls (p < 0.05). Mean Z scores in the fracture group for DXR-BMD were -0.42 (boys) and -0.46 (girls), and for DXR-MCI were -0.51 (boys) and -0.53 (girls). These findings indicate that the fully digital DXR technique can be accurately applied in pediatric populations ≥ 6 years of age. The lower DXR-BMD and DXR-MCI values in the fracture group suggest promising early identification of individuals with increased fracture risk, without the need for additional radiation exposure, enabling the initiation of prevention strategies to possibly reduce the incidence of osteoporosis later in life.

  1. Semiconstrained Distal Radioulnar Joint Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Savvidou, Christiana; Murphy, Erin; Mailhot, Emilie; Jacob, Shushan; Scheker, Luis R.

    2013-01-01

    Distal radioulnar joint (DRUJ) problems can occur as a result of joint instability, abutment, or incongruity. The DRUJ is a weight-bearing joint; the ulnar head is frequently excised either totally or partially, and in some cases it is fused, because of degenerative, rheumatoid, or posttraumatic arthritis. Articles about these procedures report the ability to pronate and supinate, but they rarely discuss grip strength, and even less do they address lifting capacity. We report the long term results of the first 35 patients who underwent total DRUJ arthroplasty with the Aptis DRUJ prosthesis after 5 years follow-up. Surgical indications were all causes of dysfunctional DRUJ (degenerative, posttraumatic, autoimmune, congenital). We recorded data for patient demographics, range of motion (ROM), strength, and lifting capacity of the operated and of the nonoperated extremity. Pain and functional assessments were also recorded. The Aptis DRUJ prosthesis, a bipolar self-stabilizing DRUJ endoprosthesis that restores forearm function, consists of a semiconstained and modular implant designed to replace the function of the ulnar head, the sigmoid notch of the radius, and the triangular fibrocartilage ligaments. The surgical technique is presented in detail. The majority of the patients regained adequate ROM and improved their strength and lifting capacity to the operated side. Pain and activities of daily living were improved. Twelve patients experienced complications, most commonly being extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) tendinitis, ectopic bone formation, bone resorption with stem loosening, low-grade infection, and need for ball replacement. The Aptis total DRUJ replacement prosthesis is an alternative to salvage procedures that enables a full range of motion as well as the ability to grip and lift weights encountered in daily living activities. PMID:24436788

  2. Posttraumatic pancreatic fistula cured by endoprosthesis in the pancreatic duct.

    PubMed

    Fabre, J M; Bauret, P; Prudhomme, M; Quenet, F; Noel, P; Baumel, H; Michel, H; Domergue, J

    1995-05-01

    We report a case of pancreatic fistula attributable to posttraumatic rupture of the main duct that was undiagnosed before ERCP and was cured instantaneously by endoscopic placement of an endoprosthesis in the pancreatic duct after failure of conventional medical treatment.

  3. Functional recovery after treatment of extra-articular distal radius fractures in the elderly using the IlluminOss® System (IO-Wrist); a multicenter prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Hagenaars, Tjebbe; Van Oijen, Guido W; Roerdink, W Herbert; Vegt, Paul A; Vroemen, Jos P A M; Verhofstad, Michael H J; Van Lieshout, Esther M M

    2016-05-27

    Approximately 17 % of all fractures involve the distal radius. Two-thirds require reduction due to displacement. High redislocation rates and functional disability remain a significant problem after non-operative treatment, with up to 30 % of patients suffering long-term functional restrictions. Whether operative correction is superior to non-operative treatment with respect to functional outcome has not unequivocally been confirmed. The IlluminOss® System was introduced in 2009 as a novel, patient-specific, and minimally invasive intramedullary fracture fixation. This minimally invasive technique has a much lower risk of iatrogenic soft tissue complications. Because IlluminOss® allows for early mobilization, it may theoretically lead to earlier functional recovery and ADL independence than non-operative immobilization. The main aim of this study is to examine outcome in elderly patients who sustained a unilateral, displaced, extra-articular distal radius fracture that was treated with IlluminOss®. The design of the study will be a multicenter, prospective, observational study (case series). The study population comprises elderly (60 years or older; independent in activities of daily living) with a unilateral, displaced, extra-articular distal radius fracture (AO/OTA type 23-A2 and A3) that after successful closed reduction was fixed within 2 weeks after the injury with IlluminOss®. Critical elements of treatment will be registered, and outcome will be monitored until 1 year after surgery. The Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand score will serve as primary outcome measure. The Patient-Rated Wrist Evaluation score, level of pain, health-related quality of life (Short Form-36 and EuroQoL-5D), time to ADL independence, time to activities/work resumption, range of motion of the wrist, radiological outcome, and complications are secondary outcome measures. Health care consumption and lost productivity will be used for a cost analysis. The cost analysis

  4. High-resolution pQCT analysis at the distal radius and tibia discriminates patients with recent wrist and femoral neck fractures.

    PubMed

    Vico, Laurence; Zouch, Mohamed; Amirouche, Adel; Frère, Delphine; Laroche, Norbert; Koller, Bruno; Laib, Andres; Thomas, Thierry; Alexandre, Christian

    2008-11-01

    We depict a fragility bone state in two primitive osteoporosis populations using 3D high-resolution peripheral in vivo QCT (HR-pQCT). Postmenopausal women (C, controls, n = 54; WF, wrist, n = 50; HF, hip, n = 62 recent fractured patients) were analyzed for lumbar and hip DXA areal BMD (aBMD), cancellous and cortical volumetric BMD (vBMD), and microstructural and geometric parameters on tibia and radius by HR-pQCT. Principal component analysis (PCA) allowed extracting factors that best represent bone variables. Comparison between groups was made by analysis of covariance (ANCOVA). Two factors (>80% of the entire variability) are extracted by PCA: at the radius, the first is a combination of trabecular parameters and the second of cortical parameters. At the tibia, we found the reverse. Femoral neck aBMD is decreased in WF (8.6%) and in HF (18%) groups (no lumbar difference). WF showed a approximately 20% reduction in radius trabecular vBMD and number. Radius cortical vBMD and thickness decrease by 6% and 14%, respectively. At the tibia, only the cortical compartment is affected, with approximately 20% reduction in bone area, thickness, and section modulus and 6% reduction in vBMD. HF showed same radius trabecular alterations than WF, but radius cortical parameters are more severely affected than WF with reduced bone area (25%), thickness (28.5%), and vBMD (11%). At the tibia, trabecular vBMD and number decrease by 26% and 17.5%, respectively. Tibia cortical bone area, thickness, and section modulus showed a >30% decrease, whereas vBMD reduction reached 13%. Geometry parameters at the tibia displayed the greatest differences between healthy and fractured patients and between wrist and hip fractures.

  5. High-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) can assess microstructural and biomechanical properties of both human distal radius and tibia: Ex vivo computational and experimental validations.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bin; Wang, Ji; Yu, Y Eric; Zhang, Zhendong; Nawathe, Shashank; Nishiyama, Kyle K; Rosete, Fernando Rey; Keaveny, Tony M; Shane, Elizabeth; Guo, X Edward

    2016-05-01

    High-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) provides in vivo three-dimensional (3D) imaging at the distal radius and tibia and has been increasingly used to characterize cortical and trabecular bone morphology in clinical studies. In this study, we comprehensively examined the accuracy of HR-pQCT and HR-pQCT based micro finite element (μFE) analysis predicted bone elastic stiffness and strength through comparisons with gold-standard micro computed tomography (μCT) based morphological/μFE measures and direct mechanical testing results. Twenty-six sets of human cadaveric distal radius and tibia segments were imaged by HR-pQCT and μCT. Microstructural analyses were performed for the registered HR-pQCT and μCT images. Bone stiffness and yield strength were determined by both HR-pQCT and μCT based linear and nonlinear μFE predictions and mechanical testing. Our results suggested that strong and significant correlations existed between the HR-pQCT standard, model-independent and corresponding μCT measurements. HR-pQCT based nonlinear μFE overestimated stiffness and yield strength while the linear μFE underestimated yield strength, but both were strongly correlated with those predicted by μCT μFE and measured by mechanical testing at both radius and tibia (R(2)>0.9). The microstructural differences between HR-pQCT and μCT were also examined by the Bland-Altman plots. Our results showed HR-pQCT morphological measurements of BV/TV(d), Tb.Th, and Tb.Sp, can be adjusted by correction values to approach true values measured by gold-standard μCT. In addition, we observed moderate correlations of HR-pQCT biomechanical and microstructural parameters between the distal radius and tibia. We concluded that morphological and mechanical properties of human radius and tibia bone can be assessed by HR-pQCT based measures.

  6. New lumbar disc endoprosthesis applied to the patient's anatomic features.

    PubMed

    Mróz, Adrian; Skalski, Konstanty; Walczyk, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    The paper describes the process of designing, manufacturing and design verification of the intervertebral of a new structure of lumbar disc endoprosthesis - INOP/LSP.1101. Modern and noninvasive medical imagining techniques, make it possible to record results of tests in a digital form, which creates opportunities for further processing. Mimics Innovation Suite software generates three-dimensional virtual models reflecting the real shape and measurements of components of L4-L5 spinal motion segment. With the use of 3D Print technique, physical models of bone structures of the mobile segment of the spine as well as the INOP/LSP.1101 endoprosthesis model were generated. A simplified FEA analysis of stresses in the endoprosthesis was performed to evaluate the designed geometries and materials of the new structure. The endoprosthesis prototype was made of Co28Cr6Mo alloy with the use of selective laser technology. The prototypes were subject to tribological verification with the use of the SBT-03.1 spine simulator. The structure of the endoprosthesis ensures a full reflection of its kinematics, full range of mobility of the motion segment in all anatomical planes as well as restoration of a normal height of the intervertebral space and curvature of the lordosis. The results of the tribological tests confirmed that SLM technology has the potential for production of the human bone and jointendoprostheses.

  7. Open reduction and palmar plate-osteosynthesis in combination with a nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite spacer in the treatment of comminuted fractures of the distal radius.

    PubMed

    Huber, F-X; Hillmeier, J; Herzog, L; McArthur, N; Kock, H-J; Meeder, P J

    2006-06-01

    In a prospective study, we used the nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite paste Ostim (Osartis, Obernburg, Germany) in combination with a palmar plate to treat comminuted radius fractures with a metaphyseal and articular component in order to examine the clinical use of Ostim as a bone substitute. Twenty-one patients with 22 radius fractures of AO types C2 and C3 were included in the study. The measurements, taken 10.2+/-1.3 months after the initial treatment, revealed a dorsopalmar tilt of 8.8+/-3.7 degrees , a radioulnar inclination of 18.8+/-2.8 degrees and an ulnar variance of 0.8+/-1.8mm. According to the Gartland and Werley evaluation, eight of the treated fractures attained an excellent, 11 a good and the remaining three a fair result. The study demonstrates that Ostim, in combination with angularly stable osteosynthesis, can be used as an acceptable bone substitute for the treatment of type C2 and C3 radial fractures.

  8. UK DRAFFT: a randomised controlled trial of percutaneous fixation with Kirschner wires versus volar locking-plate fixation in the treatment of adult patients with a dorsally displaced fracture of the distal radius.

    PubMed

    Costa, Matthew L; Achten, Juul; Plant, Caroline; Parsons, Nick R; Rangan, Amar; Tubeuf, Sandy; Yu, Ge; Lamb, Sarah E

    2015-02-01

    In high-income countries, 6% of all women will have sustained a fracture of the wrist (distal radius) by the age of 80 years and 9% by the age of 90 years. Advances in orthopaedic surgery have improved the outcome for patients: many such fractures can be treated in a plaster cast alone, but others require surgical fixation to hold the bone in place while they heal. The existing evidence suggests that modern locking-plate fixation provides improved functional outcomes, but costs more than traditional wire fixation. In this multicentre trial, we randomly assigned 461 adult patients having surgery for an acute dorsally displaced fracture of the distal radius to either percutaneous Kirschner-wire fixation or locking-plate fixation. The primary outcome measure was the Patient-Rated Wrist Evaluation© (PRWE) questionnaire at 12 months after the fracture. In this surgical trial, neither the patients nor the surgeons could be blind to the intervention. We also collected information on complications and combined costs and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) to assess cost-effectiveness. The baseline characteristics of the two groups were well balanced and over 90% of patients completed follow-up. Both groups of patients recovered wrist function by 12 months. There was no clinically relevant difference in the PRWE questionnaire score at 3 months, 6 months or 12 months [difference at 12 months: -1.3; 95% confidence interval (CI) -4.5 to 1.8; p=0.398]. There was no difference in the number of complications in each group and small differences in QALY gains (0.008; 95% CI -0.001 to 0.018); Kirschner-wire fixation represents a cost-saving intervention (-£727; 95% CI -£588 to -£865), particularly in younger patients. Contrary to the existing literature, and against the increasing use of locking-plate fixation, this trial shows that there is no difference between Kirschner wires and volar locking plates for patients with dorsally displaced fractures of the distal radius. A

  9. Effects on bone geometry, density, and microarchitecture in the distal radius but not the tibia in women with primary hyperparathyroidism: A case-control study using HR-pQCT.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Stinus; Beck Jensen, Jens-Erik; Rasmussen, Lars; Hauge, Ellen M; Brixen, Kim

    2010-09-01

    Patients with primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) have continuously elevated parathyroid hormone (PTH) and consequently increased bone turnover with negative effects on cortical (Ct) bone with preservation of trabecular (Tb) bone. High-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) is a new technique for in vivo assessment of geometry, volumetric density, and microarchitecture at the radius and tibia. In this study we aimed to evaluate bone status in women with PHPT compared with controls using HR-pQCT. The distal radius and tibia of 54 women--27 patients with PHPT (median age 60, range 44-75 years) and 27 randomly recruited age-matched healthy controls (median age 60, range 44-76 years)--were imaged using HR-pQCT along with areal bone mineral density (aBMD) by dual-energy X-ray absorptiomentry (DXA) of the ultradistal forearm, femoral neck, and spine (L1-L4). Groups were comparable regarding age, height, and weight. In the radius, patients had reduced Ct area (Ct.Ar) (p = .008), Ct thickness (Ct.th) (p = .01) along with reduced total (p = .002), Ct (p = .02), and Tb (p = .02) volumetric density and reduced Tb number (Tb.N) (p = .04) and increased Tb spacing (Tb.sp) (p = .05). Ct porosity did not differ. In the tibia, no differences in HR-pQCT parameters were found. Moreover, patients had lower ultradistal forearm (p = .005), spine (p = .04), and femoral neck (p = 0.04) aBMD compared with controls. In conclusion, a negative bone effect of continuously elevated PTH with alteration of HR-pQCT assessed geometry, volumetric density, and both trabecular and cortical microarchitecture in radius but not tibia was found along with reduced aBMD by DXA at all sites in female patients with PHPT. © 2010 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  10. [Joint endoprosthesis pathology. Histopathological diagnostics and classification].

    PubMed

    Krenn, V; Morawietz, L; Jakobs, M; Kienapfel, H; Ascherl, R; Bause, L; Kuhn, H; Matziolis, G; Skutek, M; Gehrke, T

    2011-05-01

    Prosthesis durability has steadily increased with high 10-year rates of 88-95%. However, four pathogenetic groups of diseases can decrease prosthesis durability: (1) periprosthetic wear particle disease (aseptic loosening) (2) bacterial infection (septic loosening) (3) periprosthetic ossification, and (4) arthrofibrosis. The histopathological "extended consensus classification of periprosthetic membranes" includes four types of membranes, arthrofibrosis, and osseous diseases of endoprosthetics: The four types of neosynovia are: wear particle-induced type (type I), mean prosthesis durability (MPD) in years 12.0; infectious type (type II), MPD 2.5; combined type (type III) MPD 4.2; and indeterminate type (type IV), MPD 5.5. Arthrofibrosis can be determined in three grades: grade 1 needs clinical information to be differentiated from a type IV membrane, and grades 2 & 3 can be diagnosed histopathologically. Periprosthetic ossification, osteopenia-induced fractures, and aseptic osteonecrosis can be histopathologically diagnosed safely with clinical information. The extended consensus classification of periprosthetic membranes may be a diagnostic groundwork for a future national endoprosthesis register.

  11. Initial clinical experience with a sac-anchoring endoprosthesis for aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Donayre, Carlos E; Zarins, Christopher K; Krievins, Dainis K; Holden, Andrew; Hill, Andrew; Calderas, Carlos; Velez, Jaime; White, Rodney A

    2011-03-01

    All current aortic endografts depend on proximal and distal fixation to prevent migration. However, migration and rupture can occur, particularly in patients with aortic necks that are short or angulated, or both. We present our initial clinical experience with a new sac-anchoring endoprosthesis designed to anchor and seal the device within the aneurysm sac. The initial worldwide experience using a new endoprosthesis for the treatment of aortic aneurysms (Nellix Endovascular, Palo Alto, Calif) was reviewed. The endoprosthesis consists of dual balloon-expandable endoframes surrounded by polymer-filled endobags designed to obliterate the aneurysm sac and maintain endograft position. Clinical results and follow-up contrast computed tomography (CT) scans at 30 days and 6 and 12 months were reviewed. The endograft was successfully deployed in 21 patients with infrarenal aortic aneurysms measuring 5.7 ± 0.7 cm (range, 4.3-7.4 cm). Two patients with common iliac aneurysms were treated with sac-anchoring extenders that maintained patency of the internal iliac artery. Infusion of 71 ± 37 mL of polymer (range, 19-158 mL) into the aortic endobags resulted in complete aneurysm exclusion in all patients. Mean implant time was 76 ± 35 minutes, with 33 ± 17 minutes of fluoroscopy time and 180 ± 81 mL of contrast; estimated blood loss was 174 ± 116 mL. One patient died during the postoperative period (30-day mortality, 4.8%), and one died at 10 months from non-device-related causes. During a mean follow-up of 8.7 ± 3.1 months and a median of 6.3 months, there were no late aneurysm- or device-related adverse events and no secondary procedures. CT imaging studies at 6 months and 1 year revealed no increase in aneurysm size, no device migration, and no new endoleaks. One patient had a limited proximal type I endoleak at 30 days that resolved at 60 days and remained sealed. One patient has an ongoing distal type I endoleak near the iliac bifurcation, with no change in aneurysm

  12. Cost effectiveness of treatment with percutaneous Kirschner wires versus volar locking plate for adult patients with a dorsally displaced fracture of the distal radius: analysis from the DRAFFT trial.

    PubMed

    Tubeuf, S; Yu, G; Achten, J; Parsons, N R; Rangan, A; Lamb, S E; Costa, M L

    2015-08-01

    We present an economic evaluation using data from the Distal Radius Acute Fracture Fixation Trial (DRAFFT) to compare the relative cost effectiveness of percutaneous Kirschner wire (K-wire) fixation and volar locking-plate fixation for patients with dorsally-displaced fractures of the distal radius. The cost effectiveness analysis (cost per quality-adjusted life year; QALY) was derived from a multi-centre, two-arm, parallel group, assessor-blind, randomised controlled trial which took place in 18 trauma centres in the United Kingdom. Data from 460 patients were available for analysis, which includes both a National Health Service cost perspective including costs of surgery, implants and healthcare resource use over a 12-month period after surgery, and a societal perspective, which includes the cost of time off work and the need for additional private care. There was only a small difference in QALYs gained for patients treated with locking-plate fixation over those treated with K-wires. At a mean additional cost of £714 (95% confidence interval 588 to 865) per patient, locking-plate fixation presented an incremental cost effectiveness ratio (ICER) of £89,322 per QALY within the first 12 months of treatment. Sensitivity analyses were undertaken to assess the ICER of locking-plate fixation compared with K-wires. These were greater than £30,000. Compared with locking-plate fixation, K-wire fixation is a 'cost saving' intervention, with similar health benefits. ©2015 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  13. In Vivo Precision of Digital Topological Skeletonization Based Individual Trabecula Segmentation (ITS) Analysis of Trabecular Microstructure at the Distal Radius and Tibia by HR-pQCT.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bin; Zhang, Zhendong; Wang, Ji; Yu, Y Eric; Liu, Xiaowei Sherry; Nishiyama, Kyle K; Rubin, Mishaela R; Shane, Elizabeth; Bilezikian, John P; Guo, X Edward

    2016-06-01

    Trabecular plate and rod microstructure plays a dominant role in the apparent mechanical properties of trabecular bone. With high-resolution computed tomography (CT) images, digital topological analysis (DTA) including skeletonization and topological classification was applied to transform the trabecular three-dimensional (3D) network into surface and curve skeletons. Using the DTA-based topological analysis and a new reconstruction/recovery scheme, individual trabecula segmentation (ITS) was developed to segment individual trabecular plates and rods and quantify the trabecular plate- and rod-related morphological parameters. High-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) is an emerging in vivo imaging technique to visualize 3D bone microstructure. Based on HR-pQCT images, ITS was applied to various HR-pQCT datasets to examine trabecular plate- and rod-related microstructure and has demonstrated great potential in cross-sectional and longitudinal clinical applications. However, the reproducibility of ITS has not been fully determined. The aim of the current study is to quantify the precision errors of ITS plate-rod microstructural parameters. In addition, we utilized three different frequently used contour techniques to separate trabecular and cortical bone and to evaluate their effect on ITS measurements. Overall, good reproducibility was found for the standard HR-pQCT parameters with precision errors for volumetric BMD and bone size between 0.2%-2.0%, and trabecular bone microstructure between 4.9%-6.7% at the radius and tibia. High reproducibility was also achieved for ITS measurements using all three different contour techniques. For example, using automatic contour technology, low precision errors were found for plate and rod trabecular number (pTb.N, rTb.N, 0.9% and 3.6%), plate and rod trabecular thickness (pTb.Th, rTb.Th, 0.6% and 1.7%), plate trabecular surface (pTb.S, 3.4%), rod trabecular length (rTb.ℓ, 0.8%), and plate

  14. Linking of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons Distal Radius Fracture Clinical Practice Guidelines to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health; International Classification of Diseases; and ICF Core Sets for Hand Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Esakki, Saravanan; MacDermid, Joy; Vajravelu, Saipriya

    2016-01-01

    Background: American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) distal radius fracture (DRF) clinical practice guidelines (CPG) are readily available