Science.gov

Sample records for distant branch points

  1. On an Integral with Two Branch Points

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Oliveira, E. Capelas; Chiacchio, Ary O.

    2006-01-01

    The paper considers a class of real integrals performed by using a convenient integral in the complex plane. A complex integral containing a multi-valued function with two branch points is transformed into another integral containing a pole and a unique branch point. As a by-product we obtain a new class of integrals which can be calculated in a…

  2. Functional impact of dendritic branch point morphology

    PubMed Central

    Ferrante, Michele; Migliore, Michele; Ascoli, Giorgio A.

    2013-01-01

    Cortical pyramidal cells store multiple features of complex synaptic input in individual dendritic branches and independently regulate the coupling between dendritic and somatic spikes. Branch points in apical trees exhibit wide ranges of sizes and shapes, and the large diameter ratio between trunk and oblique dendrites exacerbates impedance mismatch. The morphological diversity of dendritic bifurcations could thus locally tune neuronal excitability and signal integration. However, these aspects have never been investigated. Here, we first quantified the morphological variability of branch points from two-photon images of rat CA1 pyramidal neurons. We then investigated the geometrical features affecting spike initiation, propagation, and timing with a computational model validated by glutamate uncaging experiments. The results suggest that even subtle membrane readjustments at branch point could drastically alter the ability of synaptic input to generate, propagate, and time action potentials. PMID:23365251

  3. Black Holes In Distant Galaxies Point To Wild Youth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-06-01

    Like 'flower power' tattoos on aging ex-hippy baby boomers, unexpectedly large numbers of neutron stars and black holes in elliptical galaxies suggest some of these galaxies lived through a much wilder youth. The discovery by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory may require a revision of how elliptical galaxies evolved. "For the first time, Chandra has allowed us to distinguish hundreds of star-like sources that are black holes and neutron stars in distant elliptical galaxies," said Craig Sarazin of the University of Virginia who presented his team's findings on three elliptical galaxies, known as NGC 4697, NGC 4649, and NGC 1553, today at the American Astronomical Society meeting in Albuquerque, NM. "The black holes and neutron stars we now see in these elliptical galaxies are reminders of their very active past." Black holes and neutron stars are the "stellar corpses" of the brightest, most massive and short-lived stars. The presence of numerous neutron stars and black holes shows that these galaxies once contained many very bright, massive stars. This is in marked contrast to the present populations of lower-mass, faint, old stars that now dominate elliptical galaxies. NGC 1553 Press Image and Caption The black holes and neutron stars found by Chandra in these galaxies appear to be members of binary star systems. The strong pull of gravity from the collapsed star pulls material off the normal star. This material emits large amounts of X-rays as it falls into the black hole or neutron star. The Chandra observations also show that most of the binary star systems that contain black holes are not scattered randomly among the stars in the elliptical galaxies. Instead, most of the X-ray binaries are located in "globular star clusters," round balls of stars, containing about one million stars in a region of the galaxy where typically only one would be found. The high fraction of black hole binaries found in globular star clusters suggests that the black holes captured a

  4. Analysis of a method for precisely relating a seafloor point to a distant point on land

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiess, F. N.; Lowenstein, C. D.; Mcintyre, M. O.

    1985-01-01

    A study of the environmental constraints and engineering aspects of the acoustic portion of a system for making geodetic ties between undersea reference points and others on land is described. Important areas in which to make such observations initially would be from the California mainland out to oceanic points seaward of the San Andreas fault, and across the Aleutian Trench. The overall approach would be to operate a GPS receiver in a relative positioning (interferometric) mode to provide the long range element of the baseline determination (10 to 1,000 km) and an array of precision sea floor acoustic transponders to link the locally moving sea surface GPS antenna location to a fixed sea floor point. Analyses of various environmental constrants (tides, waves, currents, sound velocity variations) lead to the conclusion that, if one uses a properly designed transponder having a remotely controllable precise retransmission time delay, and is careful with regard to methods for installing these on the sea floor, one should, in many ocean locations, be able to achieve sub-decimeter overall system accuracy. Achievements of cm accuracy or better will require additional understanding of time and space scales of variation of sound velocity structure in the ocean at relevant locations.

  5. Distribution of branch point prenyltransferases in regions of bovine brain.

    PubMed

    Runquist, M; Parmryd, I; Thelin, A; Chojnacki, T; Dallner, G

    1995-11-01

    Bovine brains contain large amounts of isoprenoid compounds and the enzymes involved in their biosynthesis were investigated. Ten different regions were dissected from fresh bovine brains and, in addition, fractions from cerebellum, spinal cord, and hypophysis were obtained. The cholesterol concentration was found to be approximately 8 mg/g in the cortex regions and three times higher in the pons, medulla oblongata, and white matter. Dolichol concentration varied between 8 and 40 micrograms/g in the different tissues, and ubiquinone was found at a lower level, which varied between 3 and 25 micrograms/g. Farnesylpyrophosphate synthase activity in cytosolic fractions from various regions exhibited only a twofold variation, whereas geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate synthase displayed larger differences, being particularly rich in the pons, medulla oblongata, white matter, and spinal cord. Squalene synthase activity was lowest in the thalamus and threefold higher in the pons. Determination of specific activity based on cholesterol content revealed that enzyme activities in various regions are not related to the actual lipid amount present. Both cis- and trans-prenyltransferases exhibited similarities in their regional distribution showing up to 20-fold differences in activity. Thus, it appears that the mevalonate pathway lipids and the various branch point enzymes involved in their syntheses vary greatly in different brain regions and are subjected to separate regulation.

  6. Evolution of branch points for a laser beam propagating through an uplink turbulent atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Ge, Xiao-Lu; Liu, Xuan; Guo, Cheng-Shan

    2014-03-24

    Evolution of branch points in the distorted optical field is studied when a laser beam propagates through turbulent atmosphere along an uplink path. Two categories of propagation events are mainly explored for the same propagation height: fixed wavelength with change of the turbulence strength and fixed turbulence strength with change of the wavelength. It is shown that, when the beam propagates to a certain height, the density of the branch-points reaches its maximum and such a height changes with the turbulence strength but nearly remains constant with different wavelengths. The relationship between the density of branch-points and the Rytov number is also given. A fitted formula describing the relationship between the density of branch-points and propagation height with different turbulence strength and wavelength is found out. Interestingly, this formula is very similar to the formula used for describing the Blackbody radiation in physics. The results obtained may be helpful for atmospheric optics, astronomy and optical communication.

  7. Galactosyltransferase 4 is a major control point for glycan branching in N-linked glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Andrew G.; Hayes, Jerrard M.; Bezak, Tania; Głuchowska, Sonia A.; Cosgrave, Eoin F. J.; Struwe, Weston B.; Stroop, Corné J. M.; Kok, Han; van de Laar, Teun; Rudd, Pauline M.; Tipton, Keith F.; Davey, Gavin P.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Protein N-glycosylation is a common post-translational modification that produces a complex array of branched glycan structures. The levels of branching, or antennarity, give rise to differential biological activities for single glycoproteins. However, the precise mechanism controlling the glycan branching and glycosylation network is unknown. Here, we constructed quantitative mathematical models of N-linked glycosylation that predicted new control points for glycan branching. Galactosyltransferase, which acts on N-acetylglucosamine residues, was unexpectedly found to control metabolic flux through the glycosylation pathway and the level of final antennarity of nascent protein produced in the Golgi network. To further investigate the biological consequences of glycan branching in nascent proteins, we glycoengineered a series of mammalian cells overexpressing human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). We identified a mechanism in which galactosyltransferase 4 isoform regulated N-glycan branching on the nascent protein, subsequently controlling biological activity in an in vivo model of hCG activity. We found that galactosyltransferase 4 is a major control point for glycan branching decisions taken in the Golgi of the cell, which might ultimately control the biological activity of nascent glycoprotein. PMID:25271059

  8. Branch Point Identification and Sequence Requirements for Intron Splicing in Plasmodium falciparum ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaohong; Tolzmann, Caitlin A.; Melcher, Martin; Haas, Brian J.; Gardner, Malcolm J.; Smith, Joseph D.; Feagin, Jean E.

    2011-01-01

    Splicing of mRNA is an ancient and evolutionarily conserved process in eukaryotic organisms, but intron-exon structures vary. Plasmodium falciparum has an extreme AT nucleotide bias (>80%), providing a unique opportunity to investigate how evolutionary forces have acted on intron structures. In this study, we developed an in vivo luciferase reporter splicing assay and employed it in combination with lariat isolation and sequencing to characterize 5′ and 3′ splicing requirements and experimentally determine the intron branch point in P. falciparum. This analysis indicates that P. falciparum mRNAs have canonical 5′ and 3′ splice sites. However, the 5′ consensus motif is weakly conserved and tolerates nucleotide substitution, including the fifth nucleotide in the intron, which is more typically a G nucleotide in most eukaryotes. In comparison, the 3′ splice site has a strong eukaryotic consensus sequence and adjacent polypyrimidine tract. In four different P. falciparum pre-mRNAs, multiple branch points per intron were detected, with some at U instead of the typical A residue. A weak branch point consensus was detected among 18 identified branch points. This analysis indicates that P. falciparum retains many consensus eukaryotic splice site features, despite having an extreme codon bias, and possesses flexibility in branch point nucleophilic attack. PMID:21926333

  9. The Aggregate behavior of branch points--measuring the number and velocity of atmospheric turbulence layers.

    PubMed

    Oesch, Denis W; Sanchez, Darryl J; Matson, Charles L

    2010-10-11

    Optical waves propagating through atmospheric turbulence develop spatial and temporal variations in their phase. For sufficiently strong turbulence, these phase differences can lead to interference in the propagating wave and the formation of branch points; positions of zero amplitude. Under the assumption of a layered turbulence model, we show that these branch points can be used to estimate the number and velocities of atmospheric layers. We describe how to carry out this estimation process and demonstrate its robustness in the presence of sensor noise.

  10. On the existence of point spectrum for branching strips quantum graph

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, I. Yu. Skorynina, A. N.; Blinova, I. V.

    2014-03-15

    The quantum graph having the form of branching strips with hexagonal (honeycomb) structure is considered. The Hamiltonian is determined as free 1D Schrödinger operator on each edge and some “boundary” conditions at each vertex. We obtain the conditions ensuring the point spectrum's existence for the Schrödinger operator of the system and relations that give us the eigenvalues.

  11. Verification of Branch Point Withdrawal in Elongational Flow of Pom-Pom Polystyrene Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, M. H.; Rolón-Garrido, V. H.

    2008-07-01

    According to tube model ideas, chain stretch at deformation rates below the inverse Rouse time of the chain, is only possible for polymer topologies with two or more branch points. The basic topologies which embody this idea are the H-molecule with two side chains, and the pom-pom molecule with q>2 side chains at each end of the backbone. According to the pom-pom hypothesis, maximum chain stretch of the backbone is limited by branch point withdrawal, i.e. the side chains are drawn into the tube of the backbone as soon as the relative tension in the backbone reaches a value of q. This hypothesis, which has never been verified before, can now be tested by considering recent elongational experiments by Nielsen et al. [Macromolecules 39, 8844-8853 (2006)] on a nearly monodisperse polystyrene pom-pom melt with q = 2.5. The analysis presented is based on the original integral version of the Pom-Pom model, and on the Molecular Stress Function (MSF) model with strain-dependent tube diameter. The material strain measure determined from the experiments is found to be consistent with a constant maximum stretch, independent of the elongation rate, which is, however, significantly larger than q. To achieve quantitative agreement between experiment and modelling, (1) dynamic dilution of the backbone, which increases the tube diameter of the backbone and reduces equilibrium tension in the backbone, (2) finite extensibility effects, (3) stretch relaxation causing a transition from chain stretch to tube squeeze at lower strain rates, and (4) the dynamics of branch point withdrawal need to be considered. Integrating all of these features in a MSF stretch evolution equation with multiple time scales, the fundamental pom-pom hypothesis is confirmed.

  12. Identification of new branch points and unconventional introns in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Gould, Genevieve M; Paggi, Joseph M; Guo, Yuchun; Phizicky, David V; Zinshteyn, Boris; Wang, Eric T; Gilbert, Wendy V; Gifford, David K; Burge, Christopher B

    2016-10-01

    Spliced messages constitute one-fourth of expressed mRNAs in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and most mRNAs in metazoans. Splicing requires 5' splice site (5'SS), branch point (BP), and 3' splice site (3'SS) elements, but the role of the BP in splicing control is poorly understood because BP identification remains difficult. We developed a high-throughput method, Branch-seq, to map BPs and 5'SSs of isolated RNA lariats. Applied to S. cerevisiae, Branch-seq detected 76% of expressed, annotated BPs and identified a comparable number of novel BPs. We performed RNA-seq to confirm associated 3'SS locations, identifying some 200 novel splice junctions, including an AT-AC intron. We show that several yeast introns use two or even three different BPs, with effects on 3'SS choice, protein coding potential, or RNA stability, and identify novel introns whose splicing changes during meiosis or in response to stress. Together, these findings show unanticipated complexity of splicing in yeast. PMID:27473169

  13. Avoided level crossings, diabolic points, and branch points in the complex plane in an open double quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotter, I.; Sadreev, A. F.

    2005-03-01

    We study the spectrum of an open double quantum dot as a function of different system parameters in order to receive information on the geometric phases of branch points in the complex plane (BPCP). We relate them to the geometrical phases of the diabolic points (DPs) of the corresponding closed system. The double dot consists of two single dots and a wire connecting them. The two dots and the wire are represented by only a single state each. The spectroscopic values follow from the eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the Hamiltonian describing the double dot system. They are real when the system is closed, and complex when the system is opened by attaching leads to it. The discrete states as well as the narrow resonance states avoid crossing. The DPs are points within the avoided level crossing scenario of discrete states. At the BPCP, width bifurcation occurs. Here, different Riemann sheets evolve and the levels do not cross anymore. The BPCP are physically meaningful. The DPs are unfolded into two BPCP with different chirality when the system is opened. The geometric phase that arises by encircling the DP in the real plane, is different from the phase that appears by encircling the BPCP. This is found to be true even for a weakly opened system and the two BPCP into which the DP is unfolded.

  14. LSPV+7, a branch-point-tolerant reconstructor for strong turbulence adaptive optics.

    PubMed

    Steinbock, Michael J; Hyde, Milo W; Schmidt, Jason D

    2014-06-20

    Optical wave propagation through long paths of extended turbulence presents unique challenges to adaptive optics (AO) systems. As scintillation and branch points develop in the beacon phase, challenges arise in accurately unwrapping the received wavefront and optimizing the reconstructed phase with respect to branch cut placement on a continuous facesheet deformable mirror. Several applications are currently restricted by these capability limits: laser communication, laser weapons, remote sensing, and ground-based astronomy. This paper presents a set of temporally evolving AO simulations comparing traditional least-squares reconstruction techniques to a complex-exponential reconstructor and several other reconstructors derived from the postprocessing congruence operation. The reconstructors' behavior in closed-loop operation is compared and discussed, providing several insights into the fundamental strengths and limitations of each reconstructor type. This research utilizes a self-referencing interferometer (SRI) as the high-order wavefront sensor, driving a traditional linear control law in conjunction with a cooperative point source beacon. The SRI model includes practical optical considerations and frame-by-frame fiber coupling effects to allow for realistic noise modeling. The "LSPV+7" reconstructor is shown to offer the best performance in terms of Strehl ratio and correction stability-outperforming the traditional least-squares reconstructed system by an average of 120% in the studied scenarios. Utilizing a continuous facesheet deformable mirror, these reconstructors offer significant AO performance improvements in strong turbulence applications without the need for segmented deformable mirrors. PMID:24979411

  15. An SF1 affinity model to identify branch point sequences in human introns

    PubMed Central

    Pastuszak, Alexander W.; Joachimiak, Marcin P.; Blanchette, Marco; Rio, Donald C.; Brenner, Steven E.; Frankel, Alan D.

    2011-01-01

    Splicing factor 1 (SF1) binds to the branch point sequence (BPS) of mammalian introns and is believed to be important for the splicing of some, but not all, introns. To help identify BPSs, particularly those that depend on SF1, we generated a BPS profile model in which SF1 binding affinity data, validated by branch point mapping, were iteratively incorporated into computational models. We searched a data set of 117 499 human introns for best matches to the SF1 Affinity Model above a threshold, and counted the number of matches at each intronic position. After subtracting a background value, we found that 87.9% of remaining high-scoring matches identified were located in a region upstream of 3′-splice sites where BPSs are typically found. Since U2AF65 recognizes the polypyrimidine tract (PPT) and forms a cooperative RNA complex with SF1, we combined the SF1 model with a PPT model computed from high affinity binding sequences for U2AF65. The combined model, together with binding site location constraints, accurately identified introns bound by SF1 that are candidates for SF1-dependent splicing. PMID:21071404

  16. Patterned Photostimulation with Digital Micromirror Devices to Investigate Dendritic Integration Across Branch Points

    PubMed Central

    Santos, M. Daniel; Tang, Cha-Min

    2011-01-01

    Light is a versatile and precise means to control neuronal excitability. The recent introduction of light sensitive effectors such as channel-rhodopsin and caged neurotransmitters have led to interests in developing better means to control patterns of light in space and time that are useful for experimental neuroscience. One conventional strategy, employed in confocal and 2-photon microscopy, is to focus light to a diffraction limited spot and then scan that single spot sequentially over the region of interest. This approach becomes problematic if large areas have to be stimulated within a brief time window, a problem more applicable to photostimulation than for imaging. An alternate strategy is to project the complete spatial pattern on the target with the aid of a digital micromirror device (DMD). The DMD approach is appealing because the hardware components are relatively inexpensive and is supported by commercial interests. Because such a system is not available for upright microscopes, we will discuss the critical issues in the construction and operations of such a DMD system. Even though we will be primarily describing the construction of the system for UV photolysis, the modifications for building the much simpler visible light system for optogenetic experiments will also be provided. The UV photolysis system was used to carryout experiments to study a fundamental question in neuroscience, how are spatially distributed inputs integrated across distal dendritic branch points. The results suggest that integration can be non-linear across branch points and the supralinearity is largely mediated by NMDA receptors. PMID:21403635

  17. LSPV+7, a branch-point-tolerant reconstructor for strong turbulence adaptive optics.

    PubMed

    Steinbock, Michael J; Hyde, Milo W; Schmidt, Jason D

    2014-06-20

    Optical wave propagation through long paths of extended turbulence presents unique challenges to adaptive optics (AO) systems. As scintillation and branch points develop in the beacon phase, challenges arise in accurately unwrapping the received wavefront and optimizing the reconstructed phase with respect to branch cut placement on a continuous facesheet deformable mirror. Several applications are currently restricted by these capability limits: laser communication, laser weapons, remote sensing, and ground-based astronomy. This paper presents a set of temporally evolving AO simulations comparing traditional least-squares reconstruction techniques to a complex-exponential reconstructor and several other reconstructors derived from the postprocessing congruence operation. The reconstructors' behavior in closed-loop operation is compared and discussed, providing several insights into the fundamental strengths and limitations of each reconstructor type. This research utilizes a self-referencing interferometer (SRI) as the high-order wavefront sensor, driving a traditional linear control law in conjunction with a cooperative point source beacon. The SRI model includes practical optical considerations and frame-by-frame fiber coupling effects to allow for realistic noise modeling. The "LSPV+7" reconstructor is shown to offer the best performance in terms of Strehl ratio and correction stability-outperforming the traditional least-squares reconstructed system by an average of 120% in the studied scenarios. Utilizing a continuous facesheet deformable mirror, these reconstructors offer significant AO performance improvements in strong turbulence applications without the need for segmented deformable mirrors.

  18. De novo production of the key branch point benzylisoquinoline alkaloid reticuline in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Trenchard, Isis J.; Siddiqui, Michael S.; Thodey, Kate; Smolke, Christina D.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial biosynthesis for plant-based natural products, such as the benzylisoquinoline alkaloids (BIAs), has the potential to address limitations in plant-based supply of established drugs and make new molecules available for drug discovery. While yeast strains have been engineered to produce a variety of downstream BIAs including the opioids, these strains have relied on feeding an early BIA substrate. We describe the de novo synthesis of the major BIA branch point intermediate reticuline via norcoclaurine in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Modifications were introduced into yeast central metabolism to increase supply of the BIA precursor tyrosine, allowing us to achieve a 60-fold increase in production of the early benzylisoquinoline scaffold from fed dopamine with no supply of exogenous tyrosine. Yeast strains further engineered to express a mammalian tyrosine hydroxylase, four mammalian tetrahydrobiopterin biosynthesis and recycling enzymes, and a bacterial DOPA decarboxylase produced norcoclaurine de novo. We further increased production of early benzylisoquinoline scaffolds by 160-fold through introducing mutant tyrosine hydroxylase enzymes, an optimized plant norcoclaurine synthase variant, and optimizing culture conditions. Finally, we incorporated five additional plant enzymes - three methyltransferases, a cytochrome P450, and its reductase partner - to achieve de novo production of the key branch point molecule reticuline with a titer of 19.2 μg/L. These strains and reconstructed pathways will serve as a platform for the biosynthesis of diverse natural and novel BIAs. PMID:26166409

  19. Cloning and functional characterization of three branch point oxidosqualene cyclases from Withania somnifera (L.) dunal.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Niha; Rana, Satiander; Razdan, Sumeer; Bhat, Wajid Waheed; Hussain, Aashiq; Dhar, Rekha S; Vaishnavi, Samantha; Hamid, Abid; Vishwakarma, Ram; Lattoo, Surrinder K

    2014-06-13

    Oxidosqualene cyclases (OSCs) positioned at a key metabolic subdividing junction execute indispensable enzymatic cyclization of 2,3-oxidosqualene for varied triterpenoid biosynthesis. Such branch points present favorable gene targets for redirecting metabolic flux toward specific secondary metabolites. However, detailed information regarding the candidate OSCs covering different branches and their regulation is necessary for the desired genetic manipulation. The aim of the present study, therefore, was to characterize members of OSC superfamily from Withania somnifera (Ws), a medicinal plant of immense repute known to synthesize a large array of biologically active steroidal lactone triterpenoids called withanolides. Three full-length OSC cDNAs, β-amyrin synthase (WsOSC/BS), lupeol synthase (WsOSC/LS), and cycloartenol synthase (WsOSC/CS), having open reading frames of 2289, 2268, and 2277 bp, were isolated. Heterologous expression in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, LC-MS analyses, and kinetic studies confirmed their monofunctionality. The three WsOSCs were found to be spatially regulated at transcriptional level with WsOSC/CS being maximally expressed in leaf tissue. Promoter analysis of three WsOSCs genes resulted in identification of distinct cis-regulatory elements. Further, transcript profiling under methyl jasmonate, gibberellic acid, and yeast extract elicitations displayed differential transcriptional regulation of each of the OSCs. Changes were also observed in mRNA levels under elicitations and further substantiated with protein expression levels by Western blotting. Negative regulation by yeast extract resulted in significant increase in withanolide content. Empirical evidence suggests that repression of competitive branch OSCs like WsOSC/BS and WsOSC/LS possibly leads to diversion of substrate pool toward WsOSC/CS for increased withanolide production.

  20. Thermodynamic characterization of a triple-helical three-way junction containing a Hoogsteen branch point.

    PubMed

    Hüsler, P L; Klump, H H

    1995-09-10

    We have designed a Hoogsteen (HG) triple-helical three-way junction (ternary complex) constructed from three 33-mer oligonucleotides based on the same subset of sequences used for the Watson-Crick (WC) triple-helical three-way junction, characterized previously (P. L. Hüsler and H. H. Klump (1994) Arch. Biochem. Biophys., 313, 29-38). The junction differs primarily in the assembly of the branch point and the ends of the arms. The three oligonucleotides can each fold into a WC hairpin, linked by a four-member cytosine loop, each containing a homo-pyrimidine 10-mer single-strand extension. On lowering the pH (between 6 and 4), the extensions mutually associate to one of the other hairpins via Hoogsteen (HG) hydrogen bonding. Collectively, this process results in the formation of the branch point and the triple-helical arms. The HG triple-helical three-way junction is characterized by gel electrophoresis, circular dichroism, uv melting, and differential scanning calorimetry. The junction undergoes thermal unfolding in two distinct temperature regions. In the temperature range 15 to 50 degrees C loss of HG base pairing results in the dissociation of the three-way junction. Between 55 and 95 degrees C the resulting hairpins undergo further successive unfolding. The overall calorimetric unfolding enthalpy and entropy changes associated with the loss of HG base pairing are approximately equal to the sum of the enthalpy and entropy changes associated with the dissociation of the HG base pairing in the isolated arms (170.6 kcal.mol-1; 540.1 cal.mol-1.K-1). It is apparent from these results that in the proximity of the branch point the structure is not perturb or strain. This result is contrary to the results obtained for the WC triple-helical three-way and for three-way junctions constructed from canonical double-helical DNA. Complete folding of the junction requires either high Na+ (600 mM) ion concentrations or 40-60 mM Mg2+.

  1. The (n, α) Reaction in the s-process Branching Point {sup 59}Ni

    SciTech Connect

    Weiß, C.; Guerrero, C.; Griesmayer, E.; Andrzejewski, J.; Badurek, G.; Chiaveri, E.; Dressler, R.; Ganesan, S.; Jericha, E.; Käppeler, F.; Koehler, P.; Lederer, C.; Leeb, H.; Marganiec, J.; Pavlik, A.; Perkowski, J.; Rauscher, T.; and others

    2014-06-15

    The (n, α) reaction in the radioactive {sup 59}Ni is of relevance in nuclear astrophysics as {sup 59}Ni can be considered as the first branching point in the astrophysical s-process. Its relevance in nuclear technology is especially related to material embrittlement in stainless steel. However, there is a discrepancy between available experimental data and the evaluated nuclear data files for this reaction. At the n{sub T}OF facility at CERN, a dedicated system based on sCVD diamond diodes was set up to measure the {sup 59}Ni(n, α){sup 56}Fe cross section. The results of this measurement, with special emphasis on the dominant resonance at 203 eV, are presented here.

  2. The (n, α) Reaction in the s-process Branching Point 59Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiß, C.; Guerrero, C.; Griesmayer, E.; Andrzejewski, J.; Badurek, G.; Chiaveri, E.; Dressler, R.; Ganesan, S.; Jericha, E.; Käppeler, F.; Koehler, P.; Lederer, C.; Leeb, H.; Marganiec, J.; Pavlik, A.; Perkowski, J.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Schumann, D.; Tagliente, G.; Vlachoudis, V.; Altstadt, S.; Audouin, L.; Barbagallo, M.; Bécares, V.; Bečvář, F.; Belloni, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Billowes, J.; Boccone, V.; Bosnar, D.; Brugger, M.; Calviani, M.; Calviño, F.; Cano-Ott, D.; Carrapiço, C.; Cerutti, F.; Chin, M.; Colonna, N.; Cortés, G.; Cortés-Giraldo, M. A.; Diakaki, M.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Duran, I.; Dzysiuk, N.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Ferrari, A.; Fraval, K.; García, A. R.; Giubrone, G.; Gómez-Hornillos, M. B.; Gonçalves, I. F.; González-Romero, E.; Gunsing, F.; Gurusamy, P.; Hernández-Prieto, A.; Jenkins, D. G.; Kadi, Y.; Karadimos, D.; Kivel, N.; Kokkoris, M.; Krtička, M.; Kroll, J.; Lampoudis, C.; Langer, C.; Leal-Cidoncha, E.; Leong, L. S.; Losito, R.; Mallick, A.; Manousos, A.; Martínez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P. F.; Mastromarco, M.; Meaze, M.; Mendoza, E.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Mingrone, F.; Mirea, M.; Mondalaers, W.; Paradela, C.; Plompen, A.; Praena, J.; Quesada, J. M.; Riego, A.; Robles, M. S.; Roman, F.; Rubbia, C.; Sabaté-Gilarte, M.; Sarmento, R.; Saxena, A.; Schillebeeckx, P.; Schmidt, S.; Tain, J. L.; Tarrío, D.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tsinganis, A.; Valenta, S.; Vannini, G.; Variale, V.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Versaci, R.; Vermeulen, M. J.; Vlastou, R.; Wallner, A.; Ware, T.; Weigand, M.; Wright, T.; Žugec, P.

    2014-06-01

    The (n, α) reaction in the radioactive 59Ni is of relevance in nuclear astrophysics as 59Ni can be considered as the first branching point in the astrophysical s-process. Its relevance in nuclear technology is especially related to material embrittlement in stainless steel. However, there is a discrepancy between available experimental data and the evaluated nuclear data files for this reaction. At the n_TOF facility at CERN, a dedicated system based on sCVD diamond diodes was set up to measure the 59Ni(n, α)56Fe cross section. The results of this measurement, with special emphasis on the dominant resonance at 203 eV, are presented here.

  3. Triple-helical DNA as a reversible block of the branch point in a partially symmetrical DNA four-arm junction.

    PubMed

    Kirby, A W; Gaskin, M N; Antezana, M A; Goodman, S J; Myers, E; Bruist, M F

    1997-08-22

    DNA branch migration is a fundamental process in genetic recombination. A new model system has been developed for studying branch migration in a small synthetic four-arm junction. A mathematical method for describing branch-point movement by discrete steps in such junctions is also presented. The key to our experimental system is the ability to fix the location of the branch point during the assembly of the junction with a reversible block. The block is provided by a short oligonucleotide that forms triplex DNA adjacent to the initial location branch point at low pH. Raising the pH causes the triplex strand to dissociate, making the branch point free to migrate. Once mobile, the branch point can run off the end of the junction. The time-course for this runoff is consistent with a random walk of the branch point. If it is assumed that one migration step moves the branch point one base-pair, the time-course gives a rate constant for one step of 1.4 second-1 at 37 degrees C in 10 mM MgCl2, 50 mM NaCl. These values are consistent with other measurements of non-enzymatic branch migration. We have also monitored the spread of the branch points directly with T4 endonuclease VII. Using EcoRI restriction endonuclease, we have shown that the binding of this protein to the arms of the junction essentially blocks branch migration through the binding site. In these experiments Ca2+ replaces Mg2+, and the enzyme does not cleave the DNA. In vivo there must be a special process to get branch points to migrate past bound proteins.

  4. Branch-point reconstruction in laser beam projection through turbulence with finite-degree-of-freedom phase-only wave-front correction.

    PubMed

    Roggemann, M C; Koivunen, A C

    2000-01-01

    Wave-front sensing and deformable mirror control algorithms in adaptive optics systems are designed on the premise that a continuous phase function exists in the telescope pupil that can be conjugated with a deformable mirror for the purpose of projecting a laser beam. However, recent studies of coherent wave propagation through turbulence have shown that under conditions where scintillation is not negligible, a truly continuous phase function does not in general exist as a result of the presence of branch points in the complex optical field. Because of branch points and the associated branch cuts, least-squares wave-front reconstruction paradigms can have large errors. We study the improvement that can be obtained by implementing wave-front reconstructors that can sense the presence of branch points and reconstruct a discontinuous phase function in the context of a laser beam projection system. This study was conducted by fitting a finite-degree-of-freedom deformable mirror to branch-point and least-squares reconstructions of the phase of the beacon field, propagating the corrected field to the beacon plane, and evaluating performance in the beacon plane. We find that the value of implementing branch-point reconstructors with a finite-degree-of-freedom deformable mirror is significant for optical paths that cause saturated log-amplitude fluctuations.

  5. Transiently populated intermediate functions as a branching point of the FF domain folding pathway.

    PubMed

    Korzhnev, Dmitry M; Religa, Tomasz L; Kay, Lewis E

    2012-10-30

    Studies of protein folding and the intermediates that are formed along the folding pathway provide valuable insights into the process by which an unfolded ensemble forms a functional native conformation. However, because intermediates on folding pathways can serve as initiation points of aggregation (implicated in a number of diseases), their characterization assumes an even greater importance. Establishing the role of such intermediates in folding, misfolding, and aggregation remains a major challenge due to their often low populations and short lifetimes. We recently used NMR relaxation dispersion methods and computational techniques to determine an atomic resolution structure of the folding intermediate of a small protein module--the FF domain--with an equilibrium population of 2-3% and a millisecond lifetime, 25 °C. Based on this structure a variant FF domain has been designed in which the native state is selectively destabilized by removing the carboxyl-terminal helix in the native structure to produce a highly populated structural mimic of the intermediate state. Here, we show via solution NMR studies of the designed mimic that the mimic forms distinct conformers corresponding to monomeric and dimeric (K(d) = 0.2 mM) forms of the protein. The conformers exchange on the seconds timescale with a monomer association rate of 1.1 · 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) and with a region responsible for dimerization localized to the amino-terminal residues of the FF domain. This study establishes the FF domain intermediate as a central player in both folding and misfolding pathways and illustrates how incomplete folding can lead to the formation of higher-order structures.

  6. Simulations demonstrate a simple network to be sufficient to control branch point selection, smooth muscle and vasculature formation during lung branching morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cellière, Géraldine; Menshykau, Denis; Iber, Dagmar

    2012-08-15

    Proper lung functioning requires not only a correct structure of the conducting airway tree, but also the simultaneous development of smooth muscles and vasculature. Lung branching morphogenesis is strongly stereotyped and involves the recursive use of only three modes of branching. We have previously shown that the experimentally described interactions between Fibroblast growth factor (FGF)10, Sonic hedgehog (SHH) and Patched (Ptc) can give rise to a Turing mechanism that not only reproduces the experimentally observed wildtype branching pattern but also, in part counterintuitive, patterns in mutant mice. Here we show that, even though many proteins affect smooth muscle formation and the expression of Vegfa, an inducer of blood vessel formation, it is sufficient to add FGF9 to the FGF10/SHH/Ptc module to successfully predict simultaneously the emergence of smooth muscles in the clefts between growing lung buds, and Vegfa expression in the distal sub-epithelial mesenchyme. Our model reproduces the phenotype of both wildtype and relevant mutant mice, as well as the results of most culture conditions described in the literature. PMID:23213471

  7. Simulations demonstrate a simple network to be sufficient to control branch point selection, smooth muscle and vasculature formation during lung branching morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Cellière, Géraldine; Menshykau, Denis; Iber, Dagmar

    2012-01-01

    Summary Proper lung functioning requires not only a correct structure of the conducting airway tree, but also the simultaneous development of smooth muscles and vasculature. Lung branching morphogenesis is strongly stereotyped and involves the recursive use of only three modes of branching. We have previously shown that the experimentally described interactions between Fibroblast growth factor (FGF)10, Sonic hedgehog (SHH) and Patched (Ptc) can give rise to a Turing mechanism that not only reproduces the experimentally observed wildtype branching pattern but also, in part counterintuitive, patterns in mutant mice. Here we show that, even though many proteins affect smooth muscle formation and the expression of Vegfa, an inducer of blood vessel formation, it is sufficient to add FGF9 to the FGF10/SHH/Ptc module to successfully predict simultaneously the emergence of smooth muscles in the clefts between growing lung buds, and Vegfa expression in the distal sub-epithelial mesenchyme. Our model reproduces the phenotype of both wildtype and relevant mutant mice, as well as the results of most culture conditions described in the literature. PMID:23213471

  8. N-acetyl-D-glucosamine kinase interacts with dynein light-chain roadblock type 1 at Golgi outposts in neuronal dendritic branch points

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Md Ariful; Sharif, Syeda Ridita; Lee, HyunSook; Seog, Dae-Hyun; Moon, Il Soo

    2015-01-01

    N-acetylglucosamine kinase (GlcNAc kinase or NAGK) is a ubiquitously expressed enzyme in mammalian cells. Recent studies have shown that NAGK has an essential structural, non-enzymatic role in the upregulation of dendritogenesis. In this study, we conducted yeast two-hybrid screening to search for NAGK-binding proteins and found a specific interaction between NAGK and dynein light-chain roadblock type 1 (DYNLRB1). Immunocytochemistry (ICC) on hippocampal neurons using antibodies against NAGK and DYNLRB1 or dynein heavy chain showed some colocalization, which was increased by treating the live cells with a crosslinker. A proximity ligation assay (PLA) of NAGK-dynein followed by tubulin ICC showed the localization of PLA signals on microtubule fibers at dendritic branch points. NAGK-dynein PLA combined with Golgi ICC showed the colocalization of PLA signals with somal Golgi facing the apical dendrite and with Golgi outposts in dendritic branch points and distensions. NAGK-Golgi PLA followed by tubulin or DYNLRB1 ICC showed that PLA signals colocalize with DYNLRB1 at dendritic branch points and at somal Golgi, indicating a tripartite interaction between NAGK, dynein and Golgi. Finally, the ectopic introduction of a small peptide derived from the C-terminal amino acids 74–96 of DYNLRB1 resulted in the stunting of hippocampal neuron dendrites in culture. Our data indicate that the NAGK-dynein-Golgi tripartite interaction at dendritic branch points functions to regulate dendritic growth and/or branching. PMID:26272270

  9. An Old Yellow Enzyme Gene Controls the Branch Point between Aspergillus fumigatus and Claviceps purpurea Ergot Alkaloid Pathways▿

    PubMed Central

    Coyle, Christine M.; Cheng, Johnathan Z.; O'Connor, Sarah E.; Panaccione, Daniel G.

    2010-01-01

    Ergot fungi in the genus Claviceps and several related fungal groups in the family Clavicipitaceae produce toxic ergot alkaloids. These fungi produce a variety of ergot alkaloids, including clavines as well as lysergic acid derivatives. Ergot alkaloids are also produced by the distantly related, opportunistic human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus. However, this fungus produces festuclavine and fumigaclavines A, B, and C, which collectively differ from clavines of clavicipitaceous fungi in saturation of the last assembled of four rings in the ergoline ring structure. The two lineages are hypothesized to share early steps of the ergot alkaloid pathway before diverging at some point after the synthesis of the tricyclic intermediate chanoclavine-I. Disruption of easA, a gene predicted to encode a flavin-dependent oxidoreductase of the old yellow enzyme class, in A. fumigatus led to accumulation of chanoclavine-I and chanoclavine-I-aldehyde. Complementation of the A. fumigatus easA mutant with a wild-type allele from the same fungus restored the wild-type profile of ergot alkaloids. These data demonstrate that the product of A. fumigatus easA is required for incorporation of chanoclavine-I-aldehyde into more-complex ergot alkaloids, presumably by reducing the double bond conjugated to the aldehyde group, thus facilitating ring closure. Augmentation of the A. fumigatus easA mutant with a homologue of easA from Claviceps purpurea resulted in accumulation of ergot alkaloids typical of clavicipitaceous fungi (agroclavine, setoclavine, and its diastereoisomer isosetoclavine). These data indicate that functional differences in the easA-encoded old yellow enzymes of A. fumigatus and C. purpurea result in divergence of their respective ergot alkaloid pathways. PMID:20435769

  10. Structural and Functional Insights into (S)-Ureidoglycolate Dehydrogenase, a Metabolic Branch Point Enzyme in Nitrogen Utilization

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Myung-Il; Shin, Inchul; Cho, Suhee; Lee, Jeehyun; Rhee, Sangkee

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen metabolism is one of essential processes in living organisms. The catabolic pathways of nitrogenous compounds play a pivotal role in the storage and recovery of nitrogen. In Escherichia coli, two different, interconnecting metabolic routes drive nitrogen utilization through purine degradation metabolites. The enzyme (S)-ureidoglycolate dehydrogenase (AllD), which is a member of l-sulfolactate dehydrogenase-like family, converts (S)-ureidoglycolate, a key intermediate in the purine degradation pathway, to oxalurate in an NAD(P)-dependent manner. Therefore, AllD is a metabolic branch-point enzyme for nitrogen metabolism in E. coli. Here, we report crystal structures of AllD in its apo form, in a binary complex with NADH cofactor, and in a ternary complex with NADH and glyoxylate, a possible spontaneous degradation product of oxalurate. Structural analyses revealed that NADH in an extended conformation is bound to an NADH-binding fold with three distinct domains that differ from those of the canonical NADH-binding fold. We also characterized ligand-induced structural changes, as well as the binding mode of glyoxylate, in the active site near the NADH nicotinamide ring. Based on structural and kinetic analyses, we concluded that AllD selectively utilizes NAD+ as a cofactor, and further propose that His116 acts as a general catalytic base and that a hydride transfer is possible on the B-face of the nicotinamide ring of the cofactor. Other residues conserved in the active sites of this novel l-sulfolactate dehydrogenase-like family also play essential roles in catalysis. PMID:23284870

  11. Activity in distant comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luu, Jane X.

    1992-01-01

    Activity in distant comets remains a mystery in the sense that we still have no complete theory to explain the various types of activity exhibited by different comets at large distances. This paper explores the factors that should play a role in determining activity in a distant comet, especially in the cases of comet P/Tempel 2, comet Schwassmann-Wachmann 1, and 2060 Chiron.

  12. A rare branch-point mutation is associated with missplicing of fibrillin-2 in a large family with congenital contractural arachnodactyly.

    PubMed Central

    Maslen, C; Babcock, D; Raghunath, M; Steinmann, B

    1997-01-01

    Congenital contractural arachnodactyly (CCA) is an autosomal dominant disorder that is phenotypically similar to but genetically distinct from Marfan syndrome. Genetic-linkage analysis has implicated the fibrillin-2 gene (FBN2) as the CCA locus. Mutation analysis of two isolated CCA patients revealed missense mutations, indicating that defects in FBN2 may be responsible for this disorder. However, cosegregation of a mutant allele with the disease phenotype has not yet been established. We have investigated the primary cause of CCA in a large well-characterized kindred with five generations comprising 18 affected individuals. Previous studies demonstrated linkage of this family's CCA phenotype to FBN2. Mutation analysis of cDNA derived from the proband and her affected brother, using a nonisotopic RNase cleavage assay, revealed the partial skipping of exon 31. Approximately 25% mutant transcript is produced, which is apparently sufficient to cause a CCA phenotype. Sequence analysis of genomic DNA revealed an unusual base composition for intron 30 and identified the mutation, a g-26t transversion, in the vicinity of the splicing branch-point site in intron 30. Genomic DNA from 30 additional family members, both affected and unaffected, then was analyzed for the mutation. The results clearly demonstrate cosegregation of the branch-point mutation with the CCA phenotype. This is the first report of a CCA mutation in a multiplex family, unequivocally establishing that mutation in FBN2 are responsible for the CCA phenotype. In addition, branch-point mutations only very rarely have been associated with human disease, suggesting that the unusual composition of this intron influences splicing stability. Images Figure 2ab Figure 2c Figure 3ab Figure 3c Figure 4 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:9199560

  13. Gaseous activity of distant comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Womack, Maria; Sarid, Gal; Wierzchos, Kacper

    2016-10-01

    The activity of most comets within 3AU of the Sun is dominated by the sublimation of frozen water, the most abundant ice in comets. Some comets, however, are active well beyond the water-ice sublimation limit. Studying distantly active comets provides valuable opportunities to explore primitive bodies when water-ice sublimation is largely dormant, which is the case for most of a comet's lifetime. Beyond 4 AU, super-volatiles such as CO or CO2 are thought to play a major role in driving observed activity. Carbon monoxide is of special interest because it is a major contributor to comae and has a very low sublimation temperature. Three bodies dominate the observational record and modeling efforts for distantly active small bodies: the long-period comet C/1995 O1 Hale-Bopp and the short-period comets (with centaur orbits) 29P/Schwassmann Wachmann 1 and 2060 Chiron. Hale-Bopp's long-period orbit means it has experienced very little solar heating in its lifetime and is analogous to dynamically new comets making their first approach to the Sun. Because Chiron and 29P have much smaller orbits closer to the Sun, they have experienced much more thermal processing than Hale-Bopp and this is expected to have changed their chemical composition from their original state. We point out that the observed CO production rates and line-widths in these three distantly active objects are consistent with each other when adjusted for heliocentric distance. This is particularly interesting for Hale-Bopp and 29P, which have approximately the same radius. The consistent CO production rates may point to a similar CO release mechanism in these objects. We also discuss how observed radio line profiles support that the development and sublimation of icy grains in the coma at about 5-6 AU is probably a common feature in distantly active comets, and an important source of other volatiles within 6 AU, including H2O, HCN, CH3OH, and H2CO.

  14. The Interaction of Arp2/3 Complex with Actin: Nucleation, High Affinity Pointed End Capping, and Formation of Branching Networks of Filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyche Mullins, R.; Heuser, John A.; Pollard, Thomas D.

    1998-05-01

    The Arp2/3 complex is a stable assembly of seven protein subunits including two actin-related proteins (Arp2 and Arp3) and five novel proteins. Previous work showed that this complex binds to the sides of actin filaments and is concentrated at the leading edges of motile cells. Here, we show that Arp2/3 complex purified from Acanthamoeba caps the pointed ends of actin filaments with high affinity. Arp2/3 complex inhibits both monomer addition and dissociation at the pointed ends of actin filaments with apparent nanomolar affinity and increases the critical concentration for polymerization at the pointed end from 0.6 to 1.0 μ M. The high affinity of Arp2/3 complex for pointed ends and its abundance in amoebae suggest that in vivo all actin filament pointed ends are capped by Arp2/3 complex. Arp2/3 complex also nucleates formation of actin filaments that elongate only from their barbed ends. From kinetic analysis, the nucleation mechanism appears to involve stabilization of polymerization intermediates (probably actin dimers). In electron micrographs of quick-frozen, deep-etched samples, we see Arp2/3 bound to sides and pointed ends of actin filaments and examples of Arp2/3 complex attaching pointed ends of filaments to sides of other filaments. In these cases, the angle of attachment is a remarkably constant 70 ± 7 degrees. From these in vitro biochemical properties, we propose a model for how Arp2/3 complex controls the assembly of a branching network of actin filaments at the leading edge of motile cells.

  15. A DISTANT QUASAR'S BRILLIANT LIGHT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The arrow in this image, taken by a ground-based telescope, points to a distant quasar, the brilliant core of an active galaxy residing billions of light-years from Earth. As light from this faraway object travels across space, it picks up information on galaxies and the vast clouds of material between galaxies as it moves through them. The Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph aboard NASA's Hubble Space Telescope decoded the quasar's light to find the spectral 'fingerprints' of highly ionized (energized) oxygen, which had mixed with invisible clouds of hydrogen in intergalactic space. The quasar's brilliant beam pierced at least four separate filaments of the invisible hydrogen laced with the telltale oxygen. The presence of oxygen between the galaxies implies there are huge quantities of hydrogen in the universe. Credits: WIYN Telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory in Arizona. The telescope is owned and operated by the University of Wisconsin, Indiana University, Yale University, and the National Optical Astronomy Observatories.

  16. Distant Kuiper Belt Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, R. Lynne; Bernstein, Gary; Malhotra, Renu

    2001-02-01

    Kuiper Belt Object surveys indicate a lack of objects with semi- major axis a⪆50 AU in low eccentricity, low inclination orbits. This presents a problem for the simplest theories of Kuiper Belt evolution, which predict a dense, primordial outer Kuiper Belt. A possible solution is that the outer Belt is very dynamically cold, appearing as a razor-thin plane on the sky. If this disk was inclined only 0.5° from the ecliptic, present surveys could fail to detect it since the deep surveys (limiting magnitude R~26) lack sufficient sky coverage and the shallow surveys (limiting mag R~24.4) lack sufficient depth to see small (radius ⪉130 km) objects beyond 50 AU. If this cold, dense disk were to cross a Mosaic field with a limiting magnitude R=25.8, we would expect to see at least 15 distant KBOs. By observing strategically placed large fields we could detect any cold, dense distant disk inclined at up to 0.7° from the invariable plane. This would place a strong constraint on the location of a cold, dense outer Kuiper Belt.

  17. Shoot branching.

    PubMed

    Ward, Sally P; Leyser, Ottoline

    2004-02-01

    The mature form of a plant shoot system is an expression of several genetically controlled traits, many of which are also environmentally regulated. A major component of this architectural variation is the degree of shoot branching. Recent results indicate conserved mechanisms for shoot branch development across the monocots and eudicots. The existence of a novel long-range branch-inhibiting signal has been inferred from studies of branching mutants in pea and Arabidopsis. PMID:14732444

  18. HUBBLE PINPOINTS DISTANT SUPERNOVAE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    These Hubble Space Telescope images pinpoint three distant supernovae, which exploded and died billions of years ago. Scientists are using these faraway light sources to estimate if the universe was expanding at a faster rate long ago and is now slowing down. Images of SN 1997cj are in the left hand column; SN 1997ce, in the middle; and SN 1997ck, on the right. All images were taken by the Hubble telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2. The top row of images are wider views of the supernovae. The supernovae were discovered in April 1997 in a ground-based survey at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Once the supernovae were discovered, the Hubble telescope was used to distinguish the supernovae from the light of their host galaxies. A series of Hubble telescope images were taken in May and June 1997 as the supernovae faded. Six Hubble telescope observations spanning five weeks were taken for each supernova. This time series enabled scientists to measure the brightness and create a light curve. Scientists then used the light curve to make an accurate estimate of the distances to the supernovae. Scientists combined the estimated distance with the measured velocity of the supernova's host galaxy to determine the expansion rate of the universe in the past (5 to 7 billion years ago) and compare it with the current rate. These supernovae belong to a class called Type Ia, which are considered reliable distance indicators. Looking at great distances also means looking back in time because of the finite velocity of light. SN 1997ck exploded when the universe was half its present age. It is the most distant supernova ever discovered (at a redshift of 0.97), erupting 7.7 billion years ago. The two other supernovae exploded about 5 billion years ago. SN 1997ce has a redshift of 0.44; SN 1997cj, 0.50. SN 1997ck is in the constellation Hercules, SN 1997ce is in Lynx, just north of Gemini; and SN 1997cj is in Ursa Major, near the Hubble Deep Field

  19. A native-like intermediate serves as a branching point between the folding and aggregation pathways of the mouse prion protein

    PubMed Central

    Honda, Ryo P.; Xu, Ming; Yamaguchi, Kei-ichi; Roder, Heinrich; Kuwata, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Transient folding intermediates and/or partially unfolded equilibrium states are thought to play a key role in the formation of protein aggregates. However, there is only indirect evidence linking accumulation of folding intermediates to aggregation, and the underlying mechanism remains to be elucidated. Here we show that a partially unfolded state of the prion protein accumulates both as a stable equilibrium state at acidic pH (A-state) and as a late folding intermediate. With a time resolution of approximately 60 μs, we systematically studied the kinetics of folding and unfolding, starting from various initial conditions including the U-, N-, and A-states. Quantitative modeling showed that the observed kinetic data are completely consistent with a sequential four-state mechanism where the A-state is a late folding intermediate. Combined with previous evidence linking A-state accumulation to aggregation, the results indicate that this native-like state serves as a branching point between the folding and aggregation pathways. PMID:26256540

  20. Pool size measurements facilitate the determination of fluxes at branching points in non-stationary metabolic flux analysis: the case of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Heise, Robert; Fernie, Alisdair R; Stitt, Mark; Nikoloski, Zoran

    2015-01-01

    Pool size measurements are important for the estimation of absolute intracellular fluxes in particular scenarios based on data from heavy carbon isotope experiments. Recently, steady-state fluxes estimates were obtained for central carbon metabolism in an intact illuminated rosette of Arabidopsis thaliana grown photoautotrophically (Szecowka et al., 2013; Heise et al., 2014). Fluxes were estimated therein by integrating mass-spectrometric data of the dynamics of the unlabeled metabolic fraction, data on metabolic pool sizes, partitioning of metabolic pools between cellular compartments and estimates of photosynthetically inactive pools, with a simplified model of plant central carbon metabolism. However, the fluxes were determined by treating the pool sizes as fixed parameters. Here we investigated whether and, if so, to what extent the treatment of pool sizes as parameters to be optimized in three scenarios may affect the flux estimates. The results are discussed in terms of benchmark values for canonical pathways and reactions, including starch and sucrose synthesis as well as the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylation and oxygenation reactions. In addition, we discuss pathways emerging from a divergent branch point for which pool sizes are required for flux estimation, irrespective of the computational approach used for the simulation of the observable labeling pattern. Therefore, our findings indicate the necessity for development of techniques for accurate pool size measurements to improve the quality of flux estimates from non-stationary flux estimates in intact plant cells in the absence of alternative flux measurements.

  1. Pool size measurements facilitate the determination of fluxes at branching points in non-stationary metabolic flux analysis: the case of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Heise, Robert; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Stitt, Mark; Nikoloski, Zoran

    2015-01-01

    Pool size measurements are important for the estimation of absolute intracellular fluxes in particular scenarios based on data from heavy carbon isotope experiments. Recently, steady-state fluxes estimates were obtained for central carbon metabolism in an intact illuminated rosette of Arabidopsis thaliana grown photoautotrophically (Szecowka et al., 2013; Heise et al., 2014). Fluxes were estimated therein by integrating mass-spectrometric data of the dynamics of the unlabeled metabolic fraction, data on metabolic pool sizes, partitioning of metabolic pools between cellular compartments and estimates of photosynthetically inactive pools, with a simplified model of plant central carbon metabolism. However, the fluxes were determined by treating the pool sizes as fixed parameters. Here we investigated whether and, if so, to what extent the treatment of pool sizes as parameters to be optimized in three scenarios may affect the flux estimates. The results are discussed in terms of benchmark values for canonical pathways and reactions, including starch and sucrose synthesis as well as the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylation and oxygenation reactions. In addition, we discuss pathways emerging from a divergent branch point for which pool sizes are required for flux estimation, irrespective of the computational approach used for the simulation of the observable labeling pattern. Therefore, our findings indicate the necessity for development of techniques for accurate pool size measurements to improve the quality of flux estimates from non-stationary flux estimates in intact plant cells in the absence of alternative flux measurements. PMID:26082786

  2. Cloning and bacterial expression of sesquiterpene cyclase, a key branch point enzyme for the synthesis of sesquiterpenoid phytoalexin capsidiol in UV-challenged leaves of Capsicum annuum.

    PubMed

    Back, K; He, S; Kim, K U; Shin, D H

    1998-09-01

    Sesquiterpene cyclase, a branch point enzyme in the general isoprenoid pathway for the synthesis of phytoalexin capsidiol, was induced in detached leaves of Capsicum annuum (pepper) by UV treatment. The inducibility of cyclase enzyme activities paralleled the absolute amount of cyclase protein(s) of pepper immunodetected by monoclonal antibodies raised against tobacco sesquiterpene cyclase. A cDNA library was constructed with poly(A)+ RNA isolated from 24 h UV-challenged leaves of pepper. A cDNA clone for sesquiterpene cyclase in pepper was isolated by using a tobacco 5-epi aristolochene synthase gene as a heterologous probe. The predicted protein encoded by this cDNA was comprised of 559 amino acids and had a relative molecular mass of 65,095. The primary structural information from the cDNA clone revealed that it shared 77%, 72% and 49% identity with 5-epi aristolochene, vetispiradiene, and cadinene synthase, respectively. The enzymatic product catalyzed by the cDNA clone in bacteria was identified as 5-epi aristolochene, as judged by argentation TLC. RNA blot hybridization demonstrated the induction of an mRNA consistent with the induction of cyclase enzyme activity in UV-treated pepper. PMID:9816674

  3. Cancer-Associated SF3B1 Hotspot Mutations Induce Cryptic 3' Splice Site Selection through Use of a Different Branch Point.

    PubMed

    Darman, Rachel B; Seiler, Michael; Agrawal, Anant A; Lim, Kian H; Peng, Shouyong; Aird, Daniel; Bailey, Suzanna L; Bhavsar, Erica B; Chan, Betty; Colla, Simona; Corson, Laura; Feala, Jacob; Fekkes, Peter; Ichikawa, Kana; Keaney, Gregg F; Lee, Linda; Kumar, Pavan; Kunii, Kaiko; MacKenzie, Crystal; Matijevic, Mark; Mizui, Yoshiharu; Myint, Khin; Park, Eun Sun; Puyang, Xiaoling; Selvaraj, Anand; Thomas, Michael P; Tsai, Jennifer; Wang, John Y; Warmuth, Markus; Yang, Hui; Zhu, Ping; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Furman, Richard R; Yu, Lihua; Smith, Peter G; Buonamici, Silvia

    2015-11-01

    Recurrent mutations in the spliceosome are observed in several human cancers, but their functional and therapeutic significance remains elusive. SF3B1, the most frequently mutated component of the spliceosome in cancer, is involved in the recognition of the branch point sequence (BPS) during selection of the 3' splice site (ss) in RNA splicing. Here, we report that common and tumor-specific splicing aberrations are induced by SF3B1 mutations and establish aberrant 3' ss selection as the most frequent splicing defect. Strikingly, mutant SF3B1 utilizes a BPS that differs from that used by wild-type SF3B1 and requires the canonical 3' ss to enable aberrant splicing during the second step. Approximately 50% of the aberrantly spliced mRNAs are subjected to nonsense-mediated decay resulting in downregulation of gene and protein expression. These findings ascribe functional significance to the consequences of SF3B1 mutations in cancer. PMID:26565915

  4. Controlled by Distant Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-03-01

    VLT Automatically Takes Detailed Spectra of Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows Only Minutes After Discovery A time-series of high-resolution spectra in the optical and ultraviolet has twice been obtained just a few minutes after the detection of a gamma-ray bust explosion in a distant galaxy. The international team of astronomers responsible for these observations derived new conclusive evidence about the nature of the surroundings of these powerful explosions linked to the death of massive stars. At 11:08 pm on 17 April 2006, an alarm rang in the Control Room of ESO's Very Large Telescope on Paranal, Chile. Fortunately, it did not announce any catastrophe on the mountain, nor with one of the world's largest telescopes. Instead, it signalled the doom of a massive star, 9.3 billion light-years away, whose final scream of agony - a powerful burst of gamma rays - had been recorded by the Swift satellite only two minutes earlier. The alarm was triggered by the activation of the VLT Rapid Response Mode, a novel system that allows for robotic observations without any human intervention, except for the alignment of the spectrograph slit. ESO PR Photo 17a/07 ESO PR Photo 17a/07 Triggered by an Explosion Starting less than 10 minutes after the Swift detection, a series of spectra of increasing integration times (3, 5, 10, 20, 40 and 80 minutes) were taken with the Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES), mounted on Kueyen, the second Unit Telescope of the VLT. "With the Rapid Response Mode, the VLT is directly controlled by a distant explosion," said ESO astronomer Paul Vreeswijk, who requested the observations and is lead-author of the paper reporting the results. "All I really had to do, once I was informed of the gamma-ray burst detection, was to phone the staff astronomers at the Paranal Observatory, Stefano Bagnulo and Stan Stefl, to check that everything was fine." The first spectrum of this time series was the quickest ever taken of a gamma-ray burst afterglow

  5. Observations of Distant Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donahue, Megan

    2004-01-01

    The is the proceedings and papers supported by the LTSA grant: Homer, D. J.\\& Donahue, M. 2003, in "The Emergence of Cosmic Structure": 13'h Astrophysics Conference Proceedings, Vol. 666,3 1 1-3 14, (AIP). Baumgartner, W. H., Loewenstein, M., Horner, D. J., Mushotzky, R. F. 2003, HEAD- AAS, 35.3503. Homer, D. J. , Donahue, M., Voit G. M. 2003, HEAD-AAS, 35.1309. Nowak, M. A., Smith, B., Donahue, M., Stocke, J. 2003, HEAD-AAS, 35.1316. Scott, D., Borys, C., Chapman, S. C., Donahue, M., Fahlman, G. G., Halpem, M. Newbury, P. 2002, AAS, 128.01. Jones, L. R. et al. 2002, A new era in cosmology, ASP Conference Proceedings, Vol. 283, p. 223 Donahue, M., Daly, R. A., Homer, D. J. 2003, ApJ, 584, 643, Constraints on the Cluster Environments and Hotspot magnetic field strengths for radio sources 3280 and 3254. Donahue, M., et al. 2003, ApJ, 598, 190. The mass, baryonic fraction, and x-ray temperature of the luminous, high-redshift cluster of galaxies MS045 1.6-0305 Perlman, E. S. et al. 2002, ApJS, 140, 256. Smith, B. J., Nowak, M., Donahue, M., Stocke, J. 2003, AJ, 126, 1763. Chandra Observations of the Interacting NGC44 10 Group of Galaxies. Postman, M., Lauer, T. R., Oegerle, W., Donahue, M. 2002, ApJ, 579, 93. The KPNO/deep-range cluster survey I. The catalog and space density of intermediate-redshift clusters. Molnar, S. M., Hughes, J. P., Donahue, M., Joy, M. 2002, ApJ, 573, L91, Chandra Observations of Unresolved X-Ray Sources around Two Clusters of Galaxies. Donahue, M., Mack, J., 2002 NewAR, 46, 155, HST NIcmos and WFPC2 observations of molecular hydrogen and dust around cooling flows. Koekemoer, A. M. et al. 2002 NewAR, 46, 149, Interactions between the A2597 central radio source and dense gas host galaxy. Donahue, M. et al. 2002 ApJ, 569,689, Distant cluster hunting II.

  6. Galactic Teamwork Makes Distant Bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-03-01

    During the period of reionization that followed the dark ages of our universe, hydrogen was transformed from a neutral state, which is opaque to radiation, to an ionized one, which is transparent to radiation. But what generated the initial ionizing radiation? The recent discovery of multiple distant galaxies offers evidence for how this process occurred.Two Distant GalaxiesWe believe reionization occurred somewhere between a redshift of z = 6 and 7, because Ly-emitting galaxies drop out at roughly this redshift. Beyond this distance, were generally unable to see the light from these galaxies, because the universe is no longer transparent to their emission. This is not always the case, however: if a bubble of ionized gas exists around a distant galaxy, the radiation can escape, allowing us to see the galaxy.This is true of two recently-discovered Ly-emitting galaxies, confirmed to be at a redshift of z~7 and located near one another in a region known as the Bremer Deep Field. The fact that were able to see the radiation from these galaxies means that they are in an ionized HII region presumably one of the earlier regions to have become reionized in the universe.But on their own, neither of these galaxies is capable of generating an ionized bubble large enough for their light to escape. So what ionized the region around them, and what does this mean for our understanding of how reionization occurred in the universe?A Little Help From FriendsLocation in different filters of the objects in the Hubble Bremer Deep Field catalog. The z~7 selection region is outlined by the grey box. BDF-521 and BDF-3299 were the two originally discovered galaxies; the remaining red markers indicate the additional six galaxies discovered in the same region. [Castellano et al. 2016]A team of scientists led by Marco Castellano (Rome Observatory, INAF) investigated the possibility that there are other, faint galaxies near these two that have helped to ionize the region. Performing a survey

  7. Evolutionary Branching in a Finite Population: Deterministic Branching vs. Stochastic Branching

    PubMed Central

    Wakano, Joe Yuichiro; Iwasa, Yoh

    2013-01-01

    Adaptive dynamics formalism demonstrates that, in a constant environment, a continuous trait may first converge to a singular point followed by spontaneous transition from a unimodal trait distribution into a bimodal one, which is called “evolutionary branching.” Most previous analyses of evolutionary branching have been conducted in an infinitely large population. Here, we study the effect of stochasticity caused by the finiteness of the population size on evolutionary branching. By analyzing the dynamics of trait variance, we obtain the condition for evolutionary branching as the one under which trait variance explodes. Genetic drift reduces the trait variance and causes stochastic fluctuation. In a very small population, evolutionary branching does not occur. In larger populations, evolutionary branching may occur, but it occurs in two different manners: in deterministic branching, branching occurs quickly when the population reaches the singular point, while in stochastic branching, the population stays at singularity for a period before branching out. The conditions for these cases and the mean branching-out times are calculated in terms of population size, mutational effects, and selection intensity and are confirmed by direct computer simulations of the individual-based model. PMID:23105010

  8. Rural Outreach: Connecting Distant Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenkel, Mary Beth

    Rural outreach in community mental health centers involves staff commuting from a central agency to surrounding rural towns to provide clinical and/or community service. The problem for outreach staff is how to best provide services to a rural network that is distant and different from the urban network. In general the greater the distance, the…

  9. The Cosmic Dance of Distant Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-03-01

    detail, since they had to select a single slit, i.e. a single direction, across the galaxy. Things changed with the availability of the multi-object GIRAFFE spectrograph [2], now installed on the 8.2-m Kueyen Unit Telescope of ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) at the Paranal Observatory (Chile). In one mode, known as "3-D spectroscopy" or "integral field", this instrument can obtain simultaneous spectra of smaller areas of extended objects like galaxies or nebulae. For this, 15 deployable fibre bundles, the so-called Integral Field Units (IFUs) , cf. ESO PR 01/02 , are used to make meticulous measurements of distant galaxies. Each IFU is a microscopic, state-of-the-art two-dimensional lens array with an aperture of 3 x 2 arcsec2 on the sky. It is like an insect's eye, with twenty micro-lenses coupled with optical fibres leading the light recorded at each point in the field to the entry slit of the spectrograph. ESO PR Photo 10c/06 ESO PR Photo 10c/06 Dark Matter and Stellar Mass in Distant Galaxies "GIRAFFE on ESO's VLT is the only instrument in the world that is able to analyze simultaneously the light coming from 15 galaxies covering a field of view almost as large as the full moon," said Mathieu Puech, lead author of one the papers presenting the results [3]. "Every galaxy observed in this mode is split into continuous smaller areas where spectra are obtained at the same time." The astronomers used GIRAFFE to measure the velocity fields of several tens of distant galaxies, leading to the surprising discovery that as much as 40% of distant galaxies were "out of balance" - their internal motions were very disturbed - a possible sign that they are still showing the aftermath of collisions between galaxies. When they limited themselves to only those galaxies that have apparently reached their equilibrium, the scientists found that the relation between the dark matter and the stellar content did not appear to have evolved during the last 6 billions years. Thanks to its

  10. Distant Massive Clusters and Cosmology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donahue, Megan

    1999-01-01

    We present a status report of our X-ray study and analysis of a complete sample of distant (z=0.5-0.8), X-ray luminous clusters of galaxies. We have obtained ASCA and ROSAT observations of the five brightest Extended Medium Sensitivity (EMSS) clusters with z > 0.5. We have constructed an observed temperature function for these clusters, and measured iron abundances for all of these clusters. We have developed an analytic expression for the behavior of the mass-temperature relation in a low-density universe. We use this mass-temperature relation together with a Press-Schechter-based model to derive the expected temperature function for different values of Omega-M. We combine this analysis with the observed temperature functions at redshifts from 0 - 0.8 to derive maximum likelihood estimates for the value of Omega-M. We report preliminary results of this analysis.

  11. Synchronous network of distant telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhilyaev, B.; Svyatogorov, O.; Verlyuk, I.; Andreev, M.; Sergeev, A.; Lovkaya, M.; Antov, A.; Konstantinova-Antova, R.; Bogdanovski, R.; Avgoloupis, S.; Seiradakis, J.; Contadakis, M. E.

    The Synchronous Network of distant Telescopes (SNT) represents an innovative approach in observational astrophysics. The authors present an unique existing realization of the SNT-conception. It was founded within the international collaboration between astronomical observatories of Ukraine, Russia, Bulgaria and Greece. All the telescopes of the Network are equipped with standardized photometric systems (based on photo-multipliers). The unified timing systems (based on GPS-receivers) synchronize all the apertures to UTC with an accuracy of 1 microsecond and better. The essential parts of the SNT are the original software for operating and data processing. The described international Network successfully works for more than 10 years. The obtained unique observational data made it possible to discover new fine-scale features and flare-triggered phenomena in flaring red dwarfs, as well as the recently found high-frequency variability in some chromospherically active stars.

  12. The Cosmic Dance of Distant Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-03-01

    detail, since they had to select a single slit, i.e. a single direction, across the galaxy. Things changed with the availability of the multi-object GIRAFFE spectrograph [2], now installed on the 8.2-m Kueyen Unit Telescope of ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) at the Paranal Observatory (Chile). In one mode, known as "3-D spectroscopy" or "integral field", this instrument can obtain simultaneous spectra of smaller areas of extended objects like galaxies or nebulae. For this, 15 deployable fibre bundles, the so-called Integral Field Units (IFUs) , cf. ESO PR 01/02 , are used to make meticulous measurements of distant galaxies. Each IFU is a microscopic, state-of-the-art two-dimensional lens array with an aperture of 3 x 2 arcsec2 on the sky. It is like an insect's eye, with twenty micro-lenses coupled with optical fibres leading the light recorded at each point in the field to the entry slit of the spectrograph. ESO PR Photo 10c/06 ESO PR Photo 10c/06 Dark Matter and Stellar Mass in Distant Galaxies "GIRAFFE on ESO's VLT is the only instrument in the world that is able to analyze simultaneously the light coming from 15 galaxies covering a field of view almost as large as the full moon," said Mathieu Puech, lead author of one the papers presenting the results [3]. "Every galaxy observed in this mode is split into continuous smaller areas where spectra are obtained at the same time." The astronomers used GIRAFFE to measure the velocity fields of several tens of distant galaxies, leading to the surprising discovery that as much as 40% of distant galaxies were "out of balance" - their internal motions were very disturbed - a possible sign that they are still showing the aftermath of collisions between galaxies. When they limited themselves to only those galaxies that have apparently reached their equilibrium, the scientists found that the relation between the dark matter and the stellar content did not appear to have evolved during the last 6 billions years. Thanks to its

  13. Metabolite and transcript profiling of berry skin during fruit development elucidates differential regulation between Cabernet Sauvignon and Shiraz cultivars at branching points in the polyphenol pathway

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Grapevine berries undergo complex biochemical changes during fruit maturation, many of which are dependent upon the variety and its environment. In order to elucidate the varietal dependent developmental regulation of primary and specialized metabolism, berry skins of Cabernet Sauvignon and Shiraz were subjected to gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC-MS) based metabolite profiling from pre-veraison to harvest. The generated dataset was augmented with transcript profiling using RNAseq. Results The analysis of the metabolite data revealed similar developmental patterns of change in primary metabolites between the two cultivars. Nevertheless, towards maturity the extent of change in the major organic acid and sugars (i.e. sucrose, trehalose, malate) and precursors of aromatic and phenolic compounds such as quinate and shikimate was greater in Shiraz compared to Cabernet Sauvignon. In contrast, distinct directional projections on the PCA plot of the two cultivars samples towards maturation when using the specialized metabolite profiles were apparent, suggesting a cultivar-dependent regulation of the specialized metabolism. Generally, Shiraz displayed greater upregulation of the entire polyphenol pathway and specifically higher accumulation of piceid and coumaroyl anthocyanin forms than Cabernet Sauvignon from veraison onwards. Transcript profiling revealed coordinated increased transcript abundance for genes encoding enzymes of committing steps in the phenylpropanoid pathway. The anthocyanin metabolite profile showed F3′5′H-mediated delphinidin-type anthocyanin enrichment in both varieties towards maturation, consistent with the transcript data, indicating that the F3′5′H-governed branching step dominates the anthocyanin profile at late berry development. Correlation analysis confirmed the tightly coordinated metabolic changes during development, and suggested a source-sink relation between

  14. Distant intentionality and healing: assessing the evidence.

    PubMed

    Schlitz, M; Braud, W

    1997-11-01

    Since the 1950s, researchers have attempted to understand reports of distant or "psychic" healing, developing experimental protocols that test the distant healing hypothesis by measuring biological changes in a target system while ruling out suggestion or self-regulation as counterexplanations. This article provides a brief overview of these "healing analog" experiments. It also provides a summary and meta-analysis of 30 formal experiments in which self-reported healers, "psychics," and other self-selected volunteers attempted to influence autonomic nervous system activity in a distant person. Results across the experiments showed a significant and characteristic variation during distant intentionality periods, compared with randomly interspersed control periods. Possible alternative explanations for the reported effects are considered. Finally the implications of distant intentionality are discussed for an understanding of the possible mechanisms of distant healing, the nature of the mind-body relationship, and the role of consciousness in the physical world.

  15. A splice site mutant of maize activates cryptic splice sites, elicits intron inclusion and exon exclusion, and permits branch point elucidation.

    PubMed

    Lal, S; Choi, J H; Shaw, J R; Hannah, L C

    1999-10-01

    DNA sequence analysis of the bt2-7503 mutant allele of the maize brittle-2 gene revealed a point mutation in the 5' terminal sequence of intron 3 changing GT to AT. This lesion completely abolishes use of this splice site, activates two cryptic splice sites, and alters the splicing pattern from extant splice sites. One activated donor site, located nine nt 5' to the normal splice donor site, begins with the dinucleotide GC. While non-consensus, this sequence still permits both trans-esterification reactions of pre-mRNA splicing. A second cryptic site located 23 nt 5' to the normal splice site and beginning with GA, undergoes the first trans-esterification reaction leading to lariat formation, but lacks the ability to participate in the second reaction. Accumulation of this splicing intermediate and use of an innovative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction technique (J. Vogel, R.H. Wolfgang, T. Borner [1997] Nucleic Acids Res 25: 2030-2031) led to the identification of 3' intron sequences needed for lariat formation. In most splicing reactions, neither cryptic site is recognized. Most mature transcripts include intron 3, while the second most frequent class lacks exon 3. Traditionally, the former class of transcripts is taken as evidence for the intron definition of splicing, while the latter class has given credence to the exon definition of splicing. PMID:10517832

  16. Distant retrograde orbits for the Moon's exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorenko, Vladislav

    We discuss the properties of the distant retrograde orbits (which are called quasi-satellite orbits also) around Moon. For the first time the distant retrograde orbits were described by J.Jackson in studies on restricted three body problem at the beginning of 20th century [1]. In the synodic (rotating) reference frame distant retrograde orbit looks like an ellipse whose center is slowly drifting in the vicinity of minor primary body while in the inertial reference frame the third body is orbiting the major primary body. Although being away the Hill sphere the third body permanently stays close enough to the minor primary. Due to this reason the distant retrograde orbits are called “quasi-satellite” orbits (QS-orbits) too. Several asteroids in solar system are in a QS-orbit with respect to one of the planet. As an example we can mention the asteroid 2002VE68 which circumnavigates Venus [2]. Attention of specialists in space flight mechanics was attracted to QS-orbits after the publications of NASA technical reports devoted to periodic moon orbits [3,4]. Moving in QS-orbit the SC remains permanently (or at least for long enough time) in the vicinity of small celestial body even in the case when the Hill sphere lies beneath the surface of the body. The properties of the QS-orbit can be studied using the averaging of the motion equations [5,6,7]. From the theoretical point of view it is a specific case of 1:1 mean motion resonance. The integrals of the averaged equations become the parameters defining the secular evolution of the QS-orbit. If the trajectory is robust enough to small perturbations in the simplified problem (i.e., restricted three body problem) it may correspond to long-term stability of the real-world orbit. Our investigations demonstrate that under the proper choice of the initial conditions the QS-orbits don’t escape from Moon or don’t impact Moon for long enough time. These orbits can be recommended as a convenient technique for the large

  17. Cosmic Ray Transport in the Distant Heliosheath

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Florinski, V.; Adams, James H.; Washimi, H.

    2011-01-01

    The character of energetic particle transport in the distant heliosheath and especially in the vicinity of the heliopause could be quite distinct from the other regions of the heliosphere. The magnetic field structure is dominated by a tightly wrapped oscillating heliospheric current sheet which is transported to higher latitudes by the nonradial heliosheath flows. Both Voyagers have, or are expected to enter a region dominated by the sectored field formed during the preceding solar maximum. As the plasma flow slows down on approach to the heliopause, the distance between the folds of the current sheet decreases to the point where it becomes comparable to the cyclotron radius of an energetic ion, such as a galactic cosmic ray. Then, a charged particle can effectively drift across a stack of magnetic sectors with a speed comparable with the particle s velocity. Cosmic rays should also be able to efficiently diffuse across the mean magnetic field if the distance between sector boundaries varies. The region of the heliopause could thus be much more permeable to cosmic rays than was previously thought. This new transport proposed mechanism could explain the very high intensities (approaching the model interstellar values) of galactic cosmic rays measured by Voyager 1 during 2010-2011.

  18. Cold Gas in Distant Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carilli, Christopher; Walter, Fabian

    2015-08-01

    Over the past decade, observations of the cool interstellar medium (ISM) in distant galaxies via molecular and atomic fine structure line (FSL) emission have gone from a curious look into a few extreme, rare objects to a mainstream tool for studying galaxy formation out to the highest redshifts. Molecular gas has been observed in about 200 galaxies at z > 1 to z ~ 7, including AGN host-galaxies, highly star-forming submillimeter galaxies, and increasing samples of main-sequence color-selected star-forming galaxies. Studies have moved well beyond simple detections to dynamical imaging at kpc resolution and multiline, multispecies studies that determine the physical conditions in the ISM in early galaxies. Observations of the cool gas are the required complement to studies of the stellar density and star-formation history of the Universe as they reveal the phase of the ISM that immediately precedes star formation in galaxies.Current observations suggest that the order of magnitude increase in the cosmic star-formation rate density from z ~ 0 to 2 is commensurate with a similar increase in the gas-to-stellar mass ratio in star-forming disk galaxies. Progress has been made in determining the CO luminosity to H2 mass conversion factor at high z. The dichotomy between high versus low values for the conversion factor for main-sequence versus starburst galaxies, respectively, appears to persist with increasing redshift, with a likely dependence on metalicity and other local physical conditions. There may also be two sequences in the relationship between star-formation rate and gas mass: one for starbursts, in which the gas consumption timescale is short (~ few e7 years), and one for main sequence galaxies, with an order of magnitude longer gas consumption timescale.With the advent of ALMA, studies of atomic FSL emission are rapidly progressing, with ~ 50 galaxies detected in the exceptionally bright [CII] 158 um line to date, 50% in the last year or so. The [CII] line is

  19. Using Distant Sources in Local Seismic Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julian, Bruce; Foulgr, Gillian

    2014-05-01

    Seismic tomography methods such as the 'ACH' method of Aki, Christoffersson & Husebye (1976, 1977) are subject to significant bias caused by the unknown wave-speed structure outside the study volume, whose effects are mathematically of the same order as the local-structure effects being studied. Computational experiments using whole-mantle wave-speed models show that the effects are also of comparable numerical magnitude (Masson & Trampert, 1997). Failure to correct for these effects will significantly corrupt computed local structures. This bias can be greatly reduced by solving for additional parameters defining the shapes, orientations, and arrival times of the incident wavefronts. The procedure is exactly analogous to solving for hypocentral locations in local-earthquake tomography. For planar incident wavefronts, each event adds three free parameters and the forward problem is surprisingly simple: The first-order change in the theoretical arrival time at observation point B resulting from perturbations in the incident-wave time t0 and slowness vector s is δtB ≡ δt0 + δs · rA = δtA, the change in the time of the plane wave at the point A where the un-perturbed ray enters the study volume (Julian and Foulger, submitted). This consequence of Fermat's principle apparently has not previously been recognized. In addition to eliminating the biasing effect of structure outside the study volume, this formalism enables us to combine data from local and distant events in studies of local structure, significantly improving resolution of deeper structure, particularly in places such as volcanic and geothermal areas where seismicity is confined to shallow depths. Many published models that were derived using ACH and similar methods probably contain significant artifacts and are in need of re-evaluation.

  20. Parallel Interior Point Solver - Simple Branch & Bound

    SciTech Connect

    Oxberry, Geoffrey; Munguia, Lluis-Miquel; Rajan, Deepak

    2015-02-04

    The purpose of this software package is to solve large-scale block-angular mixed-integer (linear) programs specified in SMPS format; the major application of this software package is to solving large-scale stochastic mixed-integer programs, which are block-angular.

  1. DISTANT CLUSTER OF GALAXIES [left

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    One of the deepest images to date of the universe, taken with NASA's Hubble Space Telescope (HST), reveals thousands of faint galaxies at the detection limit of present day telescopes. Peering across a large volume of the observable cosmos, Hubble resolves thousands of galaxies from five to twelve billion light-years away. The light from these remote objects has taken billions of years to cross the expanding universe, making these distant galaxies fossil evidence' of events that happened when the universe was one-third its present age. A fraction of the galaxies in this image belong to a cluster located nine billion light-years away. Though the field of view (at the cluster's distance) is only two million light-years across, it contains a multitude of fragmentary objects. (By comparison, the two million light-years between our Milky Way galaxy and its nearest large companion galaxy, in the constellation Andromeda, is essentially empty space!) Very few of the cluster's members are recognizable as normal spiral galaxies (like our Milky Way), although some elongated members might be edge-on disks. Among this zoo of odd galaxies are ``tadpole-like'' objects, disturbed and apparently merging systems dubbed 'train-wrecks,' and a multitude of faint, tiny shards and fragments, dwarf galaxies or possibly an unknown population of objects. However, the cluster also contains red galaxies that resemble mature examples of today's elliptical galaxies. Their red color comes from older stars that must have formed shortly after the Big Bang. The image is the full field view of the Wide Field and Planetary Camera-2. The picture was taken in intervals between May 11 and June 15, 1994 and required an 18-hour long exposure, over 32 orbits of HST, to reveal objects down to 29th magnitude. [bottom right] A close up view of the peculiar radio galaxy 3C324 used to locate the cluster. The galaxy is nine billion light-years away as measured by its spectral redshift (z=1.2), and located in the

  2. Arming and firing system for DISTANT RUNNER

    SciTech Connect

    Skenandore, L.H.; Johnson, J.P.

    1982-03-01

    Sandia A and F systems Division 1132 provided arming and firing support for the DISTANT RUNNER Test Program at White Sands Missile Range. This report describes the field support and the firing system that was used.

  3. [Distant mental influence on living organisms].

    PubMed

    Bonilla, Ernesto

    2013-12-01

    This article reviews studies of distant mental influence on living organisms, including mental suggestions of sleeping and awakening, mental influence at long distances, mental interactions with remote biological systems, mental effects on physiological activity and the sense of being stared at. Significant effects of distant mental influence have been shown in several randomized controlled trials in humans, animals, plants, bacteria and cells in the laboratory. Although distant mental influence on living organisms appears to contradict our ordinary sense of reality and the laws defined by conventional science, several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the observed effects; they include skeptical, signal transfer, field, multidimensional space/time and quantum mechanics hypotheses. In conclusion, as the progress of physics continues to expand our comprehension of reality, a rational explanation for distant mind-matter interaction will emerge and, as history has shown repeatedly, the supernatural events will evolve into paranormal and then, into normal ones, as the scientific frontiers expand. PMID:24502184

  4. [Distant mental influence on living organisms].

    PubMed

    Bonilla, Ernesto

    2013-12-01

    This article reviews studies of distant mental influence on living organisms, including mental suggestions of sleeping and awakening, mental influence at long distances, mental interactions with remote biological systems, mental effects on physiological activity and the sense of being stared at. Significant effects of distant mental influence have been shown in several randomized controlled trials in humans, animals, plants, bacteria and cells in the laboratory. Although distant mental influence on living organisms appears to contradict our ordinary sense of reality and the laws defined by conventional science, several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the observed effects; they include skeptical, signal transfer, field, multidimensional space/time and quantum mechanics hypotheses. In conclusion, as the progress of physics continues to expand our comprehension of reality, a rational explanation for distant mind-matter interaction will emerge and, as history has shown repeatedly, the supernatural events will evolve into paranormal and then, into normal ones, as the scientific frontiers expand.

  5. Gene Transfers Between Distantly Related Organisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doolittle, Russell F.

    2003-01-01

    With the completion of numerous microbial genome sequences, reports of individual gene transfers between distantly related prokaryotes have become commonplace. On the other hand, transfers between prokaryotes and eukaryotes still excite the imagination. Many of these claims may be premature, but some are certainly valid. In this chapter, the kinds of supporting data needed to propose transfers between distantly related organisms and cite some interesting examples are considered.

  6. Toward an understanding of fibrin branching structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogelson, Aaron L.; Keener, James P.

    2010-05-01

    The blood clotting enzyme thrombin converts fibrinogen molecules into fibrin monomers which polymerize to form a fibrous three-dimensional gel. The concentration of thrombin affects the architecture of the resulting gel, in particular, a higher concentration of thrombin produces a gel with more branch points per unit volume and with shorter fiber segments between branch points. We propose a mechanism by which fibrin branching can occur and show that this mechanism can lead to dependence of the gel’s structure (at the time of gelation) on the rate at which monomer is supplied. A higher rate of monomer supply leads to a gel with a higher branch concentration and with shorter fiber segments between branch points. The origin of this dependence is explained.

  7. Einstein Ring in Distant Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-06-01

    Using ESO's Very Large Telescope, Rémi Cabanac and his European colleagues have discovered an amazing cosmic mirage, known to scientists as an Einstein Ring. This cosmic mirage, dubbed FOR J0332-3557, is seen towards the southern constellation Fornax (the Furnace), and is remarkable on at least two counts. First, it is a bright, almost complete Einstein ring. Second, it is the farthest ever found. ESO PR Photo 20a/05 ESO PR Photo 20a/05 Deep Image of a Region in Fornax (FORS/VLT) [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 434 pix - 60k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 867 pix - 276k] [Full Res - JPEG: 1859 x 2015 pix - 3.8M] ESO PR Photo 20b/05 ESO PR Photo 20b/05 Zoom-in on the Newly Found Einstein Ring (FORS/VLT) [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 575 pix - 168k] [Normal - JPEG: 630 x 906 pix - 880k] Caption: ESO PR Photo 20a/05 is a composite image taken in two bands (B and R) with VLT/FORS1 of a small portion of the sky (field-of-view 7x7' or 1/15th of the area of the full moon). The faintest object seen in the image has a magnitude 26, that is, it is 100 million times fainter than what can be observed with the unaided eye. The bright elliptical galaxy on the lower-left quadrant is a dwarf galaxy part of a large nearby cluster in the Fornax constellation. As for all deep images of the sky, this field shows a variety of objects, the brightest ponctual sources being stars from our Galaxy. By far the field is dominated by thousands of faint background galaxies the colours of which are related to the age of their dominant stellar population, their dust content and their distance. The newly found Einstein ring is visible in the top right part of the image. ESO PR Photo 20b/05 zooms-in on the position of the newly found cosmic mirage. ESO PR Photo 20c/05 ESO PR Photo 20c/05 Einstein Ring in Distant Universe (FORS/VLT) [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 584 pix - 104k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 1168 pix - 292k] [Full Res - JPEG: 1502 x 2192 pix - 684k] Caption of ESO PR Photo 20c/05: The left image is magnified and centred

  8. Treatment of distant metastases from follicular cell-derived thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Schlumberger, Martin; Leboulleux, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Distant metastases from thyroid cancer of follicular origin are uncommon. Treatment includes levothyroxine administration at suppressive doses, focal treatment modalities with surgery, external radiation therapy and thermal ablation, and radioiodine in patients with uptake of (131)I in their metastases. Two thirds of distant metastases will become refractory to radioiodine at some point, and when there is a significant tumor burden and documented progression on imaging, a treatment with a kinase inhibitor may provide benefits. PMID:25750740

  9. Treatment of distant metastases from follicular cell-derived thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Leboulleux, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Distant metastases from thyroid cancer of follicular origin are uncommon. Treatment includes levothyroxine administration at suppressive doses, focal treatment modalities with surgery, external radiation therapy and thermal ablation, and radioiodine in patients with uptake of 131I in their metastases. Two thirds of distant metastases will become refractory to radioiodine at some point, and when there is a significant tumor burden and documented progression on imaging, a treatment with a kinase inhibitor may provide benefits. PMID:25750740

  10. Branch Library Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perkins, John W.; And Others

    Designed for the training of a newly appointed branch librarian as well as for general background on the function of a branch library for the entire staff, this publication was written as a comprehensive guide to the administration of a branch library. Specific chapters focus on: (1) administrative goals and activities, (2) organizational…

  11. Tree Branching: Leonardo da Vinci's Rule versus Biomechanical Models

    PubMed Central

    Minamino, Ryoko; Tateno, Masaki

    2014-01-01

    This study examined Leonardo da Vinci's rule (i.e., the sum of the cross-sectional area of all tree branches above a branching point at any height is equal to the cross-sectional area of the trunk or the branch immediately below the branching point) using simulations based on two biomechanical models: the uniform stress and elastic similarity models. Model calculations of the daughter/mother ratio (i.e., the ratio of the total cross-sectional area of the daughter branches to the cross-sectional area of the mother branch at the branching point) showed that both biomechanical models agreed with da Vinci's rule when the branching angles of daughter branches and the weights of lateral daughter branches were small; however, the models deviated from da Vinci's rule as the weights and/or the branching angles of lateral daughter branches increased. The calculated values of the two models were largely similar but differed in some ways. Field measurements of Fagus crenata and Abies homolepis also fit this trend, wherein models deviated from da Vinci's rule with increasing relative weights of lateral daughter branches. However, this deviation was small for a branching pattern in nature, where empirical measurements were taken under realistic measurement conditions; thus, da Vinci's rule did not critically contradict the biomechanical models in the case of real branching patterns, though the model calculations described the contradiction between da Vinci's rule and the biomechanical models. The field data for Fagus crenata fit the uniform stress model best, indicating that stress uniformity is the key constraint of branch morphology in Fagus crenata rather than elastic similarity or da Vinci's rule. On the other hand, mechanical constraints are not necessarily significant in the morphology of Abies homolepis branches, depending on the number of daughter branches. Rather, these branches were often in agreement with da Vinci's rule. PMID:24714065

  12. Characterizing Branched Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drury, Byron; Klales, Anna; Heller, Eric

    2014-03-01

    Branched flow appears in a variety of physical systems spanning length scales from microns to thousands of kilometers. For instance, it plays an important role in both electron transport in two dimensional electron gases and the propagation of tsunamis in the ocean. Branches have typically been identified with caustics in the theoretical literature, but concentrations of flux recognizable as branches can arise from other mechanisms. We propose a generalized definition of branching based on a local measure of the stability of trajectories. We analytically and numerically study the characteristics of Hamiltonian flow in phase space and characterize the relationship between branch formation and trajectory stability.

  13. HUBBLE SPIES MOST DISTANT SUPERNOVA EVER SEEN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers pinpointed a blaze of light from the farthest supernova ever seen, a dying star that exploded 10 billion years ago. The detection and analysis of this supernova, called 1997ff, is greatly bolstering the case for the existence of a mysterious form of dark energy pervading the cosmos, making galaxies hurl ever faster away from each other. The supernova also offers the first glimpse of the universe slowing down soon after the Big Bang, before it began speeding up. This panel of images, taken with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, shows the supernova's cosmic neighborhood; its home galaxy; and the dying star itself. Astronomers found this supernova in 1997 during a second look at the northern Hubble Deep Field [top panel], a tiny region of sky first explored by the Hubble telescope in 1995. The image shows the myriad of galaxies Hubble spied when it peered across more than 10 billion years of time and space. The white box marks the area where the supernova dwells. The photo at bottom left is a close-up view of that region. The white arrow points to the exploding star's home galaxy, a faint elliptical. Its redness is due to the billions of old stars residing there. The picture at bottom right shows the supernova itself, distinguished by the white dot in the center. Although this stellar explosion is among the brightest beacons in the universe, it could not be seen directly in the Hubble images. The stellar blast is so distant from Earth that its light is buried in the glow of its host galaxy. To find the supernova, astronomers compared two pictures of the 'deep field' taken two years apart. One image was of the original Hubble Deep Field; the other, the follow-up deep-field picture taken in 1997. Using special computer software, astronomers then measured the light from the galaxies in both images. Noting any changes in light output between the two pictures, the computer identified a blob of light in the 1997 picture

  14. Heralded Quantum Entanglement between Distant Matter Qubits

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wen-Juan; Wang, Xiang-Bin

    2015-01-01

    We propose a scheme to realize heralded quantum entanglement between two distant matter qubits using two Λ atom systems. Our proposal does not need any photon interference. We also present a general theory of outcome state of non-monochromatic incident light and finite interaction time. PMID:26041259

  15. Distant visceral metastases in pleural mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Roberts, G H

    1976-10-01

    Distant visceral metastases were found in 15 of 32 cases of pleural mesothelioma (47%). Contrary to earlier reports pleural mesothelioma should be regarded as a tumour in which visceral metastases are not uncommon. No association was found between the histological type of mesothelioma and visceral metastases; the peritoneal involvement found in five cases is probably due to local infiltration and seeding.

  16. Detection of cancer before distant metastasis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To establish a distant metastasis (DM) cells must disseminate from the primary tumor and overcome a series of obstacles, the metastatic cascade. In this study we develop a mathematical model for this cascade to estimate the tumor size and the circulating tumor cell (CTC) load before the first metastasis has formed from a primary breast cancer tumor. Methods The metastatic cascade is described in discrete steps: 1. local tumor growth; 2. dissemination into circulation; 3. survival in circulation; 4. extravasation into tissue; and 5. growth into a metastasis. The model was built using data and relationships described in the literature to predict the relationship between tumor size and probability of distant metastasis for 38715 patients with surgically removed TXNXM0 primary breast cancer from the Netherlands Cancer Registry. The model was calibrated using primary tumor size, probability of distant metastasis and time to distant metastasis for 1489 patients with stage T1BNXM0 (25% of total patients with T1BNXM0). Validation of the model was done with data for all patients. Results From the time to distant metastasis of these 38715 breast cancer patients, we determined a tumor doubling time of 1.7 ± 0.9 months. Fitting the data for 25% of T1B patients estimates a metastatic efficiency of 1 metastasis formed per 60 million disseminated tumor cells. Validation of the model to data of patients in all T-stages shows good agreement between model and epidemiological data. To reduce the 5-year risk of distant metastasis for TXNXM0 from 9.2% to 1.0%, the primary tumor needs to be detected and removed before it reaches a diameter of 2.7 ± 1.6 mm. At this size, the model predicts that there will be 9 ± 6 CTC/L blood. Conclusions To reduce the rate of distant metastasis in surgically treated TXNXM0 breast cancer to 1%, imaging technology will need to be able to detect lesions of 2.7 mm in diameter or smaller. Before CTC detection can be applied in

  17. Single Molecule Dynamics of Branched DNA Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mai, Danielle; Sing, Charles; Schroeder, Charles

    This work focuses on extending the field of single polymer dynamics to topologically complex polymers. Here, we report the direct observation of DNA-based branched polymers. Recently, we recently demonstrated a two-step synthesis method to generate star, H-shaped, and comb polymers for single molecule visualization. Following synthesis, we use single-color or dual-color single molecule fluorescence microscopy to directly visualize branched polymer dynamics in flow, in particular tracking side branches and backbones independently. In this way, our imaging method allows for characterization of molecular properties, including quantification of polymer contour length and branch distributions. Moving beyond characterization, we use molecular rheology and single molecule techniques to study the dynamics of single branched polymers in flow. Here, we utilize precision microfluidics to directly observe branched DNA polymer conformations during transient stretching, steady-state extension, and relaxation from high stretch. We specifically measure backbone end-to-end distance as a function of time. Experiments and Brownian dynamics simulations show that branched polymer relaxation is a strong function of the number of branches and position of branch points along the main chain backbone.

  18. The CYP2C19 Intron 2 Branch Point SNP is the Ancestral Polymorphism Contributing to the Poor Metabolizer Phenotype in Livers with CYP2C19*35 and CYP2C19*2 Alleles

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhry, Amarjit S.; Prasad, Bhagwat; Shirasaka, Yoshiyuki; Fohner, Alison; Finkelstein, David; Fan, Yiping; Wang, Shuoguo; Wu, Gang; Aklillu, Eleni; Sim, Sarah C.; Thummel, Kenneth E.

    2015-01-01

    CYP2C19 rs12769205 alters an intron 2 branch point adenine leading to an alternative mRNA in human liver with complete inclusion of intron 2 (exon 2B). rs12769205 changes the mRNA reading frame, introduces 87 amino acids, and leads to a premature stop codon. The 1000 Genomes project (http://browser.1000genomes.org/index.html) indicated rs12769205 is in linkage disequilibrium with rs4244285 on CYP2C19*2, but found alone on CYP2C19*35 in Blacks. Minigenes containing rs12769205 transfected into HepG2 cells demonstrated this single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) alone leads to exon 2B and decreases CYP2C19 canonical mRNA. A residual amount of CYP2C19 protein was detectable by quantitative proteomics with tandem mass spectrometry in CYP2C19*2/*2 and *1/*35 liver microsomes with an exon 2 probe. However, an exon 4 probe, downstream from rs12769205, but upstream of rs4244285, failed to detect CYP2C19 protein in livers homozygous for rs12769205, demonstrating rs12769205 alone can lead to complete loss of CYP2C19 protein. CYP2C19 genotypes and mephenytoin phenotype were compared in 104 Ethiopians. Poor metabolism of mephenytoin was seen in persons homozygous for both rs12769205 and rs4244285 (CYP2C19*2/*2), but with little effect on mephenytoin disposition of CYP2C19*1/*2, CYP2C19*1/*3, or CYP2C19*1/*35 heterozygous alleles. Extended haplotype homozygosity tests of the HapMap Yorubans (YRI) showed both haplotypes carrying rs12769205 (CYP2C19*35 and CYP2C19*2) are under significant natural selection, with CYP2C19*35 having a higher relative extended haplotype homozygosity score. The phylogenetic tree of the YRI CYP2C19 haplotypes revealed rs12769205 arose first on CYP2C19*35 and that rs4244285 was added later, creating CYP2C19*2. In conclusion, rs12769205 is the ancestral polymorphism leading to aberrant splicing of CYP2C19*35 and CYP2C19*2 alleles in liver. PMID:26021325

  19. Strategies for distant speech recognitionin reverberant environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delcroix, Marc; Yoshioka, Takuya; Ogawa, Atsunori; Kubo, Yotaro; Fujimoto, Masakiyo; Ito, Nobutaka; Kinoshita, Keisuke; Espi, Miquel; Araki, Shoko; Hori, Takaaki; Nakatani, Tomohiro

    2015-12-01

    Reverberation and noise are known to severely affect the automatic speech recognition (ASR) performance of speech recorded by distant microphones. Therefore, we must deal with reverberation if we are to realize high-performance hands-free speech recognition. In this paper, we review a recognition system that we developed at our laboratory to deal with reverberant speech. The system consists of a speech enhancement (SE) front-end that employs long-term linear prediction-based dereverberation followed by noise reduction. We combine our SE front-end with an ASR back-end that uses neural networks for acoustic and language modeling. The proposed system achieved top scores on the ASR task of the REVERB challenge. This paper describes the different technologies used in our system and presents detailed experimental results that justify our implementation choices and may provide hints for designing distant ASR systems.

  20. On the colors of distant objects.

    PubMed

    Lynch, David K; Mazuk, S

    2005-09-20

    Distant objects like clouds, mountains, and the Sun can appear to have colors that are significantly different from their intrinsic colors: the low Sun is often red, white clouds and snow-capped peaks appear yellow or pink, and dark green or gray mountains can appear blue or purple. The color alteration increases with distance, or alternatively, optical depth. We investigate the perceived colors of distant objects by computing the CIE chromaticity coordinates from their spectra. For sources viewed through significant amounts of atmosphere (e.g., the low Sun), MODTRAN4 radiative-transfer calculations are used to retrieve the spectra. In addition to clouds and mountains, the colors of stars, the Sun, and the sky are presented as a function of solar elevation under a variety of atmospheric conditions.

  1. Quantitative Spectroscopy of Distant Type Ia Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bronder, T. J.; Hook, I.; Howell, D. A.; Sullivan, M.; Perrett, K.; Conley, A.; Astier, P.; Basa, S.; Carlberg, R. G.; Guy, J.; Pain, R.; Pritchet, C. J.; Neill, James D.

    2007-08-01

    Quantitative analysis of 24 high-z (zmed = 0.81) Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) spectra observed at the Gemini Telescopes for the Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS) is presented. This analysis includes equivalent width measurements of SNe Ia-specific absorption features with methods tailored to the reduced signal-to-noise and host galaxy contamination present in these distant spectra. The results from this analysis are compared to corresponding measurements of a large set of low-z SNe Ia from the literature. This comparison showed no significant difference (less than 2σ) between the spectroscopic features of the distant and nearby SNe; a result that supports the assumption that SNe Ia are not evolving with redshift. Additionally, a new correlation between SiII absorption (observed near peak luminosity) and SNe Ia peak magnitudes is presented.

  2. Entangling distant quantum dots using classical interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busch, Jonathan; Kyoseva, Elica S.; Trupke, Michael; Beige, Almut

    2008-10-01

    We show that it is possible to employ reservoir engineering to turn two distant and relatively bad cavities into one good cavity with a tunable spontaneous decay rate. As a result, quantum computing schemes, which would otherwise require the shuttling of atomic qubits in and out of an optical resonator, can now be applied to distant quantum dots. To illustrate this we transform a recent proposal to entangle two qubits via the observation of macroscopic fluorescence signals [J. Metz , Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 040503 (2006)] to the electron-spin states of two semiconductor quantum dots. Our scheme requires neither the coherent control of qubit-qubit interactions nor the detection of single photons. Moreover, the scheme is relatively robust against spin-bath couplings, parameter fluctuations, and the spontaneous emission of photons.

  3. Influencing Attitudes Toward Near and Distant Objects

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Kentaro; Eyal, Tal; Chaiken, Shelly; Trope, Yaacov; Liberman, Nira

    2008-01-01

    It is argued that the temporal distance of attitude objects systematically changes how the object is mentally represented, and thus influences the strength of particular persuasive appeals. Three experiments tested the hypothesis that people preferentially attend to arguments that highlight primary, abstract (high-level) vs. incidental, concrete (low-level) features when attitude objects are temporally distant vs. near. Results suggested that when attitude objects are temporally distant vs. near, arguments emphasizing primary vs. secondary features (Study 1), desirability vs. feasibility features (Study 2), and general classes vs. specific cases are more persuasive (Study 3). The relation of construal theory to dual process theories of persuasion and persuasion phenomena, such as personal relevance effects and functional matching effects, are discussed. PMID:19884971

  4. Melons are Branched Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurau, Razvan; Ryan, James P.

    2014-11-01

    Melonic graphs constitute the family of graphs arising at leading order in the 1/N expansion of tensor models. They were shown to lead to a continuum phase, reminiscent of branched polymers. We show here that they are in fact precisely branched polymers, that is, they possess Hausdorff dimension 2 and spectral dimension 4/3.

  5. Beyond Sedna: Probing the Distant Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwamb, Megan E.

    This thesis presents studies in observational planetary astronomy probing the structure of the Kuiper belt and beyond. The discovery of Sedna on a highly eccentric orbit beyond Neptune challenges our understanding of the solar system and suggests the presence of a population of icy bodies residing past the Kuiper belt. With a perihelion of 76 AU, Sedna is well beyond the reach of the gas-giants and could not be scattered onto its highly eccentric orbit from interactions with Neptune alone. Sedna's aphelion at ˜1000 AU is too far from the edge of the solar system to feel the perturbing effects of passing stars or galactic tides in the present-day solar neighborhood. Sedna must have been emplaced in its orbit at an earlier time when massive unknown bodies were present in or near the solar system. The orbits of distant Sedna-like bodies are dynamically frozen and serve as the relics of their formation process. We have performed two surveys to search for additional members of the Sedna population. In order to find the largest and brightest Sedna-like bodies we have searched ˜12,000 deg² within +/-30 degrees of the ecliptic to a limiting R magnitude of 21.3 using the QUEST camera on the 1.2m Samuel Oschin Telescope. To search for the fainter, more common members of this distant class of solar system bodies, we have performed an deep survey using the Subaru Prime Focus Camera on the 8.2m Subaru telescope covering 43 deg² to a limiting R magnitude of 25.3. Searching over a two-night baseline, we were sensitive to motions out to distances of approximately 1000 AU. We present the results of these surveys. We discuss the implications for a distant Sedna-like population beyond the Kuiper belt and discuss future prospects for detecting and studying these distant bodies, focusing in particular on the constraints we can place on the embedded stellar cluster environment the early Sun may have been born in, where the location and distribution of Sedna-like orbits sculpted by

  6. The fates of Solar system analogues with one additional distant planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veras, Dimitri

    2016-08-01

    The potential existence of a distant planet ("Planet Nine") in the Solar system has prompted a re-think about the evolution of planetary systems. As the Sun transitions from a main sequence star into a white dwarf, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune are currently assumed to survive in expanded but otherwise unchanged orbits. However, a sufficiently-distant and sufficiently-massive extra planet would alter this quiescent end scenario through the combined effects of Solar giant branch mass loss and Galactic tides. Here, I estimate bounds for the mass and orbit of a distant extra planet that would incite future instability in systems with a Sun-like star and giant planets with masses and orbits equivalent to those of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune. I find that this boundary is diffuse and strongly dependent on each of the distant planet's orbital parameters. Nevertheless, I claim that instability occurs more often than not when the planet is as massive as Jupiter and harbours a semimajor axis exceeding about 300 au, or has a mass of a super-Earth and a semimajor axis exceeding about 3000 au. These results hold for orbital pericentres ranging from 100 to at least 400 au. This instability scenario might represent a common occurrence, as potentially evidenced by the ubiquity of metal pollution in white dwarf atmospheres throughout the Galaxy.

  7. Materials Test Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Gail

    2012-01-01

    The Materials Test Branch resides at Marshall Space Flight Center's Materials and Processing laboratory and has a long history of supporting NASA programs from Mercury to the recently retired Space Shuttle. The Materials Test Branch supports its customers by supplying materials testing expertise in a wide range of applications. The Materials Test Branch is divided into three Teams, The Chemistry Team, The Tribology Team and the Mechanical Test Team. Our mission and goal is to provide world-class engineering excellence in materials testing with a special emphasis on customer service.

  8. Relevance of the Branch Point Adenosine, Coordination Loop, and 3′ Exon Binding Site for in Vivo Excision of the Sinorhizobium meliloti Group II Intron RmInt1*

    PubMed Central

    Molina-Sánchez, María Dolores; Barrientos-Durán, Antonio; Toro, Nicolás

    2011-01-01

    Excision of the bacterial group II intron RmInt1 has been demonstrated in vivo, resulting in the formation of both intron lariat and putative intron RNA circles. We show here that the bulged adenosine in domain VI of RmInt1 is required for splicing via the branching pathway, but branch site mutants produce small numbers of RNA molecules in which the first G residue of the intron is linked to the last C residue. Mutations in the coordination loop in domain I reduced splicing efficiency, but branched templates clearly predominated among splicing products. We also found that a single substitution at the EBS3 position (G329C), preventing EBS3-IBS3 pairing, resulted in the production of 50 to 100 times more RNA molecules in which the 5′ and 3′ extremities were joined. We provide evidence that these intron molecules may correspond to both, intron circles linked by a 2′-5′ phosphodiester bond, and tandem, head-to-tail intron copies. PMID:21521690

  9. Light and shadow from distant worlds.

    PubMed

    Deming, Drake; Seager, Sara

    2009-11-19

    Exoplanets are distant worlds that orbit stars other than our Sun. More than 370 such planets are known, and a growing fraction of them are discovered because they transit their star as seen from Earth. The special transit geometry enables us to measure masses and radii for dozens of planets, and we have identified gases in the atmospheres of several giant ones. Within the next decade, we expect to find and study a 'habitable' rocky planet transiting a cool red dwarf star close to our Sun. Eventually, we will be able to image the light from an Earth-like world orbiting a nearby solar-type star.

  10. Heralded photonic interaction between distant single ions.

    PubMed

    Schug, M; Huwer, J; Kurz, C; Müller, P; Eschner, J

    2013-05-24

    We establish a heralded interaction between two remotely trapped single (40)Ca(+) ions through the exchange of single photons. In the sender ion, we release single photons with a controlled temporal shape on the P(3/2) to D(5/2) transition and transmit them to the distant receiver ion. Individual absorption events in the receiver ion are detected by quantum jumps. For continuously generated photons, the absorption reduces significantly the lifetime of the long-lived D(5/2) state. For triggered single-photon transmission, we observe a coincidence between the emission at the sender and quantum jump events at the receiver. PMID:23745873

  11. The Olive Branch Awards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harnack, William

    1984-01-01

    The first annual Olive Branch Awards, sponsored by the Writers' and Publishers Alliance and the Editors' Organizing Committee, were given to ten magazines, out of 60 that submitted entries. Winning entries are described briefly. (IM)

  12. Restoration technology branch

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2007-01-01

    The mission of Leetown Science Center (LSC), Restoration Technology Branch (RTB) is to conduct research needed to restore or protect the chemical, physical and biological integrity of desirable aquatic systems.

  13. Back-Translation for Discovering Distant Protein Homologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gîrdea, Marta; Noé, Laurent; Kucherov, Gregory

    Frameshift mutations in protein-coding DNA sequences produce a drastic change in the resulting protein sequence, which prevents classic protein alignment methods from revealing the proteins’ common origin. Moreover, when a large number of substitutions are additionally involved in the divergence, the homology detection becomes difficult even at the DNA level. To cope with this situation, we propose a novel method to infer distant homology relations of two proteins, that accounts for frameshift and point mutations that may have affected the coding sequences. We design a dynamic programming alignment algorithm over memory-efficient graph representations of the complete set of putative DNA sequences of each protein, with the goal of determining the two putative DNA sequences which have the best scoring alignment under a powerful scoring system designed to reflect the most probable evolutionary process. This allows us to uncover evolutionary information that is not captured by traditional alignment methods, which is confirmed by biologically significant examples.

  14. Branch retinal vein occlusion.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Sadaf; Mirza, Sajid Ali; Shokh, Ishrat

    2008-01-01

    Retinal vein occlusions (RVO) are the second commonest sight threatening vascular disorder. Branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) and central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) are the two basic types of vein occlusion. Branch retinal vein occlusion is three times more common than central retinal vein occlusion and- second only to diabetic retinopathy as the most common retinal vascular cause of visual loss. The origin of branch retinal vein occlusion undoubtedly includes both systemic factors such as hypertension and local anatomic factors such as arteriovenous crossings. Branch retinal vein occlusion causes a painless decrease in vision, resulting in misty or distorted vision. Current treatment options don't address the underlying aetiology of branch retinal vein occlusion. Instead they focus on treating sequelae of the occluded venous branch, such as macular oedema, vitreous haemorrhage and traction retinal detachment from neovascularization. Evidences suggest that the pathogenesis of various types of retinal vein occlusion, like many other ocular vascular occlusive disorders, is a multifactorial process and there is no single magic bullet that causes retinal vein occlusion. A comprehensive management of patients with retinal vascular occlusions is necessary to correct associated diseases or predisposing abnormalities that could lead to local recurrences or systemic event. Along with a review of the literature, a practical approach for the management of retinal vascular occlusions is required, which requires collaboration between the ophthalmologist and other physicians: general practitioner, cardiologist, internist etc. as appropriate according to each case. PMID:19385476

  15. Distant Site Effects of Ingested Prebiotics

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Stephanie; Reid, Gregor

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiome is being more widely recognized for its association with positive health outcomes, including those distant to the gastrointestinal system. This has given the ability to maintain and restore microbial homeostasis a new significance. Prebiotic compounds are appealing for this purpose as they are generally food-grade substances only degraded by microbes, such as bifidobacteria and lactobacilli, from which beneficial short-chain fatty acids are produced. Saccharides such as inulin and other fructo-oligosaccharides, galactooligosaccharides, and polydextrose have been widely used to improve gastrointestinal outcomes, but they appear to also influence distant sites. This review examined the effects of prebiotics on bone strength, neural and cognitive processes, immune functioning, skin, and serum lipid profile. The mode of action is in part affected by intestinal permeability and by fermentation products reaching target cells. As the types of prebiotics available diversify, so too will our understanding of the range of microbes able to degrade them, and the extent to which body sites can be impacted by their consumption. PMID:27571098

  16. A Distant Solar System (Artist's Concept Animation)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This animation portrays an artist's concept of a distant hypothetical solar system, about the same age as our own. It begins close to the star, and then moves out past a number of planets. Though 'extrasolar' planets are too small to be seen with telescopes, astronomers have detected more than 100 gas giants like Jupiter via their gravitational tug on their parent stars.

    The view pulls back to reveal the outer fringes of the system and a ring of dusty debris that circles the star. This debris is all that remains of the planet-forming disk from which the planets evolved.

    Planets are formed when dusty material in a large disk surrounding a young star clumps together. Leftover material is eventually blown out by solar wind or pushed out by gravitational interactions with planets. Billions of years later, only an outer disk of debris remains.

    These outer debris disks are too faint to be imaged directly by visible-light telescopes. They are washed out by the glare of the Sun. However, NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope can detect their heat, or excess thermal emission, in infrared light. This allows astronomers to study the aftermath of planet building in distant solar systems like our own.

  17. Distant Site Effects of Ingested Prebiotics.

    PubMed

    Collins, Stephanie; Reid, Gregor

    2016-01-01

    The gut microbiome is being more widely recognized for its association with positive health outcomes, including those distant to the gastrointestinal system. This has given the ability to maintain and restore microbial homeostasis a new significance. Prebiotic compounds are appealing for this purpose as they are generally food-grade substances only degraded by microbes, such as bifidobacteria and lactobacilli, from which beneficial short-chain fatty acids are produced. Saccharides such as inulin and other fructo-oligosaccharides, galactooligosaccharides, and polydextrose have been widely used to improve gastrointestinal outcomes, but they appear to also influence distant sites. This review examined the effects of prebiotics on bone strength, neural and cognitive processes, immune functioning, skin, and serum lipid profile. The mode of action is in part affected by intestinal permeability and by fermentation products reaching target cells. As the types of prebiotics available diversify, so too will our understanding of the range of microbes able to degrade them, and the extent to which body sites can be impacted by their consumption. PMID:27571098

  18. Transport Measurements on Individual Branched Nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yong; Li, Wenzhi; Naughton, M. J.

    2005-03-01

    We have made electrical measurements on individual branched (``Y-junction") carbon nanotubes. After isolation on silicon substrates and identification via electron microscopy, photo and e-beam lithography were used to deposit metal electrodes (e.g. Au/Ti) onto individual branches of the nanostructures, including 4-probe configurations across a branch point (Y-junction). Various post-processing procedures, such as rapid thermal annealing and electron beam welding, were employed in attempts to improve contact resistances. Four-probe I-V measurements at room temperature yield varied intrinsic conductivity in these nanostructures (resistances between 10^4 and 10^7φ). Transmission microscopy reveals a fishbone internal structure, which could be responsible for the low conductance. We also report on the construction of ``divining rod'' cantilevers out of these branched nanotubes, using an etch-well technique, toward potential SPM applications, and on similar attempts using inorganic (e.g. ZnO2) nanowires.

  19. Cosmic Lens Reveals Distant Galactic Violence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-10-01

    By cleverly unraveling the workings of a natural cosmic lens, astronomers have gained a rare glimpse of the violent assembly of a young galaxy in the early Universe. Their new picture suggests that the galaxy has collided with another, feeding a supermassive black hole and triggering a tremendous burst of star formation. Gravitational Lens Diagram Imaging a Distant Galaxy Using a Gravitational Lens CREDIT: Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF Click on image for details and more graphics. The astronomers used the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope to look at a galaxy more than 12 billion light-years from Earth, seen as it was when the Universe was only about 15 percent of its current age. Between this galaxy and Earth lies another distant galaxy, so perfectly aligned along the line of sight that its gravity bends the light and radio waves from the farther object into a circle, or "Einstein Ring." This gravitational lens made it possible for the scientists to learn details of the young, distant galaxy that would have been unobtainable otherwise. "Nature provided us with a magnifying glass to peer into the workings of a nascent galaxy, providing an exciting look at the violent, messy process of building galaxies in the early history of the Universe," said Dominik Riechers, who led this project at the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy in Germany and now is a Hubble Fellow at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The new picture of the distant galaxy, dubbed PSS J2322+1944, shows a massive reservoir of gas, 16,000 light-years in diameter, that contains the raw material for building new stars. A supermassive black hole is voraciously eating material, and new stars are being born at the rate of nearly 700 Suns per year. By comparison, our Milky Way Galaxy produces the equivalent of about 3-4 Suns per year. The black hole appears to be near the edge, rather than at the center, of the giant gas reservoir, indicating, the astronomers say

  20. Differential conduction block in branches of a bifurcating axon.

    PubMed Central

    Grossman, Y; Parnas, I; Spira, M E

    1979-01-01

    1. Propagation of action potentials at high frequency was studied in a branching axon of the lobster by means of simultaneous intracellular recording both before and after the branch point. 2. Although the branching axon studied has a geometrical ratio close to one (perfect impedance matching) conduction across the branch point failed at stimulation frequencies above 30 Hz. 3. The block of conduction after high frequency stimulation occurred at the branch point per se. The parent axon and daughter branches continued to conduct action potentials. 4. Conduction block after high frequency stimulation appeared first in the thicker daughter branch and only later in the thin branch. 5. With high frequency stimulation there was a 10-15% reduction in amplitude of the action potential in the parent axon, a corresponding decrease in the rate of rise of the action potential, a 25-30% decrease in conduction velocity, marked increase in threshold and prolongation of the refractory period. In addition the membrane was depolarized by 1-3 mV. 6. Measurements of the membrane current using the patch clamp technique showed a large decrease in the phase of inward current associated with the action potential, before the branching point. 7. The small membrane depolarization seen after high frequency stimulation is not the sole cause of the conduction block. Imposed prolonged membrane depolarization (8 mV for 120 sec) was insufficient to produce conduction block. 8. In vivo chronic extracellular recordings from the main nerve bundle (which contains the parent axon) and the large daughter branch revealed that: (a) the duration and frequency of trains of action potentials along the axons exceeded those used in the isolated nerve experiments and (b) conduction failure in the large daughter branch could be induced in the whole animal by electrical stimulation of the main branch as in the isolated preparation. 9. Possible mechanisms underlying block of conduction after high frequency

  1. WARM DUSTY DEBRIS DISKS AND DISTANT COMPANION STARS: V488 PER AND 2M1337

    SciTech Connect

    Zuckerman, B.

    2015-01-10

    A possible connection between the presence of large quantities of warm (T ≥ 200 K) circumstellar dust at youthful stars and the existence of wide-separation companion stars has been noted in the literature. Here we point out the existence of a distant companion star to V488 Per, a K-type member of the α Persei cluster with the largest known fractional excess infrared luminosity (∼16%) of any main sequence star. We also report the presence of a distant companion to the previously recognized warm dust star 2M1337. With these discoveries the existence of a cause and effect relationship between a distant companion and large quantities of warm dust in orbit around youthful stars now seems compelling.

  2. Current sheet crossings in the distant magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heikkila, W. J.

    1988-01-01

    A computer search of crossings of the field reversal region in the middle of the distant magnetotail has been done with ISEE-3 data. It is found that the instantaneous direction of the magnetic field at the crossings Bz is northward on average at a distance of 220 earth radii, with moderate values of the plasma flow. This result suggests that the magnetic field lines are closed; since the flow is tailward, the Dungey (1961) model with a steady state reconnection line across the magnetotail earthward of the spacecraft is invalidated. The present result gives strong support to a model in which tailward boundary layer flow provides the viscous interaction proposed by Axford and Hines (1961). At higher values of the plasma velocity, negative values of Bz are found.

  3. Variable Stars in a Distant Spiral Galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A NASA Hubble Space Telescope (HST) view of the magnificent spiral galaxy NGC 4603, the most distant galaxy in which a special class of pulsating stars called Cepheid variables have been found. It is associated with the Centaurus cluster, one of the most massive assemblages of galaxies in the nearby universe. The Local Group of galaxies, of which the Milky Way is a member, is moving in the direction of Centaurus at a speed of more than a million miles an hour under the influence of the gravitational pull of the matter in that direction. Clusters of young bright blue stars highlight the galaxy's spiral arms. In contrast, red giant stars in the process of dying are also found. Only the very brightest stars in NGC 4603 can be seen individually, even with the unmatched ability of the Hubble Space Telescope to obtain detailed images of distant objects. Much of the diffuse glow comes from fainter stars that cannot be individually distinguished by Hubble. The reddish filaments are regions where clouds of dust obscure blue light from the stars behind them. This galaxy was observed by a team affiliated with the HST Key Project on the Extragalactic Distance Scale. Because NGC 4603 is much farther away than the other galaxies studied with Hubble by the Key Project team, 108 million light-years, its stars appear very faint from the Earth, and so accurately measuring their brightness, as is required for distinguishing the characteristic variations of Cepheids, is extremely difficult. Determining the distance to the galaxy required an unprecedented statistical analysis based on extensive computer simulations.

  4. Distant Operational Care Centre: Design Project Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The goal of this project is to outline the design of the Distant Operational Care Centre (DOCC), a modular medical facility to maintain human health and performance in space, that is adaptable to a range of remote human habitats. The purpose of this project is to outline a design, not to go into a complete technical specification of a medical facility for space. This project involves a process to produce a concise set of requirements, addressing the fundamental problems and issues regarding all aspects of a space medical facility for the future. The ideas presented here are at a high level, based on existing, researched, and hypothetical technologies. Given the long development times for space exploration, the outlined concepts from this project embodies a collection of identified problems, and corresponding proposed solutions and ideas, ready to contribute to future space exploration efforts. In order to provide a solid extrapolation and speculation in the context of the future of space medicine, the extent of this project's vision is roughly within the next two decades. The Distant Operational Care Centre (DOCC) is a modular medical facility for space. That is, its function is to maintain human health and performance in space environments, through prevention, diagnosis, and treatment. Furthermore, the DOCC must be adaptable to meet the environmental requirements of different remote human habitats, and support a high quality of human performance. To meet a diverse range of remote human habitats, the DOCC concentrates on a core medical capability that can then be adapted. Adaptation would make use of the DOCC's functional modularity, providing the ability to replace, add, and modify core functions of the DOCC by updating hardware, operations, and procedures. Some of the challenges to be addressed by this project include what constitutes the core medical capability in terms of hardware, operations, and procedures, and how DOCC can be adapted to different remote

  5. Fuzzy branching temporal logic.

    PubMed

    Moon, Seong-ick; Lee, Kwang H; Lee, Doheon

    2004-04-01

    Intelligent systems require a systematic way to represent and handle temporal information containing uncertainty. In particular, a logical framework is needed that can represent uncertain temporal information and its relationships with logical formulae. Fuzzy linear temporal logic (FLTL), a generalization of propositional linear temporal logic (PLTL) with fuzzy temporal events and fuzzy temporal states defined on a linear time model, was previously proposed for this purpose. However, many systems are best represented by branching time models in which each state can have more than one possible future path. In this paper, fuzzy branching temporal logic (FBTL) is proposed to address this problem. FBTL adopts and generalizes concurrent tree logic (CTL*), which is a classical branching temporal logic. The temporal model of FBTL is capable of representing fuzzy temporal events and fuzzy temporal states, and the order relation among them is represented as a directed graph. The utility of FBTL is demonstrated using a fuzzy job shop scheduling problem as an example. PMID:15376850

  6. Pen Branch delta expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, E.A.; Christensen, E.J.; Mackey, H.E.; Sharitz, R.R.; Jensen, J.R.; Hodgson, M.E.

    1984-02-01

    Since 1954, cooling water discharges from K Reactor ({anti X} = 370 cfs {at} 59 C) to Pen Branch have altered vegetation and deposited sediment in the Savannah River Swamp forming the Pen Branch delta. Currently, the delta covers over 300 acres and continues to expand at a rate of about 16 acres/yr. Examination of delta expansion can provide important information on environmental impacts to wetlands exposed to elevated temperature and flow conditions. To assess the current status and predict future expansion of the Pen Branch delta, historic aerial photographs were analyzed using both basic photo interpretation and computer techniques to provide the following information: (1) past and current expansion rates; (2) location and changes of impacted areas; (3) total acreage presently affected. Delta acreage changes were then compared to historic reactor discharge temperature and flow data to see if expansion rate variations could be related to reactor operations.

  7. Damage Tolerance Assessment Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, James L.

    2013-01-01

    The Damage Tolerance Assessment Branch evaluates the ability of a structure to perform reliably throughout its service life in the presence of a defect, crack, or other form of damage. Such assessment is fundamental to the use of structural materials and requires an integral blend of materials engineering, fracture testing and analysis, and nondestructive evaluation. The vision of the Branch is to increase the safety of manned space flight by improving the fracture control and the associated nondestructive evaluation processes through development and application of standards, guidelines, advanced test and analytical methods. The Branch also strives to assist and solve non-aerospace related NDE and damage tolerance problems, providing consultation, prototyping and inspection services.

  8. THE MASSIVE DISTANT CLUSTERS OF WISE SURVEY: THE FIRST DISTANT GALAXY CLUSTER DISCOVERED BY WISE

    SciTech Connect

    Gettings, Daniel P.; Gonzalez, Anthony H.; Mancone, Conor; Stanford, S. Adam; Eisenhardt, Peter R. M.; Stern, Daniel; Brodwin, Mark; Zeimann, Gregory R.; Masci, Frank J.; Papovich, Casey; Tanaka, Ichi; Wright, Edward L.

    2012-11-01

    We present spectroscopic confirmation of a z = 0.99 galaxy cluster discovered using data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). This is the first z {approx} 1 cluster candidate from the Massive Distant Clusters of WISE Survey to be confirmed. It was selected as an overdensity of probable z {approx}> 1 sources using a combination of WISE and Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR8 photometric catalogs. Deeper follow-up imaging data from Subaru and WIYN reveal the cluster to be a rich system of galaxies, and multi-object spectroscopic observations from Keck confirm five cluster members at z = 0.99. The detection and confirmation of this cluster represents a first step toward constructing a uniformly selected sample of distant, high-mass galaxy clusters over the full extragalactic sky using WISE data.

  9. Radioiodinated branched carbohydrates

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Mark M.; Knapp, Jr., Furn F.

    1989-01-01

    A radioiodinated branched carbohydrate for tissue imaging. Iodine-123 is stabilized in the compound by attaching it to a vinyl functional group that is on the carbohydrate. The compound exhibits good uptake and retention and is promising in the development of radiopharmaceuticals for brain, heart and tumor imaging.

  10. Front Range Branch Officers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Front Range Branch of AGU has installed officers for 1990: Ray Noble, National Center for Atmospheric Research, chair; Sherry Oaks, U.S. Geological Survey, chair-elect; Howard Garcia, NOAA, treasurer; Catharine Skokan, Colorado School of Mines, secretary. JoAnn Joselyn of NOAA is past chair. Members at large are Wallace Campbell, NOAA; William Neff, USGS; and Stephen Schneider, NCAR.

  11. Adsorption of annealed branched polymers on curved surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Jef; Erdemci-Tandogan, Gonca; Zandi, Roya

    2015-12-16

    The behavior of annealed branched polymers near adsorbing surfaces plays a fundamental role in many biological and industrial processes. Most importantly single stranded RNA in solution tends to fold up and self-bind to form a highly branched structure. Using a mean field theory, we both perturbatively and numerically examine the adsorption of branched polymers on surfaces of several different geometries in a good solvent. Independent of the geometry of the wall, we observe that as branching density increases, surface tension decreases. However, we find a coupling between the branching density and curvature in that a further lowering of surface tension occurs when the wall curves towards the polymer, but the amount of lowering of surface tension decreases when the wall curves away from the polymer. We find that for branched polymers confined into spherical cavities, most of branch-points are located in the vicinity of the interior wall and the surface tension is minimized for a critical cavity radius. For branch polymers next to sinusoidal surfaces, we find that branch-points accumulate at the valleys while end-points on the peaks.

  12. Cravity modulation of the moss Tortula modica branching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khorkavtsiv, Yaroslava; Kit, Nadja

    45-50 (o) to orthotropic stolon axes, and later it decreased negatively gravitropically. The bending of lateral branches of gravitropic protonemata is carried out in two stages: the light induction makes cells metabolically active, but not sensitive to gravitation, while the wall of daughter cell grows perpendicularly to the axes of mother cell and only after that the branches growth direction acquires dependent on gravitation fixed space orientation. Protonemata on light was branched under the angle 45-50 (o) to the axes of the main stolon, that caused similar phenotype of protonemata turf in many moss species. The growth of lateral branches and the set-point angle from the point of view of growth as physical process, is, perhaps, balanced by the action of gravitation and light, and is controlled endogenously by autotropic growth.

  13. 33 CFR 117.620 - Westport River-East Branch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Westport River-East Branch. 117... Branch. The Westport Point Bridge, mile 1.2 at Westport, shall operate as follows: (a) Public vessels of... designed, installed, and maintained, according to the provisions of § 118.160 of this chapter. (c) That...

  14. 33 CFR 117.620 - Westport River-East Branch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Westport River-East Branch. 117... Branch. The Westport Point Bridge, mile 1.2 at Westport, shall operate as follows: (a) Public vessels of... designed, installed, and maintained, according to the provisions of § 118.160 of this chapter. (c) That...

  15. 33 CFR 117.620 - Westport River-East Branch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Westport River-East Branch. 117... Branch. The Westport Point Bridge, mile 1.2 at Westport, shall operate as follows: (a) Public vessels of... designed, installed, and maintained, according to the provisions of § 118.160 of this chapter. (c) That...

  16. 33 CFR 117.620 - Westport River-East Branch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Westport River-East Branch. 117... Branch. The Westport Point Bridge, mile 1.2 at Westport, shall operate as follows: (a) Public vessels of... designed, installed, and maintained, according to the provisions of § 118.160 of this chapter. (c) That...

  17. The International Branch Campus as Transnational Strategy in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkins, Stephen; Huisman, Jeroen

    2012-01-01

    The international branch campus is a phenomenon on the rise, but we still have limited knowledge of the strategic choices underlying the start of these ventures. The objective of this paper is to shed light on the motivations and decisions of universities to engage (or not) with the establishment of international branch campuses. As a point of…

  18. The distant type Ia supernova rate

    SciTech Connect

    Pain, R.; Fabbro, S.; Sullivan, M.; Ellis, R.S.; Aldering, G.; Astier, P.; Deustua, S.E.; Fruchter, A.S.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D.E.; Hardin, D.; Hook, I.M.; Howell, D.A.; Irwin, M.J.; Kim, A.G.; Kim, M.Y.; Knop, R.A.; Lee, J.C.; Perlmutter, S.; Ruiz-Lapuente, P.; Schahmaneche, K.; Schaefer, B.; Walton, N.A.

    2002-05-20

    We present a measurement of the rate of distant Type Ia supernovae derived using 4 large subsets of data from the Supernova Cosmology Project. Within this fiducial sample,which surveyed about 12 square degrees, thirty-eight supernovae were detected at redshifts 0.25--0.85. In a spatially flat cosmological model consistent with the results obtained by the Supernova Cosmology Project, we derive a rest-frame Type Ia supernova rate at a mean red shift z {approx_equal} 0.55 of 1.53 {sub -0.25}{sub -0.31}{sup 0.28}{sup 0.32} x 10{sup -4} h{sup 3} Mpc{sup -3} yr{sup -1} or 0.58{sub -0.09}{sub -0.09}{sup +0.10}{sup +0.10} h{sup 2} SNu(1 SNu = 1 supernova per century per 10{sup 10} L{sub B}sun), where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second includes systematic effects. The dependence of the rate on the assumed cosmological parameters is studied and the redshift dependence of the rate per unit comoving volume is contrasted with local estimates in the context of possible cosmic star formation histories and progenitor models.

  19. Finding Basalt Chips from Distant Maria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G. J.

    2006-04-01

    The Apollo 16 landing site is in the lunar highlands, over 200 kilometers away from the nearest maria. Nevertheless, the Apollo 16 regolith contains a small percentage (<1%) of tiny fragments thrown to the site from distant maria. Ryan Zeigler, his colleagues at Washington University in St. Louis: Randy Korotev, Brad Jolliff, and the late Larry Haskin, and Jeffrey Gillis-Davis (University of Hawaii) made a detailed study of the chemical composition and mineralogy of fragments (only 2-4 millimeters across) of mare basalts. The basalts vary in composition, but are similar to other types identified previously. The team matched the compositions of the fragments to compositions of mare surfaces in the Apollo 16 region using remote sensing data from the Clementine mission. This blending of cosmochemical and remote sensing analyses allowed them to make educated guesses about where each of the basalt fragments may have originated. We now have a fuller understanding of the range of compositions of mare basalts and, because basalts record a wealth of information about planetary interiors, this research enlightens us about the diversity of rock compositions in the lunar mantle.

  20. NEARBY GALAXIES IN MORE DISTANT CONTEXTS

    SciTech Connect

    Eskew, Michael; Zaritsky, Dennis E-mail: dzaritsky@as.arizona.edu

    2011-02-15

    We use published reconstructions of the star formation history (SFH) of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), Small Magellanic Cloud, and NGC 300 from the analysis of resolved stellar populations to investigate where such galaxies might land on well-known extragalactic diagnostic plots over the galaxies' lifetime (assuming that nothing other than their stellar populations change). For example, we find that the evolution of these galaxies implies a complex evolution in the Tully-Fisher relation with look-back time and that the observed scatter is consistent with excursions these galaxies take as their stellar populations evolve. We find that the growth of stellar mass is weighted to early times, despite the strongly star-forming current nature of the three systems. Lastly, we find that these galaxies can take circuitous paths across the color-magnitude diagram. For example, it is possible, within the constraints provided by the current determination of its SFH, that the LMC reached the red sequence at intermediate age prior to ending back up on the blue cloud at the current time. Unfortunately, this behavior happens at sufficiently early times that our resolved SFH is crude and insufficiently constraining to convincingly demonstrate that this was the actual evolutionary path. The limited sample size precludes any general conclusions, but we present these as examples how we can bridge the study of resolved populations and the more distant universe.

  1. The Distant Type Ia Supernova Rate

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Pain, R.; Fabbro, S.; Sullivan, M.; Ellis, R. S.; Aldering, G.; Astier, P.; Deustua, S. E.; Fruchter, A. S.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D. E.; Hardin, D.; Hook, I. M.; Howell, D. A.; Irwin, M. J.; Kim, A. G.; Kim, M. Y.; Knop, R. A.; Lee, J. C.; Perlmutter, S.; Ruiz-Lapuente, P.; Schahmaneche, K.; Schaefer, B.; Walton, N. A.

    2002-05-28

    We present a measurement of the rate of distant Type Ia supernovae derived using 4 large subsets of data from the Supernova Cosmology Project. Within this fiducial sample, which surveyed about 12 square degrees, thirty-eight supernovae were detected at redshifts 0.25--0.85. In a spatially flat cosmological model consistent with the results obtained by the Supernova Cosmology Project, we derive a rest-frame Type Ia supernova rate at a mean red shift z {approx_equal} 0.55 of 1.53 {sub -0.25}{sub -0.31}{sup 0.28}{sup 0.32} x 10{sup -4} h{sup 3} Mpc{sup -3} yr{sup -1} or 0.58{sub -0.09}{sub -0.09}{sup +0.10}{sup +0.10} h{sup 2} SNu(1 SNu = 1 supernova per century per 10{sup 10} L{sub B}sun), where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second includes systematic effects. The dependence of the rate on the assumed cosmological parameters is studied and the redshift dependence of the rate per unit comoving volume is contrasted with local estimates in the context of possible cosmic star formation histories and progenitor models.

  2. The Most Distant X-Ray Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, Mark

    1999-01-01

    In this program we have used ROSAT (Roentgen Satellite Mission) to observe X-ray emission around several high redshift radio galaxies in a search for extended, hot plasma which may indicate the presence of a rich galaxy cluster. When this program was begun, massive, X-ray emitting galaxy clusters were known to exist out to to z=0.8, but no more distant examples had been identified. However, we had identified several apparently rich clusters around 3CR radio galaxies at z greater than 0.8, and hoped to use ROSAT to confirm the nature of these structures as massive, virialized clusters. We have written up our results and submitted them as a paper to the Astrophysical Journal. This paper has been refereed and requires some significant revisions to accommodate the referees comments. We are in the process of doing this, adding some additional analysis as well. We will resubmit the paper early in 2000, and hopefully will meet with the referee's approval. We are including three copies of the submitted paper here, although it has not yet been accepted for publication.

  3. Critical branching neural networks.

    PubMed

    Kello, Christopher T

    2013-01-01

    It is now well-established that intrinsic variations in human neural and behavioral activity tend to exhibit scaling laws in their fluctuations and distributions. The meaning of these scaling laws is an ongoing matter of debate between isolable causes versus pervasive causes. A spiking neural network model is presented that self-tunes to critical branching and, in doing so, simulates observed scaling laws as pervasive to neural and behavioral activity. These scaling laws are related to neural and cognitive functions, in that critical branching is shown to yield spiking activity with maximal memory and encoding capacities when analyzed using reservoir computing techniques. The model is also shown to account for findings of pervasive 1/f scaling in speech and cued response behaviors that are difficult to explain by isolable causes. Issues and questions raised by the model and its results are discussed from the perspectives of physics, neuroscience, computer and information sciences, and psychological and cognitive sciences.

  4. Atomic branching in molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, Ernesto; Rodríguez-Velázquez, Juan A.; Randić, Milan

    A graph theoretic measure of extended atomic branching is defined that accounts for the effects of all atoms in the molecule, giving higher weight to the nearest neighbors. It is based on the counting of all substructures in which an atom takes part in a molecule. We prove a theorem that permits the exact calculation of this measure based on the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the adjacency matrix of the graph representing a molecule. The definition of this measure within the context of the Hückel molecular orbital (HMO) and its calculation for benzenoid hydrocarbons are also studied. We show that the extended atomic branching can be defined using any real symmetric matrix, as well as any Hermitian (self-adjoint) matrix, which permits its calculation in topological, geometrical, and quantum chemical contexts.

  5. Electrochemical Energy Storage Branch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1985-01-01

    The activities of the Electrochemical Energy Storage Branch are highlighted, including the Technology Base Research and the Exploratory Technology Development and Testing projects within the Electrochemical Energy Storage Program for the 1984 fiscal year. General Headquarters activities are presented first; and then, a summary of the Director Controlled Milestones, followed by other major accomplishments. A listing of the workshops and seminars held during the year is also included.

  6. An Astrostatistical Approach to Distant Galaxy Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotz, Jennifer

    2012-10-01

    A galaxy's morphology is an important tracer of its recent assembly history and correlates strongly with other fundamental properties such as star-formation history, kinematics, and black hole mass. Our current approaches do not fully exploit the wealth of structural information available in the deep HST images, nor do they reliably classify rare but important populations such as galaxy mergers and unstable disks at z > 1. As a result, the connections between galaxy assembly, star formation, and morphological transformation via mergers, disk instabilities, and bulge formation remain unsolved problems.Our primary goals for this Legacy Archival program are {1} to derive a rigorous statistical methodology for quantifying and classifying distant galaxy structures; {2} to apply these new astrostatistical algorithms to galaxies at 0 < z < 2.5 in the major HST extragalactic legacy fields and measure the structural evolution; {3} to measure and classify mock HST images of hydrodynamical cosmological simulations of galaxies at 0 < z < 2.5, and test these against our measurements of the real universe.This program will produce several much-needed Legacy products. With these algorithms, we will produce and publicly release high quality catalogs of optical/near-IR quantitative morphology and classifications for the HST extragalactic legacy fields. We will also provide similar catalogs for mock HST images of state-of-the-art cosmological simulations of galaxy assembly and structural evolution. Finally, we will publicly release the software for calculating our new morphology statistics and running the new galaxy classification algorithms to encourage broad use by the community.

  7. Interpreting the Clustering of Distant Red Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Tinker, Jeremy L.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Zheng, Zheng; /Princeton, Inst. Advanced Study

    2009-08-03

    We analyze the angular clustering of z {approx} 2.3 distant red galaxies (DRGs) measured by Quadri et al. (2008). We find that, with robust estimates of the measurement errors and realistic halo occupation distribution modeling, the measured clustering can be well fit within standard halo occupation models, in contrast to previous results. However, in order to fit the strong break in w({theta}) at {theta} = 10{double_prime}, nearly all satellite galaxies in the DRG luminosity range are required to be DRGs. Within this luminosity-threshold sample, the fraction of galaxies that are DRGs is {approx} 44%, implying that the formation of DRGs is more efficient for satellite galaxies than for central galaxies. Despite the evolved stellar populations contained within DRGs at z = 2.3, 90% of satellite galaxies in the DRG luminosity range have been accreted within 500 Myr. Thus, satellite DRGs must have known they would become satellites well before the time of their accretion. This implies that the formation of DRGs correlates with large-scale environment at fixed halo mass, although the large-scale bias of DRGs can be well fit without such assumptions. Further data are required to resolve this issue. Using the observational estimate that {approx} 30% of DRGs have no ongoing star formation, we infer a timescale for star formation quenching for satellite galaxies of 450 Myr, although the uncertainty on this number is large. However, unless all non-star forming satellite DRGs were quenched before accretion, the quenching timescale is significantly shorter than z {approx} 0 estimates. Down to the completeness limit of the Quadri et al sample, we find that the halo masses of central DRGs are {approx} 50% higher than non-DRGs in the same luminosity range, but at the highest halo masses the central galaxies are DRGs only {approx} 2/3 of the time.

  8. Now and Then: William Branch's "In Splendid Error."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Melvin G.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses William Branch's play "In Splendid Error," a portrayal of events in the lives of Frederick Douglass and John Brown; points out that such plays can increase audiences' awareness of social and racial injustices. (GW)

  9. Recursive Branching Simulated Annealing Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bolcar, Matthew; Smith, J. Scott; Aronstein, David

    2012-01-01

    This innovation is a variation of a simulated-annealing optimization algorithm that uses a recursive-branching structure to parallelize the search of a parameter space for the globally optimal solution to an objective. The algorithm has been demonstrated to be more effective at searching a parameter space than traditional simulated-annealing methods for a particular problem of interest, and it can readily be applied to a wide variety of optimization problems, including those with a parameter space having both discrete-value parameters (combinatorial) and continuous-variable parameters. It can take the place of a conventional simulated- annealing, Monte-Carlo, or random- walk algorithm. In a conventional simulated-annealing (SA) algorithm, a starting configuration is randomly selected within the parameter space. The algorithm randomly selects another configuration from the parameter space and evaluates the objective function for that configuration. If the objective function value is better than the previous value, the new configuration is adopted as the new point of interest in the parameter space. If the objective function value is worse than the previous value, the new configuration may be adopted, with a probability determined by a temperature parameter, used in analogy to annealing in metals. As the optimization continues, the region of the parameter space from which new configurations can be selected shrinks, and in conjunction with lowering the annealing temperature (and thus lowering the probability for adopting configurations in parameter space with worse objective functions), the algorithm can converge on the globally optimal configuration. The Recursive Branching Simulated Annealing (RBSA) algorithm shares some features with the SA algorithm, notably including the basic principles that a starting configuration is randomly selected from within the parameter space, the algorithm tests other configurations with the goal of finding the globally optimal

  10. Three ancient hormonal cues co-ordinate shoot branching in a moss.

    PubMed

    Coudert, Yoan; Palubicki, Wojtek; Ljung, Karin; Novak, Ondrej; Leyser, Ottoline; Harrison, C Jill

    2015-03-25

    Shoot branching is a primary contributor to plant architecture, evolving independently in flowering plant sporophytes and moss gametophytes. Mechanistic understanding of branching is largely limited to flowering plants such as Arabidopsis, which have a recent evolutionary origin. We show that in gametophytic shoots of Physcomitrella, lateral branches arise by re-specification of epidermal cells into branch initials. A simple model co-ordinating the activity of leafy shoot tips can account for branching patterns, and three known and ancient hormonal regulators of sporophytic branching interact to generate the branching pattern- auxin, cytokinin and strigolactone. The mode of auxin transport required in branch patterning is a key divergence point from known sporophytic pathways. Although PIN-mediated basipetal auxin transport regulates branching patterns in flowering plants, this is not so in Physcomitrella, where bi-directional transport is required to generate realistic branching patterns. Experiments with callose synthesis inhibitors suggest plasmodesmal connectivity as a potential mechanism for transport.

  11. ROSAT Discovers Unique, Distant Cluster of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-06-01

    Brightest X-ray Cluster Acts as Strong Gravitational Lens Based on exciting new data obtained with the ROSAT X-ray satellite and a ground-based telescope at the ESO La Silla Observatory, a team of European astronomers [2] has just discovered a very distant cluster of galaxies with unique properties. It emits the strongest X-ray emission of any cluster ever observed by ROSAT and is accompanied by two extraordinarily luminous arcs that represent the gravitationally deflected images of even more distant objects. The combination of these unusual characteristics makes this cluster, now known as RXJ1347.5-1145, a most interesting object for further cosmological studies. DISCOVERY AND FOLLOW-UP OBSERVATIONS This strange cluster of galaxies was discovered during the All Sky Survey with the ROSAT X-ray satellite as a moderately intense X-ray source in the constellation of Virgo. It could not be identified with any already known object and additional ground-based observations were therefore soon after performed with the Max-Planck-Society/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at the La Silla observatory in Chile. These observations took place within a large--scale redshift survey of X-ray clusters of galaxies detected by the ROSAT All Sky Survey, a so-called ``ESO Key Programme'' led by astronomers from the Max-Planck-Institut fur Extraterrestrische Physik and the Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera. The main aim of this programme is to identify cluster X-ray sources, to determine the distance to the X-ray emitting clusters and to investigate their overall properties. These observations permitted to measure the redshift of the RXJ1347.5-1145 cluster as z = 0.45, i.e. it moves away from us with a velocity (about 106,000 km/sec) equal to about one-third of the velocity of light. This is an effect of the general expansion of the universe and it allows to determine the distance as about 5,000 million light-years (assuming a Hubble constant of 75 km/sec/Mpc). In other words, we see these

  12. Distant Influence of Kuroshio Eddies on North Pacific Weather Patterns?

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaohui; Chang, Ping; Saravanan, R; Montuoro, Raffaele; Hsieh, Jen-Shan; Wu, Dexing; Lin, Xiaopei; Wu, Lixin; Jing, Zhao

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution satellite measurements of surface winds and sea-surface temperature (SST) reveal strong coupling between meso-scale ocean eddies and near-surface atmospheric flow over eddy-rich oceanic regions, such as the Kuroshio and Gulf Stream, highlighting the importance of meso-scale oceanic features in forcing the atmospheric planetary boundary layer (PBL). Here, we present high-resolution regional climate modeling results, supported by observational analyses, demonstrating that meso-scale SST variability, largely confined in the Kuroshio-Oyashio confluence region (KOCR), can further exert a significant distant influence on winter rainfall variability along the U.S. Northern Pacific coast. The presence of meso-scale SST anomalies enhances the diabatic conversion of latent heat energy to transient eddy energy, intensifying winter cyclogenesis via moist baroclinic instability, which in turn leads to an equivalent barotropic downstream anticyclone anomaly with reduced rainfall. The finding points to the potential of improving forecasts of extratropical winter cyclones and storm systems and projections of their response to future climate change, which are known to have major social and economic impacts, by improving the representation of ocean eddy-atmosphere interaction in forecast and climate models. PMID:26635077

  13. Distant Influence of Kuroshio Eddies on North Pacific Weather Patterns?

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiaohui; Chang, Ping; Saravanan, R.; Montuoro, Raffaele; Hsieh, Jen-Shan; Wu, Dexing; Lin, Xiaopei; Wu, Lixin; Jing, Zhao

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution satellite measurements of surface winds and sea-surface temperature (SST) reveal strong coupling between meso-scale ocean eddies and near-surface atmospheric flow over eddy-rich oceanic regions, such as the Kuroshio and Gulf Stream, highlighting the importance of meso-scale oceanic features in forcing the atmospheric planetary boundary layer (PBL). Here, we present high-resolution regional climate modeling results, supported by observational analyses, demonstrating that meso-scale SST variability, largely confined in the Kuroshio-Oyashio confluence region (KOCR), can further exert a significant distant influence on winter rainfall variability along the U.S. Northern Pacific coast. The presence of meso-scale SST anomalies enhances the diabatic conversion of latent heat energy to transient eddy energy, intensifying winter cyclogenesis via moist baroclinic instability, which in turn leads to an equivalent barotropic downstream anticyclone anomaly with reduced rainfall. The finding points to the potential of improving forecasts of extratropical winter cyclones and storm systems and projections of their response to future climate change, which are known to have major social and economic impacts, by improving the representation of ocean eddy–atmosphere interaction in forecast and climate models. PMID:26635077

  14. Distant Influence of Kuroshio Eddies on North Pacific Weather Patterns?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaohui; Chang, Ping; Saravanan, R.; Montuoro, Raffaele; Hsieh, Jen-Shan; Wu, Dexing; Lin, Xiaopei; Wu, Lixin; Jing, Zhao

    2015-12-01

    High-resolution satellite measurements of surface winds and sea-surface temperature (SST) reveal strong coupling between meso-scale ocean eddies and near-surface atmospheric flow over eddy-rich oceanic regions, such as the Kuroshio and Gulf Stream, highlighting the importance of meso-scale oceanic features in forcing the atmospheric planetary boundary layer (PBL). Here, we present high-resolution regional climate modeling results, supported by observational analyses, demonstrating that meso-scale SST variability, largely confined in the Kuroshio-Oyashio confluence region (KOCR), can further exert a significant distant influence on winter rainfall variability along the U.S. Northern Pacific coast. The presence of meso-scale SST anomalies enhances the diabatic conversion of latent heat energy to transient eddy energy, intensifying winter cyclogenesis via moist baroclinic instability, which in turn leads to an equivalent barotropic downstream anticyclone anomaly with reduced rainfall. The finding points to the potential of improving forecasts of extratropical winter cyclones and storm systems and projections of their response to future climate change, which are known to have major social and economic impacts, by improving the representation of ocean eddy-atmosphere interaction in forecast and climate models.

  15. Combustion Branch Website Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Eric

    2004-01-01

    The NASA combustion branch is a leader in developing and applying combustion science to focused aerospace propulsion systems concepts. It is widely recognized for unique facilities, analytical tools, and personnel. In order to better communicate the outstanding research being done in this Branch to the public and other research organization, a more substantial website was desired. The objective of this project was to build an up-to-date site that reflects current research in a usable and attractive manner. In order to accomplish this, information was requested from all researchers in the Combustion branch, on their professional skills and on the current projects. This information was used to fill in the Personnel and Research sections of the website. A digital camera was used to photograph all personnel and these photographs were included in the personnel section as well. The design of the site was implemented using the latest web standards: xhtml and external css stylesheets. This implementation conforms to the guidelines recommended by the w3c. It also helps to ensure that the web site is accessible by disabled users, and complies with Section 508 Federal legislation (which mandates that all Federal websites be accessible). Graphics for the new site were generated using the gimp (www.gimp.org) an open-source graphics program similar to Adobe Photoshop. Also, all graphics on the site were of a reasonable size (less than 20k, most less than 2k) so that the page would load quickly. Technologies such as Macromedia Flash and Javascript were avoided, as these only function on some clients which have the proper software installed or enabled. The website was tested on different platforms with many different browsers to ensure there were no compatibility issues. The website was tested on windows with MS IE 6, MSIE 5 , Netscape 7, Mozilla and Opera. On a Mac, the site was tested with MS IE 5 , Netscape 7 and Safari.

  16. Thermal Energy Conversion Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bielozer, Matthew C.; Schreiber, Jeffrey, G.; Wilson, Scott D.

    2004-01-01

    The Thermal Energy Conversion Branch (5490) leads the way in designing, conducting, and implementing research for the newest thermal systems used in space applications at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Specifically some of the most advanced technologies developed in this branch can be broken down into four main areas: Dynamic Power Systems, Primary Solar Concentrators, Secondary Solar Concentrators, and Thermal Management. Work was performed in the Dynamic Power Systems area, specifically the Stirling Engine subdivision. Today, the main focus of the 5490 branch is free-piston Stirling cycle converters, Brayton cycle nuclear reactors, and heat rejection systems for long duration mission spacecraft. All space exploring devices need electricity to operate. In most space applications, heat energy from radioisotopes is converted to electrical power. The Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) already supplies electricity for missions such as the Cassini Spacecraft. The focus of today's Stirling research at GRC is aimed at creating an engine that can replace the RTG. The primary appeal of the Stirling engine is its high system efficiency. Because it is so efficient, the Stirling engine will significantly reduce the plutonium fuel mission requirements compared to the RTG. Stirling is also being considered for missions such as the lunar/Mars bases and rovers. This project has focused largely on Stirling Engines of all types, particularly the fluidyne liquid piston engine. The fluidyne was developed by Colin D. West. This engine uses the same concepts found in any type of Stirling engine, with the exception of missing mechanical components. All the working components are fluid. One goal was to develop and demonstrate a working Stirling Fluidyne Engine at the 2nd Annual International Energy Conversion Engineering Conference in Providence, Rhode Island.

  17. A Molecular Thermometer for the Distant Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-05-01

    Astronomers have made use of ESO's Very Large Telescope to detect for the first time in the ultraviolet the carbon monoxide molecule in a galaxy located almost 11 billion light-years away, a feat that had remained elusive for 25 years. This detection allows them to obtain the most precise measurement of the cosmic temperature at such a remote epoch. Green Flash at Paranal ESO PR Photo 13a/08 Finding well-hidden galaxies The team of astronomers [1] aimed the UVES spectrograph on ESO's VLT for more than 8 hours at a well-hidden galaxy whose light has taken almost 11 billion years to reach us, that is about 80% of the age of the Universe. The only way this galaxy can be seen is through the imprint its interstellar gas leaves on the spectrum of an even more remote quasar [2]. "Quasars are here only used as a beacon in the very distant Universe. Interstellar clouds of gas in galaxies, located between the quasars and us on the same line of sight, absorb parts of the light emitted by the quasars. The resulting spectrum consequently presents dark 'valleys' that can be attributed to well-known elements and possibly molecules," explains Raghunathan Srianand (Pune, India), who led the team making the observations. Thanks to the power of the VLT and a very careful selection of the target - the target was selected among about ten thousands quasars - the team was able to discover the presence of normal and deuterated molecular hydrogen (H2, HD) and carbon monoxide (CO) molecules in the interstellar medium of this remote galaxy. "This is the first time that these three molecules have been detected in absorption in front of a quasar, a detection that has remained elusive for more than a quarter century," says Cédric Ledoux (ESO), member of the team. The same team had already broken the record for the most distant detection of molecular hydrogen in a galaxy that we see as it was when the Universe was less than 1.5 billion years old (see ESO 16/06). The interstellar gas is the

  18. Flight Dynamics Analysis Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stengle, Tom; Flores-Amaya, Felipe

    2000-01-01

    This report summarizes the major activities and accomplishments carried out by the Flight Dynamics Analysis Branch (FDAB), Code 572, in support of flight projects and technology development initiatives in fiscal year 2000. The report is intended to serve as a summary of the type of support carried out by the FDAB, as well as a concise reference of key accomplishments and mission experience derived from the various mission support roles. The primary focus of the FDAB is to provide expertise in the disciplines of flight dynamics, spacecraft trajectory, attitude analysis, and attitude determination and control. The FDAB currently provides support for missions and technology development projects involving NASA, government, university, and private industry.

  19. Horizontal branch evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rood, R. T.; Crocker, D. A.

    In 1973 the outstanding problems confronting the theory of horizontal-branch (HB) evolution were the second-parameter problem and the Oosterhoff effect. Despite significant progress, particularly in the observations and in the observation/theory interface, they remain as the outstanding problems of 1988. The Oosterhoff effect is now discussed primarily in the guise of the Sandage period-shift effect. The morphology of the HB seems more complicated than ever. Many clusters show bimodal distributions along the HB. Here these are tentatively considered to be manifestations of the second parameter problem.

  20. Branch formation during organ development

    PubMed Central

    Gjorevski, Nikolce; Nelson, Celeste M.

    2010-01-01

    Invertebrates and vertebrates use branching morphogenesis to build epithelial trees to maximize the surface area of organs within a given volume. Several molecular regulators of branching have recently been discovered, a number of which are conserved across different organs and species. Signals that control branching at the cellular and tissue levels are also starting to emerge, and are rapidly unveiling the physical nature of branch development. Here we discuss the molecular, cellular and physical processes that govern branch formation and highlight the major outstanding questions in the field. PMID:20890968

  1. A numerical experiment on light pollution from distant sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocifaj, M.

    2011-08-01

    To predict the light pollution of the night-time sky realistically over any location or measuring point on the ground presents quite a difficult calculation task. Light pollution of the local atmosphere is caused by stray light, light loss or reflection of artificially illuminated ground objects or surfaces such as streets, advertisement boards or building interiors. Thus it depends on the size, shape, spatial distribution, radiative pattern and spectral characteristics of many neighbouring light sources. The actual state of the atmospheric environment and the orography of the surrounding terrain are also relevant. All of these factors together influence the spectral sky radiance/luminance in a complex manner. Knowledge of the directional behaviour of light pollution is especially important for the correct interpretation of astronomical observations. From a mathematical point of view, the light noise or veil luminance of a specific sky element is given by a superposition of scattered light beams. Theoretical models that simulate light pollution typically take into account all ground-based light sources, thus imposing great requirements on CPU and MEM. As shown in this paper, a contribution of distant sources to the light pollution might be essential under specific conditions of low turbidity and/or Garstang-like radiative patterns. To evaluate the convergence of the theoretical model, numerical experiments are made for different light sources, spectral bands and atmospheric conditions. It is shown that in the worst case the integration limit is approximately 100 km, but it can be significantly shortened for light sources with cosine-like radiative patterns.

  2. Pen Branch Fault Program

    SciTech Connect

    Price, V.; Stieve, A.L.; Aadland, R.

    1990-09-28

    Evidence from subsurface mapping and seismic reflection surveys at Savannah River Site (SRS) suggests the presence of a fault which displaces Cretaceous through Tertiary (90--35 million years ago) sediments. This feature has been described and named the Pen Branch fault (PBF) in a recent Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) paper (DP-MS-88-219). Because the fault is located near operating nuclear facilities, public perception and federal regulations require a thorough investigation of the fault to determine whether any seismic hazard exists. A phased program with various elements has been established to investigate the PBF to address the Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulatory guidelines represented in 10 CFR 100 Appendix A. The objective of the PBF program is to fully characterize the nature of the PBF (ESS-SRL-89-395). This report briefly presents current understanding of the Pen Branch fault based on shallow drilling activities completed the fall of 1989 (PBF well series) and subsequent core analyses (SRL-ESS-90-145). The results are preliminary and ongoing: however, investigations indicate that the fault is not capable. In conjunction with the shallow drilling, other activities are planned or in progress. 7 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Incredibly distant ionospheric responses to earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusupov, Kamil; Akchurin, Adel

    2015-04-01

    Attempts to observe ionospheric responses to the earthquake has been going on for decades. In recent years, the greatest progress in the study of this question have GPS-measurements with simultaneous HF-measurements. The use of a dense network of GPS-receivers and getting with it sufficiently detailed two-dimensional maps of the total electron content (TEC) greatly clarified the nature of the ionospheric response to strong earthquakes. For ionospheric responses observation, that are remote more than 1000 km from the strong earthquakes epicentres, it is necessary to applying more sensitive methods than GPS. The most experience in the observation of the ionospheric responses to earthquakes accumulated with Doppler sounding. Using these measurements, ionospheric disturbances characteristic features (signature) have been allocated, which associated with the passage of Rayleigh waves on the surface. Particular, this Rayleigh wave signatures allocation is implemented in the Nostradamus coherent backscatter radar. The authors of this method suggest using radar techniques like a sensitive "ionospheric seismometer." The most productive allocation and studying of the vertical structure ionospheric responses could be ionosonde observations. However, their typical 15 minute sounding rate is quite sufficient for observing the regular ionosphere, but it is not enough for studying the ionospheric responses to earthquakes, because ionospheric responses is often seen only in one ionogram and it is absent in adjacent. The decisive factor in establishing the striking ionospheric response to the earthquake was the Tohoku earthquake in 2011, when there was three ionosondes distant at 870-2000 km from the epicentre. These ionosondes simultaneously showed distortion of the F1-layer traces as its multiple stratification (multiple-cusp signature - MCS), which generated by Rayleigh wave. Note that there was another fourth Japanese ionosonde. It is located a little further near boundaries

  4. LIVE DEMONSTRATION OF DISTANT EARLY WARNING SYSTEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammitzsch, M.; Lendholt, M.; Wächter, J.

    2009-12-01

    The DEWS (Distant Early Warning System) [1] project, funded under the 6th Framework Programme of the European Union, has the objective to create a new generation of interoperable early warning systems based on an open sensor platform. This platform integrates OGC [2] SWE [3] compliant sensor systems for the rapid detection of earthquakes, for the monitoring of sea level, ocean floor events, and ground displacements. Based on the upstream information flow DEWS focuses on the improvement of downstream capacities of warning centres especially by improving information logistics for effective and targeted warning message aggregation for a multilingual environment. Multiple telecommunication channels will be used for the dissemination of warning messages. Wherever possible, existing standards have been integrated. The Command and Control User Interface (CCUI), a rich client application based on Eclipse RCP (Rich Client Platform) [4] and the open source GIS uDig [5], integrates various OGC services. Using WMS (Web Map Service) [6] and WFS (Web Feature Service) [7] spatial data are utilized to depict the situation picture and to integrate a simulation system via WPS (Web Processing Service) [8] to identify affected areas. Warning messages are compiled and transmitted in the OASIS [9] CAP (Common Alerting Protocol) [10] standard together with addressing information defined via EDXL-DE (Emergency Data Exchange Language - Distribution Element) [11]. Internal interfaces are realized with SOAP [12] web services. Based on results of GITEWS [13] - in particular the GITEWS Tsunami Service Bus [14] - the DEWS approach provides an implementation for tsunami early warning systems. The introductory part of the demonstration briefly explains the DEWS project, the CCUI in conjunction with operators’ workflow, the system architecture, details of information logistics and the virtual scenario of live demonstration. The live demonstration exhibits the CCUI on screen and the service

  5. Detecting Changes of a Distant Gas Source with an Array of MOX Gas Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Pashami, Sepideh; Lilienthal, Achim J.; Trincavelli, Marco

    2012-01-01

    We address the problem of detecting changes in the activity of a distant gas source from the response of an array of metal oxide (MOX) gas sensors deployed in an open sampling system. The main challenge is the turbulent nature of gas dispersion and the response dynamics of the sensors. We propose a change point detection approach and evaluate it on individual gas sensors in an experimental setup where a gas source changes in intensity, compound, or mixture ratio. We also introduce an efficient sensor selection algorithm and evaluate the change point detection approach with the selected sensor array subsets. PMID:23443385

  6. 1. DISTANT VIEW OF FRONT FROM SOUTHWEST SHOWING AREA OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. DISTANT VIEW OF FRONT FROM SOUTHWEST SHOWING AREA OF COUNCIL CHAMBERS, SHOP WITH PORTION OF WATER TREATMENT PLANT AND TRACK FILL AREA IN RIGHT HAND CORNER - Hardin City Water Works, 101 East Fourth Street, Hardin, Big Horn County, MT

  7. 1. Distant view of mill ruins with boom crane for ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Distant view of mill ruins with boom crane for unloading sugar cane in foreground, looking W. - Laurel Valley Sugar Plantation, Sugar Mill, 2 miles South of Thibodaux on State Route 308, Thibodaux, Lafourche Parish, LA

  8. DISTANT VIEW OF ST. FRANCIS DE SALES CATHEDRAL, LOOKING NORTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DISTANT VIEW OF ST. FRANCIS DE SALES CATHEDRAL, LOOKING NORTH ALONG MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. WAY FROM 14TH STREET - St. Francis de Sales Church, 2100 Martin Luther King, Jr. Way, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  9. 113. Doughton Park Recreation Area. Distant view of road cut, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    113. Doughton Park Recreation Area. Distant view of road cut, roadway, and stone railing at ice cliffs. Looking northeast. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  10. 1. Distant view of lock and dam to northeast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Distant view of lock and dam to northeast - Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 1, In Mississippi River at Mississippi Boulevard, below Ford Parkway Bridge, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  11. 2. Distant view of lock and dam to northwest ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Distant view of lock and dam to northwest - Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel, Lock & Dam No. 1, In Mississippi River at Mississippi Boulevard, below Ford Parkway Bridge, Saint Paul, Ramsey County, MN

  12. 1. Distant view, showing bridge in context with agricultural (pastures ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Distant view, showing bridge in context with agricultural (pastures and cornfields) setting; looking southeast. - Eureka Bridge, Spanning Yellow River (Moved to City Park, Castalia), Frankville, Winneshiek County, IA

  13. 1. DISTANT VIEW OF OPEN DITCH, LOOKING NORTHEAST. CONSTRUCTION PROJECT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. DISTANT VIEW OF OPEN DITCH, LOOKING NORTHEAST. CONSTRUCTION PROJECT TO BEGIN IMMEDIATELY SOUTH OF PIPE CULVERT - Twin Rock Irrigation Ditch, West bank of Animas River, East of U.S. Highway 550, Bondad, La Plata County, CO

  14. Functionally conserved enhancers with divergent sequences in distant vertebrates

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Song; Oksenberg, Nir; Takayama, Sachiko; Heo, Seok -Jin; Poliakov, Alexander; Ahituv, Nadav; Dubchak, Inna; Boffelli, Dario

    2015-10-30

    To examine the contributions of sequence and function conservation in the evolution of enhancers, we systematically identified enhancers whose sequences are not conserved among distant groups of vertebrate species, but have homologous function and are likely to be derived from a common ancestral sequence. In conclusion, our approach combined comparative genomics and epigenomics to identify potential enhancer sequences in the genomes of three groups of distantly related vertebrate species.

  15. Distant Supernovae Indicate Ever-Expanding Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-12-01

    ,000 million light-years) is observed on five dates with the SUSI camera at the 3.6-m New Technology Telescope (NTT). The host galaxy is clearly visible and the supernova reaches its maximum brightness around 13 March 1997, after which it fades. In PR Photo 50b/98 of another supernova that was found at the same time, the image of the host galaxy is barely visible, most probably because it is a low surface brightness galaxy . Here, the redshift of the supernova is z = 0.40 (distance 6,000 million light-years) and the brightness peaks around 16 March 1997. Technical information: All images were obtained through an R (red) optical filtre. The image quality varies somewhat from image to image. Exposure times and seeing values: Photo 50a/98 - 11 March (300 sec; 0.73 arcsec); 13 March (600 sec; 0.79 arcsec); 16 March (600 sec; 0.72 arcsec); 29 March (1200 sec; 1.17 arcsec); 5 April (300 sec; 0.55 arcsec) and Photo 50b/98 - 11 March (300 sec; 0.50 arcsec); 13 March (600 sec; 0.81 arcsec); 16 March (600 sec; 0.90 arcsec); 29 March (1200 sec; 0.83 arcsec); 7 April (300 sec; 1.43 arcsec); 7 May (1800 sec; 1.22 arcsec). These explosions, known as Type Ia Supernovae , are distinguished by their very uniform properties, including their intrinsic brightness; this makes them ideal for the measurement of large distances, cf. ESO PR Photos 50a/98 and 50b/98 , as well as ESO Press Release 09/95. It is by means of observations of remote objects of this type that the all-important distances could be determined with sufficient accuracy. In particular, coordinated observing campaigns of Type Ia Supernovae were carried out at several of the world's major observatories. In this way it became possible to secure the crucial data that provide the basis of the new analysis. Distances to Type Ia Supernovae are larger than expected The new observations show that, compared to their nearby twins, distant supernovae appear too dim, even for a Universe which has been freely coasting (i.e. with no change of the

  16. Distant entry pneumothorax in a competitive fencer.

    PubMed Central

    Harmer, P A; Moriarity, J; Walsh, M; Bean, M; Cramer, J

    1996-01-01

    An elite level fencer sustained a penetrating wound to the upper arm after his opponent's blade broke. Standard care for a deep puncture wound was given but it was some time before the athlete presented symptoms of a pneumothorax, which was confirmed by radiograph. Although resolution of this case was unremarkable, the possibility of penetrating thoracic injury, even when the point of entry is well outside the thorax and the athlete is not immediately symptomatic, should be born in mind by medical personnel working with fencers. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8889127

  17. SNLS: Empirical modeling of distant supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guy, J.; Astier, P.; Pain, R.; Regnault, N.; Aubourg, E.; Balam, D.; Basa, S.; Carlberg, R. G.; Conley, A.; Fabbro, S.; Fouchez, D.; Hook, I. M.; Howell, D. A.; Lafoux, H.; Neill, J. D.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Perrett, K.; Pritchet, C. J.; Rich, J.; Sullivan, M.; Taillet, R.; Baumont, S.; Bronder, J.; Lusset, V.; Mourao, A.; Perlmutter, S.; Ripoche, P.; Tao, C.; SNLS Collaboration

    2005-12-01

    The SuperNova Legacy Survey provides us with a rich data set of supernovae multi-color light curves in the redshift range 0.1--1. Thanks to the "rolling search" operation mode, most of them contain photometric points well before the peak luminosity. In addition, the far-UV rest-frame light curves can be modeled from g and r-band observations of high-z SNe. In this poster, we present an update of the Spectral Adaptive Lightcurve Template model (SALT) adjusted on the SNLS data set.

  18. Nonlinear Mechanics of Athermal Branched Biopolymer Networks.

    PubMed

    Rens, R; Vahabi, M; Licup, A J; MacKintosh, F C; Sharma, A

    2016-07-01

    Naturally occurring biopolymers such as collagen and actin form branched fibrous networks. The average connectivity in branched networks is generally below the isostatic threshold at which central force interactions marginally stabilize the network. In the submarginal regime, for connectivity below this threshold, such networks are unstable toward small deformations unless stabilized by additional interactions such as bending. Here we perform a numerical study on the elastic behavior of such networks. We show that the nonlinear mechanics of branched networks is qualitatively similar to that of filamentous networks with freely hinged cross-links. In agreement with a recent theoretical study,1 we find that branched networks also exhibit nonlinear mechanics consistent with athermal critical phenomena controlled by strain. We obtain the critical exponents capturing the nonlinear elastic behavior near the critical point by performing scaling analysis of the stiffening curves. We find that the exponents evolve with the connectivity in the network. We show that the nonlinear mechanics of disordered networks, independent of the detailed microstructure, can be characterized by a strain-driven second-order phase transition, and that the primary quantitative differences among different architectures are in the critical exponents describing the transition.

  19. Imaging polarimetry of distant comets at the 6-m BTA telescope of the SAO RAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, Oleksandra; Afanasiev, Viktor; Rosenbush, Vera; Kiselev, Nikolai

    2016-07-01

    Results of the recent polarimetric observations of distant comets C/2013 V4 (Catalina), C/2014 A4 (SONEAR), C/2010 S1 (LINEAR), C/2010 R1 (LINEAR), and 29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1 are presented together with analysis of their photometry and spectroscopy. Observations were carried out at the 6-m telescope BTA of the SAO RAS with the multi-mode focal reducer SCORPIO-2 from 2011 to 2015. Comets were observed in the range of heliocentric distances from 4.2 to 7.0 AU and phase angles from 4.9 to 9.4 degrees. The maps of intensity and linear polarization over the coma are derived. The comets observed show a considerable activity at heliocentric distances far exceeding a zone of water sublimation. Molecular emissions were only detected in the spectra of comet 29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1. The linear polarization of distant comets with a high level of activity is the first ever measured at the heliocentric distances larger than 5 AU. The degree of linear polarization (from -2 to -3.7%) for these comets is significantly higher (in absolute value) than the typical value of the whole coma polarization (about -1.5 %) at the minimum of negative polarization branch for close to the Sun comets.

  20. Branches in the Everett interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunningham, Arthur J.

    2014-05-01

    Hugh Everett III describes a quantum measurement as resulting in the "branching" of the quantum state of observer and measured system, with all possible measurement outcomes represented by the ensuing branches of the total quantum state. But Everett does not specify a general rule for decomposing a quantum state into branches, and commentators have long puzzled over how, and even whether, to regard Everett's notion of branching states as physically meaningful. It is common today to appeal to decoherence considerations as a way of giving physical content to the Everettian notion of branches, but these appeals to decoherence are often regarded as considerations foreign to Everett's own approach. This paper contends that this assessment is only half right: though he does not invoke environmental decoherence, Everett does appeal to decoherence considerations, broadly understood, in his treatment of measurement. Careful consideration of his idealized models of measurement, and of the significance he ascribes to the branching of states corresponding to definite measurement outcomes, reveals that his notion of branching refers to a special physical characteristic of elements of a particular decomposition, namely the absence of interference between these component states as a result of the particular dynamics governing the evolution of the system. Characterizations of branching that appeal to the results of modern decoherence theory should therefore be regarded as a natural development of Everett's own physically meaningful conception of branching.

  1. Methods and Technologies Branch (MTB)

    Cancer.gov

    The Methods and Technologies Branch focuses on methods to address epidemiologic data collection, study design and analysis, and to modify technological approaches to better understand cancer susceptibility.

  2. The control of branching morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Iber, Dagmar; Menshykau, Denis

    2013-01-01

    Many organs of higher organisms are heavily branched structures and arise by an apparently similar process of branching morphogenesis. Yet the regulatory components and local interactions that have been identified differ greatly in these organs. It is an open question whether the regulatory processes work according to a common principle and how far physical and geometrical constraints determine the branching process. Here, we review the known regulatory factors and physical constraints in lung, kidney, pancreas, prostate, mammary gland and salivary gland branching morphogenesis, and describe the models that have been formulated to analyse their impacts. PMID:24004663

  3. Dark census: Statistically detecting the satellite populations of distant galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cyr-Racine, Francis-Yan; Moustakas, Leonidas A.; Keeton, Charles R.; Sigurdson, Kris; Gilman, Daniel A.

    2016-08-01

    In the standard structure formation scenario based on the cold dark matter paradigm, galactic halos are predicted to contain a large population of dark matter subhalos. While the most massive members of the subhalo population can appear as luminous satellites and be detected in optical surveys, establishing the existence of the low mass and mostly dark subhalos has proven to be a daunting task. Galaxy-scale strong gravitational lenses have been successfully used to study mass substructures lying close to lensed images of bright background sources. However, in typical galaxy-scale lenses, the strong lensing region only covers a small projected area of the lens's dark matter halo, implying that the vast majority of subhalos cannot be directly detected in lensing observations. In this paper, we point out that this large population of dark satellites can collectively affect gravitational lensing observables, hence possibly allowing their statistical detection. Focusing on the region of the galactic halo outside the strong lensing area, we compute from first principles the statistical properties of perturbations to the gravitational time delay and position of lensed images in the presence of a mass substructure population. We find that in the standard cosmological scenario, the statistics of these lensing observables are well approximated by Gaussian distributions. The formalism developed as part of this calculation is very general and can be applied to any halo geometry and choice of subhalo mass function. Our results significantly reduce the computational cost of including a large substructure population in lens models and enable the use of Bayesian inference techniques to detect and characterize the distributed satellite population of distant lens galaxies.

  4. Morphometric studies of the muscular branch of the median nerve.

    PubMed Central

    Olave, E; Prates, J C; Gabrielli, C; Pardi, P

    1996-01-01

    The branch from the median nerve to the thenar muscles has a proximal and lateral (recurrent) course and is vulnerable to lesions that affect these muscles. Because of its anatomical-clinical importance, this branch was studied in 60 palmar regions from 30 cadavers of adult individuals of both sexes, aged between 23 and 77 y. It arose from the lateral branch of the median nerve in 83.3% of the cases. Its origin was distal to the flexor retinaculum in 48.3%, at the distal margin of the retinaculum in 31.6%, in the carpal tunnel in 18.3% and proximal to the retinaculum in 1.7%; it pierced the retinaculum in 15%. The point of recurrence of the branch was localised topographically to 34.6 +/- 3.6 mm from the distal wrist crease; the angle between its recurrent course and the longitudinal axis of the hand averaged 66.8 degrees. In 50% of the cases the muscular branch innervated abductor pollicis brevis (APB), opponens pollicis (OP) and the superficial head of flexor pollicis brevis (FPB), in 40% it supplied only APB and OP, and in 10% a short muscular branch gave rise to independent branches in the palm and which supplied APB, OP and the superficial head of FPB. The so called "accessory thenar branch' was found in 38.3%. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8886966

  5. A Branch Meeting in Avon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, Kathryn; Coles, Alf

    2011-01-01

    The Association of Teachers of Mathematics (ATM) exists for, and is run by, its members. Branch meetings are so much more than the "grass roots" of the association--it can be a powerhouse of inspiration and creativity. In this article, the authors provide commentaries on a recent branch meeting.

  6. The zygomaticotemporal branch of the trigeminal nerve: an anatomical study.

    PubMed

    Totonchi, Ali; Pashmini, Nazly; Guyuron, Bahman

    2005-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the site of emergence of the zygomaticotemporal branch of the trigeminal nerve from the temporalis muscle and to identify the number of its accessory branches and their locations. A pilot study, conducted on the same number of patients, concluded that the main zygomaticotemporal branch emerges from the deep temporal fascia at a point on average 17 mm lateral and 6 mm cephalad to the lateral palpebral commissure, commonly referred to as the lateral canthus. These measurements, however, were obtained after dissection of the temporal area, rendering the findings less reliable. The current study included 20 consecutive patients, 19 women and one man, between the ages of 26 and 85 years, with an average age of 47.6 years. Those who had a history of previous trauma or surgery in the temple area were excluded. Before the start of the endoscopic forehead procedure, the likely topographic site of the zygomaticotemporal branch was marked 17 mm lateral and 6 mm cephalad to the lateral orbital commissure on the basis of the information extrapolated from the pilot study. The surface mark was then transferred to the deeper layers using a 25-gauge needle stained with brilliant green. After endoscopic exposure of the marked site, the distance between the main branch of the trigeminal nerve or its accessory branches and the tattoo mark was measured in posterolateral and cephalocaudal directions. In addition, the number and locations of the accessory branches of the trigeminal nerve were recorded. On the left side, the average distance of the emergence site of the main zygomaticotemporal branch of the trigeminal nerve from the palpebral fissure was 16.8 mm (range, 12 to 31 mm) in the posterolateral direction and an average of 6.4 mm (range, 4 to 11 mm) in the cephalad direction. On the right side, the average measurements for the main branch were 17.1 mm (range, 15 to 21 mm) in the lateral direction and 6.65 mm (range, 5 to 11 mm) in the

  7. The zygomaticotemporal branch of the trigeminal nerve: an anatomical study.

    PubMed

    Totonchi, Ali; Pashmini, Nazly; Guyuron, Bahman

    2005-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the site of emergence of the zygomaticotemporal branch of the trigeminal nerve from the temporalis muscle and to identify the number of its accessory branches and their locations. A pilot study, conducted on the same number of patients, concluded that the main zygomaticotemporal branch emerges from the deep temporal fascia at a point on average 17 mm lateral and 6 mm cephalad to the lateral palpebral commissure, commonly referred to as the lateral canthus. These measurements, however, were obtained after dissection of the temporal area, rendering the findings less reliable. The current study included 20 consecutive patients, 19 women and one man, between the ages of 26 and 85 years, with an average age of 47.6 years. Those who had a history of previous trauma or surgery in the temple area were excluded. Before the start of the endoscopic forehead procedure, the likely topographic site of the zygomaticotemporal branch was marked 17 mm lateral and 6 mm cephalad to the lateral orbital commissure on the basis of the information extrapolated from the pilot study. The surface mark was then transferred to the deeper layers using a 25-gauge needle stained with brilliant green. After endoscopic exposure of the marked site, the distance between the main branch of the trigeminal nerve or its accessory branches and the tattoo mark was measured in posterolateral and cephalocaudal directions. In addition, the number and locations of the accessory branches of the trigeminal nerve were recorded. On the left side, the average distance of the emergence site of the main zygomaticotemporal branch of the trigeminal nerve from the palpebral fissure was 16.8 mm (range, 12 to 31 mm) in the posterolateral direction and an average of 6.4 mm (range, 4 to 11 mm) in the cephalad direction. On the right side, the average measurements for the main branch were 17.1 mm (range, 15 to 21 mm) in the lateral direction and 6.65 mm (range, 5 to 11 mm) in the

  8. Dichotomous branching: the plant form and integrity upon the apical meristem bifurcation

    PubMed Central

    Gola, Edyta M.

    2014-01-01

    The division of the apical meristem into two independently functioning axes is defined as dichotomous branching. This type of branching typically occurs in non-vascular and non-seed vascular plants, whereas in seed plants it presents a primary growth form only in several taxa. Dichotomy is a complex process, which requires a re-organization of the meristem structure and causes changes in the apex geometry and activity. However, the mechanisms governing the repetitive apex divisions are hardly known. Here, an overview of dichotomous branching is presented, occurring in structurally different apices of phylogenetically distant plants, and in various organs (e.g., shoots, roots, rhizophores). Additionally, morphogenetic effects of dichotomy are reviewed, including its impact on organogenesis and mechanical constraints. At the end, the hormonal and genetic regulation of the dichotomous branching is discussed. PMID:24936206

  9. 64. View of Woodstock Village (less distant view), looking southeast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    64. View of Woodstock Village (less distant view), looking southeast from the overlook on the south peak Carriage Road loop, in Billings Park (town of Woodstock). Billings Park is adjacent to the national park, its roads are contiguous with the park roads, and it was historically integral to the Billings Estate property on Mount Tom. The distant view includes the Congregational Church and Pleasant Street on the left; the commercial hub of the village at center left; the middle covered bridge by the tree trunk at center; and the large roof of the Town Hall at right. - Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park, 54 Elm Street, Woodstock, Windsor County, VT

  10. 32. View of Woodstock Village (less distant view), looking southeast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. View of Woodstock Village (less distant view), looking southeast from the overlook on the south peak Carriage Road loop, in Billings Park (town of Woodstock). Billings Park is adjacent to the national park, its roads are contiguous with the park roads, and it was historically integral to the Billings Estate property on Mount Tom. The distant view includes the Congregational Church and Pleasant Street on the left; the commercial hub of the village at center left; the middle covered bridge by the tree trunk at center; and the large roof of the town hall at right. - Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park, 54 Elm Street, Woodstock, Windsor County, VT

  11. Forces between a single atom and its distant mirror image.

    PubMed

    Bushev, Pavel; Wilson, Alex; Eschner, Jürgen; Raab, Christoph; Schmidt-Kaler, Ferdinand; Becher, Christoph; Blatt, Rainer

    2004-06-01

    An excited-state atom whose emitted light is backreflected by a distant mirror can experience trapping forces, because the presence of the mirror modifies both the electromagnetic vacuum field and the atom's own radiation reaction field. We demonstrate this mechanical action using a single trapped barium ion. We observe the trapping conditions to be notably altered when the distant mirror is translated across an optical wavelength. The well-localized barium ion enables the spatial dependence of the forces to be measured explicitly. The experiment has implications for quantum information processing and may be regarded as the most elementary optical tweezers.

  12. [Distant metastases of malignant tumors of head and neck].

    PubMed

    Totan, C; Dincă, O; Negureanu, M; Vlădan, C; Bucur, Al

    2010-01-01

    The charts of 176 previously untreated patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma who completed treatment during 2006 in Oro-Maxillo-Facial Clinic, UMF "Carol Davila" Bucharest were reviewed. These patients had no evidence of distant metastases when initially evaluated. The overall incidence of distant metastases was 27.84%, varying from 10.52% for buccal mucosa to 63.63% for tongue and floor of the mouth (p < 0.05). 80% of the metastases were detected within two years after treatment. The rate also increased with the T and N classification; however, the N stage had greater influence on the rate of metastases than the T stage.

  13. Vital signs of life on distant worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-01-01

    for less than a century. Malcolm Fridlund, Project Scientist for ESA's Darwin mission says, "If other planets follow the Earth's pattern, it is much more likely that they will be inhabited by dinosaurs or even bacteria than by something that can count." In the 1970s, the British scientist James Lovelock pointed out that, just by breathing, life affects the composition of the Earth's atmosphere. He suggested looking for similar effects as a way to search with telescopes for life on other planets. You can study the composition of an atmosphere by splitting a planet's light into a rainbow of colours. This 'spectrum' will contain dark lines made by various chemicals in the planet's atmosphere. Darwin's strategy is to look for oxygen because oxygen is used by some life forms and produced as waste by others. Scientists believe that without life, all free oxygen in a planet's atmosphere would disappear within just four million years, because it reacts so easily with other chemicals. "The best estimates suggest that Darwin will be able to detect the build-up of oxygen caused within a few hundred million years of life's origin," says Fridlund. Although Darwin will not detect oxygen directly, it will 'see' ozone, a form of oxygen. It will also see carbon dioxide, water, and, in certain cases, methane. Fridlund says, "The general consensus is that if we find ozone, liquid water, and carbon dioxide simultaneously, it will be a very strong indicator of life's presence." The work will not stop once Darwin completes its survey of the nearest several thousand star-planet systems. Once it finds a living planet, the race will be on to understand the nature of its life forms. That means searching for more specific biomarkers. In future space missions, for example, scientists may use chlorophyll as a biomarker. This molecule allows plants and certain bacteria to use light as an energy source. "Finding the next generation of biomarkers is a very active field of research at the moment

  14. Vital signs of life on distant worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-01-01

    for less than a century. Malcolm Fridlund, Project Scientist for ESA's Darwin mission says, "If other planets follow the Earth's pattern, it is much more likely that they will be inhabited by dinosaurs or even bacteria than by something that can count." In the 1970s, the British scientist James Lovelock pointed out that, just by breathing, life affects the composition of the Earth's atmosphere. He suggested looking for similar effects as a way to search with telescopes for life on other planets. You can study the composition of an atmosphere by splitting a planet's light into a rainbow of colours. This 'spectrum' will contain dark lines made by various chemicals in the planet's atmosphere. Darwin's strategy is to look for oxygen because oxygen is used by some life forms and produced as waste by others. Scientists believe that without life, all free oxygen in a planet's atmosphere would disappear within just four million years, because it reacts so easily with other chemicals. "The best estimates suggest that Darwin will be able to detect the build-up of oxygen caused within a few hundred million years of life's origin," says Fridlund. Although Darwin will not detect oxygen directly, it will 'see' ozone, a form of oxygen. It will also see carbon dioxide, water, and, in certain cases, methane. Fridlund says, "The general consensus is that if we find ozone, liquid water, and carbon dioxide simultaneously, it will be a very strong indicator of life's presence." The work will not stop once Darwin completes its survey of the nearest several thousand star-planet systems. Once it finds a living planet, the race will be on to understand the nature of its life forms. That means searching for more specific biomarkers. In future space missions, for example, scientists may use chlorophyll as a biomarker. This molecule allows plants and certain bacteria to use light as an energy source. "Finding the next generation of biomarkers is a very active field of research at the moment

  15. Branch strategies - Modeling and optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubey, Pradeep K.; Flynn, Michael J.

    1991-01-01

    The authors provide a common platform for modeling different schemes for reducing the branch-delay penalty in pipelined processors as well as evaluating the associated increased instruction bandwidth. Their objective is twofold: to develop a model for different approaches to the branch problem and to help select an optimal strategy after taking into account additional i-traffic generated by branch strategies. The model presented provides a flexible tool for comparing different branch strategies in terms of the reduction it offers in average branch delay and also in terms of the associated cost of wasted instruction fetches. This additional criterion turns out to be a valuable consideration in choosing between two strategies that perform almost equally. More importantly, it provides a better insight into the expected overall system performance. Simple compiler-support-based low-implementation-cost strategies can be very effective under certain conditions. An active branch prediction scheme based on loop buffers can be as competitive as a branch-target-buffer based strategy.

  16. New Distant Comet Headed for Bright Encounter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-08-01

    of a dense dust cloud around the nucleus. It is in fact likely that most of the light observed from the central condensation in the comet's head is sunlight reflected from the particles in this cloud. The nucleus is probably completely hidden from view inside this cloud and we do not see it at all. When we cannot observe the nucleus of a comet directly, we can only judge its size indirectly from the amount of dust it produces; a larger dust production will normally correspond to a larger nucleus. However, a temporarily high dust production rate during an outburst from the nucleus will lead to an overestimate of its size. In this case, the comet's brightness will begin to fade after a while, as the dust particles ejected during the outburst slowly disperse into space. A main goal of future observations is therefore to decide whether or not Comet Hale-Bopp has just undergone an outburst. For this, the brightness of the central condensation and the size and shape of the dust cloud must be carefully monitored as long as possible. In this connection, the relatively bright pre-discovery images from April 1993 and May 1995 (see above) seem to argue against a recent outburst. How bright will the comet be at perihelion ? The main question now asked from many sides is obviously how bright the comet will be when it passes perihelion in 1997. Will it, as some headlines have already stated, and in view of its current brightness, become the `comet of the century, if not of the millennium' ? From the above, it is clear that no firm prediction can be made before we have learned whether the present brightness is `stable' or whether it undergoes important variations which indicate that there has been a recent outburst. Astronomers are therefore very reluctant to express themselves on this point until further observations become available. However, if the comet did not undergo a recent outburst and the nucleus is indeed as large as the current brightness would appear to indicate, then

  17. 6. Photocopy of photograph, c. 1892. DISTANT VIEW OF SAN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Photocopy of photograph, c. 1892. DISTANT VIEW OF SAN JUAN SMELTING AND MINING COMPANY WORKS WITH EXTANT SMELTER STACK AT LEFT. (Original print in possession of Strater Hotel, Durango, Colorado. Photographer unknown.) - San Juan & New York Mining & Smelting Company, Smelter Stack, State Route 160, Durango, La Plata County, CO

  18. 1. Distant view shows Engine Room Building behind cranes. Retort ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Distant view shows Engine Room Building behind cranes. Retort rings in foreground were once located in Engine Room Building. See photo WA-131-A-2. Building on left is Machine Shop. Boiler Building is in front of stack. - Pacific Creosoting Plant, Engine Room Building, 5350 Creosote Place, Northeast, Bremerton, Kitsap County, WA

  19. 3. Distant view toward east, west face of perimeter acquisition ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Distant view toward east, west face of perimeter acquisition radar building with data link satellite dish on south side - Stanley R. Mickelsen Safeguard Complex, Perimeter Acquisition Radar Building, Limited Access Area, between Limited Access Patrol Road & Service Road A, Nekoma, Cavalier County, ND

  20. Voyager observations of jupiter's distant magnetotail. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Kurth, W.S.; Gurnett, D.A.; Scarf, F.L.; Poynter, R.L.; Sullivan, J.D.

    1980-08-01

    Observations of nonthermal continuum radiation by Voyager 1 and 2 at large distances from Jupiter have led to the identification of brief encounters with the Jovian magnetosphere at distances greater than 700 RJ and in directions substantially far from the Jupiter-Sun line. In addition, a number of examples of continuum radiation apparently trapped in local density depressions in the solar wind are observed. Simultaneous measurements by the Voyager plasma instrument have verified the distant magnetotail crossings and are used to correlate the occurrence of trapped continuum radiation events within solar wind density rarefractions. The Voyager observations of the distant Jovian magnetotail are compared with observations in the distant terrestrial magnetosphere and also with observations of the plasma tails of comets. One variable explanation of the observations is that the Jovian tail consists of filamentary structures, some of which extend to large distances in the pre-dawn direction. The observations of continuum radiation trapped in low-density regions of the solar wind suggest that Voyager may at times be connected to the distant tail by a low-density trough which acts as a wave guide and allows radiation from the tail to reach the spacecraft. This may provide an indirect method of detecting the tail extending more than 2 AU downstream from Jupiter.

  1. Near East University Learning Management System Based Distant Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavus, Nadire; Uzunboylu, Huseyin; Ibrahim, Dogan

    2005-01-01

    In order to establish a distant education system, it is first required to create a virtual learning system environment. A detailed literature search has revealed the existence of some "Open-Source" systems such as "Claroline, Moodle etc." Each system has been investigated in detail and it was found that "Moodle" is the one closest to the NEU…

  2. NEW JERSEY APPROACH TO OUTERBRIDGE CROSSING BRIDGE, NOTE DISTANT HORIZON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    NEW JERSEY APPROACH TO OUTERBRIDGE CROSSING BRIDGE, NOTE DISTANT HORIZON NEW YORK SKYLINE AND ALMOST IN THE MIDDLE OF THE HORIZON THE TWIN TOWERS OF THE VERRAZANO-NARROWS BRIDGE - Outerbridge Crossing Bridge, Spanning Arthur Kill from New Jersey to Staten Island, Staten Island (subdivision), Richmond County, NY

  3. Nuclear explosions and distant earthquakes: A search for correlations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Healy, J.H.; Marshall, P.A.

    1970-01-01

    An apparent correlation between nuclear explosions and earthquakes has been reported for the events between September 1961 and September 1966. When data from the events between September 1966 and December 1968 are examined, this correlation disappears. No relationship between the size of the nuclear explosions and the number of distant earthquakes is apparent in the data.

  4. DISTANT VIEW, BLM TACK SHED ON LEFT, BLM SEED SHED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DISTANT VIEW, BLM TACK SHED ON LEFT, BLM SEED SHED AT LEFT CENTER, FIRE DISPATCH OFFICES 1 AND 2 AT RIGHT CENTER, UTILITY BUILDING "B" ON RIGHT. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Cedar City Automotive Repair Shop, 820 North Main Street, Cedar City, Iron County, UT

  5. DISTANT VIEW, AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR SHOP ON LEFT AND UTILITY BUILDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DISTANT VIEW, AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR SHOP ON LEFT AND UTILITY BUILDING "B" ON RIGHT. HOSE WINDING SHED ADJACENT TO SHED-ROOFED ADDITION ON THE UTILITY BUILDING, BLM SEED SHED AND TACK SHED VISIBLE IN FAR DISTANCE. VIEW TO EAST/ - Cedar City Automotive Repair Shop, 820 North Main Street, Cedar City, Iron County, UT

  6. Dynamics of the Most Distant Kuiper Belt Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volk, Kathryn; Malhotra, Renu; Wang, Xianyu

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the evolution of the most distant known Kuiper belt objects (KBOs) under the secular and resonant effects of the known planets in the Solar System as well as under the influence of a massive, unseen distant planet. The orbits of these distant KBOs evolve on a wide range of timescales (from millions to billions of years); most important are the changes in the objects’ perihelion distances which can dramatically change the relative domination of secular or resonant effects on their orbital evolution. Motivated by the period ratios of the distant KBOs, which are near simple integer ratios, we examine the properties of mean motion resonances with a hypothetical, unseen planet; we discuss how the uncertainties in the observed objects’ orbits compare to the widths of these hypothesized resonances. We also examine the timescales for secular orbital evolution and the timescales for scattering through close encounters in the models with and without the hypothetical planet to assess the case for such a planet.

  7. More distant view than previous photograph of front and side ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    More distant view than previous photograph of front and side (west) of building 253, along with fronts of buildings 254, 255, 256, and 257. Looking northeast from corner of W.J. Avenue and N. 10th Street. - Fitzsimons General Hospital, Building 253, North side of East O'Neil Avenue between Tenth & Twelfth Streets, Aurora, Adams County, CO

  8. 3. DISTANT VIEW (TO THE NORTHEAST) OF THE POWER STATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. DISTANT VIEW (TO THE NORTHEAST) OF THE POWER STATION (FAR LEFT, WOOD SHED, AND CHANGE HOUSE (CENTER). THE SMALLER ATTACHED SECTION ON THE CHANGE HOUSE SERVED AS THE MINE OFFICE AND RECORDS STORAGE ROOM. - Foster Gulch Mine, Bear Creek 1 mile Southwest of Town of Bear Creek, Red Lodge, Carbon County, MT

  9. DISTANT VIEW, UTILITY BUILDING "B" (EAST SIDE) ON LEFT AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DISTANT VIEW, UTILITY BUILDING "B" (EAST SIDE) ON LEFT AND AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR SHOP (EAST AND SOUTH SIDES) ON RIGHT, GASOLINE AND OIL HOUSE VISIBLE IN FAR DISTANCE. VIEW TO NORTHWEST. - Cedar City Automotive Repair Shop, 820 North Main Street, Cedar City, Iron County, UT

  10. DISTANT VIEW, UTILITY BUILDING "B" (EAST SIDE) ON LEFT AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DISTANT VIEW, UTILITY BUILDING "B" (EAST SIDE) ON LEFT AND AUTOMOTIVE REPAIR SHOP (EAST SIDE) ON RIGHT. GASOLINE AND OIL HOUSE VISIBLE IN CENTER DISTANCE, FIRE DISPATCH OFFICES 1 AND 2 TO LEFT OF UTILITY BUILDING. VIEW TO WEST. - Cedar City Automotive Repair Shop, 820 North Main Street, Cedar City, Iron County, UT

  11. Clouds, Graphs, and Maps: Distant Reading and Disciplinary Imagination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Derek Norton

    2009-01-01

    "Clouds, Graphs, and Maps: Distant Reading and Disciplinary Imagination" examines recent efforts by scholars in rhetoric and composition to account for patterns and trends indicative of the discipline's maturation. Many of these "discipliniographic" appraisals resort, on the one hand, to anecdotal, experience-based accounts or, on the other hand,…

  12. Oxidative stress inhibits distant metastasis by human melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Piskounova, Elena; Agathocleous, Michalis; Murphy, Malea M.; Hu, Zeping; Huddlestun, Sara E.; Zhao, Zhiyu; Leitch, A. Marilyn; Johnson, Timothy M.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Morrison, Sean J.

    2015-01-01

    Solid cancer cells commonly enter the blood and disseminate systemically but are highly inefficient at forming distant metastases for poorly understood reasons. We studied human melanomas that differed in their metastasis histories in patients and in their capacity to metastasize in NSG mice. All melanomas had high frequencies of cells that formed subcutaneous tumours, but much lower percentages of cells that formed tumours after intravenous or intrasplenic transplantation, particularly among inefficient metastasizers. Melanoma cells in the blood and visceral organs experienced oxidative stress not observed in established subcutaneous tumours. Successfully metastasizing melanomas underwent reversible metabolic changes during metastasis that increased their capacity to withstand oxidative stress, including increased dependence upon NADPH-generating enzymes in the folate pathway. Anti-oxidants promoted distant metastasis in NSG mice. Folate pathway inhibition using low-dose methotrexate, ALDH1L2 knockdown, or MTHFD1 knockdown inhibited distant metastasis without significantly affecting the growth of subcutaneous tumors in the same mice. Oxidative stress thus limits distant metastasis by melanoma cells in vivo. PMID:26466563

  13. 20. DISTANT HELICOPTER VIEW TO SOUTHEAST UP LITTLE ROCK CREEK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. DISTANT HELICOPTER VIEW TO SOUTHEAST UP LITTLE ROCK CREEK CANYON, WITH DAM AND RESERVOIR AT RIGHT CENTER. PALMDALE-LITTLEROCK DITCH, MARKED BY DENSE VEGETATION, CROSSES ROAD AT LOWER CENTER - Little Rock Creek Dam, Little Rock Creek, Littlerock, Los Angeles County, CA

  14. Dynamics of branched tissue assembly

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The assembly of cells into tissues is a complex process controlled by numerous signaling pathways to ensure the fidelity of the final structure. Tissue assembly is also very dynamic, as exemplified by the formation of branched organs. Here we present two examples of tissue assembly in branched systems that highlight this dynamic nature: formation of the tracheal network in Drosophila melanogaster and the ducts of the mammary gland in mice. Extension of the branches during tracheal development is a stereotyped process that produces identical organ geometries across individuals, whereas elongation of the ducts of the pubertal mammary gland is a non-stereotyped process that produces unique patterns. By studying these two organs, we can begin to understand the dynamic nature of development of other stereotyped and non-stereotyped branching systems, including the lung, kidney, and salivary gland. PMID:23114096

  15. Structural Mechanics and Dynamics Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stefko, George

    2003-01-01

    The 2002 annual report of the Structural Mechanics and Dynamics Branch reflects the majority of the work performed by the branch staff during the 2002 calendar year. Its purpose is to give a brief review of the branch s technical accomplishments. The Structural Mechanics and Dynamics Branch develops innovative computational tools, benchmark experimental data, and solutions to long-term barrier problems in the areas of propulsion aeroelasticity, active and passive damping, engine vibration control, rotor dynamics, magnetic suspension, structural mechanics, probabilistics, smart structures, engine system dynamics, and engine containment. Furthermore, the branch is developing a compact, nonpolluting, bearingless electric machine with electric power supplied by fuel cells for future "more electric" aircraft. An ultra-high-power-density machine that can generate projected power densities of 50 hp/lb or more, in comparison to conventional electric machines, which generate usually 0.2 hp/lb, is under development for application to electric drives for propulsive fans or propellers. In the future, propulsion and power systems will need to be lighter, to operate at higher temperatures, and to be more reliable in order to achieve higher performance and economic viability. The Structural Mechanics and Dynamics Branch is working to achieve these complex, challenging goals.

  16. Comparing Imaging and Non-Imaging Techniques for Reducing Background Clutter and Resolving Distant Point Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Wurtz, R; Ziock, K; Fabris, L; Graham, R

    2005-11-10

    To reach maximum sensitivity, any method used to search for orphan sources must be insensitive to local variations of the background. Using imaging and non-imaging techniques, we analyzed the same data acquired by a search instrument deployed as a large-area, coded-mask imager. Data from many passes past a 1 mCi source at 65 m from the instrument were used to construct a model of the instrument response. We then used the model to ''hide'' the source in data taken in a light urban environment. We compared the success of detecting the hidden sources using imaging coded-mask methods, pseudo-imaging based on a zero-area matched filter, and non-imaging using simple thresholding. The results clearly indicate the superiority of imaging with the coded-mask techniques returning the best results.

  17. Collateral branching of long-distance cortical projections in monkey.

    PubMed

    Rockland, Kathleen S

    2013-12-15

    Collateralization of individual cortical axons is well documented for rodents but less so for monkeys, where double retrograde tracer experiments have tended to find only small numbers of neurons projecting to two different injection sites. Evidence from both double label and single axon studies, however, suggests that in specific projection systems the number of neurons with collateralized axons can be 10% or greater. These include feedback projections from temporal areas (but less so those from V4 and MT/V5). Single-axon analyses show that many parietal neurons branch to multiple targets. Except for giant Meynert cells in area V1, feedforward projections from early visual areas have only a small number of neurons with branching axons. Why only some neurons collateralize, what determines branch points and projection foci, and how this impacts network organization are largely unknown. Deciphering the branching code might offer new perspectives on space-time organization at the network level.

  18. Monitoring and forecast of hydro meteorological hazards basing on data of distant assay and mathematical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapunov, Valentin; Dikinis, Alexandr; Voronov, Nikolai

    2014-05-01

    Russian Federation having giant area has low concentration of land meteorological check points. Net of monitoring is not enough for effective forecast and prediction of weather dynamics and extremely situations. Under increase of extremely situations and incidents - hurricanes et al (two times from begin of XXI century) reconstruction and "perestroika" of monitoring net is needful and necessary. The basis of such a progress is distant monitoring using planes and satellites adding land contact monitoring base on efforts of existed points and stations. Interaction of contact and distant views may make hydro meteorological data and prediction more fine and significant. Tradition physical methods must be added by new biological methods of modern study. According to gotten researches animal are able to predict extremely hazards of natural and anthropogenic nature basing of interaction between biological matter and probable physical field that is under primary study. For example it was animals which forecasted dropping of Chelyabinsk meteorite of 2013. Adding of biological indication with complex of meteorological data may increase significance of hazard prediction. The uniting of all data and approaches may become basis of proposed mathematical hydro meteorological weather models. Introduction to practice reported complex methods may decrease of loss from hydro meteorological risks and hazards and increase stability of country economics.

  19. Most Distant Group of Galaxies Known in the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-04-01

    New VLT Discovery Pushes Back the Beginnings Summary Using the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) , a team of astronomers from The Netherlands, Germany, France and the USA [1] have discovered the most distant group of galaxies ever seen , about 13.5 billion light-years away. It has taken the light now recorded by the VLT about nine-tenths of the age of the Universe to cover the huge distance. We therefore observe those galaxies as they were at a time when the Universe was only about 10% of its present age . The astronomers conclude that this group of early galaxies will develop into a rich cluster of galaxies, such as those seen in the nearby Universe. The newly discovered structure provides the best opportunity so far for studying when and how galaxies began to form clusters after the initial Big Bang , one of the greatest puzzles in modern cosmology. PR Photo 11a/02 : Sky field with the distant cluster of galaxies. PR Photo 11b/02 : Spectra of some of the galaxies in the cluster. Radio Galaxies as cosmic signposts A most intriguing question in modern astronomy is how the first groupings or "clusters" of galaxies emerged from the gas produced in the Big Bang. Some theoretical models predict that densely populated galaxy clusters ("rich clusters" in current astronomical terminology) are built up through a step-wise process. Clumps develop in the primeval gas, and stars condense out of these clumps to form small galaxies. Then these small galaxies merge together to form larger units. The peculiar class of "radio galaxies" is particularly important for investigating such scenarios. They are called so because their radio emission - a result of violent processes believed to be related to massive black holes located at the centres of these galaxies - is stronger by 5 - 10 orders of magnitude than that of our own Milky Way galaxy. In fact, this radio emission is often so intense that the galaxies can be spotted at extremely large distances, and thus at the remote epoch when

  20. Strategy of Irrigation Branch in Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeyliger, A.; Ermolaeva, O.

    2012-04-01

    At this moment, at the starting time of the program on restoration of a large irrigation in Russia till 2020, the scientific and technical community of irrigation branch does not have clear vision on how to promote a development of irrigated agriculture and without repeating of mistakes having a place in the past. In many respects absence of a vision is connected to serious backlog of a scientific and technical and informational and technological level of development of domestic irrigation branch from advanced one. Namely such level of development is necessary for the resolving of new problems in new conditions of managing, and also for adequate answers to new challenges from climate and degradation of ground & water resources, as well as a rigorous requirement from an environment. In such important situation for irrigation branch when it is necessary quickly generate a scientific and technical politics for the current decade for maintenance of translation of irrigated agriculture in the Russian Federation on a new highly effective level of development, in our opinion, it is required to carry out open discussion of needs and requirements as well as a research for a adequate solutions. From political point of view a framework organized in FP6 DESIRE 037046 project is an example of good practice that can serve as methodical approach how to organize and develop such processes. From technical point of view a technology of operational management of irrigation at large scale presents a prospective alternative to the current type of management based on planning. From point of view ICT operational management demands creation of a new platform for the professional environment of activity. This platform should allow to perceive processes in real time, at their partial predictability on signals of a straight line and a feedback, within the framework of variability of decision making scenarious, at high resolution and the big ex-awning of sensor controls and the gauges

  1. Distant metastasis from benign solitary fibrous tumor of the kidney.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Hideo; Kurihara, Tsuyoshi; Katsuoka, Yuichi; Nakano, Toru; Yoshioka, Maki; Miyano, Satetsu; Sato, Yuichi; Uejima, Iwao; Hoshikawa, Masahiro; Takagi, Masayuki; Chikaraishi, Tatsuya

    2013-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) rarely occurs in the kidneys, and only one reported case of renal SFT has shown distant metastasis. We report the second case of renal SFT exhibiting distant metastasis. A 48-year-old man was referred to our hospital because of a right renal mass. An abdominal CT scan detected a large renal tumor, which was suspected to be a renal cell carcinoma. Right radical nephrectomy was performed, and the tumor was found to measure 28 × 18 × 10 cm. The pathological diagnosis was benign solitary fibrous tumor of the kidney. Eight years after the operation, lung and liver metastases developed. Pulmonary segmentectomy and partial hepatectomy were performed. The pathological diagnoses of these resected tissue specimens were compatible with benign SFT.

  2. [Effect of Distant Interactions on Growth and Development of Streptomycetes].

    PubMed

    Nikolaev, Yu A; Surgucheva, N A; Filippova, S N

    2015-01-01

    Regulation of streptomycete growth and development by distant interactions of physical nature was shown using a vial-in-vial experimental setup, providing physical isolation of the inducer and detector cultures. Some effects of distant interaction were observed with Streptomyces netropsis proliferating submerged culture as an inducer and a surface culture of the same strain as a detector. The growth rate of the detector strain doubled. Spore germination was stimulated, as was indicated by a 30% increase in the number of colony-forming units (CRU) in the detector culture plated as a spore suspension. The phase variation spectrum also changed, with an increased share of the colonies of the morphotype predominant under the standard conditions.

  3. Distant and wide range wireless power transfer from metamedia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Lin; Luo, Xudong; Ma, Hongru

    2016-07-01

    Based on electromagnetic scattering theory, a model of superscatterer enhanced distant wireless power transfer (WPT) device has designed and analyzed with the concept of transformation optics. The numerical results obtained through a series expansion method reveal that a properly designed ss-WPT has high efficiency for long transfer distances as well as a wide transfer range. The transfer distance can be further enlarged by fine tuning of the design. These effects can be explained qualitatively through the study of magnetic flux.

  4. Thyrotoxicosis associated with distant metastatic follicular carcinoma of the thyroid

    SciTech Connect

    Bowden, W.D.; Jones, R.E.

    1986-04-01

    In a man with metastatic follicular carcinoma of the thyroid, thyrotoxicosis developed after total thyroidectomy and was successfully treated with antithyroid medications. Treatment with radioactive iodine decreased the size of the distant metastasis and eventually diminished thyroid hormone production. Follicular carcinoma complicated by hyperthyroidism requires vigorous control of the hypermetabolic state. Treatment with radioactive iodine can effectively reduce metabolic complications and tumor bulk, and yields a remission rate as high as 33%.

  5. 11. A DISTANT VIEW OF THE EAST ELEVATION OF THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. A DISTANT VIEW OF THE EAST ELEVATION OF THE BRIDGE, LOOKING WEST, SHOWING ITS RELATIONSHIP TO SOME OF THE FEATURES IN RILEY PARK. THE BOARDWALK ALONG THE SOUTH AND RIVERBANK LEADS TO A PEDESTRIAN SUSPENSION BRIDGE AND DOWNTOWN DELPHI ACROSS THE RIVER. ALSO VISIBLE IS THE RUPTURED DAM AND A PORTION OF A CLUB OR BATHING HOUSE - Delphi Bridge on U.S. Route 421, Spanning Deer Creek at U.S. Route 421, Delphi, Carroll County, IN

  6. Distant Skin Metastases from Carcinoma Buccal Mucosa: A Rare Presentation.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Shashank; Leekha, Nitin; Gupta, Sweety; Mithal, Umang; Arora, Vandana; De, Sudarsan

    2016-01-01

    Cancer of the oral cavity makes up approximately 30% of all head and neck region tumors. Skin metastasis is rare with an incidence ranging between 0.7% and 2.4%. Skin metastasis usually occurs in the neck, scalp, and over the skin near the primary site. We report a patient with carcinoma left buccal mucosa who presented with distant skin metastases to the right side chest wall. PMID:27512210

  7. Distant Skin Metastases from Carcinoma Buccal Mucosa: A Rare Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Shashank; Leekha, Nitin; Gupta, Sweety; Mithal, Umang; Arora, Vandana; De, Sudarsan

    2016-01-01

    Cancer of the oral cavity makes up approximately 30% of all head and neck region tumors. Skin metastasis is rare with an incidence ranging between 0.7% and 2.4%. Skin metastasis usually occurs in the neck, scalp, and over the skin near the primary site. We report a patient with carcinoma left buccal mucosa who presented with distant skin metastases to the right side chest wall. PMID:27512210

  8. Viscoelasticity of randomly branched polymers in the vulcanization class.

    PubMed

    Lusignan, C P; Mourey, T H; Wilson, J C; Colby, R H

    1999-11-01

    We report viscosity, recoverable compliance, and molar mass distribution for a series of randomly branched polyester samples with long linear chain sections between branch points. Molecular structure characterization determines tau=2.47+/-0.05 for the exponent controlling the molar mass distribution, so this system belongs to the vulcanization (mean-field) universality class. Consequently, branched polymers of similar size strongly overlap and form interchain entanglements. The viscosity diverges at the gel point with an exponent s=6.1+/-0.3, that is significantly larger than the value of 1.33 predicted by the branched polymer Rouse model (bead-spring model without entanglements). The recoverable compliance diverges at the percolation threshold with an exponent t=3.2+/-0.2. This effect is consistent with the idea that each branched polymer of size equal to the correlation length stores k(B)T of elastic energy. Near the gel point, the complex shear modulus is a power law in frequency with an exponent u=0.33+/-0.05. The measured rheological exponents confirm that the dynamic scaling law u=t/(s+t) holds for the vulcanization class. Since s is larger and u is smaller than the Rouse values observed in systems that belong to the critical percolation universality class, we conclude that entanglements profoundly increase the longest relaxation time. Examination of the literature data reveals clear trends for the exponents s and u as functions of the chain length between branch points. These dependencies, qualitatively explained by hierarchical relaxation models, imply that the dynamic scaling observed in systems that belong to the vulcanization class is nonuniversal.

  9. Warped branches of flux compactifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Yen-Kheng

    2012-03-01

    We consider Freund-Rubin-type compactifications which are described by (p+q)-dimensional Einstein gravity with a positive cosmological constant and a q-form flux. Using perturbative expansions of Kinoshita’s ansatz for warped dSp×Sq and AdSp×Sq spacetimes, we obtain analytical solutions describing the warped branches and their respective phase spaces. These equations are given by inhomogeneous Gegenbauer differential equations which can be solved by the Green’s function method. The requirement that the Green’s functions are regular provides constraints which determine the structure of the phase space of the warped branches. We apply the perturbation results to calculate the thermodynamic variables for the warped dSp×Sq branch. In particular, the first law of thermodynamics can be reproduced using this method.

  10. Functional independence of tree branches under long-term ozone stress: Gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Schaap, W.; Hinckley, T.; Sprugel, D.G. ); Wang, D. )

    1991-05-01

    The use of branches in air pollution research was evaluated with a test of the hypothesis that branches can be treated as functionally independent units. Field-planted Douglas-fir saplings were enclosed in open-top chambers with branches at an upper and lower position in the crown enclosed in open-end branch chambers. The pollutant environment of branches could be manipulated independently of that of the tree. Comparisons were made between branches with the same treatment but different whole tree treatments. For current foliage exposed to ozone net photosynthesis and photochemical efficiency were reduced while CO{sub 2} compensation point and stomatal and non-stomatal inhibition of net photosynthesis were increased. First year results support the hypothesis of functional independence. Second year results suggest a limit to functional independence with branches largely, but not completely, independent.

  11. Reaction enhancement of initially distant scalars by Lagrangian coherent structures

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, Kenneth R. Crimaldi, John P.; Meiss, James D.

    2015-03-15

    Turbulent fluid flows have long been recognized as a superior means of diluting initial concentrations of scalars due to rapid stirring. Conversely, experiments have shown that the structures responsible for this rapid dilution can also aggregate initially distant reactive scalars and thereby greatly enhance reaction rates. Indeed, chaotic flows not only enhance dilution by shearing and stretching but also organize initially distant scalars along transiently attracting regions in the flow. To show the robustness of this phenomenon, a hierarchical set of three numerical flows is used: the periodic wake downstream of a stationary cylinder, a chaotic double gyre flow, and a chaotic, aperiodic flow consisting of interacting Taylor vortices. We demonstrate that Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS), as identified by ridges in finite time Lyapunov exponents, are directly responsible for this coalescence of reactive scalar filaments. When highly concentrated filaments coalesce, reaction rates can be orders of magnitude greater than would be predicted in a well-mixed system. This is further supported by an idealized, analytical model that was developed to quantify the competing effects of scalar dilution and coalescence. Chaotic flows, known for their ability to efficiently dilute scalars, therefore have the competing effect of organizing initially distant scalars along the LCS at timescales shorter than that required for dilution, resulting in reaction enhancement.

  12. 30 CFR 57.6403 - Branch circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Branch circuits. 57.6403 Section 57.6403... Blasting-Surface and Underground § 57.6403 Branch circuits. (a) If electric blasting includes the use of branch circuits, each branch shall be equipped with a safety switch or equivalent method to isolate...

  13. 30 CFR 56.6403 - Branch circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Branch circuits. 56.6403 Section 56.6403... Blasting § 56.6403 Branch circuits. (a) If electric blasting includes the use of branch circuits, each branch shall be equipped with a safety switch or equivalent method to isolate the circuits to be used....

  14. 30 CFR 56.6403 - Branch circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Branch circuits. 56.6403 Section 56.6403... Blasting § 56.6403 Branch circuits. (a) If electric blasting includes the use of branch circuits, each branch shall be equipped with a safety switch or equivalent method to isolate the circuits to be used....

  15. 30 CFR 57.6403 - Branch circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Branch circuits. 57.6403 Section 57.6403... Blasting-Surface and Underground § 57.6403 Branch circuits. (a) If electric blasting includes the use of branch circuits, each branch shall be equipped with a safety switch or equivalent method to isolate...

  16. 30 CFR 56.6403 - Branch circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Branch circuits. 56.6403 Section 56.6403... Blasting § 56.6403 Branch circuits. (a) If electric blasting includes the use of branch circuits, each branch shall be equipped with a safety switch or equivalent method to isolate the circuits to be used....

  17. 30 CFR 57.6403 - Branch circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Branch circuits. 57.6403 Section 57.6403... Blasting-Surface and Underground § 57.6403 Branch circuits. (a) If electric blasting includes the use of branch circuits, each branch shall be equipped with a safety switch or equivalent method to isolate...

  18. 30 CFR 57.6403 - Branch circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Branch circuits. 57.6403 Section 57.6403... Blasting-Surface and Underground § 57.6403 Branch circuits. (a) If electric blasting includes the use of branch circuits, each branch shall be equipped with a safety switch or equivalent method to isolate...

  19. 30 CFR 56.6403 - Branch circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Branch circuits. 56.6403 Section 56.6403... Blasting § 56.6403 Branch circuits. (a) If electric blasting includes the use of branch circuits, each branch shall be equipped with a safety switch or equivalent method to isolate the circuits to be used....

  20. 33 CFR 117.620 - Westport River-East Branch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Massachusetts § 117.620 Westport River—East Branch. The Westport Point Bridge, mile 1.2 at Westport, shall operate as follows: (a) Public vessels of the United States must be passed as soon as possible. (b) The owners of this bridge shall provide...

  1. 22. NORTH BRANCH, PRAIRIE CITY DITCH, CONTOURING AROUND SIDE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. NORTH BRANCH, PRAIRIE CITY DITCH, CONTOURING AROUND SIDE OF KNOLL. DITCH LIES BETWEEN OAK TREE AND POINTED ROCKS, AND EXITS PHOTOGRAPH AT LOWER RIGHT CORNER. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Natomas Ditch System, Rhodes Ditch, West of Bidwell Street, north of U.S. Highway 50, Folsom, Sacramento County, CA

  2. 21. LOOKING EAST ALONG NORTH BRANCH PRAIRIE CITY DITCH TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. LOOKING EAST ALONG NORTH BRANCH PRAIRIE CITY DITCH TO POINT (AT WIRE ROLL) WHERE IT IS CUT BY A ROCK WALL. DITCH IS ALSO VISIBLE RUNNING ALONG BASE OF KNOLL IN DISTANCE, BELOW AND TO RIGHT OF DEAD TREE. - Natomas Ditch System, Rhodes Ditch, West of Bidwell Street, north of U.S. Highway 50, Folsom, Sacramento County, CA

  3. Deep HST imaging of distant weak radio and field galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Windhorst, R. A.; Gordon, J. M.; Pascarelle, S. M.; Schmidtke, P. C.; Keel, W. C.; Burkey, J. M.; Dunlop, J. S.

    1994-01-01

    We present deep Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Wide-Field Camera (WFC) V- and I-band images of three distant weak radio galaxies with z = 0.311-2.390 and seven field galaxies with z = 0.131-0.58. The images were deconvolved with both the Lucy and multiresolution CLEAN methods, which yield a restoring Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) of less than or equal to 0.2 sec, (nearly) preserve photons and signal-to-noise ratio at low spatial frequencies, and produce consistent light profiles down to our 2 sigma surface brightness sensitivity limit of V approximately 27.2 and I approximately 25.9 mag/sq arcsec. Multi-component image modeling was used to provide deconvolution-independent estimates of structural parameters for symmetric galaxies. We present 12-band (m(sub 2750) UBVRIgriJHK) photometry for a subset of the galaxies and bootstrap the unknown FOC/48 zero point at 2750 A in three independent ways (yielding m(sub 2750) = 21.34 +/- 0.09 mag for 1.0 e(-)/s). Two radio galaxies with z = 0.311 and 0.528, as well as one field galaxy with z = 0.58, have the colors and spectra of early-type galaxies, and a(exp 1/4)-like light profiles in the HST images. The two at z greater than 0.5 have little or no color gradients in V - I and are likely giant ellipticals, while the z = 0.311 radio galaxy has a dim exponential disk and is likely an S0. Six of the seven field galaxies have light profiles that indicate (small) inner bulges following a(exp 1/4) laws and outer exponential disks, both with little or no color gradients. These are (early-type) spiral galaxies with z = 0.131-0.528. About half have faint companions or bars. One shows lumpy structure, possibly a merger. The compact narrow-line galaxy 53W002 at z = 2.390 has less than or = 30% +/- 10% of its HST V and I flux in the central kiloparsec (due to its weak Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN)). Most of its light (V approximately equal to 23.3) occurs in a symmetric envelope with a regular a(exp 1/4)-like profile of effective

  4. Development of Distant Learning Laboratory and Creation of Educational Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Considine, Michelle

    1995-01-01

    The Office of Education's fundamental goal is to disseminate information, mostly that which relates to science and technology. In this attempt, as I have observed, the office has many programs bringing both students and teachers to NASA Langley to expose them to the facilities and to teach them some about the scientific theory and about available modern technology. As a way of expanding the audience that can be reached, as the expense of bringing people in is limiting, Marchelle Canright has proposed establishing a center dedicated to researching and producing distant learning videos. Although distant learning through telecommunications is not a new concept, as many universities, colleges, and precollege level schools offer televised courses, the research in this field has been limited. Many of the standing distant learning broadcasts are simply recordings of teachers in classrooms giving lectures to their own students; they are not aimed at the television audience. In some cases the videos are produced without a Live-lecture atmosphere, but are still only classroom lectures. In either case, however, the full range of capabilities of video production are not being fully utilized. Methods for best relaying educational material have not been explored. Possibilities for including computerized images and video clips for the purpose of showing diagrams and processes, as well as examples in fitting cases, may add considerably to the educational value of these videos. Also, through Internet and satellite links, it is possible for remote students to interact with the teachers during televised sessions. These possibilities might, also, add to the effectiveness of distant learning programs. Ms. Canright's proposed center will be dedicated to researching these possibilities and eventually spreading the results to distant learning program managers. This is the project I was involved in over the summer. As implied, the center is still at the foundation stages. Ms. Canright has

  5. Chandra Finds Most Distant X-ray Galaxy Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-02-01

    The most distant X-ray cluster of galaxies yet has been found by astronomers using NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory. Approximately 10 billion light years from Earth, the cluster 3C294 is 40 percent farther than the next most distant X-ray galaxy cluster. The existence of such a distant galaxy cluster is important for understanding how the universe evolved. "Distant objects like 3C294 provide snapshots to how these galaxy clusters looked billions of years ago," said Andrew Fabian of the Institute of Astronomy, Cambridge, England and lead author of the paper accepted for publication in the Monthly Notices of Britain’s Royal Astronomical Society. "These latest results help us better understand what the universe was like when it was only 20 percent of its current age." Chandra’s image reveals an hourglass-shaped region of X-ray emission centered on the previously known central radio source. This X-ray emission extends outward from the central galaxy for at least 300,000 light years and shows that the known radio source is in the central galaxy of a massive cluster. Scientists have long suspected that distant radio-emitting galaxies like 3C294 are part of larger groups of galaxies known as "clusters." However, radio data provides astronomers with only a partial picture of these distant objects. Confirmation of the existence of clusters at great distances - and, hence, at early stages of the universe - requires information from other wavelengths. Optical observations can be used to pinpoint individual galaxies, but X-ray data are needed to detect the hot gas that fills the space within the cluster. "Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe," said Fabian. "We do not expect to find many massive objects, such as the 3C294 cluster, in early times because structure is thought to grow from small scales to large scales." The vast clouds of hot gas that envelope galaxies in clusters are thought to be heated by collapse toward the

  6. Trigger Points: An Anatomical Substratum

    PubMed Central

    Akamatsu, Flávia Emi; Ayres, Bernardo Rodrigues; Saleh, Samir Omar; Hojaij, Flávio; Andrade, Mauro; Hsing, Wu Tu; Jacomo, Alfredo Luiz

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to bring the trapezius muscle knowledge of the locations where the accessory nerve branches enter the muscle belly to reach the motor endplates and find myofascial trigger points (MTrPs). Although anatomoclinical correlations represent a major feature of MTrP, no previous reports describing the distribution of the accessory nerve branches and their anatomical relationship with MTrP are found in the literature. Both trapezius muscles from twelve adult cadavers were carefully dissected by the authors (anatomy professors and medical graduate students) to observe the exact point where the branches of the spinal accessory nerve entered the muscle belly. Dissection was performed through stratigraphic layers to preserve the motor innervation of the trapezius muscle, which is located deep in the muscle. Seven points are described, four of which are motor points: in all cases, these locations corresponded to clinically described MTrPs. The four points were common in these twelve cadavers. This type of clinical correlation between spinal accessory nerve branching and MTrP is useful to achieve a better understanding of the anatomical correlation of MTrP and the physiopathology of these disorders and may provide a scientific basis for their treatment, rendering useful additional information to therapists to achieve better diagnoses and improve therapeutic approaches. PMID:25811029

  7. Lifestyle assessment of branched tetraether source bacteria via root systems of different age and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huguet, Arnaud; Gocke, Martina; Wiesenberg, Guido L. B.; Fosse, Céline; Derenne, Sylvie

    2013-04-01

    Branched glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers (GDGTs) are complex lipids of high molecular weight, recently discovered in soils. They were suggested to be produced by still unknown anaerobic bacteria. The relative distribution of branched GDGTs was shown to depend on environmental parameters: the degree of methylation of branched GDGTs (MBT index) likely depends on air temperature and to a lesser extent on soil pH, whereas the relative abundance of cyclopentyl rings of branched GDGTs (CBT index) correlates well with soil pH. Even though over the last years an increasing number of studies have focused on the potential use of branched GDGTs as paleoclimate proxies, the ecological niche of their source organisms remains unknown. An improved knowledge of the habitat and lifestyle of branched GDGT-producing bacteria is essential to interpret the environmental data derived from these lipids. The aim of this work was to obtain more information on branched GDGT source bacteria via the analysis of branched GDGTs in the vicinity of root systems of different age and habitat. Calcified and non-calcified living and dead roots were selected. The distribution and abundance of branched GDGTs were determined in roots and surrounding soil/sediment collected from two forest sites on fluvial sand and loess near Sopron (Hungary). Living root samples and surrounding soil were collected between 0 and 0.5 m below present surface, whereas calcified root systems (rhizoliths) were collected at 1.5 - 1.8 m depth. Reference sediment samples without visible root remains were collected 50-70 cm distant from the rhizoliths. Ancient roots (ca. 3000-yr age) and surrounding sediments were also collected at 2.2-2.6m in a loess-paleosol sequence located in Nussloch (SW Germany). In living root systems from Hungary, branched GDGTs were especially abundant in fine roots (<2 mm) and in the close vicinity of all roots (rhizosphere) and were less concentrated in the larger roots (>2 mm) themselves. This

  8. NCI: DCTD: Biometric Research Branch

    Cancer.gov

    The Biometric Research Branch (BRP) is the statistical and biomathematical component of the Division of Cancer Treatment, Diagnosis and Centers (DCTDC). Its members provide statistical leadership for the national and international research programs of the division in developmental therapeutics, developmental diagnostics, diagnostic imaging and clinical trials.

  9. Risk Factor Assessment Branch (RFAB)

    Cancer.gov

    The Risk Factor Assessment Branch (RFAB) focuses on the development, evaluation, and dissemination of high-quality risk factor metrics, methods, tools, technologies, and resources for use across the cancer research continuum, and the assessment of cancer-related risk factors in the population.

  10. Theoretical horizontal-branch evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweigart, Allen V.

    1987-01-01

    The general features of the theoretical evolution of canonical horizontal-branch (HB) stars are briefly reviewed with specific emphasis on the track morphology in the HR diagram and the determination of the globular cluster helium abundance. The observational evidence for the occurrence of semiconvection is discussed together with some remaining theoretical uncertainty.

  11. NCI: DCTD: Biometric Research Branch

    Cancer.gov

    The Biometric Research Branch (BRB) is the statistical and biomathematical component of the Division of Cancer Treatment, Diagnosis and Centers (DCTDC). Its members provide statistical leadership for the national and international research programs of the division in developmental therapeutics, developmental diagnostics, diagnostic imaging and clinical trials.

  12. Cash efficiency for bank branches.

    PubMed

    Cabello, Julia García

    2013-01-01

    Bank liquidity management has become a major issue during the financial crisis as liquidity shortages have intensified and have put pressure on banks to diversity and improve their liquidity sources. While a significant strand of the literature concentrates on wholesale liquidity generation and on the alternative to deposit funding, the management of an inventory of cash holdings within the banks' branches is also a relevant issue as any significant improvement in cash management at the bank distribution channels may have a positive effect in reducing liquidity tensions. In this paper, we propose a simple programme of cash efficiency for the banks' branches, very easy to implement, which conform to a set of instructions to be imposed from the bank to their branches. This model proves to significantly reduce cash holdings at branches thereby providing efficiency improvements in liquidity management. The methodology we propose is based on the definition of some stochastic processes combined with renewal processes, which capture the random elements of the cash flow, before applying suitable optimization programmes to all the costs involved in cash movements. The classical issue of the Transaction Demand for the Cash and some aspects of Inventory Theory are also present. Mathematics Subject Classification (2000) C02, C60, E50.

  13. Multiple pathways regulate shoot branching

    PubMed Central

    Rameau, Catherine; Bertheloot, Jessica; Leduc, Nathalie; Andrieu, Bruno; Foucher, Fabrice; Sakr, Soulaiman

    2015-01-01

    Shoot branching patterns result from the spatio-temporal regulation of axillary bud outgrowth. Numerous endogenous, developmental and environmental factors are integrated at the bud and plant levels to determine numbers of growing shoots. Multiple pathways that converge to common integrators are most probably involved. We propose several pathways involving not only the classical hormones auxin, cytokinins and strigolactones, but also other signals with a strong influence on shoot branching such as gibberellins, sugars or molecular actors of plant phase transition. We also deal with recent findings about the molecular mechanisms and the pathway involved in the response to shade as an example of an environmental signal controlling branching. We propose the TEOSINTE BRANCHED1, CYCLOIDEA, PCF transcription factor TB1/BRC1 and the polar auxin transport stream in the stem as possible integrators of these pathways. We finally discuss how modeling can help to represent this highly dynamic system by articulating knowledges and hypothesis and calculating the phenotype properties they imply. PMID:25628627

  14. Anisotropies and flows of suprathermal particles in the distant magnetotail - ISEE 3 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholer, M.; Hovestadt, D.; Klecker, B.; Gloeckler, G.; Ipavich, F. M.; Fan, C. Y.

    1983-01-01

    The ISEE-3 spacecraft has been transferred in 1982 into an earth orbit which brings the satellite close to the tailward Lagrangian point L2 at about 220 R(E) and thus allows exploration of the distant geomagnetic tail. An initial analysis of energetic proton measurements greater than 30 keV from the Max-Planck-Institut/University of Maryland sensor system on ISEE-3 is reported. It has been found that suprathermal protons are a persistent feature of the distant tail. Differential intensitites at 30 keV are essentially constant between the lunar distance and 220 R(E) and about one order of magnitude smaller than in the near earth, or greater than about 20 R(E), plasma sheet. Assuming that these protons are convected with the local plasma flow, it is possible to derive plasma velocities. During time periods where a comparison is possible, these velocities compare favourably well with the velocities derived from the Los Alamos National Laboratory plasma analyzer on board the same spacecraft. The appearance of the plasma sheet, as evidenced by the suprathermal particles, is rather bursty. Anisotropies are large, and predominantly tailward.

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance signal dynamics of liquids in the presence of distant dipolar fields, revisited.

    PubMed

    Barros, Wilson; Gochberg, Daniel F; Gore, John C

    2009-05-01

    The description of the nuclear magnetic resonance magnetization dynamics in the presence of long-range dipolar interactions, which is based upon approximate solutions of Bloch-Torrey equations including the effect of a distant dipolar field, has been revisited. New experiments show that approximate analytic solutions have a broader regime of validity as well as dependencies on pulse-sequence parameters that seem to have been overlooked. In order to explain these experimental results, we developed a new method consisting of calculating the magnetization via an iterative formalism where both diffusion and distant dipolar field contributions are treated as integral operators incorporated into the Bloch-Torrey equations. The solution can be organized as a perturbative series, whereby access to higher order terms allows one to set better boundaries on validity regimes for analytic first-order approximations. Finally, the method legitimizes the use of simple analytic first-order approximations under less demanding experimental conditions, it predicts new pulse-sequence parameter dependencies for the range of validity, and clarifies weak points in previous calculations.

  16. Anomalous scaling in an age-dependent branching model.

    PubMed

    Keller-Schmidt, Stephanie; Tuğrul, Murat; Eguíluz, Víctor M; Hernández-García, Emilio; Klemm, Konstantin

    2015-02-01

    We introduce a one-parametric family of tree growth models, in which branching probabilities decrease with branch age τ as τ(-α). Depending on the exponent α, the scaling of tree depth with tree size n displays a transition between the logarithmic scaling of random trees and an algebraic growth. At the transition (α=1) tree depth grows as (logn)(2). This anomalous scaling is in good agreement with the trend observed in evolution of biological species, thus providing a theoretical support for age-dependent speciation and associating it to the occurrence of a critical point.

  17. Anomalous scaling in an age-dependent branching model.

    PubMed

    Keller-Schmidt, Stephanie; Tuğrul, Murat; Eguíluz, Víctor M; Hernández-García, Emilio; Klemm, Konstantin

    2015-02-01

    We introduce a one-parametric family of tree growth models, in which branching probabilities decrease with branch age τ as τ(-α). Depending on the exponent α, the scaling of tree depth with tree size n displays a transition between the logarithmic scaling of random trees and an algebraic growth. At the transition (α=1) tree depth grows as (logn)(2). This anomalous scaling is in good agreement with the trend observed in evolution of biological species, thus providing a theoretical support for age-dependent speciation and associating it to the occurrence of a critical point. PMID:25768548

  18. Three-component PSBL ions observed in the distant magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Y.; Mukai, T.; Terasawa, T.; Machida, S.

    2003-04-01

    The most conspicuous feature of the Plasma Sheet Boundary Layer (PSBL) in the Earth's magnetotail is the existence of high-energy ion beams. These ion beams have been observed by several satellites in the near-tail region of XGSE > -25Re. In spite of the previous observational and theoretical works, the source and acceleration mechanism of the PSBL ion beams is still unclear. The insufficiency of the ion observation in the source region of the PSBL ion beams is one of the major reasons. The purpose of this paper is to identify the source of the PSBL ion beams by analyzing the data obtained by the GEOTAIL satellite in the distant magnetotail XGSE< -40Re. Detailed structure of the PSBL in the upstream region of slow-mode shocks in the distant magnetotail was investigated using low energy particle data. GEOTAIL observations proved the existence of the slow-shock plasma sheet-lobe boundaries bounding the magnetic reconnection region in the Earth's magnetotail. We observed three-component ions: cold ions and two-component PSBL beam ions in the PSBL. One of the two-component PSBL beam ions was observed in the outer region of the PSBL. The energy of this component was higher than the other component while the temperature was much lower. Its distribution function looked like "kidney bean" shape. The other PSBL ion component had characteristics that its low energy cut off gradually decreased as the satellite approached the plasma sheet. The source of the former component may be the current sheet accelerated lobe cold ions while the source of the latter component may be the ions leaked from the hot plasma sheet towards the lobe region along the magnetic field. Three-component PSBL ions were observed along with 34% of the slow-shock plasma sheet-lobe boundaries identified in the distant magnetotail.

  19. "Spooky actions at a distance": physics, psi, and distant healing.

    PubMed

    Leder, Drew

    2005-10-01

    Over decades, consciousness research has accumulated evidence of the real and measureable existence of "spooky actions at a distance"--modes of telepathy, telekinesis, clairvoyance, and the like. More recently scientists have begun rigorous study of the effects of distant healing intention and prayer vis-a-vis nonhuman living systems and patients in clinical trials. A barrier to taking such work seriously may be the belief that it is fundamentally incompatible with the scientific world view. This article suggests that it need not be; contemporary physics has generated a series of paradigms that can be used to make sense of, interpret, and explore "psi" and distant healing. Four such models are discussed, two drawn from relativity theory and two from quantum mechanics. First is the energetic transmission model, presuming the effects of conscious intention to be mediated by an as-yet unknown energy signal. Second is the model of path facilitation. As gravity, according to general relativity, "warps" space-time, easing certain pathways of movement, so may acts of consciousness have warping and facilitating effects on the fabric of the surrounding world. Third is the model of nonlocal entanglement drawn from quantum mechanics. Perhaps people, like particles, can become entangled so they behave as one system with instantaneous and unmediated correlations across a distance. Last discussed is a model involving actualization of potentials. The act of measurement in quantum mechanics collapses a probabilistic wave function into a single outcome. Perhaps conscious healing intention can act similarly, helping to actualize one of a series of possibilities; for example, recovery from a potentially lethal tumor. Such physics-based models are not presented as explanatory but rather as suggestive. Disjunctions as well as compatibilities between the phenomena of modern physics and those of psi and distant healing are explored. PMID:16296928

  20. "Spooky actions at a distance": physics, psi, and distant healing.

    PubMed

    Leder, Drew

    2005-10-01

    Over decades, consciousness research has accumulated evidence of the real and measureable existence of "spooky actions at a distance"--modes of telepathy, telekinesis, clairvoyance, and the like. More recently scientists have begun rigorous study of the effects of distant healing intention and prayer vis-a-vis nonhuman living systems and patients in clinical trials. A barrier to taking such work seriously may be the belief that it is fundamentally incompatible with the scientific world view. This article suggests that it need not be; contemporary physics has generated a series of paradigms that can be used to make sense of, interpret, and explore "psi" and distant healing. Four such models are discussed, two drawn from relativity theory and two from quantum mechanics. First is the energetic transmission model, presuming the effects of conscious intention to be mediated by an as-yet unknown energy signal. Second is the model of path facilitation. As gravity, according to general relativity, "warps" space-time, easing certain pathways of movement, so may acts of consciousness have warping and facilitating effects on the fabric of the surrounding world. Third is the model of nonlocal entanglement drawn from quantum mechanics. Perhaps people, like particles, can become entangled so they behave as one system with instantaneous and unmediated correlations across a distance. Last discussed is a model involving actualization of potentials. The act of measurement in quantum mechanics collapses a probabilistic wave function into a single outcome. Perhaps conscious healing intention can act similarly, helping to actualize one of a series of possibilities; for example, recovery from a potentially lethal tumor. Such physics-based models are not presented as explanatory but rather as suggestive. Disjunctions as well as compatibilities between the phenomena of modern physics and those of psi and distant healing are explored.

  1. Distant Healing Intention Therapies: An Overview of the Scientific Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Schlitz, Marilyn; Baur, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    This article provides a broad overview of “distant healing intention” (DHI) therapies, ie, intentional healing modalities claimed to transcend the usual constraints of distance through space or time. We provide a summary of previous reviews and meta-analyses that have explored a diverse array of DHI modalities, outcome measures, and experimental protocols. While some significant experimental effects have been observed, the evidence to date does not yet provide confidence in its clinical efficacy. The purported “nonlocal” nature of DHI raises significant methodological and theoretical challenges. We recommend several avenues for improving future research. PMID:26665044

  2. Role of lymphatic vasculature in regional and distant metastases.

    PubMed

    Podgrabinska, Simona; Skobe, Mihaela

    2014-09-01

    In cancer, lymphatic vasculature has been traditionally viewed only as a transportation system for metastatic cells. It has now become clear that lymphatics perform many additional functions which could influence cancer progression. Lymphangiogenesis, induced at the primary tumor site and at distant sites, potently augments metastasis. Lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) control tumor cell entry and exit from the lymphatic vessels. LECs also control immune cell traffic and directly modulate adaptive immune responses. This review highlights advances in our understanding of the mechanisms by which lymphatic vessels, and in particular lymphatic endothelium, impact metastasis.

  3. Cancer Salivary Biomarkers for Tumours Distant to the Oral Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Rapado-González, Óscar; Majem, Blanca; Muinelo-Romay, Laura; López-López, Rafa; Suarez-Cunqueiro, María Mercedes

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of saliva as a diagnostic approach for systemic diseases was proposed just two decades ago, but recently great interest in the field has emerged because of its revolutionary potential as a liquid biopsy and its usefulness as a non-invasive sampling method. Multiple molecules isolated in saliva have been proposed as cancer biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis, drug monitoring and pharmacogenetic studies. In this review, we focus on the current status of the salivary diagnostic biomarkers for different cancers distant to the oral cavity, noting their potential use in the clinic and their applicability in personalising cancer therapies. PMID:27626410

  4. Branching processes in disease epidemics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Sarabjeet

    Branching processes have served as a model for chemical reactions, biological growth processes and contagion (of disease, information or fads). Through this connection, these seemingly different physical processes share some common universalities that can be elucidated by analyzing the underlying branching process. In this thesis, we focus on branching processes as a model for infectious diseases spreading between individuals belonging to different populations. The distinction between populations can arise from species separation (as in the case of diseases which jump across species) or spatial separation (as in the case of disease spreading between farms, cities, urban centers, etc). A prominent example of the former is zoonoses -- infectious diseases that spill from animals to humans -- whose specific examples include Nipah virus, monkeypox, HIV and avian influenza. A prominent example of the latter is infectious diseases of animals such as foot and mouth disease and bovine tuberculosis that spread between farms or cattle herds. Another example of the latter is infectious diseases of humans such as H1N1 that spread from one city to another through migration of infectious hosts. This thesis consists of three main chapters, an introduction and an appendix. The introduction gives a brief history of mathematics in modeling the spread of infectious diseases along with a detailed description of the most commonly used disease model -- the Susceptible-Infectious-Recovered (SIR) model. The introduction also describes how the stochastic formulation of the model reduces to a branching process in the limit of large population which is analyzed in detail. The second chapter describes a two species model of zoonoses with coupled SIR processes and proceeds into the calculation of statistics pertinent to cross species infection using multitype branching processes. The third chapter describes an SIR process driven by a Poisson process of infection spillovers. This is posed as a

  5. Evolutionary branching under multi-dimensional evolutionary constraints.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hiroshi; Sasaki, Akira

    2016-10-21

    The fitness of an existing phenotype and of a potential mutant should generally depend on the frequencies of other existing phenotypes. Adaptive evolution driven by such frequency-dependent fitness functions can be analyzed effectively using adaptive dynamics theory, assuming rare mutation and asexual reproduction. When possible mutations are restricted to certain directions due to developmental, physiological, or physical constraints, the resulting adaptive evolution may be restricted to subspaces (constraint surfaces) with fewer dimensionalities than the original trait spaces. To analyze such dynamics along constraint surfaces efficiently, we develop a Lagrange multiplier method in the framework of adaptive dynamics theory. On constraint surfaces of arbitrary dimensionalities described with equality constraints, our method efficiently finds local evolutionarily stable strategies, convergence stable points, and evolutionary branching points. We also derive the conditions for the existence of evolutionary branching points on constraint surfaces when the shapes of the surfaces can be chosen freely. PMID:27444402

  6. Nucleosynthesis in asymptotic giant branch stars

    SciTech Connect

    El Eid, Mounib F.

    2014-05-09

    The nucleosynthesis in asymptotic giant branch stars (briefly: AGB)is a challenging and fascinating subject in the theory of stellar evolution and important for observations as well. This is because about of half the heavy elements beyond iron are synthesized during thermal pulsation phases of these stars. Furthermore, the understanding of the production of the heavy elements and some light elements like carbon and fluorine represent a powerful tool to get more insight into the internal structure of these stars. The diversity of nuclear processing during the AGB phases may also motivate experimental activities in measuring important nuclear reactions. In this contribution, we emphasize several interesting feature of the nucleosynthesis in AGB stars which still needs further elaboration especially from theoretical point of view.

  7. Geodynamics Branch research report, 1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, W. D. (Editor); Cohen, S. C. (Editor)

    1983-01-01

    The research program of the Geodynamics Branch is summarized. The research activities cover a broad spectrum of geoscience disciplines including space geodesy, geopotential field modeling, tectonophysics, and dynamic oceanography. The NASA programs which are supported by the work described include the Geodynamics and Ocean Programs, the Crustal Dynamics Project, the proposed Ocean Topography Experiment (TOPEX) and Geopotential Research Mission. The individual papers are grouped into chapters on Crustal Movements, Global Earth Dynamics, Gravity Field Model Development, Sea Surface Topography, and Advanced Studies.

  8. Solid State Photovoltaic Research Branch

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the Solid State Photovoltaic Research Branch of the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) from October 1, 1988, through September 30,l 1989. Six technical sections of the report cover these main areas of SERIs in-house research: Semiconductor Crystal Growth, Amorphous Silicon Research, Polycrystalline Thin Films, III-V High-Efficiency Photovoltaic Cells, Solid-State Theory, and Laser Raman and Luminescence Spectroscopy. Sections have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  9. Solid State Photovoltaic Research Branch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1990-09-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the Solid State Photovoltaic Research Branch of the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) from October 1, 1988, through September 30, 1989. Six technical sections of the report cover these main areas of SERIs in-house research: Semiconductor Crystal Growth, Amorphous Silicon Research, Polycrystalline Thin Films, III-V High-Efficiency Photovoltaic Cells, Solid-State Theory, and Laser Raman and Luminescence Spectroscopy. Sections have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  10. Horizontal-branch stellar evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweigart, Allen V.

    1990-01-01

    The results of canonical theory for the evolution of horizontal-branch (HB) stars are examined. Particular attention is given to how an HB star maintains the appropriate composition distribution within the semiconvective zone and how this composition is affected by the finite time-dependence with which convective boundaries actually move. Newly developed models based on time-dependent overshooting are presented for both the core-helium-exhaustion and main HB phases.

  11. Branching patterns of wave trains in the FPU lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shangjiang; Lamb, Jeroen S. W.; Rink, Bob W.

    2009-02-01

    We study the existence and branching patterns of wave trains in the one-dimensional infinite Fermi-Pasta-Ulam (FPU) lattice. A wave train Ansatz in this Hamiltonian lattice leads to an advance-delay differential equation on a space of periodic functions, which carries a natural Hamiltonian structure. The existence of wave trains is then studied by means of a Lyapunov-Schmidt reduction, leading to a finite-dimensional bifurcation equation with an inherited Hamiltonian structure. While exploring some of the additional symmetries of the FPU lattice, we use invariant theory to find the bifurcation equations describing the branching patterns of wave trains near p : q resonant waves. We show that at such branching points, a generic nonlinearity selects exactly two two-parameter families of mixed-mode wave trains.

  12. Interactions between axillary branches of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ongaro, Veronica; Bainbridge, Katherine; Williamson, Lisa; Leyser, Ottoline

    2008-03-01

    Studies of apical dominance have benefited greatly from two-branch assays in pea and bean, in which the shoot system is trimmed back to leave only two active cotyledonary axillary branches. In these two-branch shoots, a large body of evidence shows that one actively growing branch is able to inhibit the growth of the other, prompting studies on the nature of the inhibitory signals, which are still poorly understood. Here, we describe the establishment of two-branch assays in Arabidopsis, using consecutive branches on the bolting stem. As with the classical studies in pea and bean, these consecutive branches are able to inhibit one another's growth. Not only can the upper branch inhibit the lower branch, but also the lower branch can inhibit the upper branch, illustrating the bi-directional action of the inhibitory signals. Using mutants, we show that the inhibition is partially dependent on the MAX pathway and that while the inhibition is clearly transmitted across the stem from the active to the inhibited branch, the vascular connectivity of the two branches is weak, and the MAX pathway is capable of acting unilaterally in the stem. PMID:19825548

  13. Walker Branch Watershed Ecosystems Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Walker Branch Watershed is located on the U. S. Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Reservation near Oak Ridge, in Anderson County, Tennessee. The Walker Branch Watershed Project began in 1967 under sponsorship of the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission (now the U. S. Department of Energy). Initially, the project centered primarily on the geologic and hydrologic processes that control the amounts and chemistry of water moving through the watershed. Past projects have included: • U. S. Department of Energy funded studies of watershed hydrology and forest nutrient dynamics • National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration funded studies of forest micrometeorology • Studies of atmospheric deposition under the National Atmospheric Deposition Program • The International Biological Program Eastern Deciduous Forest Biome Project • National Science Foundation sponsored studies of trace element cycling and stream nutrient spiraling • Electric Power Research Institute funded studies of the effects of acidic deposition on canopy processes and soil chemistry. These projects have all contributed to a more complete understanding of how forest watersheds function and have provided insights into the solution of energy-related problems associated with air pollution, contaminant transport, and forest nutrient dynamics. This is one of a few sites in the world characterized by long-term, intensive environmental studies. The Walker Branch Watershed website at http://walkerbranch.ornl.gov/ provides maps, photographs, and data on climate, precipitation, atmospheric deposition, stream discharge and runoff, stream chemistry, and vegetation. [Taken from http://walkerbranch.ornl.gov/ABOUTAAA.HTM

  14. Sensitivity of Saturn's orbit to a hypothetical distant planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folkner, William; Jacobson, Robert A.; Park, Ryan; Williams, James G.

    2016-10-01

    Several distant scattered Kuiper belt objects have similar perihelion directions that might be aligned due to the influence an unknown planet well outside the orbit of Neptune (Batygin & Brown, 2016 Astronomical J. 151:22). Such a planet, with a mass up to an order of magnitude larger than the Earth, would affect the rest of the solar system. Saturn, which is well observed from radio range and VLBI observations of the Cassini spacecraft, provides an opportunity to look for these perturbations. An unknown large planet would be expected to affect the orbit of Saturn, but the effect might be partially absorbed in the estimation of parameters used to fit the planetary ephemerides. Ephemeris parameters include the planetary orbital elements, the mass of the Sun and the masses of asteroids that perturb the orbit of Mars. Earlier analysis of the Cassini data showed no effect as suggested by the Modified Newtonian Dynamics theory (Hees et al., 2014 Phys. Rev. D 89:102002). We present an updated Cassini data set, with the accuracy of ranges to Saturn improved through updated estimates of the Cassini spacecraft orbit, and an analysis of the largest possible perturbing distant planet mass consistent with the ranging data.

  15. Photoinduction of cyclosis-mediated interactions between distant chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Bulychev, Alexander A; Komarova, Anna V

    2015-01-01

    Communications between chloroplasts and other organelles based on the exchange of metabolites, including redox active substances, are recognized as a part of intracellular regulation, chlororespiration, and defense against oxidative stress. Similar communications may operate between spatially distant chloroplasts in large cells where photosynthetic and respiratory activities are distributed unevenly under fluctuating patterned illumination. Microfluorometry of chlorophyll fluorescence in vivo in internodal cells of the alga Chara corallina revealed that a 30-s pulse of localized light induces a transient increase (~25%) in F' fluorescence of remote cell parts exposed to dim background light at a 1.5-mm distance on the downstream side from the illuminated spot in the plane of unilateral cytoplasmic streaming but has no effect on F' at equal distance on the upstream side. An abrupt arrest of cytoplasmic streaming for about 30s by triggering the action potential extended either the ascending or descending fronts of the F' fluorescence response, depending on the exact moment of streaming cessation. The response of F' fluorescence to localized illumination of a distant cell region was absent in dark-adapted internodes, when the localized light was applied within the first minute after switching on continuous background illumination of the whole cell, but it appeared in full after longer exposures to continuous background light. These results and the elimination of the F' response by methyl viologen known to redirect electron transport pathways beyond photosystem I indicate the importance of photosynthetic induction and the stromal redox state for long-distance communications of chloroplasts in vivo.

  16. Dark energy from quantum uncertainty of distant clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, M. J.

    2015-06-01

    The observed cosmic acceleration was attributed to an exotic dark energy in the framework of classical general relativity. The dark energy behaves very similar with vacuum energy in quantum mechanics. However, once the quantum effects are seriously taken into account, it predicts a completely wrong result and leads to a severe fine-tuning. To solve the problem, the exact meaning of time in quantum mechanics is reexamined. We abandon the standard interpretation of time in quantum mechanics that time is just a global parameter, replace it by a quantum dynamical variable playing the role of physical clock. We find that synchronization of two spatially separated clocks can not be precisely realized at quantum level. There is an intrinsic quantum uncertainty of distant clock time, which implies an apparent vacuum energy fluctuation and gives an observed dark energy density at tree level approximation, where L P and L H are the Planck and Hubble scale cutoffs. The fraction of the dark energy is given by , which does not evolve with the internal clock time. The "dark energy" as a quantum cosmic variance is always seen comparable with the matter energy density by an observer using the internal clock time. The corrected distance-redshift relation of cosmic observations due to the distant clock effect are also discussed, which again gives a redshift independent fraction . The theory is consistent with current cosmic observations.

  17. Abstract Mindsets Increase Believability of Spatially Distant Online Messages

    PubMed Central

    Sungur, Hande; Hartmann, Tilo; van Koningsbruggen, Guido M.

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence from online credibility research reveals that online users rely on heuristic processes to evaluate the credibility of online information. The current paper, which is based on the construal level theory (CLT), proposes that congruency between the psychological distance of a stimulus and the way it is mentally construed can act as a heuristic for believability. According to CLT, psychologically close (e.g., spatially, temporally, socially) stimuli are represented concretely whereas psychologically distant stimuli are represented abstractly. The level of mental construals and the psychological distance of information have been shown to influence people’s truth judgments in offline contexts. This study tests whether congruency between the construal level of people’s mindsets (abstract vs. concrete) and the psychological distance implied in an online message (far vs. close) enhances message believability. By partially confirming CLT predictions, we found that believability of an online news item about a distant location increased when people maintained an abstract mindset rather than a concrete one. The effect of a concrete mindset on believability was not significant for the close psychological distance condition. Our findings provide initial evidence that congruency between the construal level of people’s mindsets and psychological distance cues in online messages can act as a heuristic for believability. We discuss the potential of applying the CLT framework to the growing literature on online cognitive heuristics in the area of online information credibility. PMID:27468272

  18. Effects of near and distant semantic neighbors on word production.

    PubMed

    Mirman, Daniel

    2011-03-01

    One way to examine the dynamics of word processing is to investigate how processing is affected by the co-activation of similar words ("neighbors"). A unique prediction of attractor dynamical models is that near neighbors should exert inhibitory effects and distant neighbors should exert facilitative effects. In study 1, data from 62 unselected chronic aphasia patients revealed a higher rate of semantic errors for words with many near semantic neighbors and fewer semantic errors for words with many distant semantic neighbors. In study 2, this basic result was replicated in controls using a speeded picture-naming paradigm. Together, these two studies provide strong new evidence consistent with the attractor dynamics view of neighborhood effects. In addition, analyses of correlations between effect sizes and lesion locations, and comparisons with the existing literature on semantic deficits in aphasia and the speeded picture-naming paradigm, all provide converging evidence that the semantic error patterns found in the present studies were due to disruptions of cognitive control mechanisms. PMID:21264640

  19. Unbound or distant planetary mass population detected by gravitational microlensing.

    PubMed

    2011-05-19

    Since 1995, more than 500 exoplanets have been detected using different techniques, of which 12 were detected with gravitational microlensing. Most of these are gravitationally bound to their host stars. There is some evidence of free-floating planetary-mass objects in young star-forming regions, but these objects are limited to massive objects of 3 to 15 Jupiter masses with large uncertainties in photometric mass estimates and their abundance. Here, we report the discovery of a population of unbound or distant Jupiter-mass objects, which are almost twice (1.8(+1.7)(-0.8)) as common as main-sequence stars, based on two years of gravitational microlensing survey observations towards the Galactic Bulge. These planetary-mass objects have no host stars that can be detected within about ten astronomical units by gravitational microlensing. However, a comparison with constraints from direct imaging suggests that most of these planetary-mass objects are not bound to any host star. An abrupt change in the mass function at about one Jupiter mass favours the idea that their formation process is different from that of stars and brown dwarfs. They may have formed in proto-planetary disks and subsequently scattered into unbound or very distant orbits.

  20. Abstract Mindsets Increase Believability of Spatially Distant Online Messages.

    PubMed

    Sungur, Hande; Hartmann, Tilo; van Koningsbruggen, Guido M

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence from online credibility research reveals that online users rely on heuristic processes to evaluate the credibility of online information. The current paper, which is based on the construal level theory (CLT), proposes that congruency between the psychological distance of a stimulus and the way it is mentally construed can act as a heuristic for believability. According to CLT, psychologically close (e.g., spatially, temporally, socially) stimuli are represented concretely whereas psychologically distant stimuli are represented abstractly. The level of mental construals and the psychological distance of information have been shown to influence people's truth judgments in offline contexts. This study tests whether congruency between the construal level of people's mindsets (abstract vs. concrete) and the psychological distance implied in an online message (far vs. close) enhances message believability. By partially confirming CLT predictions, we found that believability of an online news item about a distant location increased when people maintained an abstract mindset rather than a concrete one. The effect of a concrete mindset on believability was not significant for the close psychological distance condition. Our findings provide initial evidence that congruency between the construal level of people's mindsets and psychological distance cues in online messages can act as a heuristic for believability. We discuss the potential of applying the CLT framework to the growing literature on online cognitive heuristics in the area of online information credibility. PMID:27468272

  1. Refined model for the evolution of distant satellite orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vashkov'yak, M. A.; Teslenko, N. M.

    2009-12-01

    We consider a model that describes the evolution of distant satellite orbits and that refines the solution of the doubly averaged Hill problem. Generally speaking, such a refinement was performed previously by J. Kovalevsky and A.A. Orlov in terms of Zeipel’s method by constructing a solution of the third order with respect to the small parameter m, the ratio of the mean motions of the planet and the satellite. The analytical solution suggested here differs from the solutions obtained by these authors and is closest in form to the general solution of the doubly averaged problem (˜ m 2). We have performed a qualitative analysis of the evolutionary equations and conditions for the intersection of satellite orbits with the surface of a spherical planet with a finite radius. Using the suggested solution, we have obtained improved analytical time dependences of the elements of evolving orbits for a number of distant satellites of giant planets compared to the solution of the doubly averaged Hill problem and, thus, achieved their better agreement with the results of our numerical integration of the rigorous equations of perturbed motion for satellites.

  2. Managing occurrence branching in qualitative simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Tokuda, L.

    1996-12-31

    Qualitative simulators can produce common sense abstractions of complex behaviors given only partial knowledge about a system. One of the problems which limits the applicability of qualitative simulators is the intractable branching of successor states encountered with model of even modest size. Some branches may be unavoidable due to the complex nature of a system. Other branches may be accidental results of the model chosen. A common source of intractability is occurrence branching. Occurrence branching occurs when the state transitions of two variables are unordered with respect to each other. This paper extends the QSIM model to distinguish between interesting occurrence branching and uninteresting occurrence branching. A representation, algorithm, and simulator for efficiently handling uninteresting branching is presented.

  3. 30 CFR 56.6403 - Branch circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Electric Blasting § 56.6403 Branch circuits. (a) If electric blasting includes the use of branch circuits,...

  4. Northwestern Branch of Mangala Vallis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 12 June 2002) The Science One of the many branches of the Mangala Vallis channel system is seen in this image. The water that likely carved the channels emerged from a huge graben or fracture almost 1000 km to the south. The THEMIS image shows where one of the channels exits the cratered highlands terrain onto the lowland plains. A bright scarp marks the transition between the two terrain types and demonstrates that in this location the highlands terrain is being eroded back. Note how the floor of the main channel appears to be at the same level as the lowland terrain, suggestive of a base level where erosion is no longer effective. Most of the steep slope faces in the image display darker slope streaks that are thought to be dust avalanche scars and indicate that a relatively thick mantle of dust is present in this region. Wind-sculpted ridges known as yardangs cover many of the surfaces throughout the area as shown by images from the Mars Global Surveyor mission. Most of them are at the limit of resolution in the THEMIS image but some are evident on the floor of the main channel at the point at which a smaller side channel enters. In this location they appear to extend right up to the base of the channel wall, giving the appearance that they are emerging from underneath the thick pile of material into which the channel is eroded. This suggests a geologic history in which a preexisting landscape of eroded yardangs was covered over by a thick pile of younger material that is now eroding back down to the original level. Alternatively, it is possible that the yardangs formed more recently at the abrupt transition between the channel floor and wall. More analysis is necessary to sort out the story. The Story This channel system is named 'Mangala,' the word for Mars in Sanskrit, a language of the Hindus of India that goes back more than 4,000 years, with written literature almost as long. Great epic tales have been written in this language, and Odyssey is

  5. Structural dynamics branch research and accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Summaries are presented of fiscal year 1989 research highlights from the Structural Dynamics Branch at NASA Lewis Research Center. Highlights from the branch's major work areas include aeroelasticity, vibration control, dynamic systems, and computation structural methods. A listing of the fiscal year 1989 branch publications is given.

  6. 7 CFR 51.578 - Branch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Branch. 51.578 Section 51.578 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Celery Definitions § 51.578 Branch. Branch means the leaf of a stalk and consists of...

  7. 7 CFR 51.578 - Branch.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Branch. 51.578 Section 51.578 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Celery Definitions § 51.578 Branch. Branch means the leaf of a stalk and consists of...

  8. Introduction of Branching Degrees of Octane Isomers.

    PubMed

    Perdih, Anton

    2016-01-01

    The concept of branching degrees is introduced. In the case of octane isomers it is derived from the values of a set of their physicochemical properties, calculating for each isomer the average of the normalized values and these averages are defined as branching degrees of octane isomers. The sequence of these branching degrees of octane isomers does not differ much from the »regular« one defined earlier. 2,2-Dimethylhexane appears to be less branched than 3,4-dimethylhexane and 3-ethyl, 2-methylpentane, whereas 2,3,4-trimethylpentane appears to be less branched than 3-ethyl, 3-methylpentane. While the increasing number of branches gives rise to increasing branching degrees, the peripheral position of branches and the separation between branches decreases the value of the branching degree. The central position of branches increases it. A bigger branch increases it more than a smaller one. The quantification of these structural features and their correlations with few indices is given as well. PMID:27333567

  9. The Effects of a Branch Campus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lien, Donald; Wang, Yaqin

    2012-01-01

    We examine the effects of a branch campus on the social welfare of the host country and the foreign university. Overall, we find that a branch campus increases both the domestic social welfare (measured by the aggregate student utility) and the tuition revenue of the foreign university. The effect of a branch campus on the brain drain is…

  10. Guide to the Seattle Archives Branch.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobbs, Richard, Comp.

    The guide presents an overview of the textual and microfilmed records located at the Seattle Branch of the National Archives of the United States. Established in 1969, the Seattle Archives Branch is one of 11 branches which preserve and make available for research those U.S. Government records of permanent value created and maintained by Federal…

  11. Introduction of Branching Degrees of Octane Isomers.

    PubMed

    Perdih, Anton

    2016-01-01

    The concept of branching degrees is introduced. In the case of octane isomers it is derived from the values of a set of their physicochemical properties, calculating for each isomer the average of the normalized values and these averages are defined as branching degrees of octane isomers. The sequence of these branching degrees of octane isomers does not differ much from the »regular« one defined earlier. 2,2-Dimethylhexane appears to be less branched than 3,4-dimethylhexane and 3-ethyl, 2-methylpentane, whereas 2,3,4-trimethylpentane appears to be less branched than 3-ethyl, 3-methylpentane. While the increasing number of branches gives rise to increasing branching degrees, the peripheral position of branches and the separation between branches decreases the value of the branching degree. The central position of branches increases it. A bigger branch increases it more than a smaller one. The quantification of these structural features and their correlations with few indices is given as well.

  12. Distant, delayed and ancient earthquake-induced landslides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havenith, Hans-Balder; Torgoev, Almaz; Braun, Anika; Schlögel, Romy; Micu, Mihai

    2016-04-01

    On the basis of a new classification of seismically induced landslides we outline particular effects related to the delayed and distant triggering of landslides. Those cannot be predicted by state-of-the-art methods. First, for about a dozen events the 'predicted' extension of the affected area is clearly underestimated. The most problematic cases are those for which far-distant triggering of landslides had been reported, such as for the 1988 Saguenay earthquake. In Central Asia reports for such cases are known for areas marked by a thick cover of loess. One possible contributing effect could be a low-frequency resonance of the thick soils induced by distant earthquakes, especially those in the Pamir - Hindu Kush seismic region. Such deep focal and high magnitude (>>7) earthquakes are also found in Europe, first of all in the Vrancea region (Romania). For this area and others in Central Asia we computed landslide event sizes related to scenario earthquakes with M>7.5. The second particular and challenging type of triggering is the one delayed with respect to the main earthquake event: case histories have been reported for the Racha earthquake in 1991 when several larger landslides only started moving 2 or 3 days after the main shock. Similar observations were also made after other earthquake events in the U.S., such as after the 1906 San Francisco, the 1949 Tacoma, the 1959 Hebgen Lake and the 1983 Bora Peak earthquakes. Here, we will present a series of detailed examples of (partly monitored) mass movements in Central Asia that mainly developed after earthquakes, some even several weeks after the main shock: e.g. the Tektonik and Kainama landslides triggered in 1992 and 2004, respectively. We believe that the development of the massive failures is a consequence of the opening of tension cracks during the seismic shaking and their filling up with water during precipitations that followed the earthquakes. The third particular aspect analysed here is the use of large

  13. A Local Reference For Bar Studies In The Distant Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menéndez-Delmestre, Karín; Sheth, Kartik; S4G Team

    2015-08-01

    Stellar bars are present in ~2/3 of nearby spirals and play a critical role in the evolution of their hosts. With the advent of large high-resolution imaging surveys, bar studies are being extended to distant galaxies. However, photometric studies of the distant universe are invariably subject to the effects of band-shifting, the progressive shift of the photometric band to bluer rest-frame wavelengths. In order to reliably characterize the intrinsic evolution of bars with redshift, safe from band-shifting effects, it is necessary to establish a local anchor of how bar properties vary with wavelength. We present a detailed multi-band study of bar properties from UV through mid-infrared for a sample of 16 large nearby barred galaxies. Based on ellipticity and position angle profiles resulting from fitting elliptical isophotes to the 2D light distribution of each galaxy, we find that both the bar length and the bar ellipticity increase at bluer wavebands. We attribute the increase in bar length to the frequent presence of prominent star forming knots at the end of bars: these regions are significantly brighter in bluer bands, resulting in the “artificial” lengthening of the bar. The increase in bar ellipticity, on the other hand, is driven by the bulge size: the bulge, composed primarily of old/red stars, is less prominent at bluer bands, allowing for thinner ellipses to be fit within the bar region. The resulting effect is that bars appear longer and thinner at bluer bands. Although we find that ~50% of the bars disappear in the UV, the results on bar ellipticity and length extend to those cases in which the bar is still visible in the UV. These results imply that careful correction for band-shifting effects is necessary for high-z studies to reliably gauge any intrinsic evolution of the bar properties with redshift. In the light of the ample space-based optical data now available, this study may be used as a reference to implement band-shifting corrections to

  14. Fast moving plasma structures in the distant magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholer, M.; Klecker, B.; Hovestadt, D.; Gloeckler, G.; Ipavich, F. M.; Smith, E. J.

    1984-01-01

    The paper reports for the first time the detailed time behavior of the intensities and the angular distributions of energetic protons and electrons in the distant magnetotail of the earth at 220 earth radii and 110 earth radii. The data have been obtained by the Max-Planck-Institut/University of Maryland sensor system on ISEE 3 during the spacecraft's first deep tail passage. Three energetic particle bursts are studied in detail. It is suggested that the satellite encounters detached plasma structures evidenced by the isotropic electrons. These structures, probably plasmoids, move with high velocities (about 800 km/s) down the tail. The energetic electrons and protons stream ahead of these fast tailward moving plasma structures, which leads to the various time dispersion effects. This allows, in principle, a determination of the source distance from the satellite.

  15. Characteristics of plasmoidlike structures in the distant magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholer, M.; Hovestadt, D.; Klecker, B.; Gloeckler, G.; Ipavich, F. M.

    1984-01-01

    A statistical analysis is presented of energetic particle burst events in the distant geomagnetic tail which have the particle characteristics of plasmoids as described by Hanes et al. (1984) and Scholer et al. (1984). The average velocities of the plasmoids are more or less evenly distributed between about 300 km/s and about 1000 km/s, with a mean value of about 600 km/s. Most plasmoids have a length between about 50 and 100 earth radii, with a mean value of about 80 earth radii. The proton energy spectra are always steeper than power law. The proton differential intensity at 30 keV varies between 100 and 1000 protons/sq cm/s/sr/keV, with an average value of about 500 protons/sq cm/s/sr/keV. This value is about one order of magnitude smaller than typical values in the near-earth plasma sheet.

  16. Combined Therapy for Distant Metastasis of Sacral Chordoma

    PubMed Central

    Özkal, Birol; Yaldız, Can; Temiz, Peyker; Temiz, Cüneyt

    2015-01-01

    Chordomas are known as rare primary malign tumours that have formed from primitive notochord remains. Sacral chordomas grow slowly but locally and aggressively. Chordomas are locally invasive and have low tendency to metastasis and have a poor prognosis in long-term follow-up. Metastasis may be seen in a rate of 5–40% of the chordomas. Metastasis of chordomas is common in liver, lung, lymph nodes, peritoneum, and brain. The treatment approaches, including surgery, have been discussed in the literature before. Susceptibility to radiotherapy and chemotherapy is controversial in these tumours. The success of surgical treatment affects survival directly. In this report, we will report a sacral chordoma case in which an intraperitoneal distant metastasis occurred and discuss the surgical approach. PMID:25649759

  17. Neutral sheet crossings by ISEE-3 in the distant magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heikkila, W. J.; Slavin, J. A.; Smith, E. J.; Baker, D. N.; Zwickl, R. D.

    1986-01-01

    Magnetic field data from ISEE-3 in the distant magnetotail at crossings of the field reversal (or neutral sheet) region were analyzed to determine the instantaneous direction of the normal component Bz at the crossing. A crossing identified as being almost always tailward of the steady-state X-line was selected. Data for 1 hr are discussed to illustrate difficulties. One particular smooth crossing shows that complicated microstructure can occur in times less than 1 min. Averaging over long times may eliminate essential information. Inspection of the magnetic field data at the highest resolution, however, shows that the direction of the plasma sheet flows and the sense of Bz across the neutral sheet do not always agree with the reconnection models. Rather, they indicate that the low latitude boundary layer may play a significant role in the dynamics of the magnetotail.

  18. Connecting The Interstellar Gas And Dust Properties Of Distant Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Varsha

    The properties of interstellar gas and dust in distant galaxies are fundamental parameters in constraining galaxy evolution models. Quasar absorption systems (QASs), which trace intervening galaxies along the sightlines to luminous background quasars, provide invaluable tools to directly study gas and dust in distant normal galaxies. Recent studies of QASs have found interesting trends in both gas and dust properties, such as correlations in metallicity with redshift and dust depletions. Our Spitzer spectroscopic studies also indicate that silicate dust grains are present in QASs, and in fact, at a level higher than expected for diffuse gas in the Milky Way. Moreover, the silicate dust grains in these distant galaxies may be substantially more crystalline than those in the Milky Way interstellar medium. We now propose a comprehensive study of the gas and dust properties of all QASs with strong Ly-alpha and/or metal absorption lines that have adequate archival IR data to probe the study of dust. Our analysis will include data primarily from the NASA-supported Spitzer, Herschel, HST, and Keck Observatory archives, along with a small amount of VLT/SDSS archival data. Our specific goals are as follows: (1) We will measure a large range of metal absorption lines in high-resolution quasar spectra from Keck, HST, and VLT archives to uniformly determine the metallicity, dust depletions, ionization, and star formation rates in the foreground QASs. In particular, we will study the variations in these quantities with gas velocity, using Voigt profile fitting techniques to determine the velocity structure. This analysis will also allow us to quantify the kinematics of the absorbing gas. (2) We will use archival Spitzer IRS quasar spectra to search for and measure the strengths of the 10 and 18 micron silicate dust absorption features for a much larger sample of QASs than previously studied. (3) We will fit the observed silicate absorption features in the Spitzer archival

  19. Distant touch hydrodynamic imaging with an artificial lateral line.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yingchen; Chen, Jack; Engel, Jonathan; Pandya, Saunvit; Chen, Nannan; Tucker, Craig; Coombs, Sheryl; Jones, Douglas L; Liu, Chang

    2006-12-12

    Nearly all underwater vehicles and surface ships today use sonar and vision for imaging and navigation. However, sonar and vision systems face various limitations, e.g., sonar blind zones, dark or murky environments, etc. Evolved over millions of years, fish use the lateral line, a distributed linear array of flow sensing organs, for underwater hydrodynamic imaging and information extraction. We demonstrate here a proof-of-concept artificial lateral line system. It enables a distant touch hydrodynamic imaging capability to critically augment sonar and vision systems. We show that the artificial lateral line can successfully perform dipole source localization and hydrodynamic wake detection. The development of the artificial lateral line is aimed at fundamentally enhancing human ability to detect, navigate, and survive in the underwater environment.

  20. Distant Analysis of the GENEPI-ENTB Databank - System Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foszner, Paweł; Gruca, Aleksandra; Polańska, Joanna

    This paper presents the Internet application, which allows to perform distant statistical analysis of the data form the GENEPI-ENTB database. The database includes tissues from irradiated patients with different types of cancer linked out to a detailed description of treatment and outcome. The main purpose of the system presented in the paper is to provide to the users an access to the GENEPI-ENTB data and allow to perform statistical analysis of the data. The authors describe the system architecture, the analysis that can be done by tools available in the system and how exactly the system works. The paper also includes short description of the GENEPI-ENTB database, characterization of the project, and plans of the future development of the system.

  1. Evidence for a distant unseen solar system planet: Assessing the observational biases in the extreme Kuiper belt population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volk, Kathryn; Malhotra, Renu

    2016-10-01

    Several recent studies have appealed to peculiarities in the observed distribution of very distant, extreme Kuiper belt objects (eKBOs) to argue for the existence of an Earth-mass or larger planet in the distant solar system. Trujillo and Sheppard (2014) noted that the arguments of perihelion of the observed eKBOs cluster near 0, and Batygin & Brown (2016) noted that the eKBOs also have clustered orbit poles and eccentricity vectors (which result in clustered longitudes of perihelion and longitudes of ascending node). Both papers argue that observational biases are unlikely to explain the observed clustering. Because the observed population of eKBOs is far from complete, a thorough assessment of the observational biases in the population is warranted. Very accurate assessment of observational biases is only possible for objects discovered by well-characterized surveys, but the number of eKBOs found by such surveys is small. We instead use the set of observed KBOs in the Minor Planet Center catalog along with published survey pointings and limiting magnitudes to approximately reconstruct the biases in the observed eKBO population. We will report on the role of observational biases in either strengthening or weakening the case for a distant unseen planet in our solar system. This research was supported by NASA (grant NNX14AG93G).

  2. Distant Healing Of Surgical Wounds: An Exploratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Schlitz, Marilyn; Hopf, Harriet W.; Eskenazi, Loren; Vieten, Cassandra; Radin, Dean

    2012-01-01

    Distant healing intention (DHI) is one of the most common complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) healing modalities, but clinical trials to date have provided ambivalent support for its efficacy. One possible reason is that DHI effects may involve variables that are sensitive to unknown, uncontrolled, or uncontrollable factors. To examine two of those potential variables – expectation and belief – the effects of DHI were explored on objective and psychosocial measures associated with surgical wounds in 72 women undergoing plastic surgery. Participants were randomly assigned to one of three groups: blinded and receiving DHI (DH), blinded and not receiving DHI (Control), and knowing that they were receiving DHI (Expectancy). Outcome measures included collagen deposition in a surrogate wound and several self-report measures. DHI was provided by experienced distant healers. No differences in the main measures were observed across the three groups. Participants’ prior belief in the efficacy of DHI was negatively correlated with the status of their mental health at the end of the study (p = 0.04, two-tailed), and healers’ perceptions of the quality of their subjective “contact” with the participants were negatively correlated both with change in mood (p = 0.001) and with collagen deposition (p = 0.04). A post-hoc analysis found that among participants assigned to receive DHI under blinded conditions, those undergoing reconstructive surgery after breast cancer treatment reported significantly better change in mood than those who were undergoing purely elective cosmetic surgery (p = 0.004). If future DHI experiments confirm the post-hoc observations, then some of the ambiguity observed in earlier DHI studies may be attributable to interactions among participants’ and healers’ beliefs, their expectations, and their motivations. PMID:22742672

  3. Photoinduction of cyclosis-mediated interactions between distant chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Bulychev, Alexander A; Komarova, Anna V

    2015-01-01

    Communications between chloroplasts and other organelles based on the exchange of metabolites, including redox active substances, are recognized as a part of intracellular regulation, chlororespiration, and defense against oxidative stress. Similar communications may operate between spatially distant chloroplasts in large cells where photosynthetic and respiratory activities are distributed unevenly under fluctuating patterned illumination. Microfluorometry of chlorophyll fluorescence in vivo in internodal cells of the alga Chara corallina revealed that a 30-s pulse of localized light induces a transient increase (~25%) in F' fluorescence of remote cell parts exposed to dim background light at a 1.5-mm distance on the downstream side from the illuminated spot in the plane of unilateral cytoplasmic streaming but has no effect on F' at equal distance on the upstream side. An abrupt arrest of cytoplasmic streaming for about 30s by triggering the action potential extended either the ascending or descending fronts of the F' fluorescence response, depending on the exact moment of streaming cessation. The response of F' fluorescence to localized illumination of a distant cell region was absent in dark-adapted internodes, when the localized light was applied within the first minute after switching on continuous background illumination of the whole cell, but it appeared in full after longer exposures to continuous background light. These results and the elimination of the F' response by methyl viologen known to redirect electron transport pathways beyond photosystem I indicate the importance of photosynthetic induction and the stromal redox state for long-distance communications of chloroplasts in vivo. PMID:25615586

  4. Quest for the most distant objects in the universe

    SciTech Connect

    Kanipe, J.

    1988-06-01

    Far out in the distant universe, between 10 billion and 11 billion years away in space and time, lies a region where the majority of known quasars resides. Astronomers have known about this stratum of quasars for over two decades and have spent the better part of that time trying to understand why these objects seem predisposed to congregate at this distance. The most plausible explanation is that there were more quasars 10 billion or 11 billion years ago than there are now and that this region represents, in effect, the quasar spawning grounds. For astronomers this quasar stratum has played an important role in demarcating the edge of the observable universe. Beyond lies only a handful of more distant quasars, and beyond that lies a vast, impenetrable region that extends back to a time before the quasars formed, when matter and photons went their separate ways 700,000 years after the Big Bang. But a recent flurry of back-to-back quasar discoveries may spell the beginning of the end of this theory. Between August 1986 and late September 1987 more than a half-dozen quasars were detected at 12 billion light-years, which is beyond what astronomers had considered the edge of the universe. Although the new quasars may not seem to be too far out of bounds, a little distance translates into a lot of time in the development of the young universe. The final stroke would be the discovery of quasars or possibly primeval galaxies in a region of space thought to predate the formation of galaxies. Theorists would then be forced to discard established models that explain how galaxies formed and evolved and to devise new theories that better reflect observations. This would cause a major revolution in astronomy.

  5. Chandra Finds Well-Established Black Holes In Distant Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-03-01

    Pushing further back toward the first generation of objects to form in the universe, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has observed the three most distant known quasars and found them to be prodigious producers of X-rays. This indicates that the supermassive black holes powering them were already in place when the Universe was only about one billion years old. "Chandra's superb sensitivity has allowed the detection of X-rays from the dawn of the modern universe, when the first massive black holes and galaxies were forming," said Niel Brandt of Penn State University, leader of one the teams involved. "These results indicate that future X-ray surveys should be able to detect the first black holes to form in the Universe." The three quasars were recently discovered at optical wavelengths by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and are 13 billion light years from Earth, making them the most distant known quasars. The X-rays Chandra detected were emitted when the universe was only a billion years old, about 7 percent of the present age of the Universe. Since X-rays reveal conditions in the immediate vicinity of supermassive black holes, Brandt proposed that Chandra look at these objects in three snapshots of about two hours each to see if they were different from their older counterparts. The observations on January 29, 2002 were made public immediately and the four different teams quickly went to work on them. Brandt's team concluded that the quasars looked similar to ones that were at least twice as old, so the conditions around the central black hole had not changed much in that time, contrary to some theoretical expectations. A team led by Smita Mathur of Ohio State University reached a similar conclusion. "These young quasars do not appear to be any different from their older cousins, based upon our current understanding and assumptions," said Mathur. "Perhaps the most remarkable thing about them may be that they are so absolutely unremarkable." Jill Bechtold of the

  6. Chiral methyl-branched pheromones.

    PubMed

    Ando, Tetsu; Yamakawa, Rei

    2015-07-01

    Insect pheromones are some of the most interesting natural products because they are utilized for interspecific communication between various insects, such as beetles, moths, ants, and cockroaches. A large number of compounds of many kinds have been identified as pheromone components, reflecting the diversity of insect species. While this review deals only with chiral methyl-branched pheromones, the chemical structures of more than one hundred non-terpene compounds have been determined by applying excellent analytical techniques. Furthermore, their stereoselective syntheses have been achieved by employing trustworthy chiral sources and ingenious enantioselective reactions. The information has been reviewed here not only to make them available for new research but also to understand the characteristic chemical structures of the chiral pheromones. Since biosynthetic studies are still limited, it might be meaningful to examine whether the structures, particularly the positions and configurations of the branched methyl groups, are correlated with the taxonomy of the pheromone producers and also with the function of the pheromones in communication systems. PMID:25849023

  7. Structural and functional evaluation of branched myofibers lacking intermediate filaments.

    PubMed

    Goodall, Mariah H; Ward, Christopher W; Pratt, Stephen J P; Bloch, Robert J; Lovering, Richard M

    2012-07-15

    Intermediate filaments (IFs), composed of desmin and keratins, link myofibrils to each other and to the sarcolemma in skeletal muscle. Fast-twitch muscle of mice lacking the IF proteins, desmin and keratin 19 (K19), showed reduced specific force and increased susceptibility to injury in earlier studies. Here we tested the hypothesis that the number of malformed myofibers in mice lacking desmin (Des(-/-)), keratin 19 (K19(-/-)), or both IF proteins (double knockout, DKO) is increased and is coincident with altered excitation-contraction (EC) coupling Ca(2+) kinetics, as reported for mdx mice. We quantified the number of branched myofibers, characterized their organization with confocal and electron microscopy (EM), and compared the Ca(2+) kinetics of EC coupling in flexor digitorum brevis myofibers from adult Des(-/-), K19(-/-), or DKO mice and compared them to age-matched wild type (WT) and mdx myofibers. Consistent with our previous findings, 9.9% of mdx myofibers had visible malformations. Des(-/-) myofibers had more malformations (4.7%) than K19(-/-) (0.9%) or DKO (1.3%) myofibers. Confocal and EM imaging revealed no obvious changes in sarcomere misalignment at the branch points, and the neuromuscular junctions in the mutant mice, while more variably located, were limited to one per myofiber. Global, electrically evoked Ca(2+) signals showed a decrease in the rate of Ca(2+) uptake (decay rate) into the sarcoplasmic reticulum after Ca(2+) release, with the most profound effect in branched DKO myofibers (44% increase in uptake relative to WT). Although branched DKO myofibers showed significantly faster rates of Ca(2+) clearance, the milder branching phenotype observed in DKO muscle suggests that the absence of K19 corrects the defect created by the absence of desmin alone. Thus, there are complex roles for desmin-based and K19-based IFs in skeletal muscle, with the null and DKO mutations having different effects on Ca(2+) reuptake and myofiber branching.

  8. A possible mechanism for the observed streaming of O(+) and H(+) ions at nearly equal speeds in the distant magnetotail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, N.; Schunk, R. W.

    1985-07-01

    In recent years, O(+) and H(+) ions streaming away from the earth along geomagnetic field lines have been observed in the distant magnetotail region. In the present paper, it is suggested that the transverse acceleration of the ions occurs on auroral field lines at altitudes above the field-aligned potential drops, where ion beams and electrostatic hydrogen cyclotron (EHC) waves have been simultaneously observed. It is pointed out that the preferential acceleration of O(+) relative to H(+) occurs through the interaction of O(+) ions with weak EHC waves, as suggested by Singh et al. (1983). A quantitative explanation is provided for the observed relationship between the energies of O(+) and H(+) ions.

  9. The Most Distant Object Yet Discovered in the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-04-01

    ESO's Very Large Telescope has shown that a faint gamma-ray burst detected last Thursday is the signature of the explosion of the earliest, most distant known object in the Universe (a redshift of 8.2). The explosion apparently took place more than 13 billion years ago, only about 600 million years after the Big Bang. ESO PR Photo 17a/09 Artist's impression of a gamma-ray burst Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are powerful flashes of energetic gamma-rays lasting from less than a second to several minutes. They release a tremendous amount of energy in this short time making them the most powerful events in the Universe. They are thought to be mostly associated with the explosion of stars that collapse into black holes. The gamma-ray burst GRB 090423 was detected by the NASA/STFC/ASI Swift satellite during the morning (CEST) of Thursday 23 April 2009. The 10 second burst was located in the constellation of Leo (the Lion). It was soon being followed by a whole range of telescopes on the ground, including the 2.2-metre ESO/MPG telescope at La Silla and ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT) at Paranal, both in Chile. VLT infrared observations, made 17 hours after the burst detection, allowed astronomers to establish the distance to the explosion. "We find that the light coming from the explosion has been stretched, or redshifted, considerably by the expansion of the Universe", says Nial Tanvir, the leader of the team who made the VLT observations. "With a redshift of 8.2 this is the most remote gamma-ray burst ever detected, and also the most distant object ever discovered -- by some way." Because light moves at a finite speed, looking farther into the Universe means looking back in time. The explosion occurred when the Universe was about 600 million years old, less than 5 percent of its current age. It is believed that the very first stars only formed when the Universe was between 200 and 400 million years old. "This discovery proves the importance of gamma-ray bursts in probing the

  10. Method and apparatus for determining return stroke polarity of distant lightning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakeslee, Richard J. (Inventor); Brook, Marx (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A method is described for determining the return stroke polarity of distant lightning for distances beyond 600 km by detecting the electric field associated with a return stroke of distant lightning, and processing the electric field signal to determine the polarity of the slow tail of the VLF waveform signal associated with the detected electric field. The polarity of the return stroke of distant lightning is determined based upon the polarity of the slow tail portion of the waveform.

  11. Method and apparatus for determining return stroke polarity of distant lightning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakeslee, Richard J. (Inventor); Brook, Marx (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A method is described for determining the return stroke polarity of distant lightning for distances beyond 600 km by detecting the electric field associated with a return stroke of distant lightning, and processing the electric field signal to determine the polarity of the slow tail of the VLF waveform signal associated with the detected electric field. The polarity of the return stroke of distant lightning is determined based upon the polarity of the slow tail portion of the waveform.

  12. Distant metastasis from oral cancer: A review and molecular biologic aspects.

    PubMed

    Irani, Soussan

    2016-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) has been estimated to be the sixth most common cancer worldwide. The distant metastasis plays a critical role in the management and prognosis in oral cancer patients. Regarding the distant metastasis from the oral cancer, the hypopharynx is the most common primary site, followed by the base of tongue and anterior tongue. The present review article analyzes the characteristics of the distant metastases from the oral cavity from 1937 to 2015. PMID:27583211

  13. Distant metastasis from oral cancer: A review and molecular biologic aspects

    PubMed Central

    Irani, Soussan

    2016-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) has been estimated to be the sixth most common cancer worldwide. The distant metastasis plays a critical role in the management and prognosis in oral cancer patients. Regarding the distant metastasis from the oral cancer, the hypopharynx is the most common primary site, followed by the base of tongue and anterior tongue. The present review article analyzes the characteristics of the distant metastases from the oral cavity from 1937 to 2015. PMID:27583211

  14. Beyond 3 AU from the Sun: "Hypervolatiles" in Distant Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonev, Boncho P.; Villanueva, Geronimo Luis; Mumma, Michael J.; DiSanti, Michael A.; Paganini, Lucas; Boehnhardt, Hermann; Lippi, Manuela; Gibb, Erika L.; Bockelee-Morvan, Dominique; de Val-Borro, Miguel; Kawakita, Hideyo; Altwegg, Kathrin

    2016-10-01

    Our understanding of inner coma composition in comets has long been biased towards heliocentric distances (Rh) smaller than 2-3 AU. However, observations far from the Sun are also of high value for better understanding the nucleus structure and outgassing of volatiles. Substantial and very important evidence for the activity of distant comets has been accumulated from photometry and analyses of light curves, but direct detections of primary (parent) volatiles are still rare. For example, comet C/2006 W3 (Christensen) remained outside 3.1 AU throughout its apparition, yet it presented the best opportunity since Hale-Bopp (1997) for detailed spectroscopic studies in a distant comet. C/2006 W3 was observed from several space- and ground-based facilities using both infrared and radio techniques. CO, CH4, and C2H6 were measured via infrared spectroscopy at ESO-VLT at Rh = 3.25 AU. Production rates were found to exceed those measured for each of these species in most other comets, despite those comets being observed much closer to the Sun. With its relatively high CO/CO2 ratio, C/2006 W3 also appears as an outlier in the AKARI comet survey of 18 comets. The detections of H2O (Herschel Space Observatory) and CO (ESO-VLT) allow for constraining the coma abundance ratio H2O/CO at Rh = 5 AU.We will compare the C2H6/CH4/CO ratios in C/2006 W3 with those in other comets spanning a large range in Rh: from D/2012 S1 ISON (~0.7 AU) to 29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1 (~ 6.3 AU). Notably in situ measurements by the Rosetta mission were performed in the coma of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, at a very similar heliocentric distance to C/2006 W3 (3.15 AU). While comparisons of column-integrated remote sensing measurements and abundances from in-situ mass spectrometry (as performed by the ROSINA instrument) are not straightforward, both types of measurement are of high value for constraining models of nucleus outgassing beyond 3 AU from the Sun, where the inferred nucleus structure and

  15. Site-specific inductive and inhibitory activities of MMP-2 and MMP-3 orchestrate mammary gland branching morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wiseman, Bryony S.; Sternlicht, Mark D.; Lund, Leif R.; Alexander, Caroline M.; Mott, Joni; Bissell, Mina J.; Soloway, Paul; Itohara, Shigeyoshi; Werb, Zena

    2003-01-01

    During puberty, mouse mammary epithelial ducts invade the stromal mammary fat pad in a wave of branching morphogenesis to form a complex ductal tree. Using pharmacologic and genetic approaches, we find that mammary gland branching morphogenesis requires transient matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity for invasion and branch point selection. MMP-2, but not MMP-9, facilitates terminal end bud invasion by inhibiting epithelial cell apoptosis at the start of puberty. Unexpectedly, MMP-2 also represses precocious lateral branching during mid-puberty. In contrast, MMP-3 induces secondary and tertiary lateral branching of ducts during mid-puberty and early pregnancy. Nevertheless, the mammary gland is able to develop lactational competence in MMP mutant mice. Thus, specific MMPs refine the mammary branching pattern by distinct mechanisms during mammary gland branching morphogenesis. PMID:12975354

  16. Vere-Jones' self-similar branching model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saichev, A.; Sornette, D.

    2005-11-01

    Motivated by its potential application to earthquake statistics as well as for its intrinsic interest in the theory of branching processes, we study the exactly self-similar branching process introduced recently by Vere-Jones. This model extends the ETAS class of conditional self-excited branching point-processes of triggered seismicity by removing the problematic need for a minimum (as well as maximum) earthquake size. To make the theory convergent without the need for the usual ultraviolet and infrared cutoffs, the distribution of magnitudes m' of daughters of first-generation of a mother of magnitude m has two branches m'm with exponent β+d , where β and d are two positive parameters. We investigate the condition and nature of the subcritical, critical, and supercritical regime in this and in an extended version interpolating smoothly between several models. We predict that the distribution of magnitudes of events triggered by a mother of magnitude m over all generations has also two branches m'm with exponent β+h , with h=d1-s , where s is the fraction of triggered events. This corresponds to a renormalization of the exponent d into h by the hierarchy of successive generations of triggered events. For a significant part of the parameter space, the distribution of magnitudes over a full catalog summed over an average steady flow of spontaneous sources (immigrants) reproduces the distribution of the spontaneous sources with a single branch and is blind to the exponents β,d of the distribution of triggered events. Since the distribution of earthquake magnitudes is usually obtained with catalogs including many sequences, we conclude that the two branches of the distribution of aftershocks are not directly observable and the model is compatible with real seismic catalogs. In summary, the exactly self-similar Vere-Jones model provides an attractive new approach to model triggered seismicity, which

  17. Vegetation survey of PEN Branch wetlands

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    A survey was conducted of vegetation along Pen Branch Creek at Savannah River Site (SRS) in support of K-Reactor restart. Plants were identified to species by overstory, understory, shrub, and groundcover strata. Abundance was also characterized and richness and diversity calculated. Based on woody species basal area, the Pen Branch delta was the most impacted, followed by the sections between the reactor and the delta. Species richness for shrub and groundcover strata were also lowest in the delta. No endangered plant species were found. Three upland pine areas were also sampled. In support of K Reactor restart, this report summarizes a study of the wetland vegetation along Pen Branch. Reactor effluent enters Indian Grove Branch and then flows into Pen Branch and the Pen Branch Delta.

  18. Research program of the Geodynamics Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, W. D. (Editor); Cohen, S. C. (Editor); Boccucci, B. S. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    This report is the Fourth Annual Summary of the Research Program of the Geodynamics Branch. The branch is located within the Laboratory for Terrestrial Physics of the Space and Earth Sciences Directorate of the Goddard Space Flight Center. The research activities of the branch staff cover a broad spectrum of geoscience disciplines including: tectonophysics, space geodesy, geopotential field modeling, and dynamic oceanography. The NASA programs which are supported by the work described in this document include the Geodynamics and Ocean Programs, the Crustal Dynamics Project and the proposed Ocean Topography Experiment (TOPEX). The reports highlight the investigations conducted by the Geodynamics Branch staff during calendar year 1985. The individual papers are grouped into chapters on Crustal Movements and Solid Earth Dynamics, Gravity Field Modeling and Sensing Techniques, and Sea Surface Topography. Further information on the activities of the branch or the particular research efforts described herein can be obtained through the branch office or from individual staff members.

  19. Abnormal branch of the testicular artery.

    PubMed

    Bhaskar, P Vijaya; Bhasin, Vishu; Kumar, Sushil

    2006-09-01

    We present a case report of an abnormal course and branching of the right testicular artery, which was uncovered during routine dissection of the abdomen in our first year medical class. It arose from the anterior surface of the abdominal aorta and immediately divided into two branches; one branch coursed inferiorly behind the inferior vena cava as the testicular artery proper, while the other branch passed behind the inferior vena cava and emerged on the anterior surface of the right kidney. After crossing the anterior surface of the kidney, it bifurcated into an ascending branch that went to the right suprarenal gland and a descending branch that ended in the posterior abdominal wall. The left testicular artery was normal in its course and distribution. This is a very rare variation.

  20. Complex organics in space from Solar System to distant galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwok, Sun

    2016-02-01

    Recent observational and experimental evidence for the presence of complex organics in space is reviewed. Remote astronomical observations have detected ˜ 200 gas-phased molecules through their rotational and vibrational transitions. Many classes of organic molecules are represented in this list, including some precursors to biological molecules. A number of unidentified spectral phenomena observed in the interstellar medium are likely to have originated from complex organics. The observations of these features in distant galaxies suggests that organic synthesis had already taken place during the early epochs of the Universe. In the Solar System, almost all biologically relevant molecules can be found in the soluble component of carbonaceous meteorites. Complex organics of mixed aromatic and aliphatic structures are present in the insoluble component of meteorites. Hydrocarbons cover much of the surface of the planetary satellite Titan and complex organics are found in comets and interplanetary dust particles. The possibility that the early Solar System, or even the early Earth, have been enriched by interstellar organics is discussed.

  1. Chimeragenesis of distantly-related proteins by noncontiguous recombination.

    PubMed

    Smith, Matthew A; Romero, Philip A; Wu, Timothy; Brustad, Eric M; Arnold, Frances H

    2013-02-01

    We introduce a method for identifying elements of a protein structure that can be shuffled to make chimeric proteins from two or more homologous parents. Formulating recombination as a graph-partitioning problem allows us to identify noncontiguous segments of the sequence that should be inherited together in the progeny proteins. We demonstrate this noncontiguous recombination approach by constructing a chimera of β-glucosidases from two different kingdoms of life. Although the protein's alpha-beta barrel fold has no obvious subdomains for recombination, noncontiguous SCHEMA recombination generated a functional chimera that takes approximately half its structure from each parent. The X-ray crystal structure shows that the structural blocks that make up the chimera maintain the backbone conformations found in their respective parental structures. Although the chimera has lower β-glucosidase activity than the parent enzymes, the activity was easily recovered by directed evolution. This simple method, which does not rely on detailed atomic models, can be used to design chimeras that take structural, and functional, elements from distantly-related proteins. PMID:23225662

  2. Research methodology for studies of prayer and distant healing.

    PubMed

    Targ, Elisabeth

    2002-02-01

    The double-blind randomized clinical trial is the gold standard for trials of prayer and distant healing. Adequate blinding and randomization procedures should be followed and documented. The intervention must be well defined (include frequency, amount of time and training and/or experience level of healers). Subjects should have risks and benefits of study participation explained to them and sign informed consent before enrollment. Populations should be homogeneous. Consider stratification for smaller samples. Baseline information, including psychological status, beliefs about prayer and healing and other sources of prayer and healing, should be collected from subjects in clinical trials. This should be examined as part of the final data analysis for contribution to outcomes. Objectively measurable outcomes with adequate variability should be chosen. Subject study participation activities such as clinical interviews, traveling to special sites. journaling or meditation should be minimized to avoid washing out a small effect. In clinical trials subjects should be asked if they believed they were in the treatment group and this information should be entered as a co-variate for data analysis. Healers/prayers should be treated in a collegial and respectful way. Their healing efforts (time. location, method) should be documented in a log and they should be periodically contacted and encouraged by experimenters if the study' is taking place over an extended period of time. Observational and outcomes research can add an important dimension to healing research. Qualitative studies may also make an important contribution and help guide development of future controlled trials.

  3. 2012 DR30, The Most Distant Solar System Object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiss, Csaba; Szabó, G.; Pál, A.; Kiss, L.; Sárneczky, K.; Müller, T.; Vilenius, E.; Santos-Sanz, P.; Lellouch, E.; Conn, B.; Ortiz, J.; Duffard, R.; Morales, N.; Horner, J.; Bannister, M.; Stansberry, J.

    2012-10-01

    2012 DR30, the most distant TNO in the Solar System (a=1103 AU) has recently been observed with the Herschel Space Observatory. Radiometric model results using the far-infrared fluxes and visual range data show a dark and cratered surface (p_V = 6%) and provide a diameter of 200km. If considered as a Centaur, this is the fifth largest object known in this dynamical class. Recent visual range measurements indicate the presence of methane ice on the surface, a feature that has been seen previously for objects with diameters of >=1000km only (like Eris, Makemake and Pluto). The presence of methane ice can be explained assuming that the object spent most of its lifetime in a very cold environment and has been recently placed to its present orbit. This scenario is in agreement with the results of a dynamical study of the object's orbit, also suggesting an Oort-cloud origin. This research has been supported by the following grants: (1) The PECS program of the European Space Agency (ESA) and the Hungarian Space Office, PECS-98073; (2) C.K. and A.P. acknowledges the support of the Bolyai Research Fellowship of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences.

  4. Probing of susceptibility structures through the distant dipolar field effect.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chung Ki

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, the utilization of the distant dipolar field (DDF) signal to extract the properties of susceptibility structures over a subvoxel length scale is investigated. Numerical simulations are performed to study a system of randomly distributed blood vessels with a susceptibility offset inside a voxel. It is shown that the DDF signal of the system as a function of the strength of the correlation gradient field manifests a peak that depends on the volume ratio, size, and susceptibility offset of the blood vessels. In particular, the location of the signal peak is found to vary as powers of these parameters. As a result, by varying the strength of the correlation gradient field, the characteristic properties of the blood vessels can be extracted from the peak position of the DDF signal. It is also found that, for a given volume ratio of the blood vessels, a smaller size of the blood vessels can be probed when the susceptibility offset is increased. Nevertheless, it is demonstrated that, owing to the broad width of the signal peak, the DDF effect generally cannot be used for the preferential selection of the signal arising from the blood vessels on the length scale determined by the correlation length. PMID:23643159

  5. Neutral sheet crossings by ISEE-3 in the distant magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heikkila, W. J.; Slavin, J. A.; Smith, E. J.; Baker, D. N.; Zwickl, R. D.

    1986-01-01

    The magnetic field data from ISEE-3 in the distant magnetotail at crossings of the field reversal (or neutral sheet) region are analyzed to determine the instantaneous direction of the normal component B(z) at the crossing. Crossings in the middle of the aberrated magnetotail near the apogee A2 of the first deep-tail orbit of ISEE-3 in January-February, 1983 were selected. Data for an interval of one hour is discussed at length to illustrate some of the difficulties that can occur. One particular smooth crossing at 15:56 UT, February 4, 1983, shows that complicated microstructure can occur in times shorter than one minute; averaging over long times may eliminate essential information for this purpose. By inspecting the magnetic field data at the highest resolution, however, it is shown that the direction of the plasma sheet flows and the sense of B(z) across the neutral sheet do not always agree with the reconnection models. Rather, they indicate that the low latitude boundary layer may play a significant role in the dynamics of the magnetotail.

  6. "Neuropeptides in the brain defense against distant organ damage".

    PubMed

    Hamasaki, Mike Yoshio; Barbeiro, Hermes Vieira; Barbeiro, Denise Frediani; Cunha, Débora Maria Gomes; Koike, Marcia Kiyomi; Machado, Marcel Cerqueira César; Pinheiro da Silva, Fabiano

    2016-01-15

    Delirium, or acute confusional state, is a common manifestation in diseases that originate outside the central nervous system, affecting 30-40% of elderly hospitalized patients and up to 80% of the critically ill, even though it remains unclear if severe systemic inflammation is able or not to induce cellular disturbances and immune activation in the brain. Neuropeptides are pleotropic molecules heterogeneously distributed throughout the brain and possess a wide spectrum of functions, including regulation of the inflammatory response, so we hypothesized that they would be the major alarm system in the brain before overt microglia activation. In order to investigate this hypothesis, we induced acute pancreatitis in 8-10week old rats and collected brain tissue, 12 and 24h following pancreatic injury, to measure neuropeptide and cytokine tissue levels. We found significantly higher levels of β-endorphin, orexin and oxytocin in the brain of rats submitted to pancreatic injury, when compared to healthy controls. Interestingly, these differences were not associated with increased local cytokine levels, putting in evidence that neuropeptide release occurred independently of microglia activation and may be a pivotal alarm system to initiate neurologic reactions to distant inflammatory non-infectious aggression.

  7. Entanglement between distant qubits in cyclic XX chains

    SciTech Connect

    Canosa, N.; Rossignoli, R.

    2007-03-15

    We evaluate the exact concurrence between any two spins in a cyclic XX chain of n spins placed in a uniform transverse magnetic field, at both zero and finite temperature, by means of the Jordan-Wigner transformation plus a number-parity-projected statistics. It is shown that, while at T=0 there is always entanglement between any two spins in a narrow field interval before the transition to the aligned state, at low but nonzero temperatures the entanglement remains nonzero for arbitrarily high fields, for any pair separation L, although its magnitude decreases exponentially with increasing field. It is also demonstrated that the associated limit temperatures approach a constant nonzero value in this limit, which decreases as L{sup -2} for L<distant qubits (L{approx_equal}n/2). Related aspects such as the different behavior of even and odd antiferromagnetic chains, the existence of n ground-state transitions, and the thermodynamic limit n{yields}{infinity} are also discussed.

  8. Dam removal increases American eel abundance in distant headwater streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hitt, Nathaniel P.; Eyler, Sheila; Wofford, John E.B.

    2012-01-01

    American eel Anguilla rostrata abundances have undergone significant declines over the last 50 years, and migration barriers have been recognized as a contributing cause. We evaluated eel abundances in headwater streams of Shenandoah National Park, Virginia, to compare sites before and after the removal of a large downstream dam in 2004 (Embrey Dam, Rappahannock River). Eel abundances in headwater streams increased significantly after the removal of Embrey Dam. Observed eel abundances after dam removal exceeded predictions derived from autoregressive models parameterized with data prior to dam removal. Mann–Kendall analyses also revealed consistent increases in eel abundances from 2004 to 2010 but inconsistent temporal trends before dam removal. Increasing eel numbers could not be attributed to changes in local physical habitat (i.e., mean stream depth or substrate size) or regional population dynamics (i.e., abundances in Maryland streams or Virginia estuaries). Dam removal was associated with decreasing minimum eel lengths in headwater streams, suggesting that the dam previously impeded migration of many small-bodied individuals (<300 mm TL). We hypothesize that restoring connectivity to headwater streams could increase eel population growth rates by increasing female eel numbers and fecundity. This study demonstrated that dams may influence eel abundances in headwater streams up to 150 river kilometers distant, and that dam removal may provide benefits for eel management and conservation at the landscape scale.

  9. Morpho-kinematic of distant galaxies with JWST and MOSAIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, M.; Hammer, F.; Puech, M.; Flores, H.

    2015-12-01

    The combination of high spatial resolution from space imagery and 3D spectroscopy from ground is a remarkable tool to dissect distant galaxies and their internal motions. Using HST and VLT observations, we have captured the strong evolution of disk galaxies over the past 8 billion years (z˜1), which suggests disk (re)formation after gas rich mergers. At higher lookback time, the morpho-kinmatics of galaxies is strongly limited by the lower signal-to-noise and coarse spatial resolution of the observations. In the next decade, the synergy between JWST/NIRCAM and MOSAIC the futur MOS at the E-ELT will allow us to capture the morpho-kinematics up to the first galaxies and unveil the physical processes dominating their formation. The lesson learned at intermediate redshift will allow us to optimize the specification for MOSAIC to achieve the morpho-kinematics follow-up of galaxies from z˜4 to z=0.

  10. Realigning thunder and lightning: temporal adaptation to spatiotemporally distant events.

    PubMed

    Navarra, Jordi; Fernández-Prieto, Irune; Garcia-Morera, Joel

    2013-01-01

    The brain is able to realign asynchronous signals that approximately coincide in both space and time. Given that many experience-based links between visual and auditory stimuli are established in the absence of spatiotemporal proximity, we investigated whether or not temporal realignment arises in these conditions. Participants received a 3-min exposure to visual and auditory stimuli that were separated by 706 ms and appeared either from the same (Experiment 1) or from different spatial positions (Experiment 2). A simultaneity judgment task (SJ) was administered right afterwards. Temporal realignment between vision and audition was observed, in both Experiment 1 and 2, when comparing the participants' SJs after this exposure phase with those obtained after a baseline exposure to audiovisual synchrony. However, this effect was present only when the visual stimuli preceded the auditory stimuli during the exposure to asynchrony. A similar pattern of results (temporal realignment after exposure to visual-leading asynchrony but not after exposure to auditory-leading asynchrony) was obtained using temporal order judgments (TOJs) instead of SJs (Experiment 3). Taken together, these results suggest that temporal recalibration still occurs for visual and auditory stimuli that fall clearly outside the so-called temporal window for multisensory integration and appear from different spatial positions. This temporal realignment may be modulated by long-term experience with the kind of asynchrony (vision-leading) that we most frequently encounter in the outside world (e.g., while perceiving distant events). PMID:24391928

  11. Possible signature of distant foreground in the Planck data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yershov, V. N.; Orlov, V. V.; Raikov, A. A.

    2014-12-01

    By using the Planck map of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation, we have checked and confirmed the existence of a correlation between supernova (SN) redshifts, zSN, and CMB temperature fluctuations at the SNe locations, TSN, which we previously reported for the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe data. The Pearson correlation coefficient for the Planck data is r = +0.38 ± 0.08, which indicates that the correlation is statistically significant (the signal is about 5σ above the noise level). The correlation becomes even stronger for the Type Ia subsample of SNe, rIa = +0.45 ± 0.09, whereas for the rest of the SNe it is vanishing. By checking the slopes of the regression lines TSN/zSN for Planck's different frequency bands, we have also excluded the possibility of this anomaly being caused by the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect. The remaining possibility is some, unaccounted for, contribution to the CMB from distant (z > 0.3) foreground through either the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect or thermal emission from intergalactic matter.

  12. THE MOST DISTANT STARS IN THE MILKY WAY

    SciTech Connect

    Bochanski, John J.; Willman, Beth; Caldwell, Nelson; Brown, Warren; Sanderson, Robyn; West, Andrew A.; Strader, Jay

    2014-07-20

    We report on the discovery of the most distant Milky Way (MW) stars known to date: ULAS J001535.72+015549.6 and ULAS J074417.48+253233.0. These stars were selected as M giant candidates based on their infrared and optical colors and lack of proper motions. We spectroscopically confirmed them as outer halo giants using the MMT/Red Channel spectrograph. Both stars have large estimated distances, with ULAS J001535.72+015549.6 at 274 ± 74 kpc and ULAS J074417.48+253233.0 at 238 ± 64 kpc, making them the first MW stars discovered beyond 200 kpc. ULAS J001535.72+015549.6 and ULAS J074417.48+253233.0 are both moving away from the Galactic center at 52 ± 10 km s{sup –1} and 24 ± 10 km s{sup –1}, respectively. Using their distances and kinematics, we considered possible origins such as: tidal stripping from a dwarf galaxy, ejection from the MW's disk, or membership in an undetected dwarf galaxy. These M giants, along with two inner halo giants that were also confirmed during this campaign, are the first to map largely unexplored regions of our Galaxy's outer halo.

  13. Distant Compact Clusters of Galaxies from the BMW survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Antonio, Ian; Guzzo, Luigi; Longhetti, Marcella; Moretti, Alberto; Campana, Sergio; Lazzati, Davide; Panzera, Mariarosa; Tagliaferri, Gianpiero

    2002-02-01

    We propose to use SQIID to identify high-redshift clusters of galaxies from the BMW, an X-ray selected sample of serendipitously detected extended sources from the ROSAT HRI archive. The BMW survey is unique because of the superior angular resolution of the HRI. In fact, this is the only modern sample of distant clusters available that is not based on the low-resolution PSPC. Using 4m optical imaging, we have already identified several high-redshift clusters, two of which have z> 0.8, thus confirming the ability of the survey to peer efficiently into the z~ 1 regime, where only a handful of X-ray clusters are known. To test the evolution of the cluster abundance, we must increase the number of clusters known in this redshift regime. The BMW survey provides us with the only current opportunity to study compact clusters missing in all PSPC surveys. Because z~ 1 ellipticals have very red colors, K-band imaging is the most effective way of identifying these clusters. With SQIID, we also can obtain redshift estimates via the J-K red sequence. We propose near-IR imaging in J,H,K of 30 highest-z cluster candidates from the BMW survey, as indicated by their small size and low flux. This will allow efficient use of 8-meter spectroscopy to follow up the high-end tail of the redshift distribution.

  14. Comparative analysis of the transcriptome across distant species.

    PubMed

    Gerstein, Mark B; Rozowsky, Joel; Yan, Koon-Kiu; Wang, Daifeng; Cheng, Chao; Brown, James B; Davis, Carrie A; Hillier, LaDeana; Sisu, Cristina; Li, Jingyi Jessica; Pei, Baikang; Harmanci, Arif O; Duff, Michael O; Djebali, Sarah; Alexander, Roger P; Alver, Burak H; Auerbach, Raymond; Bell, Kimberly; Bickel, Peter J; Boeck, Max E; Boley, Nathan P; Booth, Benjamin W; Cherbas, Lucy; Cherbas, Peter; Di, Chao; Dobin, Alex; Drenkow, Jorg; Ewing, Brent; Fang, Gang; Fastuca, Megan; Feingold, Elise A; Frankish, Adam; Gao, Guanjun; Good, Peter J; Guigó, Roderic; Hammonds, Ann; Harrow, Jen; Hoskins, Roger A; Howald, Cédric; Hu, Long; Huang, Haiyan; Hubbard, Tim J P; Huynh, Chau; Jha, Sonali; Kasper, Dionna; Kato, Masaomi; Kaufman, Thomas C; Kitchen, Robert R; Ladewig, Erik; Lagarde, Julien; Lai, Eric; Leng, Jing; Lu, Zhi; MacCoss, Michael; May, Gemma; McWhirter, Rebecca; Merrihew, Gennifer; Miller, David M; Mortazavi, Ali; Murad, Rabi; Oliver, Brian; Olson, Sara; Park, Peter J; Pazin, Michael J; Perrimon, Norbert; Pervouchine, Dmitri; Reinke, Valerie; Reymond, Alexandre; Robinson, Garrett; Samsonova, Anastasia; Saunders, Gary I; Schlesinger, Felix; Sethi, Anurag; Slack, Frank J; Spencer, William C; Stoiber, Marcus H; Strasbourger, Pnina; Tanzer, Andrea; Thompson, Owen A; Wan, Kenneth H; Wang, Guilin; Wang, Huaien; Watkins, Kathie L; Wen, Jiayu; Wen, Kejia; Xue, Chenghai; Yang, Li; Yip, Kevin; Zaleski, Chris; Zhang, Yan; Zheng, Henry; Brenner, Steven E; Graveley, Brenton R; Celniker, Susan E; Gingeras, Thomas R; Waterston, Robert

    2014-08-28

    The transcriptome is the readout of the genome. Identifying common features in it across distant species can reveal fundamental principles. To this end, the ENCODE and modENCODE consortia have generated large amounts of matched RNA-sequencing data for human, worm and fly. Uniform processing and comprehensive annotation of these data allow comparison across metazoan phyla, extending beyond earlier within-phylum transcriptome comparisons and revealing ancient, conserved features. Specifically, we discover co-expression modules shared across animals, many of which are enriched in developmental genes. Moreover, we use expression patterns to align the stages in worm and fly development and find a novel pairing between worm embryo and fly pupae, in addition to the embryo-to-embryo and larvae-to-larvae pairings. Furthermore, we find that the extent of non-canonical, non-coding transcription is similar in each organism, per base pair. Finally, we find in all three organisms that the gene-expression levels, both coding and non-coding, can be quantitatively predicted from chromatin features at the promoter using a 'universal model' based on a single set of organism-independent parameters.

  15. GRBs: The Most Distant Signposts in our Universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa

    2007-01-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are the most powerful photon sources in the Universe, rivaled only by supernovae in the magnitude of their energy release. In 1997 GRB were found to originate in host galaxies at cosmological distances, revealing the total energy of their explosions to be an astounding approx.10(exp 52) - 10(exp 53)ergs. GRB durations span over five orders of magnitude, ranging from milliseconds to thousands of seconds. The underlying sources of the energy release remain, however, unknown. Leading candidates are mergers, either of two neutron stars or of a black hole and a neutron star, and core collapses of very massive stars, called "collapsars". To date the furthest GRB galaxy has been found at a cosmological redshift of 6.29, very close to the most distant quasar (at z=6.4). Since the Swift satellite continues to observe these phenomena at a rate of approx.120 per year, and with the upcoming launch of GLAST with two burst instruments on board, we will be able to use GRBs as beacons to probe very high redshifts. Thus bursts found at 6

  16. Adaptive filtering of Echelle spectra of distant Quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Priebe, A.; Liebscher, D.-E.; Lorenz, H.; Richter, G.-M.

    1992-01-01

    The study of the Ly alpha - forest of distant (approximately greater than 3) Quasars is an important tool in obtaining a more detailed picture of the distribution of matter along the line of sight and thus of the general distribution of matter in the Universe and is therefore of important cosmological significance. Obviously, this is one of the tasks where spectral resolution plays an important role. The spectra used were obtained with the EFOSC at the ESO 3.6m telescope. Applying for the data reduction the standard Echelle procedure, as it is implemented for instance in the MIDAS-package, one uses stationary filters (e.g. median) for noise and cosmic particle event reduction in the 2-dimensional Echelle image. These filters are useful if the spatial spectrum of the noise reaches essentially higher frequencies then the highest resolution features in the image. Otherwise the resolution in the data will be degraded and the spectral lines smoothed. However, in the Echelle spectra the highest resolution is already in the range of one or a few pixels and therefore stationary filtering means always a loss of resolution. An Echelle reduction procedure on the basis of a space variable filter described which recognizes the local resolution in the presence of noise and adapts to it is developed. It was shown that this technique leads to an improvement in resolution by a factor of 2 with respect to standard procedures.

  17. Mechanical Components Branch Test Facilities and Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oswald, Fred B.

    2004-01-01

    The Mechanical Components Branch at NASA Glenn Research Center formulates, conducts, and manages research focused on propulsion systems for both present and advanced aeronautical and space vehicles. The branch is comprised of research teams that perform basic research in three areas: mechanical drives, aerospace seals, and space mechanisms. Each team has unique facilities for testing aerospace hardware and concepts. This report presents an overview of the Mechanical Components Branch test facilities.

  18. Tipping Points

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, J.

    2007-12-01

    A climate tipping point, at least as I have used the phrase, refers to a situation in which a changing climate forcing has reached a point such that little additional forcing (or global temperature change) is needed to cause large, relatively rapid, climate change. Present examples include potential loss of all Arctic sea ice and instability of the West Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets. Tipping points are characterized by ready feedbacks that amplify the effect of forcings. The notion that these may be runaway feedbacks is a misconception. However, present "unrealized" global warming, due to the climate system's thermal inertia, exacerbates the difficulty of avoiding global warming tipping points. I argue that prompt efforts to slow CO2 emissions and absolutely reduce non-CO2 forcings are both essential if we are to avoid tipping points that would be disastrous for humanity and creation, the planet as civilization knows it.

  19. Giant Cosmic Lens Reveals Secrets of Distant Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-04-01

    Using the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope and helped by a gigantic cosmic lens conveniently provided by nature, an international team of astronomers has discovered that a young galaxy had a central disk of gas in which hundreds of new stars were being born every year -- at a time when the Universe was only a fraction of its current age. Artist's Conception of the Star-Forming Disk (Click on Image for Larger Version) VLA Image of PSS J2322+1944 (Click on Image for Larger Version) "This unique look into a very distant, young galaxy gives us unprecedented insight into the process that produced both tremendous numbers of stars and supermassive black holes in forming galaxies," said Chris Carilli, of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, NM, leader of the research team. "This work strongly supports the idea that the stars and the black holes formed simultaneously," he added. The research was published in the April 4 issue of Science Express. The astronomers studied a quasar called PSS J2322+1944, about 12 billion light-years from Earth. The quasar is an extremely luminous object powered by the supermassive black hole at the core of a galaxy. At the distance of this quasar, the scientists see the object as it was when the Universe was less than 2 billion years old, about 15 percent of its current age. The discovery required a huge assist from nature. To find the star-forming disk, the astronomers needed to observe natural radio emission from the carbon monoxide (CO) molecule, an important component of the gas that forms stars. However, this molecule emits radio waves at frequencies much higher than the VLA is capable of receiving. At PSS J2322+1944's distance of 12 billion light-years, however, the expansion of the Universe stretched the radio waves, reducing their frequency. CO emission at 230 GigaHertz was shifted to 45 GigaHertz, within the VLA's range. That alone was not enough. The distance that made it

  20. [Branches of the National Institute of Hygiene].

    PubMed

    Gromulska, Marta

    2008-01-01

    National Epidemiological Institute (National Institute of Hygiene, from 7th September 1923) was established in 1918 in Warsaw and acted at national level. Its actions in the field of diseases combat were supported by bacteriological stations and vaccine production in voivodeship cities, which were taken charge of by the state, and names "National Epidemiological Institutes". According to the ministers resolution from 6th July 1921,Epidemiological Institutes were merged to National Central Epidemiological Institutes (PZH), the epidemiological institutes outside Warsaw were named branches, which were to be located in every voivodeship city, according to the initial organizational resolutions. There were country branches of NCEI in: Cracow, Lwów, Lódź, Toruń, Lublin, and Wilno in the period 1919-1923. New branches in Poznań (1925), Gdynia(1934), Katowice (Voivodeship Institute of Hygiene (1936), Luck (1937), Stanisławów (1937), Kielce(1938), and Brześć/Bug (Municipal Station acting as branch of National Central Epidemiological Institute. Branches were subordinated to NCEI-PZH) in Warsaw where action plans and unified research and diagnostic method were established and annual meeting of the country branches managers took place. All branches cooperated with hospitals, national health services, district general practitioners and administration structure in control of infectious diseases. In 1938, the post of branch inspector was established, the first of whom was Feliks Przesmycki PhD. Branches cooperated also with University of Cracow, University of Lwów and University of Wilno. In 1935, National Institutes of Food Research was incorporated in PZH, Water Department was established, and these areas of activity began to develop in the branches accordingly. In 1938 there were 13 branches of PZH, and each had three divisions: bacteriological, food research and water research. Three branches in Cracow, Kielce and Lublin worked during World War II under German

  1. Clinical and Translational Epidemiology Branch (CTEB)

    Cancer.gov

    The Clinical and Translational Epidemiology Branch focuses on factors that influence cancer progression, recurrence, survival, and other treatment outcomes, and factors associated with cancer development.

  2. Active Tobacco Smoking and Distant Metastasis in Patients With Oropharyngeal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, Sean M.; Ali, Nawal N.; Margalit, Danielle N.; Chan, Annie W.

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: Distant metastasis is the site of first relapse in approximately one-third of patients with locally advanced oropharyngeal carcinoma, irrespective of human papillomavirus status. Yet the risk factors associated with distant metastasis are not well characterized. We sought to characterize the relationship between smoking status and distant metastasis. Methods and Materials: We evaluated the association between tobacco smoking status and distant metastasis in a retrospective cohort study of 132 patients who underwent definitive radiation therapy and chemotherapy for Stage III-IVA/B oropharyngeal cancer. Information on tobacco smoking was prospectively collected by patient questionnaires and physician notes at the time of diagnosis. Thirty-three percent of the patients were nonsmokers, 51% were former smokers, 16% were active smokers. The cumulative lifetime tobacco smoking in pack-years was 20 (range, 0-150). Results: With a median follow-up time of 52 months, the overall rate of distant metastasis at 4 years was 8%. Distant metastasis was the most common first site of relapse, occurring in 56% of the patients with recurrences. Active smokers had higher rates of distant metastasis than non-active smokers (including never- and former smokers; 31% vs. 4%, p < 0.001) and former smokers (31% vs. 3%, p < 0.001). There was no statistically significant difference in the risk of distant metastasis for patients with lifetime cumulative pack-years >20 and {<=}20 (10% vs. 4%, p = 0.19). In univariate analysis, active smoking (p = 0.0004) and N category (p = 0.009) were predictive of increased risk of distant metastasis. In multivariate analysis, active smoking was the most significant predictive factor for increased risk of distant metastasis (hazard ratio, 12.7, p < 0.0001). Conclusions: This study identified a strong association between active smoking and distant metastasis in patients with oropharyngeal cancer.

  3. Branching patterns emerge in a mathematical model of the dynamics of lung development

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yina; Chen, Ting-Hsuan; Zeng, Xingjuan; Warburton, David; Boström, Kristina I; Ho, Chih-Ming; Zhao, Xin; Garfinkel, Alan

    2014-01-01

    phenomena, and how the system can switch from one branching pattern to another using low-dimensional ‘control knobs’. The model provides a number of testable predictions, some of which have already been observed (though not explained) in experimental work. Key points The development of the lung is a highly stereotypical process, including the structured deployment of three distinct modes of branching: first side branching and then tip splitting with and without 90° rotation of the branching plane. These modes are supposedly under genetic control, but it is not clear how genes could act to produce these spatial patterns. Here, we show that cascades of branching events emerge naturally; the branching cascade can be explained by a relatively simple mathematical model, whose equations model the reaction and diffusion of chemical morphogens. Our low-dimensional model gives a qualitative understanding of how generic physiological mechanisms can produce branching phenomena, and how the system can switch from one branching pattern to another using low-dimensional ‘control knobs’. The model makes a number of experimental predictions, and explains several phenomena that have been observed but whose mechanisms were unknown. PMID:24247979

  4. Branch Mode Selection during Early Lung Development

    PubMed Central

    Menshykau, Denis; Kraemer, Conradin; Iber, Dagmar

    2012-01-01

    Many organs of higher organisms, such as the vascular system, lung, kidney, pancreas, liver and glands, are heavily branched structures. The branching process during lung development has been studied in great detail and is remarkably stereotyped. The branched tree is generated by the sequential, non-random use of three geometrically simple modes of branching (domain branching, planar and orthogonal bifurcation). While many regulatory components and local interactions have been defined an integrated understanding of the regulatory network that controls the branching process is lacking. We have developed a deterministic, spatio-temporal differential-equation based model of the core signaling network that governs lung branching morphogenesis. The model focuses on the two key signaling factors that have been identified in experiments, fibroblast growth factor (FGF10) and sonic hedgehog (SHH) as well as the SHH receptor patched (Ptc). We show that the reported biochemical interactions give rise to a Schnakenberg-type Turing patterning mechanisms that allows us to reproduce experimental observations in wildtype and mutant mice. The kinetic parameters as well as the domain shape are based on experimental data where available. The developed model is robust to small absolute and large relative changes in the parameter values. At the same time there is a strong regulatory potential in that the switching between branching modes can be achieved by targeted changes in the parameter values. We note that the sequence of different branching events may also be the result of different growth speeds: fast growth triggers lateral branching while slow growth favours bifurcations in our model. We conclude that the FGF10-SHH-Ptc1 module is sufficient to generate pattern that correspond to the observed branching modes. PMID:22359491

  5. Branch mode selection during early lung development.

    PubMed

    Menshykau, Denis; Kraemer, Conradin; Iber, Dagmar

    2012-01-01

    Many organs of higher organisms, such as the vascular system, lung, kidney, pancreas, liver and glands, are heavily branched structures. The branching process during lung development has been studied in great detail and is remarkably stereotyped. The branched tree is generated by the sequential, non-random use of three geometrically simple modes of branching (domain branching, planar and orthogonal bifurcation). While many regulatory components and local interactions have been defined an integrated understanding of the regulatory network that controls the branching process is lacking. We have developed a deterministic, spatio-temporal differential-equation based model of the core signaling network that governs lung branching morphogenesis. The model focuses on the two key signaling factors that have been identified in experiments, fibroblast growth factor (FGF10) and sonic hedgehog (SHH) as well as the SHH receptor patched (Ptc). We show that the reported biochemical interactions give rise to a Schnakenberg-type Turing patterning mechanisms that allows us to reproduce experimental observations in wildtype and mutant mice. The kinetic parameters as well as the domain shape are based on experimental data where available. The developed model is robust to small absolute and large relative changes in the parameter values. At the same time there is a strong regulatory potential in that the switching between branching modes can be achieved by targeted changes in the parameter values. We note that the sequence of different branching events may also be the result of different growth speeds: fast growth triggers lateral branching while slow growth favours bifurcations in our model. We conclude that the FGF10-SHH-Ptc1 module is sufficient to generate pattern that correspond to the observed branching modes. PMID:22359491

  6. Branch-pipe-routing approach for ships using improved genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Haiteng; Niu, Wentie

    2016-09-01

    Branch-pipe routing plays fundamental and critical roles in ship-pipe design. The branch-pipe-routing problem is a complex combinatorial optimization problem and is thus difficult to solve when depending only on human experts. A modified genetic-algorithm-based approach is proposed in this paper to solve this problem. The simplified layout space is first divided into threedimensional (3D) grids to build its mathematical model. Branch pipes in layout space are regarded as a combination of several two-point pipes, and the pipe route between two connection points is generated using an improved maze algorithm. The coding of branch pipes is then defined, and the genetic operators are devised, especially the complete crossover strategy that greatly accelerates the convergence speed. Finally, simulation tests demonstrate the performance of proposed method.

  7. Origin of Broad Visible Emission from Branched Polysilane and Polygermane Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Akira; Sato, Takaaki; Matsuda, Minoru

    2001-11-01

    The emission properties of branched polysilane and polygermane are studied using time-resolved emission spectroscopy. As branched polymers, the organosilicon cluster (OSI) and organogermanium cluster (OGE) are investigated, which are prepared from tetrachlorosilane and tetrachlorogermane, respectively, and have a hyperbranched structure. The broad visible emissions of OSI and OGE are explained by the energy diagram based on a configuration coordinate model, and the excited states are attributed to a localized state around the branching point. The molecular orbital (MO) calculation suggested the formation of a localized state by the distortion around the branching point in the excited state. The potential barrier for the nonradiative relaxation process was determined from the temperature dependence of the emission lifetime.

  8. Branch-pipe-routing approach for ships using improved genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Haiteng; Niu, Wentie

    2016-05-01

    Branch-pipe routing plays fundamental and critical roles in ship-pipe design. The branch-pipe-routing problem is a complex combinatorial optimization problem and is thus difficult to solve when depending only on human experts. A modified genetic-algorithm-based approach is proposed in this paper to solve this problem. The simplified layout space is first divided into threedimensional (3D) grids to build its mathematical model. Branch pipes in layout space are regarded as a combination of several two-point pipes, and the pipe route between two connection points is generated using an improved maze algorithm. The coding of branch pipes is then defined, and the genetic operators are devised, especially the complete crossover strategy that greatly accelerates the convergence speed. Finally, simulation tests demonstrate the performance of proposed method.

  9. The Relationship between Teacher Immediacy Behaviours and Distant Learners' Social Presence Perceptions in Videoconferencing Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozkaya, Mujgan

    2008-01-01

    Videoconferencing systems combine face-to-face and mediated interactions in distance education. We extend the use of a Social Presence measure to on-site (face-to-face) learners and distant learners. Comparison between physically present and distant located learners did not indicate significant differences in social presence. Also results indicate…

  10. Automatic Camera Control System for a Distant Lecture with Videoing a Normal Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suganuma, Akira; Nishigori, Shuichiro

    The growth of a communication network technology enables students to take part in a distant lecture. Although many lectures are conducted in universities by using Web contents, normal lectures using a blackboard are still held. The latter style lecture is good for a teacher's dynamic explanation. A way to modify it for a distant lecture is to…

  11. 76 FR 31351 - Safety Requirements and Manning Exemption Eligibility on Distant Water Tuna Fleet Vessels

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-31

    ...The Coast Guard announces the availability of Office of Vessel Activities Policy Letter 11-05 regarding Distant Water Tuna Fleet vessels manning exemption eligibility and safety requirements. This final policy clarifies the requirements to allow a distant water tuna fleet vessel to engage foreign citizens under a temporary manning...

  12. New View of Distant Galaxy Reveals Furious Star Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-12-01

    A furious rate of star formation discovered in a distant galaxy shows that galaxies in the early Universe developed either much faster or in a different way from what astronomers have thought. "This galaxy is forming stars at an incredible rate," said Wei-Hao Wang, an astronomer at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, New Mexico. The galaxy, Wang said, is forming the equivalent of 4,000 Suns a year. This is a thousand times more violent than our own Milky Way Galaxy. Location of Distant Galaxy Visible-light, left (from HST) and Infrared, right, (from Spitzer) Images: Circles indicate location of GOODS 850-5. CREDIT: Wang et al., STScI, Spitzer, NASA, NRAO/AUI/NSF Click on image for high-resolution file (1 MB) The galaxy, called GOODS 850-5, is 12 billion light-years from Earth, and thus is seen as it was only about 1.5 billion years after the Big Bang. Wang and his colleagues observed it using the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory's Submillimeter Array (SMA) on Mauna Kea in Hawaii. Young stars in the galaxy were enshrouded in dust that was heated by the stars and radiated infrared light strongly. Because of the galaxy's great distance from Earth, the infrared light waves have been stretched out to submillimeter-length radio waves, which are seen by the SMA. The waves were stretched or "redshifted," as astronomers say, by the ongoing expansion of the Universe. "This evidence for prolific star formation is hidden by the dust from visible-light telescopes," Wang explained. The dust, in turn, was formed from heavy elements that had to be built up in the cores of earlier stars. This indicates, Wang said, that significant numbers of stars already had formed, then spewed those heavy elements into interstellar space through supernova explosions and stellar winds. "Seeing the radiation from this heated dust revealed star formation we could have found in no other way," Wang said. Similar dusty galaxies in the early Universe may contain most of the

  13. Tipping Point

    MedlinePlus

    ... Tipping Point by CPSC Blogger September 22 appliance child Childproofing CPSC danger death electrical fall furniture head injury product safety television tipover tv Watch the video in Adobe Flash format. Almost weekly, we see ...

  14. PN populations in the local group and distant stellar populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Warren

    2016-08-01

    Our understanding of galactic structure and evolution is far from complete. Within the past twelve months we have learnt that the Milky Way is about 50% wider than was previously thought. As a consequence, new models are being developed that force us to reassess the kinematic structure of our Galaxy. Similarly, we need to take a fresh look at the halo structure of external galaxies in our Local Group. Studies of stellar populations, star-forming regions, clusters, the interstellar medium, elemental abundances and late stellar evolution are all required in order to understand how galactic assembly has occurred as we see it. PNe play an important role in this investigation by providing a measure of stellar age, mass, abundances, morphology, kinematics and synthesized matter that is returned to the interstellar medium (ISM). Through a method of chemical tagging, halo PNe can reveal evidence of stellar migration and galactic mergers. This is an outline of the advances that have been made towards uncovering the full number of PNe in our Local Group galaxies and beyond. Current numbers are presented and compared to total population estimates based on galactic mass and luminosity. A near complete census of PNe is crucial to understanding the initial-to-final mass relation for stars with mass >1 to <8 times the mass of the sun. It also allows us to extract more evolutionary information from luminosity functions and compare dust-to-gas ratios from PNe in different galactic locations. With new data provided by the Gaia satellite, space-based telescopes and the rise of giant and extra-large telescopes, we are on the verge of observing and understanding objects such as PNe in distant galaxies with the same detail we expected from Galactic observations only a decade ago.

  15. PSF subtraction to search for distant Jupiters with SPITZER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rameau, Julien; Artigau, Etienne; Baron, Frédérique; Lafrenière, David; Doyon, Rene; Malo, Lison; Naud, Marie-Eve; Delorme, Philippe; Janson, Markus; Albert, Loic; Gagné, Jonathan; Beichman, Charles

    2015-12-01

    In the course of the search for extrasolar planets, a focus has been made towards rocky planets very close (within few AUs) to their parent stars. However, planetary systems might host gas giants as well, possibly at larger separation from the central star. Direct imaging is the only technique able to probe the outer part of planetary systems. With the advent of the new generation of planet finders like GPI and SPHERE, extrasolar systems are now studied at the solar system scale. Nevertheless, very extended planetary systems do exist and have been found (Gu Ps, AB Pic b, etc.). They are easier to detect and characterize. They are also excellent proxy for close-in gas giants that are detected from the ground. These planets have no equivalent in our solar system and their origin remain a matter of speculation. In this sense, studying planetary systems from its innermost to its outermost part is therefore mandatory to have a clear understanding of its architecture, hence hints of its formation and evolution. We are carrying out a space-based survey using SPITZER to search for distant companions around a well-characterized sample of 120 young and nearby stars. We designed an observing strategy that allows building a very homogeneous PSF library. With this library, we perform a PSF subtraction to search for planets from 10’’ down to 1’’. In this poster, I will present the library, the different algorithms used to subtract the PSF, and the promising detection sensitivity that we are able to reach with this survey. This project to search for the most extreme planetary systems is unique in the exoplanet community. It is also the only realistic mean of directly imaging and subsequently obtaining spectroscopy of young Saturn or Jupiter mass planets in the JWST-era.

  16. Estimating sizes of faint, distant galaxies in the submillimetre regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindroos, L.; Knudsen, K. K.; Fan, L.; Conway, J.; Coppin, K.; Decarli, R.; Drouart, G.; Hodge, J. A.; Karim, A.; Simpson, J. M.; Wardlow, J.

    2016-10-01

    We measure the sizes of redshift ˜2 star-forming galaxies by stacking data from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). We use a uv-stacking algorithm in combination with model fitting in the uv-domain and show that this allows for robust measures of the sizes of marginally resolved sources. The analysis is primarily based on the 344 GHz ALMA continuum observations centred on 88 submillimetre galaxies in the LABOCA ECDFS Submillimeter Survey (ALESS). We study several samples of galaxies at z ≈ 2 with M* ≈ 5 × 1010 M⊙, selected using near-infrared photometry (distant red galaxies, extremely red objects, sBzK-galaxies, and galaxies selected on photometric redshift). We find that the typical sizes of these galaxies are ˜0.6 arcsec which corresponds to ˜5 kpc at z = 2, this agrees well with the median sizes measured in the near-infrared z band (˜0.6 arcsec). We find errors on our size estimates of ˜0.1-0.2 arcsec, which agree well with the expected errors for model fitting at the given signal-to-noise ratio. With the uv-coverage of our observations (18-160 m), the size and flux density measurements are sensitive to scales out to 2 arcsec. We compare this to a simulated ALMA Cycle 3 data set with intermediate length baseline coverage, and we find that, using only these baselines, the measured stacked flux density would be an order of magnitude fainter. This highlights the importance of short baselines to recover the full flux density of high-redshift galaxies.

  17. Drift and ownership toward a distant virtual body

    PubMed Central

    Pomés, Ausiàs; Slater, Mel

    2013-01-01

    In body ownership illusions participants feel that a mannequin or virtual body (VB) is their own. Earlier results suggest that body ownership over a body seen from behind in extra personal space is possible when the surrogate body is visually stroked and tapped on its back, while spatially and temporal synchronous tactile stimulation is applied to the participant's back. This result has been disputed with the claim that the results can be explained by self-recognition rather than somatic body ownership. We carried out an experiment with 30 participants in a between-groups design. They all saw the back of a VB 1.2 m in front, that moved in real-time determined by upper body motion capture. All felt tactile stimulation on their back, and for 15 of them this was spatially and temporally synchronous with stimulation that they saw on the back of the VB, but asynchronous for the other 15. After 3 min a revolving fan above the VB descended and stopped at the position of the VB neck. A questionnaire assessed referral of touch to the VB, body ownership, the illusion of drifting forwards toward the VB, and the VB drifting backwards. Heart rate deceleration (HRD) and the amount of head movement during the threat period were used to assess the response to the threat from the fan. Results showed that although referral of touch was significantly greater in the synchronous condition than the asynchronous, there were no other differences between the conditions. However, a further multivariate analysis revealed that in the visuotactile synchronous condition HRD and head movement increased with the illusion of forward drift and decreased with backwards drift. Body ownership contributed positively to these drift sensations. Our conclusion is that the setup results in a contradiction—somatic feelings associated with a distant body—that the brain attempts to resolve by generating drift illusions that would make the two bodies coincide. PMID:24399960

  18. Soils of Walker Branch Watershed

    SciTech Connect

    Lietzke, D.A.

    1994-03-01

    The soil survey of Walker Branch Watershed (WBW) utilized the most up-to-date knowledge of soils, geology, and geohydrology in building the soils data base needed to reinterpret past research and to begin new research in the watershed. The soils of WBW were also compared with soils mapped elsewhere along Chestnut Ridge on the Oak Ridge Reservation to (1) establish whether knowledge obtained elsewhere could be used within the watershed, (2) determine whether there were any soils restricted to the watershed, and (3) evaluate geologic formation lateral variability. Soils, surficial geology, and geomorphology were mapped at a scale of 1:1,200 using a paper base map having 2-ft contour intervals. Most of the contours seemed to reasonably represent actual landform configurations, except for dense wooded areas. For example, the very large dolines or sinkholes were shown on the contour base map, but numerous smaller ones were not. In addition, small drainageways and gullies were often not shown. These often small but important features were located approximately as soil mapping progressed.

  19. Waiting for Shadows from the Distant Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-03-01

    How can we hope to measure the hundreds of thousands of objects in our distant solar system? A team of astronomers is harnessing citizen science to begin to tackle this problem!A light curve from an occultation collected by a RECON site in Quincy, California. As the objects shadow passes, the background stars light dims. [RECON/Charley Arrowsmith (Feather River College)]Occultation InformationEstimates currently place the number of Kuiper belt objects larger than 100 km across at over 100,000. Knowing the sizes and characteristics of these objects is important for understanding the composition of the outer solar system and constraining models of the solar systems formation and evolution.Unfortunately, measuring small, dim bodies at large distances is incredibly difficult! One of the best ways to obtain the sizes of these objects is to watch as they occult a distant star. Timing the object as it passes across the face of the star can give us a good measure of its size and shape, when observed from multiple stations in the path of the shadow.An Extended NetworkOccultations by nearby objects (like main-belt asteroids) can be predicted fairly accurately, but those by trans-Neptunian objects are much more poorly constrained. Only ~900 trans-Neptunian objects have approximately known paths, and occultation-shadow predictions for these objects are often only accurate to ~1000km on the Earths surface. So how can we ensure that theres a telescope in the right location, ready to observe when an occultation occurs?Map of the 56 RECON sites distributed over 2000 km in the western United States. [Buie et al. 2016]The simplest answer is to set up a huge network of observing stations, and wait for the shadows to come to the network. With this approach, even if the predicted path isnt precisely known, some of the stations will still observe the occultation.Due to the number of stations needed, this project lends itself perfectly to citizen science. In a recently published paper by

  20. A role for Fas II in the stabilization of motor neuron branches during pruning in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Hebbar, Sarita; Fernandes, Joyce J

    2005-09-01

    During insect metamorphosis, the nervous system is extensively remodeled resulting in the development of new circuits that will execute adult-specific behaviors. The peripheral remodeling seen during development of innervation to the Dorsal Longitudinal (flight) Muscle (DLM) in Drosophila involves an initial retraction of larval neuromuscular junctions followed by adult-specific branch outgrowth. Subsequently, a phase of pruning occurs during which motor neuron branches are pruned back to reveal the stereotypic pattern of multiple contact points (or arbors) along the length of each DLM fiber. In this study, we show that the cell adhesion molecule, Fasciclin II (Fas II), is important for generating the stereotypic pattern. In Fas II hypomorphs, the number of contact points is increased, and the phenotype is rescued by targeted expression of Fas II in either synaptic partner. Arbor development has three distinct phases: outgrowth and elaboration, pruning and stabilization, and expansion of stabilized arbors. Fas II is expressed during the first two phases. A subset of branches is labeled during the elaboration phase, which is likely to initiate a stabilization pathway allowing branches to survive the pruning phase. However, since not all Fas II positive branches are retained, we propose that it primes branches for stabilization. Our data suggest that Fas II functions to restrict branch length and arbor expanse.

  1. Roles for auxin, cytokinin, and strigolactone in regulating shoot branching.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Brett J; Beveridge, Christine A

    2009-04-01

    Many processes have been described in the control of shoot branching. Apical dominance is defined as the control exerted by the shoot tip on the outgrowth of axillary buds, whereas correlative inhibition includes the suppression of growth by other growing buds or shoots. The level, signaling, and/or flow of the plant hormone auxin in stems and buds is thought to be involved in these processes. In addition, RAMOSUS (RMS) branching genes in pea (Pisum sativum) control the synthesis and perception of a long-distance inhibitory branching signal produced in the stem and roots, a strigolactone or product. Auxin treatment affects the expression of RMS genes, but it is unclear whether the RMS network can regulate branching independently of auxin. Here, we explore whether apical dominance and correlative inhibition show independent or additive effects in rms mutant plants. Bud outgrowth and branch lengths are enhanced in decapitated and stem-girdled rms mutants compared with intact control plants. This may relate to an RMS-independent induction of axillary bud outgrowth by these treatments. Correlative inhibition was also apparent in rms mutant plants, again indicating an RMS-independent component. Treatments giving reductions in RMS1 and RMS5 gene expression, auxin transport, and auxin level in the main stem were not always sufficient to promote bud outgrowth. We suggest that this may relate to a failure to induce the expression of cytokinin biosynthesis genes, which always correlated with bud outgrowth in our treatments. We present a new model that accounts for apical dominance, correlative inhibition, RMS gene action, and auxin and cytokinin and their interactions in controlling the progression of buds through different control points from dormancy to sustained growth. PMID:19218361

  2. Non-Chemical Distant Cellular Interactions as a potential confounder of cell biology experiments.

    PubMed

    Farhadi, Ashkan

    2014-01-01

    Distant cells can communicate with each other through a variety of methods. Two such methods involve electrical and/or chemical mechanisms. Non-chemical, distant cellular interactions may be another method of communication that cells can use to modify the behavior of other cells that are mechanically separated. Moreover, non-chemical, distant cellular interactions may explain some cases of confounding effects in Cell Biology experiments. In this article, we review non-chemical, distant cellular interactions studies to try to shed light on the mechanisms in this highly unconventional field of cell biology. Despite the existence of several theories that try to explain the mechanism of non-chemical, distant cellular interactions, this phenomenon is still speculative. Among candidate mechanisms, electromagnetic waves appear to have the most experimental support. In this brief article, we try to answer a few key questions that may further clarify this mechanism.

  3. Disappearance of criticality in a branched-chain thermal explosion with heat loss

    SciTech Connect

    Okoya, S.S.

    2006-01-01

    Branched-chain thermal explosions involving simplified initiation, branching, and termination of chains, as well as heat exchange with the surroundings, are considered, but it is assumed that consumption of fuel is negligible for combustion in a mixture of H{sub 2}+O{sub 2} that covers nth Arrhenius kinetics for the chain-branching step. In particular, the effect of heat loss on the problem is considered, Mostly analytical investigations of the simplified model are presented using standard Semenov's techniques. The analytical method provides expressions for criticality and the transition points. Also, the different qualitative effects of varying the dimensionless parameters are investigated.

  4. Growth towards light as an adaptation to high light conditions in Chara branches.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Susanne; Ziegler, Carmen; Melzer, Arnulf

    2006-01-01

    Growth of plants or plant organs towards more light is commonly interpreted as an adaptation to low light conditions. Here, we show for the first time, in a study of charophyte branches, a growth-based orientation towards light functioning as a mechanism to protect the plant from excessive light. Two Chara species were exposed to five different intensities of photosynthetically active radiation and species traits and pigmentation were measured. Branches of plants exposed to higher light intensities were convergent and pointed steeply upwards, whereas those exposed to lower light intensities grew nearly straight and were less inclined. Only branches that increased in length during the experiments reacted to differences in light intensity. This indicates that branch orientation is determined by a light-dependent growth reaction. Orientation of charophyte branches towards light is accompanied by a decrease in chlorophyll a (Chla) content and a lower Chla : carotenoid ratio, which clearly indicates that the plant is taking protective measures against potentially damaging excess light conditions. We suggest that the growth-based orientation of Chara branches towards light may protect sexual organs, which grow on adaxial branch sides, from light damage. In addition, the upward orientation of branches might lead to increased light transmission within dense charophyte beds, thus enabling an enhanced gross production.

  5. Optimal branching designs in respiratory systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Keunhwan; Kim, Wonjung; Kim, Ho-Young

    2015-11-01

    In nature, the size of the flow channels systematically decreases with multiple generations of branching, and a mother branch is ultimately divided into numerous terminal daughters. One important feature of branching designs is an increase in the total cross-sectional area along with generation, which provide more time and area for mass transfer at the terminal branches. However, the expansion of the total cross-sectional area can be costly due to the maintenance of redundant branches or the additional viscous resistance. Accordingly, we expect to find optimal designs in natural branching systems. Here we present two examples of branching designs in respiratory systems: fish gills and human lung airways. Fish gills consist of filaments with well-ordered lamellar structures. By developing a mathematical model of oxygen transfer rate as a function of the dimensions of fish gills, we demonstrate that the interlamellar distance has been optimized to maximize the oxygen transfer rate. Using the same framework, we examine the diameter reduction ratio in human lung airways, which branch by dichotomy with a systematic reduction of their diameters. Our mathematical model for oxygen transport in the airways enables us to unveil the design principle of human lung airways.

  6. Pacific Coastal Ecology Branch: Research Overview

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Pacific Coastal Ecology Branch, Newport, Oregon is part of the Western Ecology Division of the National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory of the U.S. EPA. The Branch conducts research and provides scientific technical support to Headquarters and Regional O...

  7. Branching out Has So Much to Offer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Joe

    2012-01-01

    In 1989 there were thirty ATM branches nationally. In January 2012 there were just twelve ATM branches with another three "proposed". How can that happen? How did it happen? Maybe the most pertinent question is: Why did it happen? There is no single answer to the last question, but perhaps it was something to do with the changes that were sweeping…

  8. Universal properties of branching random walks in confined geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mulatier, C.; Mazzolo, A.; Zoia, A.

    2014-08-01

    Characterizing the occupation statistics of random walks through confined geometries amounts to assessing the distribution of the travelled length ℓ and the number of collisions n performed by the stochastic process in a given region, for which remarkably simple Cauchy-like formulas were established in the case of branching Pearson random walks with exponentially distributed jumps. In this letter, we derive two key results: first, we show that such formulas strikingly carry over to the much broader class of branching processes with arbitrary jumps, and have thus a universal character; second, we obtain a stronger version of these formulas relating the travelled length density and the collision density at any point of the phase space. Our results are key to such technological issues as the analysis of radiation flow for nuclear reactor design and medical diagnosis and apply more broadly to physical and biological systems with diffusion, reproduction and death.

  9. Stress, stability and vibration of complex, branched shells of revolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, D.

    1974-01-01

    A comprehensive computer program, designated BOSOR4, for analysis of the stress, stability, and vibration of segmented, ring-stiffened, branched shells of revolution and prismatic shells and panels is described. The program performs large-deflection axisymmetric stress analysis, small-deflection nonsymmetric stress analysis, modal vibration analysis with axisymmetric nonlinear prestress included, and buckling analysis with axisymmetric or nonsymmetric prestress. One of the main advantages of the code is the provision for realistic engineering details such as eccentric load paths, internal supports, arbitrary branching conditions, and a 'library' of wall constructions. The program is based on the finite-difference energy method, which is very rapidly convergent with increasing numbers of mesh points. The organization of the program is briefly described with the flow of calculations charted for each of the types of analysis. Overlay charts and core storage requirements are given for the CDC 6600, IBM 370/165, and UNIVAC 1108 versions of BOSOR4.

  10. What are cirrus point sources?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heiles, Carl; Mccarthy, Patrick J.; Reach, William; Strauss, Michael A.

    1987-01-01

    Most cirrus point sources are associated with interstellar gas. A subset of these was isolated, together with other sources showing large band 4 to 3 flux density ratios, that are not associated with interstellar gas. Most of the point sources are associated with diffuse cirrus emissions. The sources appear to be distributed randomly on the sky, with the exception of six clusters, one of which is not associated with any known object. Six sources out of seventeen that were observed for redshifted H I at Arecibo were found to be associated with relatively nondescript external galaxies. Most of the sources do not appear on the Palomar Sky Survey. Deep optical observations of eight fields revealed some fairly distant galaxies, one object with a very peculiar optical spectrum, and several blank fields.

  11. [Croatian Medical Association--Branch Istria].

    PubMed

    Labinac-Peteh, Loredana

    2014-01-01

    Istrian branch of Croatian Medical Association was established at the Assembly in 1948. at the General Hospital Pula. From the beginning, the seat of the branch is located in Pula. During the last time the work of branch went through different periods, but has never stopped its activity, leading to the basic postulates of professionality in addition with promotion of collegiality. Istrian branch od Croatian Medical Association now has 630 members, most of members are doctors of medicine, slightly less doctors of dental medicine. At the local level Istrian branch today is recognized as expert entity for the helth and as adviser is involved in work of Department of Health in the Istrian County. PMID:25648003

  12. Root branching: mechanisms, robustness, and plasticity.

    PubMed

    Dastidar, Mouli Ghosh; Jouannet, Virginie; Maizel, Alexis

    2012-01-01

    Plants are sessile organisms that must efficiently exploit their habitat for water and nutrients. The degree of root branching impacts the efficiency of water uptake, acquisition of nutrients, and anchorage. The root system of plants is a dynamic structure whose architecture is determined by modulation of primary root growth and root branching. This plasticity relies on the continuous integration of environmental inputs and endogenous developmental programs controlling root branching. This review focuses on the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of lateral root distribution, initiation, and organogenesis with the main focus on the root system of Arabidopsis thaliana. We also examine the mechanisms linking environmental changes to the developmental pathways controlling root branching. Recent progress that emphasizes the parallels to the formation of root branches in other species is discussed. PMID:23801487

  13. Multiparametric Image Analysis of Lung Branching Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Schnatwinkel, Carsten; Niswander, Lee

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Lung branching morphogenesis is a fundamental developmental process, yet the cellular dynamics that occur during lung development and the molecular mechanisms underlying recent postulated branching modes are poorly understood. RESULTS Here, we implemented a time-lapse video microscopy method to study the cellular behavior and molecular mechanisms of planar bifurcation and domain branching in lung explant- and organotypic cultures. Our analysis revealed morphologically distinct stages that are shaped at least in part by a combination of localized and orientated cell divisions and by local mechanical forces. We also identified myosin light-chain kinase as an important regulator of bud bifurcation, but not domain branching in lung explants. CONCLUSION This live imaging approach provides a method to study cellular behavior during lung branching morphogenesis and suggests the importance of a mechanism primarily based on oriented cell proliferation and mechanical forces in forming and shaping the developing lung airways. PMID:23483685

  14. Electrophoretic dynamics of self-assembling branched DNA structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heuer, Daniel Milton

    This study advances our understanding of the electrophoretic dynamics of branched biopolymers and explores technologies designed to exploit their unique properties. New self-assembly techniques were developed to create branched DNA for visualization via fluorescence microscopy. Experiments in fixed gel networks reveal a distinct trapping behavior, in contrast with linear topologies. The finding that detection can be achieved by introducing a branch point contributes significantly to the field of separation science and can be exploited to develop new applications. Results obtained in polymer solutions point to identical mobilities for branched and linear topologies, despite large differences in their dynamics. This finding led to a new description of electrophoresis based on non-Newtonian viscoelastic effects in the electric double layer surrounding a charged object. This new theoretical framework presents a new outlook important not only to the electrophoretic physics of nucleic acids, but all charged objects including proteins, colloids, and nanoparticles. To study the behavior of smaller biopolymers, such as restriction fragments and recombination intermediates, a library of symmetrically branched DNA was synthesized followed by characterization in gels. The experimental results contribute a large body of information relating molecular architecture and the dynamics of rigid structures in an electric field. The findings allow us to create new separation technologies based on topology. These contributions can also be utilized in a number of different applications including the study of recombination intermediates and the separation of proteins according to structure. To demonstrate the importance of these findings, a sequence and mutation detection technique was envisioned and applied for genetic analysis. Restriction fragments from mutation "hotspots" in the p53 tumor suppressor gene, known to play a role in cancer development, were analyzed with this technique

  15. Pointing control design for autonomous space vehicle applications

    SciTech Connect

    Young, K.D.

    1993-03-01

    This paper addresses the design of pointing control systems for autonomous space vehicles. The function of the pointing control system is to keep distant orbiting objects within the field-of-view of an on-board optical sensor. We outline the development of novel nonlinear control algorithms which exploit the availability of on- board sensors. Simulation results comparing the performance of the different pointing control implementations are presented.

  16. Topological Proximity Effect: A Gauge Influence from Distant Fields on Planar Quantum-Coherent Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulopoulos, K.

    2015-06-01

    A quantum system that lies nearby a magnetic or time-varying electric field region, and that is under periodic boundary conditions parallel to the interface, is shown to exhibit a "hidden" Aharonov-Bohm effect (magnetic or electric), caused by fluxes that are not enclosed by, but are merely neighboring to our system - its origin being the absence of magnetic monopoles in 3D space (with corresponding spacetime generalizations). Novel possibilities then arise, where a field-free system can be dramatically affected by manipulating fields in an adjacent or even distant land, provided that these nearby fluxes are not quantized (i.e. they are fractional or irrational parts of the flux quantum). Topological effects (such as Quantum Hall types of behaviors) can therefore be induced from outside our system (that is always field-free and can even reside in simply-connected space). Potential novel applications are outlined, and exotic consequences in solid state physics are pointed out (i.e. the possibility of field-free quantum periodic systems that violate Bloch's theorem), while formal analogies with certain high energy physics phenomena and with some rather under-explored areas in mechanics and thermodynamics are noted.

  17. PN populations in the Local Group and distant stellar populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Warren Alfred

    2015-08-01

    understanding objects such as PNe in distant galaxies with the same detail we expected from Galactic observations only a decade ago. We will take a look at what this means for future PN studies.

  18. Generation of heralded entanglement between distant quantum dot hole spins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delteil, Aymeric

    Entanglement plays a central role in fundamental tests of quantum mechanics as well as in the burgeoning field of quantum information processing. Particularly in the context of quantum networks and communication, some of the major challenges are the efficient generation of entanglement between stationary (spin) and propagating (photon) qubits, the transfer of information from flying to stationary qubits, and the efficient generation of entanglement between distant stationary (spin) qubits. In this talk, I will present such experimental implementations achieved in our team with semiconductor self-assembled quantum dots.Not only are self-assembled quantum dots good single-photon emitters, but they can host an electron or a hole whose spin serves as a quantum memory, and then present spin-dependent optical selection rules leading to an efficient spin-photon quantum interface. Moreover InGaAs quantum dots grown on GaAs substrate can profit from the maturity of III-V semiconductor technology and can be embedded in semiconductor structures like photonic cavities and Schottky diodes.I will report on the realization of heralded quantum entanglement between two semiconductor quantum dot hole spins separated by more than five meters. The entanglement generation scheme relies on single photon interference of Raman scattered light from both dots. A single photon detection projects the system into a maximally entangled state. We developed a delayed two-photon interference scheme that allows for efficient verification of quantum correlations. Moreover the efficient spin-photon interface provided by self-assembled quantum dots allows us to reach an unprecedented rate of 2300 entangled spin pairs per second, which represents an improvement of four orders of magnitude as compared to prior experiments carried out in other systems.Our results extend previous demonstrations in single trapped ions or neutral atoms, in atom ensembles and nitrogen vacancy centers to the domain of

  19. HUBBLE VIEWS DISTANT GALAXIES THROUGH A COSMIC LENS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This NASA Hubble Space Telescope image of the rich galaxy cluster, Abell 2218, is a spectacular example of gravitational lensing. The arc-like pattern spread across the picture like a spider web is an illusion caused by the gravitational field of the cluster. The cluster is so massive and compact that light rays passing through it are deflected by its enormous gravitational field, much as an optical lens bends light to form an image. The process magnifies, brightens and distorts images of objects that lie far beyond the cluster. This provides a powerful 'zoom lens' for viewing galaxies that are so far away they could not normally be observed with the largest available telescopes. Hubble's high resolution reveals numerous arcs which are difficult to detect with ground-based telescopes because they appear to be so thin. The arcs are the distorted images of a very distant galaxy population extending 5-10 times farther than the lensing cluster. This population existed when the universe was just one quarter of its present age. The arcs provide a direct glimpse of how star forming regions are distributed in remote galaxies, and other clues to the early evoution of galaxies. Hubble also reveals multiple imaging, a rarer lensing event that happens when the distortion is large enough to produce more than one image of the same galaxy. Abell 2218 has an unprecedented total of seven multiple systems. The abundance of lensing features in Abell 2218 has been used to make a detailed map of the distribution of matter in the cluster's center. From this, distances can be calculated for a sample of 120 faint arclets found on the Hubble image. These arclets represent galaxies that are 50 times fainter than objects that can be seen with ground-based telescopes. Studies of remote galaxies viewed through well-studied lenses like Abell 2218 promise to reveal the nature of normal galaxies at much earlier epochs than was previously possible. The technique is a powerful combination of Hubble

  20. NASA Telescopes Help Identify Most Distant Galaxy Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-01-01

    WASHINGTON -- Astronomers have uncovered a burgeoning galactic metropolis, the most distant known in the early universe. This ancient collection of galaxies presumably grew into a modern galaxy cluster similar to the massive ones seen today. The developing cluster, named COSMOS-AzTEC3, was discovered and characterized by multi-wavelength telescopes, including NASA's Spitzer, Chandra and Hubble space telescopes, and the ground-based W.M. Keck Observatory and Japan's Subaru Telescope. "This exciting discovery showcases the exceptional science made possible through collaboration among NASA projects and our international partners," said Jon Morse, NASA's Astrophysics Division director at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Scientists refer to this growing lump of galaxies as a proto-cluster. COSMOS-AzTEC3 is the most distant massive proto-cluster known, and also one of the youngest, because it is being seen when the universe itself was young. The cluster is roughly 12.6 billion light-years away from Earth. Our universe is estimated to be 13.7 billion years old. Previously, more mature versions of these clusters had been spotted at 10 billion light-years away. The astronomers also found that this cluster is buzzing with extreme bursts of star formation and one enormous feeding black hole. "We think the starbursts and black holes are the seeds of the cluster," said Peter Capak of NASA's Spitzer Science Center at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. "These seeds will eventually grow into a giant, central galaxy that will dominate the cluster -- a trait found in modern-day galaxy clusters." Capak is first author of a paper appearing in the Jan. 13 issue of the journal Nature. Most galaxies in our universe are bound together into clusters that dot the cosmic landscape like urban sprawls, usually centered around one old, monstrous galaxy containing a massive black hole. Astronomers thought that primitive versions of these clusters, still forming and clumping

  1. Persistent water level changes in a well near Parkfield, California, due to local and distant earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roeloffs, Evelyn A.

    1998-01-01

    Coseismic water level rises in the 30-m deep Bourdieu Valley (BV) well near Parkfield, California, have occurred in response to three local and five distant earthquakes. Coseismic changes in static strain cannot explain these water level rises because (1) the well is insensitive to strain at tidal periods; (2) for the distant earthquakes, the expected coseismic static strain is extremely small; and (3) the water level response is of the incorrect sign for the local earthquakes. These water level changes must therefore be caused by seismic waves, but unlike seismic water level oscillations, they are monotonic, persist for days or weeks, and seem to be caused by waves with periods of several seconds rather than long-period surface waves. Other investigators have reported a similar phenomenon in Japan. Certain wells consistently exhibit this type of coseismic water level change, which is always in the same direction, regardless of the earthquake's azimuth or focal mechanism, and approximately proportional to the inverse square of hypocentral distance. To date, the coseismic water level rises in the B V well have never exceeded the seasonal water level maximum, although their sizes are relatively well correlated with earthquake magnitude and distance. The frequency independence of the well's response to barometric pressure in the frequency band 0.1 to 0.7 cpd implies that the aquifer is fairly well confined. High aquifer compressibility, probably due to a gas phase in the pore space, is the most likely reason why the well does not respond to Earth tides. The phase and amplitude relationships between the seasonal water level and precipitation cycles constrain the horizontal hydraulic diffusivity to within a factor of 4.5, bounding hypothetical earthquake-induced changes in aquifer hydraulic properties. Moreover, changes of hydraulic conductivity and/or diffusivity throughout the aquifer would not be expected to change the water level in the same direction at every time

  2. Persistent water level changes in a well near Parkfield, California, due to local and distant earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roeloffs, E.A.

    1998-01-01

    Coseismic water level rises in the 30-m deep Bourdieu Valley (BV) well near Parkfield, California, have occurred in response to three local and five distant earthquakes. Coseismic changes in static strain cannot explain these water level rises because (1) the well is insensitive to strain at tidal periods; (2) for the distant earthquakes, the expected coseismic static strain is extremely small; and (3) the water level response is of the incorrect sign for the local earthquakes. These water level changes must therefore be caused by seismic waves, but unlike seismic water level oscillations, they are monotonic, persist for days or weeks, and seem to be caused by waves with periods of several seconds rather than long-period surface waves. Other investigators have reported a similar phenomenon in Japan. Certain wells consistently exhibit this type of coseismic water level change, which is always in the same direction, regardless of the earthquake's azimuth or focal mechanism, and approximately proportional to the inverse square of hypocentral distance. To date, the coseismic water level rises in the BV well have never exceeded the seasonal water level maximum, although their sizes are relatively well correlated with earthquake magnitude and distance. The frequency independence of the well's response to barometric pressure in the frequency band 0.1 to 0.7 cpd implies that the aquifer is fairly well confined. High aquifer compressibility, probably due to a gas phase in the pore space, is the most likely reason why the well does not respond to Earth tides. The phase and amplitude relationships between the seasonal water level and precipitation cycles constrain the horizontal hydraulic diffusivity to within a factor of 4.5, bounding hypothetical earthquake-induced changes in aquifer hydraulic properties. Moreover, changes of hydraulic conductivity and/or diffusivity throughout the aquifer would not be expected to change the water level in the same direction at every time

  3. Mechanisms of Side Branching and Tip Splitting in a Model of Branching Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yina; Sun, Mingzhu; Garfinkel, Alan; Zhao, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Recent experimental work in lung morphogenesis has described an elegant pattern of branching phenomena. Two primary forms of branching have been identified: side branching and tip splitting. In our previous study of lung branching morphogenesis, we used a 4 variable partial differential equation (PDE), due to Meinhardt, as our mathematical model to describe the reaction and diffusion of morphogens creating those branched patterns. By altering key parameters in the model, we were able to reproduce all the branching styles and the switch between branching modes. Here, we attempt to explain the branching phenomena described above, as growing out of two fundamental instabilities, one in the longitudinal (growth) direction and the other in the transverse direction. We begin by decoupling the original branching process into two semi-independent sub-processes, 1) a classic activator/inhibitor system along the growing stalk, and 2) the spatial growth of the stalk. We then reduced the full branching model into an activator/inhibitor model that embeds growth of the stalk as a controllable parameter, to explore the mechanisms that determine different branching patterns. We found that, in this model, 1) side branching results from a pattern-formation instability of the activator/inhibitor subsystem in the longitudinal direction. This instability is far from equilibrium, requiring a large inhomogeneity in the initial conditions. It successively creates periodic activator peaks along the growing stalk, each of which later on migrates out and forms a side branch; 2) tip splitting is due to a Turing-style instability along the transversal direction, that creates the spatial splitting of the activator peak into 2 simultaneously-formed peaks at the growing tip, the occurrence of which requires the widening of the growing stalk. Tip splitting is abolished when transversal stalk widening is prevented; 3) when both instabilities are satisfied, tip bifurcation occurs together with side

  4. Branch architecture, light interception and crown development in saplings of a plagiotropically branching tropical tree, Polyalthia jenkinsii (Annonaceae).

    PubMed

    Osada, Noriyuki; Takeda, Hiroshi

    2003-01-01

    To investigate crown development patterns, branch architecture, branch-level light interception, and leaf and branch dynamics were studied in saplings of a plagiotropically branching tree species, Polyalthia jenkinsii Hk. f. & Thoms. (Annonaceae) in a Malaysian rain forest. Lengths of branches and parts of the branches lacking leaves ('bare' branches) were smaller in upper branches than in lower branches within crowns, whereas lengths of 'leafy' parts and the number of leaves per branch were larger in intermediate than in upper and lower branches. Maximum diffuse light absorption (DLA) of individual leaves was not related to sapling height or branch position within crowns, whereas minimum DLA was lower in tall saplings. Accordingly, branch-level light interception was higher in intermediate than in upper and lower branches. The leaf production rate was higher and leaf loss rate was smaller in upper than in intermediate and lower branches. Moreover, the branch production rate of new first-order branches was larger in the upper crowns. Thus, leaf and branch dynamics do not correspond to branch-level light interception in the different canopy zones. As a result of architectural constraints, branches at different vertical positions experience predictable light microenvironments in plagiotropic species. Accordingly, this pattern of carbon allocation among branches might be particularly important for growth and crown development in plagiotropic species.

  5. Branch architecture, light interception and crown development in saplings of a plagiotropically branching tropical tree, Polyalthia jenkinsii (Annonaceae).

    PubMed

    Osada, Noriyuki; Takeda, Hiroshi

    2003-01-01

    To investigate crown development patterns, branch architecture, branch-level light interception, and leaf and branch dynamics were studied in saplings of a plagiotropically branching tree species, Polyalthia jenkinsii Hk. f. & Thoms. (Annonaceae) in a Malaysian rain forest. Lengths of branches and parts of the branches lacking leaves ('bare' branches) were smaller in upper branches than in lower branches within crowns, whereas lengths of 'leafy' parts and the number of leaves per branch were larger in intermediate than in upper and lower branches. Maximum diffuse light absorption (DLA) of individual leaves was not related to sapling height or branch position within crowns, whereas minimum DLA was lower in tall saplings. Accordingly, branch-level light interception was higher in intermediate than in upper and lower branches. The leaf production rate was higher and leaf loss rate was smaller in upper than in intermediate and lower branches. Moreover, the branch production rate of new first-order branches was larger in the upper crowns. Thus, leaf and branch dynamics do not correspond to branch-level light interception in the different canopy zones. As a result of architectural constraints, branches at different vertical positions experience predictable light microenvironments in plagiotropic species. Accordingly, this pattern of carbon allocation among branches might be particularly important for growth and crown development in plagiotropic species. PMID:12495920

  6. Tillering and panicle branching genes in rice.

    PubMed

    Liang, Wei-hong; Shang, Fei; Lin, Qun-ting; Lou, Chen; Zhang, Jing

    2014-03-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) is one of the most important staple food crops in the world, and rice tillering and panicle branching are important traits determining grain yield. Since the gene MONOCULM 1 (MOC 1) was first characterized as a key regulator in controlling rice tillering and branching, great progress has been achieved in identifying important genes associated with grain yield, elucidating the genetic basis of yield-related traits. Some of these important genes were shown to be applicable for molecular breeding of high-yielding rice. This review focuses on recent advances, with emphasis on rice tillering and panicle branching genes, and their regulatory networks. PMID:24345551

  7. Modified negative-branch confocal unstable resonator.

    PubMed

    Hall, Thomas; Duschek, Frank; Grünewald, Karin M; Handke, Jürgen

    2006-12-01

    A new type of unstable resonator, suitable for a laser with a large medium cross section and a small or median output coupling, is presented. The resonator configuration, a modification of a negative-branch confocal unstable resonator, is numerically investigated. The basis of the theory is the Fresnel-Kirchhoff integral equation, and the calculations describe a passive resonator. With respect to output mirror tilting, the calculations confirm that the modified negative-branch confocal unstable resonator is less sensitive to mirror misalignments than the conventional negative-branch confocal unstable resonator. Furthermore, the modified resonator improves the beam quality in comparison with the conventional unstable resonator. PMID:17119575

  8. Tillering and panicle branching genes in rice.

    PubMed

    Liang, Wei-hong; Shang, Fei; Lin, Qun-ting; Lou, Chen; Zhang, Jing

    2014-03-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) is one of the most important staple food crops in the world, and rice tillering and panicle branching are important traits determining grain yield. Since the gene MONOCULM 1 (MOC 1) was first characterized as a key regulator in controlling rice tillering and branching, great progress has been achieved in identifying important genes associated with grain yield, elucidating the genetic basis of yield-related traits. Some of these important genes were shown to be applicable for molecular breeding of high-yielding rice. This review focuses on recent advances, with emphasis on rice tillering and panicle branching genes, and their regulatory networks.

  9. Cellular and physical mechanisms of branching morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Varner, Victor D.; Nelson, Celeste M.

    2014-01-01

    Branching morphogenesis is the developmental program that builds the ramified epithelial trees of various organs, including the airways of the lung, the collecting ducts of the kidney, and the ducts of the mammary and salivary glands. Even though the final geometries of epithelial trees are distinct, the molecular signaling pathways that control branching morphogenesis appear to be conserved across organs and species. However, despite this molecular homology, recent advances in cell lineage analysis and real-time imaging have uncovered surprising differences in the mechanisms that build these diverse tissues. Here, we review these studies and discuss the cellular and physical mechanisms that can contribute to branching morphogenesis. PMID:25005470

  10. Oral microflora as a cause of endocarditis and other distant site infections.

    PubMed

    Lockhart, P B; Durack, D T

    1999-12-01

    Bacteremia originating from the oral cavity is common, but the role of bacteremia in the genesis of infective endocarditis and other distant site infections is unclear. Only a small percentage of oral flora have been associated with distant site infection. Important issues remain unresolved concerning the identification of patients at risk, the relative risk from invasive dental procedures versus naturally occurring bacteremia, and the impact of prophylactic antibiotics on the incidence, nature, magnitude, and duration of bacteremia from the oral cavity. This article addresses the controversies in infection management in patients at risk for distant site infection.

  11. Entanglement of Optical and Mechanical Modes Enhanced in Distant Optomechanical Systems by Atomic Coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Guixia; Xiao, Ruijie; Zhou, Ling

    2016-01-01

    We present a scheme for three-level cascade atoms to entangle various optical and mechanical modes of two coupled cavity optomechanical system. With the existence of atomic mediums, our study shows that the larger stationary macroscopic entanglement of distant optomechanical systems can be obtained and reaches the maximum at the same effective detuning. Furthermore, we find that it is insensitive to the cavity decay rate for the entanglement between the two distant movable mirrors, and between the mirror and the adjacent or the distant cavity mode, which compensates for the effects of the cavity dissipation.

  12. Clearing the Cosmic Fog - The Most Distant Galaxy Ever Measured

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-10-01

    distances to such faint and remote objects is an enormous challenge and can only reliably be done using spectroscopy from very large ground-based telescopes [4], by measuring the redshift of the galaxy's light. Matt Lehnert takes up the story: "After the announcement of the candidate galaxies from Hubble we did a quick calculation and were excited to find that the immense light collecting power of the VLT, when combined with the sensitivity of the infrared spectroscopic instrument, SINFONI, and a very long exposure time might just allow us to detect the extremely faint glow from one of these remote galaxies and to measure its distance." On special request to ESO's Director General they obtained telescope time on the VLT and observed a candidate galaxy called UDFy-38135539 [5] for 16 hours. After two months of very careful analysis and testing of their results, the team found that they had clearly detected the very faint glow from hydrogen at a redshift of 8.6, which makes this galaxy the most distant object ever confirmed by spectroscopy. A redshift of 8.6 corresponds to a galaxy seen just 600 million years after the Big Bang. Co-author Nicole Nesvadba (Institut d'Astrophysique Spatiale) sums up this work, "Measuring the redshift of the most distant galaxy so far is very exciting in itself, but the astrophysical implications of this detection are even more important. This is the first time we know for sure that we are looking at one of the galaxies that cleared out the fog which had filled the very early Universe." One of the surprising things about this discovery is that the glow from UDFy-38135539 seems not to be strong enough on its own to clear out the hydrogen fog. "There must be other galaxies, probably fainter and less massive nearby companions of UDFy-38135539, which also helped make the space around the galaxy transparent. Without this additional help the light from the galaxy, no matter how brilliant, would have been trapped in the surrounding hydrogen fog and we

  13. Cluster galaxy evolution with the Las Campanas Distant Cluster Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Amy Elizabeth

    Understanding the formation and evolution of galaxies is a principal goal of modern cosmology. In this thesis, we place constraints on galaxy evolution models using the largest sample of high redshift clusters to date. Our sample consists of 63 clusters at 0.3 ≲ z ≲ 0.9 drawn from the Las Campanas Distant Cluster Survey (LCDCS). This survey differs from traditional optical surveys in that we detect clusters as regions of excess surface brightness relative to the background sky rather than selecting overdensities of resolved galaxies. Therefore, not only does this sample result in a significant increase in the number of known clusters at these redshifts, but because our cluster identification criteria is independent of those utilized in previous surveys, this catalog provides an independent, well-defined sample with which to compare the results of more traditional surveys. In this work, we take a two-pronged approach to studying galaxy evolution. First, we examine the luminosity and color evolution of the bright cluster galaxies as a class. Specifically, we measure the evolution of: (1) M*I , the characteristic luminosity of cluster galaxies, (2) the location of the red envelope in V--I and I--K', and (3) the fraction of blue galaxies (i.e. the Butcher-Oemler effect; Butcher & Oemler 1984). Our data suggest that luminous early type galaxies (or the progenitors of current day early type galaxies) form the bulk of their stellar populations at high redshifts ( ≲ 5) and that many of these galaxies, if not all, experience a short term episode of star formation at lower redshifts (1.5 < z < 2). Second, we narrow the focus and study a single type of cluster galaxy, the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG). We constrain the amount of luminosity and color evolution of BCGs, particularly in the context of recent claims in the literature of significant mass accretion since z ˜ 1 (Aragon-Salamanca 1998; Burke, Collins, & Mann 2000). Consistent with previous results (Burke

  14. Herschel unveils a puzzling uniformity of distant dusty galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbaz, D.; Hwang, H. S.; Magnelli, B.; Daddi, E.; Aussel, H.; Altieri, B.; Amblard, A.; Andreani, P.; Arumugam, V.; Auld, R.; Babbedge, T.; Berta, S.; Blain, A.; Bock, J.; Bongiovanni, A.; Boselli, A.; Buat, V.; Burgarella, D.; Castro-Rodriguez, N.; Cava, A.; Cepa, J.; Chanial, P.; Chary, R.-R.; Cimatti, A.; Clements, D. L.; Conley, A.; Conversi, L.; Cooray, A.; Dickinson, M.; Dominguez, H.; Dowell, C. D.; Dunlop, J. S.; Dwek, E.; Eales, S.; Farrah, D.; Förster Schreiber, N.; Fox, M.; Franceschini, A.; Gear, W.; Genzel, R.; Glenn, J.; Griffin, M.; Gruppioni, C.; Halpern, M.; Hatziminaoglou, E.; Ibar, E.; Isaak, K.; Ivison, R. J.; Lagache, G.; Le Borgne, D.; Le Floc'h, E.; Levenson, L.; Lu, N.; Lutz, D.; Madden, S.; Maffei, B.; Magdis, G.; Mainetti, G.; Maiolino, R.; Marchetti, L.; Mortier, A. M. J.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nordon, R.; O'Halloran, B.; Okumura, K.; Oliver, S. J.; Omont, A.; Page, M. J.; Panuzzo, P.; Papageorgiou, A.; Pearson, C. P.; Perez Fournon, I.; Pérez García, A. M.; Poglitsch, A.; Pohlen, M.; Popesso, P.; Pozzi, F.; Rawlings, J. I.; Rigopoulou, D.; Riguccini, L.; Rizzo, D.; Rodighiero, G.; Roseboom, I. G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Saintonge, A.; Sanchez Portal, M.; Santini, P.; Sauvage, M.; Schulz, B.; Scott, D.; Seymour, N.; Shao, L.; Shupe, D. L.; Smith, A. J.; Stevens, J. A.; Sturm, E.; Symeonidis, M.; Tacconi, L.; Trichas, M.; Tugwell, K. E.; Vaccari, M.; Valtchanov, I.; Vieira, J.; Vigroux, L.; Wang, L.; Ward, R.; Wright, G.; Xu, C. K.; Zemcov, M.

    2010-07-01

    emissivity index of β = 1.5). Above z = 1.5, distant galaxies are found to exhibit a substantially larger mid- over far-IR ratio, which could either result from stronger broad emission lines or warm dust continuum heated by a hidden AGN. Two thirds of the AGNs identified in the field with a measured redshift exhibit the same behavior as purely star-forming galaxies. Hence a large fraction of AGNs harbor coeval star formation at very high SFR and in conditions similar to purely star-forming galaxies. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  15. Shy Dimwits: A Search for Cold and Distant Brown Dwarfs in WFC3 Near-Infrared Slitless Grism Archival Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgasser, Adam

    2011-10-01

    Low-temperature L- and T-type brown dwarfs are ubiquitous in the vicinity of the Sun, but studies of these objects at large distances have been avoided due to their exceedingly faint luminosities. Nevertheless, a significant sample {roughly 200} of distant and cold brown dwarfs are likely present in the >250 WFC3 slitless G141 grism pointings currently available in the HST archive. I propose an Archival Program to identify and characterize these sources, using empirical templates to determine spectral types and atmospheric parameters {temperature, surface gravity and metallicity}. I will then use this sample to constrain the mass function and Galactic spatial distribution of brown dwarfs in thin disk, thick disk and halo populations, extending prior work with HST/WFPC2 and HST/ACS well beyond the hydrogen-burning mass limit. By sampling and spectroscopically characterizing these overlooked distant and cold brown dwarfs, I aim to realize their potential as standard candles and clocks in investigations of the Milky Way.

  16. TIME STRUCTURE OF GAMMA-RAY SIGNALS GENERATED IN LINE-OF-SIGHT INTERACTIONS OF COSMIC RAYS FROM DISTANT BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect

    Prosekin, Anton; Aharonian, Felix; Essey, Warren; Kusenko, Alexander

    2012-10-01

    Blazars are expected to produce both gamma rays and cosmic rays. Therefore, observed high-energy gamma rays from distant blazars may contain a significant contribution from secondary gamma rays produced along the line of sight by the interactions of cosmic-ray protons with background photons. Unlike the standard models of blazars that consider only the primary photons emitted at the source, models that include the cosmic-ray contribution predict that even {approx}10 TeV photons should be detectable from distant objects with redshifts as high as z {>=} 0.1. Secondary photons contribute to signals of point sources only if the intergalactic magnetic fields are very small, B {approx}< 10{sup -14} G, and their detection can be used to set upper bounds on magnetic fields along the line of sight. Secondary gamma rays have distinct spectral and temporal features. We explore the temporal properties of such signals using a semi-analytical formalism and detailed numerical simulations, which account for all the relevant processes, including magnetic deflections. In particular, we elucidate the interplay of time delays coming from the proton deflections and from the electromagnetic cascade, and we find that, at multi-TeV energies, secondary gamma rays can show variability on timescales of years for B {approx} 10{sup -15} G.

  17. Simulated lipoprotein transport in the wall of branched arteries.

    PubMed

    Darbeau, M Z; Lutz, R J; Collins, W E

    2000-01-01

    Study of arterial blood flow dynamics improves our understanding of the development of cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis. The transport and accumulation of macromolecules in the arterial wall can be influenced by local fluid mechanics. We used numeric simulations to investigate such transport in a T-junction model. Presumably an in vitro experiment would consist of gel segments inserted in the walls of a mechanical flow T-junction model near branch points where separation and recirculation zones are expected. The transport of low density lipoprotein (LDL) was investigated theoretically at these sites in a two dimensional numeric T-branch model. In the numeric model, the hydraulic conductivity of the porous gel wall segments was varied for a fixed species diffusivity to provide simulations with wall transmural Peclet numbers ranging from 0.3 to 30. Steady state flow patterns in the lumen of the two dimensional T-branch were simulated at Reynolds numbers of 250 and 500, using the software package FIDAP 7.61 to implement the finite element method. The simulations demonstrated that wall Peclet numbers greater than 1.0 were needed to achieve species concentration gradients within the wall that varied in the axial direction, thereby reflecting the influence of disturbed flow and pressure patterns in the lumen. As expected, the transmural concentration gradients were steeper when convection predominated. Blood flow in the lumen can influence the distribution of macromolecules in the arterial wall and needs to be investigated for the relevance to atherosclerosis.

  18. Branching ratio deviations from statistical behavior in core photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Tommaso, Devis; Decleva, Piero

    2005-08-01

    Accurate calculations of carbon 1s photoionization cross sections have been performed at the density functional level with the B-spline linear combination of atomic orbitals approach. The molecules considered are FCCH, FCCCH3, FCCCN, F2CCH2, CF3COOCH2CH3, and C3H5O. The variation of the branching ratios relative to inequivalent C 1s ionizations have been evaluated from threshold to about 100 eV photoelectron kinetic energy. Large deviations from the statistical ratios are observed at low energies, which remain often significant several tens of eV above threshold. The importance of taking into account core branching ratios for peak deconvolution and quantitative analysis, as well as an additional tool for structural information, is pointed out. Strong shape resonant effects are found to largely cancel in branching ratios. Their nature and variation along the series is analyzed in the framework of excitations into σ* valence orbitals.

  19. Overview of the Advanced High Frequency Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miranda, Felix A.

    2015-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the competencies, selected areas of research and technology development activities, and current external collaborative efforts of the NASA Glenn Research Center's Advanced High Frequency Branch.

  20. Code 672 observational science branch computer networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hancock, D. W.; Shirk, H. G.

    1988-01-01

    In general, networking increases productivity due to the speed of transmission, easy access to remote computers, ability to share files, and increased availability of peripherals. Two different networks within the Observational Science Branch are described in detail.

  1. FY 1990 Applied Sciences Branch annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Keyes, B.M.; Dippo, P.C.

    1991-11-01

    The Applied Sciences Branch actively supports the advancement of DOE/SERI goals for the development and implementation of the solar photovoltaic technology. The primary focus of the laboratories is to provide state-of-the-art analytical capabilities for materials and device characterization and fabrication. The branch houses a comprehensive facility which is capable of providing information on the full range of photovoltaic components. A major objective of the branch is to aggressively pursue collaborative research with other government laboratories, universities, and industrial firms for the advancement of photovoltaic technologies. Members of the branch disseminate research findings to the technical community in publications and presentations. This report contains information on surface and interface analysis, materials characterization, development, electro-optical characterization module testing and performance, surface interactions and FTIR spectroscopy.

  2. Residence times of branching diffusion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumonteil, E.; Mazzolo, A.

    2016-07-01

    The residence time of a branching Brownian process is the amount of time that the mother particle and all its descendants spend inside a domain. Using the Feynman-Kac formalism, we derive the residence-time equation as well as the equations for its moments for a branching diffusion process with an arbitrary number of descendants. This general approach is illustrated with simple examples in free space and in confined geometries where explicit formulas for the moments are obtained within the long time limit. In particular, we study in detail the influence of the branching mechanism on those moments. The present approach can also be applied to investigate other additive functionals of branching Brownian process.

  3. 30 CFR 57.6403 - Branch circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Explosives Electric Blasting-Surface and Underground § 57.6403 Branch circuits. (a) If electric blasting includes the use...

  4. Arkansas State University Beebe Branch Faculty Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas State Univ., Beebe.

    Arkansas State University Beebe Branch provides a liberal arts oriented program for traditional and nontraditional students. Its faculty handbook contains institutional goals, description of responsibilities of administrative officers and faculty committees, faculty employment policies, and administrative and instructional policies. The…

  5. Residence times of branching diffusion processes.

    PubMed

    Dumonteil, E; Mazzolo, A

    2016-07-01

    The residence time of a branching Brownian process is the amount of time that the mother particle and all its descendants spend inside a domain. Using the Feynman-Kac formalism, we derive the residence-time equation as well as the equations for its moments for a branching diffusion process with an arbitrary number of descendants. This general approach is illustrated with simple examples in free space and in confined geometries where explicit formulas for the moments are obtained within the long time limit. In particular, we study in detail the influence of the branching mechanism on those moments. The present approach can also be applied to investigate other additive functionals of branching Brownian process. PMID:27575100

  6. Applied Aeroscience and CFD Branch Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeBeau, Gerald J.; Kirk, Benjamin S.

    2014-01-01

    The principal mission of NASA Johnson Space Center is Human Spaceflight. In support of the mission the Applied Aeroscience and CFD Branch has several technical competencies that include aerodynamic characterization, aerothermodynamic heating, rarefied gas dynamics, and decelerator (parachute) systems.

  7. Soils of Walker Branch Watershed

    SciTech Connect

    Lietzke, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    The soil survey of Walker Branch Watershed (WBW) utilized the most up-to-date knowledge of soils, geology, and geohydrology in building the soils data base needed to reinterpret past research and to begin new research in the watershed. The soils of WBW were also compared with soils mapped elsewhere along Chestnut Ridge on the Oak Ridge Reservation to (1) establish whether knowledge obtained elsewhere could be used within the watershed, (2) determine whether there were any soils restricted to the watershed, and (3) evaluate geologic formation lateral variability. Soils, surficial geology, and geomorphology were mapped at a scale of 1:1200 using a paper base map having 2-ft contour intervals. Most of the contours seemed to reasonably represent actual landform configurations, except for dense wooded areas. For example, the very large dolines or sinkholes were shown on the contour base map, but numerous smaller ones were not. In addition, small drainageways and gullies were often not shown. These often small but important features were located approximately as soil mapping progressed. WBW is underlain by dolostones of the Knox Group, but only a very small part of the surface area contains outcroppings of rock and most outcrops were located in the lower part. Soil mapping revealed the presence of both ancient alluvium and ancient colluvium deposits, not recognized in previous soil surveys, that have been preserved in high-elevation stable portions of present-day landforms. An erosional geomorphic process of topographic inversion requiring several millions of years within the Pleistocene is necessary to bring about the degree of inversion that is expressed in the watershed. Indeed, some of these ancient alluvial and colluvial remnants may date back into the Tertiary. Also evident in the watershed, and preserved in the broad, nearly level bottoms of dolines, are multiple deposits of silty material either devoid or nearly devoid of coarse fragments. Recent research

  8. Comparing tube models for predicting the linear rheology of branched polymer melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zuowei; Chen, Xue; Larson, Ronald

    2010-03-01

    The hierarchical [1,2] and bob (or branch-on-branch) [3] models are tube-based computational models developed for predicting the linear rheology of general mixtures of polydisperse branched polymers. These two models are based on a similar tube-theory framework, but differ in their numerical implementation and details of relaxation mechanisms. We present a detailed overview of the similarities and differences of these models, and examine the effects of these differences on the predictions of the linear viscoelastic properties of a set of representative branched polymer samples, in order to give a general picture of the performance of these models. Our analysis confirms that the hierarchical and bob models quantitatively predict the linear rheology of a wide range of branched polymer melts, but also indicate that there is still no unique solution to cover all types of branched polymers without case-by-case adjustment of parameters such as the dilution exponent α and the factor p^2 which defines the hopping distance of a branch point relative to the tube diameter. An updated version of the hierarchical model, which shows improved computational efficiency and refined relaxation mechanisms, is introduced and used in these analyses. [1] R. G. Larson, Macromolecules 34, 4556 (2001). [2] S. J. Park et al., Rheol. Acta 44, 319 (2005). [3] C. Das et al., J. Rheol. 50, 207 (2006).

  9. Dynamics of strigolactone function and shoot branching responses in Pisum sativum.

    PubMed

    Dun, Elizabeth A; de Saint Germain, Alexandre; Rameau, Catherine; Beveridge, Christine A

    2013-01-01

    Strigolactones (SLs), or their metabolites, were recently identified as endogenous inhibitors of shoot branching. However, certain key features and dynamics of SL action remained to be physiologically characterized. Here we show that successive direct application of SL to axillary buds at every node along the stem can fully inhibit branching. The SL inhibition of early outgrowth did not require inhibitory signals from other growing buds or the shoot tip. In addition to this very early or initial suppression of outgrowth, we also found SL to be effective, up to a point, at moderating the continuing growth of axillary branches. The effectiveness of SL at affecting bud and branch growth correlated with the ability of SL to regulate expression of PsBRC1. PsBRC1 is a transcription factor that is expressed strongly in axillary buds and is required for SL inhibition of shoot branching. Consistent with a dynamic role of the hormone, SL inhibition of bud growth did not prevent buds from later responding to a decapitation treatment, even though SL treatment immediately after decapitation inhibits the outgrowth response. Also, as expected from the hypothesized branching control network in plants, treatment of exogenous SL caused feedback down-regulation of SL biosynthesis genes within 2 h. Altogether, these results reveal new insights into the dynamics of SL function and support the premise that SLs or SL-derived metabolites function dynamically as a shoot branching hormone and that they act directly in axillary buds. PMID:23220942

  10. Polypyrimidine tract sequences direct selection of alternative branch sites and influence protein binding.

    PubMed Central

    Norton, P A

    1994-01-01

    IVS1, an intron derived from the rat fibronectin gene, is spliced inefficiently in vitro, involving the use of three alternative branch sites. Mutation of one branch point site, BP3, so as to increase complementarity to U2 snRNA resulted in exclusive use of that site and improved splicing efficiency, indicating that the wild type BP3 site is one determinant of poor IVS1 splicing. Deletions within the polypyrimidine tract had a variable effect on splicing efficiency and altered the pattern of branch site usage. Selection of each branch site was influenced negatively by purine substitutions ca. 20 nucleotides downstream. It is proposed that all three IVS1 branch sites are pyrimidine tract-dependent. Pyrimidine tract deletions also influenced the crosslinking of PTB (the polypyrimidine tract-binding protein), hnRNP C, and splicing factor U2AF65. All three proteins bound preferentially to distinct regions within the polypyrimidine tract and thus are candidates for mediating pyrimidine tract-dependent branch site selection. The findings indicate the complexity of the IVS1 polypyrimidine tract and suggest a crucial role for this region in modulating branch site selection and IVS1 splicing. Images PMID:7937104

  11. Masses and branching fractions at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    S. D'Auria

    2003-10-30

    The authors present a collection of new results on b-meson and {Lambda}{sub b} masses and branching fractions measured at CDF. They have improved the measurement of the {Lambda}{sub b} and B{sub s} mass and they have measured the branching fractions of B{sub s} {yields} D{sub s}{pi}, {Lambda}{sub b} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{pi} and B{sub u} {yields} {Phi}K{sup {+-}}.

  12. Parton branching in the color mutation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwa, Rudolph C.; Wu, Yuanfang

    1999-11-01

    The soft production problem in hadronic collisions as described in the eikonal color mutation branching model is improved in the way that the initial parton distribution is treated. Furry branching of the partons is considered as a means of describing the nonperturbative process of parton reproduction in the soft interaction. The values of all the moments, and Cq, for q=2,...,5, as well as their energy dependences, can be correctly determined by the use of only two parameters.

  13. Vibration analysis of pipelines with arbitrary branches by absorbing transfer matrix method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Gongmin; Li, Shuaijun; Li, Yanhua; Chen, Hao

    2013-11-01

    Branched pipes of arbitrary shapes are prevalent in pipe systems. Considering fluid-structure interaction (FSI), an absorbing transfer matrix method in frequency domain for fluid-filled pipelines with any branched pipes is proposed in this paper. A dominant chain of pipeline would be selected, and the point transfer matrix of each junction on the dominant chain would be determined. Here, the point transfer matrix, representing the influence of branched pipes at the junction on the dominant pipeline, was "absorbed" by the dominant chain. Based on these, with transfer matrixes of other elements, the fluid and structure dynamics problem could be solved following the chain transfer matrix method process. Several numerical examples with different constraints are presented to illustrate the application of the proposed method. Moreover, the experiment of cross-shaped pipes with various boundary conditions was carried out. And results from the present approach were validated by measured and numerical data. Then, the forced vibrations of branched pipes were analyzed by considering the effects of various parameters, which shows the fluid pressure and vibrations can be optimized by changing the branch angles and positions. Through these examples, it is shown that the proposed method is efficient and can be used to calculate branched pipes of any shape.

  14. Setting, distant view looking east/southeast toward north and west elevations ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Setting, distant view looking east/southeast toward north and west elevations of Ranger's Residence, with rock formations in the background - Toney Residence, 10700 Escondido Canyon Road, Agua Dulce, Los Angeles County, CA

  15. A new species of the leafhopper genus Bhatia Distant (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae: Deltocephalinae) from China.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lin; Zhang, Yalin

    2015-01-01

    A new leafhopper species Bhatia multispinosa Lu & Zhang is described from the Emei Mountains in China. A checklist to the species of Bhatia Distant from China is provided, together with a key for their separation.

  16. Vastarena, a new genus for the New Caledonian cicada Abroma pumila Distant (Insecta: Hemiptera, Cicadoidea, Cicadidae).

    PubMed

    Delorme, Quentin

    2016-01-01

    In New Caledonia, the species Abroma pumila (Distant, 1892) shows several incompatibilities with the genus type species A. guerinii (Signoret, 1860). A new genus, Vastarena, is proposed. PMID:27615969

  17. Branching influences force-velocity curves and length fluctuations in actin networks.

    PubMed

    Hansda, Deepak Kumar; Sen, Shamik; Padinhateeri, Ranjith

    2014-12-01

    We investigate collective dynamics of branched actin networks growing against a rigid movable wall constrained by a resistive force. Computing the force velocity relations, we show that the stall force of such networks depends not only on the average number of filaments touching the wall, but also on the amount of fluctuation of the leading edge of the network. These differences arise due to differences in the network architecture, namely, distance between two adjacent branching points and the initial distance of the starting filament from the wall, with their relative magnitudes influencing the nature of the force velocity curves (convex versus concave). We also show that the introduction of branching results in nonmonotonic diffusion constant, a quantity that measures the growth in length fluctuation of the leading edge of the network, as a function of externally applied force. Together our results demonstrate how the collective dynamics of a branched network differs from that of a parallel filament network.

  18. The importance of distant metastases in hormone-sensitive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Rugo, Hope S

    2008-01-01

    Breast cancer is a leading cause of cancer death in women worldwide. Survival from breast cancer is improving, but distant metastases remain the most common type of breast cancer recurrence, resulting in more than 40,000 deaths per year in the USA alone. Distant metastases are associated with the poorest outcomes when compared with loco-regional or contralateral recurrences and are also associated with greater health care costs and diminished quality of life. The risk of distant metastases increases with larger primary tumor size, lymph node positive cancer, higher tumor grade, and prior loco-regional recurrence. Yet, even patients with minimal risk factors may develop distant metastases. Thus, reducing the development of such relapses is an important goal in adjuvant therapy. As the development of distant metastases has been consistently associated with eventual mortality from breast cancer, a reduction in distant metastases may serve as a better surrogate marker for overall survival and provide earlier results from clinical trials testing new types of adjuvant therapy. PMID:18279764

  19. Measuring branch deflection of spruce branches caused by intercepted snow load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bründl, Michael; Bartelt, Perry; Schneebeli, Martin; Flühler, Hannes

    1999-10-01

    Snow interception plays an important role in the hydrological cycle of mountain forests since it determines water supply for discharge in spring. A common way to measure the intercepted snow mass on trees is to put a cut tree on a scale. This method yields accurate results with a high temporal resolution but it destroys the natural system of tree, snowpack and soil. Hence, it does not work when water transport processes between the tree, the snowpack and the soil are investigated. We developed a non-destructive method to continuously observe and measure snow load on spruce branches during winter.Throughout a winter season we continuously observed a spruce with a video camera. To quantify the motion of branches during the snow interception process we suspended small illuminated balls on branches at different distances from the trunk. The position of the balls at a given time were measured by analysis of the video image. The result of this analysis is a time series of branch motion during an interception event.Given the measured deflections the intercepted mass on branches was calculated. The deformation of branches under certain branch temperatures was calibrated with known weights. The calibrations were used to calculate the linear relation between the branch temperature and the Young's modulus of a branch. This relation was used as input into a finite element model which calculated the intercepted mass. For a fully snow-capped 220 cm long spruce branch we found an intercepted snow mass of 4·7 kg. The calculated snow mass was compared with snow storage measurements of different branches and showed that this method allows estimation of snow mass intercepted by a single branch.

  20. Distant World in Peril Discovered from La Silla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-01-01

    Giant Exoplanet Orbits Giant Star Summary When, in a distant future, the Sun begins to expand and evolves into a "giant" star, the surface temperature on the Earth will rise dramatically and our home planet will eventually be incinerated by that central body. Fortunately for us, this dramatic event is several billion years away. However, that sad fate will befall another planet, just discovered in orbit about the giant star HD 47536, already within a few tens of millions of years. At a distance of nearly 400 light-years from us, it is the second-remotest planetary system discovered to date [1]. This is an interesting side-result of a major research project, now carried out by a European-Brazilian team of astronomers [2]. In the course of a three-year spectroscopic survey, they have observed about 80 giant stars in the southern sky with the advanced FEROS spectrograph on the 1.52-m telescope installed at the ESO La Silla Observatory (Chile). It is one of these stars that has just been found to host a giant planet. This is only the fourth such case known and with a diameter of about 33 million km (or 23.5 times that of our Sun), HD 47536 is by far the largest of those giant stars [1]. The distance of the planet from the star is still of the order of 300 million km (or twice the distance of the Earth from the Sun), a safe margin now, but this will not always be so. The orbital period is 712 days, i.e., somewhat less than two Earth years, and the planet's mass is 5 - 10 times that of Jupiter. The presence of exoplanets in orbit around giant stars, some of which will eventually perish into their central star (be "cannibalized"), provides a possible explanation of the anomalous abundance of certain chemical elements that is observed in the atmospheres of some stars, cf. ESO PR 10/01. This interesting discovery bodes well for coming observations of exoplanetary systems with new, more powerful instruments, like HARPS to be installed next year at the ESO 3.6-m telescope on

  1. Title Sheet, National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Northwestern Branch ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Title Sheet, National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Northwestern Branch - National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Northwestern Branch, 5000 West National Avenue, Milwaukee, Milwaukee County, WI

  2. Branch management: mechanisms of axon branching in the developing vertebrate CNS

    PubMed Central

    Kalil, Katherine; Dent, Erik W.

    2014-01-01

    The remarkable ability of a single axon to extend multiple branches and form terminal arbors allows vertebrate neurons to integrate information from divergent regions of the nervous system. Axons select appropriate pathways during development, but it is the branches that extend interstitially from the axon shaft and arborize at specific targets that are responsible for virtually all of the synaptic connectivity in the vertebrate CNS. How do axons form branches at specific target regions? Recent studies have identified molecular cues that activate intracellular signalling pathways in axons and mediate dynamic reorganization of the cytoskeleton to promote the formation of axon branches. PMID:24356070

  3. ESA's XMM-Newton gains deep insights into the distant Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-07-01

    First image from the XMM-LSS survey hi-res Size hi-res: 87 kb Credits: ESA First image from the XMM-LSS survey The first image from the XMM-LSS survey is actually a combination of fourteen separate 'pointings' of the space observatory. It represents a region of the sky eight times larger than the full Moon and contains around 25 clusters. The circles represent the sources previously known from the 1991 ROSAT All-Sky Survey. A computer programme zooms in on an interesting region hi-res Size hi-res: 86 kb Credits: ESA A computer programme zooms in on an interesting region A computer programme zooms in on an interesting region of the image and identifies the possible cluster. Each point on this graph represents a single X-ray photons detected by XMM-Newton. Most come from distant actie galaxies and the computer must perform a sophisticated, statistical computation to determine which X-ray come from clusters. Contour map of clusters hi-res Size hi-res: 139 kb Credits: ESA Contour map of clusters The computer programme transforms the XMM-Newton data into a contour map of the cluster's probable extent and superimposes it over the CFHT snapshot, allowing the individual galaxies in the cluster to be targeted for further observations with ESO's VLT, to measure its distance and locate the cluster in the universe. Unlike grains of sand on a beach, matter is not uniformly spread throughout the Universe. Instead, it is concentrated into galaxies like our own which themselves congregate into clusters. These clusters are 'strung' throughout the Universe in a web-like structure. Astronomers have studied this large-scale structure of the nearby Universe but have lacked the instruments to extend the search to the large volumes of the distant Universe. Thanks to its unrivalled sensitivity, in less than three hours, ESA's X-ray observatory XMM-Newton can see back about 7000 million years to a cosmological era when the Universe was about half its present size, and clusters of galaxies

  4. Titan: a distant but enticing destination for human visitors.

    PubMed

    Nott, Julian

    2009-10-01

    Until recently, very little was known about Saturn's largest satellite, Titan. But that has changed dramatically since the Cassini spacecraft started orbiting in the Saturn system in 2004. Larger than Mercury and with a dense atmosphere, Titan has many of the characteristics of a planet. Indeed, many scientists now see it as the most interesting place in the Solar System for robotic exploration, with many unique features and even the possibility of exotic forms of life. This paper points out that Titan is also a potential destination for humans. With its predominantly nitrogen atmosphere, moderate gravity, and available water and oxygen, it also appears that, once it becomes possible to travel there, it will prove to be much more hospitable for human visitors than any other destination in the Solar System.

  5. Titan: a distant but enticing destination for human visitors.

    PubMed

    Nott, Julian

    2009-10-01

    Until recently, very little was known about Saturn's largest satellite, Titan. But that has changed dramatically since the Cassini spacecraft started orbiting in the Saturn system in 2004. Larger than Mercury and with a dense atmosphere, Titan has many of the characteristics of a planet. Indeed, many scientists now see it as the most interesting place in the Solar System for robotic exploration, with many unique features and even the possibility of exotic forms of life. This paper points out that Titan is also a potential destination for humans. With its predominantly nitrogen atmosphere, moderate gravity, and available water and oxygen, it also appears that, once it becomes possible to travel there, it will prove to be much more hospitable for human visitors than any other destination in the Solar System. PMID:19817245

  6. Structure and other properties of Jupiter's distant magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepping, R. P.; Desch, M. D.; Klein, L. W.; Sittler, E. C., Jr.; Sullivan, J. D.; Kurth, W. S.; Behannon, K. W.

    1983-01-01

    Analyses of data from Voyager 2 experiments provide evidence for, and characteristics of, a Jovian magnetotail extending at least to 9,000 Jovian radii from the planet. During approximately (25 day) periodic sightings of the tail, the magnetic field tended to point radially towards or away from Jupiter, indicating preservation to large distances of the bipolar, lobe like structure observed near the planet. This periodicity, along with various properties of the solar wind at this time, indicates that the tail is apparently influenced by recurrent solar wind features. Anomalous magnetic fields, not aligned with the nominal tail axis, also exist within the tail, especially in the low density, central (core) region, indicating some complexity of internal structure.

  7. Autonomous Orbit Determination between a Lunar Satellite and a Distant Retrograde Orbit Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Xiyun; Tang, Jingshi; Liu, Lin; Liu, Peng

    Currently, orbit determination of lunar satellites heavily rely on ground stations on the Earth. The observation data suffers from problems such as low accuracy and bad visibility. An efficient way to release the burden of the ground stations and to enhance the observation accuracy is to use the inter-satellite range data between two lunar satellites. However, a well-known problem of only using this type of data is the overall rotation of the orbital plane (undetermined orbit inclination, ascending nod and perigee). Some external reference sources should be introduced into the system to avoid the overall rotation. Recently, an interesting idea is to use a probe around the Earth-Moon CLP (collinear libration point) as the reference source. The orbit of the CLP probe is unknown a priori. It is determined simultaneously with the lunar satellite’s orbit by using the inter-satellite range data between them. There are many advantages of this idea, but also some problems. One main problem is caused by the strong instability of the motions around the CLPs. Probes usually need a frequent orbit control, but the accuracy of the orbit determination of the CLP probes from a short arc between two maneuvers is usually unsatisfied. In this contribution, another kind of special probe other than the CLP probe is considered. It lies on a DRO (distant retrograde orbit) around the Moon. The DROs usually have much better stability property than the CLP orbits, so DRO probes don’t need a frequent orbit control. At the same time, our studies show that the OD accuracy is comparable to that of the CLP probe. The work is firstly done in the CRTBP (circular restricted three-body problem) model, by studying the OD results of different amplitude (both in plane and out of plane) for the DROs. Then, the study is generated to the real force model of the Earth-Moon system.

  8. Using 21 cm absorption surveys to measure the average H I spin temperature in distant galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, J. R.; Zwaan, M. A.; Duchesne, S. W.; Curran, S. J.

    2016-10-01

    We present a statistical method for measuring the average H I spin temperature in distant galaxies using the expected detection yields from future wide-field 21 cm absorption surveys. As a demonstrative case study, we consider an all-southern-sky simulated survey of 2-h per pointing with the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder for intervening H I absorbers at intermediate cosmological redshifts between z = 0.4 and 1. For example, if such a survey yielded 1000 absorbers, we would infer a harmonic-mean spin temperature of overline{T}_spin ˜ 100 K for the population of damped Lyman α absorbers (DLAs) at these redshifts, indicating that more than 50 per cent of the neutral gas in these systems is in a cold neutral medium (CNM). Conversely, a lower yield of only 100 detections would imply overline{T}_spin ˜ 1000 K and a CNM fraction less than 10 per cent. We propose that this method can be used to provide independent verification of the spin temperature evolution reported in recent 21 cm surveys of known DLAs at high redshift and for measuring the spin temperature at intermediate redshifts below z ≈ 1.7, where the Lyman α line is inaccessible using ground-based observatories. Increasingly more sensitive and larger surveys with the Square Kilometre Array should provide stronger statistical constraints on the average spin temperature. However, these will ultimately be limited by the accuracy to which we can determine the H I column density frequency distribution, the covering factor and the redshift distribution of the background radio source population.

  9. Distant drivers or local signals: where do mercury trends in western Arctic belugas originate?

    PubMed

    Loseto, L L; Stern, G A; Macdonald, R W

    2015-03-15

    Temporal trends of contaminants are monitored in Arctic higher trophic level species to inform us on the fate, transport and risk of contaminants as well as advise on global emissions. However, monitoring mercury (Hg) trends in species such as belugas challenge us, as their tissue concentrations reflect complex interactions among Hg deposition and methylation, whale physiology, dietary exposure and foraging patterns. The Beaufort Sea beluga population showed significant increases in Hg during the 1990 s; since that time an additional 10 years of data have been collected. During this time of data collection, changes in the Arctic have affected many processes that underlie the Hg cycle. Here, we examine Hg in beluga tissues and investigate factors that could contribute to the observed trends after removing the effect of age and size on Hg concentrations and dietary factors. Finally, we examine available indicators of climate variability (Arctic Oscillation (AO), the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and sea-ice minimum (SIM) concentration) to evaluate their potential to explain beluga Hg trends. Results reveal a decline in Hg concentrations from 2002 to 2012 in the liver of older whales and the muscle of large whales. The temporal increases in Hg in the 1990 s followed by recent declines do not follow trends in Hg emission, and are not easily explained by diet markers highlighting the complexity of feeding, food web dynamics and Hg uptake. Among the regional-scale climate variables the PDO exhibited the most significant relationship with beluga Hg at an eight year lag time. This distant signal points us to consider beluga winter feeding areas. Given that changes in climate will impact ecosystems; it is plausible that these climate variables are important in explaining beluga Hg trends. Such relationships require further investigation of the multiple connections between climate variables and beluga Hg.

  10. Distant drivers or local signals: where do mercury trends in western Arctic belugas originate?

    PubMed

    Loseto, L L; Stern, G A; Macdonald, R W

    2015-03-15

    Temporal trends of contaminants are monitored in Arctic higher trophic level species to inform us on the fate, transport and risk of contaminants as well as advise on global emissions. However, monitoring mercury (Hg) trends in species such as belugas challenge us, as their tissue concentrations reflect complex interactions among Hg deposition and methylation, whale physiology, dietary exposure and foraging patterns. The Beaufort Sea beluga population showed significant increases in Hg during the 1990 s; since that time an additional 10 years of data have been collected. During this time of data collection, changes in the Arctic have affected many processes that underlie the Hg cycle. Here, we examine Hg in beluga tissues and investigate factors that could contribute to the observed trends after removing the effect of age and size on Hg concentrations and dietary factors. Finally, we examine available indicators of climate variability (Arctic Oscillation (AO), the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO) and sea-ice minimum (SIM) concentration) to evaluate their potential to explain beluga Hg trends. Results reveal a decline in Hg concentrations from 2002 to 2012 in the liver of older whales and the muscle of large whales. The temporal increases in Hg in the 1990 s followed by recent declines do not follow trends in Hg emission, and are not easily explained by diet markers highlighting the complexity of feeding, food web dynamics and Hg uptake. Among the regional-scale climate variables the PDO exhibited the most significant relationship with beluga Hg at an eight year lag time. This distant signal points us to consider beluga winter feeding areas. Given that changes in climate will impact ecosystems; it is plausible that these climate variables are important in explaining beluga Hg trends. Such relationships require further investigation of the multiple connections between climate variables and beluga Hg. PMID:25442642

  11. Comet Halley passes the halfway mark. Very distant image obtained with the ESO NTT.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-02-01

    Eight years after the passage of Comet Halley in early 1986, astronomers at the European Southern Observatory have succeeded in obtaining an image [1] of this famous object at a distance of no less than 2,820 million km from the Sun. The comet is now about as far away as giant planet Uranus. It recently passed the halfway mark towards the most distant point of its very elongated 76-year orbit. The image shows the 6 x 15 km avocado-shaped nucleus as an extremely faint point of light without any surrounding dust cloud. It appears that the surface is now completely frozen and the comet has ceased to emit dust and gas. This observation was made with the ESO 3.58 metre New Technology Telescope (NTT). It is by far the faintest and most distant image ever recorded of this comet. A DIFFICULT OBSERVATION The new Halley image was obtained in the course of an observational programme by a small group of astronomers [2], aimed at the investigation of distant solar system objects. The observation was difficult to perform and is close to the limit of what is possible, even with the NTT, one of the technologically most advanced astronomical telescopes. In fact, this observation may be compared to viewing a black golfball, used during a late evening game, from a distance of 12,000 km. At Halley's present, very large distance from the Sun, the intensity of the solar light is over 350 times fainter than here on Earth. The surface of the cometary nucleus is very dark; it reflects only 4 % of the infalling sunlight. The amount of light received from Halley is therefore extremely small: the recorded star-like image of the nucleus is about 160 million times fainter than the faintest star that can be seen with the unaided eye. A long exposure was needed to catch enough light to show the object; even with the very sensitive SuSI CCD camera at the NTT, the shutter had to be kept open for a total of 3 hours 45 minutes. During this time, of the order of 9000 photons from Comet Halley were

  12. Renal branching morphogenesis: morphogenetic and signaling mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Blake, Joshua; Rosenblum, Norman D

    2014-12-01

    The human kidney is composed of an arborized network of collecting ducts, calyces and urinary pelvis that facilitate urine excretion and regulate urine composition. The renal collecting system is formed in utero, completed by the 34th week of gestation in humans, and dictates final nephron complement. The renal collecting system arises from the ureteric bud, a derivative of the intermediate-mesoderm derived nephric duct that responds to inductive signals from adjacent tissues via a process termed ureteric induction. The ureteric bud subsequently undergoes a series of iterative branching and remodeling events in a process called renal branching morphogenesis. Altered signaling that disrupts patterning of the nephric duct, ureteric induction, or renal branching morphogenesis leads to varied malformations of the renal collecting system collectively known as congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (CAKUT) and is the most frequently detected congenital renal aberration in infants. Here, we describe critical morphogenetic and cellular events that govern nephric duct specification, ureteric bud induction, renal branching morphogenesis, and cessation of renal branching morphogenesis. We also highlight salient molecular signaling pathways that govern these processes, and the investigative techniques used to interrogate them. PMID:25080023

  13. Technical activities of the configuration aeroelasticity branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Stanley R. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    A number of recent technical activities of the Configuration Aeroelasticity Branch of the NASA Langley Research Center are discussed in detail. The information on the research branch is compiled in twelve separate papers. The first of these topics is a summary of the purpose of the branch, including a full description of the branch and its associated projects and program efforts. The next ten papers cover specific projects and are as follows: Experimental transonic flutter characteristics of supersonic cruise configurations; Aeroelastic effects of spoiler surfaces mounted on a low aspect ratio rectangular wing; Planform curvature effects on flutter of 56 degree swept wing determined in Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT); An introduction to rotorcraft testing in TDT; Rotorcraft vibration reduction research at the TDT; A preliminary study to determine the effects of tip geometry on the flutter of aft swept wings; Aeroelastic models program; NACA 0012 pressure model and test plan; Investigation of the use of extension twist coupling in composite rotor blades; and Improved finite element methods for rotorcraft structures. The final paper describes the primary facility operation by the branch, the Langley TDT.

  14. Europe's space telescope ISO finds water in distant places

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1997-04-01

    really is, in the words of an English poet, "Water, water everywhere". A Spanish astronomer, Jose Cernicharo of the Instituto de Estructura de la Materia in Madrid, has played a prominent part in this work. He is delighted by the results. "For the first time, we have a clear impression of the abundance of water in the Galaxy," Cernicharo says. "In relatively dense clouds as many as ten per cent of all oxygen atoms are incorporated into molecules of water vapour. Even more may be in the form of water ice. Water vapour is, after molecular hydrogen and carbon monoxide, one of the most important molecules in space. It plays an important role in the dynamical evolution of the gas inside the molecular clouds of our Galaxy, and hence in the formation of new stars." The water supply of the outer planets The water vapour in Saturn, Uranus and Neptune showed up in analyses of very accurate observations made with ISO's Short Wavelength Spectrometer during October and November 1996. A report to the world's astronomical community tells of a particularly clear water signature from Uranus, in distinctive infrared emissions at eight wavelengths between 28.43 and 44.19 microns. A preliminary analysis indicated that the water vapour exists in the giant planet's outer atmosphere, at a temperature around 0 degrees C. ISO detected six of the same water "lines" in the infrared spectrum of distant Neptune, and three in Saturn, which is closer than Uranus. The puzzle for planetary astronomers is now to figure out where the water comes from. These giant planets are a long way from the Sun. Uranus, for example, is twenty times farther out than the Earth is, and sunlight is feebler by a factor of 400. The planets have their own internal sources of heat, and they are thought to contain plenty of water incorporated when the planets formed. But it would be difficult for water vapour to escape into the outer atmosphere. On the other hand, water in the form of ice is a major constituent of comets

  15. Saturation point structure of marine stratocumulus clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boers, Reinout; Betts, Alan K.

    1988-01-01

    An investigation of the microstructure of a Pacific stratocumulus capped boundary layer is presented. A complex structure of three branches, identified using conserved variable diagrams, is found to correspond well to a conceptual model for the unstable, radiatively cooled cloud topped boundary layer. A simple conditional sampling method was used to identify saturation point pairs for ascending and descending branches of the internal boundary layer circulation. Results indicate a primary circulation scale of 5 km and provide a reasonable cloud top entrainment rate of 1 cm/s.

  16. Improved robust point matching with label consistency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhagalia, Roshni; Miller, James V.; Roy, Arunabha

    2010-03-01

    Robust point matching (RPM) jointly estimates correspondences and non-rigid warps between unstructured point-clouds. RPM does not, however, utilize information of the topological structure or group memberships of the data it is matching. In numerous medical imaging applications, each extracted point can be assigned group membership attributes or labels based on segmentation, partitioning, or clustering operations. For example, points on the cortical surface of the brain can be grouped according to the four lobes. Estimated warps should enforce the topological structure of such point-sets, e.g. points belonging to the temporal lobe in the two point-sets should be mapped onto each other. We extend the RPM objective function to incorporate group membership labels by including a Label Entropy (LE) term. LE discourages mappings that transform points within a single group in one point-set onto points from multiple distinct groups in the other point-set. The resulting Labeled Point Matching (LPM) algorithm requires a very simple modification to the standard RPM update rules. We demonstrate the performance of LPM on coronary trees extracted from cardiac CT images. We partitioned the point sets into coronary sections without a priori anatomical context, yielding potentially disparate labelings (e.g. [1,2,3] --> [a,b,c,d]). LPM simultaneously estimated label correspondences, point correspondences, and a non-linear warp. Non-matching branches were treated wholly through the standard RPM outlier process akin to non-matching points. Results show LPM produces warps that are more physically meaningful than RPM alone. In particular, LPM mitigates unrealistic branch crossings and results in more robust non-rigid warp estimates.

  17. Geometry optimization of branchings in vascular networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khamassi, Jamel; Bierwisch, Claas; Pelz, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Progress has been made in developing manufacturing technologies which enable the fabrication of artificial vascular networks for tissue cultivation. However, those networks are rudimentary designed with respect to their geometry. This restricts long-term biological functionality of vascular cells which depends on geometry-related fluid mechanical stimuli and the avoidance of vessel occlusion. In the present work, a bioinspired geometry optimization for branchings in artificial vascular networks has been conducted. The analysis could be simplified by exploiting self-similarity properties of the system. Design rules in the form of two geometrical parameters, i.e., the branching angle and the radius ratio of the daughter branches, are derived using the wall shear stress as command variable. The numerical values of these parameters are within the range of experimental observations. Those design rules are not only beneficial for tissue engineering applications. Moreover, they can be used as indicators for diagnoses of vascular diseases or for the layout of vascular grafts.

  18. Heterogeneity of coronary arterial branching geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Shu-Yen; Reyes, Denise A.; Higgins, William E.; Ritman, Erik L.

    2000-04-01

    Past measurements of arterial branching geometry have indicated that the branching geometry is somewhat consistent with an optimal trade-off between the work needed to build and maintain the arterial tree and the work needed to operate the tree as a transport system. The branching geometry is also consistent with the mechanism that acutely adjusts the lumen diameter by way of maintaining a constant shear stress by dilating (or constricting) the arteries via the nitric oxide mechanism. However, those observations also indicate that there is considerable variation about the predicted optimization, both within any one individual and between individuals. Possible causes for this variation include: (1) measurement noise -- both due to the imprecision of the method but also the preparation of the specimen for applying the measurement technique, (2) the fact that the measurement task presents a major logistic problem, which increases as the vessel size decreases (but the number of branches correspondingly doubles at each branching) and results in progressive under-sampling as the vessel size decreases, (3) because of the logistic task involved the number of arterial trees analyzed is also greatly limited, and (4) there may indeed be actual heterogeneity in the geometry which is due to slight variation in implementation of the 'rules' used to construct a vascular tree. Indeed, it is this latter possibility that is of considerable physiological interest as it could result in the observed heterogeneity of organ perfusion and also provide some insight into the relative importance of 'initial ' conditions (i.e., how the vascular tree initially develops during embryogenesis) and the adaptive mechanisms operative in the maturing individual. The use of micro-CT imaging to provide 3D images of the intact vascular tree within the intact organ overcomes or minimizes the logistic problems listed above. It is the purpose of this study to examine whether variability in the branching

  19. Distant World in Peril Discovered from La Silla

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-01-01

    Giant Exoplanet Orbits Giant Star Summary When, in a distant future, the Sun begins to expand and evolves into a "giant" star, the surface temperature on the Earth will rise dramatically and our home planet will eventually be incinerated by that central body. Fortunately for us, this dramatic event is several billion years away. However, that sad fate will befall another planet, just discovered in orbit about the giant star HD 47536, already within a few tens of millions of years. At a distance of nearly 400 light-years from us, it is the second-remotest planetary system discovered to date [1]. This is an interesting side-result of a major research project, now carried out by a European-Brazilian team of astronomers [2]. In the course of a three-year spectroscopic survey, they have observed about 80 giant stars in the southern sky with the advanced FEROS spectrograph on the 1.52-m telescope installed at the ESO La Silla Observatory (Chile). It is one of these stars that has just been found to host a giant planet. This is only the fourth such case known and with a diameter of about 33 million km (or 23.5 times that of our Sun), HD 47536 is by far the largest of those giant stars [1]. The distance of the planet from the star is still of the order of 300 million km (or twice the distance of the Earth from the Sun), a safe margin now, but this will not always be so. The orbital period is 712 days, i.e., somewhat less than two Earth years, and the planet's mass is 5 - 10 times that of Jupiter. The presence of exoplanets in orbit around giant stars, some of which will eventually perish into their central star (be "cannibalized"), provides a possible explanation of the anomalous abundance of certain chemical elements that is observed in the atmospheres of some stars, cf. ESO PR 10/01. This interesting discovery bodes well for coming observations of exoplanetary systems with new, more powerful instruments, like HARPS to be installed next year at the ESO 3.6-m telescope on

  20. Distant Supernova Remnant Imaged by Chandra's High Resolution Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-09-01

    The High Resolution Camera (HRC), one of the two X-ray cameras on NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, was placed into the focus for the first time on Monday, August 30. The first target was LMC X-1, a point-like source of X rays in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The Large Magellanic Cloud, a companion galaxy to the Milky Way, is 160,000 light years from Earth. After checking the focus with LMC X-1, Chandra observed N132D, a remnant of an exploded star in the Large Magellanic Cloud. "These were preliminary test observations," emphasized Dr. Stephen Murray, of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, principal investigator for the High Resolution Camera. "But we are very pleased with the results. All indications are that the HRC will produce X-ray images of unprecedented clarity." The N132D image shows a highly structured remnant, or shell, of 10-million-degree gas that is 80 light years across. Such a shell in the vicinity of the Sun would encompass more than fifty nearby stars. The amount of material in the N132D hot gas remnant is equal to that of 600 suns. The N132D supernova remnant appears to be colliding with a giant molecular cloud, which produces the brightening on the southern rim of the remnant. The molecular cloud, visible with a radio telescope, has the mass of 300,000 suns. The relatively weak x-radiation on the upper left shows that the shock wave is expanding into a less dense region on the edge of the molecular cloud. A number of small circular structures are visible in the central regions and a hint of a large circular loop can be seen in the upper part of the remnant. Whether the peculiar shape of the supernova remnant can be fully explained in terms of these effects, or whether they point to a peculiar cylindrically shaped explosion remains to be seen. -more- "The image is so rich in structure that it will take a while to sort out what is really going on," Murray said. "It could be multiple supernovas, or absorbing clouds in the vicinity of the

  1. Building Virtual Spaces for Children in the Digital Branch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DuBroy, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: A digital branch is just like a physical branch except that content is delivered digitally via the web. A digital branch has staff, a collection, a community, and a building. The purpose of this paper is to explore the concept of building individual spaces for different user groups, specifically children, within a digital branch.…

  2. [Learning to prevent dehydration in distant Mexican communities and markets].

    PubMed

    Alvarez Larrauri, S; Alvarez Larrauri, C; Jufresa Carreras, J

    1994-06-01

    Child mortality due to diarrheal diseases is high in Mexico. Official records reported 14,000 children died in 1990 of this cause. Yet, we do not know the real extent of the problem since unregistered child deaths in our countryside seem to be far more frequent than acknowledged by government information. Most of these deaths occur among poor peasants and indigenous people living far from medical services. There are more than 100,000 communities with less than 500 inhabitants. This population does not benefit from medical services due to several problems, such as accessibility and linguistic and cultural gaps. In order to promote Oral Rehydration Therapy (ORT) within these communities, the authors implemented an education strategy, aimed at this specific population, to enhance their learning of prevention of diarrhea and dehydration, and thereby to increase their use of ORT. While rendering account of research devised to prove the extensibility to larger scales of methods formerly tried at an experimental (pilot) level, this paper further discusses and reinforces the contribution of the insights of a critical sociology epistemological framework in planning and conducting sociological interventions in the field of health as well as in any other field. The basic assumption of this point of view is that to adopt rationalized solutions to their problems (e.g. the prevention of dehydration of their children by means of the ORT) people should have the opportunity to deliberate rationally about them in order to be able to justify or validate their actions regarding the course of events and the opinions and norms of their closest community.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8036530

  3. -delayed proton emission branches in 43Cr

    SciTech Connect

    Pomorski, M.; Miernik, K.; Dominik, W.; Janas, Z.; Pfutzner, M.; Bingham, C. R.; Czyrkowski, H.; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Darby, Iain; Dabrowski, Ryszard; Ginter, T. N.; Grzywacz, Robert Kazimierz; Karny, M.; Korgul, A.; Kusmierz, W.; Liddick, Sean; Rajabali, M. M.; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr; Stolz, A.

    2011-01-01

    The + decay of very neutron-deficient 43Cr was studied by means of an imaging time projection chamber that allowed recording tracks of charged particles. Events of -delayed emission of one, two, and three protons were clearly identified. The absolute branching ratios for these channels were determined to be (81 4)%, (7.1 0.4)%, and (0.08 0.03)%, respectively. 43Cr is thus established as the second case in which the -3p decay occurs. Although the feeding to the proton-bound states in 43V is expected to be negligible, the large branching ratio of (12 4)% for decays without proton emission is found.

  4. Nature of branching in disordered materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Amit S.

    The phenomenon of structural branching is ubiquitous in a wide array of materials such as polymers, ceramic aggregates, networks and gels. These materials with structural branching are a unique class of disordered materials and often display complex architectures. Branching has a strong influence over the structure-property relationships of these materials. Despite the generic importance across a wide spectrum of materials, our physical understanding of the scientific nature of branching and the analytic description and quantification of branching is at an early stage, though many decades of effort have been made. For polymers, branching is conventionally characterized by hydrodynamic radius (size exclusion chromatography, SEC, rheology) or by counting branch sites (nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, NMR). SEC and rheology are, at best, qualitative; and quantitative characterization techniques like NMR and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) (for ceramic nanoparticulate aggregates) have limitations in providing routine quantification. Effective structure characterization, though an important step in understanding these materials, remains elusive. For ceramic aggregates, theoretical work has dominated and only a few publications on analytic studies exist to support theory. A new generic scaling model is proposed in Chapter I, which encompasses the critical structural features associated with these complex architectures. The central theme of this work is the application of this model to describe a variety of disordered structures like aggregated nano-particulates, long chain branched polymers like polyethylene, hyperbranched polymers, multi-arm star polymers, and cyclic macromolecules. The application of the proposed model to these materials results in a number of fundamental structural parameters, like the mass-fractal dimension, df, the minimum path dimension, dmin, connectivity dimension, c, and the mole fraction branch content, φbr. These dimensions

  5. 33 CFR 334.290 - Elizabeth River, Southern Branch, Va., naval restricted areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., Va., naval restricted areas. 334.290 Section 334.290 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF....290 Elizabeth River, Southern Branch, Va., naval restricted areas. (a) The areas—(1) St. Helena Annex Area. Beginning at a point at St. Helena Annex of the Norfolk Naval Shipyard, on the eastern shore...

  6. 24 CFR 3280.804 - Disconnecting means and branch-circuit protective equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... fused distribution panelboard is used, the maximum fuse size of the mains must be plainly marked with lettering at least 1/4-inch high and that is visible when fuses are changed. (See Article 110.22 of NFPA 70..., feeder, or branch circuit at the point where it originated and the type marking needed.) (b) Plug...

  7. Oncologic outcomes following metastasectomy in colorectal cancer patients developing distant metastases after initial treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do Yoon; Suh, Kwang Wook

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We performed a comparative analysis of the clinicopathologic features and oncologic outcomes of colorectal cancer patients with metachronous versus synchronous metastasis, according to the prognostic factors. Methods Ninety-three patients who underwent curative resection for distant metastatic colorectal cancer were included in the study between December 2001 and December 2011. We assessed recurrence-free survival and overall survival in patients with distant metastasis who underwent curative surgery. Results The most common site of distant metastasis was lung alone (n = 19, 51.4%) in patients with metachronous metastasis, while liver alone was most common in those with synchronous metastasis (n = 40, 71.4%). Overall survival rate was significantly different between patients with synchronous metastasis and metachronous metastasis (34.0% vs. 53.7%; P = 0.013). Incomplete resection of the metastatic lesion was significantly related to poor overall survival in both, patients with synchronous metastasis, and metachronous metastasis. Conclusion Our study indicates that patients developing distant metastasis after initial treatment show a different metastatic pattern and better oncologic outcomes, as compared to those presenting with distant metastasis. Resection with tumor free margins significantly improves survival in patients with metachronous as well as synchronous metastasis. PMID:25960988

  8. WHO PULLED THE TRIGGER: A SUPERNOVA OR AN ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STAR?

    SciTech Connect

    Boss, Alan P.; Keiser, Sandra A. E-mail: keiser@dtm.ciw.ed

    2010-07-01

    The short-lived radioisotope (SLRI) {sup 60}Fe requires production in a core collapse supernova or asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star immediately before its incorporation into the earliest solar system solids. Shock waves from a somewhat distant supernova, or a relatively nearby AGB star, have the right speeds to simultaneously trigger the collapse of a dense molecular cloud core and to inject shock wave material into the resulting protostar. A new set of FLASH2.5 adaptive mesh refinement hydrodynamic models shows that the injection efficiency depends sensitively on the assumed shock thickness and density. Supernova shock waves appear to be thin enough to inject the amount of shock wave material necessary to match the SLRI abundances measured for primitive meteorites. Planetary nebula shock waves from AGB stars, however, appear to be too thick to achieve the required injection efficiencies. These models imply that a supernova pulled the trigger that led to the formation of our solar system.

  9. Controlled synthesis of hyper-branched inorganic nanocrystals withrich three-dimensional structures

    SciTech Connect

    Kanaras, Antonios G.; Sonnichsen, Carsten; Liu, Haitao; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2005-07-27

    Studies of crystal growth kinetics are tightly integrated with advances in the creation of new nanoscale inorganic building blocks and their functional assemblies 1-11. Recent examples include the development of semiconductor nanorods which have potential uses in solar cells 12-17, and the discovery of a light driven process to create noble metal particles with sharp corners that can be used in plasmonics 18,19. In the course of studying basic crystal growth kinetics we developed a process for preparing branched semiconductor nanocrystals such as tetrapods and inorganic dendrimers of precisely controlled generation 20,21. Here we report the discovery of a crystal growth kinetics regime in which a new class of hyper-branched nanocrystals are formed. The shapes range from 'thorny balls', to tree-like ramified structures, to delicate 'spider net'-like particles. These intricate shapes depend crucially on a delicate balance of branching and extension. The multitudes of resulting shapes recall the diverse shapes of snowflakes 22.The three dimensional nature of the branch points here, however, lead to even more complex arrangements than the two dimensionally branched structures observed in ice. These hyper-branched particles not only extend the available three-dimensional shapes in nanoparticle synthesis ,but also provide a tool to study growth kinetics by carefully observing and modeling particle morphology.

  10. Function Point Analysis Depot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muniz, R.; Martinez, El; Szafran, J.; Dalton, A.

    2011-01-01

    The Function Point Analysis (FPA) Depot is a web application originally designed by one of the NE-C3 branch's engineers, Jamie Szafran, and created specifically for the Software Development team of the Launch Control Systems (LCS) project. The application consists of evaluating the work of each developer to be able to get a real estimate of the hours that is going to be assigned to a specific task of development. The Architect Team had made design change requests for the depot to change the schema of the application's information; that information, changed in the database, needed to be changed in the graphical user interface (GUI) (written in Ruby on Rails (RoR and the web service/server side in Java to match the database changes. These changes were made by two interns from NE-C, Ricardo Muniz from NE-C3, who made all the schema changes for the GUI in RoR and Edwin Martinez, from NE-C2, who made all the changes in the Java side.

  11. Synergistic amylomaltase and branching enzyme catalysis to suppress cassava starch digestibility.

    PubMed

    Sorndech, Waraporn; Meier, Sebastian; Jansson, Anita M; Sagnelli, Domenico; Hindsgaul, Ole; Tongta, Sunanta; Blennow, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    Starch provides our main dietary caloric intake and over-consumption of starch-containing foods results in escalating life-style disease including diabetes. By increasing the content of α-1,6 branch points in starch, digestibility by human amylolytic enzymes is expected to be retarded. Aiming at generating a soluble and slowly digestible starch by increasing the content and changing the relative positioning of the branch points in the starch molecules, we treated cassava starch with amylomaltase (AM) and branching enzyme (BE). We performed a detailed molecular analysis of the products including amylopectin chain length distribution, content of α-1,6 glucosidic linkages, absolute molecular weight distribution and digestibility. Step-by-step enzyme catalysis was the most efficient treatment, and it generated branch structures even more extreme than those of glycogen. All AM- and BE-treated samples showed increased resistance to degradation by porcine pancreatic α-amylase and glucoamylase as compared to cassava starch. The amylolytic products showed chain lengths and branching patterns similar to the products obtained from glycogen. Our data demonstrate that combinatorial enzyme catalysis provides a strategy to generate potential novel soluble α-glucan ingredients with low dietary digestibility assets.

  12. ASSEMBLY AND CHARACTERIZATION OF 8-ARM AND 12-ARM DNA BRANCHED JUNCTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xing

    2012-01-01

    Branched DNA molecules can be assembled into objects and networks directed by sticky-ended cohesion. The connectivity of these species is limited by the number of arms flanking the branch point. To date, the only branched junctions constructed contain six or fewer arms. We report the construction of DNA branched junctions that contain either 8 or 12 double helical arms surrounding a branch point. The design of the 8-arm junction expoits the limits of a previous approach to thwart branch migration, but the design of the 12-arm junction uses a new to principle achieve this end. The 8-arm junction is stable with 16 nucleotide pairs per arm, but the 12-arm junction has been stabilized by 24 nucleotide pairs per arm. Ferguson analysis of these junctions in combination with three, four, five, and six-arm junctions indicates a linear increase in friction constant as the number of arms increases; the four-arm junction migrates anomalously at 4°C., suggesting stacking of its domains. All strands in both the 8-arm and 12-arm junctions show similar responses to hydroxyl radical autofootprinting analysis, indicating that they lack any dominant stacking structures. The stability of the 12-arm junction demonstrates that the number of arms in a junction is not limited to the case of having adjacent identical base pairs flanking the junction. The ability to construct eight-arm and twelve-arm junctions increases the number of objects, graphs and networks that can be built from branched DNA components. In principle, the stick structure corresponding to cubic close packing is now a possible target for assembly by DNA nanotechnology. PMID:17564446

  13. A method of real-time detection for distant moving obstacles by monocular vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Bao-zhi; Zhu, Ming

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we propose an approach for detection of distant moving obstacles like cars and bicycles by a monocular camera to cooperate with ultrasonic sensors in low-cost condition. We are aiming at detecting distant obstacles that move toward our autonomous navigation car in order to give alarm and keep away from them. Method of frame differencing is applied to find obstacles after compensation of camera's ego-motion. Meanwhile, each obstacle is separated from others in an independent area and given a confidence level to indicate whether it is coming closer. The results on an open dataset and our own autonomous navigation car have proved that the method is effective for detection of distant moving obstacles in real-time.

  14. ORD’s Urban Watershed Management Branch

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a poster for the Edison Science Day, tentatively scheduled for June 10, 2009. This poster presentation summarizes key elements of the EPA Office of Research and Development’s (ORD) Urban Watershed Management Branch (UWMB). An overview of the national problems posed by w...

  15. Branched modular primers in DNA sequencing

    SciTech Connect

    Mugasimangalam, R.C.; Shmulevitz, M. |; Ramanathan, V.

    1997-08-01

    The need to synthesize new sequencing primers, such as in primer walking, can be eliminated by assembling modular primers from oligonucleotide modules selected from presynthesized libraries. Our earlier modular primers consisted of 5-mers, 6-mers or 7-mers, annealing to the template contiguously with each other. Here we introduce a novel {open_quotes}branched{close_quotes} type of modular primer with a distinctly different specificity mechanism. The concept of a {open_quotes}branched{close_quotes} primer involves modules that are physically linked by annealing to each other as well as to the target, forming a branched structure of the 3-way junction type. While contiguous modular primers are made specific by the preference of the polymerase for longer primer, branched primers, in contrast, owe their specificity to cooperative annealing of their modules to the intended site on the template. This cooperativity of annealing to the template is provided by mutually complementary segments in the two modules that bind each other. Thus the primer-template complex is no longer limited to linear sequences, but acquires another, second dimension giving the modular primer new functionality.

  16. Branching instability in expanding bacterial colonies

    PubMed Central

    Giverso, Chiara; Verani, Marco; Ciarletta, Pasquale

    2015-01-01

    Self-organization in developing living organisms relies on the capability of cells to duplicate and perform a collective motion inside the surrounding environment. Chemical and mechanical interactions coordinate such a cooperative behaviour, driving the dynamical evolution of the macroscopic system. In this work, we perform an analytical and computational analysis to study pattern formation during the spreading of an initially circular bacterial colony on a Petri dish. The continuous mathematical model addresses the growth and the chemotactic migration of the living monolayer, together with the diffusion and consumption of nutrients in the agar. The governing equations contain four dimensionless parameters, accounting for the interplay among the chemotactic response, the bacteria–substrate interaction and the experimental geometry. The spreading colony is found to be always linearly unstable to perturbations of the interface, whereas branching instability arises in finite-element numerical simulations. The typical length scales of such fingers, which align in the radial direction and later undergo further branching, are controlled by the size parameters of the problem, whereas the emergence of branching is favoured if the diffusion is dominant on the chemotaxis. The model is able to predict the experimental morphologies, confirming that compact (resp. branched) patterns arise for fast (resp. slow) expanding colonies. Such results, while providing new insights into pattern selection in bacterial colonies, may finally have important applications for designing controlled patterns. PMID:25652464

  17. Re-Envisioning New York's Branch Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giles, David; Estima, Jeanette; Francois, Noelle

    2014-01-01

    Nearly two years ago, the Center for an Urban Future published "Branches of Opportunity," a report documenting that New York City's public libraries have become more vital than ever, and are serving more New Yorkers in more ways than ever before. This new report provides an exhaustive analysis of the libraries' capital needs and offers a…

  18. 76 FR 60757 - Executive Branch Qualified Trusts

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-30

    ... qualified trusts provisions for the executive branch in subparts D and E of 5 CFR part 2634 (see 57 FR 11800.... 12674, 54 FR 15159, 3 CFR, 1989 Comp., p. 215, as modified by E.O. 12731, 55 FR 42547, 3 CFR, 1990 Comp... the use of a qualified blind trust is the lack of knowledge, or actual ``blindness,'' by an...

  19. Academic Branch Libraries: Assessment and Collection Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poole, Julie

    2009-01-01

    An ongoing project at Mercer University's Regional Academic Center Libraries illustrates how utilizing established assessment guidelines, stakeholder input, and a clear understanding of audience and curriculum needs may all be used to optimize a collection. Academic branch libraries often have clear collection development limitations in terms of…

  20. Characterization of branch complexity by fractal analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alados, C.L.; Escos, J.; Emlen, J.M.; Freeman, D.C.

    1999-01-01

    The comparison between complexity in the sense of space occupancy (box-counting fractal dimension D(c) and information dimension D1) and heterogeneity in the sense of space distribution (average evenness index f and evenness variation coefficient J(cv)) were investigated in mathematical fractal objects and natural branch structures. In general, increased fractal dimension was paired with low heterogeneity. Comparisons between branch architecture in Anthyllis cytisoides under different slope exposure and grazing impact revealed that branches were more complex and more homogeneously distributed for plants on northern exposures than southern, while grazing had no impact during a wet year. Developmental instability was also investigated by the statistical noise of the allometric relation between internode length and node order. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that fractal dimension of branch structure can be used to analyze the structural organization of plants, especially if we consider not only fractal dimension but also shoot distribution within the canopy (lacunarity). These indexes together with developmental instability analyses are good indicators of growth responses to the environment.

  1. Tribology and Mechanical Components Branch Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert F.

    2010-01-01

    An overview of NASA Glenn Research Center's Tribology & Mechanical Components Branch is provided. Work in space mechanisms, seals, oil-free turbomachinery, and mechanical components is presented. An overview of current research for these technology areas is contained in this overview.

  2. Characterization of deoxyribozymes that synthesize branched RNA.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yangming; Silverman, Scott K

    2003-12-30

    We recently reported deoxyribozymes (DNA enzymes) that synthesize 2',5'-branched RNA. The in vitro-selected 9F7 and 9F21 deoxyribozymes mediate reaction of a branch-site adenosine 2'-hydroxyl on one RNA substrate with the 5'-triphosphate of another RNA substrate. Here we characterize these DNA enzymes with respect to their branch-forming activity. Both 9F7 and 9F21 are much more active with Mn(2+) than with Mg(2+). The K(d,app)(Mg(2+)) > 400 mM but K(d,app)(Mn(2+)) approximately 20-50 mM, and the ligation rates k(obs) are orders of magnitude faster with Mn(2+) than with Mg(2+) (e.g., 9F7 approximately 0.3 min(-1) with 20 mM Mn(2+) versus 0.4 h(-1) with 100 mM Mg(2+), both at pH 7.5 and 37 degrees C). Of the other tested transition metal ions Zn(2+), Ni(2+), Co(2+), and Cd(2+), only Co(2+) supports a trace amount of activity. 9F7 is more tolerant than 9F21 of varying the RNA substrate sequences. For the RNA substrate that donates the adenosine 2'-hydroxyl, 9F7 requires YUA, where Y = pyrimidine and A is the branch site. The 3'-tail emerging from the branch-site A may have indefinite length, but it must be at least one nucleotide long for high activity. The 5'-triphosphate RNA substrate requires several additional nucleotides with varying sequence requirements (5'-pppGRMWR). Outside of these regions that flank the ligation site, 9F7 and 9F21 tolerate any RNA substrate sequences via Watson-Crick covariation of the DNA binding arms that interact directly with the substrates. 9F7 provides a high yield of 2',5'-branched RNA on the preparative nanomole scale. The ligation reaction is effectively irreversible; the pyrophosphate leaving group in the ligation reaction does not induce 2',5'-cleavage, and pyrophosphate does not significantly inhibit ligation except in 1000-fold excess. Deleting a specific nucleotide in one of the DNA binding arms near the ligation junction enhances ligation activity, suggesting an interesting structure near this region of the deoxyribozyme

  3. The AFCRL Lunar amd Planetary Research Branch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Stephan D.

    2011-07-01

    The Lunar and Planetary research program led by Dr John (Jack) Salisbury in the 1960s at the United States Air Force Cambridge Research Laboratories (AFCRL) investigated the surface characteristics of Solar System bodies. The Branch was one of the first groups to measure the infrared spectra of likely surface materials in the laboratory under appropriate vacuum and temperature conditions. The spectral atlases created from the results were then compared to photometric and spectral measurements obtained from ground- and balloon-based telescopes to infer the mineral compositions and physical conditions of the regoliths of the Moon, Mars and asteroids. Starting from scratch, the Branch initially sponsored observations of other groups while its in-house facilities were being constructed. The earliest contracted efforts include the spatially-resolved mapping of the Moon in the first half of the 1960s by Richard W. Shorthill and John W. Saari of the Boeing Scientific Research Laboratories in Seattle. This effort ultimately produced isophotal and isothermal contour maps of the Moon during a lunation and time-resolved thermal images of the eclipsed Moon. The Branch also sponsored probe rocket-based experiments flown by Riccardo Giacconi and his group at American Science and Engineering Inc. that produced the first observations of X-ray stars in 1962 and later the first interferometric measurement of the ozone and C02 emission in the upper atmosphere. The Branch also made early use of balloon-based measurements. This was a singular set of experiments, as these observations are among the very few mid-infrared astronomical measurements obtained from a balloon platform. Notable results of the AFCRL balloon flights were the mid-infrared spectra of the spatially-resolved Moon obtained with the University of Denver mid-infrared spectrometer on the Branch's balloon-borne 61-cm telescope during a 1968 flight. These observations remain among the best available. Salisbury also funded

  4. Giant Gas Cloud Made of Atoms Formed in First Stars Revealed in Universe's Most Distant Quasar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-07-01

    Image of J1148+5251: Quasar is Red Dot Pointed Out by Arrow CREDIT: Sloan Digital Sky Survey At Apache Point Observatory (Click on Image for Larger Version) In addition, Walter also looks forward to studying other objects deeper into the era of reionization, both with the expanded VLA (EVLA) and with the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA), a joint North America-Europe project to be built in Chile. "With the EVLA and ALMA, we will be able to study the structures and dynamics of similar systems in great detail," Walter said. J1148+5251 was discovered by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, using a 2.5-meter optical telescope at Apache Point, NM, earlier this year. At a distance of more than 12.8 billion light-years, it is the most distant quasar yet found in the Universe. Followup observations at the W.M. Keck Observatory in Hawaii showed a clear signature of light absorption indicating that the object is seen at the end of the reionization era. This signature, found using a spectroscope to analyze light from the object, is known as the Gunn-Peterson Effect, after James Gunn and Bruce Peterson, who predicted it in 1965. The carbon monoxide gas was found using radio telescopes that detected radio waves emitted by the gas molecules. The wavelength of this radio emission was greatly increased by the Doppler Effect produced by the expansion of the Universe. For example, at the great distance of J1148+5251, waves that left the galaxy with a length of less than one millimeter were received by the VLA at a wavelength of more than six millimeters. In addition to Walter, Carilli and Lo, who used the VLA to observe J1148+5251, other team members led by Bertoldi and Cox used the Institute of Millimeter Radio Astronomy's (IRAM) Plateau de Bure radio interferometer in France. These included Roberto Neri of IRAM; Alain Omont of the Paris Institute of Astrophysics; and Karl Menten of Germany's Max Planck Instutute for Radioastronomy. Xiaohui Fan of the University of Arizona's Steward

  5. The Branching Bifurcation of Adaptive Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Della Rossa, Fabio; Dercole, Fabio; Landi, Pietro

    2015-06-01

    We unfold the bifurcation involving the loss of evolutionary stability of an equilibrium of the canonical equation of Adaptive Dynamics (AD). The equation deterministically describes the expected long-term evolution of inheritable traits — phenotypes or strategies — of coevolving populations, in the limit of rare and small mutations. In the vicinity of a stable equilibrium of the AD canonical equation, a mutant type can invade and coexist with the present — resident — types, whereas the fittest always win far from equilibrium. After coexistence, residents and mutants effectively diversify, according to the enlarged canonical equation, only if natural selection favors outer rather than intermediate traits — the equilibrium being evolutionarily unstable, rather than stable. Though the conditions for evolutionary branching — the joint effect of resident-mutant coexistence and evolutionary instability — have been known for long, the unfolding of the bifurcation has remained a missing tile of AD, the reason being related to the nonsmoothness of the mutant invasion fitness after branching. In this paper, we develop a methodology that allows the approximation of the invasion fitness after branching in terms of the expansion of the (smooth) fitness before branching. We then derive a canonical model for the branching bifurcation and perform its unfolding around the loss of evolutionary stability. We cast our analysis in the simplest (but classical) setting of asexual, unstructured populations living in an isolated, homogeneous, and constant abiotic environment; individual traits are one-dimensional; intra- as well as inter-specific ecological interactions are described in the vicinity of a stationary regime.

  6. Crack stability and branching at interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, Robb

    1995-11-01

    The various events that occur at a crack on an interface are explored, and described in terms of a simple graphical construction called the crack stability diagram. For simple Griffith cleavage in a homogeneous material, the stability diagram is a sector of a circle in the space of stress intensity factors, KI/KII. The Griffith circle is limited in both positive and negative KII directions by nonblunting dislocation emission on the cleavage plane. For a branching plane inclined at an angle to the original cleavage plane, both cleavage and emission (which blunts the crack) can be described as a balance between an elastic driving force and a lattice resistance for the event. We use an analytic expression obtained by Cotterell and Rice for cleavage, and show that it is an excellent approximation, but show that the lattice resistance includes a cornering resistance, in addition to the standard surface energy in the final cleavage criterion. Our discussion of the lattaice resistance is derived from simulations in two-dimensional hexagonal lattices with UBER force laws with a variety of shapes. Both branching cleavage and blunting emission can be described in terms of a stability diagram in the space of the remote stress intensity factors, and the competition between events on the initial cleavage plane and those on the branching plane can be described by overlays of the two appropriate stability diagrams. The popular criterion that kII=0 on the branching plane is explored for lattices and found to fail significantly, because the lattice stabilizes cleavage by the anisotropy of the surface energy. Also, in the lattice, dislocation emission must must always be considered as an alternative competing event to branching.

  7. Distant (200-238 earth radii) magnetotail lobe characteristics during quiet solar wind conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsurutani, Bruce T.; Burton, Marcia E.; Smith, Edward J.; Jones, Douglas E.; Lepping, Ronald P.

    1987-01-01

    Simultaneous ISEE-3 magnetic field and IMP-8 magnetic field and plasma data have been used to investigate the distant tail lobe average properties under quiet solar wind conditions. Under solar wind pressures of not greater than 5 x 10 to the -10th dynes/sq cm, an average tail lobe strength of 7.1 + or - 1.2 nT, and an average plasma beta of 0.3, are found. Results suggest that under quiet solar wind conditions the distant tail lobes are relatively free from plasma and are usually dominated by the magnetic field pressure.

  8. Insertion and Deletion Mismatches Distant from the Target Position Improve Gene Correction with a Tailed Duplex.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Hiroyuki; Nishigaki, Natsuki; Ikeda, Akihiro; Yukawa, Seiya; Morita, Yukiko; Nakatsu, Yoshimichi; Tsuzuki, Teruhisa; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2016-07-01

    A 5'-tailed duplex (TD) DNA corrects a base-substitution mutation. In this study, the effects of insertion and deletion (indel) mismatches distant from the target position on the gene correction were examined. Three target plasmid DNAs with and without indel mismatches ∼330 bases distant from the correction target position were prepared, and introduced into HeLa cells together with the TD. The indel mismatches improved the gene correction efficiency and specificity without sequence conversions at the indel mismatch site. These results suggested that the gene correction efficiency and specificity are increased when an appropriate second mismatch is introduced into the TD fragment. PMID:27253876

  9. Using gravitational lensing to study the X-ray spectrum of distant QSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadina, Mauro

    2014-11-01

    The unique imaging capabilities of Chandra have been successfully used to perform microlensing studies of distant QSOs. The main aim was to infer the dimensions of their X-ray emitting regions. Using data from the Chandra archive, we built-up an XMM-Newton program devoted to using the magnification due to gravitational lenses to characterize in detail the broad band spectra and variability of distant AGN. Here we present preliminary results of the XMM-Newton observation of QSO B1422+231 at z=3.62.

  10. Secondary photons and neutrinos from cosmic rays produced by distant blazars.

    PubMed

    Essey, Warren; Kalashev, Oleg E; Kusenko, Alexander; Beacom, John F

    2010-04-01

    Secondary photons and neutrinos produced in the interactions of cosmic ray protons emitted by distant active galactic nuclei (AGN) with the photon background along the line of sight can reveal a wealth of new information about the intergalactic magnetic fields, extragalactic background light, and the acceleration mechanisms of cosmic rays. The secondary photons may have already been observed by gamma-ray telescopes. We show that the secondary neutrinos improve the prospects of discovering distant blazars by IceCube, and we discuss the ramifications for the cosmic backgrounds, magnetic fields, and AGN models.

  11. Distant Metastases in Head-and-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yao Min; Lu Minggen; Savvides, Panayiotis S.; Rezaee, Rod; Zender, Chad A.; Lavertu, Pierre; Buatti, John M.; Machtay, Mitchell

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To determine the pattern and risk factors for distant metastases in head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) after curative treatment with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: This was a retrospective study of 284 HNSCC patients treated in a single institution with IMRT. Sites included were oropharynx (125), oral cavity (70), larynx (55), hypopharynx (17), and unknown primary (17). American Joint Committee on Cancer stage distribution includes I (3), II (19), III (42), and IV (203). There were 224 males and 60 females with a median age of 57. One hundred eighty-six patients were treated with definitive IMRT and 98 postoperative IMRT. One hundred forty-nine patients also received concurrent cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Results: The median follow-up for all patients was 22.8 months (range, 0.07-77.3 months) and 29.5 months (4.23-77.3 months) for living patients. The 3-year local recurrence-free survival, regional recurrence-free survival, locoregional recurrence-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, and overall survival were 94.6%, 96.4%, 92.5%, 84.1%, and 68.95%, respectively. There were 45 patients with distant metastasis. In multivariate analysis, distant metastasis was strongly associated with N stage (p = 0.046), T stage (p < 0.0001), and pretreatment maximum standardized uptake value of the lymph node (p = 0.006), but not associated with age, gender, disease sites, pretreatment standardized uptake value of the primary tumor, or locoregional control. The freedom from distant metastasis at 3 years was 98.1% for no factors, 88.6% for one factor, 68.3% for two factors, and 41.7% for three factors (p < 0.0001 by log-rank test). Conclusion: With advanced radiation techniques and concurrent chemotherapy, the failure pattern has changed with more patients failing distantly. The majority of patients with distant metastases had no local or regional failures, indicating that these patients might have microscopic distant

  12. Treatment of rabbit carotid aneurysms by hybrid stents (microporous thin polyurethane-covered stents): Preservation of side-branches

    PubMed Central

    Nishi, Shogo; Nakayama, Yasuhide; Ishibashi-Ueda, Hatsue; Yoshida, Masato; Yonetani, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Objective We sought to determine the patency of normal arterial branches from the covered segments of an artery after stenting. Background Most intracranial aneurysms occur at arterial branching points (bifurcations, side-branches, or perforators). The post-stenting patency of normal arterial branches from the covered segments of the artery is important. We have previously developed a hybrid stent with micropores to prevent early parent artery occlusion by more early endothelialization, and mid- to long-term parent artery stenosis by control of intimal hyperplasia after aneurysm occlusion. Methods We created aneurysms in 10 rabbits by distal ligation and intraluminal incubation of elastase within an endovascularly trapped proximal segment of the common carotid artery. All animals were treated with hybrid stents having micropores. Four animals were observed for one month and three each for three and 12 months. The patency of the side-branches of the subclavian artery was evaluated angiographically and in some cases, histologically. Results Aneurysms were completely occluded at all time points other than 12 months. The subclavian artery and brachiocephalic artery were patent, without significant stenosis. All the side-branches of the subclavian artery detected on the preoperative angiogram remained patent at the final assessment. Conclusion The use of hybrid stents for aneurysm repair and side-branch patency seems to be effective, as per the long-term results obtained in an animal model. PMID:23887877

  13. Hierarchical assembly of branched supramolecular polymers from (cyclic Peptide)-polymer conjugates.

    PubMed

    Koh, Ming Liang; Jolliffe, Katrina A; Perrier, Sébastien

    2014-11-10

    We report the synthesis and assembly of (N-methylated cyclic peptide)-polymer conjugates for which the cyclic peptide is attached to either the α- or both α- and ω- end groups of a polymer. A combination of chromatographic, spectroscopic, and scattering techniques reveals that the assembly of the conjugates follows a two-level hierarchy, initially driven by H-bond formation between two N-methylated cyclic peptides, followed by unspecific, noncovalent aggregation of this peptide into small domains that behave as branching points and lead to the formation of branched supramolecular polymers.

  14. Lanthanide cofactors accelerate DNA-catalyzed synthesis of branched RNA.

    PubMed

    Javadi-Zarnaghi, Fatemeh; Höbartner, Claudia

    2013-08-28

    Most deoxyribozymes (DNA catalysts) require metal ions as cofactors for catalytic activity, with Mg(2+), Mn(2+), and Zn(2+) being the most represented activators. Trivalent transition-metal ions have been less frequently considered. Rare earth ions offer attractive properties for studying metal ion binding by biochemical and spectroscopic methods. Here we report the effect of lanthanide cofactors, in particular terbium (Tb(3+)), for DNA-catalyzed synthesis of 2',5'-branched RNA. We found up to 10(4)-fold increased ligation rates for the 9F7 deoxribozyme using 100 μM Tb(3+) and 7 mM Mg(2+), compared to performing the reaction with 7 mM Mg(2+) alone. Combinatorial mutation interference analysis (CoMA) was used to identify nucleotides in the catalytic region of 9F7 that are essential for ligation activity with different metal ion combinations. A minimized version of the DNA enzyme sustained high levels of Tb(3+)-assisted activity. Sensitized luminescence of Tb(3+) bound to DNA in combination with DMS probing and DNase I footprinting results supported the CoMA data. The accelerating effect of Tb(3+) was confirmed for related RNA-ligating deoxyribozymes, pointing toward favorable activation of internal 2'-OH nucleophiles. The results of this study offer fundamental insights into nucleotide requirements for DNA-catalyzed RNA ligation and will be beneficial for practical applications that utilize 2',5'-branched RNA.

  15. Indexes system of technological condition assessment of economic branches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuvashova, M. N.; Avramchikova, N. T.; Antamoshkin, A. N.

    2015-10-01

    The increased level of innovative production process, connected with the current trends, points out the necessity of economic diversification of the whole national economy as well as regional economies in order to increase competitiveness and stable development. Russian regional economies are characterized with local directive of development and innovative processes have evident local vector. Intensive development of Siberian regional economies, which depends on oil and mining industries, considerably falls behind the world indicators according to the GRP output per head. To improve the quality of economic space the authors have suggested a new scientific approach, which allows qualitative assessment inside the economic space of resource-based regions, based on principles of high technological modes development inside economic branches taking into account density, regular enterprise distribution and connectivity of commercial organizations as well as secures innovative development of regional economy and its competitiveness. In this context it is necessary to develop a modern system of indexes, characterizing the structure of economic branches in accordance with present technological modes and at the same time the dynamics of appropriate structural shifts in regional economies of this type.

  16. Comet Halley passes the halfway mark. Very distant image obtained with the ESO NTT.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-02-01

    Eight years after the passage of Comet Halley in early 1986, astronomers at the European Southern Observatory have succeeded in obtaining an image [1] of this famous object at a distance of no less than 2,820 million km from the Sun. The comet is now about as far away as giant planet Uranus. It recently passed the halfway mark towards the most distant point of its very elongated 76-year orbit. The image shows the 6 x 15 km avocado-shaped nucleus as an extremely faint point of light without any surrounding dust cloud. It appears that the surface is now completely frozen and the comet has ceased to emit dust and gas. This observation was made with the ESO 3.58 metre New Technology Telescope (NTT). It is by far the faintest and most distant image ever recorded of this comet. A DIFFICULT OBSERVATION The new Halley image was obtained in the course of an observational programme by a small group of astronomers [2], aimed at the investigation of distant solar system objects. The observation was difficult to perform and is close to the limit of what is possible, even with the NTT, one of the technologically most advanced astronomical telescopes. In fact, this observation may be compared to viewing a black golfball, used during a late evening game, from a distance of 12,000 km. At Halley's present, very large distance from the Sun, the intensity of the solar light is over 350 times fainter than here on Earth. The surface of the cometary nucleus is very dark; it reflects only 4 % of the infalling sunlight. The amount of light received from Halley is therefore extremely small: the recorded star-like image of the nucleus is about 160 million times fainter than the faintest star that can be seen with the unaided eye. A long exposure was needed to catch enough light to show the object; even with the very sensitive SuSI CCD camera at the NTT, the shutter had to be kept open for a total of 3 hours 45 minutes. During this time, of the order of 9000 photons from Comet Halley were

  17. Hydrologic and hydraulic analyses at Akin Branch and Cayce Valley Branch, Columbia, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Outlaw, George S.

    1993-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the City of Columbia, Tennessee, conducted hydrologic and hydraulic analyses at Akin Branch and Cayce Valley Branch in the Little Bigby Creek watershed, Columbia, Tennessee, from 1990 through 1991. Results of the analyses can be used by city planners in the development of plans to replace several deteriorating and inadequate drainage structures. Akin Branch and Cayce Valley Branch drain small watersheds of 1.69 and 1.04 square miles, respectively. Flood discharges for 5-, lo-, and 25-year recurrence-interval storm events were calculated at the stream mouths using flood-frequency relations developed for use at small urban streams in Tennessee. For each stream, flood discharges at locations upstream from the mouth were calculated by subdividing the watershed and assigning a percentage of the discharge at the mouth, based on drainage area, to each subarea. Flood profiles for the selected recurrence-interval flood discharges were simulated for Akin Branch and Cayce Valley Branch for existing conditions and conditions that might exist if drainage improvements such as larger culverts and bridges and channel improvements are constructed. The results of the simulations were used to predict changes in flood elevations that might result from such drainage improvements. Analyses indicate that reductions in existing flood elevations of as much as 2.1 feet for the 5-year flood at some sites on Akin Branch and as much as 3.8 feet for the 5-year flood at some sites on Cayce Valley Branch might be expected with the drainage improvements.

  18. Advantages of negative-branch compared with positive-branch one-dimensional unstable resonators.

    PubMed

    Yasui, K; Takenaka, Y

    2001-07-20

    Effects of small misalignments in positive- and negative-branch strip confocal unstable resonators have been compared at the same absolute values of collimated Fresnel numbers and at the same Fresnel numbers. We show that positions of beam modes in negative-branch unstable resonators are far less sensitive to misalignment because of both geometric features and diffraction effects of beam flipping in the resonators. PMID:18360383

  19. THE FIRM REDSHIFT LOWER LIMIT OF THE MOST DISTANT TeV-DETECTED BLAZAR PKS 1424+240

    SciTech Connect

    Furniss, A.; Williams, D. A.; Primack, J.; Danforth, C.; Stocke, J.; Fumagalli, M.; Prochaska, J. X.; Filippenko, A. V.; Neely, W.

    2013-05-10

    We present the redshift lower limit of z {>=} 0.6035 for the very high energy (VHE; E {>=} 100 GeV) emitting blazar PKS 1424+240 (PG 1424+240). This limit is inferred from Ly{beta} and Ly{gamma} absorption observed in the far-ultraviolet spectra from the Hubble Space Telescope/Cosmic Origins Spectrograph. No VHE-detected blazar has shown solid spectroscopic evidence of being more distant. At this distance, VHE observations by VERITAS are shown to sample historically large gamma-ray opacity values at 500 GeV, extending beyond {tau} = 4 for low-level models of the extragalactic background light (EBL) and beyond {tau} = 5 for high levels. The majority of the z = 0.6035 absorption-corrected VHE spectrum appears to exhibit a lower flux than an extrapolation of the contemporaneous Large Area Telescope power-law fit beyond 100 GeV. However, the highest energy VERITAS point is the only point showing agreement with this extrapolation, possibly implying the overestimation of the gamma-ray opacity or the onset of an unexpected VHE spectral feature. A curved log parabola is favored when fitting the full range of gamma-ray data (0.5-500 GeV). While fitting the absorption-corrected VHE data alone results in a harder differential power law than that from the full range, the indices derived using three EBL models are consistent with the physically motivated limit set by Fermi acceleration processes.

  20. The Green Chair Group. Predicting Distant Education in the Year 2001. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Home Study Council, Washington, DC.

    In a series of three workshops in 1981, a group of experienced home study educators, education technologists, and informed people from state and federal government, private industry, and trade associations tackled the questions, "What lies ahead in home study, for 'distant education,' in the next 20 years? How should educators plan for the…

  1. The CfA-Rosat Survey of Distant Clusters of Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNamara, Brian

    1998-01-01

    We (Vikhlinin, McNamara, Forman, Jones, Hornstrup, Quintana) have completed a new survey of distant clusters of galaxies, which we use to to study cluster evolution over cosmological timescales. The clusters were identified as extended X-ray sources in 650 ROSAT PSPC images of high Galactic latitude fields. Our catalog of approximately 230 extended X-ray sources covers 160 square degrees on the sky. Ours is the largest of the several ROSAT serendipitous cluster surveys in progress (e.g. SHARC, Rosati, WARPS etc.). Using V,R,I imagery obtained at several observatories, we find that greater than 90% of the X-ray sources are associated with distant clusters of galaxies. We have obtained spectroscopic redshifts for nearly 80 clusters in our catalog, and we have measured photometric redshifts for the remaining clusters. Our sample contains more than 20 clusters at z > 0.5. I will discuss the logN-logS relationship for our clusters. Because our large survey area, we are able to confirm the evolution of the most luminous distant clusters first seen in the Einstein Extended Medium Sensitivity Survey. In addition, I will discuss the relationships between optical richness, core radius, and X-ray luminosity for distant, X-ray-selected clusters.

  2. Two Women with Multiple Disabilities Communicate with Distant Partners via a Special Text Messaging System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Green, Vanessa A.; Oliva, Doretta; Alberti, Gloria; Carrella, Luigina

    2013-01-01

    This study extended the research on a special text messaging system, which allows persons with multiple disabilities to (a) write and send messages to distant partners and (b) have messages from those partners read out to them. The study involved two women with multiple disabilities (including blindness or minimal residual vision). The system…

  3. A comparison of rearing Creontiades signatus distant on green bean pods or pea plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A laboratory procedure for mass rearing Creontiades signatus Distant, a relatively new plant bug pest of south Texas cotton, was compared using green bean pods versus whole cowpea plants to determine which would provide for the easiest most efficient method for producing the insect in culture. The n...

  4. The Detection and Photometric Redshift Determination of Distant Galaxies using SIRTF's Infrared Array Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, C.; Eisenhardt, P.

    1998-01-01

    We investigate the ability of the Space Infrared Telescope Facility's Infrared Array Camera to detect distant (z3) galaxies and measure their photometric redshifts. Our analysis shows that changing the original long wavelength filter specifications provides significant improvements in performance in this and other areas.

  5. Diversity between and within: Approaches to Teaching about Distant Place in the Secondary School Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Liz

    2014-01-01

    This study outlines some challenges of teaching about distant place and demonstrates how different strategies can influence school students' framings of diversity. The analysis is based on an interpretive case study of 13-14?year-old students learning about Japan in a UK school. Their changing representations of Japan were tracked in detail…

  6. Is Blended Learning the Solution to Web-Based Distant Engineering Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavus, Nadire; Ibrahim, Dogan

    2007-01-01

    The term "blended learning" is being used increasingly to describe the learning and teaching activities which involve a mixture of online teaching and face-to-face teaching. This paper describes the requirements of distant learning engineering courses, and proposes that a blended learning model suits best to the needs of such courses where the…

  7. Proposed Training Module on Goal Setting and Decision-Making Skills for Distant Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibrahim, Aminu Kazeem; Tanglang, Nebath

    2015-01-01

    Inappropriate goal setting and decision-making skills are threat to distant learners' completion of academic programme, development and social well-being. This was realised following two related studies carried out by the authors of this write-up in addition to facts from reviewed literatures as one of the factors responsible for low retention and…

  8. 5. Photocopy of photograph, 1942. DISTANT VIEW OF U.S. VANADIUM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Photocopy of photograph, 1942. DISTANT VIEW OF U.S. VANADIUM CORPORATION WORKS WITH EXTANT SMELTER STACK AT LEFT. (Original print in possession of Western Colorado Power Archives. Photographer unknown.) - San Juan & New York Mining & Smelting Company, Smelter Stack, State Route 160, Durango, La Plata County, CO

  9. Globalization or Hegemony? Childcare on the Brink: Hints from Three Geographically Distant Localities in North America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manning, John P.; Thirumurthy, Vidya; Field, Harriet

    2012-01-01

    In a previous publication the authors examined selected aspects of the structure and curriculum of fifteen childcare centers located in three geographically distant locations in North America and determined that contrasts within and between the regions in terms of structure and curriculum guided by the National Association for the Education of…

  10. Computer-Mediated Communication with Distant Friends: Relations with Adjustment during Students' First Semester in College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranney, John D.; Troop-Gordon, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    Because of recent technological innovations, college freshmen can readily communicate with friends who they see infrequently (e.g., friends from home). The current study addressed whether computer-mediated communication with these distant friends can compensate for a lack of high-quality on-campus friendships during students' first semester of…

  11. Discrete Feynman-Kac formulas for branching random walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoia, A.; Dumonteil, E.; Mazzolo, A.

    2012-05-01

    Branching random walks are key to the description of several physical and biological systems, such as neutron transport in multiplying media, epidemics and population genetics. Within this context, assessing the number of visits nV of the walker to a given region V in the phase space plays a fundamental role. In this letter we derive the discrete Feynman-Kac equations for the distribution of nV as a function of the starting point of the walker, when the process is observed up to the n-th generation. We provide also the recurrence relation for the moments of the distribution, and illustrate this formalism on a problem in reactor physics. Feynman-Kac formulas for the residence times of Markovian processes are recovered in the diffusion limit.

  12. Acting on Lessons Learned: A NASA Glenn Acoustics Branch Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, L. Danielle

    2008-01-01

    Lessons learned from the International Space Station have indicated that early attention to acoustics will be key to achieving safer, more productive environments for new long duration missions. Fans are known to be dominant noise sources, and reducing fan noise poses challenges for fan manufacturers and systems engineers. The NASA Glenn Acoustics Branch has considered ways in which expertise and capabilities traditionally used to understand and mitigate aircraft engine noise can be used to address small fan noise issues in Exploration and Information Technology applications. Many could benefit if NASA can capture what is known about small fan aero and acoustic performance in a "Guide for the Design, Selection, and Installation of Fans for Spaceflight Applications." A draft outline for this document will be offered as a useful starting point for brainstorming ideas for the various smaller, near-term research projects that would need to be addressed first.

  13. Analysis of angle effect on particle flocculation in branch flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Karthik; Fink, Kathryn; Liepmann, Dorian

    2014-11-01

    Hollow point microneedle drug delivery systems are known to be highly susceptible to blockage, owing to their very small structures. This problem has been especially noted when delivering suspended particle solutions, such as vaccines. Attempts to reduce particle flocculation in such devices through surface treatments of the particles have been largely unsuccessful. Furthermore, the particle clog only forms at the mouths of the microneedle structures, leaving the downstream walls clear. This implies that the sudden change in length scales alter the hydrodynamic interactions, creating the conditions for particle flocculation. However, while it is known that particle flocculation occurs, the physics behind the event are obscure. We utilize micro-PIV to observe how the occurrence and formation of particle flocculation changes in relation to the angle encountered by particle laden flow into microfluidic branch structures. The results offer the ability to optimize particle flocculation in MEMS devices, increasing device efficacy and longevity.

  14. Light Signaling in Bud Outgrowth and Branching in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Leduc, Nathalie; Roman, Hanaé; Barbier, François; Péron, Thomas; Huché-Thélier, Lydie; Lothier, Jérémy; Demotes-Mainard, Sabine; Sakr, Soulaiman

    2014-01-01

    Branching determines the final shape of plants, which influences adaptation, survival and the visual quality of many species. It is an intricate process that includes bud outgrowth and shoot extension, and these in turn respond to environmental cues and light conditions. Light is a powerful environmental factor that impacts multiple processes throughout plant life. The molecular basis of the perception and transduction of the light signal within buds is poorly understood and undoubtedly requires to be further unravelled. This review is based on current knowledge on bud outgrowth-related mechanisms and light-mediated regulation of many physiological processes. It provides an extensive, though not exhaustive, overview of the findings related to this field. In parallel, it points to issues to be addressed in the near future. PMID:27135502

  15. Fort Collins Science Center Ecosystem Dynamics Branch

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Jim; Melcher, C.; Bowen, Z.

    2009-01-01

    Complex natural resource issues require understanding a web of interactions among ecosystem components that are (1) interdisciplinary, encompassing physical, chemical, and biological processes; (2) spatially complex, involving movements of animals, water, and airborne materials across a range of landscapes and jurisdictions; and (3) temporally complex, occurring over days, weeks, or years, sometimes involving response lags to alteration or exhibiting large natural variation. Scientists in the Ecosystem Dynamics Branch of the U.S. Geological Survey, Fort Collins Science Center, investigate a diversity of these complex natural resource questions at the landscape and systems levels. This Fact Sheet describes the work of the Ecosystems Dynamics Branch, which is focused on energy and land use, climate change and long-term integrated assessments, herbivore-ecosystem interactions, fire and post-fire restoration, and environmental flows and river restoration.

  16. Photovoltaic Program Branch annual report, FY 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, K A

    1990-03-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the Photovoltaic (PV) Program Branch of the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) from October 1, 1988, through September 30, 1989. The branch is responsible for managing the subcontracted portion of SERI's PV Advanced Research and Development Project. In fiscal year (FY) 1989, this included nearly 50 subcontracts, with a total annualized funding of approximately $13.1 million. Approximately two-thirds of the subcontracts were with universities, at a total funding of nearly $4 million. The six technical sections of the report cover the main areas of the subcontracted program: Amorphous Silicon Research, Polycrystalline Thin Films, Crystalline Silicon Materials Research, High-Efficiency Concepts, New Ideas, and University Participation. Technical summaries of each of the subcontracted programs provide a discussion of approaches, major accomplishments in FY 1989, and future research directions. Each report will be cataloged individually.

  17. Automated 3D reconstruction of coronary artery tree based on stochastic branch and bound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buhler, Patrick; Rebholz, Philipp; Hesser, Jurgen

    2005-04-01

    The paper discusses a new method for reconstructing vessel trees from biplane X-Ray projections. The used method reconstructs corresponding points in less than a second and is thus ideally suited for interventional procedures where time is essential. Biplane reconstruction is a two-fold problem: find corresponding points in both images and reconstruct the vessel segments between successive corresponding points in 3D. In this paper we solve the first problem using a new branch and bound technique based on Bayesian networks. With epipolar geometry we assign each of the vessel bifurcation/crossing/endpoint in one image a set of corresponding points in the second image. Starting with the vessel of largest diameter as root node we successively build up a tree of all possible solutions. Branches are cut according to probabilistic conditions (branch&bound based global search for the best solution). Each node is thus a possible partial tree for which we assign a conditional probability that the assignment of corresponding points is correct. The probability is the joint probability of having the correct topology, connectivity, tree and segment shape, characteristics of bifurcations. The respective probabilities for each bifurcation are measured from CTA data of real patients and the probability of the node is computed via a Bayesian network. If the assigned probability is too small, the branch is pruned. Further, for performance reasons we use A*-search where the most probable solution gets favored. All corresponding points are found in less then one second and both, topology and vessel crossings, are identified correctly. This method is thus by orders of magnitude faster than competing ones. This approach is therefore focused on both an automatic and robust method for 3D biplane reconstruction on one hand and an interactive method on the other hand. Further, it can be trained on a typical set of patients in order to obtain as reliable information as possible about the 3D

  18. Dynamical Scaling in Branching Models for Seismicity

    SciTech Connect

    Lippiello, Eugenio; Godano, Cataldo; De Arcangelis, Lucilla

    2007-03-02

    We propose a branching process based on a dynamical scaling hypothesis relating time and mass. In the context of earthquake occurrence, we show that experimental power laws in size and time distribution naturally originate solely from this scaling hypothesis. We present a numerical protocol able to generate a synthetic catalog with an arbitrary large number of events. The numerical data reproduce the hierarchical organization in time and magnitude of experimental interevent time distribution.

  19. THE STRUCTURE OF THE SAGITTARIUS STELLAR STREAM AS TRACED BY BLUE HORIZONTAL BRANCH STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Ruhland, Christine; Rix, Hans-Walter; Bell, Eric F.; Xue Xiangxiang

    2011-04-20

    We use a sample of blue horizontal branch (BHB) stars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 to explore the structure of the tidal tails from the Sagittarius Dwarf Galaxy. We use a method yielding BHB star candidates with up to {approx}70% purity from photometry alone. The resulting sample has a distance precision of roughly 5% and can probe distances in excess of 100 kpc. Using this sample, we identify a possible extension to the trailing arm at distances of 60-80 kpc from the Sun with an estimated significance of at least 3.8{sigma}. Current models predict that a distant 'returning' segment of the debris stream should exist, but place it substantially closer to the Sun where no debris is observed in our data. Exploiting the distance precision of our tracers, we estimate the mean line-of-sight thickness of the leading arm to be {approx}3 kpc, and show that the two 'bifurcated' branches of the debris stream differ by only 1-2 kpc in distance. With a spectroscopic very pure BHB star subsample, we estimate the velocity dispersion in the leading arm, 37 km s{sup -1}, which is in reasonable agreement with models of Sgr disruption. We finally present a sample of high-probability Sgr BHB stars in the leading arm of Sgr, selected to have distances and velocities consistent with Sgr membership, to allow further study.

  20. On Higgs branch localization of Seiberg-Witten theories on an ellipsoid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Heng-Yu; Tsai, Tsung-Hsuan

    2016-01-01

    In this note, we consider so-called "Higgs branch localization" for four-dimensional N=2 field theories on a 4D ellipsoid. We find a new set of saddle point equations arising from the additional Higgs branch deformation term, whose solutions include both Higgs branch and BPS instanton-vortex mixed configurations. By evaluating the contour integral, we also demonstrate that the ellipsoid partition almost factorizes into purely b- and b^{-1}-dependent parts, using SQCD as an explicit example. We identify various factorized parts with the ellipsoid partition function of two-dimensional N=(2,2) SQCDA, which is precisely the vortex world volume theory. We also give a physical interpretation for the non-factorizable parts and discuss future directions.

  1. Fully-branched hyperbranched polymers with a diselenide core as glutathione peroxidase mimics.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yu; Chen, Junyi; Xu, Huaping; Van Oosterwijck, Chantal; Zhang, Xi; Dehaen, Wim; Smet, Mario

    2012-05-14

    A novel glutathione peroxidase (GPx) mimic has been prepared by incorporation of a selenium-based catalytic unit into the focal point of a fully-branched hyperbranched polymer. First, an AB(2) monomer consisting of isatin and an electron rich aromatic moiety was polycondensed in the presence of 5-nitroisatin as a core reagent, resulting in a polymer with 100% degree of branching. The latter was coupled to the catalytically active moiety, Br(CH(2))(5) SeSe(CH(2))(5) Br, by nucleophilic substitution of the bromides by the residual amide groups of the incorporated nitroisatin core. The obtained polymer has demonstrated prominent GPx activity as desired, which could be attributed to the hydrophobic, densely branched and core-shell structure of the polymer surrounding the catalytic center. PMID:22434542

  2. Bifurcation Analysis Using Rigorous Branch and Bound Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Andrew P.; Crespo, Luis G.; Munoz, Cesar A.; Lowenberg, Mark H.

    2014-01-01

    For the study of nonlinear dynamic systems, it is important to locate the equilibria and bifurcations occurring within a specified computational domain. This paper proposes a new approach for solving these problems and compares it to the numerical continuation method. The new approach is based upon branch and bound and utilizes rigorous enclosure techniques to yield outer bounding sets of both the equilibrium and local bifurcation manifolds. These sets, which comprise the union of hyper-rectangles, can be made to be as tight as desired. Sufficient conditions for the existence of equilibrium and bifurcation points taking the form of algebraic inequality constraints in the state-parameter space are used to calculate their enclosures directly. The enclosures for the bifurcation sets can be computed independently of the equilibrium manifold, and are guaranteed to contain all solutions within the computational domain. A further advantage of this method is the ability to compute a near-maximally sized hyper-rectangle of high dimension centered at a fixed parameter-state point whose elements are guaranteed to exclude all bifurcation points. This hyper-rectangle, which requires a global description of the bifurcation manifold within the computational domain, cannot be obtained otherwise. A test case, based on the dynamics of a UAV subject to uncertain center of gravity location, is used to illustrate the efficacy of the method by comparing it with numerical continuation and to evaluate its computational complexity.

  3. Adaptation measures to drought in Mongolian rangeland: The long-distant movement of people and livestock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kakinuma, K.; Kanae, S.

    2015-12-01

    Coping with droughts are one of the most important issues in arid and semi-arid regions. Mongolia, where are located in central Asia, are concerned the increase of droughts in the future (IPCC 2014). Mongolia has long history of livestock grazing. Herders have developed the mobile grazing systems to use spatiotemporal variable vegetation. Especially, they often take a rapid and long-distant movement to avoid drought condition ("otor" in Mongolia). The movement is a main adaptation measure to droughts for herders, and it would be applicable to other regions where will be increase the frequency of droughts in the future. However there are few knowledge about processes and actual conditions of the long-distant movement of herders and livestock across Mongolia. Therefore our objective is to discuss the long-distance movement as adaptation measures to droughts. Mongolia has a climatic gradient along the latitude; rainfall variability in southern regions are higher than that in northern regions. Previous theoretical studies predicted that rainfall variability affect the grazing strategies. Based on them, we established two hypotheses about the relationship between climatic variability and the form of long distant movement. (1) The long-distance movement likely occur in southern regions because the frequency of drought are higher in southern regions than in northern regions (2) Cooperation among herders, such as acceptance of livestock that from other prefectures, are likely occur in southern regions while exclusive management are likely occur in northern regions. We interviewed to local herders, decision makers about the long-distant movement, and investigated the number of livestock that across the border of prefectures in recent year across Mongolia. We will discuss long-distant movements as an adaptation measure to drought thorough these results.

  4. [Lymph node and distant metastases of thyroid gland cancer. Metastases in the thyroid glands].

    PubMed

    Schmid, K W

    2015-11-01

    The different biological features of the various major entities of thyroid cancer, e.g. papillary, follicular, poorly differentiated, anaplastic and medullary, depend to a large extent on their different metastatic spread. Papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) has a propensity for cervical lymphatic spread that occurs in 20-50 % of patients whereas distant metastasis occurs in < 5 % of cases. Cervical lymphadenopathy may be the first symptom particularly of (micro) PTC. In contrast follicular thyroid cancer (FTC) has a marked propensity for vascular but not lymphatic invasion and 10-20 % of FTC develop distant metastases. At the time of diagnosis approximately one third of medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) cases show lymph node metastases, in 10-15 % distant metastases and 25 % develop metastases during the course of the disease. Poorly differentiated (PDTC) and anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) spread via both lymphatic and vascular invasion. Thus distant metastases are relatively uncommon in DTC and when they occur, long-term stable disease is the typical clinical course. The major sites of distant metastases are the lungs and bone. Metastases to the brain, breasts, liver, kidneys, muscle and skin are relatively rare or even rare. The thyroid gland itself can be a site of metastases from a variety of other tumors. In autopsy series of patients with disseminated cancer disease, metastases to the thyroid gland were found in up to 10 % of cases. Metastases from other primary tumors to the thyroid gland have been reported in 1.4-3 % of patients who have surgery for suspected cancer of the thyroid gland. The most common primary cancers that metastasize to the thyroid gland are renal cell (48.1 %), colorectal (10.4 %), lung (8.3 %) and breast cancer (7.8 %) and surprisingly often sarcomas (4.0 %).

  5. The root of branching river networks.

    PubMed

    Perron, J Taylor; Richardson, Paul W; Ferrier, Ken L; Lapôtre, Mathieu

    2012-12-01

    Branching river networks are one of the most widespread and recognizable features of Earth's landscapes and have also been discovered elsewhere in the Solar System. But the mechanisms that create these patterns and control their spatial scales are poorly understood. Theories based on probability or optimality have proven useful, but do not explain how river networks develop over time through erosion and sediment transport. Here we show that branching at the uppermost reaches of river networks is rooted in two coupled instabilities: first, valleys widen at the expense of their smaller neighbours, and second, side slopes of the widening valleys become susceptible to channel incision. Each instability occurs at a critical ratio of the characteristic timescales for soil transport and channel incision. Measurements from two field sites demonstrate that our theory correctly predicts the size of the smallest valleys with tributaries. We also show that the dominant control on the scale of landscape dissection in these sites is the strength of channel incision, which correlates with aridity and rock weakness, rather than the strength of soil transport. These results imply that the fine-scale structure of branching river networks is an organized signature of erosional mechanics, not a consequence of random topology.

  6. Overview of Glenn Mechanical Components Branch Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakrajsek, James

    2002-09-01

    Mr. James Zakrajsek, chief of the Mechanical Components Branch, gave an overview of research conducted by the branch. Branch members perform basic research on mechanical components and systems, including gears and bearings, turbine seals, structural and thermal barrier seals, and space mechanisms. The research is focused on propulsion systems for present and advanced aerospace vehicles. For rotorcraft and conventional aircraft, we conduct research to develop technology needed to enable the design of low noise, ultra safe geared drive systems. We develop and validate analytical models for gear crack propagation, gear dynamics and noise, gear diagnostics, bearing dynamics, and thermal analyses of gear systems using experimental data from various component test rigs. In seal research we develop and test advanced turbine seal concepts to increase efficiency and durability of turbine engines. We perform experimental and analytical research to develop advanced thermal barrier seals and structural seals for current and next generation space vehicles. Our space mechanisms research involves fundamental investigation of lubricants, materials, components and mechanisms for deep space and planetary environments.

  7. Measurement of tau lepton branching fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Nicol, N.A.

    1993-09-30

    We present {tau}{sup {minus}} lepton branching fraction measurements based on data from the TPC/Two-Gamma detector at PEP. Using a sample of{tau}{sup {minus}} {yields} {nu}{sub {tau}}K{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}} events, we examine the resonance structure of the K{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}} system and obtain the first measurements of branching fractions for {tau}{sup {minus}} {yields} {nu}{sub {tau}}K{sub 1}{sup {minus}}(1270) and {tau}{sup {minus}} {yields} {nu}{sub {tau}}K{sub 1}{sup {minus}}(1400). We also describe a complete set of branching fraction measurements in which all the decays of the {tau}{sup {minus}} lepton are separated into classes defined by the identities of the charged particles and an estimate of the number of neutrals. This is the first such global measurement with decay classes defined by the four possible charged particle species, e, {mu}, {pi}, and K.

  8. RADIONUCLIDE INVENTORY AND DISTRIBUTION: FOURMILE BRANCH, PEN BRANCH, AND STEEL CREEK IOUS

    SciTech Connect

    Hiergesell, R.; Phifer, M.

    2014-04-29

    As a condition to the Department of Energy (DOE) Low Level Waste Disposal Federal Facility Review Group (LFRG) review team approving the Savannah River Site (SRS) Composite Analysis (CA), SRS agreed to follow up on a secondary issue, which consisted of the consolidation of several observations that the team concluded, when evaluated collectively, could potentially impact the integration of the CA results. This report addresses secondary issue observations 4 and 21, which identify the need to improve the CA sensitivity and uncertainty analysis specifically by improving the CA inventory and the estimate of its uncertainty. The purpose of the work described herein was to be responsive to these secondary issue observations by re-examining the radionuclide inventories of the Integrator Operable Units (IOUs), as documented in ERD 2001 and Hiergesell, et. al. 2008. The LFRG concern has been partially addressed already for the Lower Three Runs (LTR) IOU (Hiergesell and Phifer, 2012). The work described in this investigation is a continuation of the effort to address the LFRG concerns by re-examining the radionuclide inventories associated with Fourmile Branch (FMB) IOU, Pen Branch (PB) IOU and Steel Creek (SC) IOU. The overall approach to computing radionuclide inventories for each of the IOUs involved the following components: • Defining contaminated reaches of sediments along the IOU waterways • Identifying separate segments within each IOU waterway to evaluate individually • Computing the volume and mass of contaminated soil associated with each segment, or “compartment” • Obtaining the available and appropriate Sediment and Sediment/Soil analytical results associated with each IOU • Standardizing all radionuclide activity by decay-correcting all sample analytical results from sample date to the current point in time, • Computing representative concentrations for all radionuclides associated with each compartment in each of the IOUs • Computing the

  9. Vertical profile of branch CO2 efflux in a Norway spruce tree: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta, M.; Pavelka, M.

    2012-04-01

    and seasonal dynamics than branches from the lower whorls. The results presented in this study serve primarily to demonstrate the importance of branch location within canopy from the point of view of the CO2 efflux. CO2 efflux from branch woody-tissue exhibited vertical differentiation among whorls that must be taken into account when collecting, analysis and interpreting data. The determination of CO2 efflux from individual components at ecosystem level is still needed to gain a better understanding of the carbon budget issues. Such data are important for evaluating effect of global climate or other possible influences on carbon cycling and sequestration in forest ecosystems. Acknowledgment: This work was support by the projects CZ.1.05/1.1.00/02.0073 from the Ministry of Education, Youth and Sports and LM2010007 from the Ministry of the Environmental of Czech Republic

  10. TYPICAL VIEW OF WEST BRANCH COLUMBIA SOUTHERN CANAL OPEN CHANNEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    TYPICAL VIEW OF WEST BRANCH COLUMBIA SOUTHERN CANAL OPEN CHANNEL BETWEEN WEST BRANCH DROP AND GERKING FLUME. LOOKING SOUTH/SOUTHEAST - Tumalo Irrigation District, Tumalo Project, West of Deschutes River, Tumalo, Deschutes County, OR

  11. Trees and streams: The efficiency of branching patterns

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leopold, L.B.

    1971-01-01

    Extending the analysis of branching patterns of the drainage net of rivers, originated by Horton, the relation of average numbers and lengths of tree branches to size of branch was investigated. Size of branch was defined by branch order, or its position in the hierarchy of tributaries. It was found that, as in river drainage nets, there is a definite logarithmic relation between branch order and lengths and numbers. This definite relation is quantitatively comparable, within limits, among river networks, tree branching systems, and several random-walk models in both two and three dimensions. Such a relation appears to be the most probable under the applicable constraints. Moreover the most probable arrangement appears to minimize the total length of all stems in the branching system within other constraints and so, to that extent, achieves a certain efficiency. ?? 1971.

  12. West Branch Pennsylvania Canal, Lock No. 34 Lock Keeper's House, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    West Branch Pennsylvania Canal, Lock No. 34 Lock Keeper's House, South of State Route 664 along North bank of West Branch of Susquehanna River, 2,000 feet East of Jay Street Bridge, Lock Haven, Clinton County, PA

  13. Detail view of bronze door. Note oak branches with acorns ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail view of bronze door. Note oak branches with acorns in the left panels and olive branches with olives in right. - Flanders Field American Cemetery & Memorial, Chapel, Wortegemseweg 117, Waregem, West Flanders (Belgium)

  14. Crystal structures of Escherichia coli branching enzyme in complex with cyclodextrins.

    PubMed

    Feng, Lei; Fawaz, Remie; Hovde, Stacy; Sheng, Fang; Nosrati, Meisam; Geiger, James H

    2016-05-01

    Branching enzyme (BE) is responsible for the third step in glycogen/starch biosynthesis. It catalyzes the cleavage of α-1,4 glucan linkages and subsequent reattachment to form α-1,6 branch points. These branches are crucial to the final structure of glycogen and starch. The crystal structures of Escherichia coli BE (EcBE) in complex with α-, β- and γ-cyclodextrin were determined in order to better understand substrate binding. Four cyclodextrin-binding sites were identified in EcBE; they were all located on the surface of the enzyme, with none in the vicinity of the active site. While three of the sites were also identified as linear polysaccharide-binding sites, one of the sites is specific for cyclodextrins. In previous work three additional binding sites were identified as exclusively binding linear malto-oligosaccharides. Comparison of the binding sites shed light on this apparent specificity. Binding site IV is located in the carbohydrate-binding module 48 (CBM48) domain of EcBE and superimposes with the cyclodextrin-binding site found in the CBM48 domain of 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Comparison of these sites shows the similarities and differences in the two binding modes. While some of the binding sites were found to be conserved between branching enzymes of different organisms, some are quite divergent, indicating both similarities and differences between oligosaccharide binding in branching enzymes from various sources. PMID:27139627

  15. An information-theoretic look at branch-prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Ponder, C.G. ); Shebanow, M.C. )

    1990-09-11

    Accurate branch-prediction is necessary to utilize deeply pipelined and Very Long Instruction-Word (VLIW) architectures. For a set of program traces we show the upper limits on branch predictability, and hence machine utilization, for important classes of branch-predictors using static (compiletime) and dynamic (runtime) program information. A set of optimal superpredictors'' is derived from these program traces. These optimal predictors compare favorably with other proposed methods of branch-prediction. 3 refs., 5 figs., 12 tabs.

  16. Initiation of the western branch of the East African Rift coeval with the eastern branch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, E. M.; Stevens, N. J.; O'Connor, P. M.; Dirks, P. H. G. M.; Gottfried, M. D.; Clyde, W. C.; Armstrong, R. A.; Kemp, A. I. S.; Hemming, S.

    2012-04-01

    The East African Rift System transects the anomalously high-elevation Ethiopian and East African plateaux that together form part of the 6,000-km-long African superswell structure. Rifting putatively developed as a result of mantle plume activity that initiated under eastern Africa. The mantle activity has caused topographic uplift that has been connected to African Cenozoic climate change and faunal evolution. The rift is traditionally interpreted to be composed of two distinct segments: an older, volcanically active eastern branch and a younger, less volcanic western branch. Here, we show that initiation of rifting in the western branch began more than 14 million years earlier than previously thought, contemporaneously with the eastern branch. We use a combination of detrital zircon geochronology, tephro- and magnetostratigraphy, along with analyses of past river flow recorded in sedimentary rocks from the Rukwa Rift Basin, Tanzania, to constrain the timing of rifting, magmatism and drainage development in this part of the western branch. We find that rift-related volcanism and lake development had begun by about 25million years ago. These events were preceded by pediment development and a fluvial drainage reversal that we suggest records the onset of topographic uplift caused by the African superswell. We conclude that uplift of eastern Africa was more widespread and synchronous than previously recognized.

  17. 46 CFR 169.733 - Fire extinguishing branch lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fire extinguishing branch lines. 169.733 Section 169.733... Vessel Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment Markings § 169.733 Fire extinguishing branch lines. Each branch line valve of every fire extinguishing system must be plainly and permanently...

  18. 46 CFR 169.733 - Fire extinguishing branch lines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fire extinguishing branch lines. 169.733 Section 169.733... Vessel Control, Miscellaneous Systems, and Equipment Markings § 169.733 Fire extinguishing branch lines. Each branch line valve of every fire extinguishing system must be plainly and permanently...

  19. 46 CFR 169.690 - Lighting branch circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lighting branch circuits. 169.690 Section 169.690... Machinery and Electrical Electrical Installations on Vessels of 100 Gross Tons and Over § 169.690 Lighting branch circuits. Each lighting branch circuit must meet the requirements of § 111.75-5 of this...

  20. 46 CFR 169.690 - Lighting branch circuits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Lighting branch circuits. 169.690 Section 169.690... Machinery and Electrical Electrical Installations on Vessels of 100 Gross Tons and Over § 169.690 Lighting branch circuits. Each lighting branch circuit must meet the requirements of § 111.75-5 of this...