Science.gov

Sample records for distinct dynamic post-translational

  1. A Systematic Framework for Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Protein Post-Translational Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Grandits, Melanie; Oostenbrink, Chris; Zagrovic, Bojan

    2013-01-01

    By directly affecting structure, dynamics and interaction networks of their targets, post-translational modifications (PTMs) of proteins play a key role in different cellular processes ranging from enzymatic activation to regulation of signal transduction to cell-cycle control. Despite the great importance of understanding how PTMs affect proteins at the atomistic level, a systematic framework for treating post-translationally modified amino acids by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, a premier high-resolution computational biology tool, has never been developed. Here, we report and validate force field parameters (GROMOS 45a3 and 54a7) required to run and analyze MD simulations of more than 250 different types of enzymatic and non-enzymatic PTMs. The newly developed GROMOS 54a7 parameters in particular exhibit near chemical accuracy in matching experimentally measured hydration free energies (RMSE = 4.2 kJ/mol over the validation set). Using this tool, we quantitatively show that the majority of PTMs greatly alter the hydrophobicity and other physico-chemical properties of target amino acids, with the extent of change in many cases being comparable to the complete range spanned by native amino acids. PMID:23874192

  2. A systematic framework for molecular dynamics simulations of protein post-translational modifications.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Drazen; Margreitter, Christian; Grandits, Melanie; Oostenbrink, Chris; Zagrovic, Bojan

    2013-01-01

    By directly affecting structure, dynamics and interaction networks of their targets, post-translational modifications (PTMs) of proteins play a key role in different cellular processes ranging from enzymatic activation to regulation of signal transduction to cell-cycle control. Despite the great importance of understanding how PTMs affect proteins at the atomistic level, a systematic framework for treating post-translationally modified amino acids by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, a premier high-resolution computational biology tool, has never been developed. Here, we report and validate force field parameters (GROMOS 45a3 and 54a7) required to run and analyze MD simulations of more than 250 different types of enzymatic and non-enzymatic PTMs. The newly developed GROMOS 54a7 parameters in particular exhibit near chemical accuracy in matching experimentally measured hydration free energies (RMSE=4.2 kJ/mol over the validation set). Using this tool, we quantitatively show that the majority of PTMs greatly alter the hydrophobicity and other physico-chemical properties of target amino acids, with the extent of change in many cases being comparable to the complete range spanned by native amino acids. PMID:23874192

  3. Post-translational Control of the Temporal Dynamics of Transcription Factor Activity Regulates Neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Quan, Xiao-Jiang; Yuan, Liqun; Tiberi, Luca; Claeys, Annelies; De Geest, Natalie; Yan, Jiekun; van der Kant, Rob; Xie, Wei R; Klisch, Tiemo J; Shymkowitz, Joost; Rousseau, Frederic; Bollen, Mathieu; Beullens, Monique; Zoghbi, Huda Y; Vanderhaeghen, Pierre; Hassan, Bassem A

    2016-01-28

    Neurogenesis is initiated by the transient expression of the highly conserved proneural proteins, bHLH transcriptional regulators. Here, we discover a conserved post-translational switch governing the duration of proneural protein activity that is required for proper neuronal development. Phosphorylation of a single Serine at the same position in Scute and Atonal proneural proteins governs the transition from active to inactive forms by regulating DNA binding. The equivalent Neurogenin2 Threonine also regulates DNA binding and proneural activity in the developing mammalian neocortex. Using genome editing in Drosophila, we show that Atonal outlives its mRNA but is inactivated by phosphorylation. Inhibiting the phosphorylation of the conserved proneural Serine causes quantitative changes in expression dynamics and target gene expression resulting in neuronal number and fate defects. Strikingly, even a subtle change from Serine to Threonine appears to shift the duration of Atonal activity in vivo, resulting in neuronal fate defects. PMID:26824657

  4. Deciphering Post-translational Modification Codes

    PubMed Central

    Lothrop, Adam P.; Torres, Matthew P.; Fuchs, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) occur on nearly all proteins. Many domains within proteins are modified on multiple amino acid sidechains by diverse enzymes to create a myriad of possible protein species. How these combinations of PTMs lead to distinct biological outcomes is only beginning to be understood. This manuscript highlights several examples of combinatorial PTMs in proteins, and describes recent technological developments, which are driving our ability to understand how PTM patterns may “code” for biological outcomes. PMID:23402885

  5. The selective post-translational processing of transcription factor Nrf1 yields distinct isoforms that dictate its ability to differentially regulate gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yiguo; Li, Shaojun; Xiang, Yuancai; Qiu, Lu; Zhao, Huakan; Hayes, John D

    2015-01-01

    Upon translation, the N-terminal homology box 1 (NHB1) signal anchor sequence of Nrf1 integrates it within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) whilst its transactivation domains [TADs, including acidic domain 1 (AD1), the flanking Asn/Ser/Thr-rich (NST) domain and AD2] are transiently translocated into the ER lumen, whereupon the NST domain is glycosylated to yield an inactive 120-kDa glycoprotein. Subsequently, these TADs are retrotranslocated into extra-luminal subcellular compartments, where Nrf1 is deglycosylated to yield an active 95-kDa isoform. Herein, we report that AD1 and AD2 are required for the stability of the 120-kDa Nrf1 glycoprotein, but not that of the non-glycosylated/de-glycosylated 95-kDa isoform. Degrons within AD1 do not promote proteolytic degradation of the 120-kDa Nrf1 glycoprotein. However, repositioning of AD2-adjoining degrons (i.e. DSGLS-containing SDS1 and PEST2 sequences) into the cyto/nucleoplasm enables selective topovectorial processing of Nrf1 by the proteasome and/or calpains to generate a cleaved active 85-kDa Nrf1 or a dominant-negative 36-kDa Nrf1γ. Production of Nrf1γ is abolished by removal of SDS1 or PEST2 degrons, whereas production of the cleaved 85-kDa Nrf1 is blocked by deletion of the ER luminal-anchoring NHB2 sequence (aa 81-106). Importantly, Nrf1 activity is positively and/or negatively regulated by distinct doses of proteasome and calpain inhibitors. PMID:26268886

  6. The selective post-translational processing of transcription factor Nrf1 yields distinct isoforms that dictate its ability to differentially regulate gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yiguo; Li, Shaojun; Xiang, Yuancai; Qiu, Lu; Zhao, Huakan; Hayes, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Upon translation, the N-terminal homology box 1 (NHB1) signal anchor sequence of Nrf1 integrates it within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) whilst its transactivation domains [TADs, including acidic domain 1 (AD1), the flanking Asn/Ser/Thr-rich (NST) domain and AD2] are transiently translocated into the ER lumen, whereupon the NST domain is glycosylated to yield an inactive 120-kDa glycoprotein. Subsequently, these TADs are retrotranslocated into extra-luminal subcellular compartments, where Nrf1 is deglycosylated to yield an active 95-kDa isoform. Herein, we report that AD1 and AD2 are required for the stability of the 120-kDa Nrf1 glycoprotein, but not that of the non-glycosylated/de-glycosylated 95-kDa isoform. Degrons within AD1 do not promote proteolytic degradation of the 120-kDa Nrf1 glycoprotein. However, repositioning of AD2-adjoining degrons (i.e. DSGLS-containing SDS1 and PEST2 sequences) into the cyto/nucleoplasm enables selective topovectorial processing of Nrf1 by the proteasome and/or calpains to generate a cleaved active 85-kDa Nrf1 or a dominant-negative 36-kDa Nrf1γ. Production of Nrf1γ is abolished by removal of SDS1 or PEST2 degrons, whereas production of the cleaved 85-kDa Nrf1 is blocked by deletion of the ER luminal-anchoring NHB2 sequence (aa 81–106). Importantly, Nrf1 activity is positively and/or negatively regulated by distinct doses of proteasome and calpain inhibitors. PMID:26268886

  7. Dynamic Changes of Post-Translationally Modified Forms of CXCL10 and Soluble DPP4 in HCV Subjects Receiving Interferon-Free Therapy.

    PubMed

    Meissner, Eric G; Decalf, Jérémie; Casrouge, Armanda; Masur, Henry; Kottilil, Shyam; Albert, Matthew L; Duffy, Darragh

    2015-01-01

    Serum levels of the interferon (IFN)-stimulated chemokine CXCL10 are increased during chronic HCV infection and associate with outcome of IFN-based therapy. Elevated levels of NH2-terminal truncated CXCL10 (3-77aa), produced by DPP4 cleavage, negatively associate with spontaneous clearance of acute HCV infection and sustained virological response (SVR) with IFN-based therapy for chronic infection. The association of different CXCL10 forms and DPP4 with outcome during IFN-free HCV therapy has not been examined. Using novel Simoa assays, plasma was analyzed from HCV genotype-1 (GT1) subjects who relapsed (n = 11) or achieved SVR (n = 10) after sofosbuvir and ribavirin (SOF/RBV) treatment, and from SOF/RBV relapsers who achieved SVR with a subsequent SOF/ledipasvir regimen (n = 9). While the NH2-truncated form of CXCL10 was elevated in HCV infection relative to healthy controls, pre-treatment plasma concentrations of CXCL10 forms failed to stratify subjects based on treatment outcome to IFN-free regimens. However, a trend (statistically non-significant) towards elevated higher levels of total and long CXCL10 was observed pre-treatment in subjects who relapsed. All forms of CXCL10 decreased rapidly following treatment initiation and were again elevated in subjects who experienced HCV relapse, indicating that CXCL10 production may be associated with active viral replication. While soluble DPP4 (sDPP4) and NH2-truncated CXCL10 concentrations were highly correlated, on-treatment sDPP4 levels and activity declined more slowly than CXCL10, suggesting differential regulation. These data suggest post-translationally modified forms of CXCL10 will not support the prediction of treatment outcome in HCV GT1 subjects treated with SOF/RBV.

  8. Metabolic regulation of histone post-translational modifications

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jing; Krautkramer, Kimberly A.; Feldman, Jessica L.; Denu, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Histone post-translational modifications regulate transcription and other DNA-templated functions. This process is dynamically regulated by specific modifying enzymes whose activities require metabolites that either serve as co-substrates or act as activators/inhibitors. Therefore, metabolism can influence histone modification by changing local concentrations of key metabolites. Physiologically, the epigenetic response to metabolism is important for nutrient sensing and environment adaption. In pathologic states, the connection between metabolism and histone modification mediates epigenetic abnormality in complex disease. In this review, we summarize recent studies of the molecular mechanisms involved in metabolic regulation of histone modifications and discuss their biological significance. PMID:25562692

  9. Identification of Post-translational Modifications of Plant Protein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Piquerez, Sophie J. M.; Balmuth, Alexi L.; Sklenář, Jan; Jones, Alexandra M.E.; Rathjen, John P.; Ntoukakis, Vardis

    2014-01-01

    Plants adapt quickly to changing environments due to elaborate perception and signaling systems. During pathogen attack, plants rapidly respond to infection via the recruitment and activation of immune complexes. Activation of immune complexes is associated with post-translational modifications (PTMs) of proteins, such as phosphorylation, glycosylation, or ubiquitination. Understanding how these PTMs are choreographed will lead to a better understanding of how resistance is achieved. Here we describe a protein purification method for nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR)-interacting proteins and the subsequent identification of their post-translational modifications (PTMs). With small modifications, the protocol can be applied for the purification of other plant protein complexes. The method is based on the expression of an epitope-tagged version of the protein of interest, which is subsequently partially purified by immunoprecipitation and subjected to mass spectrometry for identification of interacting proteins and PTMs. This protocol demonstrates that: i). Dynamic changes in PTMs such as phosphorylation can be detected by mass spectrometry; ii). It is important to have sufficient quantities of the protein of interest, and this can compensate for the lack of purity of the immunoprecipitate; iii). In order to detect PTMs of a protein of interest, this protein has to be immunoprecipitated to get a sufficient quantity of protein. PMID:24637539

  10. The interplay of post-translational modification and gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Osamor, Victor Chukwudi; Chinedu, Shalom N; Azuh, Dominic E; Iweala, Emeka Joshua; Ogunlana, Olubanke Olujoke

    2016-01-01

    Several proteins interact either to activate or repress the expression of other genes during transcription. Based on the impact of these activities, the proteins can be classified into readers, modifier writers, and modifier erasers depending on whether histone marks are read, added, or removed, respectively, from a specific amino acid. Transcription is controlled by dynamic epigenetic marks with serious health implications in certain complex diseases, whose understanding may be useful in gene therapy. This work highlights traditional and current advances in post-translational modifications with relevance to gene therapy delivery. We report that enhanced understanding of epigenetic machinery provides clues to functional implication of certain genes/gene products and may facilitate transition toward revision of our clinical treatment procedure with effective fortification of gene therapy delivery. PMID:27013864

  11. The interplay of post-translational modification and gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Osamor, Victor Chukwudi; Chinedu, Shalom N; Azuh, Dominic E; Iweala, Emeka Joshua; Ogunlana, Olubanke Olujoke

    2016-01-01

    Several proteins interact either to activate or repress the expression of other genes during transcription. Based on the impact of these activities, the proteins can be classified into readers, modifier writers, and modifier erasers depending on whether histone marks are read, added, or removed, respectively, from a specific amino acid. Transcription is controlled by dynamic epigenetic marks with serious health implications in certain complex diseases, whose understanding may be useful in gene therapy. This work highlights traditional and current advances in post-translational modifications with relevance to gene therapy delivery. We report that enhanced understanding of epigenetic machinery provides clues to functional implication of certain genes/gene products and may facilitate transition toward revision of our clinical treatment procedure with effective fortification of gene therapy delivery.

  12. Exploring adenylylation and phosphocholination as post-translational modifications.

    PubMed

    Müller, Matthias P; Albers, Michael F; Itzen, Aymelt; Hedberg, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Editing the translations: Adenylylation and phosphocholination have recently been found as important post-translational modifications used by pathogenic bacteria during the infection process. This review discusses the combined use of chemical handles and specific antibodies for the identification of previously unknown substrates of these post-translational modifications in infected host cells.

  13. Evolution of histone H3: emergence of variants and conservation of post-translational modification sites.

    PubMed

    Waterborg, Jakob H

    2012-02-01

    Histone H3 proteins are highly conserved across all eukaryotes and are dynamically modified by many post-translational modifications (PTMs). Here we describe a method that defines the evolution of the family of histone H3 proteins, including the emergence of functionally distinct variants. It combines information from histone H3 protein sequences in eukaryotic species with the evolution of these species as described by the tree of life (TOL) project. This so-called TOL analysis identified the time when the few observed protein sequence changes occurred and when distinct, co-existing H3 protein variants arose. Four distinct ancient duplication events were identified where replication-coupled (RC) H3 variants diverged from replication-independent (RI) forms, like histone H3.3 in animals. These independent events occurred in ancestral lineages leading to the clades of metazoa, viridiplantae, basidiomycota, and alveolata. The proto-H3 sequence in the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA) was expanded to at least 133 of its 135 residues. Extreme conservation of known acetylation and methylation sites of lysines and arginines predicts that these PTMs will exist across the eukaryotic crown phyla and in protists with canonical chromatin structures. Less complete conservation was found for most serine and threonine phosphorylation sites. This study demonstrates that TOL analysis can determine the evolution of slowly evolving proteins in sequence-saturated datasets.

  14. Mapping post-translational modifications of mammalian testicular specific histone variant TH2B in tetraploid and haploid germ cells and their implications on the dynamics of nucleosome structure.

    PubMed

    Pentakota, Satya Krishna; Sandhya, Sankaran; P Sikarwar, Arun; Chandra, Nagasuma; Satyanarayana Rao, Manchanahalli R

    2014-12-01

    Histones regulate a variety of chromatin templated events by their post-translational modifications (PTMs). Although there are extensive reports on the PTMs of canonical histones, the information on the histone variants remains very scanty. Here, we report the identification of different PTMs, such as acetylation, methylation, and phosphorylation of a major mammalian histone variant TH2B. Our mass spectrometric analysis has led to the identification of both conserved and unique modifications across tetraploid spermatocytes and haploid spermatids. We have also computationally derived the 3-dimensional model of a TH2B containing nucleosome in order to study the spatial orientation of the PTMs identified and their effect on nucleosome stability and DNA binding potential. From our nucleosome model, it is evident that substitution of specific amino acid residues in TH2B results in both differential histone-DNA and histone-histone contacts. Furthermore, we have also observed that acetylation on the N-terminal tail of TH2B weakens the interactions with the DNA. These results provide direct evidence that, similar to somatic H2B, the testis specific histone TH2B also undergoes multiple PTMs, suggesting the possibility of chromatin regulation by such covalent modifications in mammalian male germ cells.

  15. Proteomic Profiling and Functional Characterization of Multiple Post-Translational Modifications of Tubulin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ningning; Xiong, Yun; Ren, Yiran; Zhang, Linlin; He, Xianfei; Wang, Xincheng; Liu, Min; Li, Dengwen; Shui, Wenqing; Zhou, Jun

    2015-08-01

    Tubulin is known to undergo unique post-translational modifications (PTMs), such as detyrosination and polyglutamylation, particularly in the unstructured carboxy-terminal tails (CTTs). However, more conventional PTMs of tubulin and their roles in the regulation of microtubule properties and functions remain poorly defined. Here, we report the comprehensive profiling of tubulin phosphorylation, acetylation, ubiquitylation, and O-GlcNAcylation in HeLa cells with a proteomic approach. Our tubulin-targeted analysis has identified 80 residues bearing single or multiple conventional PTMs including 24 novel PTM sites not covered in previous global proteomic surveys. By using a series of PTM-deficient or PTM-mimicking mutants, we further find that tubulin phosphorylation and acetylation play important roles in the control of microtubule assembly and stability. In addition, these tubulin PTMs have distinct effects on the retrograde transport of adenoviruses along microtubules. These findings thus enlarge the repertoire of tubulin PTMs and foster our understanding of their versatile roles in the regulation of microtubule dynamics and cellular functions.

  16. Post-translational modifications mediated by reactive nitrogen species

    PubMed Central

    del Río, Luis A; Barroso, Juan B

    2008-01-01

    In animal cells, nitric oxide and NO-derived molecules have been shown to mediate post-translational modifications such as S-nitrosylation and protein tyrosine nitration which are associated with cell signalling and pathological processes, respectively. In plant cells, knowledge of the function of these post-translational modifications under physiological and stress conditions is still very rudimentary. In this addendum, we briefly examine how reactive nitrogen species (RNS) can exert important effects on proteins that could mediate signalling processes in plants. PMID:19841652

  17. Ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptide natural products: overview and recommendations for a universal nomenclature

    PubMed Central

    Arnison, Paul G.; Bibb, Mervyn J.; Bierbaum, Gabriele; Bowers, Albert A.; Bugni, Tim S.; Bulaj, Grzegorz; Camarero, Julio A.; Campopiano, Dominic J.; Challis, Gregory L.; Clardy, Jon; Cotter, Paul D.; Craik, David J.; Dawson, Michael; Dittmann, Elke; Donadio, Stefano; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Entian, Karl-Dieter; Fischbach, Michael A.; Garavelli, John S.; Göransson, Ulf; Gruber, Christian W.; Haft, Daniel H.; Hemscheidt, Thomas K.; Hertweck, Christian; Hill, Colin; Horswill, Alexander R.; Jaspars, Marcel; Kelly, Wendy L.; Klinman, Judith P.; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Link, A. James; Liu, Wen; Marahiel, Mohamed A.; Mitchell, Douglas A.; Moll, Gert N.; Moore, Bradley S.; Müller, Rolf; Nair, Satish K.; Nes, Ingolf F.; Norris, Gillian E.; Olivera, Baldomero M.; Onaka, Hiroyasu; Patchett, Mark L.; Piel, Joern; Reaney, Martin J. T.; Rebuffat, Sylvie; Ross, R. Paul; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Schmidt, Eric W.; Selsted, Michael E.; Severinov, Konstantin; Shen, Ben; Sivonen, Kaarina; Smith, Leif; Stein, Torsten; Süssmuth, Roderich D.; Tagg, John R.; Tang, Gong-Li; Truman, Andrew W.; Vederas, John C.; Walsh, Christopher T.; Walton, Jonathan D.; Wenzel, Silke C.; Willey, Joanne M.; van der Donk, Wilfred A.

    2014-01-01

    This review presents recommended nomenclature for the biosynthesis of ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified peptides (RiPPs), a rapidly growing class of natural products. The current knowledge regarding the biosynthesis of the >20 distinct compound classes is also reviewed, and commonalities are discussed. PMID:23165928

  18. Rosuvastatin Modulates the Post-Translational Acetylome in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ming Chung; Hsing, Chung Hsi; Li, Fu An; Wu, Chien Hsing; Fu, Yaw Syan; Cheng, Jen Kun; Huang, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Background Statins are lipid-lowering drugs that can simultaneously evoke pleiotropic effects on cardioprotection, vasodilation, and diabetes prevention. Recently, statins have been reported to be able to activate the AMP-activated protein kinase, thereby up-regulating sirtuin (SIRT) that functions as non-histone deacetylases. Therefore, it is essential to investigate the post-translational acetylome that might explain the mechanism of statin-modulated pleiotropic effects. Methods Endothelial cells EAhy 926 treated with rosuvastatin were used to monitor the expression of SIRTs proteins. The protein lysates of both mock- and rosuvastatin-treated cells were further separated by two- dimensional gel electrophoresis coupled with western blotting analysis. The significantly changed acetyl- containing proteins detected by using an anti-acetyl lysine antibody were collected from another preparative gel for mass spectrometric assay to identify the acetylated site in the proteins. Results Rosuvastatin treatment was shown to increase the SIRT1 expression when compared with SIRT2. Among 100 detected proteins with acetylated signal, 12 showed an increased level of acetylation, whereas 6 showed a decreased level of acetylation (deacetylation). The acetylated lysine (K) sites of 3 heat shock proteins, i.e., HSP47/K165, HSP70/K380, and heat shock-inducible protein/K417, were determined. We also found that beta-filamin, elongation factor, galectin and hCG22067 have 2 acetylated lysine sites in their peptide sequences. These dynamic acetylations might alter the protein’s function and are thought to be important in regulating statin-mediated pleiotropic effect. Conclusions Our study provided a feasible methodology for detecting acetylated proteins. This acetylome information may be utilized to explain, at least partially, the mechanisms of statin-derived pleiotropic effects. PMID:27122770

  19. Elucidating Host–Pathogen Interactions Based on Post-Translational Modifications Using Proteomics Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Ravikumar, Vaishnavi; Jers, Carsten; Mijakovic, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Microbes with the capability to survive in the host tissue and efficiently subvert its innate immune responses can cause various health hazards. There is an inherent need to understand microbial infection patterns and mechanisms in order to develop efficient therapeutics. Microbial pathogens display host specificity through a complex network of molecular interactions that aid their survival and propagation. Co-infection states further lead to complications by increasing the microbial burden and risk factors. Quantitative proteomics based approaches and post-translational modification analysis can be efficiently applied to gain an insight into the molecular mechanisms involved. The measurement of the proteome and post-translationally modified proteome dynamics using mass spectrometry, results in a wide array of information, such as significant changes in protein expression, protein abundance, the modification status, the site occupancy level, interactors, functional significance of key players, potential drug targets, etc. This mini review discusses the potential of proteomics to investigate the involvement of post-translational modifications in bacterial pathogenesis and host–pathogen interactions. PMID:26635773

  20. Alteration and modulation of protein activity by varying post-translational modification

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, David N.; Reed, David W.; Thompson, Vicki S.; Lacey, Jeffrey A.; Apel, William A.

    2016-07-12

    Embodiments of the invention include methods of altering the enzymatic activity or solubility of an extremophilic enzyme or post-translationally modifying a protein of interest via using isolated or partially purified glycosyltransferases and/or post-translational modification proteins, extracts of cells comprising glycosyltransferases and/or post-translational modification proteins, and/or in cells comprising one or more glycosyltransferases and/or post-translational modification proteins.

  1. Alteration and modulation of protein activity by varying post-translational modification

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, David N; Reed, David W; Thompson, Vicki S; Lacey, Jeffrey A; Apel, William A

    2015-03-03

    Embodiments of the invention include methods of altering the enzymatic activity or solubility of an extremophilic enzyme or post-translationally modifying a protein of interest via using isolated or partially purified glycosyltransferases and/or post-translational modification proteins, extracts of cells comprising glycosyltransferases and/or post-translational modification proteins, and/or in cells comprising one or more glycosyltransferases and/or post-translational modification proteins.

  2. Experimental annotation of post-translational features and translated coding regions in the pathogen Salmonella Typhimurium

    SciTech Connect

    Ansong, Charles; Tolic, Nikola; Purvine, Samuel O.; Porwollik, Steffen; Jones, Marcus B.; Yoon, Hyunjin; Payne, Samuel H.; Martin, Jessica L.; Burnet, Meagan C.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Venepally, Pratap; Smith, Richard D.; Peterson, Scott; Heffron, Fred; Mcclelland, Michael; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2011-08-25

    Complete and accurate genome annotation is crucial for comprehensive and systematic studies of biological systems. For example systems biology-oriented genome scale modeling efforts greatly benefit from accurate annotation of protein-coding genes to develop proper functioning models. However, determining protein-coding genes for most new genomes is almost completely performed by inference, using computational predictions with significant documented error rates (> 15%). Furthermore, gene prediction programs provide no information on biologically important post-translational processing events critical for protein function. With the ability to directly measure peptides arising from expressed proteins, mass spectrometry-based proteomics approaches can be used to augment and verify coding regions of a genomic sequence and importantly detect post-translational processing events. In this study we utilized “shotgun” proteomics to guide accurate primary genome annotation of the bacterial pathogen Salmonella Typhimurium 14028 to facilitate a systems-level understanding of Salmonella biology. The data provides protein-level experimental confirmation for 44% of predicted protein-coding genes, suggests revisions to 48 genes assigned incorrect translational start sites, and uncovers 13 non-annotated genes missed by gene prediction programs. We also present a comprehensive analysis of post-translational processing events in Salmonella, revealing a wide range of complex chemical modifications (70 distinct modifications) and confirming more than 130 signal peptide and N-terminal methionine cleavage events in Salmonella. This study highlights several ways in which proteomics data applied during the primary stages of annotation can improve the quality of genome annotations, especially with regards to the annotation of mature protein products.

  3. Post-Translational Modifications of Histones in Vertebrate Neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Mitrousis, Nikolaos; Tropepe, Vincent; Hermanson, Ola

    2015-01-01

    The process of neurogenesis, through which the entire nervous system of an organism is formed, has attracted immense scientific attention for decades. How can a single neural stem cell give rise to astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and neurons? Furthermore, how is a neuron led to choose between the hundreds of different neuronal subtypes that the vertebrate CNS contains? Traditionally, niche signals and transcription factors have been on the spotlight. Recent research is increasingly demonstrating that the answer may partially lie in epigenetic regulation of gene expression. In this article, we comprehensively review the role of post-translational histone modifications in neurogenesis in both the embryonic and adult CNS. PMID:26733796

  4. Linking Post-Translational Modifications and Variation of Phenotypic Traits*

    PubMed Central

    Albertin, Warren; Marullo, Philippe; Bely, Marina; Aigle, Michel; Bourgais, Aurélie; Langella, Olivier; Balliau, Thierry; Chevret, Didier; Valot, Benoît; da Silva, Telma; Dillmann, Christine; de Vienne, Dominique; Sicard, Delphine

    2013-01-01

    Enzymes can be post-translationally modified, leading to isoforms with different properties. The phenotypic consequences of the quantitative variability of isoforms have never been studied. We used quantitative proteomics to dissect the relationships between the abundances of the enzymes and isoforms of alcoholic fermentation, metabolic traits, and growth-related traits in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although the enzymatic pool allocated to the fermentation proteome was constant over the culture media and the strains considered, there was variation in abundance of individual enzymes and sometimes much more of their isoforms, which suggests the existence of selective constraints on total protein abundance and trade-offs between isoforms. Variations in abundance of some isoforms were significantly associated to metabolic traits and growth-related traits. In particular, cell size and maximum population size were highly correlated to the degree of N-terminal acetylation of the alcohol dehydrogenase. The fermentation proteome was found to be shaped by human selection, through the differential targeting of a few isoforms for each food-processing origin of strains. These results highlight the importance of post-translational modifications in the diversity of metabolic and life-history traits. PMID:23271801

  5. Vienna-PTM web server: a toolkit for MD simulations of protein post-translational modifications.

    PubMed

    Margreitter, Christian; Petrov, Drazen; Zagrovic, Bojan

    2013-07-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) play a key role in numerous cellular processes by directly affecting structure, dynamics and interaction networks of target proteins. Despite their importance, our understanding of protein PTMs at the atomistic level is still largely incomplete. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, which provide high-resolution insight into biomolecular function and underlying mechanisms, are in principle ideally suited to tackle this problem. However, because of the challenges associated with the development of novel MD parameters and a general lack of suitable computational tools for incorporating PTMs in target protein structures, MD simulations of post-translationally modified proteins have historically lagged significantly behind the studies of unmodified proteins. Here, we present Vienna-PTM web server (http://vienna-ptm.univie.ac.at), a platform for automated introduction of PTMs of choice to protein 3D structures (PDB files) in a user-friendly visual environment. With 256 different enzymatic and non-enzymatic PTMs available, the server performs geometrically realistic introduction of modifications at sites of interests, as well as subsequent energy minimization. Finally, the server makes available force field parameters and input files needed to run MD simulations of modified proteins within the framework of the widely used GROMOS 54A7 and 45A3 force fields and GROMACS simulation package. PMID:23703210

  6. Vienna-PTM web server: a toolkit for MD simulations of protein post-translational modifications

    PubMed Central

    Margreitter, Christian; Petrov, Drazen; Zagrovic, Bojan

    2013-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) play a key role in numerous cellular processes by directly affecting structure, dynamics and interaction networks of target proteins. Despite their importance, our understanding of protein PTMs at the atomistic level is still largely incomplete. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, which provide high-resolution insight into biomolecular function and underlying mechanisms, are in principle ideally suited to tackle this problem. However, because of the challenges associated with the development of novel MD parameters and a general lack of suitable computational tools for incorporating PTMs in target protein structures, MD simulations of post-translationally modified proteins have historically lagged significantly behind the studies of unmodified proteins. Here, we present Vienna-PTM web server (http://vienna-ptm.univie.ac.at), a platform for automated introduction of PTMs of choice to protein 3D structures (PDB files) in a user-friendly visual environment. With 256 different enzymatic and non-enzymatic PTMs available, the server performs geometrically realistic introduction of modifications at sites of interests, as well as subsequent energy minimization. Finally, the server makes available force field parameters and input files needed to run MD simulations of modified proteins within the framework of the widely used GROMOS 54A7 and 45A3 force fields and GROMACS simulation package. PMID:23703210

  7. Assays for Post-translational Modifications of Intermediate Filament Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Omary, M. Bishr

    2016-01-01

    Intermediate filament (IF) proteins are known to be regulated by a number of post-translational modifications (PTMs). Phosphorylation is the best studied IF PTM, whereas ubiquitination, sumoylation, acetylation, glycosylation, ADP-ribosylation, farnesylation and transamidation are less understood in functional terms but are known to regulate specific IFs under various contexts. The number and diversity of IF PTMs is certain to grow along with rapid advances in proteomic technologies. Therefore, the need for a greater understanding of the implications of PTMs to the structure, organization, and function of the IF cytoskeleton has become more apparent with the increased availability of data from global profiling studies of normal and diseased specimens. This chapter will provide information on established methods for the isolation and monitoring of IF PTMs along with the key reagents that are necessary to carry out these experiments. PMID:26795469

  8. Post-Translational Modification Control of Innate Immunity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Juan; Qian, Cheng; Cao, Xuetao

    2016-07-19

    A coordinated balance between the positive and negative regulation of pattern-recognition receptor (PRR)-initiated innate inflammatory responses is required to ensure the most favorable outcome for the host. Post-translational modifications (PTMs) of innate sensors and downstream signaling molecules influence their activity and function by inducing their covalent linkage to new functional groups. PTMs including phosphorylation and polyubiquitination have been shown to potently regulate innate inflammatory responses through the activation, cellular translocation, and interaction of innate receptors, adaptors, and downstream signaling molecules in response to infectious and dangerous signals. Other PTMs such as methylation, acetylation, SUMOylation, and succinylation are increasingly implicated in the regulation of innate immunity and inflammation. In this review, we focus on the roles of PTMs in controlling PRR-triggered innate immunity and inflammatory responses. The emerging roles of PTMs in the pathogenesis and potential treatment of infectious and inflammatory immune diseases are also discussed.

  9. Post-Translational Modifications of Histones in Human Sperm.

    PubMed

    Krejčí, Jana; Stixová, Lenka; Pagáčová, Eva; Legartová, Soňa; Kozubek, Stanislav; Lochmanová, Gabriela; Zdráhal, Zbyněk; Sehnalová, Petra; Dabravolski, Siarhei; Hejátko, Jan; Bártová, Eva

    2015-10-01

    We examined the levels and distribution of post-translationally modified histones and protamines in human sperm. Using western blot immunoassay, immunofluorescence, mass spectrometry (MS), and FLIM-FRET approaches, we analyzed the status of histone modifications and the protamine P2. Among individual samples, we observed variability in the levels of H3K9me1, H3K9me2, H3K27me3, H3K36me3, and H3K79me1, but the level of acetylated (ac) histones H4 was relatively stable in the sperm head fractions, as demonstrated by western blot analysis. Sperm heads with lower levels of P2 exhibited lower levels of H3K9ac, H3K9me1, H3K27me3, H3K36me3, and H3K79me1. A very strong correlation was observed between the levels of P2 and H3K9me2. FLIM-FRET analysis additionally revealed that acetylated histones H4 are not only parts of sperm chromatin but also appear in a non-integrated form. Intriguingly, H4ac and H3K27me3 were detected in sperm tail fractions via western blot analysis. An appearance of specific histone H3 and H4 acetylation and H3 methylation in sperm tail fractions was also confirmed by both LC-MS/MS and MALDI-TOF MS analysis. Taken together, these data indicate that particular post-translational modifications of histones are uniquely distributed in human sperm, and this distribution varies among individuals and among the sperm of a single individual.

  10. Nine Post-translational Modifications during the Biosynthesis of Cinnamycin

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Lantibiotics are ribosomally synthesized and post-translationally modified antimicrobial peptides that are characterized by the thioether cross-linked amino acids lanthionine (Lan) and methyllanthionine (MeLan). Cinnamycin is a 19 amino acid lantibiotic that contains one Lan and two MeLan. Cinnamycin also contains an unusual lysinoalanine (Lal) bridge formed from the ε-amino group of lysine 19 and a serine residue at position 6, and an erythro-3-hydroxy-l-aspartic acid resulting from the hydroxylation of l-aspartate at position 15. These modifications are critical in mediating the interactions of cinnamycin with its target, phosphatidylethanolamine. Recently, the cinnamycin biosynthetic gene cluster (cin) from Streptomyces cinnamoneus cinnamoneus DSM 40005 was reported. Herein, we investigated the biosynthetic machinery using both in vitro studies and heterologous expression in Escherichia coli. CinX is an α-ketoglutarate/iron(II)-dependent hydroxylase that carries out the hydroxylation of aspartate 15 of the precursor peptide CinA. In addition, CinM catalyzes dehydration of four Ser and Thr residues and subsequent cyclization of Cys residues to form the three (Me)Lan bridges. The order of the post-translational modifications catalyzed by CinM and CinX is interchangeable in vitro. CinX did not require the leader sequence at the N-terminus of CinA for activity, but the leader peptide was necessary for CinM function. Although CinM dehydrated serine 6, it did not catalyze the formation of Lal. A small protein encoded by cinorf7 is critical for the formation of the cross-link between Lys19 and dehydroalanine 6 as shown by coexpression studies of CinA, CinM, CinX, and Cinorf7 in E. coli. PMID:21770392

  11. Formylglycine, a post-translationally generated residue with unique catalytic capabilities and biotechnology applications.

    PubMed

    Appel, Mason J; Bertozzi, Carolyn R

    2015-01-16

    Formylglycine (fGly) is a catalytically essential residue found almost exclusively in the active sites of type I sulfatases. Formed by post-translational oxidation of cysteine or serine side chains, this aldehyde-functionalized residue participates in a unique and highly efficient catalytic mechanism for sulfate ester hydrolysis. The enzymes that produce fGly, formylglycine-generating enzyme (FGE) and anaerobic sulfatase-maturating enzyme (anSME), are as unique and specialized as fGly itself. FGE especially is structurally and mechanistically distinct, and serves the sole function of activating type I sulfatase targets. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge regarding the mechanism by which fGly contributes to sulfate ester hydrolysis, the molecular details of fGly biogenesis by FGE and anSME, and finally, recent biotechnology applications of fGly beyond its natural catalytic function.

  12. Molecular classification of fatty liver by high-throughput profiling of protein post-translational modifications.

    PubMed

    Urasaki, Yasuyo; Fiscus, Ronald R; Le, Thuc T

    2016-04-01

    We describe an alternative approach to classifying fatty liver by profiling protein post-translational modifications (PTMs) with high-throughput capillary isoelectric focusing (cIEF) immunoassays. Four strains of mice were studied, with fatty livers induced by different causes, such as ageing, genetic mutation, acute drug usage, and high-fat diet. Nutrient-sensitive PTMs of a panel of 12 liver metabolic and signalling proteins were simultaneously evaluated with cIEF immunoassays, using nanograms of total cellular protein per assay. Changes to liver protein acetylation, phosphorylation, and O-N-acetylglucosamine glycosylation were quantified and compared between normal and diseased states. Fatty liver tissues could be distinguished from one another by distinctive protein PTM profiles. Fatty liver is currently classified by morphological assessment of lipid droplets, without identifying the underlying molecular causes. In contrast, high-throughput profiling of protein PTMs has the potential to provide molecular classification of fatty liver.

  13. Formylglycine, a Post-Translationally Generated Residue with Unique Catalytic Capabilities and Biotechnology Applications

    PubMed Central

    Appel, Mason J.; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2015-01-01

    Formylglycine (fGly) is a catalytically essential residue found almost exclusively in the active sites of type I sulfatases. Formed by post-translational oxidation of cysteine or serine side chains, this aldehyde-functionalized residue participates in a unique and highly efficient catalytic mechanism for sulfate ester hydrolysis. The enzymes that produce fGly, formylglycine-generating enzyme (FGE) and anaerobic sulfatase-maturating enzyme (anSME), are as unique and specialized as fGly itself. FGE especially is structurally and mechanistically distinct, and serves the sole function of activating type I sulfatase targets. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge regarding the mechanism by which fGly contributes to sulfate ester hydrolysis, the molecular details of fGly biogenesis by FGE and anSME, and finally, recent biotechnology applications of fGly beyond its natural catalytic function. PMID:25514000

  14. Chaperone-assisted Post-translational Transport of Plastidic Type I Signal Peptidase 1.

    PubMed

    Endow, Joshua K; Singhal, Rajneesh; Fernandez, Donna E; Inoue, Kentaro

    2015-11-27

    Type I signal peptidase (SPase I) is an integral membrane Ser/Lys protease with one or two transmembrane domains (TMDs), cleaving transport signals off translocated precursor proteins. The catalytic domain of SPase I folds to form a hydrophobic surface and inserts into the lipid bilayers at the trans-side of the membrane. In bacteria, SPase I is targeted co-translationally, and the catalytic domain remains unfolded until it reaches the periplasm. By contrast, SPases I in eukaryotes are targeted post-translationally, requiring an alternative strategy to prevent premature folding. Here we demonstrate that two distinct stromal components are involved in post-translational transport of plastidic SPase I 1 (Plsp1) from Arabidopsis thaliana, which contains a single TMD. During import into isolated chloroplasts, Plsp1 was targeted to the membrane via a soluble intermediate in an ATP hydrolysis-dependent manner. Insertion of Plsp1 into isolated chloroplast membranes, by contrast, was found to occur by two distinct mechanisms. The first mechanism requires ATP hydrolysis and the protein conducting channel cpSecY1 and was strongly enhanced by exogenously added cpSecA1. The second mechanism was independent of nucleoside triphosphates and proteinaceous components but with a high frequency of mis-orientation. This unassisted insertion was inhibited by urea and stroma extract. During import-chase assays using intact chloroplasts, Plsp1 was incorporated into a soluble 700-kDa complex that co-migrated with the Cpn60 complex before inserting into the membrane. The TMD within Plsp1 was required for the cpSecA1-dependent insertion but was dispensable for association with the 700-kDa complex and also for unassisted membrane insertion. These results indicate cooperation of Cpn60 and cpSecA1 for proper membrane insertion of Plsp1 by cpSecY1.

  15. Current strategies and findings in clinically relevant post-translational modification-specific proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Pagel, Oliver; Loroch, Stefan; Sickmann, Albert; Zahedi, René P

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics has considerably extended our knowledge about the occurrence and dynamics of protein post-translational modifications (PTMs). So far, quantitative proteomics has been mainly used to study PTM regulation in cell culture models, providing new insights into the role of aberrant PTM patterns in human disease. However, continuous technological and methodical developments have paved the way for an increasing number of PTM-specific proteomic studies using clinical samples, often limited in sample amount. Thus, quantitative proteomics holds a great potential to discover, validate and accurately quantify biomarkers in body fluids and primary tissues. A major effort will be to improve the complete integration of robust but sensitive proteomics technology to clinical environments. Here, we discuss PTMs that are relevant for clinical research, with a focus on phosphorylation, glycosylation and proteolytic cleavage; furthermore, we give an overview on the current developments and novel findings in mass spectrometry-based PTM research. PMID:25955281

  16. Co- and/or post-translational modifications are critical for TCH4 XET activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, P.; Braam, J.; McIntire, L. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    TCH4 encodes a xyloglucan endotransglycosylase (XET) of Arabidopsis thaliana. XETs endolytically cleave and religate xyloglucan polymers; xyloglucan is one of the primary structural components of the plant cell wall. Therefore, XET function may affect cell shape and plant morphogenesis. To gain insight into the biochemical function of TCH4, we defined structural requirements for optimal XET activity. Recombinant baculoviruses were designed to produce distinct forms of TCH4. TCH4 protein engineered to be synthesized in the cytosol and thus lack normal co- and post-translational modifications is virtually inactive. TCH4 proteins, with and without a polyhistidine tag, that harbor an intact N-terminus are directed to the secretory pathway. Thus, as predicted, the N-terminal region of TCH4 functions as a signal peptide. TCH4 is shown to have at least one disulfide bond as monitored by a mobility shift in SDS-PAGE in the presence of dithiothreitol (DTT). This disulfide bond(s) is essential for full XET activity. TCH4 is glycosylated in vivo; glycosidases that remove N-linked glycosylation eliminated 98% of the XET activity. Thus, co- and/or post-translational modifications are critical for optimal TCH4 XET activity. Furthermore, using site-specific mutagenesis, we demonstrated that the first glutamate residue of the conserved DEIDFEFL motif (E97) is essential for activity. A change to glutamine at this position resulted in an inactive protein; a change to aspartic acid caused protein mislocalization. These data support the hypothesis that, in analogy to Bacillus beta-glucanases, this region may be the active site of XET enzymes.

  17. Lysine carboxylation: unveiling a spontaneous post-translational modification

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez-Morales, David; Adamian, Larisa; Shi, Dashuang; Liang, Jie

    2014-01-01

    A computational method for the prediction of lysine carboxylation (KCX) in protein structures is described. The method accurately identifies misreported KCXs and predicts previously unknown KCX sites. The carboxylation of lysine residues is a post-translational modification (PTM) that plays a critical role in the catalytic mechanisms of several important enzymes. It occurs spontaneously under certain physicochemical conditions, but is difficult to detect experimentally. Its full impact is unknown. In this work, the signature microenvironment of lysine-carboxylation sites has been characterized. In addition, a computational method called Predictor of Lysine Carboxylation (PreLysCar) for the detection of lysine carboxylation in proteins with available three-dimensional structures has been developed. The likely prevalence of lysine carboxylation in the proteome was assessed through large-scale computations. The results suggest that about 1.3% of large proteins may contain a carboxylated lysine residue. This unexpected prevalence of lysine carboxylation implies an enrichment of reactions in which it may play functional roles. The results also suggest that by switching enzymes on and off under appropriate physicochemical conditions spontaneous PTMs may serve as an important and widely used efficient biological machinery for regulation.

  18. Software eyes for protein post-translational modifications.

    PubMed

    Na, Seungjin; Paek, Eunok

    2015-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) are critical to almost all aspects of complex processes of the cell. Identification of PTMs is one of the biggest challenges for proteomics, and there have been many computational studies for the analysis of PTMs from tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). Most early PTM identification studies have been performed by matching MS/MS data to protein databases, using database search tools, but they are prohibitively slow when a large number of PTMs is given as a search parameter. In this article, we present recent developments to search for more types of PTMs and to speed up the search, and discuss many computational issues and solutions in terms of identifying multiply modified peptides or searching for all possible modifications at once in unrestrictive mode. Apart from the most common type of PTMs involving covalent addition of functional groups to proteins, PTMs such as disulfide linkage require dedicated software for the analysis because they may involve cross-linking between two different parts of proteins. Finally, methods for identification of protein disulfide bonds are presented.

  19. Contribution of Post-translational Phosphorylation to Sarcomere-Linked Cardiomyopathy Phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Westfall, Margaret V

    2016-01-01

    Secondary shifts develop in post-translational phosphorylation of sarcomeric proteins in multiple animal models of inherited cardiomyopathy. These signaling alterations together with the primary mutation are predicted to contribute to the overall cardiac phenotype. As a result, identification and integration of post-translational myofilament signaling responses are identified as priorities for gaining insights into sarcomeric cardiomyopathies. However, significant questions remain about the nature and contribution of post-translational phosphorylation to structural remodeling and cardiac dysfunction in animal models and human patients. This perspective essay discusses specific goals for filling critical gaps about post-translational signaling in response to these inherited mutations, especially within sarcomeric proteins. The discussion focuses primarily on pre-clinical analysis of animal models and defines challenges and future directions in this field. PMID:27683560

  20. Contribution of Post-translational Phosphorylation to Sarcomere-Linked Cardiomyopathy Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Westfall, Margaret V.

    2016-01-01

    Secondary shifts develop in post-translational phosphorylation of sarcomeric proteins in multiple animal models of inherited cardiomyopathy. These signaling alterations together with the primary mutation are predicted to contribute to the overall cardiac phenotype. As a result, identification and integration of post-translational myofilament signaling responses are identified as priorities for gaining insights into sarcomeric cardiomyopathies. However, significant questions remain about the nature and contribution of post-translational phosphorylation to structural remodeling and cardiac dysfunction in animal models and human patients. This perspective essay discusses specific goals for filling critical gaps about post-translational signaling in response to these inherited mutations, especially within sarcomeric proteins. The discussion focuses primarily on pre-clinical analysis of animal models and defines challenges and future directions in this field. PMID:27683560

  1. Contribution of Post-translational Phosphorylation to Sarcomere-Linked Cardiomyopathy Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Westfall, Margaret V.

    2016-01-01

    Secondary shifts develop in post-translational phosphorylation of sarcomeric proteins in multiple animal models of inherited cardiomyopathy. These signaling alterations together with the primary mutation are predicted to contribute to the overall cardiac phenotype. As a result, identification and integration of post-translational myofilament signaling responses are identified as priorities for gaining insights into sarcomeric cardiomyopathies. However, significant questions remain about the nature and contribution of post-translational phosphorylation to structural remodeling and cardiac dysfunction in animal models and human patients. This perspective essay discusses specific goals for filling critical gaps about post-translational signaling in response to these inherited mutations, especially within sarcomeric proteins. The discussion focuses primarily on pre-clinical analysis of animal models and defines challenges and future directions in this field.

  2. Recent advances in chemical proteomics: exploring the post-translational proteome.

    PubMed

    Tate, Edward W

    2008-11-01

    Identification and quantification of multiple proteins from complex mixtures is a central theme in post-genomic biology. Despite recent progress in high-throughput proteomics, proteomic analysis of post-translationally modified (PTM) proteins remains particularly challenging. This mini-review introduces the emerging field of chemical proteomics and reviews recent advances in chemical proteomic technology that are offering striking new insights into the functional biology of post-translational modification.

  3. Incorporation of post-translational modified amino acids as an approach to increase both chemical and biological diversity of conotoxins and conopeptides.

    PubMed

    Espiritu, Michael J; Cabalteja, Chino C; Sugai, Christopher K; Bingham, Jon-Paul

    2014-01-01

    Bioactive peptides from Conus venom contain a natural abundance of post-translational modifications that affect their chemical diversity, structural stability, and neuroactive properties. These modifications have continually presented hurdles in their identification and characterization. Early endeavors in their analysis relied on classical biochemical techniques that have led to the progressive development and use of novel proteomic-based approaches. The critical importance of these post-translationally modified amino acids and their specific assignment cannot be understated, having impact on their folding, pharmacological selectivity, and potency. Such modifications at an amino acid level may also provide additional insight into the advancement of conopeptide drugs in the quest for precise pharmacological targeting. To achieve this end, a concerted effort between the classical and novel approaches is needed to completely elucidate the role of post-translational modifications in conopeptide structure and dynamics. This paper provides a reflection in the advancements observed in dealing with numerous and multiple post-translationally modified amino acids within conotoxins and conopeptides and provides a summary of the current techniques used in their identification.

  4. Utilization of a calmodulin lysine methyltransferase co-expression system for the generation of a combinatorial library of post-translationally modified proteins.

    PubMed

    Magnani, Roberta; Chaffin, Brian; Dick, Emerson; Bricken, Michael L; Houtz, Robert L; Bradley, Luke H

    2012-12-01

    By successfully incorporating sequence diversity into proteins, combinatorial libraries have been a staple technology used in protein engineering, directed evolution, and synthetic biology for generating proteins with novel specificities and activities. However, these approaches mostly overlook the incorporations of post-translational modifications, which nature extensively uses for modulating protein activities in vivo. As an initial step of incorporating post-translational modifications into combinatorial libraries, we present a bacterial co-expression system, utilizing a recently characterized calmodulin methyltransferase (CaM KMT), to trimethylate a combinatorial library of the calmodulin central linker region. We show that this system is robust, with the successful over-expression and post-translational modification performed in Escherichia coli. Furthermore we show that trimethylation differentially affected the conformational dynamics of the protein upon the binding of calcium, and the thermal stability of the apoprotein. Collectively, these data support that when applied to an appropriately designed protein library scaffold, CaM KMT is able to produce a post-translationally modified library of protein sequences, thus providing a powerful tool for future protein library designs and constructions.

  5. DAPPLE 2: a Tool for the Homology-Based Prediction of Post-Translational Modification Sites.

    PubMed

    Trost, Brett; Maleki, Farhad; Kusalik, Anthony; Napper, Scott

    2016-08-01

    The post-translational modification of proteins is critical for regulating their function. Although many post-translational modification sites have been experimentally determined, particularly in certain model organisms, experimental knowledge of these sites is severely lacking for many species. Thus, it is important to be able to predict sites of post-translational modification in such species. Previously, we described DAPPLE, a tool that facilitates the homology-based prediction of one particular post-translational modification, phosphorylation, in an organism of interest using known phosphorylation sites from other organisms. Here, we describe DAPPLE 2, which expands and improves upon DAPPLE in three major ways. First, it predicts sites for many post-translational modifications (20 different types) using data from several sources (15 online databases). Second, it has the ability to make predictions approximately 2-7 times faster than DAPPLE depending on the database size and the organism of interest. Third, it simplifies and accelerates the process of selecting predicted sites of interest by categorizing them based on gene ontology terms, keywords, and signaling pathways. We show that DAPPLE 2 can successfully predict known human post-translational modification sites using, as input, known sites from species that are either closely (e.g., mouse) or distantly (e.g., yeast) related to humans. DAPPLE 2 can be accessed at http://saphire.usask.ca/saphire/dapple2 .

  6. DAPPLE 2: a Tool for the Homology-Based Prediction of Post-Translational Modification Sites.

    PubMed

    Trost, Brett; Maleki, Farhad; Kusalik, Anthony; Napper, Scott

    2016-08-01

    The post-translational modification of proteins is critical for regulating their function. Although many post-translational modification sites have been experimentally determined, particularly in certain model organisms, experimental knowledge of these sites is severely lacking for many species. Thus, it is important to be able to predict sites of post-translational modification in such species. Previously, we described DAPPLE, a tool that facilitates the homology-based prediction of one particular post-translational modification, phosphorylation, in an organism of interest using known phosphorylation sites from other organisms. Here, we describe DAPPLE 2, which expands and improves upon DAPPLE in three major ways. First, it predicts sites for many post-translational modifications (20 different types) using data from several sources (15 online databases). Second, it has the ability to make predictions approximately 2-7 times faster than DAPPLE depending on the database size and the organism of interest. Third, it simplifies and accelerates the process of selecting predicted sites of interest by categorizing them based on gene ontology terms, keywords, and signaling pathways. We show that DAPPLE 2 can successfully predict known human post-translational modification sites using, as input, known sites from species that are either closely (e.g., mouse) or distantly (e.g., yeast) related to humans. DAPPLE 2 can be accessed at http://saphire.usask.ca/saphire/dapple2 . PMID:27367363

  7. Markov chain Monte Carlo based analysis of post-translationally modified VDAC gating kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Tewari, Shivendra G.; Zhou, Yifan; Otto, Bradley J.; Dash, Ranjan K.; Kwok, Wai-Meng; Beard, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    The voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) is the main conduit for permeation of solutes (including nucleotides and metabolites) of up to 5 kDa across the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM). Recent studies suggest that VDAC activity is regulated via post-translational modifications (PTMs). Yet the nature and effect of these modifications is not understood. Herein, single channel currents of wild-type, nitrosated, and phosphorylated VDAC are analyzed using a generalized continuous-time Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method. This developed method describes three distinct conducting states (open, half-open, and closed) of VDAC activity. Lipid bilayer experiments are also performed to record single VDAC activity under un-phosphorylated and phosphorylated conditions, and are analyzed using the developed stochastic search method. Experimental data show significant alteration in VDAC gating kinetics and conductance as a result of PTMs. The effect of PTMs on VDAC kinetics is captured in the parameters associated with the identified Markov model. Stationary distributions of the Markov model suggest that nitrosation of VDAC not only decreased its conductance but also significantly locked VDAC in a closed state. On the other hand, stationary distributions of the model associated with un-phosphorylated and phosphorylated VDAC suggest a reversal in channel conformation from relatively closed state to an open state. Model analyses of the nitrosated data suggest that faster reaction of nitric oxide with Cys-127 thiol group might be responsible for the biphasic effect of nitric oxide on basal VDAC conductance. PMID:25628567

  8. Markov chain Monte Carlo based analysis of post-translationally modified VDAC gating kinetics.

    PubMed

    Tewari, Shivendra G; Zhou, Yifan; Otto, Bradley J; Dash, Ranjan K; Kwok, Wai-Meng; Beard, Daniel A

    2014-01-01

    The voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) is the main conduit for permeation of solutes (including nucleotides and metabolites) of up to 5 kDa across the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM). Recent studies suggest that VDAC activity is regulated via post-translational modifications (PTMs). Yet the nature and effect of these modifications is not understood. Herein, single channel currents of wild-type, nitrosated, and phosphorylated VDAC are analyzed using a generalized continuous-time Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method. This developed method describes three distinct conducting states (open, half-open, and closed) of VDAC activity. Lipid bilayer experiments are also performed to record single VDAC activity under un-phosphorylated and phosphorylated conditions, and are analyzed using the developed stochastic search method. Experimental data show significant alteration in VDAC gating kinetics and conductance as a result of PTMs. The effect of PTMs on VDAC kinetics is captured in the parameters associated with the identified Markov model. Stationary distributions of the Markov model suggest that nitrosation of VDAC not only decreased its conductance but also significantly locked VDAC in a closed state. On the other hand, stationary distributions of the model associated with un-phosphorylated and phosphorylated VDAC suggest a reversal in channel conformation from relatively closed state to an open state. Model analyses of the nitrosated data suggest that faster reaction of nitric oxide with Cys-127 thiol group might be responsible for the biphasic effect of nitric oxide on basal VDAC conductance. PMID:25628567

  9. Novel post-translational incorporation of tyrosine in PMA-activated polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN)

    SciTech Connect

    Nath, J.; Oliver, C.; Ohno, Y.; Gallin, J.I.

    1986-03-05

    During studies undertaken to determine whether stimulation of tubulin tyrosinolation occurs in PMA-activated PMN, a distinctly different and novel post-translational incorporation of tyrosine into multiple PMN proteins was observed. The reaction also occurred in organelle-depleted neutrophil cytoplasts and was highly exaggerated in organelle-enriched karyogranuloplasts. The incorporation was specific for tyrosine, did not require extracellular Ca/sup 2 +/ and was inhibited in the presence of a variety of reducing agents, intracellular scavengers of oxygen radicals and inhibitors of peroxidase-mediated reactions. The PMA-induced incorporation of tyrosine was completely absent in PMN from patients with chronic granulomatous disease, but occurred normally in PMN of a patient with myeloperoxidase deficiency. Moreover, the incorporation of tyrosine was blocked by N-acetyl-L-tyrosine but not by phenylalanine suggesting a requirement for the phenolic group. A two-fold increase in stable protein carbonyl derivatives was demonstrated suggesting an increased oxidative modification of the proteins. SDS urea PAGE and reversed phase HPLC did not reveal any detectable changes in the extent of protein cross-linking. The PMN tyrosine pool was approximately 900 ..mu..M and yet only 1 ..mu..M tyrosine was added in these experiments. The functional significance of this reaction is not yet clear.

  10. Characterization of Post-Translational Modifications to Calsequestrins of Cardiac and Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Kevin M.; Munske, Gerhard R.; Byrd, Samuel S.; Kang, Jeehoon; Cho, Hyun-Jai; Ríos, Eduardo; Kang, ChulHee

    2016-01-01

    Calsequestrin is glycosylated and phosphorylated during its transit to its final destination in the junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum. To determine the significance and universal profile of these post-translational modifications to mammalian calsequestrin, we characterized, via mass spectrometry, the glycosylation and phosphorylation of skeletal muscle calsequestrin from cattle (B. taurus), lab mice (M. musculus) and lab rats (R. norvegicus) and cardiac muscle calsequestrin from cattle, lab rats and humans. On average, glycosylation of skeletal calsequestrin consisted of two N-acetylglucosamines and one mannose (GlcNAc2Man1), while cardiac calsequestrin had five additional mannoses (GlcNAc2Man6). Skeletal calsequestrin was not phosphorylated, while the C-terminal tails of cardiac calsequestrin contained between zero to two phosphoryls, indicating that phosphorylation of cardiac calsequestrin may be heterogeneous in vivo. Static light scattering experiments showed that the Ca2+-dependent polymerization capabilities of native bovine skeletal calsequestrin are enhanced, relative to the non-glycosylated, recombinant isoform, which our crystallographic studies suggest may be due to glycosylation providing a dynamic “guiderail”-like scaffold for calsequestrin polymerization. Glycosylation likely increases a polymerization/depolymerization response to changing Ca2+ concentrations, and proper glycosylation, in turn, guarantees both effective Ca2+ storage/buffering of the sarcoplasmic reticulum and localization of calsequestrin (Casq) at its target site. PMID:27649144

  11. Characterization of Post-Translational Modifications to Calsequestrins of Cardiac and Skeletal Muscle.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Kevin M; Munske, Gerhard R; Byrd, Samuel S; Kang, Jeehoon; Cho, Hyun-Jai; Ríos, Eduardo; Kang, ChulHee

    2016-01-01

    Calsequestrin is glycosylated and phosphorylated during its transit to its final destination in the junctional sarcoplasmic reticulum. To determine the significance and universal profile of these post-translational modifications to mammalian calsequestrin, we characterized, via mass spectrometry, the glycosylation and phosphorylation of skeletal muscle calsequestrin from cattle (B. taurus), lab mice (M. musculus) and lab rats (R. norvegicus) and cardiac muscle calsequestrin from cattle, lab rats and humans. On average, glycosylation of skeletal calsequestrin consisted of two N-acetylglucosamines and one mannose (GlcNAc₂Man₁), while cardiac calsequestrin had five additional mannoses (GlcNAc₂Man₆). Skeletal calsequestrin was not phosphorylated, while the C-terminal tails of cardiac calsequestrin contained between zero to two phosphoryls, indicating that phosphorylation of cardiac calsequestrin may be heterogeneous in vivo. Static light scattering experiments showed that the Ca(2+)-dependent polymerization capabilities of native bovine skeletal calsequestrin are enhanced, relative to the non-glycosylated, recombinant isoform, which our crystallographic studies suggest may be due to glycosylation providing a dynamic "guiderail"-like scaffold for calsequestrin polymerization. Glycosylation likely increases a polymerization/depolymerization response to changing Ca(2+) concentrations, and proper glycosylation, in turn, guarantees both effective Ca(2+) storage/buffering of the sarcoplasmic reticulum and localization of calsequestrin (Casq) at its target site. PMID:27649144

  12. Protein post-translational modifications and regulation of pluripotency in human stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu-Chieh; Peterson, Suzanne E; Loring, Jeanne F

    2014-02-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) are known to be essential mechanisms used by eukaryotic cells to diversify their protein functions and dynamically coordinate their signaling networks. Defects in PTMs have been linked to numerous developmental disorders and human diseases, highlighting the importance of PTMs in maintaining normal cellular states. Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), including embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs), are capable of self-renewal and differentiation into a variety of functional somatic cells; these cells hold a great promise for the advancement of biomedical research and clinical therapy. The mechanisms underlying cellular pluripotency in human cells have been extensively explored in the past decade. In addition to the vast amount of knowledge obtained from the genetic and transcriptional research in hPSCs, there is a rapidly growing interest in the stem cell biology field to examine pluripotency at the protein and PTM level. This review addresses recent progress toward understanding the role of PTMs (glycosylation, phosphorylation, acetylation and methylation) in the regulation of cellular pluripotency.

  13. Alternative polyadenylation can regulate post-translational membrane localization

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Mithun; Johnson, Elizabeth L.; Coller, Hilary A.

    2016-01-01

    For many genomic loci, there are more than one potential cleavage and polyadenylation site, resulting in the generation of multiple distinct transcripts. When the proximal polyadenylation site is present within the coding region of the transcript, alternative polyadenylation can result in proteins with distinct amino acid sequences and potentially distinct functions. In most cases, the different possible polyadenylation sites are all present within the 3′ untranslated regions (UTRs), and the amino acid sequence of the encoded proteins are not affected by polyadenylation site selection. In individual instances, the selection of the proximal versus distal polyadenylation site in the 3′UTR can dramatically affect transcript stability and translatability. In some instances, UTR alternative polyadenylation generates RNA isoforms that have distinct subcellular localization patterns, and that can regulate the location of the encoded protein in an RNA-guided manner. In a recent paper, the laboratory of Christine Mayr demonstrated that alternative polyadenylation of the transmembrane protein CD47 results in transcripts with the same localization pattern, but the encoded protein localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum when it is encoded by the transcript generated by using the proximal polyadenylation site in 3′UTR, and the identical protein localizes to the plasma membrane when the transcript is encoded by the distal polyadenylation site, also in the 3′ UTR. Unlike previous studies, the mechanism of localization does not rely on differential trafficking of the mRNA and is instead, based on RNA-mediated recruitment of proteins to the cytoplasmic side of CD47 that support its plasma membrane localization. Other transmembrane proteins were discovered to be regulated similarly. The results demonstrate that the choice of polyadenylation site can affect protein localization and function, even when the sequence of the protein is unaffected. Further, the transcript encoding

  14. The interplay of multiple feedback loops with post-translational kinetics results in bistability of mycobacterial stress response

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Abhinav; Balázsi, Gábor; Gennaro, Maria Laura; Igoshin, Oleg A

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial persistence is the phenomenon in which a genetically identical fraction of a bacterial population can survive exposure to stress by reduction or cessation of growth. Persistence in mycobacteria has been recently linked to a stress-response network, consisting of the MprA/MprB two-component system and alternative sigma factor σE. This network contains multiple positive transcriptional feedback loops which may give rise to bistability, making it a good candidate for controlling the mycobacterial persistence switch. To analyze the possibility of bistability, we develop a method that involves decoupling of the network into transcriptional and post-translational interaction modules. As a result we reduce the dimensionality of the dynamical system and independently analyze input–output relations in the two modules to formulate a necessary condition for bistability in terms of their logarithmic gains. We show that neither the positive autoregulation in the MprA/MprB network nor the σE-mediated transcriptional feedback is sufficient to induce bistability in a biochemically realistic parameter range. Nonetheless, inclusion of the post-translational regulation of σE by RseA increases the effective cooperativity of the system, resulting in bistability that is robust to parameter variation. We predict that overexpression or deletion of RseA, the key element controlling the ultrasensitive response, can eliminate bistability. PMID:20733247

  15. Electrochemical methods for detection of post-translational modifications of proteins.

    PubMed

    Shumyantseva, Victoria V; Suprun, Elena V; Bulko, Tatiana V; Archakov, Alexander I

    2014-11-15

    Post-translational modifications of proteins play a key role in the regulation of various cellular processes. The analysis and identification of post-translational modifications are probably the most versatile and difficult, but also most frequently studied area of interest in proteomics research. This review focuses on the electroactivity of amino acids as a tool for analysis of post-translational modifications of proteins. The most attention is paid to the electrochemical detection of phosphorylation/dephosphorylation and glycosylation of proteins, to the best-studied and functionally-significant modifications, and, also, to the electrochemical analysis of activity of enzymes responsible for carrying out phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of proteins. Recent advances in electrochemistry with special references to proteomics are outlined and innovative technologies for protein detection are highlighted.

  16. Managing the complexity of communication: regulation of gap junctions by post-translational modification

    PubMed Central

    Axelsen, Lene N.; Calloe, Kirstine; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Nielsen, Morten S.

    2013-01-01

    Gap junctions are comprised of connexins that form cell-to-cell channels which couple neighboring cells to accommodate the exchange of information. The need for communication does, however, change over time and therefore must be tightly controlled. Although the regulation of connexin protein expression by transcription and translation is of great importance, the trafficking, channel activity and degradation are also under tight control. The function of connexins can be regulated by several post translational modifications, which affect numerous parameters; including number of channels, open probability, single channel conductance or selectivity. The most extensively investigated post translational modifications are phosphorylations, which have been documented in all mammalian connexins. Besides phosphorylations, some connexins are known to be ubiquitinated, SUMOylated, nitrosylated, hydroxylated, acetylated, methylated, and γ-carboxyglutamated. The aim of the present review is to summarize our current knowledge of post translational regulation of the connexin family of proteins. PMID:24155720

  17. Post-translational modifications of voltage-gated sodium channels in chronic pain syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Laedermann, Cedric J.; Abriel, Hugues; Decosterd, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    In the peripheral sensory nervous system the neuronal expression of voltage-gated sodium channels (Navs) is very important for the transmission of nociceptive information since they give rise to the upstroke of the action potential (AP). Navs are composed of nine different isoforms with distinct biophysical properties. Studying the mutations associated with the increase or absence of pain sensitivity in humans, as well as other expression studies, have highlighted Nav1.7, Nav1.8, and Nav1.9 as being the most important contributors to the control of nociceptive neuronal electrogenesis. Modulating their expression and/or function can impact the shape of the AP and consequently modify nociceptive transmission, a process that is observed in persistent pain conditions. Post-translational modification (PTM) of Navs is a well-known process that modifies their expression and function. In chronic pain syndromes, the release of inflammatory molecules into the direct environment of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) sensory neurons leads to an abnormal activation of enzymes that induce Navs PTM. The addition of small molecules, i.e., peptides, phosphoryl groups, ubiquitin moieties and/or carbohydrates, can modify the function of Navs in two different ways: via direct physical interference with Nav gating, or via the control of Nav trafficking. Both mechanisms have a profound impact on neuronal excitability. In this review we will discuss the role of Protein Kinase A, B, and C, Mitogen Activated Protein Kinases and Ca++/Calmodulin-dependent Kinase II in peripheral chronic pain syndromes. We will also discuss more recent findings that the ubiquitination of Nav1.7 by Nedd4-2 and the effect of methylglyoxal on Nav1.8 are also implicated in the development of experimental neuropathic pain. We will address the potential roles of other PTMs in chronic pain and highlight the need for further investigation of PTMs of Navs in order to develop new pharmacological tools to alleviate pain. PMID

  18. Post-translational modifications of voltage-gated sodium channels in chronic pain syndromes.

    PubMed

    Laedermann, Cedric J; Abriel, Hugues; Decosterd, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    In the peripheral sensory nervous system the neuronal expression of voltage-gated sodium channels (Navs) is very important for the transmission of nociceptive information since they give rise to the upstroke of the action potential (AP). Navs are composed of nine different isoforms with distinct biophysical properties. Studying the mutations associated with the increase or absence of pain sensitivity in humans, as well as other expression studies, have highlighted Nav1.7, Nav1.8, and Nav1.9 as being the most important contributors to the control of nociceptive neuronal electrogenesis. Modulating their expression and/or function can impact the shape of the AP and consequently modify nociceptive transmission, a process that is observed in persistent pain conditions. Post-translational modification (PTM) of Navs is a well-known process that modifies their expression and function. In chronic pain syndromes, the release of inflammatory molecules into the direct environment of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) sensory neurons leads to an abnormal activation of enzymes that induce Navs PTM. The addition of small molecules, i.e., peptides, phosphoryl groups, ubiquitin moieties and/or carbohydrates, can modify the function of Navs in two different ways: via direct physical interference with Nav gating, or via the control of Nav trafficking. Both mechanisms have a profound impact on neuronal excitability. In this review we will discuss the role of Protein Kinase A, B, and C, Mitogen Activated Protein Kinases and Ca++/Calmodulin-dependent Kinase II in peripheral chronic pain syndromes. We will also discuss more recent findings that the ubiquitination of Nav1.7 by Nedd4-2 and the effect of methylglyoxal on Nav1.8 are also implicated in the development of experimental neuropathic pain. We will address the potential roles of other PTMs in chronic pain and highlight the need for further investigation of PTMs of Navs in order to develop new pharmacological tools to alleviate pain. PMID

  19. Examining post-translational modification-mediated protein-protein interactions using a chemical proteomics approach.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Foley, Emily A; Kawashima, Shigehiro A; Molloy, Kelly R; Li, Yinyin; Chait, Brian T; Kapoor, Tarun M

    2013-03-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTM) of proteins can control complex and dynamic cellular processes via regulating interactions between key proteins. To understand these regulatory mechanisms, it is critical that we can profile the PTM-dependent protein-protein interactions. However, identifying these interactions can be very difficult using available approaches, as PTMs can be dynamic and often mediate relatively weak protein-protein interactions. We have recently developed CLASPI (cross-linking-assisted and stable isotope labeling in cell culture-based protein identification), a chemical proteomics approach to examine protein-protein interactions mediated by methylation in human cell lysates. Here, we report three extensions of the CLASPI approach. First, we show that CLASPI can be used to analyze methylation-dependent protein-protein interactions in lysates of fission yeast, a genetically tractable model organism. For these studies, we examined trimethylated histone H3 lysine-9 (H3K9Me₃)-dependent protein-protein interactions. Second, we demonstrate that CLASPI can be used to examine phosphorylation-dependent protein-protein interactions. In particular, we profile proteins recognizing phosphorylated histone H3 threonine-3 (H3T3-Phos), a mitotic histone "mark" appearing exclusively during cell division. Our approach identified survivin, the only known H3T3-Phos-binding protein, as well as other proteins, such as MCAK and KIF2A, that are likely to be involved in weak but selective interactions with this histone phosphorylation "mark". Finally, we demonstrate that the CLASPI approach can be used to study the interplay between histone H3T3-Phos and trimethylation on the adjacent residue lysine 4 (H3K4Me₃). Together, our findings indicate the CLASPI approach can be broadly applied to profile protein-protein interactions mediated by PTMs. PMID:23281010

  20. Examining post-translational modification-mediated protein–protein interactions using a chemical proteomics approach

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Foley, Emily A; Kawashima, Shigehiro A; Molloy, Kelly R; Li, Yinyin; Chait, Brian T; Kapoor, Tarun M

    2013-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTM) of proteins can control complex and dynamic cellular processes via regulating interactions between key proteins. To understand these regulatory mechanisms, it is critical that we can profile the PTM-dependent protein–protein interactions. However, identifying these interactions can be very difficult using available approaches, as PTMs can be dynamic and often mediate relatively weak protein–protein interactions. We have recently developed CLASPI (cross-linking-assisted and stable isotope labeling in cell culture-based protein identification), a chemical proteomics approach to examine protein–protein interactions mediated by methylation in human cell lysates. Here, we report three extensions of the CLASPI approach. First, we show that CLASPI can be used to analyze methylation-dependent protein–protein interactions in lysates of fission yeast, a genetically tractable model organism. For these studies, we examined trimethylated histone H3 lysine-9 (H3K9Me3)-dependent protein–protein interactions. Second, we demonstrate that CLASPI can be used to examine phosphorylation-dependent protein–protein interactions. In particular, we profile proteins recognizing phosphorylated histone H3 threonine-3 (H3T3-Phos), a mitotic histone “mark” appearing exclusively during cell division. Our approach identified survivin, the only known H3T3-Phos-binding protein, as well as other proteins, such as MCAK and KIF2A, that are likely to be involved in weak but selective interactions with this histone phosphorylation “mark”. Finally, we demonstrate that the CLASPI approach can be used to study the interplay between histone H3T3-Phos and trimethylation on the adjacent residue lysine 4 (H3K4Me3). Together, our findings indicate the CLASPI approach can be broadly applied to profile protein–protein interactions mediated by PTMs. PMID:23281010

  1. Post-translational modification profiling - A novel tool for mapping the protein modification landscape in cancer.

    PubMed

    Eisenberg-Lerner, Avital; Ciechanover, Aaron; Merbl, Yifat

    2016-08-01

    The ubiquitin system plays an important role in essentially every cellular process, regulating numerous pathways ranging from development, transcription, DNA damage response, cell cycle, and signal transduction. Its best studied role involves removal of faulty proteins or those that are not necessary anymore. Aberrations in the ubiquitin system have been implicated in various pathologies including cancer, where specific mutations in E3 ligases such as Mdm2, pVHL, and BRCA1 have been linked to disease progression, prognosis, and resistance to drugs. Yet, there are hundreds of E3 ligases in the human genome and our knowledge of their target proteins and their dynamic regulation in the cellular environment is largely limited. In addition, fundamental questions related to recognition and specificity in ubiquitin conjugation remain unanswered. It is thus of major importance to characterize the ubiquitin landscape under various cellular conditions, and study how the regulatory network is altered in health and disease. To do so, analytical tools that allow identification of ubiquitin substrates, the conjugation and removal of ubiquitin, and the nature of specific ubiquitin linkages that are formed are needed. In this mini-review, we discuss common proteomic methodologies applied to studying the ubiquitome, and specifically focus on our recently developed post-translational modification (PTM) profiling approach. PTM profiling is a functional assay, amenable to biochemical manipulation, which allows the detection of protein modifications in a high-throughput manner. We discuss in detail the advantages and limitations of this system, focusing primarily on examples for analyzing the ubiquitin system in cancer. Uncovering the intricate signaling dynamics governed by and regulating ubiquitin modifications should clearly evolve into a new paradigm in understanding the molecular basis of malignant transformation and the development of novel therapeutic modalities. PMID:27229346

  2. Aberrant post-translational protein modifications in the pathogenesis of alcohol-induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    Osna, Natalia A; Carter, Wayne G; Ganesan, Murali; Kirpich, Irina A; McClain, Craig J; Petersen, Dennis R; Shearn, Colin T; Tomasi, Maria L; Kharbanda, Kusum K

    2016-07-21

    It is likely that the majority of proteins will undergo post-translational modification, be it enzymatic or non-enzymatic. These modified protein(s) regulate activity, localization and interaction with other cellular molecules thereby maintaining cellular hemostasis. Alcohol exposure significantly alters several of these post-translational modifications leading to impairments of many essential physiological processes. Here, we present new insights into novel modifications following ethanol exposure and their role in the initiation and progression of liver injury. This critical review condenses the proceedings of a symposium at the European Society for the Biomedical Research on Alcoholism Meeting held September 12-15, 2015, in Valencia, Spain. PMID:27468209

  3. Aberrant post-translational protein modifications in the pathogenesis of alcohol-induced liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Osna, Natalia A; Carter, Wayne G; Ganesan, Murali; Kirpich, Irina A; McClain, Craig J; Petersen, Dennis R; Shearn, Colin T; Tomasi, Maria L; Kharbanda, Kusum K

    2016-01-01

    It is likely that the majority of proteins will undergo post-translational modification, be it enzymatic or non-enzymatic. These modified protein(s) regulate activity, localization and interaction with other cellular molecules thereby maintaining cellular hemostasis. Alcohol exposure significantly alters several of these post-translational modifications leading to impairments of many essential physiological processes. Here, we present new insights into novel modifications following ethanol exposure and their role in the initiation and progression of liver injury. This critical review condenses the proceedings of a symposium at the European Society for the Biomedical Research on Alcoholism Meeting held September 12-15, 2015, in Valencia, Spain. PMID:27468209

  4. Post-translational control of genetic circuits using Potyvirus proteases.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Rodriguez, Jesus; Voigt, Christopher A

    2016-07-27

    Genetic engineering projects often require control over when a protein is degraded. To this end, we use a fusion between a degron and an inactivating peptide that can be added to the N-terminus of a protein. When the corresponding protease is expressed, it cleaves the peptide and the protein is degraded. Three protease:cleavage site pairs from Potyvirus are shown to be orthogonal and active in exposing degrons, releasing inhibitory domains and cleaving polyproteins. This toolbox is applied to the design of genetic circuits as a means to control regulator activity and degradation. First, we demonstrate that a gate can be constructed by constitutively expressing an inactivated repressor and having an input promoter drive the expression of the protease. It is also shown that the proteolytic release of an inhibitory domain can improve the dynamic range of a transcriptional gate (200-fold repression). Next, we design polyproteins containing multiple repressors and show that their cleavage can be used to control multiple outputs. Finally, we demonstrate that the dynamic range of an output can be improved (8-fold to 190-fold) with the addition of a protease-cleaved degron. Thus, controllable proteolysis offers a powerful tool for modulating and expanding the function of synthetic gene circuits. PMID:27298256

  5. Developmentally arrested Austrofundulus limnaeus embryos have changes in post-translational modifications of histone H3.

    PubMed

    Toni, Lee S; Padilla, Pamela A

    2016-02-01

    Although vertebrate embryogenesis is typically a continuous and dynamic process, some embryos have evolved mechanisms to developmentally arrest. The embryos of Austrofundulus limnaeus, a killifish that resides in ephemeral ponds, routinely enter diapause II (DII), a reversible developmental arrest promoted by endogenous cues rather than environmental stress. DII, which starts at 24-26 days post-fertilization and can persist for months, is characterized by a significant decline in heart rate and an arrest of development and differentiation. Thus, A. limnaeus is a unique model to study epigenetic features associated with embryonic arrest. To investigate chromosome structures associated with mitosis or gene expression, we examined the post-translational modifications of histone H3 (phosphorylation of serine 10, mono-, di- and tri-methylation of lysine 4 or 27) in preDII, DII and postDII embryos. As seen by microscopy analysis, DII embryos have a significant decrease in the H3S10P marker for mitotic nuclei and an inner nuclear membrane localization of the H3K27me2 marker associated with silencing of gene expression. ELISA experiments reveal that the levels of methylation at H3K4 and H3K27 are significantly different between preDII, DII and postDII embryos, indicating that there are molecular differences between embryos of different chronological age and stage of development. Furthermore, in DII embryos relative to preDII embryos, there are differences in the level of H3K27me3 and H3K4me3, which may reflect critical chromatin remodeling that occurs prior to arrest of embryogenesis. This work helps lay a foundation for chromatin analysis of vertebrate embryo diapause, an intriguing yet greatly understudied phenomenon. PMID:26685169

  6. Smoothing T cell roads to the tumor: Chemokine post-translational regulation.

    PubMed

    Molon, Barbara; Viola, Antonella; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2012-05-01

    We described a novel tumor-associated immunosuppressive mechanism based on post-translational modifications of chemokines by reactive nitrogen species (RNS). To overcome tumor immunosuppressive hindrances, we designed and developed a new drug, AT38, that inhibits RNS generation at the tumor site. Combinatorial approaches with AT38 boost the effectiveness of cancer immunotherapy protocols.

  7. How to control self-digestion: transcriptional, post-transcriptional, and post-translational regulation of autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yuchen; Yao, Zhiyuan; Klionsky, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Macroautophagy (hereafter autophagy), literally defined as a type of self-eating, is a dynamic cellular process in which cytoplasm is sequestered within a unique compartment termed the phagophore. Upon completion, the phagophore matures into a double-membrane autophagosome that fuses with the lysosome or vacuole, allowing degradation of the cargo. Nonselective autophagy is primarily a cytoprotective response to various types of stress; however, the process can also be highly selective. Autophagy is involved in various aspects of cell physiology, and its dysregulation is associated with a range of diseases. The regulation of autophagy is complex, and the process must be properly modulated to maintain cellular homeostasis. In this review, we focus on the current state of knowledge concerning transcriptional, post-transcriptional, and post-translational regulation of autophagy in yeast and mammals. PMID:25759175

  8. Microfluidic molecular assay platform for the detection of miRNAs, mRNAs, proteins, and post-translational modifications at single-cell resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Meiye; Singh, Anup K.

    2014-07-15

    In this study, cell signaling is a dynamic and complex process. A typical signaling pathway may begin with activation of cell surface receptors, leading to activation kinase cascade that culminates in induction of mRNA and non-coding miRNA production in the nucleus, followed by modulation of mRNA expression by miRNAs in the cytosol, and end with production of proteins in response to the signaling pathway. Signaling pathways involve proteins, miRNA, and mRNAs, along with various forms of transient post-translational modifications, and detecting each type of signaling molecule requires categorically different sample preparation methods such as Western blotting for proteins, PCR for nucleic acids, and flow cytometry for post-translational modifications. Since we know that cells in populations behave heterogeneously1, especially in the cases of stem cells, cancer, and hematopoiesis, there is need for a new technology that provides capability to detect and quantify multiple categories of signaling molecules in intact single cells to provide a comprehensive view of the cell’s physiological state. In this technical brief, we describe our microfluidic platform with a portfolio of customized molecular assays that can detect nucleic acids, proteins, and post-translational modifications in single intact cells with >95% reduction in reagent requirement in under 8 hours.

  9. Microfluidic molecular assay platform for the detection of miRNAs, mRNAs, proteins, and post-translational modifications at single-cell resolution

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wu, Meiye; Singh, Anup K.

    2014-07-15

    In this study, cell signaling is a dynamic and complex process. A typical signaling pathway may begin with activation of cell surface receptors, leading to activation kinase cascade that culminates in induction of mRNA and non-coding miRNA production in the nucleus, followed by modulation of mRNA expression by miRNAs in the cytosol, and end with production of proteins in response to the signaling pathway. Signaling pathways involve proteins, miRNA, and mRNAs, along with various forms of transient post-translational modifications, and detecting each type of signaling molecule requires categorically different sample preparation methods such as Western blotting for proteins, PCR formore » nucleic acids, and flow cytometry for post-translational modifications. Since we know that cells in populations behave heterogeneously1, especially in the cases of stem cells, cancer, and hematopoiesis, there is need for a new technology that provides capability to detect and quantify multiple categories of signaling molecules in intact single cells to provide a comprehensive view of the cell’s physiological state. In this technical brief, we describe our microfluidic platform with a portfolio of customized molecular assays that can detect nucleic acids, proteins, and post-translational modifications in single intact cells with >95% reduction in reagent requirement in under 8 hours.« less

  10. Methane Seep Carbonates Host Distinct, Diverse, and Dynamic Microbial Assemblages

    PubMed Central

    Pasulka, Alexis L.; Marlow, Jeffrey J.; Grupe, Benjamin M.; Levin, Lisa A.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Marine methane seeps are globally distributed geologic features in which reduced fluids, including methane, are advected upward from the subsurface. As a result of alkalinity generation during sulfate-coupled methane oxidation, authigenic carbonates form slabs, nodules, and extensive pavements. These carbonates shape the landscape within methane seeps, persist long after methane flux is diminished, and in some cases are incorporated into the geologic record. In this study, microbial assemblages from 134 native and experimental samples across 5,500 km, representing a range of habitat substrates (carbonate nodules and slabs, sediment, bottom water, and wood) and seepage conditions (active and low activity), were analyzed to address two fundamental questions of seep microbial ecology: (i) whether carbonates host distinct microbial assemblages and (ii) how sensitive microbial assemblages are to habitat substrate type and temporal shifts in methane seepage flux. Through massively parallel 16S rRNA gene sequencing and statistical analysis, native carbonates are shown to be reservoirs of distinct and highly diverse seep microbial assemblages. Unique coupled transplantation and colonization experiments on the seafloor demonstrated that carbonate-associated microbial assemblages are resilient to seep quiescence and reactive to seep activation over 13 months. Various rates of response to simulated seep quiescence and activation are observed among similar phylogenies (e.g., Chloroflexi operational taxonomic units) and similar metabolisms (e.g., putative S oxidizers), demonstrating the wide range of microbial sensitivity to changes in seepage flux. These results imply that carbonates do not passively record a time-integrated history of seep microorganisms but rather host distinct, diverse, and dynamic microbial assemblages. PMID:26695630

  11. The exploration of network motifs as potential drug targets from post-translational regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Song, Jiangning; Bork, Peer; Zhao, Xing-Ming

    2016-02-08

    Phosphorylation and proteolysis are among the most common post-translational modifications (PTMs), and play critical roles in various biological processes. More recent discoveries imply that the crosstalks between these two PTMs are involved in many diseases. In this work, we construct a post-translational regulatory network (PTRN) consists of phosphorylation and proteolysis processes, which enables us to investigate the regulatory interplays between these two PTMs. With the PTRN, we identify some functional network motifs that are significantly enriched with drug targets, some of which are further found to contain multiple proteins targeted by combinatorial drugs. These findings imply that the network motifs may be used to predict targets when designing new drugs. Inspired by this, we propose a novel computational approach called NetTar for predicting drug targets using the identified network motifs. Benchmarking results on real data indicate that our approach can be used for accurate prediction of novel proteins targeted by known drugs.

  12. Honing the message: post-transcriptional and post-translational control in attaching and effacing pathogens.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Shantanu; Romeo, Tony; Kalman, Daniel

    2011-05-01

    Bacteria evolve their capacity to cause disease by acquiring virulence genes that are usually clustered in discrete genetic modules termed pathogenicity islands (PAI). Stable integration of PAIs into pre-existing transcriptional networks coordinates expression from PAIs with ancestral genes in response to diverse environmental cues. Such transcriptional controls are evident in the regulation of the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE), a PAI of enteropathogenic and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli. However, recent reports indicate that global post-transcriptional and post-translational regulators, including CsrA, Hfq and ClpXP, fine-tune the transcriptional output from the LEE. In this opinion article, we highlight recent advances in the understanding of post-transcriptional and post-translational regulation in attaching and effacing pathogens.

  13. Post-Translational Modifications of RelB NF-κB Subunit and Associated Functions

    PubMed Central

    Baud, Véronique; Collares, Davi

    2016-01-01

    The family of NF-κB transcription factors plays a key role in diverse biological processes, such as inflammatory and immune responses, cell survival and tumor development. Beyond the classical NF-κB activation pathway, a second NF-κB pathway has more recently been uncovered, the so-called alternative NF-κB activation pathway. It has been shown that this pathway mainly controls the activity of RelB, a member of the NF-κB family. Post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylation, acetylation, methylation, ubiquitination and SUMOylation, have recently emerged as a strategy for the fine-tuned regulation of NF-κB. Our review discusses recent progress in the understanding of RelB regulation by post-translational modifications and the associated functions in normal and pathological conditions. PMID:27153093

  14. Post-translational modifications as key regulators of TNF-induced necroptosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, X; Shi, F; Li, Y; Yu, X; Peng, S; Li, W; Luo, X; Cao, Y

    2016-01-01

    Necroptosis is a novel form of programmed cell death that is independent of caspase activity. Different stimuli can trigger necroptosis. At present, the most informative studies about necroptosis derive from the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-triggered system. The initiation of TNF-induced necroptosis requires the kinase activity of receptor-interacting protein 1 and 3 (RIP1 and RIP3). Evidence now reveals that the ability of RIP1 and RIP3 to modulate this key cellular event is tightly controlled by post-translational modifications, including ubiquitination, phosphorylation, caspase 8-mediated cleavage and GlcNAcylation. These regulatory events coordinately determine whether a cell will survive or die by apoptosis or necroptosis. In this review, we highlight recent advances in the study of post-translational modifications during TNF-induced necroptosis and discuss how these modifications regulate the complex and delicate control of programmed necrosis. PMID:27383048

  15. Top-down and Middle-down Protein Analysis Reveals that Intact and Clipped Human Histones Differ in Post-translational Modification Patterns.

    PubMed

    Tvardovskiy, Andrey; Wrzesinski, Krzysztof; Sidoli, Simone; Fey, Stephen J; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Jensen, Ole N

    2015-12-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) of histone proteins play a fundamental role in regulation of DNA-templated processes. There is also growing evidence that proteolytic cleavage of histone N-terminal tails, known as histone clipping, influences nucleosome dynamics and functional properties. Using top-down and middle-down protein analysis by mass spectrometry, we report histone H2B and H3 N-terminal tail clipping in human hepatocytes and demonstrate a relationship between clipping and co-existing PTMs of histone H3. Histones H2B and H3 undergo proteolytic processing in primary human hepatocytes and the hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2/C3A when grown in spheroid (3D) culture, but not in a flat (2D) culture. Using tandem mass spectrometry we localized four different clipping sites in H3 and one clipping site in H2B. We show that in spheroid culture clipped H3 proteoforms are mainly represented by canonical histone H3, whereas in primary hepatocytes over 90% of clipped H3 correspond to the histone variant H3.3. Comprehensive analysis of histone H3 modifications revealed a series of PTMs, including K14me1, K27me2/K27me3, and K36me1/me2, which are differentially abundant in clipped and intact H3. Analysis of co-existing PTMs revealed negative crosstalk between H3K36 methylation and H3K23 acetylation in clipped H3. Our data provide the first evidence of histone clipping in human hepatocytes and demonstrate that clipped H3 carry distinct co-existing PTMs different from those in intact H3.

  16. Fluorescence-activated sorting of fixed nuclei: a general method for studying nuclei from specific cell populations that preserves post-translational modifications.

    PubMed

    Marion-Poll, Lucile; Montalban, Enrica; Munier, Annie; Hervé, Denis; Girault, Jean-Antoine

    2014-04-01

    Long-lasting brain alterations that underlie learning and memory are triggered by synaptic activity. How activity can exert long-lasting effects on neurons is a major question in neuroscience. Signalling pathways from cytoplasm to nucleus and the resulting changes in transcription and epigenetic modifications are particularly relevant in this context. However, a major difficulty in their study comes from the cellular heterogeneity of brain tissue. A promising approach is to directly purify identified nuclei. Using mouse striatum we have developed a rapid and efficient method for isolating cell type-specific nuclei from fixed adult brain (fluorescence-activated sorting of fixed nuclei; FAST-FIN). Animals are quickly perfused with a formaldehyde fixative that stops enzymatic reactions and maintains the tissue in the state it was at the time of death, including nuclear localisation of soluble proteins such as GFP and differences in nuclear size between cell types. Tissue is subsequently dissociated with a Dounce homogeniser and nuclei prepared by centrifugation in an iodixanol density gradient. The purified fixed nuclei can then be immunostained with specific antibodies and analysed or sorted by flow cytometry. Simple criteria allow distinction of neurons and non-neuronal cells. Immunolabelling and transgenic mice that express fluorescent proteins can be used to identify specific cell populations, and the nuclei from these populations can be efficiently isolated, even rare cell types such as parvalbumin-expressing interneurons. FAST-FIN allows the preservation and study of dynamic and labile post-translational protein modifications. It should be applicable to other tissues and species, and allow study of DNA and its modifications.

  17. Identification of Nuclear Protein Targets for Six Leukemogenic Tyrosine Kinases Governed by Post-Translational Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Andrew; Williamson, Andrew; Jaworska, Ewa; Griffiths, John R.; Taylor, Sam; Walker, Michael; O’Dea, Mark Aspinall; Spooncer, Elaine; Unwin, Richard D.; Poolman, Toryn; Ray, David; Whetton, Anthony D.

    2012-01-01

    Mutated tyrosine kinases are associated with a number of different haematological malignancies including myeloproliferative disorders, lymphoma and acute myeloid leukaemia. The potential commonalities in the action of six of these leukemogenic proteins on nuclear proteins were investigated using systematic proteomic analysis. The effects on over 3600 nuclear proteins and 1500 phosphopeptide sites were relatively quantified in seven isogenic cell lines. The effects of the kinases were diverse although some commonalities were found. Comparison of the nuclear proteomic data with transcriptome data and cytoplasmic proteomic data indicated that the major changes are due to post-translational mechanisms rather than changes in mRNA or protein distribution. Analysis of the promoter regions of genes whose protein levels changed in response to the kinases showed the most common binding site found was that for NFκB whilst other sites such as those for the glucocorticoid receptor were also found. Glucocorticoid receptor levels and phosphorylation were decreased by all 6 PTKs. Whilst Glucocorticoid receptor action can potentiate NFκB action those proteins where genes have NFκB binding sites were in often regulated post-translationally. However all 6 PTKs showed evidence of NFkB pathway modulation via activation via altered IkB and NFKB levels. Validation of a common change was also undertaken with PMS2, a DNA mismatch repair protein. PMS2 nuclear levels were decreased in response to the expression of all 6 kinases, with no concomitant change in mRNA level or cytosolic protein level. Response to thioguanine, that requires the mismatch repair pathway, was modulated by all 6 oncogenic kinases. In summary common targets for 6 oncogenic PTKs have been found that are regulated by post-translational mechanisms. They represent potential new avenues for therapies but also demonstrate the post-translational regulation is a key target of leukaemogenic kinases. PMID:22745689

  18. Post-translational control of protein function with light using a LOV-intein fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Jones, D C; Mistry, I N; Tavassoli, A

    2016-04-01

    Methods for the post-translational control of protein function with light hold much value as tools in cell biology. To this end, we report a fusion protein that consists of DnaE split-inteins, flanking the light sensitive LOV2 domain of Avena sativa. The resulting chimera combines the activities of these two unrelated proteins to enable controlled formation of a functional protein via upregulation of intein splicing with blue light in bacterial and human cells. PMID:26940144

  19. Absolute quantitation of isoforms of post-translationally modified proteins in transgenic organism.

    PubMed

    Li, Yaojun; Shu, Yiwei; Peng, Changchao; Zhu, Lin; Guo, Guangyu; Li, Ning

    2012-08-01

    Post-translational modification isoforms of a protein are known to play versatile biological functions in diverse cellular processes. To measure the molar amount of each post-translational modification isoform (P(isf)) of a target protein present in the total protein extract using mass spectrometry, a quantitative proteomic protocol, absolute quantitation of isoforms of post-translationally modified proteins (AQUIP), was developed. A recombinant ERF110 gene overexpression transgenic Arabidopsis plant was used as the model organism for demonstration of the proof of concept. Both Ser-62-independent (14)N-coded synthetic peptide standards and (15)N-coded ERF110 protein standard isolated from the heavy nitrogen-labeled transgenic plants were employed simultaneously to determine the concentration of all isoforms (T(isf)) of ERF110 in the whole plant cell lysate, whereas a pair of Ser-62-dependent synthetic peptide standards were used to quantitate the Ser-62 phosphosite occupancy (R(aqu)). The P(isf) was finally determined by integrating the two empirically measured variables using the following equation: P(isf) = T(isf) · R(aqu). The absolute amount of Ser-62-phosphorylated isoform of ERF110 determined using AQUIP was substantiated with a stable isotope labeling in Arabidopsis-based relative and accurate quantitative proteomic approach. The biological role of the Ser-62-phosphorylated isoform was demonstrated in transgenic plants.

  20. T cell epitopes and post-translationally modified epitopes in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    McGinty, John W; Marré, Meghan L; Bajzik, Veronique; Piganelli, Jon D; James, Eddie A

    2015-11-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease in which progressive loss of self-tolerance, evidenced by accumulation of auto-antibodies and auto-reactive T cells that recognize diverse self-proteins, leads to immune-mediated destruction of pancreatic beta cells and loss of insulin secretion. In this review, we discuss antigens and epitopes in T1D and the role that post-translational modifications play in circumventing tolerance mechanisms and increasing antigenic diversity. Emerging data suggest that, analogous to other autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and celiac disease, enzymatically modified epitopes are preferentially recognized in T1D. Modifying enzymes such as peptidyl deiminases and tissue transglutaminase are activated in response to beta cell stress, providing a mechanistic link between post-translational modification and interactions with the environment. Although studies of such responses in the at-risk population have been limited, current data suggests that breakdown in tolerance through post-translational modification represents an important checkpoint in the development of T1D. PMID:26370701

  1. Post-translational regulation of expression and conformation of an immunoglobulin domain in yeast surface display.

    PubMed

    Parthasarathy, Ranganath; Subramanian, Shyamsundar; Boder, Eric T; Discher, Dennis E

    2006-01-01

    Display of heterologous proteins on the surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is increasingly being exploited for directed evolution because of straightforward cell screens. However, yeast post-translationally modifies proteins in ways that must be factored into library engineering and refinement. Here, we express the extracellular immunoglobulin domain of an ubiquitous mammalian membrane protein, CD47, which is implicated in cancer, immunocompatibility, and motility. CD47 has multiple sites of glycosylation and a core disulfide bond. We assess the effects of both of these post-translational modifications on expression and antibody binding. CD47's extracellular domain is fused to the yeast mating protein Aga2p on the cell wall, and the resulting fusion protein binds several key antibodies, including a conformation-sensitive antibody. Site-by-site mutagenesis of CD47's five N-linked glycosylation sites progressively decreases expression levels on yeast, but folding appears stable. Cysteine mutations disrupt the expected core disulfide, and also decrease protein expression levels, though not to the extent seen with complete deglycosylation. However, with the core disulfide mutants, antibody binding proves to be lower than expected from expression levels and glycosylation is clearly reduced compared to wild-type. The results indicate that glycosylation regulates heterologous display on yeast more than core disulfides do and thus suggest bounds on directed evolution by post-translational processing.

  2. Reproducible Analysis of Post-Translational Modifications in Proteomes—Application to Human Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Holehouse, Alex S.; Naegle, Kristen M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Protein post-translational modifications (PTMs) are an important aspect of protein regulation. The number of PTMs discovered within the human proteome, and other proteomes, has been rapidly expanding in recent years. As a consequence of the rate in which new PTMs are identified, analysis done in one year may result in different conclusions when repeated in subsequent years. Among the various functional questions pertaining to PTMs, one important relationship to address is the interplay between modifications and mutations. Specifically, because the linear sequence surrounding a modification site often determines molecular recognition, it is hypothesized that mutations near sites of PTMs may be more likely to result in a detrimental effect on protein function, resulting in the development of disease. Methods and Results We wrote an application programming interface (API) to make analysis of ProteomeScout, a comprehensive database of PTMs and protein information, easy and reproducible. We used this API to analyze the relationship between PTMs and human mutations associated with disease (based on the ‘Clinical Significance’ annotation from dbSNP). Proteins containing pathogenic mutations demonstrated a significant study bias which was controlled for by analyzing only well-studied proteins, based on their having at least one pathogenic mutation. We found that pathogenic mutations are significantly more likely to lie within eight amino acids of a phosphoserine, phosphotyrosine or ubiquitination site when compared to mutations in general, based on a Fisher’s Exact test. Despite the skew of pathogenic mutations occurring on positively charged arginines, we could not account for this relationship based only on residue type. Finally, we hypothesize a potential mechanism for a pathogenic mutation on RAF1, based on its proximity to a phosphorylation site, which represents a subtle regulation difference that may explain why its biochemical effect has failed to

  3. In-gel NHS-propionate derivatization for histone post-translational modifications analysis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiajia; Gao, Jun; Peng, Maolin; Wang, Yi; Yu, Yanyan; Yang, Pengyuan; Jin, Hong

    2015-07-30

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) on histone are highly correlated with genetic and epigenetic regulation of gene expression from chromatin. Mass spectrometry (MS) has developed to be an optimal tool for the identification and quantification of histone PTMs. Derivatization of histones with chemicals such as propionic anhydride, N-hydroxysuccinimide ester (NHS-propionate) has been widely used in histone PTMs analysis in bottom-up MS strategy, which requires high purity for histone samples. However, biological samples are not always prepared with high purity, containing detergents or other interferences in most cases. As an alternative approach, an adaptation of in gel derivatization method, termed In-gel NHS, is utilized for a broader application in histone PTMs analysis and it is shown to be a more time-saving preparation method. The proposed method was optimized for a better derivatization efficiency and displayed high reproducibility, indicating quantification of histone PTMs based on In-gel NHS was achievable. Without any traditional fussy histone purification procedures, we succeeded to quantitatively profile the histone PTMs from Arabidopsis with selective knock down of CLF (clf-29) and the original parental (col) with In-gel NHS method in a rapid way, which indicated the high specificity of CLF on H3K27me3 in Arabidopsis. In-gel NHS quantification results also suggest distinctive histone modification patterns in plants, which is invaluable foundation for future studies on histone modifications in plants.

  4. Cancer serum biomarkers based on aberrant post-translational modifications of glycoproteins: Clinical value and discovery strategies.

    PubMed

    Silva, M Luísa S

    2015-12-01

    Due to the increase in life expectancy in the last decades, as well as changes in lifestyle, cancer has become one of the most common diseases both in developed and developing countries. Early detection remains the most promising approach to improve long-term survival of cancer patients and this may be achieved by efficient screening of biomarkers in biological fluids. Great efforts have been made to identify specific alterations during oncogenesis. Changes at the cellular glycosylation profiles are among such alterations. The "glycosylation machinery" of cells is affected by malignant transformation due to the altered expression of glycogens, leading to changes in glycan biosynthesis and diversity. Alterations in the post-translational modifications of proteins that occur in cancer result in the expression of antigenically distinct glycoproteins. Therefore, these aberrant and cancer-specific glycoproteins and the autoantibodies that are produced in response to their presence constitute targets for cancer biomarkers' search. Different strategies have been implemented for the discovery of cancer glycobiomarkers and are herein reviewed, along with their potentialities and limitations. Practical issues related with serum analysis are also addressed, as well as the challenges that this area faces in the near future.

  5. Structural Studies and the Assembly of the Heptameric Post-translational Translocon Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, Y.; Li, H.; Li, H.; Wall, J. S.; Lennarz, W. J.

    2011-01-28

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, some of the nascent chains can be post-translationally translocated into the endoplasmic reticulum through the heptameric post-translational translocon complex (post-translocon). This membrane-protein complex is composed of the protein-conducting channel and the tetrameric Sec62/63 complex. The Sec62/63 complex plays crucial roles in targeting of the signal recognition particle-independent protein substrate to the protein-conducting channel and in assembly of the post-translocon. Although the molecular mechanism of the post-translational translocation process has been well established, the structure of the post-translocon and how the channel and the Sec62/63 complex form the heptameric complex are largely uncharacterized. Here, we report a 20-{angstrom} resolution cryo-electron microscopy structure of the post-translocon. The purified post-translocon was found to have a mass of 287 kDa, which is consistent with the unit stoichiometry of the seven subunits as determined by a cysteine labeling experiment. We demonstrated that Triton X-100 dissociated the heptameric complex into three subcomplexes identified as the trimeric translocon Sec61-Sbh1-Sss1, the Sec63-Sec71-Sec72 trimer, and the heterotetramer Sec62-Sec63-Sec71-Sec72, respectively. Additionally, a role of the sixth cytosolic loop of Sec61 in assembly of the post-translocon was demonstrated. Mutations of conserved, positively charged amino acid residues in the loop caused decreased formation of the post-translocon. These studies provide the first architectural description of the yeast post-translocon.

  6. Coordinated post-translational responses of aquaporins to abiotic and nutritional stimuli in Arabidopsis roots.

    PubMed

    di Pietro, Magali; Vialaret, Jérôme; Li, Guo-Wei; Hem, Sonia; Prado, Karine; Rossignol, Michel; Maurel, Christophe; Santoni, Véronique

    2013-12-01

    In plants, aquaporins play a crucial role in regulating root water transport in response to environmental and physiological cues. Controls achieved at the post-translational level are thought to be of critical importance for regulating aquaporin function. To investigate the general molecular mechanisms involved, we performed, using the model species Arabidopsis, a comprehensive proteomic analysis of root aquaporins in a large set of physiological contexts. We identified nine physiological treatments that modulate root hydraulics in time frames of minutes (NO and H2O2 treatments), hours (mannitol and NaCl treatments, exposure to darkness and reversal with sucrose, phosphate supply to phosphate-starved roots), or days (phosphate or nitrogen starvation). All treatments induced inhibition of root water transport except for sucrose supply to dark-grown plants and phosphate resupply to phosphate-starved plants, which had opposing effects. Using a robust label-free quantitative proteomic methodology, we identified 12 of 13 plasma membrane intrinsic protein (PIP) aquaporin isoforms, 4 of the 10 tonoplast intrinsic protein isoforms, and a diversity of post-translational modifications including phosphorylation, methylation, deamidation, and acetylation. A total of 55 aquaporin peptides displayed significant changes after treatments and enabled the identification of specific and as yet unknown patterns of response to stimuli. The data show that the regulation of PIP and tonoplast intrinsic protein abundance was involved in response to a few treatments (i.e. NaCl, NO, and nitrate starvation), whereas changes in the phosphorylation status of PIP aquaporins were positively correlated to changes in root hydraulic conductivity in the whole set of treatments. The identification of in vivo deamidated forms of aquaporins and their stimulus-induced changes in abundance may reflect a new mechanism of aquaporin regulation. The overall work provides deep insights into the in vivo post-translational

  7. Post-translational processing of purified human K-ras in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, J B; Sass, P M

    1991-01-01

    Membrane localization of ras p21 involves a complex series of post-translational processing events, including S-farnesylation of Cys-186, removal of three carboxyl-terminal amino acid residues, and methylation of the carboxyl-terminal farnesylcysteine residue. Palmitoylation of cysteine residues within the hypervariable region (amino acids 165-185) is also required for membrane localization of mammalian H-, N-, and K-ras(A). For K-ras(B), which contains no cysteine residues within the hypervariable region, a polybasic domain substitutes for palmitoylation as a second signal for plasma membrane targeting. In order to investigate the localization of K-ras(B) to the plasma membrane, we purified wild-type and mutant human K-ras(B) proteins from strains of E. coli harboring bacterial expression plasmids and injected them into Xenopus laevis oocytes. Our results show that wild-type and activated K-ras(B) proteins can be post-translationally modified and can induce meiotic maturation in Xenopus oocytes. A mutation at Cys-186 (Cys to Gly) abolished the ability of activated K-ras(B) to induce meiosis. Deprivation of isoprenyl precursors by the addition of lovastatin, a drug that blocks the synthesis of mevalonate, also abolished the ability of activated K-ras(B) to induce meiosis, although this inhibition could be overcome by the addition of exogenous mevalonate. Lovastatin did not block meiotic maturation induced by microinjection of purified mos protein, a component of the cytostatic factor that arrests Xenopus oocytes at the first meiotic prophase. These results indicate that post-translational isoprenylation of K-ras(B) is essential for plasma membrane targeting and induction of meiotic maturation in Xenopus oocytes and that further isoprenyl modification of proteins downstream from mos signal transduction is not essential for this process. PMID:16296004

  8. Coordinated Post-translational Responses of Aquaporins to Abiotic and Nutritional Stimuli in Arabidopsis Roots*

    PubMed Central

    di Pietro, Magali; Vialaret, Jérôme; Li, Guo-Wei; Hem, Sonia; Prado, Karine; Rossignol, Michel; Maurel, Christophe; Santoni, Véronique

    2013-01-01

    In plants, aquaporins play a crucial role in regulating root water transport in response to environmental and physiological cues. Controls achieved at the post-translational level are thought to be of critical importance for regulating aquaporin function. To investigate the general molecular mechanisms involved, we performed, using the model species Arabidopsis, a comprehensive proteomic analysis of root aquaporins in a large set of physiological contexts. We identified nine physiological treatments that modulate root hydraulics in time frames of minutes (NO and H2O2 treatments), hours (mannitol and NaCl treatments, exposure to darkness and reversal with sucrose, phosphate supply to phosphate-starved roots), or days (phosphate or nitrogen starvation). All treatments induced inhibition of root water transport except for sucrose supply to dark-grown plants and phosphate resupply to phosphate-starved plants, which had opposing effects. Using a robust label-free quantitative proteomic methodology, we identified 12 of 13 plasma membrane intrinsic protein (PIP) aquaporin isoforms, 4 of the 10 tonoplast intrinsic protein isoforms, and a diversity of post-translational modifications including phosphorylation, methylation, deamidation, and acetylation. A total of 55 aquaporin peptides displayed significant changes after treatments and enabled the identification of specific and as yet unknown patterns of response to stimuli. The data show that the regulation of PIP and tonoplast intrinsic protein abundance was involved in response to a few treatments (i.e. NaCl, NO, and nitrate starvation), whereas changes in the phosphorylation status of PIP aquaporins were positively correlated to changes in root hydraulic conductivity in the whole set of treatments. The identification of in vivo deamidated forms of aquaporins and their stimulus-induced changes in abundance may reflect a new mechanism of aquaporin regulation. The overall work provides deep insights into the in vivo post-translational

  9. Coordinated post-translational responses of aquaporins to abiotic and nutritional stimuli in Arabidopsis roots.

    PubMed

    di Pietro, Magali; Vialaret, Jérôme; Li, Guo-Wei; Hem, Sonia; Prado, Karine; Rossignol, Michel; Maurel, Christophe; Santoni, Véronique

    2013-12-01

    In plants, aquaporins play a crucial role in regulating root water transport in response to environmental and physiological cues. Controls achieved at the post-translational level are thought to be of critical importance for regulating aquaporin function. To investigate the general molecular mechanisms involved, we performed, using the model species Arabidopsis, a comprehensive proteomic analysis of root aquaporins in a large set of physiological contexts. We identified nine physiological treatments that modulate root hydraulics in time frames of minutes (NO and H2O2 treatments), hours (mannitol and NaCl treatments, exposure to darkness and reversal with sucrose, phosphate supply to phosphate-starved roots), or days (phosphate or nitrogen starvation). All treatments induced inhibition of root water transport except for sucrose supply to dark-grown plants and phosphate resupply to phosphate-starved plants, which had opposing effects. Using a robust label-free quantitative proteomic methodology, we identified 12 of 13 plasma membrane intrinsic protein (PIP) aquaporin isoforms, 4 of the 10 tonoplast intrinsic protein isoforms, and a diversity of post-translational modifications including phosphorylation, methylation, deamidation, and acetylation. A total of 55 aquaporin peptides displayed significant changes after treatments and enabled the identification of specific and as yet unknown patterns of response to stimuli. The data show that the regulation of PIP and tonoplast intrinsic protein abundance was involved in response to a few treatments (i.e. NaCl, NO, and nitrate starvation), whereas changes in the phosphorylation status of PIP aquaporins were positively correlated to changes in root hydraulic conductivity in the whole set of treatments. The identification of in vivo deamidated forms of aquaporins and their stimulus-induced changes in abundance may reflect a new mechanism of aquaporin regulation. The overall work provides deep insights into the in vivo post-translational

  10. Principal Component Analysis of Dynamically distinct D-Type Asteroids.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedic, Sanja; Ziffer, J.; Campins, H.; Fernandez, Y. R.; Walker, M.

    2008-09-01

    Principal Component Analysis (PCA), a common statistically based classification technique, has been used to classify asteroids into broad spectral categories. In some cases, a spectral superclass considered in isolation may undergo sub-classification (e.g. S-type subclasses). Since D-type asteroids populate at least three distinct dynamical regions in the asteroid belt -- namely Hilda, L4 Trojans and L5 Trojans, and since the recently-developed "Nice” model (Morbidelli et al. 2005. Nature 435, 462; Levison et al. 2008, ACM 2008 abstract #8156) hypothesizes that these regions may share a common origin, examining the appropriateness of a D-type sub-classification scheme is warranted. Toward this end, we performed PCA on the D-type L4, L5, and Hilda asteroids. Our PCA was based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey broadband colors (u - g, g - r, r - i, and i - z) of 31 L4, 24 L5, and 32 Hilda asteroids with radii ranging from approximately 5 to 45 km. PCA showed 90.2% of the variance in the spectra could be condensed into the first two principal components, PC1 and PC2, with the first and second component accounting for 50.7% and 39.4% respectively. No significant clustering is observed on a PC1 vs. PC2 plot suggesting the D-type L4, L5, and Hilda asteroids do not form three independent groups, but rather are spectrally indistinguishable. We performed several statistical analyses of the means and variances of the principal components to test the validity of this conclusion. No statistically significant difference in the means among the three groups was found, nor was there any such difference in the variances, although the statistic comparing the L4 Trojans and Hildas was close to the critical value. Further measurements of colors of both large and small Trojans and Hildas will let us continue to investigate the spectral diversity of these objects.

  11. Dysbiosis May Trigger Autoimmune Diseases via Inappropriate Post-Translational Modification of Host Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lerner, Aaron; Aminov, Rustam; Matthias, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    The gut ecosystem with myriads of microorganisms and the high concentration of immune system cells can be considered as a separate organ on its own. The balanced interaction between the host and microbial cells has been shaped during the long co-evolutionary process. In dysbiotic conditions, however, this balance is compromised and results in abnormal interaction between the host and microbiota. It is hypothesize here that the changed spectrum of microbial enzymes involved in post-translational modification of proteins (PTMP) may contribute to the aberrant modification of host proteins thus generating autoimmune responses by the host, resulting in autoimmune diseases. PMID:26903965

  12. Vimentin and post-translational modifications in cell motility during cancer - a review.

    PubMed

    Shi, A-M; Tao, Z-Q; Li, R; Wang, Y-Q; Wang, X; Zhao, J

    2016-07-01

    The post-translational modifications (PTMs) are defined as the covalent modification or enzymatic modification of proteins during or after protein biosynthesis. Proteins are synthesized by ribosomes translating mRNA into polypeptide chains, which may then undergo PTM to form the mature protein product. PTMs are important components in cell signaling. Moreover, it is a known fact that PTM regulation offers an immense array and depth of regulatory possibilities. The present review article will focus on their possible role in cancer cell motility with special reference to vimentin, an intermediate filament (IF), as the later is an important process responsible for life-threatening state viz. cancer metastasis. PMID:27383311

  13. Post-translational Modifications Regulate Class IIa Histone Deacetylase (HDAC) Function in Health and Disease*

    PubMed Central

    Mathias, Rommel A.; Guise, Amanda J.; Cristea, Ileana M.

    2015-01-01

    Class IIa histone deacetylases (HDACs4, -5, -7, and -9) modulate the physiology of the human cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, nervous, and immune systems. The regulatory capacity of this family of enzymes stems from their ability to shuttle between nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments in response to signal-driven post-translational modification. Here, we review the current knowledge of modifications that control spatial and temporal histone deacetylase functions by regulating subcellular localization, transcriptional functions, and cell cycle-dependent activity, ultimately impacting on human disease. We discuss the contribution of these modifications to cardiac and vascular hypertrophy, myoblast differentiation, neuronal cell survival, and neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:25616866

  14. Modulation of Intrinsically Disordered Protein Function by Post-translational Modifications.

    PubMed

    Bah, Alaji; Forman-Kay, Julie D

    2016-03-25

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) produce significant changes in the structural properties of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) by affecting their energy landscapes. PTMs can induce a range of effects, from local stabilization or destabilization of transient secondary structure to global disorder-to-order transitions, potentially driving complete state changes between intrinsically disordered and folded states or dispersed monomeric and phase-separated states. Here, we discuss diverse biological processes that are dependent on PTM regulation of IDPs. We also present recent tools for generating homogenously modified IDPs for studies of PTM-mediated IDP regulatory mechanisms. PMID:26851279

  15. Global histone post-translational modifications and cancer: Biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis and treatment?

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Shafqat Ali; Reddy, Divya; Gupta, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Global alterations in epigenetic landscape are now recognized as a hallmark of cancer. Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation, histone modifications, nucleosome positioning and non-coding RNAs are proven to have strong association with cancer. In particular, covalent post-translational modifications of histone proteins are known to play an important role in chromatin remodeling and thereby in regulation of gene expression. Further, histone modifications have also been associated with different aspects of carcinogenesis and have been studied for their role in the better management of cancer patients. In this review, we will explore and discuss how histone modifications are involved in cancer diagnosis, prognosis and treatment. PMID:26629316

  16. Dynamic melody recognition: distinctiveness and the role of musical expertise.

    PubMed

    Bailes, Freya

    2010-07-01

    The hypothesis that melodies are recognized at moments when they exhibit a distinctive musical pattern was tested. In a melody recognition experiment, point-of-recognition (POR) data were gathered from 32 listeners (16 musicians and 16 nonmusicians) judging 120 melodies. A series of models of melody recognition were developed, resulting from a stepwise multiple regression of two classes of information relating to melodic familiarity and melodic distinctiveness. Melodic distinctiveness measures were assembled through statistical analyses of over 15,000 Western themes and melodies. A significant model, explaining 85% of the variance, entered measures primarily of timing distinctiveness and pitch distinctiveness, but excluding familiarity, as predictors of POR. Differences between nonmusician and musician models suggest a processing shift from momentary to accumulated information with increased exposure to music. Supplemental materials for this article may be downloaded from http://mc.psychonomic-journals.org/content/supplemental. PMID:20551343

  17. S-Nitrosylation: Specificity, Occupancy, and Interaction with Other Post-Translational Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Kohr, Mark J.; Murphy, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: S-nitrosylation (SNO) has been identified throughout the body as an important signaling modification both in physiology and a variety of diseases. SNO is a multifaceted post-translational modification, in that it can either act as a signaling molecule itself or as an intermediate to other modifications. Recent Advances and Critical Issues: Through extensive SNO research, we have made progress toward understanding the importance of single cysteine-SNO sites; however, we are just beginning to explore the importance of specific SNO within the context of other SNO sites and post-translational modifications. Additionally, compartmentalization and SNO occupancy may play an important role in the consequences of the SNO modification. Future Directions: In this review, we will consider the context of SNO signaling and discuss how the transient nature of SNO, its role as an oxidative intermediate, and the pattern of SNO, should be considered when determining the impact of SNO signaling. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 1209–1219. PMID:23157187

  18. STRAP PTM: Software Tool for Rapid Annotation and Differential Comparison of Protein Post-Translational Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Jean L.; Bhatia, Vivek N.; Whelan, Stephen A.; Costello, Catherine E.

    2014-01-01

    The identification of protein post-translational modifications (PTMs) is an increasingly important component of proteomics and biomarker discovery, but very few tools exist for performing fast and easy characterization of global PTM changes and differential comparison of PTMs across groups of data obtained from liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry experiments. STRAP PTM (Software Tool for Rapid Annotation of Proteins: Post-Translational Modification edition) is a program that was developed to facilitate the characterization of PTMs using spectral counting and a novel scoring algorithm to accelerate the identification of differential PTMs from complex data sets. The software facilitates multi-sample comparison by collating, scoring, and ranking PTMs and by summarizing data visually. The freely available software (beta release) installs on a PC and processes data in protXML format obtained from files parsed through the Trans-Proteomic Pipeline. The easy-to-use interface allows examination of results at protein, peptide, and PTM levels, and the overall design offers tremendous flexibility that provides proteomics insight beyond simple assignment and counting. PMID:25422678

  19. Post-translational Claisen Condensation and Decarboxylation en Route to the Bicyclic Core of Pantocin A.

    PubMed

    Ghodge, Swapnil V; Biernat, Kristen A; Bassett, Sarah Jane; Redinbo, Matthew R; Bowers, Albert A

    2016-05-01

    Pantocin A (PA) is a member of the growing family of ribosomally encoded and post-translationally modified peptide natural products (RiPPs). PA is much smaller than most known RiPPs, a tripeptide with a tight bicyclic core that appears to be cleaved from the middle of a larger 30-residue precursor peptide. We show here that the enzyme PaaA catalyzes the double dehydration and decarboxylation of two glutamic acid residues in the 30-residue precursor PaaP. Further truncates of PaaP leader and follower peptide sequences demonstrate the different impacts of these two regions on PaaA-mediated tailoring and delineate an essential role for the follower sequence in the decarboxylation step. The crystal structure of apo PaaA is reported, allowing identification of structural features that set PaaA apart from other homologous enzymes that typically do not catalyze such extended post-translational chemistry. Together, these data reveal how additional chemistry can be extracted from a ubiquitous enzyme family toward ribosomally derived peptide natural product biosynthesis and suggest that more examples of such enzymes likely exist in untapped genomic space.

  20. Post-translational Modifications of Chicken Myelin Basic Protein Charge Components

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jeongkwon; Zhang, Rui; Strittmatter, Eric F.; Smith, Richard D.; Zand, Robert

    2008-07-11

    Purified myelin basic protein (MBP) from various species contains several post-translationally modified forms termed charge components or charge isomers. Chicken MBP contains four charge components denoted as C1, C2, C3 and C8. (The C8 isomer is a complex mixture and was not investigated in this study.) These findings are in contrast to those found for human, bovine and other mammalian MBP’s. Mammalian MBP’s, each of which contain seven or eight charge components depending on the analysis of the CM-52 chromatographic curves and the PAGE gels obtained under basic pH conditions. Chicken MBP components C1, C2 and C3 were treated with trypsin and endoproteinase Glu-C. The resulting digests were analyzed by capillary liquid chromatography combined with either an ion trap tandem mass spectrometer or with a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. This instrumentation permitted establishing the amino acid composition and the determination of the posttranslational modifications for each of the three charge components C1-C3. With the exception of N-terminal acetylation, the post-translational modifications were partial.

  1. Post-translationally modified tubulins in Artemia: prelarval development in the absence of detyrosinated tubulin.

    PubMed

    Langdon, C M; Freeman, J A; MacRae, T H

    1991-11-01

    The synthesis of post-translationally modified tubulins was examined during Artemia development. Tubulin, either purified to homogeneity or in cell-free extracts, was blotted to nitrocellulose and probed with a panel of antibodies. When purified tubulin was examined, tyrosinated tubulin underwent a large decrease as development progressed and this was accompanied by the appearance of detyrosinated tubulin in samples from organisms developed 24 hr. The inclusion of carboxypeptidase inhibitors had a small effect on the relative amounts of tyrosinated and detyrosinated tubulins in 24-hr preparations. The amount of alpha- and beta-tubulin in cell-free extracts of Artemia either remained relatively constant during development or increased slightly. The same result was obtained for acetylated and tyrosinated tubulin. Detyrosinated tubulin first appeared in 24-hr cell-free extracts and was only post-translationally modified tubulin to increase, relative to the total amount of tubulin, as the brine shrimp developed. As revealed by immunofluorescence staining, detyrosinated tubulin occurred in many cell types of developing nauplii and was prominently displayed in mitotic figures. Artemia, a complex metazoan animal, is thus able to grow for an extended period of time in the absence of detyrosinated tubulin. This isoform is however, synthesized in early larvae and may be required for the development of elongated cells including those which encircle the gut. Detyrosination remains as the only developmentally related change observed for brine shrimp tubulin. PMID:1936554

  2. Whole proteome analysis of post-translational modifications: applications of mass-spectrometry for proteogenomic annotation

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Nitin; Tanner, Stephen; Jaitly, Navdeep; Adkins, Joshua N.; Lipton, Mary S.; Edwards, Robert; Romine, Margaret F.; Osterman, Andrei; Bafna, Vineet; Smith, Richard D.; Pevzner, Pavel A.

    2007-09-04

    While bacterial genome annotations have significantly improved in recent years, techniques for bacterial proteome annotation (including post-translational chemical modifications, signal peptides, proteolytic events, etc.) are still in their infancy. At the same time, the number of sequenced bacterial genomes is rising sharply, far outpacing our ability to validate the predicted genes, let alone annotate bacterial proteomes. In this study, we use tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) to annotate the proteome of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, an important microbe for bioremediation. In particular, we provide the first comprehensive map of post-translational modifications in a bacterial genome, including a large number of chemical modifications, signal peptide cleavages and cleavage of N-terminal methionine residues. We also detect multiple genes that were missed or assigned incorrect start positions by gene prediction programs and suggest corrections to improve the gene annotation. This study demonstrates that complementing every genome sequencing project by an MS/MS project would significantly improve both genome and proteome annotations for a reasonable cost.

  3. Archaeal S-layer glycoproteins: post-translational modification in the face of extremes

    PubMed Central

    Kandiba, Lina; Eichler, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    Corresponding to the sole or basic component of the surface (S)-layer surrounding the archaeal cell in most known cases, S-layer glycoproteins are in direct contact with the harsh environments that characterize niches where Archaea can thrive. Accordingly, early work examining archaeal S-layer glycoproteins focused on identifying those properties that allow members of this group of proteins to maintain their structural integrity in the face of extremes of temperature, pH, and salinity, as well as other physical challenges. However, with expansion of the list of archaeal strains serving as model systems, as well as growth in the number of molecular tools available for the manipulation of these strains, studies on archaeal S-layer glycoproteins are currently more likely to consider the various post-translational modifications these polypeptides undergo. For instance, archaeal S-layer glycoproteins can undergo proteolytic cleavage, both N- and O-glycosylation, lipid-modification and oligomerization. In this mini-review, recent findings related to the post-translational modification of archaeal S-layer glycoproteins are considered. PMID:25505464

  4. Post-translational Tyrosine Nitration of Eosinophil Granule Toxins Mediated by Eosinophil Peroxidase*

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Martina; Petre, Alina; Youhnovski, Nikolay; Prömm, Franziska; Schirle, Markus; Schumm, Michael; Pero, Ralph S.; Doyle, Alfred; Checkel, James; Kita, Hirohito; Thiyagarajan, Nethaji; Acharya, K. Ravi; Schmid-Grendelmeier, Peter; Simon, Hans-Uwe; Schwarz, Heinz; Tsutsui, Masato; Shimokawa, Hiroaki; Bellon, Gabriel; Lee, James J.; Przybylski, Michael; Döring, Gerd

    2008-01-01

    Nitration of tyrosine residues has been observed during various acute and chronic inflammatory diseases. However, the mechanism of tyrosine nitration and the nature of the proteins that become tyrosine nitrated during inflammation remain unclear. Here we show that eosinophils but not other cell types including neutrophils contain nitrotyrosine-positive proteins in specific granules. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the human eosinophil toxins, eosinophil peroxidase (EPO), major basic protein, eosinophil-derived neurotoxin (EDN) and eosinophil cationic protein (ECP), and the respective murine toxins, are post-translationally modified by nitration at tyrosine residues during cell maturation. High resolution affinity-mass spectrometry identified specific single nitration sites at Tyr349 in EPO and Tyr33 in both ECP and EDN. ECP and EDN crystal structures revealed and EPO structure modeling suggested that the nitrated tyrosine residues in the toxins are surface exposed. Studies in EPO-/-, gp91phox-/-, and NOS-/- mice revealed that tyrosine nitration of these toxins is mediated by EPO in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and minute amounts of NOx. Tyrosine nitration of eosinophil granule toxins occurs during maturation of eosinophils, independent of inflammation. These results provide evidence that post-translational tyrosine nitration is unique to eosinophils. PMID:18694936

  5. Regulation of multispanning membrane protein topology via post-translational annealing.

    PubMed

    Van Lehn, Reid C; Zhang, Bin; Miller, Thomas F

    2015-01-01

    The canonical mechanism for multispanning membrane protein topogenesis suggests that protein topology is established during cotranslational membrane integration. However, this mechanism is inconsistent with the behavior of EmrE, a dual-topology protein for which the mutation of positively charged loop residues, even close to the C-terminus, leads to dramatic shifts in its topology. We use coarse-grained simulations to investigate the Sec-facilitated membrane integration of EmrE and its mutants on realistic biological timescales. This work reveals a mechanism for regulating membrane-protein topogenesis, in which initially misintegrated configurations of the proteins undergo post-translational annealing to reach fully integrated multispanning topologies. The energetic barriers associated with this post-translational annealing process enforce kinetic pathways that dictate the topology of the fully integrated proteins. The proposed mechanism agrees well with the experimentally observed features of EmrE topogenesis and provides a range of experimentally testable predictions regarding the effect of translocon mutations on membrane protein topogenesis.

  6. Post-translational Claisen Condensation and Decarboxylation en Route to the Bicyclic Core of Pantocin A

    PubMed Central

    Ghodge, Swapnil V.; Biernat, Kristen A.; Bassett, Sarah Jane; Redinbo, Matthew R.; Bowers, Albert A.

    2016-01-01

    Pantocin A (PA) is a member of the growing family of ribosomally encoded and post-translationally modified peptide natural products (RiPPs). PA is much smaller than most known RiPPs, a tripeptide with a tight bicyclic core that appears to be cleaved from the middle of a larger 30-residue precursor peptide. We show here that the enzyme PaaA catalyzes the double dehydration and decarboxylation of two glutamic acid residues in the 30-residue precursor PaaP. Further truncates of PaaP leader and follower peptide sequences demonstrate the different impacts of these two regions on PaaA-mediated tailoring and delineate an essential role for the follower sequence in the decarboxylation step. The crystal structure of apo PaaA is reported, allowing identification of structural features that set PaaA apart from other homologous enzymes that typically do not catalyze such extended post-translational chemistry. Together, these data reveal how additional chemistry can be extracted from a ubiquitous enzyme family toward ribosomally derived peptide natural product biosynthesis and suggest that more examples of such enzymes likely exist in untapped genomic space. PMID:27088303

  7. Phycobiliprotein biosynthesis in cyanobacteria: structure and function of enzymes involved in post-translational modification.

    PubMed

    Schluchter, Wendy M; Shen, Gaozhong; Alvey, Richard M; Biswas, Avijit; Saunée, Nicolle A; Williams, Shervonda R; Mille, Crystal A; Bryant, Donald A

    2010-01-01

    Cyanobacterial phycobiliproteins are brilliantly colored due to the presence of covalently attached chromophores called bilins, linear tetrapyrroles derived from heme. For most phycobiliproteins, these post-translational modifications are catalyzed by enzymes called bilin lyases; these enzymes ensure that the appropriate bilins are attached to the correct cysteine residues with the proper stereochemistry on each phycobiliprotein subunit. Phycobiliproteins also contain a unique, post-translational modification, the methylation of a conserved asparagine (Asn) present at beta-72, which occurs on the beta-subunits of all phycobiliproteins. We have identified and characterized several new families of bilin lyases, which are responsible for attaching PCB to phycobiliproteins as well as the Asn methyl transferase for beta-subunits in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 and Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. All of the enzymes responsible for synthesis of holo-phycobiliproteins are now known for this cyanobacterium, and a brief discussion of each enzyme family and its role in the biosynthesis of phycobiliproteins is presented here. In addition, the first structure of a bilin lyase has recently been solved (PDB ID: 3BDR). This structure shows that the bilin lyases are most similar to the lipocalin protein structural family, which also includes the bilin-binding protein found in some butterflies.

  8. Review: Post-translational cross-talk between brassinosteroid and sucrose signaling.

    PubMed

    Kühn, Christina

    2016-07-01

    A direct link has been elucidated between brassinosteroid function and perception, and sucrose partitioning and transport. Sucrose regulation and brassinosteroid signaling cross-talk at various levels, including the well-described regulation of transcriptional gene expression: BZR-like transcription factors link the signaling pathways. Since brassinosteroid responses depend on light quality and quantity, a light-dependent alternative pathway was postulated. Here, the focus is on post-translational events. Recent identification of sucrose transporter-interacting partners raises the question whether brassinosteroid and sugars jointly affect plant innate immunity and plant symbiotic interactions. Membrane permeability and sensitivity depends on the number of cell surface receptors and transporters. More than one endocytic route has been assigned to specific components, including brassinosteroid-receptors. The number of such proteins at the plasma membrane relies on endocytic recycling, internalization and/or degradation. Therefore, vesicular membrane trafficking is gaining considerable attention with regard to plant immunity. The organization of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), other receptors or transporters in membrane microdomains participate in endocytosis and the formation of specific intracellular compartments, potentially impacting biotic interactions. This minireview focuses on post-translational events affecting the subcellular compartmentation of membrane proteins involved in signaling, transport, and defense, and on the cross-talk between brassinosteroid signals and sugar availability. PMID:27181949

  9. Post-translational Modifications of Natural Antimicrobial Peptides and Strategies for Peptide Engineering.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangshun

    2012-02-01

    Natural antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are gene-coded defense molecules discovered in all the three life domains: Eubacteria, Archaea, and Eukarya. The latter covers protists, fungi, plants, and animals. It is now recognized that amino acid composition, peptide sequence, and post-translational modifications determine to a large extent the structure and function of AMPs. This article systematically describes post-translational modifications of natural AMPs annotated in the antimicrobial peptide database (http://aps.unmc.edu/AP). Currently, 1147 out of 1755 AMPs in the database are modified and classified into more than 17 types. Through chemical modifications, the peptides fold into a variety of structural scaffolds that target bacterial surfaces or molecules within cells. Chemical modifications also confer desired functions to a particular peptide. Meanwhile, these modifications modulate other peptide properties such as stability. Elucidation of the relationship between AMP property and chemical modification inspires peptide engineering. Depending on the objective of our design, peptides may be modified in various ways so that the desired features can be enhanced whereas unwanted properties can be minimized. Therefore, peptide design plays an essential role in developing natural AMPs into a new generation of therapeutic molecules.

  10. Post-translational modification of the pyruvate phosphate dikinase from Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    González-Marcano, Eglys; Mijares, Alfredo; Quiñones, Wilfredo; Cáceres, Ana; Concepción, Juan Luis

    2014-02-01

    In kinetoplastids such as Trypanosoma cruzi, glycolysis is compartmentalized in peroxisome-like organelles called glycosomes. Pyruvate phosphate dikinase (PPDK), an auxiliary enzyme of glycolysis, is also located in the glycosomes. We have detected that this protein is post-translationally modified by phosphorylation and proteolytic cleavage. On western blots of T. cruzi epimastigotes, two PPDK forms were found with apparent MW of 100 kDa and 75 kDa, the latter one being phosphorylated at Thr481, a residue present in a highly conserved region. In subcellular localization assays the 75 kDa PPDK was located peripherally at the glycosomal membrane. Both PPDK forms were found in all life-cycle stages of the parasite. When probing for both PPDK forms during a growth of epimastigotes in batch culture, an increase in the level of the 75 kDa form and a decrease of the 100 kDa one were observed by western blot analysis, signifying that glucose starvation and the concomitant switch of the metabolism to amino acid catabolism may play a role in the post-translational processing of the PPDK. Either one or both of the processes, phosphorylation and proteolytic cleavage of PPDK, result in inactivation of the enzyme. It remains to be established whether the phenomenon exerts a regulatory function.

  11. Hunting for unexpected post-translational modifications by spectral library searching with tier-wise scoring.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chun Wai Manson; Lam, Henry

    2014-05-01

    Discovering novel post-translational modifications (PTMs) to proteins and detecting specific modification sites on proteins is one of the last frontiers of proteomics. At present, hunting for post-translational modifications remains challenging in widely practiced shotgun proteomics workflows due to the typically low abundance of modified peptides and the greatly inflated search space as more potential mass shifts are considered by the search engines. Moreover, most popular search methods require that the user specifies the modification(s) for which to search; therefore, unexpected and novel PTMs will not be detected. Here a new algorithm is proposed to apply spectral library searching to the problem of open modification searches, namely, hunting for PTMs without prior knowledge of what PTMs are in the sample. The proposed tier-wise scoring method intelligently looks for unexpected PTMs by allowing mass-shifted peak matches but only when the number of matches found is deemed statistically significant. This allows the search engine to search for unexpected modifications while maintaining its ability to identify unmodified peptides effectively at the same time. The utility of the method is demonstrated using three different data sets, in which the numbers of spectrum identifications to both unmodified and modified peptides were substantially increased relative to a regular spectral library search as well as to another open modification spectral search method, pMatch.

  12. Top-Down Characterization of the Post-Translationally Modified Intact Periplasmic Proteome from the Bacterium Novosphingobium aromaticivorans

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wu, Si; Brown, Roslyn N.; Payne, Samuel H.; Meng, Da; Zhao, Rui; Tolić, Nikola; Cao, Li; Shukla, Anil; Monroe, Matthew E.; Moore, Ronald J.; et al

    2013-01-01

    The periplasm of Gram-negative bacteria is a dynamic and physiologically important subcellular compartment where the constant exposure to potential environmental insults amplifies the need for proper protein folding and modifications. Top-down proteomics analysis of the periplasmic fraction at the intact protein level provides unrestricted characterization and annotation of the periplasmic proteome, including the post-translational modifications (PTMs) on these proteins. Here, we used single-dimension ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography coupled with the Fourier transform mass spectrometry (FTMS) to investigate the intact periplasmic proteome of Novosphingobium aromaticivorans . Our top-down analysis provided the confident identification of 55 proteins in the periplasm andmore » characterized their PTMs including signal peptide removal, N-terminal methionine excision, acetylation, glutathionylation, pyroglutamate, and disulfide bond formation. This study provides the first experimental evidence for the expression and periplasmic localization of many hypothetical and uncharacterized proteins and the first unrestrictive, large-scale data on PTMs in the bacterial periplasm.« less

  13. Tubulin C-terminal Post-translational Modifications Do Not Occur in Wood Forming Tissue of Populus

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hao; Gu, Xi; Xue, Liang-Jiao; Swamy, Prashant S.; Harding, Scott A.; Tsai, Chung-Jui

    2016-01-01

    Cortical microtubules (MTs) are evolutionarily conserved cytoskeletal components with specialized roles in plants, including regulation of cell wall biogenesis. MT functions and dynamics are dictated by the composition of their monomeric subunits, α- (TUA) and β-tubulins (TUB), which in animals and protists are subject to both transcriptional regulation and post-translational modifications (PTM). While spatiotemporal regulation of tubulin gene expression has been reported in plants, whether and to what extent tubulin PTMs occur in these species remain poorly understood. We chose the woody perennial Populus for investigation of tubulin PTMs in this study, with a particular focus on developing xylem where high tubulin transcript levels support MT-dependent secondary cell wall deposition. Mass spectrometry and immunodetection concurred that detyrosination, non-tyrosination and glutamylation were essentially absent in tubulins isolated from wood-forming tissues of P. deltoides and P. tremula ×alba. Label-free quantification of tubulin isotypes and RNA-Seq estimation of tubulin transcript abundance were largely consistent with transcriptional regulation. However, two TUB isotypes were detected at noticeably lower levels than expected based on RNA-Seq transcript abundance in both Populus species. These findings led us to conclude that MT composition during wood formation depends exclusively on transcriptional and, to a lesser extent, translational regulation of tubulin isotypes. PMID:27790223

  14. The Measurement of Reversible Redox Dependent Post-translational Modifications and Their Regulation of Mitochondrial and Skeletal Muscle Function

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Philip A.; Duan, Jicheng; Qian, Wei-Jun; Marcinek, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial oxidative stress is a common feature of skeletal myopathies across multiple conditions; however, the mechanism by which it contributes to skeletal muscle dysfunction remains controversial. Oxidative damage to proteins, lipids, and DNA has received the most attention, yet an important role for reversible redox post-translational modifications (PTMs) in pathophysiology is emerging. The possibility that these PTMs can exert dynamic control of muscle function implicates them as a mechanism contributing to skeletal muscle dysfunction in chronic disease. Herein, we discuss the significance of thiol-based redox dependent modifications to mitochondrial, myofibrillar, and excitation-contraction (EC) coupling proteins with an emphasis on how these changes could alter skeletal muscle performance under chronically stressed conditions. A major barrier to a better mechanistic understanding of the role of reversible redox PTMs in muscle function is the technical challenges associated with accurately measuring the changes of site-specific redox PTMs. Here we will critically review current approaches with an emphasis on sample preparation artifacts, quantitation, and specificity. Despite these challenges, the ability to accurately quantify reversible redox PTMs is critical to understanding the mechanisms by which mitochondrial oxidative stress contributes to skeletal muscle dysfunction in chronic diseases. PMID:26635632

  15. The measurement of reversible redox dependent post-translational modifications and their regulation of mitochondrial and skeletal muscle function

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, Philip A.; Duan, Jicheng; Qian, Weijun; Marcinek, David J.

    2015-11-25

    Mitochondrial oxidative stress is a common feature of skeletal myopathies across multiple conditions; however, the mechanism by which it contributes to skeletal muscle dysfunction remains controversial. Oxidative damage to proteins, lipids, and DNA has received the most attention, yet an important role for reversible redox post-translational modifications (PTMs) in pathophysiology is emerging. The possibility that these PTMs can exert dynamic control of muscle function implicates them as a mechanism contributing to skeletal muscle dysfunction in chronic disease. Herein, we discuss the significance of thiol-based redox dependent modifications to mitochondrial, myofibrillar and excitation-contraction (EC) coupling proteins with an emphasis on how these changes could alter skeletal muscle performance under chronically stressed conditions. A major barrier to a better mechanistic understanding of the role of reversible redox PTMs in muscle function is the technical challenges associated with accurately measuring the changes of site-specific redox PTMs. Here we will critically review current approaches with an emphasis on sample preparation artifacts, quantitation, and specificity. Despite these challenges, the ability to accurately quantify reversible redox PTMs is critical to understanding the mechanisms by which mitochondrial oxidative stress contributes to skeletal muscle dysfunction in chronic diseases.

  16. Peptide-templated gold nanocluster beacon as a sensitive, label-free sensor for protein post-translational modification enzymes.

    PubMed

    Wen, Qian; Gu, Yi; Tang, Li-Juan; Yu, Ru-Qin; Jiang, Jian-Hui

    2013-12-17

    Protein post-translational modifications (PTMs), which are chemical modifications and most often regulated by enzymes, play key roles in functional proteomics. Detection of PTM enzymes, thus, is critical in the study of cell functioning and development of diagnostic and therapeutic tools. Herein, we develop a simple peptide-templated method to direct rapid synthesis of highly fluorescent gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) and interrogate the effect of enzymatic modifications on their luminescence. A new finding is that enzymes are able to exert chemical modifications on the peptide-templated AuNCs and quench their fluorescence, which furnishes the development of a real-time and label-free sensing strategy for PTM enzymes. Two PTM enzymes, histone deacetylase 1 and protein kinase A, have been employed to demonstrate the feasibility of this enzyme-responsive fluorescent nanocluster beacon. The results reveal that the AuNCs' fluorescence can be dynamically decreased with increasing concentration of the enzymes, and subpicomolar detection limits are readily achieved for both enzymes. The developed strategy can thus offer a useful, label-free biosensor platform for the detection of protein-modifying enzymes and their inhibitors in biomedical applications.

  17. Computational and statistical methods for high-throughput analysis of post-translational modifications of proteins.

    PubMed

    Schwämmle, Veit; Verano-Braga, Thiago; Roepstorff, Peter

    2015-11-01

    The investigation of post-translational modifications (PTMs) represents one of the main research focuses for the study of protein function and cell signaling. Mass spectrometry instrumentation with increasing sensitivity improved protocols for PTM enrichment and recently established pipelines for high-throughput experiments allow large-scale identification and quantification of several PTM types. This review addresses the concurrently emerging challenges for the computational analysis of the resulting data and presents PTM-centered approaches for spectra identification, statistical analysis, multivariate analysis and data interpretation. We furthermore discuss the potential of future developments that will help to gain deep insight into the PTM-ome and its biological role in cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Computational Proteomics.

  18. Beyond gene expression: the impact of protein post-translational modifications in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Cain, Joel A; Solis, Nestor; Cordwell, Stuart J

    2014-01-31

    The post-translational modification (PTM) of proteins plays a critical role in the regulation of a broad range of cellular processes in eukaryotes. Yet their role in governing similar systems in the conventionally presumed 'simpler' forms of life has been largely neglected and, until recently, was thought to occur only rarely, with some modifications assumed to be limited to higher organisms alone. Recent developments in mass spectrometry-based proteomics have provided an unparalleled power to enrich, identify and quantify peptides with PTMs. Additional modifications to biological molecules such as lipids and carbohydrates that are essential for bacterial pathophysiology have only recently been detected on proteins. Here we review bacterial protein PTMs, focusing on phosphorylation, acetylation, proteolytic degradation, methylation and lipidation and the roles they play in bacterial adaptation - thus highlighting the importance of proteomic techniques in a field that is only just in its infancy. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Trends in Microbial Proteomics. PMID:23994099

  19. [Post-translational modification (PTM) bioinformatics in China: progresses and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Zexian, Liu; Yudong, Cai; Xuejiang, Guo; Ao, Li; Tingting, Li; Jianding, Qiu; Jian, Ren; Shaoping, Shi; Jiangning, Song; Minghui, Wang; Lu, Xie; Yu, Xue; Ziding, Zhang; Xingming, Zhao

    2015-07-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) are essential for regulating conformational changes, activities and functions of proteins, and are involved in almost all cellular pathways and processes. Identification of protein PTMs is the basis for understanding cellular and molecular mechanisms. In contrast with labor-intensive and time-consuming experiments, the PTM prediction using various bioinformatics approaches can provide accurate, convenient, and efficient strategies and generate valuable information for further experimental consideration. In this review, we summarize the current progresses made by Chineses bioinformaticians in the field of PTM Bioinformatics, including the design and improvement of computational algorithms for predicting PTM substrates and sites, design and maintenance of online and offline tools, establishment of PTM-related databases and resources, and bioinformatics analysis of PTM proteomics data. Through comparing similar studies in China and other countries, we demonstrate both advantages and limitations of current PTM bioinformatics as well as perspectives for future studies in China.

  20. [The roles of epigenetics and protein post-translational modifications in bacterial antibiotic resistance].

    PubMed

    Xie, Longxiang; Yu, Zhaoxiao; Guo, Siyao; Li, Ping; Abdalla, Abualgasim Elgaili; Xie, Jianping

    2015-08-01

    The increasing antibiotic resistance is now threatening to take us back to a pre-antibiotic era. Bacteria have evolved diverse resistance mechanisms, on which in-depth research could help the development of new strategies to control antibiotic-resistant infections. Epigenetic alterations and protein post-translational modifications (PTMs) play important roles in multiple cellular processes such as metabolism, signal transduction, protein degradation, DNA replication regulation and stress response. Recent studies demonstrated that epigenetics and PTMs also play vital roles in bacterial antibiotic resistance. In this review, we summarize the regulatory roles of epigenetic factors including DNA methylation and regulatory RNAs as well as PTMs such as phosphorylation and succinylation in bacterial antibiotic resistance, which may provide innovative perspectives on selecting antibacterial targets and developing antibiotics. PMID:26266782

  1. The Emerging Immunological Role of Post-Translational Modifications by Reactive Nitrogen Species in Cancer Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    De Sanctis, Francesco; Sandri, Sara; Ferrarini, Giovanna; Pagliarello, Irene; Sartoris, Silvia; Ugel, Stefano; Marigo, Ilaria; Molon, Barbara; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Under many inflammatory contexts, such as tumor progression, systemic and peripheral immune response is tailored by reactive nitrogen species (RNS)-dependent post-translational modifications, suggesting a biological function for these chemical alterations. RNS modify both soluble factors and receptors essential to induce and maintain a tumor-specific immune response, creating a “chemical barrier” that impairs effector T cell infiltration and functionality in tumor microenvironment and supports the escape phase of cancer. RNS generation during tumor growth mainly depends on nitric oxide production by both tumor cells and tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells that constitutively activate essential metabolic pathways of l-arginine catabolism. This review provides an overview of the potential immunological and biological role of RNS-induced modifications and addresses new approaches targeting RNS either in search of novel biomarkers or to improve anti-cancer treatment. PMID:24605112

  2. The emerging immunological role of post-translational modifications by reactive nitrogen species in cancer microenvironment.

    PubMed

    De Sanctis, Francesco; Sandri, Sara; Ferrarini, Giovanna; Pagliarello, Irene; Sartoris, Silvia; Ugel, Stefano; Marigo, Ilaria; Molon, Barbara; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Under many inflammatory contexts, such as tumor progression, systemic and peripheral immune response is tailored by reactive nitrogen species (RNS)-dependent post-translational modifications, suggesting a biological function for these chemical alterations. RNS modify both soluble factors and receptors essential to induce and maintain a tumor-specific immune response, creating a "chemical barrier" that impairs effector T cell infiltration and functionality in tumor microenvironment and supports the escape phase of cancer. RNS generation during tumor growth mainly depends on nitric oxide production by both tumor cells and tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells that constitutively activate essential metabolic pathways of l-arginine catabolism. This review provides an overview of the potential immunological and biological role of RNS-induced modifications and addresses new approaches targeting RNS either in search of novel biomarkers or to improve anti-cancer treatment.

  3. Post-translational decrease in respiratory chain proteins in the Polg mutator mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Hauser, David N; Dillman, Allissa A; Ding, Jinhui; Li, Yan; Cookson, Mark R

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA damage is thought to be a causal contributor to aging as mice with inactivating mutations in polymerase gamma (Polg) develop a progeroid phenotype. To further understand the molecular mechanisms underlying this phenotype, we used iTRAQ and RNA-Seq to determine differences in protein and mRNA abundance respectively in the brains of one year old Polg mutator mice compared to control animals. We found that mitochondrial respiratory chain proteins are specifically decreased in abundance in the brains of the mutator mice, including several nuclear encoded mitochondrial components. However, we found no evidence that the changes we observed in protein levels were the result of decreases in mRNA expression. These results show that there are post-translational effects associated with mutations in Polg.

  4. Quantitation of protein post-translational modifications using isobaric tandem mass tags.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hui-Chung; Lahert, Emma; Pike, Ian; Ward, Malcolm

    2015-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) of proteins are known to modulate many cellular processes and their qualitative and quantitative evaluation is fundamental for understanding the mechanisms of biological events. Over the past decade, improvements in sample preparation techniques and enrichment strategies, the development of quantitative labeling strategies, the launch of a new generation of mass spectrometers and the creation of bioinformatics tools for the interrogation of ever larger datasets has established MS-based quantitative proteomics as a powerful workflow for global proteomics, PTM analysis and the elucidation of key biological mechanisms. With the advantage of their multiplexing capacity and the flexibility of an ever-growing family of different peptide-reactive groups, isobaric tandem mass tags facilitate quantitative proteomics and PTM experiments and enable higher sample throughput. In this review, we focus on the technical concept and utility of the isobaric tandem mass tag labeling approach to PTM analysis, including phosphorylation, glycosylation and S-nitrosylation. PMID:25697195

  5. Post-Translational Modifications of Cardiac Mitochondrial Proteins in Cardiovascular Disease: Not Lost in Translation

    PubMed Central

    Marquez, Jubert; Lee, Sung Ryul; Kim, Nari

    2016-01-01

    Protein post-translational modifications (PTMs) are crucial in regulating cellular biology by playing key roles in processes such as the rapid on and off switching of signaling network and the regulation of enzymatic activities without affecting gene expressions. PTMs lead to conformational changes in the tertiary structure of protein and resultant regulation of protein function such as activation, inhibition, or signaling roles. PTMs such as phosphorylation, acetylation, and S-nitrosylation of specific sites in proteins have key roles in regulation of mitochondrial functions, thereby contributing to the progression to heart failure. Despite the extensive study of PTMs in mitochondrial proteins much remains unclear. Further research is yet to be undertaken to elucidate how changes in the proteins may lead to cardiovascular and metabolic disease progression in particular. We aimed to summarize the various types of PTMs that occur in mitochondrial proteins, which might be associated with heart failure. This study will increase the understanding of cardiovascular diseases through PTM. PMID:26798379

  6. Post-translational modification of cardiac proteasomes: functional delineation enabled by proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Scruggs, Sarah B.; Zong, Nobel C.; Wang, Ding; Stefani, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    Proteasomes are ubiquitously expressed multicatalytic complexes that serve as key regulators of protein homeostasis. There are several lines of evidence indicating that proteasomes exist in heterogeneous subpopulations in cardiac muscle, differentiated, in part, by post-translational modifications (PTMs). PTMs regulate numerous facets of proteasome function, including catalytic activities, complex assembly, interactions with associating partners, subcellular localization, substrate preference, and complex turnover. Classical technologies used to identify PTMs on proteasomes have lacked the ability to determine site specificity, quantify stoichiometry, and perform large-scale, multi-PTM analysis. Recent advancements in proteomic technologies have largely overcome these limitations. We present here a discussion on the importance of PTMs in modulating proteasome function in cardiac physiology and pathophysiology, followed by the presentation of a state-of-the-art proteomic workflow for identifying and quantifying PTMs of cardiac proteasomes. PMID:22523251

  7. Toward Understanding the Essence of Post-Translational Modifications for the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Immunoproteome

    PubMed Central

    van Els, Cécile A. C. M.; Corbière, Véronique; Smits, Kaat; van Gaans-van den Brink, Jacqueline A. M.; Poelen, Martien C. M.; Mascart, Francoise; Meiring, Hugo D.; Locht, Camille

    2014-01-01

    CD4+ T cells are prominent effector cells in controlling Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection but may also contribute to immunopathology. Studies probing the CD4+ T cell response from individuals latently infected with Mtb or patients with active tuberculosis using either small or proteome-wide antigen screens so far revealed a multi-antigenic, yet mostly invariable repertoire of immunogenic Mtb proteins. Recent developments in mass spectrometry-based proteomics have highlighted the occurrence of numerous types of post-translational modifications (PTMs) in proteomes of prokaryotes, including Mtb. The well-known PTMs in Mtb are glycosylation, lipidation, or phosphorylation, known regulators of protein function or compartmentalization. Other PTMs include methylation, acetylation, and pupylation, involved in protein stability. While all PTMs add variability to the Mtb proteome, relatively little is understood about their role in the anti-Mtb immune responses. Here, we review Mtb protein PTMs and methods to assess their role in protective immunity against Mtb. PMID:25157249

  8. Cyclisation mechanisms in the biosynthesis of ribosomally synthesised and post-translationally modified peptides.

    PubMed

    Truman, Andrew W

    2016-01-01

    Ribosomally synthesised and post-translationally modified peptides (RiPPs) are a large class of natural products that are remarkably chemically diverse given an intrinsic requirement to be assembled from proteinogenic amino acids. The vast chemical space occupied by RiPPs means that they possess a wide variety of biological activities, and the class includes antibiotics, co-factors, signalling molecules, anticancer and anti-HIV compounds, and toxins. A considerable amount of RiPP chemical diversity is generated from cyclisation reactions, and the current mechanistic understanding of these reactions will be discussed here. These cyclisations involve a diverse array of chemical reactions, including 1,4-nucleophilic additions, [4 + 2] cycloadditions, ATP-dependent heterocyclisation to form thiazolines or oxazolines, and radical-mediated reactions between unactivated carbons. Future prospects for RiPP pathway discovery and characterisation will also be highlighted. PMID:27559376

  9. Post-Translational Modification of Bionanoparticles as a Modular Platform for Biosensor Assembly.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qing; Chen, Qi; Blackstock, Daniel; Chen, Wilfred

    2015-08-25

    Context driven biosensor assembly with modular targeting and detection moieties is gaining significant attentions. Although protein-based nanoparticles have emerged as an excellent platform for biosensor assembly, current strategies of decorating bionanoparticles with targeting and detection moieties often suffer from unfavorable spacing and orientation as well as bionanoparticle aggregation. Herein, we report a highly modular post-translational modification approach for biosensor assembly based on sortase A-mediated ligation. This approach enables the simultaneous modifications of the Bacillus stearothermophilus E2 nanoparticles with different functional moieties for antibody, enzyme, DNA aptamer, and dye decoration. The resulting easy-purification platform offers a high degree of targeting and detection modularity with signal amplification. This flexibility is demonstrated for the detection of both immobilized antigens and cancer cells. PMID:26235232

  10. Protein deacetylation by SIRT1: an emerging key post-translational modification in metabolic regulation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jiujiu; Auwerx, Johan

    2010-07-01

    The biological function of most proteins relies on reversible post-translational modifications, among which phosphorylation is most prominently studied and well recognized. Recently, a growing amount of evidence indicates that acetylation-deacetylation reactions, when applied to crucial mediators, can also robustly affect the function of target proteins and thereby have wide-ranging physiological impacts. Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), which functions as a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+))-dependent protein deacetylase, deacetylates a wide variety of metabolic molecules in response to the cellular energy and redox status and as such causes significant changes in metabolic homeostasis. This review surveys the evidence for the emerging role of SIRT1-mediated deacetylation in the control of metabolic homeostasis. PMID:20026274

  11. Cyclisation mechanisms in the biosynthesis of ribosomally synthesised and post-translationally modified peptides

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Summary Ribosomally synthesised and post-translationally modified peptides (RiPPs) are a large class of natural products that are remarkably chemically diverse given an intrinsic requirement to be assembled from proteinogenic amino acids. The vast chemical space occupied by RiPPs means that they possess a wide variety of biological activities, and the class includes antibiotics, co-factors, signalling molecules, anticancer and anti-HIV compounds, and toxins. A considerable amount of RiPP chemical diversity is generated from cyclisation reactions, and the current mechanistic understanding of these reactions will be discussed here. These cyclisations involve a diverse array of chemical reactions, including 1,4-nucleophilic additions, [4 + 2] cycloadditions, ATP-dependent heterocyclisation to form thiazolines or oxazolines, and radical-mediated reactions between unactivated carbons. Future prospects for RiPP pathway discovery and characterisation will also be highlighted. PMID:27559376

  12. Regulation of post-translational modifications of muskelin by protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Prag, Soren; De Arcangelis, Adèle; Georges-Labouesse, Elisabeth; Adams, Josephine C

    2007-01-01

    Muskelin is a member of the kelch-repeat superfamily of proteins, identified as an intracellular protein involved in cell spreading responses to thombospondin-1. Muskelin is expressed by many adult tissues and has an evolutionarily conserved, multidomain architecture consisting of an amino-terminal discoidin-like domain, a central alpha-helical region and six kelch-repeats that are predicted to form a beta-propeller structure. We previous demonstrated that muskelin molecules undergo head-to-tail association, however the physiological, post-translational regulation of muskelin is not well understood. Here, we have examined the expression of muskelin during mouse embryonic development and report widespread expression that includes muscle tissues, multiple epithelia and the brain. In cultured skeletal myoblasts and vascular smooth muscle cells, muskelin exists as a complex set of isoelectric variants. Five potential sites for phosphorylation by protein kinase C (PKC), are conserved between vertebrate and Drosophila muskelins, therefore we examined the hypothesis that muskelin is regulated post-translationally by PKC activity. We demonstrate that PKC activation or inhibition regulates the profile of endogenous muskelin isoelectric variants and that muskelin is a substrate for PKCalphain vitro. Wild-type GFP-muskelin and a panel of alanine point mutations were used to test the sensitivity of self-association to PKC activation. Mutation of two of the sites, S324 and T515, partially inhibited the ability of muskelin to self-associate in cells and inhibited responsiveness to activated PKC. Interestingly, both sites are predicted to lie in surface-exposed loops on the same side of the beta-propeller, implicating a common binding interface. PMID:17049906

  13. Post-Translational Modifications of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough Sulfate Reduction Pathway Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Gaucher, S.P.; Redding, A.M.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Keasling, J.D.; Singh, A.K.

    2008-03-01

    Recent developments in shotgun proteomics have enabled high-throughput studies of a variety of microorganisms at a proteome level and provide experimental validation for predicted open reading frames in the corresponding genome. More importantly, advances in mass spectrometric data analysis now allow mining of large proteomics data sets for the presence of post-translational modifications(PTMs). Although PTMs are a critical aspectof cellular activity, such information eludes cell-wide studies conducted at the transcript level. Here, we analyze several mass spectrometric data sets acquired using two-dimensional liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, 2D-LC/MS/MS, for the sulfate reducing bacterium, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough. Our searches of the raw spectra led us to discover several post-translationally modified peptides in D. vulgaris. Of these, several peptides containing a lysine with a +42 Da modification were found reproducibly across all data sets. Both acetylation and trimethylation have the same nominal +42 Da mass, and are therefore candidates for this modification. Several spectra were identified having markers for trimethylation, while one is consistent with an acetylation. Surprisingly, these modified peptides predominantly mapped to proteins involved in sulfate respiration. Other highly expressed proteins in D. vulgaris, such as enzymes involved in electron transport and other central metabolic processes, did not contain this modification. Decoy database searches were used to control for random spectrum/sequence matches. Additional validation for these modifications was provided by alternate workflows, for example, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by mass spectrometry analysis of the dissimilatory sulfite reductase gamma-subunit(DsrC) protein. MS data for DsrC in this alternate workflow also contained the +42 Da modification at the same loci. Furthermore, the DsrC homologue in another sulfate reducing bacterium

  14. Co- and post-translational processing of the hevein preproprotein of latex of the rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis)

    PubMed

    Lee, H I; Broekaert, W F; Raikhel, N V; Lee, H

    1991-08-25

    Hevein is a chitin-binding protein of 43 amino acids found in the lutoid body-enriched fraction of rubber tree latex. A hevein cDNA clone (HEV1) (Broekaert, W., Lee, H.-i., Kush, A., Nam, C.-H., and Raikhel, N. (1990) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 87, 7633-7637) encodes a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acids followed by a polypeptide of 187 amino acids. Interestingly, this polypeptide has two distinct domains: an amino-terminal domain of 43 amino acids, corresponding to mature hevein, and a carboxyl-terminal domain of 144 amino acids. To investigate the mechanisms involved in processing of the protein encoded by HEV1, three domain-specific antisera were raised against fusion proteins harboring the amino-terminal domain (N domain), carboxyl-terminal domain (C domain), and both domains (NC domain). Translocation experiments using an in vitro translation system show that the first 17-amino acid sequence encoded by the cDNA functions as a signal peptide. Immunoblot analysis of proteins extracted from lutoid bodies demonstrates that a 5-kDa protein comigrated with purified mature hevein and cross-reacted with N domain- and NC domain-specific antibodies. A 14-kDa protein was recognized by C domain- and NC domain-specific antibodies. A 20-kDa protein was cross-reactive with all three antibodies. Microsequencing data further suggest that the 5-kDa (amino-terminal domain) and 14-kDa (carboxyl-terminal domain) proteins are post-translational cleavage products of the 20-kDa polypeptide (both domains) which corresponds to the proprotein encoded by HEV1. In addition, it was found that the amino-terminal domain could provide chitin-binding properties to a fusion protein bearing it either amino terminally or carboxyl terminally. PMID:1874741

  15. Distinct recurrent versus afferent dynamics in cortical visual processing.

    PubMed

    Reinhold, Kimberly; Lien, Anthony D; Scanziani, Massimo

    2015-12-01

    How intracortical recurrent circuits in mammalian sensory cortex influence dynamics of sensory representation is not understood. Previous methods could not distinguish the relative contributions of recurrent circuits and thalamic afferents to cortical dynamics. We accomplish this by optogenetically manipulating thalamus and cortex. Over the initial 40 ms of visual stimulation, excitation from recurrent circuits in visual cortex progressively increased to exceed direct thalamocortical excitation. Even when recurrent excitation exceeded thalamic excitation, upon silencing thalamus, sensory-evoked activity in cortex decayed rapidly, with a time constant of 10 ms, which is similar to a neuron's integration time window. In awake mice, this cortical decay function predicted the time-locking of cortical activity to thalamic input at frequencies <15 Hz and attenuation of the cortical response to higher frequencies. Under anesthesia, depression at thalamocortical synapses disrupted the fidelity of sensory transmission. Thus, we determine dynamics intrinsic to cortical recurrent circuits that transform afferent input in time.

  16. Oral cavity contains distinct niches with dynamic microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xin; He, Jinzhi; Xue, Jing; Wang, Yan; Li, Kun; Zhang, Keke; Guo, Qiang; Liu, Xianghong; Zhou, Yuan; Cheng, Lei; Li, Mingyun; Li, Yuqing; Li, Yan; Shi, Wenyuan; Zhou, Xuedong

    2015-03-01

    Microbes colonize human oral surfaces within hours after delivery. During postnatal development, physiological changes, such as the eruption of primary teeth and replacement of the primary dentition with permanent dentition, greatly alter the microbial habitats, which, in return, may lead to community composition shifts at different phases in people's lives. By profiling saliva, supragingival and mucosal plaque samples from healthy volunteers at different ages and dentition stages, we observed that the oral cavity is a highly heterogeneous ecological system containing distinct niches with significantly different microbial communities. More importantly, the phylogenetic microbial structure varies with ageing. In addition, only a few taxa were present across the whole populations, indicating a core oral microbiome should be defined based on age and oral niches. PMID:24800728

  17. Dynamic functional integration of distinct neural empathy systems

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence points to two separate systems for empathy: a vicarious sharing emotional system that supports our ability to share emotions and mental states and a cognitive system that involves cognitive understanding of the perspective of others. Several recent models offer new evidence regarding the brain regions involved in these systems, but no study till date has examined how regions within each system dynamically interact. The study by Raz et al. in this issue of Social, Cognitive, & Affective Neuroscience is among the first to use a novel approach of functional magnetic resonance imaging analysis of fluctuations in network cohesion while an individual is experiencing empathy. Their results substantiate the approach positing two empathy mechanisms and, more broadly, demonstrate how dynamic analysis of emotions can further our understanding of social behavior. PMID:23956080

  18. Dynamic functional integration of distinct neural empathy systems.

    PubMed

    Shamay-Tsoory, Simone G

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence points to two separate systems for empathy: a vicarious sharing emotional system that supports our ability to share emotions and mental states and a cognitive system that involves cognitive understanding of the perspective of others. Several recent models offer new evidence regarding the brain regions involved in these systems, but no study till date has examined how regions within each system dynamically interact. The study by Raz et al. in this issue of Social, Cognitive, & Affective Neuroscience is among the first to use a novel approach of functional magnetic resonance imaging analysis of fluctuations in network cohesion while an individual is experiencing empathy. Their results substantiate the approach positing two empathy mechanisms and, more broadly, demonstrate how dynamic analysis of emotions can further our understanding of social behavior. PMID:23956080

  19. Structure and post-translational modifications of the web silk protein spidroin-1 from Nephila spiders.

    PubMed

    dos Santos-Pinto, José Roberto Aparecido; Lamprecht, Günther; Chen, Wei-Qiang; Heo, Seok; Hardy, John George; Priewalder, Helga; Scheibel, Thomas Rainer; Palma, Mario Sergio; Lubec, Gert

    2014-06-13

    Spidroin-1 is one of the major ampullate silk proteins produced by spiders for use in the construction of the frame and radii of orb webs, and as a dragline to escape from predators. Only partial sequences of spidroin-1 produced by Nephila clavipes have been reported up to now, and there is no information on post-translational modifications (PTMs). A gel-based mass spectrometry strategy with ETD and CID fragmentation methods were used to sequence and determine the presence/location of any PTMs on the spidroin-1. Sequence coverage of 98.06%, 95.05%, and 98.37% were obtained for N. clavipes, Nephila edulis and for Nephila madagascariensis, respectively. Phosphorylation was the major PTM observed with 8 phosphorylation sites considered reliable on spidroin-1 produced by N. clavipes, 4 in N. madagascariensis and 2 for N. edulis. Dityrosine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (formed by oxidation of the spidroin-1) were observed, although the mechanism by which they are formed (i.e. exposure to UV radiation or to peroxidases in the major ampullate silk gland) is uncertain. Herein we present structural information on the spidroin-1 produced by three different Nephila species; these findings may be valuable for understanding the physicochemical properties of the silk proteins and moreover, future designs of recombinantly produced spider silk proteins. Biotechnological significance The present investigation shows for the first time spidroin structure and post-translational modifications observed on the major ampullate silk spidroin-1. The many site specific phosphorylations (localized within the structural motifs) along with the probably photoinduction of hydroxylations may be relevant for scientists in material science, biology, biochemistry and environmental scientists. Up to now all the mechanical properties of the spidroin have been characterized without any consideration about the existence of PTMs in the sequence of spidroins. Thus, these findings for major ampullate silk

  20. Cell specific post-translational processing of pikachurin, a protein involved in retinal synaptogenesis.

    PubMed

    Han, Jianzhong; Townes-Anderson, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    Pikachurin is a recently identified, highly conserved, extracellular matrix-like protein. Murine pikachurin has 1,017 amino acids (~110 kDa), can bind to α-dystroglycan, and has been found to localize mainly in the synaptic cleft of photoreceptor ribbon synapses. Its knockout selectively disrupts synaptogenesis between photoreceptor and bipolar cells. To further characterize this synaptic protein, we used an antibody raised against the N-terminal of murine pikachurin on Western blots of mammalian and amphibian retinas and found, unexpectedly, that a low weight ~60-kDa band was the predominant signal for endogenous pikachurin. This band was predicted to be an N-terminal product of post-translational cleavage of pikachurin. A similar sized protein was also detected in human Y79 retinoblastoma cells, a cell line with characteristics of photoreceptor cells. In Y79 cells, endogenous pikachurin immunofluorescence was found on the cell surface of living cells. The expression of the N-fragment was not significantly affected by dystroglycan overexpression in spite of the biochemical evidence for pikachurin-α-dystroglycan binding. The presence of a corresponding endogenous C-fragment was not determined because of the lack of a suitable antibody. However, a protein of ~65 kDa was detected in Y79 cells expressing recombinant pikachurin with a C-terminal tag. In contrast, in QBI-HEK 293A cells, whose endogenous pikachurin protein level is negligible, recombinant pikachurin did not appear to be cleaved. Instead pikachurin was found either intact or as dimers. Finally, whole and N- and C-fragments of recombinant pikachurin were present in the conditioned media of Y79 cells indicating the secretion of pikachurin. The site of cleavage, however, was not conclusively determined. Our data suggest the existence of post-translational cleavage of pikachurin protein as well as the extracellular localization of cleaved protein specifically by retinal cells. The functions of the

  1. Dynamic Remodeling of Microbial Biofilms by Functionally Distinct Exopolysaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Chew, Su Chuen; Kundukad, Binu; Seviour, Thomas; van der Maarel, Johan R. C.; Yang, Liang; Rice, Scott A.; Doyle, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Biofilms are densely populated communities of microbial cells protected and held together by a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances. The structure and rheological properties of the matrix at the microscale influence the retention and transport of molecules and cells in the biofilm, thereby dictating population and community behavior. Despite its importance, quantitative descriptions of the matrix microstructure and microrheology are limited. Here, particle-tracking microrheology in combination with genetic approaches was used to spatially and temporally study the rheological contributions of the major exopolysaccharides Pel and Psl in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Psl increased the elasticity and effective cross-linking within the matrix, which strengthened its scaffold and appeared to facilitate the formation of microcolonies. Conversely, Pel reduced effective cross-linking within the matrix. Without Psl, the matrix becomes more viscous, which facilitates biofilm spreading. The wild-type biofilm decreased in effective cross-linking over time, which would be advantageous for the spreading and colonization of new surfaces. This suggests that there are regulatory mechanisms to control production of the exopolysaccharides that serve to remodel the matrix of developing biofilms. The exopolysaccharides were also found to have profound effects on the spatial organization and integration of P. aeruginosa in a mixed-species biofilm model of P. aeruginosa-Staphylococcus aureus. Pel was required for close association of the two species in mixed-species microcolonies. In contrast, Psl was important for P. aeruginosa to form single-species biofilms on top of S. aureus biofilms. Our results demonstrate that Pel and Psl have distinct physical properties and functional roles during biofilm formation. PMID:25096883

  2. Dynamic remodeling of microbial biofilms by functionally distinct exopolysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Chew, Su Chuen; Kundukad, Binu; Seviour, Thomas; van der Maarel, Johan R C; Yang, Liang; Rice, Scott A; Doyle, Patrick; Kjelleberg, Staffan

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms are densely populated communities of microbial cells protected and held together by a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances. The structure and rheological properties of the matrix at the microscale influence the retention and transport of molecules and cells in the biofilm, thereby dictating population and community behavior. Despite its importance, quantitative descriptions of the matrix microstructure and microrheology are limited. Here, particle-tracking microrheology in combination with genetic approaches was used to spatially and temporally study the rheological contributions of the major exopolysaccharides Pel and Psl in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Psl increased the elasticity and effective cross-linking within the matrix, which strengthened its scaffold and appeared to facilitate the formation of microcolonies. Conversely, Pel reduced effective cross-linking within the matrix. Without Psl, the matrix becomes more viscous, which facilitates biofilm spreading. The wild-type biofilm decreased in effective cross-linking over time, which would be advantageous for the spreading and colonization of new surfaces. This suggests that there are regulatory mechanisms to control production of the exopolysaccharides that serve to remodel the matrix of developing biofilms. The exopolysaccharides were also found to have profound effects on the spatial organization and integration of P. aeruginosa in a mixed-species biofilm model of P. aeruginosa-Staphylococcus aureus. Pel was required for close association of the two species in mixed-species microcolonies. In contrast, Psl was important for P. aeruginosa to form single-species biofilms on top of S. aureus biofilms. Our results demonstrate that Pel and Psl have distinct physical properties and functional roles during biofilm formation. Importance: Most bacteria grow as biofilms in the environment or in association with eukaryotic hosts. Removal of biofilms that form on surfaces is a challenge in clinical

  3. Dynamic remodeling of microbial biofilms by functionally distinct exopolysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Chew, Su Chuen; Kundukad, Binu; Seviour, Thomas; van der Maarel, Johan R C; Yang, Liang; Rice, Scott A; Doyle, Patrick; Kjelleberg, Staffan

    2014-08-05

    Biofilms are densely populated communities of microbial cells protected and held together by a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances. The structure and rheological properties of the matrix at the microscale influence the retention and transport of molecules and cells in the biofilm, thereby dictating population and community behavior. Despite its importance, quantitative descriptions of the matrix microstructure and microrheology are limited. Here, particle-tracking microrheology in combination with genetic approaches was used to spatially and temporally study the rheological contributions of the major exopolysaccharides Pel and Psl in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Psl increased the elasticity and effective cross-linking within the matrix, which strengthened its scaffold and appeared to facilitate the formation of microcolonies. Conversely, Pel reduced effective cross-linking within the matrix. Without Psl, the matrix becomes more viscous, which facilitates biofilm spreading. The wild-type biofilm decreased in effective cross-linking over time, which would be advantageous for the spreading and colonization of new surfaces. This suggests that there are regulatory mechanisms to control production of the exopolysaccharides that serve to remodel the matrix of developing biofilms. The exopolysaccharides were also found to have profound effects on the spatial organization and integration of P. aeruginosa in a mixed-species biofilm model of P. aeruginosa-Staphylococcus aureus. Pel was required for close association of the two species in mixed-species microcolonies. In contrast, Psl was important for P. aeruginosa to form single-species biofilms on top of S. aureus biofilms. Our results demonstrate that Pel and Psl have distinct physical properties and functional roles during biofilm formation. Importance: Most bacteria grow as biofilms in the environment or in association with eukaryotic hosts. Removal of biofilms that form on surfaces is a challenge in clinical

  4. A novel post-translational modification of nucleolin, SUMOylation at Lys-294, mediates arsenite-induced cell death by regulating gadd45α mRNA stability.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dongyun; Liang, Yuguang; Xie, Qipeng; Gao, Guangxun; Wei, Jinlong; Huang, Haishan; Li, Jingxia; Gao, Jimin; Huang, Chuanshu

    2015-02-20

    Nucleolin is a ubiquitously expressed protein and participates in many important biological processes, such as cell cycle regulation and ribosomal biogenesis. The activity of nucleolin is regulated by intracellular localization and post-translational modifications, including phosphorylation, methylation, and ADP-ribosylation. Small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) is a category of recently verified forms of post-translational modifications and exerts various effects on the target proteins. In the studies reported here, we discovered SUMOylational modification of human nucleolin protein at Lys-294, which facilitated the mRNA binding property of nucleolin by maintaining its nuclear localization. In response to arsenic exposure, nucleolin-SUMO was induced and promoted its binding with gadd45α mRNA, which increased gadd45α mRNA stability and protein expression, subsequently causing GADD45α-mediated cell death. On the other hand, ectopic expression of Mn-SOD attenuated the arsenite-generated superoxide radical level, abrogated nucleolin-SUMO, and in turn inhibited arsenite-induced apoptosis by reducing GADD45α expression. Collectively, our results for the first time demonstrate that nucleolin-SUMO at K294R plays a critical role in its nucleus sequestration and gadd45α mRNA binding activity. This novel biological function of nucleolin is distinct from its conventional role as a proto-oncogene. Therefore, our findings here not only reveal a new modification of nucleolin protein and its novel functional paradigm in mRNA metabolism but also expand our understanding of the dichotomous roles of nucleolin in terms of cancer development, which are dependent on multiple intracellular conditions and consequently the appropriate regulations of its modifications, including SUMOylation. PMID:25561743

  5. A homology-based pipeline for global prediction of post-translational modification sites.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiang; Shi, Shao-Ping; Xu, Hao-Dong; Suo, Sheng-Bao; Qiu, Jian-Ding

    2016-05-13

    The pathways of protein post-translational modifications (PTMs) have been shown to play particularly important roles for almost any biological process. Identification of PTM substrates along with information on the exact sites is fundamental for fully understanding or controlling biological processes. Alternative computational strategies would help to annotate PTMs in a high-throughput manner. Traditional algorithms are suited for identifying the common organisms and tissues that have a complete PTM atlas or extensive experimental data. While annotation of rare PTMs in most organisms is a clear challenge. In this work, to this end we have developed a novel homology-based pipeline named PTMProber that allows identification of potential modification sites for most of the proteomes lacking PTMs data. Cross-promotion E-value (CPE) as stringent benchmark has been used in our pipeline to evaluate homology to known modification sites. Independent-validation tests show that PTMProber achieves over 58.8% recall with high precision by CPE benchmark. Comparisons with other machine-learning tools show that PTMProber pipeline performs better on general predictions. In addition, we developed a web-based tool to integrate this pipeline at http://bioinfo.ncu.edu.cn/PTMProber/index.aspx. In addition to pre-constructed prediction models of PTM, the website provides an extensional functionality to allow users to customize models.

  6. Human Oncogenic Herpesvirus and Post-translational Modifications - Phosphorylation and SUMOylation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Pei-Ching; Campbell, Mel; Robertson, Erle S

    2016-01-01

    Pathogens, especially viruses, evolve abilities to utilize cellular machineries to facilitate their survival and propagation. Post-translational modifications (PTMs), especially phosphorylation and SUMOylation, that reversibly modulate the function and interactions of target proteins are among the most important features in cell signaling pathways. PTM-dependent events also serve as one of the favorite targets for viruses. Among the seven unambiguous human oncogenic viruses, hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), human papillomavirus (HPV), Human T lymphotrophic virus-1 (HTLV-1), and Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV), two are herpesviruses. The life cycle of herpesviruses consists of latent and lytic phases and the rapid switch between these states includes global remodeling of the viral genome from heterochromatin-to-euchromatin. The balance between lytic replication and latency is essential for herpesvirus to maintain a persistent infection through a combination of viral propagation and evasion of the host immune response, which consequently may contribute to tumorigenesis. It is no surprise that the swift reversibility of PTMs, especially SUMOylation, a modification that epigenetically regulates chromatin structure, is a major hijack target of the host for oncogenic herpesviruses. In this brief review, we summarize the varied ways in which herpesviruses engage the host immune components through PTMs, focusing on phosphorylation and SUMOylation. PMID:27379086

  7. Post-translational processing of cholecystokinin in pig brain and gut.

    PubMed Central

    Eng, J; Shiina, Y; Straus, E; Yalow, R S

    1982-01-01

    A sequential extraction method employing methanol extraction of the COOH-terminal fragments of cholecystokinin (CCK) from pig tissues followed by HCl extraction of intact CCK and its NH2-terminal fragments is described. Radioimmunoassay of extracts and their fractionation by Sephadex chromatography and HPLC demonstrate that the distributions of COOH-terminal and NH2-terminal immunoreactivities among various regions of brain are similar and independent of the concentrations in individual regions. The distribution in gut differs from that in brain. Greatest concentrations of CCK immunoreactivity are located in cortical tissue in the brain and in duodenal mucosa in gut. Both brain and gut contain CCK octapeptide (CCK8) and an NH2-terminal fragment that is likely to be desoctapeptide-CCK33. Intact CCK33 is extractable from gut but not from brain. Brain contains another NH2-terminal immunoreactive molecule lacking COOH-terminal immunoreactivity that may be a peptide with a COOH-terminal extension, as has been described for gastrin, or one that may not be derived from a CCK33-like precursor. This peptide is much less prominent in gut, or may be nonexistent there. The failure to find CCK33 in the brain and the presence in the brain of this as-yet-uncharacterized NH2-terminal peptide raises the question as to whether the differences between neuronal and mucosal tissues are a consequence of differences in post-translational processing or in the DNA templates. PMID:6964399

  8. Human Oncogenic Herpesvirus and Post-translational Modifications – Phosphorylation and SUMOylation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Pei-Ching; Campbell, Mel; Robertson, Erle S.

    2016-01-01

    Pathogens, especially viruses, evolve abilities to utilize cellular machineries to facilitate their survival and propagation. Post-translational modifications (PTMs), especially phosphorylation and SUMOylation, that reversibly modulate the function and interactions of target proteins are among the most important features in cell signaling pathways. PTM-dependent events also serve as one of the favorite targets for viruses. Among the seven unambiguous human oncogenic viruses, hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), human papillomavirus (HPV), Human T lymphotrophic virus-1 (HTLV-1), and Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV), two are herpesviruses. The life cycle of herpesviruses consists of latent and lytic phases and the rapid switch between these states includes global remodeling of the viral genome from heterochromatin-to-euchromatin. The balance between lytic replication and latency is essential for herpesvirus to maintain a persistent infection through a combination of viral propagation and evasion of the host immune response, which consequently may contribute to tumorigenesis. It is no surprise that the swift reversibility of PTMs, especially SUMOylation, a modification that epigenetically regulates chromatin structure, is a major hijack target of the host for oncogenic herpesviruses. In this brief review, we summarize the varied ways in which herpesviruses engage the host immune components through PTMs, focusing on phosphorylation and SUMOylation. PMID:27379086

  9. Polygalacturonases from Moniliophthora perniciosa are regulated by fermentable carbon sources and possible post-translational modifications.

    PubMed

    Argôlo Santos Carvalho, Heliana; de Andrade Silva, Edson Mario; Carvalho Santos, Stenio; Micheli, Fabienne

    2013-11-01

    We report the first molecular and in silico analysis of Monilophthora perniciosa polygalacturonases (PGs). Three MpPG genes (MpPG1, MpPG2 and MpPG3) were identified and analyzed at transcriptional level, by RT-qPCR, in dikaryotic M. perniciosa mycelium grown on solid-bran based medium and on liquid medium supplemented with different fermentable and non-fermentable carbon sources. The MpPG genes presented different expression patterns suggesting different individual regulation. However, all are mainly regulated by fermentable carbon sources (galactose and mannose). The integrated analysis of PG gene expression and systems biology (using MpG1 and MpG2 orthologs in Neurospora crassa, named NCU06961 and NCU02369, respectively) allowed identifying some possible mechanism of protein regulation during the necrotrophic fungal phase. MpPG1-NCU06961 and MpPG2-NCU02369 directly or indirectly interacted with central and highly connected proteins involved in protein synthesis and protein regulation associated to post-translational modifications, in cell wall metabolism, and in cellular metabolism related to energy production. This analysis also allowed the identification of key proteins for further studies of M. perniciosa development and/or for disease management, such as MpPG2, a pectin methylesterase, an acetolactate synthase and the small ubiquitin-like modifier SMT3-like.

  10. Software Analysis of Uncorrelated MS1 Peaks for Discovery of Post-Translational Modifications.

    PubMed

    Pascal, Bruce D; West, Graham M; Scharager-Tapia, Catherina; Flefil, Ricardo; Moroni, Tina; Martinez-Acedo, Pablo; Griffin, Patrick R; Carvalloza, Anthony C

    2015-12-01

    The goal in proteomics to identify all peptides in a complex mixture has been largely addressed using various LC MS/MS approaches, such as data dependent acquisition, SRM/MRM, and data independent acquisition instrumentation. Despite these developments, many peptides remain unsequenced, often due to low abundance, poor fragmentation patterns, or data analysis difficulties. Many of the unidentified peptides exhibit strong evidence in high resolution MS(1) data and are frequently post-translationally modified, playing a significant role in biological processes. Proteomics Workbench (PWB) software was developed to automate the detection and visualization of all possible peptides in MS(1) data, reveal candidate peptides not initially identified, and build inclusion lists for subsequent MS(2) analysis to uncover new identifications. We used this software on existing data on the autophagy regulating kinase Ulk1 as a proof of concept for this method, as we had already manually identified a number of phosphorylation sites Dorsey, F. C. et al (J. Proteome. Res. 8(11), 5253-5263 (2009)). PWB found all previously identified sites of phosphorylation. The software has been made freely available at http://www.proteomicsworkbench.com . Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  11. Bug22 influences cilium morphology and the post-translational modification of ciliary microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Mendes Maia, Teresa; Gogendeau, Delphine; Pennetier, Carole; Janke, Carsten; Basto, Renata

    2014-01-01

    Summary Cilia and flagella are organelles essential for motility and sensing of environmental stimuli. Depending on the cell type, cilia acquire a defined set of functions and, accordingly, are built with an appropriate length and molecular composition. Several ciliary proteins display a high degree of conservation throughout evolution and mutations in ciliary genes are associated with various diseases such as ciliopathies and infertility. Here, we describe the role of the highly conserved ciliary protein, Bug22, in Drosophila. Previous studies in unicellular organisms have shown that Bug22 is required for proper cilia function, but its exact role in ciliogenesis has not been investigated yet. Null Bug22 mutant flies display cilia-associated phenotypes and nervous system defects. Furthermore, sperm differentiation is blocked at the individualization stage, due to impaired migration of the individualization machinery. Tubulin post-translational modifications (PTMs) such as polyglycylation, polyglutamylation or acetylation, are determinants of microtubule (MT) functions and stability in centrioles, cilia and neurons. We found defects in the timely incorporation of polyglycylation in sperm axonemal MTs of Bug22 mutants. In addition, we found that depletion of human Bug22 in RPE1 cells resulted in the appearance of longer cilia and reduced axonemal polyglutamylation. Our work identifies Bug22 as a protein that plays a conserved role in the regulation of PTMs of the ciliary axoneme. PMID:24414207

  12. Importance of post-translational modifications on the function of key haemostatic proteins.

    PubMed

    Karlaftis, Vasiliki; Perera, Sachin; Monagle, Paul; Ignjatovic, Vera

    2016-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) such as glycosylation and phosphorylation play an important role on the function of haemostatic proteins and are critical in the setting of disease. Such secondary level changes to haemostatic proteins have wide ranging effects on their ability to interact with other proteins. This review aimed to summarize the knowledge of the common PTMs associated with haemostatic proteins and the implications of such modifications on protein function. Haemostatic proteins that represent the main focus for studies specific to PTMs are von Willebrand factor, tissue factor, factor VIII, antithrombin and fibrinogen. These proteins are susceptible to PTMs by glycosylation, phosphorylation, sulphation, citrullination and nitration, respectively, with a significant impact on their function. During synthesis, vWF must undergo extensive PTMs, with N-linked glycosylation being the most common. Increased phosphorylation of tissue factor results in increased affinity for platelets to the vessel endothelium. Citrullination of antithrombin leads to an increased anticoagulant function of this protein and therefore an anticoagulant state that inhibits clot formation. On the contrary, nitration of fibrinogen has been shown to result in a prothrombotic state, whilst sulphation is required for the normal function of Factor VIII. From this review, it is evident that PTMs of haemostatic proteins as a change in protein structure at a secondary level greatly influences the behaviour of the protein at a tertiary level.

  13. Post-Translational Modification of Constitutive Nitric Oxide Synthase in the Penis

    PubMed Central

    Musicki, Biljana; Ross, Ashley E.; Champion, Hunter C.; Burnett, Arthur L.; Bivalacqua, Trinity J.

    2009-01-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common men's health problem characterized by the consistent inability to sustain an erection sufficient for sexual intercourse. Basic science research on erectile physiology has been devoted to investigating the pathogenesis of ED and has led to the conclusion that ED is predominately a disease of vascular origin and/or neurogenic dysfunction. The constitutive forms of nitric oxide synthase [NOS; endothelial NOS (eNOS) and neuronal NOS (nNOS)] are important enzymes involved in the production of nitric oxide (NO) and thus regulate penile vascular homeostasis. Given the impact of endothelial- and neuronal-derived NO in penile vascular biology, a great deal of research over the past decade has focused on the role of NO synthesis from the endothelium and nitrergic nerve terminal in normal erectile physiology as well as in disease states. Loss of the functional integrity of the endothelium and subsequent endothelial dysfunction plays an integral role in the occurrence of ED. Therefore, molecular mechanisms involved in dysregulation of these NOS isoforms in the development of ED are essential to discovering the pathogenesis of ED in various disease states. This communication reviews the role of eNOS and nNOS in erectile physiology and discusses the alterations in eNOS and nNOS via post-translation modification in various vascular diseases of the penis. PMID:19342700

  14. A homology-based pipeline for global prediction of post-translational modification sites

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiang; Shi, Shao-Ping; Xu, Hao-Dong; Suo, Sheng-Bao; Qiu, Jian-Ding

    2016-01-01

    The pathways of protein post-translational modifications (PTMs) have been shown to play particularly important roles for almost any biological process. Identification of PTM substrates along with information on the exact sites is fundamental for fully understanding or controlling biological processes. Alternative computational strategies would help to annotate PTMs in a high-throughput manner. Traditional algorithms are suited for identifying the common organisms and tissues that have a complete PTM atlas or extensive experimental data. While annotation of rare PTMs in most organisms is a clear challenge. In this work, to this end we have developed a novel homology-based pipeline named PTMProber that allows identification of potential modification sites for most of the proteomes lacking PTMs data. Cross-promotion E-value (CPE) as stringent benchmark has been used in our pipeline to evaluate homology to known modification sites. Independent-validation tests show that PTMProber achieves over 58.8% recall with high precision by CPE benchmark. Comparisons with other machine-learning tools show that PTMProber pipeline performs better on general predictions. In addition, we developed a web-based tool to integrate this pipeline at http://bioinfo.ncu.edu.cn/PTMProber/index.aspx. In addition to pre-constructed prediction models of PTM, the website provides an extensional functionality to allow users to customize models. PMID:27174170

  15. Software Analysis of Uncorrelated MS1 Peaks for Discovery of Post-Translational Modifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascal, Bruce D.; West, Graham M.; Scharager-Tapia, Catherina; Flefil, Ricardo; Moroni, Tina; Martinez-Acedo, Pablo; Griffin, Patrick R.; Carvalloza, Anthony C.

    2015-12-01

    The goal in proteomics to identify all peptides in a complex mixture has been largely addressed using various LC MS/MS approaches, such as data dependent acquisition, SRM/MRM, and data independent acquisition instrumentation. Despite these developments, many peptides remain unsequenced, often due to low abundance, poor fragmentation patterns, or data analysis difficulties. Many of the unidentified peptides exhibit strong evidence in high resolution MS1 data and are frequently post-translationally modified, playing a significant role in biological processes. Proteomics Workbench (PWB) software was developed to automate the detection and visualization of all possible peptides in MS1 data, reveal candidate peptides not initially identified, and build inclusion lists for subsequent MS2 analysis to uncover new identifications. We used this software on existing data on the autophagy regulating kinase Ulk1 as a proof of concept for this method, as we had already manually identified a number of phosphorylation sites Dorsey, F. C. et al (J. Proteome. Res. 8(11), 5253-5263 (2009)). PWB found all previously identified sites of phosphorylation. The software has been made freely available at http://www.proteomicsworkbench.com .

  16. De novo sequencing of unique sequence tags for discovery of post-translational modifications of proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Yufeng; Tolic, Nikola; Hixson, Kim K.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-10-15

    De novo sequencing has a promise to discover the protein post-translation modifications; however, such approach is still in their infancy and not widely applied for proteomics practices due to its limited reliability. In this work, we describe a de novo sequencing approach for discovery of protein modifications through identification of the UStags (Anal. Chem. 2008, 80, 1871-1882). The de novo information was obtained from Fourier-transform tandem mass spectrometry for peptides and polypeptides in a yeast lysate, and the de novo sequences obtained were filtered to define a more limited set of UStags. The DNA-predicted database protein sequences were then compared to the UStags, and the differences observed across or in the UStags (i.e., the UStags’ prefix and suffix sequences and the UStags themselves) were used to infer the possible sequence modifications. With this de novo-UStag approach, we uncovered some unexpected variances of yeast protein sequences due to amino acid mutations and/or multiple modifications to the predicted protein sequences. Random matching of the de novo sequences to the predicted sequences were examined with use of two random (false) databases, and ~3% false discovery rates were estimated for the de novo-UStag approach. The factors affecting the reliability (e.g., existence of de novo sequencing noise residues and redundant sequences) and the sensitivity are described. The de novo-UStag complements the UStag method previously reported by enabling discovery of new protein modifications.

  17. ProteomeScout: a repository and analysis resource for post-translational modifications and proteins

    PubMed Central

    Matlock, Matthew K.; Holehouse, Alex S.; Naegle, Kristen M.

    2015-01-01

    ProteomeScout (https://proteomescout.wustl.edu) is a resource for the study of proteins and their post-translational modifications (PTMs) consisting of a database of PTMs, a repository for experimental data, an analysis suite for PTM experiments, and a tool for visualizing the relationships between complex protein annotations. The PTM database is a compendium of public PTM data, coupled with user-uploaded experimental data. ProteomeScout provides analysis tools for experimental datasets, including summary views and subset selection, which can identify relationships within subsets of data by testing for statistically significant enrichment of protein annotations. Protein annotations are incorporated in the ProteomeScout database from external resources and include terms such as Gene Ontology annotations, domains, secondary structure and non-synonymous polymorphisms. These annotations are available in the database download, in the analysis tools and in the protein viewer. The protein viewer allows for the simultaneous visualization of annotations in an interactive web graphic, which can be exported in Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) format. Finally, quantitative data measurements associated with public experiments are also easily viewable within protein records, allowing researchers to see how PTMs change across different contexts. ProteomeScout should prove useful for protein researchers and should benefit the proteomics community by providing a stable repository for PTM experiments. PMID:25414335

  18. Translational and post-translational regulation of mouse cation transport regulator homolog 1

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Yuki; Hirata, Yoko; Kiuchi, Kazutoshi; Oh-hashi, Kentaro

    2016-01-01

    Cation transport regulator homolog 1 (Chac1) is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress inducible gene that has a function as a γ-glutamyl cyclotransferase involved in the degradation of glutathione. To characterize the translation and stability of Chac1, we found that the Kozak-like sequence present in the 5′ untranslated region (5′UTR) of the Chac1 mRNA was responsible for Chac1 translation. In addition, the short form (ΔChac1), which translated from the second ATG codon, was generated in the absence of the 5′UTR. The proteasome pathway predominantly participated in the stability of the Chac1 protein; however, its expression was remarkably up-regulated by co-transfection with ubiquitin genes. Using an immunoprecipitation assay, we revealed that ubiquitin molecule was directly conjugated to Chac1, and that mutated Chac1 with all lysine residues replaced by arginine was also ubiquitinated. Finally, we showed that WT Chac1 but not ΔChac1 reduced the intracellular level of glutathione. Taken together, our results suggest that the Chac1 protein expression is regulated in translational and post-translational fashion due to the Kozak-like sequence in the 5′UTR and the ubiquitin-mediated pathways. The bidirectional roles of ubiquitination in regulating Chac1 stabilization might give us a new insight into understanding the homeostasis of glutathione under pathophysiological conditions. PMID:27302742

  19. A homology-based pipeline for global prediction of post-translational modification sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiang; Shi, Shao-Ping; Xu, Hao-Dong; Suo, Sheng-Bao; Qiu, Jian-Ding

    2016-05-01

    The pathways of protein post-translational modifications (PTMs) have been shown to play particularly important roles for almost any biological process. Identification of PTM substrates along with information on the exact sites is fundamental for fully understanding or controlling biological processes. Alternative computational strategies would help to annotate PTMs in a high-throughput manner. Traditional algorithms are suited for identifying the common organisms and tissues that have a complete PTM atlas or extensive experimental data. While annotation of rare PTMs in most organisms is a clear challenge. In this work, to this end we have developed a novel homology-based pipeline named PTMProber that allows identification of potential modification sites for most of the proteomes lacking PTMs data. Cross-promotion E-value (CPE) as stringent benchmark has been used in our pipeline to evaluate homology to known modification sites. Independent-validation tests show that PTMProber achieves over 58.8% recall with high precision by CPE benchmark. Comparisons with other machine-learning tools show that PTMProber pipeline performs better on general predictions. In addition, we developed a web-based tool to integrate this pipeline at http://bioinfo.ncu.edu.cn/PTMProber/index.aspx. In addition to pre-constructed prediction models of PTM, the website provides an extensional functionality to allow users to customize models.

  20. Alpha-synuclein post-translational modifications as potential biomarkers for Parkinson disease and other synucleinopathies.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Adrien W; Fauvet, Bruno; Moniatte, Marc; Lashuel, Hilal A

    2013-12-01

    The development of novel therapies against neurodegenerative disorders requires the ability to detect their early, presymptomatic manifestations in order to enable treatment before irreversible cellular damage occurs. Precocious signs indicative of neurodegeneration include characteristic changes in certain protein levels, which can be used as diagnostic biomarkers when they can be detected in fluids such as blood plasma or cerebrospinal fluid. In the case of synucleinopathies, cerebrospinal alpha-synuclein (α-syn) has attracted great interest as a potential biomarker; however, there is ongoing debate regarding the association between cerebrospinal α-syn levels and neurodegeneration in Parkinson disease and synucleinopathies. Post-translational modifications (PTMs) have emerged as important determinants of α-syn's physiological and pathological functions. Several PTMs are enriched within Lewy bodies and exist at higher levels in α-synucleinopathy brains, suggesting that certain modified forms of α-syn might be more relevant biomarkers than the total α-syn levels. However, the quantification of PTMs in bodily fluids poses several challenges. This review describes the limitations of current immunoassay-based α-syn quantification methods and highlights how these limitations can be overcome using novel mass-spectrometry-based assays. In addition, we describe how advances in chemical synthesis, which have enabled the preparation of α-syn proteins that are site-specifically modified at single or multiple residues, can facilitate the development of more accurate assays for detecting and quantifying α-syn PTMs in health and disease.

  1. Post-translational modifications disclose a dual role for redox stress in cardiovascular pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Victorino, Vanessa Jacob; Mencalha, André Luiz; Panis, Carolina

    2015-05-15

    Although some of the redox changes that occur in biological components may result in deleterious events, this process has recently been tackled as a modulatory event. Advances in our understanding regarding the role of some oxidative/nitrosative reactions revealed that proteins can be structurally and functionally modified by chemical reactions, an epigenetic event known as post-translational modification (PTM). PTMs can function as an "on-off switch" for signaling cascades, and are dependent on the specific generation of redox components such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO). NO-driven modifications regulate a wide range of cellular processes and have been highlighted as an epigenetic event that protects proteins from proteolytic degradation. On the other hand, ROS-driven modifications are implicated in cell damage in a number of pathological conditions, especially in the cardiovascular system. Therefore, while mitochondrial uncoupling yields the massive production of ROS in the heart, some cellular redox-sensitive pathways trigger PTMs that may play a cardioprotective role. In this review, we present an overview of the oxidative/nitrosative milieu in cardiac pathologies and address the role of the main redox-driven PTMs as epigenetic events in cardioprotection, as well as its regulatory function in cardiomyocyte signaling. Improved understanding of the role of these PTMs in cardiovascular disease can help direct some approaches for future clinical research regarding health risk assessment, as well as inform strategies for disease treatment and prevention.

  2. Post-translational processing targets functionally diverse proteins in Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Tacchi, Jessica L; Raymond, Benjamin B A; Haynes, Paul A; Berry, Iain J; Widjaja, Michael; Bogema, Daniel R; Woolley, Lauren K; Jenkins, Cheryl; Minion, F Chris; Padula, Matthew P; Djordjevic, Steven P

    2016-02-01

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is a genome-reduced, cell wall-less, bacterial pathogen with a predicted coding capacity of less than 700 proteins and is one of the smallest self-replicating pathogens. The cell surface of M. hyopneumoniae is extensively modified by processing events that target the P97 and P102 adhesin families. Here, we present analyses of the proteome of M. hyopneumoniae-type strain J using protein-centric approaches (one- and two-dimensional GeLC-MS/MS) that enabled us to focus on global processing events in this species. While these approaches only identified 52% of the predicted proteome (347 proteins), our analyses identified 35 surface-associated proteins with widely divergent functions that were targets of unusual endoproteolytic processing events, including cell adhesins, lipoproteins and proteins with canonical functions in the cytosol that moonlight on the cell surface. Affinity chromatography assays that separately used heparin, fibronectin, actin and host epithelial cell surface proteins as bait recovered cleavage products derived from these processed proteins, suggesting these fragments interact directly with the bait proteins and display previously unrecognized adhesive functions. We hypothesize that protein processing is underestimated as a post-translational modification in genome-reduced bacteria and prokaryotes more broadly, and represents an important mechanism for creating cell surface protein diversity.

  3. A quick signal of starvation induced autophagy: transcription versus post-translational modification of LC3.

    PubMed

    Karim, Md Razaul; Kawanago, Hisayo; Kadowaki, Motoni

    2014-11-15

    Autophagy is the major intracellular lysosomal bulk degradation pathway induced by nutrient starvation and contributes to the elimination of damaged organelles and protein aggregates to recycle building block and is essential for cell survival. Microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3) plays an indispensable role in macroautophagy formation and is a molecular marker for the process. Here, we show that autophagy increased through quick robust signaling from starvation by enhanced levels of LC3, LC3-EGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein) punctate, and bulk proteolysis in rat hepatoma H4-II-E cells and fresh rat hepatocytes. After the addition of amino acids to the starvation condition, a similar quick signal appeared by significant reduction of the LC3 ratio and bulk proteolysis. Interestingly, we observed that post-translational modification of LC3 conversion occurred even long before the changes happened in the level of LC3-mRNA (messenger RNA) expression. A similar coordinated but diverse effect on LC3 was confirmed by using autophagy and lysosomal inhibitors. These results indicated that during starvation the initial robust signal to the cytoplasm can induce autophagy activity through modification at the protein level, whereas after depleting readily available autophagy proteins the signal goes to the DNA transcription level to maintain the autophagy capacity of cells.

  4. Translational and post-translational regulation of mouse cation transport regulator homolog 1.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Yuki; Hirata, Yoko; Kiuchi, Kazutoshi; Oh-Hashi, Kentaro

    2016-01-01

    Cation transport regulator homolog 1 (Chac1) is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress inducible gene that has a function as a γ-glutamyl cyclotransferase involved in the degradation of glutathione. To characterize the translation and stability of Chac1, we found that the Kozak-like sequence present in the 5' untranslated region (5'UTR) of the Chac1 mRNA was responsible for Chac1 translation. In addition, the short form (ΔChac1), which translated from the second ATG codon, was generated in the absence of the 5'UTR. The proteasome pathway predominantly participated in the stability of the Chac1 protein; however, its expression was remarkably up-regulated by co-transfection with ubiquitin genes. Using an immunoprecipitation assay, we revealed that ubiquitin molecule was directly conjugated to Chac1, and that mutated Chac1 with all lysine residues replaced by arginine was also ubiquitinated. Finally, we showed that WT Chac1 but not ΔChac1 reduced the intracellular level of glutathione. Taken together, our results suggest that the Chac1 protein expression is regulated in translational and post-translational fashion due to the Kozak-like sequence in the 5'UTR and the ubiquitin-mediated pathways. The bidirectional roles of ubiquitination in regulating Chac1 stabilization might give us a new insight into understanding the homeostasis of glutathione under pathophysiological conditions. PMID:27302742

  5. Post-translational control of NF-κB signaling by ubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Won, Minho; Byun, Hee Sun; Park, Kyeong Ah; Hur, Gang Min

    2016-08-01

    The transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) controls a number of essential cellular functions, including the immune response, cell proliferation, and apoptosis. NF-κB signaling must be engaged temporally and spatially and well orchestrated to prevent aberrant activation because loss of normal regulation of NF-κB is a major contributor to a variety of pathological diseases, including inflammatory diseases, autoimmune diseases, and cancers. Thus, understanding the molecular mechanisms controlling NF-κB activation is an important part of treatment of these relevant diseases. Although NF-κB transcriptional activity is largely regulated by nuclear translocation, post-translational modification of NF-κB signaling components, including phosphorylation, ubiquitination, acetylation, and methylation, has emerged as an important mechanism affecting activity. Many proteins have been shown to ubiquitinate and regulate NF-κB activation at the receptor signaling complex in response to a variety of ligands, such as tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-1, and Toll-like receptor ligands. In this review, we discuss our current knowledge of ubiquitination patterns and their functional role in NF-κB regulation.

  6. The Multiplicity of Post-Translational Modifications in Pro-Opiomelanocortin-Derived Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Akikazu; Jones, Leslie Sargent; Shigeri, Yasushi

    2013-01-01

    The precursor protein, pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) undergoes extensive post-translational processing in a tissue-specific manner to yield various biologically active peptides involved in diverse cellular functions. The recently developed method of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) for direct tissue analysis has proved to be a powerful tool for investigating the distribution of peptides and proteins. In particular, topological mass spectrometry analysis using MALDI-MS can selectively provide a mass profile of the hormones included in cell secretory granules. An advantage of this technology is that it is possible to analyze a frozen thin slice section, avoiding an extraction procedure. Subsequently, tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) has a profound impact on addressing the modified residues in the hormone molecules. Based on these strategies with mass spectrometry, several interesting molecular forms of POMC-derived peptides have been found in the fish pituitary, such as novel sites of acetylation in α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH), hydroxylation of a proline residue in β-MSH, and the phosphorylated form of corticotropin-like intermediate lobe peptide. PMID:24348461

  7. The Flavone Luteolin Suppresses SREBP-2 Expression and Post-Translational Activation in Hepatic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Tsz Yan; Lin, Shu-mei; Leung, Lai K.

    2015-01-01

    High blood cholesterol has been associated with cardiovascular diseases. The enzyme HMG CoA reductase (HMGCR) is responsible for cholesterol synthesis, and inhibitors of this enzyme (statins) have been used clinically to control blood cholesterol. Sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP) -2 is a key transcription factor in cholesterol metabolism, and HMGCR is a target gene of SREBP-2. Attenuating SREBP-2 activity could potentially minimize the expression of HMGCR. Luteolin is a flavone that is commonly detected in plant foods. In the present study, Luteolin suppressed the expression of SREBP-2 at concentrations as low as 1 μM in the hepatic cell lines WRL and HepG2. This flavone also prevented the nuclear translocation of SREBP-2. Post-translational processing of SREBP-2 protein was required for nuclear translocation. Luteolin partially blocked this activation route through increased AMP kinase (AMPK) activation. At the transcriptional level, the mRNA and protein expression of SREBP-2 were reduced through luteolin. A reporter gene assay also verified that the transcription of SREBF2 was weakened in response to this flavone. The reduced expression and protein processing of SREBP-2 resulted in decreased nuclear translocation. Thus, the transcription of HMGCR was also decreased after luteolin treatment. In summary, the results of the present study showed that luteolin modulates HMGCR transcription by decreasing the expression and nuclear translocation of SREBP-2. PMID:26302339

  8. Silent Encoding of Chemical Post-Translational Modifications in Phage-Displayed Libraries.

    PubMed

    Tjhung, Katrina F; Kitov, Pavel I; Ng, Simon; Kitova, Elena N; Deng, Lu; Klassen, John S; Derda, Ratmir

    2016-01-13

    In vitro selection of chemically modified peptide libraries presented on phage, while a powerful technology, is limited to one chemical post-translational modification (cPTM) per library. We use unique combinations of redundant codons to encode cPTMs with "silent barcodes" to trace multiple modifications within a mixed modified library. As a proof of concept, we produced phage-displayed peptide libraries Ser-[X]4-Gly-Gly-Gly, with Gly and Ser encoded using unique combinations of codons (TCA-[X]4-GGAGGAGGA, AGT-[X]4-GGTGGTGGT, etc., where [X]4 denotes a random NNK library). After separate chemical modification and pooling, mixed-modified libraries can be panned and deep-sequenced to identify the enriched peptide sequence and the accompanying cPTM simultaneously. We panned libraries bearing combinations of modifications (sulfonamide, biotin, mannose) against matched targets (carbonic anhydrase, streptavidin, concanavalin A) to identify desired ligands. Synthesis and validation of sequences identified by deep sequencing revealed that specific cPTMs are significantly enriched in panning against the specific targets. Panning on carbonic anhydrase yielded a potent ligand, sulfonamide-WIVP, with Kd = 6.7 ± 2.1 nM, a 20-fold improvement compared with the control ligand sulfonamide-GGGG. Silent encoding of multiple cPTMs can be readily incorporated into other in vitro display technologies such as bacteriophage T7 or mRNA display.

  9. Glycoproteomic analysis of seven major allergenic proteins reveals novel post-translational modifications.

    PubMed

    Halim, Adnan; Carlsson, Michael C; Madsen, Caroline Benedicte; Brand, Stephanie; Møller, Svenning Rune; Olsen, Carl Erik; Vakhrushev, Sergey Y; Brimnes, Jens; Wurtzen, Peter Adler; Ipsen, Henrik; Petersen, Bent L; Wandall, Hans H

    2015-01-01

    Allergenic proteins such as grass pollen and house dust mite (HDM) proteins are known to trigger hypersensitivity reactions of the immune system, leading to what is commonly known as allergy. Key allergenic proteins including sequence variants have been identified but characterization of their post-translational modifications (PTMs) is still limited. Here, we present a detailed PTM(1) characterization of a series of the main and clinically relevant allergens used in allergy tests and vaccines. We employ Orbitrap-based mass spectrometry with complementary fragmentation techniques (HCD/ETD) for site-specific PTM characterization by bottom-up analysis. In addition, top-down mass spectrometry is utilized for targeted analysis of individual proteins, revealing hitherto unknown PTMs of HDM allergens. We demonstrate the presence of lysine-linked polyhexose glycans and asparagine-linked N-acetylhexosamine glycans on HDM allergens. Moreover, we identified more complex glycan structures than previously reported on the major grass pollen group 1 and 5 allergens, implicating important roles for carbohydrates in allergen recognition and response by the immune system. The new findings are important for understanding basic disease-causing mechanisms at the cellular level, which ultimately may pave the way for instigating novel approaches for targeted desensitization strategies and improved allergy vaccines.

  10. Glycoproteomic Analysis of Seven Major Allergenic Proteins Reveals Novel Post-translational Modifications*

    PubMed Central

    Halim, Adnan; Carlsson, Michael C.; Madsen, Caroline Benedicte; Brand, Stephanie; Møller, Svenning Rune; Olsen, Carl Erik; Vakhrushev, Sergey Y.; Brimnes, Jens; Wurtzen, Peter Adler; Ipsen, Henrik; Petersen, Bent L.; Wandall, Hans H.

    2015-01-01

    Allergenic proteins such as grass pollen and house dust mite (HDM) proteins are known to trigger hypersensitivity reactions of the immune system, leading to what is commonly known as allergy. Key allergenic proteins including sequence variants have been identified but characterization of their post-translational modifications (PTMs) is still limited. Here, we present a detailed PTM1 characterization of a series of the main and clinically relevant allergens used in allergy tests and vaccines. We employ Orbitrap-based mass spectrometry with complementary fragmentation techniques (HCD/ETD) for site-specific PTM characterization by bottom-up analysis. In addition, top-down mass spectrometry is utilized for targeted analysis of individual proteins, revealing hitherto unknown PTMs of HDM allergens. We demonstrate the presence of lysine-linked polyhexose glycans and asparagine-linked N-acetylhexosamine glycans on HDM allergens. Moreover, we identified more complex glycan structures than previously reported on the major grass pollen group 1 and 5 allergens, implicating important roles for carbohydrates in allergen recognition and response by the immune system. The new findings are important for understanding basic disease-causing mechanisms at the cellular level, which ultimately may pave the way for instigating novel approaches for targeted desensitization strategies and improved allergy vaccines. PMID:25389185

  11. Enhanced top-down characterization of histone post-translational modifications

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Zhixin; Tolić, Nikola; Zhao, Rui; Moore, Ronald J.; Hengel, Shawna M.; Robinson, Errol W.; Stenoien, David L.; Wu, Si; Smith, Richard D.; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana

    2012-01-01

    Background: Multiple post-translational modifications (PTMs) on core histones often work synergistically to fine tune chromatin structure and functions, generating a “histone code” that can be interpreted by a variety of chromatin interacting proteins. Although previous bottom-up and middle-down proteomic approaches have been developed for limited characterization of PTMs on histone N-terminal tails, high-throughput methods for comprehensive identification of PTMs distributed along the entire primary amino acid sequence are yet to be implemented. Results: Here we report a novel online two-dimensional liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry (2D LC–MS/MS) platform for high-throughput and sensitive characterization of histone PTMs at the intact protein level. The metal-free LC system with reverse phase separation followed by weak cation exchange – hydrophilic interaction chromatography (WCX-HILIC) and online Orbitrap Velos tandem mass spectrometry allowed for unambiguous identification of over 700 histone isoforms from a single 2D LC–MS/MS analysis of 7.5 µg of purified core histones. In comparison with previous offline top-down analysis of H4, this online study identified 100 additional isoforms from 100-fold less sample. This platform enabled comprehensive characterization of histone modifications, including those beyond tail regions, with dramatically improved throughput and sensitivity compared to more traditional platforms. Isoforms identified included those with combinatorial PTMs extending well beyond the N-terminal tail regions as well as a large number of phosphorylated isoforms.

  12. Oxidative post-translational modifications of cysteine residues in plant signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Waszczak, Cezary; Akter, Salma; Jacques, Silke; Huang, Jingjing; Messens, Joris; Van Breusegem, Frank

    2015-05-01

    In plants, fluctuation of the redox balance by altered levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) can affect many aspects of cellular physiology. ROS homeostasis is governed by a diversified set of antioxidant systems. Perturbation of this homeostasis leads to transient or permanent changes in the redox status and is exploited by plants in different stress signalling mechanisms. Understanding how plants sense ROS and transduce these stimuli into downstream biological responses is still a major challenge. ROS can provoke reversible and irreversible modifications to proteins that act in diverse signalling pathways. These oxidative post-translational modifications (Ox-PTMs) lead to oxidative damage and/or trigger structural alterations in these target proteins. Characterization of the effect of individual Ox-PTMs on individual proteins is the key to a better understanding of how cells interpret the oxidative signals that arise from developmental cues and stress conditions. This review focuses on ROS-mediated Ox-PTMs on cysteine (Cys) residues. The Cys side chain, with its high nucleophilic capacity, appears to be the principle target of ROS. Ox-PTMs on Cys residues participate in various signalling cascades initiated by plant stress hormones. We review the mechanistic aspects and functional consequences of Cys Ox-PTMs on specific target proteins in view of stress signalling events.

  13. Alpha-synuclein Post-translational Modifications as Potential Biomarkers for Parkinson Disease and Other Synucleinopathies

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Adrien W.; Fauvet, Bruno; Moniatte, Marc; Lashuel, Hilal A.

    2013-01-01

    The development of novel therapies against neurodegenerative disorders requires the ability to detect their early, presymptomatic manifestations in order to enable treatment before irreversible cellular damage occurs. Precocious signs indicative of neurodegeneration include characteristic changes in certain protein levels, which can be used as diagnostic biomarkers when they can be detected in fluids such as blood plasma or cerebrospinal fluid. In the case of synucleinopathies, cerebrospinal alpha-synuclein (α-syn) has attracted great interest as a potential biomarker; however, there is ongoing debate regarding the association between cerebrospinal α-syn levels and neurodegeneration in Parkinson disease and synucleinopathies. Post-translational modifications (PTMs) have emerged as important determinants of α-syn's physiological and pathological functions. Several PTMs are enriched within Lewy bodies and exist at higher levels in α-synucleinopathy brains, suggesting that certain modified forms of α-syn might be more relevant biomarkers than the total α-syn levels. However, the quantification of PTMs in bodily fluids poses several challenges. This review describes the limitations of current immunoassay-based α-syn quantification methods and highlights how these limitations can be overcome using novel mass-spectrometry-based assays. In addition, we describe how advances in chemical synthesis, which have enabled the preparation of α-syn proteins that are site-specifically modified at single or multiple residues, can facilitate the development of more accurate assays for detecting and quantifying α-syn PTMs in health and disease. PMID:23966418

  14. In Silico Analysis of Correlations between Protein Disorder and Post-Translational Modifications in Algae

    PubMed Central

    Kurotani, Atsushi; Sakurai, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    Recent proteome analyses have reported that intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) of proteins play important roles in biological processes. In higher plants whose genomes have been sequenced, the correlation between IDRs and post-translational modifications (PTMs) has been reported. The genomes of various eukaryotic algae as common ancestors of plants have also been sequenced. However, no analysis of the relationship to protein properties such as structure and PTMs in algae has been reported. Here, we describe correlations between IDR content and the number of PTM sites for phosphorylation, glycosylation, and ubiquitination, and between IDR content and regions rich in proline, glutamic acid, serine, and threonine (PEST) and transmembrane helices in the sequences of 20 algae proteomes. Phosphorylation, O-glycosylation, ubiquitination, and PEST preferentially occurred in disordered regions. In contrast, transmembrane helices were favored in ordered regions. N-glycosylation tended to occur in ordered regions in most of the studied algae; however, it correlated positively with disordered protein content in diatoms. Additionally, we observed that disordered protein content and the number of PTM sites were significantly increased in the species-specific protein clusters compared to common protein clusters among the algae. Moreover, there were specific relationships between IDRs and PTMs among the algae from different groups. PMID:26307970

  15. novPTMenzy: a database for enzymes involved in novel post-translational modifications.

    PubMed

    Khater, Shradha; Mohanty, Debasisa

    2015-01-01

    With the recent discoveries of novel post-translational modifications (PTMs) which play important roles in signaling and biosynthetic pathways, identification of such PTM catalyzing enzymes by genome mining has been an area of major interest. Unlike well-known PTMs like phosphorylation, glycosylation, SUMOylation, no bioinformatics resources are available for enzymes associated with novel and unusual PTMs. Therefore, we have developed the novPTMenzy database which catalogs information on the sequence, structure, active site and genomic neighborhood of experimentally characterized enzymes involved in five novel PTMs, namely AMPylation, Eliminylation, Sulfation, Hydroxylation and Deamidation. Based on a comprehensive analysis of the sequence and structural features of these known PTM catalyzing enzymes, we have created Hidden Markov Model profiles for the identification of similar PTM catalyzing enzymatic domains in genomic sequences. We have also created predictive rules for grouping them into functional subfamilies and deciphering their mechanistic details by structure-based analysis of their active site pockets. These analytical modules have been made available as user friendly search interfaces of novPTMenzy database. It also has a specialized analysis interface for some PTMs like AMPylation and Eliminylation. The novPTMenzy database is a unique resource that can aid in discovery of unusual PTM catalyzing enzymes in newly sequenced genomes. Database URL: http://www.nii.ac.in/novptmenzy.html

  16. Antioxidant Systems are Regulated by Nitric Oxide-Mediated Post-translational Modifications (NO-PTMs)

    PubMed Central

    Begara-Morales, Juan C.; Sánchez-Calvo, Beatriz; Chaki, Mounira; Valderrama, Raquel; Mata-Pérez, Capilla; Padilla, María N.; Corpas, Francisco J.; Barroso, Juan B.

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a biological messenger that orchestrates a plethora of plant functions, mainly through post-translational modifications (PTMs) such as S-nitrosylation or tyrosine nitration. In plants, hundreds of proteins have been identified as potential targets of these NO-PTMs under physiological and stress conditions indicating the relevance of NO in plant-signaling mechanisms. Among these NO protein targets, there are different antioxidant enzymes involved in the control of reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as H2O2, which is also a signal molecule. This highlights the close relationship between ROS/NO signaling pathways. The major plant antioxidant enzymes, including catalase, superoxide dismutases (SODs) peroxiredoxins (Prx) and all the enzymatic components of the ascorbate-glutathione (Asa-GSH) cycle, have been shown to be modulated to different degrees by NO-PTMs. This mini-review will update the recent knowledge concerning the interaction of NO with these antioxidant enzymes, with a special focus on the components of the Asa-GSH cycle and their physiological relevance. PMID:26909095

  17. Constrained Selected Reaction Monitoring: Quantification of selected post-translational modifications and protein isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoqian; Jin, Zhicheng; O’Brien, Richard; Bathon, Joan; Dietz, Harry C.; Grote, Eric; Van Eyk, Jennifer E.

    2014-01-01

    Selected reaction monitoring (SRM) is a mass spectrometry method that can target signature peptides to provide for the detection and quantitation of specific proteins in complex biological samples. When quantifying a protein, peptides are generated using a specific protease such as trypsin, allowing the choice of signature peptides with robust signals. In contrast, signature peptide selection can be constrained when the goal is to monitor a specific post-translational modification (PTM) or protein isoform as the signature peptide must include the amino acid residue(s) of PTM attachment or sequence variation. This can force the selection of a signature peptide with a weak SRM response or one that is confounded by high background. In this article, additional steps that can be optimized to maximize peptide selection and assay performance of constrained SRM assays are discussed including tuning instrument parameters, fragmenting product ions, using a different protease, and enriching the sample. Examples are provided for selection of phosphorylated or citrullinated peptides and protein isoforms. PMID:23523700

  18. Mass Spectrometric Quantification of Histone Post-translational Modifications by a Hybrid Chemical Labeling Method

    PubMed Central

    Maile, Tobias M.; Izrael-Tomasevic, Anita; Cheung, Tommy; Guler, Gulfem D.; Tindell, Charles; Masselot, Alexandre; Liang, Jun; Zhao, Feng; Trojer, Patrick; Classon, Marie; Arnott, David

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry is a powerful alternative to antibody-based methods for the analysis of histone post-translational modifications (marks). A key development in this approach was the deliberate propionylation of histones to improve sequence coverage across the lysine-rich and hydrophilic tails that bear most modifications. Several marks continue to be problematic however, particularly di- and tri-methylated lysine 4 of histone H3 which we found to be subject to substantial and selective losses during sample preparation and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. We developed a new method employing a “one-pot” hybrid chemical derivatization of histones, whereby an initial conversion of free lysines to their propionylated forms under mild aqueous conditions is followed by trypsin digestion and labeling of new peptide N termini with phenyl isocyanate. High resolution mass spectrometry was used to collect qualitative and quantitative data, and a novel web-based software application (Fishtones) was developed for viewing and quantifying histone marks in the resulting data sets. Recoveries of 53 methyl, acetyl, and phosphoryl marks on histone H3.1 were improved by an average of threefold overall, and over 50-fold for H3K4 di- and tri-methyl marks. The power of this workflow for epigenetic research and drug discovery was demonstrated by measuring quantitative changes in H3K4 trimethylation induced by small molecule inhibitors of lysine demethylases and siRNA knockdown of epigenetic modifiers ASH2L and WDR5. PMID:25680960

  19. PPARG Post-translational Modifications Regulate Bone Formation and Bone Resorption.

    PubMed

    Stechschulte, L A; Czernik, P J; Rotter, Z C; Tausif, F N; Corzo, C A; Marciano, D P; Asteian, A; Zheng, J; Bruning, J B; Kamenecka, T M; Rosen, C J; Griffin, P R; Lecka-Czernik, B

    2016-08-01

    The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) regulates osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation, and is the molecular target of thiazolidinediones (TZDs), insulin sensitizers that enhance glucose utilization and adipocyte differentiation. However, clinical use of TZDs has been limited by side effects including a higher risk of fractures and bone loss. Here we demonstrate that the same post-translational modifications at S112 and S273, which influence PPARγ pro-adipocytic and insulin sensitizing activities, also determine PPARγ osteoblastic (pS112) and osteoclastic (pS273) activities. Treatment of either hyperglycemic or normoglycemic animals with SR10171, an inverse agonist that blocks pS273 but not pS112, increased trabecular and cortical bone while normalizing metabolic parameters. Additionally, SR10171 treatment modulated osteocyte, osteoblast, and osteoclast activities, and decreased marrow adiposity. These data demonstrate that regulation of bone mass and energy metabolism shares similar mechanisms suggesting that one pharmacologic agent could be developed to treat both diabetes and metabolic bone disease. PMID:27422345

  20. Seed storage proteins of the globulin family are cleaved post-translationally in wheat embryos

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The 7S globulins are plant seed storage proteins that have been associated with the development of a number of human diseases, including peanut allergy. Immune reactivity to the wheat seed storage protein globulin-3 (Glo-3) has been associated with the development of the autoimmune disease type 1 diabetes in diabetes-prone rats and mice, as well as in a subset of human patients. Findings The present study characterized native wheat Glo-3 in salt-soluble wheat seed protein extracts. Glo-3-like peptides were observed primarily in the wheat embryo. Glo-3-like proteins varied significantly in their molecular masses and isoelectric points, as determined by two dimensional electrophoresis and immunoblotting with anti-Glo-3A antibodies. Five major polypeptide spots were identified by mass spectrometry and N-terminal sequencing as belonging to the Glo-3 family. Conclusions These results in combination with our previous findings have allowed for the development of a hypothetical model of the post-translational events contributing to the wheat 7S globulin profile in mature wheat kernels. PMID:22838494

  1. Systematic Characterization and Prediction of Post-Translational Modification Cross-Talk*

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yuanhua; Xu, Bosen; Zhou, Xueya; Li, Ying; Lu, Ming; Jiang, Rui; Li, Tingting

    2015-01-01

    Post-translational modification (PTM)1 plays an important role in regulating the functions of proteins. PTMs of multiple residues on one protein may work together to determine a functional outcome, which is known as PTM cross-talk. Identification of PTM cross-talks is an emerging theme in proteomics and has elicited great interest, but their properties remain to be systematically characterized. To this end, we collected 193 PTM cross-talk pairs in 77 human proteins from the literature and then tested location preference and co-evolution at the residue and modification levels. We found that cross-talk events preferentially occurred among nearby PTM sites, especially in disordered protein regions, and cross-talk pairs tended to co-evolve. Given the properties of PTM cross-talk pairs, a naïve Bayes classifier integrating different features was built to predict cross-talks for pairwise combination of PTM sites. By using a 10-fold cross-validation, the integrated prediction model showed an area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of 0.833, superior to using any individual feature alone. The prediction performance was also demonstrated to be robust to the biases in the collected PTM cross-talk pairs. The integrated approach has the potential for large-scale prioritization of PTM cross-talk candidates for functional validation and was implemented as a web server available at http://bioinfo.bjmu.edu.cn/ptm-x/. PMID:25605461

  2. Thioredoxin 1-Mediated Post-Translational Modifications: Reduction, Transnitrosylation, Denitrosylation, and Related Proteomics Methodologies

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Changgong; Parrott, Andrew M.; Fu, Cexiong; Liu, Tong; Marino, Stefano M.; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Jain, Mohit R.; Baykal, Ahmet T.; Li, Qing; Oka, Shinichi; Sadoshima, Junichi; Beuve, Annie; Simmons, William J.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Despite the significance of redox post-translational modifications (PTMs) in regulating diverse signal transduction pathways, the enzymatic systems that catalyze reversible and specific oxidative or reductive modifications have yet to be firmly established. Thioredoxin 1 (Trx1) is a conserved antioxidant protein that is well known for its disulfide reductase activity. Interestingly, Trx1 is also able to transnitrosylate or denitrosylate (defined as processes to transfer or remove a nitric oxide entity to/from substrates) specific proteins. An intricate redox regulatory mechanism has recently been uncovered that accounts for the ability of Trx1 to catalyze these different redox PTMs. In this review, we will summarize the available evidence in support of Trx1 as a specific disulfide reductase, and denitrosylation and transnitrosylation agent, as well as the biological significance of the diverse array of Trx1-regulated pathways and processes under different physiological contexts. The dramatic progress in redox proteomics techniques has enabled the identification of an increasing number of proteins, including peroxiredoxin 1, whose disulfide bond formation and nitrosylation status are regulated by Trx1. This review will also summarize the advancements of redox proteomics techniques for the identification of the protein targets of Trx1-mediated PTMs. Collectively, these studies have shed light on the mechanisms that regulate Trx1-mediated reduction, transnitrosylation, and denitrosylation of specific target proteins, solidifying the role of Trx1 as a master regulator of redox signal transduction. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 15, 2565–2604. PMID:21453190

  3. Antioxidant Systems are Regulated by Nitric Oxide-Mediated Post-translational Modifications (NO-PTMs).

    PubMed

    Begara-Morales, Juan C; Sánchez-Calvo, Beatriz; Chaki, Mounira; Valderrama, Raquel; Mata-Pérez, Capilla; Padilla, María N; Corpas, Francisco J; Barroso, Juan B

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a biological messenger that orchestrates a plethora of plant functions, mainly through post-translational modifications (PTMs) such as S-nitrosylation or tyrosine nitration. In plants, hundreds of proteins have been identified as potential targets of these NO-PTMs under physiological and stress conditions indicating the relevance of NO in plant-signaling mechanisms. Among these NO protein targets, there are different antioxidant enzymes involved in the control of reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as H2O2, which is also a signal molecule. This highlights the close relationship between ROS/NO signaling pathways. The major plant antioxidant enzymes, including catalase, superoxide dismutases (SODs) peroxiredoxins (Prx) and all the enzymatic components of the ascorbate-glutathione (Asa-GSH) cycle, have been shown to be modulated to different degrees by NO-PTMs. This mini-review will update the recent knowledge concerning the interaction of NO with these antioxidant enzymes, with a special focus on the components of the Asa-GSH cycle and their physiological relevance. PMID:26909095

  4. Lysine Propionylation Is a Prevalent Post-translational Modification in Thermus thermophilus

    PubMed Central

    Okanishi, Hiroki; Kim, Kwang; Masui, Ryoji; Kuramitsu, Seiki

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies of protein post-translational modifications revealed that various types of lysine acylation occur in eukaryotic and bacterial proteins. Lysine propionylation, a newly discovered type of acylation, occurs in several proteins, including some histones. In this study, we identified 361 propionylation sites in 183 mid-exponential phase and late stationary phase proteins from Thermus thermophilus HB8, an extremely thermophilic eubacterium. Functional classification of the propionylproteins revealed that the number of propionylation sites in metabolic enzymes increased in late stationary phase, irrespective of protein abundance. The propionylation sites on proteins expressed in mid-exponential and late stationary phases partially overlapped. Furthermore, amino acid frequencies in the vicinity of propionylation sites differed, not only between the two growth phases but also relative to acetylation sites. In addition, 33.8% of mid-exponential phase–specific and 80.0% of late stationary phase–specific propionylations (n ≥ 2) implied that specific mechanisms regulate propionylation in the cell. Moreover, the limited degree of overlap between lysine propionylation (36.8%) and acetylation (49.2%) sites in 67 proteins that were both acetylated and propionylated strongly suggested that the two acylation reactions are regulated separately by specific enzymes and may serve different functions. Finally, we also found that eight propionylation sites overlapped with acetylation sites critical for protein functions such as Schiff-base formation and ligand binding. PMID:24938286

  5. Post-translational processing targets functionally diverse proteins in Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Tacchi, Jessica L.; Raymond, Benjamin B. A.; Haynes, Paul A.; Berry, Iain J.; Widjaja, Michael; Bogema, Daniel R.; Woolley, Lauren K.; Jenkins, Cheryl; Minion, F. Chris; Padula, Matthew P.; Djordjevic, Steven P.

    2016-01-01

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae is a genome-reduced, cell wall-less, bacterial pathogen with a predicted coding capacity of less than 700 proteins and is one of the smallest self-replicating pathogens. The cell surface of M. hyopneumoniae is extensively modified by processing events that target the P97 and P102 adhesin families. Here, we present analyses of the proteome of M. hyopneumoniae-type strain J using protein-centric approaches (one- and two-dimensional GeLC–MS/MS) that enabled us to focus on global processing events in this species. While these approaches only identified 52% of the predicted proteome (347 proteins), our analyses identified 35 surface-associated proteins with widely divergent functions that were targets of unusual endoproteolytic processing events, including cell adhesins, lipoproteins and proteins with canonical functions in the cytosol that moonlight on the cell surface. Affinity chromatography assays that separately used heparin, fibronectin, actin and host epithelial cell surface proteins as bait recovered cleavage products derived from these processed proteins, suggesting these fragments interact directly with the bait proteins and display previously unrecognized adhesive functions. We hypothesize that protein processing is underestimated as a post-translational modification in genome-reduced bacteria and prokaryotes more broadly, and represents an important mechanism for creating cell surface protein diversity. PMID:26865024

  6. In Silico Analysis of Correlations between Protein Disorder and Post-Translational Modifications in Algae.

    PubMed

    Kurotani, Atsushi; Sakurai, Tetsuya

    2015-08-20

    Recent proteome analyses have reported that intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) of proteins play important roles in biological processes. In higher plants whose genomes have been sequenced, the correlation between IDRs and post-translational modifications (PTMs) has been reported. The genomes of various eukaryotic algae as common ancestors of plants have also been sequenced. However, no analysis of the relationship to protein properties such as structure and PTMs in algae has been reported. Here, we describe correlations between IDR content and the number of PTM sites for phosphorylation, glycosylation, and ubiquitination, and between IDR content and regions rich in proline, glutamic acid, serine, and threonine (PEST) and transmembrane helices in the sequences of 20 algae proteomes. Phosphorylation, O-glycosylation, ubiquitination, and PEST preferentially occurred in disordered regions. In contrast, transmembrane helices were favored in ordered regions. N-glycosylation tended to occur in ordered regions in most of the studied algae; however, it correlated positively with disordered protein content in diatoms. Additionally, we observed that disordered protein content and the number of PTM sites were significantly increased in the species-specific protein clusters compared to common protein clusters among the algae. Moreover, there were specific relationships between IDRs and PTMs among the algae from different groups.

  7. Systematic characterization and prediction of post-translational modification cross-talk.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuanhua; Xu, Bosen; Zhou, Xueya; Li, Ying; Lu, Ming; Jiang, Rui; Li, Tingting

    2015-03-01

    Post-translational modification (PTM)(1) plays an important role in regulating the functions of proteins. PTMs of multiple residues on one protein may work together to determine a functional outcome, which is known as PTM cross-talk. Identification of PTM cross-talks is an emerging theme in proteomics and has elicited great interest, but their properties remain to be systematically characterized. To this end, we collected 193 PTM cross-talk pairs in 77 human proteins from the literature and then tested location preference and co-evolution at the residue and modification levels. We found that cross-talk events preferentially occurred among nearby PTM sites, especially in disordered protein regions, and cross-talk pairs tended to co-evolve. Given the properties of PTM cross-talk pairs, a naïve Bayes classifier integrating different features was built to predict cross-talks for pairwise combination of PTM sites. By using a 10-fold cross-validation, the integrated prediction model showed an area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of 0.833, superior to using any individual feature alone. The prediction performance was also demonstrated to be robust to the biases in the collected PTM cross-talk pairs. The integrated approach has the potential for large-scale prioritization of PTM cross-talk candidates for functional validation and was implemented as a web server available at http://bioinfo.bjmu.edu.cn/ptm-x/.

  8. PTMcode: a database of known and predicted functional associations between post-translational modifications in proteins.

    PubMed

    Minguez, Pablo; Letunic, Ivica; Parca, Luca; Bork, Peer

    2013-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) are involved in the regulation and structural stabilization of eukaryotic proteins. The combination of individual PTM states is a key to modulate cellular functions as became evident in a few well-studied proteins. This combinatorial setting, dubbed the PTM code, has been proposed to be extended to whole proteomes in eukaryotes. Although we are still far from deciphering such a complex language, thousands of protein PTM sites are being mapped by high-throughput technologies, thus providing sufficient data for comparative analysis. PTMcode (http://ptmcode.embl.de) aims to compile known and predicted PTM associations to provide a framework that would enable hypothesis-driven experimental or computational analysis of various scales. In its first release, PTMcode provides PTM functional associations of 13 different PTM types within proteins in 8 eukaryotes. They are based on five evidence channels: a literature survey, residue co-evolution, structural proximity, PTMs at the same residue and location within PTM highly enriched protein regions (hotspots). PTMcode is presented as a protein-based searchable database with an interactive web interface providing the context of the co-regulation of nearly 75 000 residues in >10 000 proteins.

  9. Emerging Roles of Post-translational Modifications in Signal Transduction and Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Nader; Costello, Catherine E.

    2014-01-01

    The vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) belongs to the family of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and is a key player in vasculogenesis and pathological angiogenesis. An emerging picture of posttranslational modifications (PTMs) of VEGFR-2 suggests that they play central roles in generating a highly dynamic and complex signaling system that regulates key angiogenic responses ranging from endothelial cell differentiation, proliferation, migration to permeability. Recent mass spectrometry analysis of VEGFR-2 uncovered previously unrecognized PTMs on VEGFR-2 with a distinct function. The ligand binding extracellular domain of VEGFR-2 is composed of seven immunoglobulin-like domains highly decorated with N-glycosylation, while its cytoplasmic domain is subject to multiple PTMs including Tyr, Ser/Thr phosphorylation, Arg and Lys methylation, acetylation and ubiquitination. Here we review the PTMs on VEGFR-2, their importance in angiogenic signaling relays and possible novel therapeutic potentials. PMID:25161153

  10. Palmitoylation of caveolin-1 in endothelial cells is post-translational but irreversible

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parat, M. O.; Fox, P. L.

    2001-01-01

    Caveolin-1 is a palmitoylated protein involved in assembly of signaling molecules in plasma membrane subdomains termed caveolae and in intracellular cholesterol transport. Three cysteine residues in the C terminus of caveolin-1 are subject to palmitoylation, which is not necessary for caveolar targeting of caveolin-1. Protein palmitoylation is a post-translational and reversible modification that may be regulated and that in turn may regulate conformation, membrane association, protein-protein interactions, and intracellular localization of the target protein. We have undertaken a detailed analysis of [(3)H]palmitate incorporation into caveolin-1 in aortic endothelial cells. The linkage of palmitate to caveolin-1 was hydroxylamine-sensitive and thus presumably a thioester bond. However, contrary to expectations, palmitate incorporation was blocked completely by the protein synthesis inhibitors cycloheximide and puromycin. In parallel experiments to show specificity, palmitoylation of aortic endothelial cell-specific nitric-oxide synthase was unaffected by these reagents. Inhibitors of protein trafficking, brefeldin A and monensin, blocked caveolin-1 palmitoylation, indicating that the modification was not cotranslational but rather required caveolin-1 transport from the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi to the plasma membrane. In addition, immunophilin chaperones that form complexes with caveolin-1, i.e. FK506-binding protein 52, cyclophilin A, and cyclophilin 40, were not necessary for caveolin-1 palmitoylation because agents that bind immunophilins did not inhibit palmitoylation. Pulse-chase experiments showed that caveolin-1 palmitoylation is essentially irreversible because the release of [(3)H]palmitate was not significant even after 24 h. These results show that [(3)H]palmitate incorporation is limited to newly synthesized caveolin-1, not because incorporation only occurs during synthesis but because the continuous presence of palmitate on caveolin-1 prevents

  11. Myocardial infarction in mice alters sarcomeric function via post-translational protein modification.

    PubMed

    Avner, Benjamin S; Shioura, Krystyna M; Scruggs, Sarah B; Grachoff, Milana; Geenen, David L; Helseth, Donald L; Farjah, Mariam; Goldspink, Paul H; Solaro, R John

    2012-04-01

    Myocardial physiology in the aftermath of myocardial infarction (MI) before remodeling is an under-explored area of investigation. Here, we describe the effects of MI on the cardiac sarcomere with focus on the possible contributions of reactive oxygen species. We surgically induced MI in 6-7-month-old female CD1 mice by ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery. Data were collected 3-4 days after MI or sham (SH) surgery. MI hearts demonstrated ventricular dilatation and systolic dysfunction upon echo cardiographic analysis. Sub-maximum Ca-activated tension in detergent-extracted fiber bundles from papillary muscles increased significantly in the preparations from MI hearts. Ca(2+) sensitivity increased after MI, whereas cooperativity of activation decreased. To assess myosin enzymatic integrity we measured splitting of Ca-ATP in myofibrillar preparations, which demonstrated a decline in Ca-ATPase activity of myofilament myosin. Biochemical analysis demonstrated post-translational modification of sarcomeric proteins. Phosphorylation of cardiac troponin I and myosin light chain 2 was reduced after MI in papillary samples, as measured using a phospho-specific stain. Tropomyosin was oxidized after MI, forming disulfide products detectable by diagonal non-reducing-reducing SDS-PAGE. Our analysis of myocardial protein oxidation post-MI also demonstrated increased S-glutathionylation. We functionally linked protein oxidation with sarcomere function by treating skinned fibers with the sulfhydryl reducing agent dithiothreitol, which reduced Ca(2+) sensitivity in MI, but not SH, samples. Our data indicate important structural and functional alterations to the cardiac sarcomere after MI, and the contribution of protein oxidation to this process.

  12. Scanning MscL Channels with Targeted Post-Translational Modifications for Functional Alterations

    PubMed Central

    Eaton, Christina; Blount, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Mechanosensitive channels are present in all living organisms and are thought to underlie the senses of touch and hearing as well as various important physiological functions like osmoregulation and vasoregulation. The mechanosensitive channel of large conductance (MscL) from Escherichia coli was the first protein shown to encode mechanosensitive channel activity and serves as a paradigm for how a channel senses and responds to mechanical stimuli. MscL plays a role in osmoprotection in E. coli, acting as an emergency release valve that is activated by membrane tension due to cell swelling after an osmotic down-shock. Using an osmotically fragile strain in an osmotic down-shock assay, channel functionality can be directly determined in vivo. In addition, using thiol reagents and expressed MscL proteins with a single cysteine substitution, we have shown that targeted post-translational modifications can be performed, and that any alterations that lead to dysfunctional proteins can be identified by this in vivo assay. Here, we present the results of such a scan performed on 113 MscL cysteine mutants using five different sulfhydryl-reacting probes to confer different charges or hydrophobicity to each site. We assessed which of these targeted modifications affected channel function and the top candidates were further studied using patch clamp to directly determine how channel activity was affected. This comprehensive screen has identified many residues that are critical for channel function as well as highlighted MscL domains and residues that undergo the most drastic environmental changes upon gating. PMID:26368283

  13. Post-translational processing of preprosomatostatin-II examined using fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Andrews, P C; Nichols, R; Dixon, J E

    1987-09-15

    The products and an intermediate of preprosomatostatin-II processing in the anglerfish islet were purified and subjected to structural analysis. The peptides isolated identify the site of signal cleavage (between Ser-24 and Gln-25). The prohormone is further processed at Arg-97 and, to a lesser extent, at the two adjacent basic amino acid residues Lys-61 and Arg-62. A 28-residue somatostatin is also generated which can be hydroxylated at Lys-23. A proteolytic processing site which would form the 14-residue somatostatin does not appear to be used to a significant degree. Fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry (FABMS) was used to demonstrate that the amino-terminal residues of peptides 25-60, and 25-90 are pyroglutamic acid, a modification which precludes Edman degradation of these peptides. Analysis of the peptides and tryptic peptide maps by FABMS allowed confirmation of the sites of prohormone conversion and indicated that terminal basic residues were removed during processing. Three amino acid residues were also found to differ from the amino acid sequence deduced from the cDNA and were localized to specific regions by FABMS analysis. Residues found to differ from the cDNA (cDNA in parentheses) were: Asp-77 (Thr), Val-78 (Phe), and Gly-90 (Glu). Mass assignments were confirmed by running a single cycle of Edman degradation prior to FABMS. The peptides noted above were also examined by Edman sequence analysis. The sequence of a cDNA clone to preprosomatostatin-II was re-examined in light of the observed differences at the protein level. This study emphasizes the utility of FABMS in prohormone processing studies and in identification of post-translational processing events. PMID:2887572

  14. Targeted mass spectrometry methods for detecting oxidative post-translational modifications.

    PubMed

    Tveen-Jensen, Karina; Reis, Ana; Spickett, Corinne M; Pitt, Andrew R

    2014-10-01

    Oxidative post-translational modifications (oxPTMs) can alter the function of proteins, and are important in the redox regulation of cell behaviour. The most informative technique to detect and locate oxPTMs within proteins is mass spectrometry (MS). However, proteomic MS data are usually searched against theoretical databases using statistical search engines, and the occurrence of unspecified or multiple modifications, or other unexpected features, can lead to failure to detect the modifications and erroneous identifications of oxPTMs. We have developed a new approach for mining data from accurate mass instruments that allows multiple modifications to be examined. Accurate mass extracted ion chromatograms (XIC) for specific reporter ions from peptides containing oxPTMs were generated from standard LC-MSMS data acquired on a rapid-scanning high-resolution mass spectrometer (ABSciex 5600 Triple TOF). The method was tested using proteins from human plasma or isolated LDL. A variety of modifications including chlorotyrosine, nitrotyrosine, kynurenine, oxidation of lysine, and oxidized phospholipid adducts were detected. For example, the use of a reporter ion at 184.074Da/e, corresponding to phosphocholine, was used to identify for the first time intact oxidized phosphatidylcholine adducts on LDL. In all cases the modifications were confirmed by manual sequencing. ApoB-100 containing oxidized lipid adducts was detected even in healthy human samples, as well as LDL from patients with chronic kidney disease. The accurate mass XIC method gave a lower false positive rate than normal database searching using statistical search engines, and identified more oxidatively modified peptides. A major advantage was that additional modifications could be searched after data collection, and multiple modifications on a single peptide identified. The oxPTMs present on albumin and ApoB-100 have potential as indicators of oxidative damage in ageing or inflammatory diseases. PMID:26461406

  15. Extensive Post-translational Modification of Active and Inactivated Forms of Endogenous p53*

    PubMed Central

    DeHart, Caroline J.; Chahal, Jasdave S.; Flint, S. J.; Perlman, David H.

    2014-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor protein accumulates to very high concentrations in normal human fibroblasts infected by adenovirus type 5 mutants that cannot direct assembly of the viral E1B 55-kDa protein-containing E3 ubiquitin ligase that targets p53 for degradation. Despite high concentrations of nuclear p53, the p53 transcriptional program is not induced in these infected cells. We exploited this system to examine select post-translational modifications (PTMs) present on a transcriptionally inert population of endogenous human p53, as well as on p53 activated in response to etoposide treatment of normal human fibroblasts. These forms of p53 were purified from whole cell lysates by means of immunoaffinity chromatography and SDS-PAGE, and peptides derived from them were subjected to nano-ultra-high-performance LC-MS and MS/MS analyses on a high-resolution accurate-mass MS platform (data available via ProteomeXchange, PXD000464). We identified an unexpectedly large number of PTMs, comprising phosphorylation of Ser and Thr residues, methylation of Arg residues, and acetylation, ubiquitinylation, and methylation of Lys residues—for example, some 150 previously undescribed modifications of p53 isolated from infected cells. These modifications were distributed across all functional domains of both forms of the endogenous human p53 protein, as well as those of an orthologous population of p53 isolated from COS-1 cells. Despite the differences in activity, including greater in vitro sequence-specific DNA binding activity exhibited by p53 isolated from etoposide-treated cells, few differences were observed in the location, nature, or relative frequencies of PTMs on the two populations of human p53. Indeed, the wealth of PTMs that we have identified is consistent with a far greater degree of complex, combinatorial regulation of p53 by PTM than previously anticipated. PMID:24056736

  16. Post-translational modification derived products (PTMDPs): toxins in chronic diseases?

    PubMed

    Gillery, Philippe; Jaisson, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    In living organisms, proteins are progressively modified by spontaneous non-enzymatic reactions generating many post-translational modification derived products (PTMDPs) which exert deleterious effects and may be considered endogenous toxins in diabetes mellitus and chronic renal failure. Non-enzymatic glycation, which refers to the spontaneous binding of reducing sugars to free amino groups, is increased in diabetes mellitus because of hyperglycemia and is amplified by oxidative processes ('glycoxidation'). Glycoxidation leads to the formation of 'advanced glycation end products' (AGEs), together with products of other oxidative pathways. AGEs alter tissue organization and cell-protein interactions, mainly in the case of long-lived extracellular matrix proteins, and interact with membrane receptors, among which RAGE (receptor of AGEs), a multiligand receptor which triggers intracellular signaling pathways stimulating inflammatory functions. Another major protein modification, carbamylation, is increased in chronic renal failure, which may occur during the course of diabetes mellitus. Carbamylation is due to the binding of isocyanic acid on the α-NH2 extremity of proteins or amino acids, or on ε-NH2 lysine groups, generating homocitrulline, a potential biomarker in atherosclerosis. Isocyanic acid is formed in vivo either by spontaneous dissociation of urea or by myeloperoxidase action on thiocyanate. Carbamylated proteins exhibit altered properties. For example, carbamylated collagen is unable to stimulate oxidative functions of polymorphonuclear neutrophils but increases matrix metalloproteinase-9 production by monocytes. Lipoprotein functions are altered by carbamylation and may contribute to atherogenesis. Thus, the numerous PTMDPs may be considered both hallmarks of protein damage in chronic diseases and endogenous toxins acting at the molecular and cellular levels.

  17. De novo sequencing of unique sequence tags for discovery of post-translational modifications of proteins.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yufeng; Tolić, Nikola; Hixson, Kim K; Purvine, Samuel O; Anderson, Gordon A; Smith, Richard D

    2008-10-15

    De novo sequencing is a spectrum analysis approach for mass spectrometry data to discover post-translational modifications in proteins; however, such an approach is still in its infancy and is still not widely applied to proteomic practices due to its limited reliability. In this work, we describe a de novo sequencing approach for the discovery of protein modifications based on identification of the proteome UStags (Shen, Y.; Tolić, N.; Hixson, K. K.; Purvine, S. O.; Pasa-Tolić, L.; Qian, W. J.; Adkins, J. N.; Moore, R. J.; Smith, R. D. Anal. Chem. 2008, 80, 1871-1882). The de novo information was obtained from Fourier-transform tandem mass spectrometry data for peptides and polypeptides from a yeast lysate, and the de novo sequences obtained were selected based on filter levels designed to provide a limited yet high quality subset of UStags. The DNA-predicted database protein sequences were then compared to the UStags, and the differences observed across or in the UStags (i.e., the UStags' prefix and suffix sequences and the UStags themselves) were used to infer possible sequence modifications. With this de novo-UStag approach, we uncovered some unexpected variances within several yeast protein sequences due to amino acid mutations and/or multiple modifications to the predicted protein sequences. To determine false discovery rates, two random (false) databases were independently used for sequence matching, and ~3% false discovery rates were estimated for the de novo-UStag approach. The factors affecting the reliability (e.g., existence of de novo sequencing noise residues and redundant sequences) and the sensitivity of the approach were investigated and described. The combined de novo-UStag approach complements the UStag method previously reported by enabling the discovery of new protein modifications. PMID:18783246

  18. Aberrant post-translational modifications compromise human myosin motor function in old age.

    PubMed

    Li, Meishan; Ogilvie, Hannah; Ochala, Julien; Artemenko, Konstantin; Iwamoto, Hiroyuki; Yagi, Naoto; Bergquist, Jonas; Larsson, Lars

    2015-04-01

    Novel experimental methods, including a modified single fiber in vitro motility assay, X-ray diffraction experiments, and mass spectrometry analyses, have been performed to unravel the molecular events underlying the aging-related impairment in human skeletal muscle function at the motor protein level. The effects of old age on the function of specific myosin isoforms extracted from single human muscle fiber segments, demonstrated a significant slowing of motility speed (P < 0.001) in old age in both type I and IIa myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms. The force-generating capacity of the type I and IIa MyHC isoforms was, on the other hand, not affected by old age. Similar effects were also observed when the myosin molecules extracted from muscle fibers were exposed to oxidative stress. X-ray diffraction experiments did not show any myofilament lattice spacing changes, but unraveled a more disordered filament organization in old age as shown by the greater widths of the 1, 0 equatorial reflections. Mass spectrometry (MS) analyses revealed eight age-specific myosin post-translational modifications (PTMs), in which two were located in the motor domain (carbonylation of Pro79 and Asn81) and six in the tail region (carbonylation of Asp900, Asp904, and Arg908; methylation of Glu1166; deamidation of Gln1164 and Asn1168). However, PTMs in the motor domain were only observed in the IIx MyHC isoform, suggesting PTMs in the rod region contributed to the observed disordering of myosin filaments and the slowing of motility speed. Hence, interventions that would specifically target these PTMs are warranted to reverse myosin dysfunction in old age.

  19. A new role for α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex: regulating metabolism through post-translational modification of other enzymes.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Mary C; Rae, Caroline D

    2015-07-01

    This Editorial highlights a study by Gibson et al. published in this issue of JNeurochem, in which the authors reveal a novel role for the α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KGDHC) in post-translational modification of proteins. KGDHC may catalyze post-translational modification of itself as well as several other proteins by succinylation of lysine residues. The authors' report of an enzyme responsible for succinylation of key mitochondrial enzymes represents a major step toward our understanding of the complex functional metabolome. TCA, tricarboxylic acid; KG, α-ketoglutarate; KGDHC, α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex; FUM, fumarase; MDH, malate dehydrogenase; ME, malic enzyme; GDH, glutamate dehydrogenase; AAT, aspartate aminotransferase; GS, glutamine synthetase; PAG, phosphate-activated glutaminase; SIRT3, silent information regulator 3; SIRT5, silent information regulator 5. PMID:26052752

  20. Citrullination of proteins: a common post-translational modification pathway induced by different nanoparticles in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Bashir M; Verma, Navin K; Davies, Anthony M; McGowan, Aoife; Crosbie-Staunton, Kieran; Prina-Mello, Adriele; Kelleher, Dermot; Botting, Catherine H; Causey, Corey P; Thompson, Paul R; Pruijn, Ger JM; Kisin, Elena R; Tkach, Alexey V; Shvedova, Anna A; Volkov, Yuri

    2012-01-01

    Aim Rapidly expanding manufacture and use of nanomaterials emphasize the requirements for thorough assessment of health outcomes associated with novel applications. Post-translational protein modifications catalyzed by Ca2+-dependent peptidylargininedeiminases have been shown to trigger immune responses including autoantibody generation, a hallmark of immune complexes deposition in rheumatoid arthritis. Therefore, the aim of the study was to assess if nanoparticles are able to promote protein citrullination. Materials & methods Human A549 and THP-1 cells were exposed to silicon dioxide, carbon black or single-walled carbon nanotubes. C57BL/6 mice were exposed to respirable single-walled carbon nanotubes. Protein citrullination, peptidylargininedeiminases activity and target proteins were evaluated. Results The studied nanoparticles induced protein citrullination both in cultured human cells and mouse lung tissues. Citrullination occurred via the peptidylargininedeiminase-dependent mechanism. Cytokeratines 7, 8, 18 and plectins were identified as intracellular citrullination targets. Conclusion Nanoparticle exposure facilitated post-translational citrullination of proteins. PMID:22625207

  1. Role of post-translational modifications on structure, function and pharmacology of class C G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Nørskov-Lauritsen, Lenea; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    2015-09-15

    G protein-coupled receptors are divided into three classes (A, B and C) based on homology of their seven transmembrane domains. Class C is the smallest class with 22 human receptor subtypes including eight metabotropic glutamate (mGlu1-8) receptors, two GABAB receptors (GABAB1 and GABAB2), three taste receptors (T1R1-3), one calcium-sensing (CaS) receptor, one GPCR, class C, group 6, subtype A (GPRC6) receptor, and seven orphan receptors. G protein-coupled receptors undergo a number of post-translational modifications, which regulate their structure, function and/or pharmacology. Here, we review the existence of post-translational modifications in class C G protein-coupled receptors and their regulatory roles, with particular focus on glycosylation, phosphorylation, ubiquitination, SUMOylation, disulphide bonding and lipidation.

  2. Profiling post-translational modifications of histones in neural differentiation of embryonic stem cells using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Shuzhen; Sun, Ming; Zhang, Kai; Gu, Junjie; Guo, Zhenchang; Tian, Shanshan; Zhai, Guijin; He, Xiwen; Jin, Ying; Zhang, Yukui

    2016-04-01

    The neural differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) is of great significance for understanding of the mechanism of diseases. Histone post-translational modifications (HPTMs) play a key role in the regulation of ESCs differentiation. Here, we combined the stable isotope chemical derivatization with nano-HPLC-mass spectrometry (MS) for comprehensive analysis and quantification of histone post-translational modifications (HPTMs) in mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) and neural progenitor cells (mNPCs) that was derived from ESCs. We identified 85 core HPTM sites in ESCs and 78HPTM sites in NPCs including some novel lysine modifications. Our quantitative analysis results further revealed the changes of HPTMs from ESCs to NPCs and suggested effect of combinational HPTMs in the differentiation. This study demonstrates that HPLC-MS-based quantitative proteomics has a considerable advantage on quantification of combinational PTMs and expands our understanding of HPTMs in the differentiation.

  3. Post-translational control of nitrate reductase activity responding to light and photosynthesis evolved already in the early vascular plants.

    PubMed

    Nemie-Feyissa, Dugassa; Królicka, Adriana; Førland, Nina; Hansen, Margarita; Heidari, Behzad; Lillo, Cathrine

    2013-05-01

    Regulation of nitrate reductase (NR) by reversible phosphorylation at a conserved motif is well established in higher plants, and enables regulation of NR in response to rapid fluctuations in light intensity. This regulation is not conserved in algae NR, and we wished to test the evolutionary origin of the regulatory mechanism by physiological examination of ancient land plants. Especially a member of the lycophytes is of interest since their NR is candidate for regulation by reversible phosphorylation based on sequence analysis. We compared Selaginella kraussiana, a member of the lycophytes and earliest vascular plants, with the angiosperm Arabidopsis thaliana, and also tested the moss Physcomitrella patens. Interestingly, optimization of assay conditions revealed that S. kraussiana NR used NADH as an electron donor like A. thaliana, whereas P. patens NR activity depended on NADPH. Examination of light/darkness effects showed that S. kraussiana NR was rapidly regulated similar to A. thaliana NR when a differential (Mg(2+) contra EDTA) assay was used to reveal activity state of NR. This implies that already existing NR enzyme was post-translationally activated by light in both species. Light had a positive effect also on de novo synthesis of NR in S. kraussiana, which could be shown after the plants had been exposed to a prolonged dark period (7 days). Daily variations in NR activity were mainly caused by post-translational modifications. As for angiosperms, the post-translational light activation of NR in S. kraussiana was inhibited by 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1*1-dimethylurea (DCMU), an inhibitor of photosynthesis and stomata opening. Evolutionary, a post-translational control mechanism for NR have occurred before or in parallel with development of vascular tissue in land plants, and appears to be part of a complex mechanisms for coordination of CO2 and nitrogen metabolism in these plants.

  4. Post-translational control of collagen fibrillogenesis in mineralizing cultures of chick osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerstenfeld, L. C.; Riva, A.; Hodgens, K.; Eyre, D. R.; Landis, W. J.

    1993-01-01

    Cultured osteoblasts from chick embryo calvaria were used as a model system to investigate the post-translational extracellular mechanisms controlling the macroassembly of collagen fibrils. The results of these studies demonstrated that cultured osteoblasts secreted a collagenous extracellular matrix that assembled and mineralized in a defined temporal and spatial sequence. The assembly of collagen occurred in a polarized fashion, such that successive orthogonal arrays of fibrils formed between successive cell layers proceeding from the culture surface toward the media. Mineralization followed in the same manner, being observed first in the deepest and oldest fibril layers. Collagen fibrillogenesis, the kinetics of cross-link formation, and collagen stability in the extracellular matrix of the cultures were examined over a 30 day culture period. Between days 8 and 12 in culture, collagen fibril diameters increased from < 30 nm to an average of 30-45 nm. Thereafter, diameters ranged in size from 20 to 200 nm. Quantitation of the collagen cross-linking residues, hydroxylysyl pyridinoline (HP) and lysyl pyridinoline (LP), showed that these mature cross-links increased from undetectable levels to concentrations found in normal chick bone. Analysis of the kinetics of their formation by pulse-chase labeling the cultures with [3H]lysine showed a doubling time of approximately 5 days. The relationships between cross-link formation, fibrillogenesis, and collagen stability were examined in cultures treated with beta-aminopropionitrile (beta-APN), a potent inhibitor of lysyl oxidase and cross-link formation. In beta-APN-treated cultures, total collagen synthesis was increased twofold, with no change in mRNA levels for type I collagen, whereas the amount of collagen accumulated in the cell layer was decreased by 50% and mineral deposition was reduced. The rate of collagen retention in the matrix was assessed by pulse-chase analysis of [3H]proline over a 16 day period in

  5. AMS 4.0: consensus prediction of post-translational modifications in protein sequences.

    PubMed

    Plewczynski, Dariusz; Basu, Subhadip; Saha, Indrajit

    2012-08-01

    We present here the 2011 update of the AutoMotif Service (AMS 4.0) that predicts the wide selection of 88 different types of the single amino acid post-translational modifications (PTM) in protein sequences. The selection of experimentally confirmed modifications is acquired from the latest UniProt and Phospho.ELM databases for training. The sequence vicinity of each modified residue is represented using amino acids physico-chemical features encoded using high quality indices (HQI) obtaining by automatic clustering of known indices extracted from AAindex database. For each type of the numerical representation, the method builds the ensemble of Multi-Layer Perceptron (MLP) pattern classifiers, each optimising different objectives during the training (for example the recall, precision or area under the ROC curve (AUC)). The consensus is built using brainstorming technology, which combines multi-objective instances of machine learning algorithm, and the data fusion of different training objects representations, in order to boost the overall prediction accuracy of conserved short sequence motifs. The performance of AMS 4.0 is compared with the accuracy of previous versions, which were constructed using single machine learning methods (artificial neural networks, support vector machine). Our software improves the average AUC score of the earlier version by close to 7 % as calculated on the test datasets of all 88 PTM types. Moreover, for the selected most-difficult sequence motifs types it is able to improve the prediction performance by almost 32 %, when compared with previously used single machine learning methods. Summarising, the brainstorming consensus meta-learning methodology on the average boosts the AUC score up to around 89 %, averaged over all 88 PTM types. Detailed results for single machine learning methods and the consensus methodology are also provided, together with the comparison to previously published methods and state-of-the-art software tools. The

  6. Distinct tubulin dynamics in cancer cells explored using a highly tubulin-specific fluorescent probe.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Cuige; Zuo, Yinglin; Liang, Baoxia; Yue, Hong; Yue, Xin; Wen, Gesi; Wang, Ruimin; Quan, Junmin; Du, Jun; Bu, Xianzhang

    2015-09-01

    A highly specific fluorescent probe (OC9) was discovered exhibiting tubulin-specific affinity fluorescence, which allowed selective labeling of cellular tubulin in microtubules. Moreover, distinct tubulin dynamics in various cellular bio-settings such as drug resistant or epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) cancer cells were directly observed for the first time via OC9 staining.

  7. Proteasomal degradation of human CYP1B1: effect of the Asn453Ser polymorphism on the post-translational regulation of CYP1B1 expression.

    PubMed

    Bandiera, Silvio; Weidlich, Simone; Harth, Volker; Broede, Peter; Ko, Yun; Friedberg, Thomas

    2005-02-01

    Allelic variations in CYP1B1 are reported to modulate the incidence of several types of cancer. To provide a mechanistic basis for this association, we investigated the impact of nonsilent allelic changes on the intracellular levels and post-translational regulation of CYP1B1 protein. When transiently expressed in COS-1 cells, either in the presence or absence of recombinant cytochrome P450 reductase, the cellular level of the CYP1B1.4 allelic variant (containing a Ser at the amino acid position 453; Ser453) was 2-fold lower compared with the other four allelic CYP1B1 proteins (containing Asn453), as analyzed by both immunoblotting and ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase activity. This difference was caused by post-translational regulation; as in the presence of cycloheximide, the rate of degradation of immunodetectable and enzymatically active CYP1B1.4 was distinctly faster than that of CYP1B1.1. Pulse-chase analysis revealed that the half-life of CYP1B1.4 was a mere 1.6 h compared with 4.8 h for CYP1B1.1. The presence of the proteasome inhibitor MG132 [N-benzoyloxycarbonyl (Z)-Leu-Leuleucinal] increased the stability not only of immunodetectable CYP1B1, but also--unexpectedly given the size of the proteasome access channel--increased the stability of enzymatically active CYP1B1. The data presented herein also demonstrate that CYP1B1 is targeted for its polymorphism-dependent degradation by polyubiquitination but not phosphorylation. Our results importantly provide a mechanism to explain the recently reported lower incidence of endometrial cancer in individuals carrying the CYP1B1*4 compared with the CYP1B1*1 haplo-type. In addition, the mechanistic paradigms revealed herein may explain the strong overexpression of CYP1B1 in tumors compared with nondiseased tissues. PMID:15486049

  8. Global analysis of myocardial peptides containing cysteines with irreversible sulfinic and sulfonic acid post-translational modifications.

    PubMed

    Paulech, Jana; Liddy, Kiersten A; Engholm-Keller, Kasper; White, Melanie Y; Cordwell, Stuart J

    2015-03-01

    Cysteine (Cys) oxidation is a crucial post-translational modification (PTM) associated with redox signaling and oxidative stress. As Cys is highly reactive to oxidants it forms a range of post-translational modifications, some that are biologically reversible (e.g. disulfides, Cys sulfenic acid) and others (Cys sulfinic [Cys-SO2H] and sulfonic [Cys-SO3H] acids) that are considered "irreversible." We developed an enrichment method to isolate Cys-SO2H/SO3H-containing peptides from complex tissue lysates that is compatible with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The acidity of these post-translational modification (pKa Cys-SO3H < 0) creates a unique charge distribution when localized on tryptic peptides at acidic pH that can be utilized for their purification. The method is based on electrostatic repulsion of Cys-SO2H/SO3H-containing peptides from cationic resins (i.e. "negative" selection) followed by "positive" selection using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography. Modification of strong cation exchange protocols decreased the complexity of initial flowthrough fractions by allowing for hydrophobic retention of neutral peptides. Coupling of strong cation exchange and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography allowed for increased enrichment of Cys-SO2H/SO3H (up to 80%) from other modified peptides. We identified 181 Cys-SO2H/SO3H sites from rat myocardial tissue subjected to physiologically relevant concentrations of H2O2 (<100 μm) or to ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury via Langendorff perfusion. I/R significantly increased Cys-SO2H/SO3H-modified peptides from proteins involved in energy utilization and contractility, as well as those involved in oxidative damage and repair.

  9. Force-Induced Dynamical Properties of Multiple Cytoskeletal Filaments Are Distinct from that of Single Filaments

    PubMed Central

    Das, Dipjyoti; Das, Dibyendu; Padinhateeri, Ranjith

    2014-01-01

    How cytoskeletal filaments collectively undergo growth and shrinkage is an intriguing question. Collective properties of multiple bio-filaments (actin or microtubules) undergoing hydrolysis have not been studied extensively earlier within simple theoretical frameworks. In this paper, we study the collective dynamical properties of multiple filaments under force, and demonstrate the distinct properties of a multi-filament system in comparison to a single filament. Comparing stochastic simulation results with recent experimental data, we show that multi-filament collective catastrophes are slower than catastrophes of single filaments. Our study also shows further distinctions as follows: (i) force-dependence of the cap-size distribution of multiple filaments are quantitatively different from that of single filaments, (ii) the diffusion constant associated with the system length fluctuations is distinct for multiple filaments, and (iii) switching dynamics of multiple filaments between capped and uncapped states and the fluctuations therein are also distinct. We build a unified picture by establishing interconnections among all these collective phenomena. Additionally, we show that the collapse times during catastrophes can be sharp indicators of collective stall forces exceeding the additive contributions of single filaments. PMID:25531397

  10. Generation and purification of highly-specific antibodies for detecting post-translationally modified proteins in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Arur, Swathi; Schedl, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Post-translational modifications alter protein structure, affecting activity, stability, localization and/or binding partners. Antibodies that specifically recognize post-translationally modified proteins have a number of uses including immuno-cytochemistry and immuno-precipitation of the modified protein to purify protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid complexes. However, antibodies directed at modified sites on individual proteins are often non-specific. Here we describe a protocol to purify polyclonal antibodies that specifically detect the modified protein of interest. The approach uses iterative rounds of subtraction and affinity purification, using stringent washes to remove antibodies that recognize the unmodified protein and low sequence complexity epitopes containing the modified amino acid. Dot and western blots assays are employed to assess antibody preparation specificity. The approach is designed to overcome the common occurrence that a single round of subtraction and affinity purification is not sufficient to obtain a modified protein specific antibody preparation. One full round of antibody purification and specificity testing takes 6 days of discontinuous time. PMID:24457330

  11. Top-Down Analysis of Highly Post-Translationally Modified Peptides by Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, Andres; Lerno, Larry; Barile, Daniela; Lebrilla, Carlito B.

    2015-03-01

    Bovine κ-caseinoglycomacropeptide (GMP) is a highly modified peptide from κ-casein produced during the cheese making process. The chemical nature of GMP makes analysis by traditional proteomic approaches difficult, as the peptide bears a strong net negative charge and a variety of post-translational modifications. In this work, we describe the use of electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI FT-ICR MS) for the top-down analysis of GMP. The method allows the simultaneous detection of different GMP forms that result from the combination of amino acid genetic variations and post-translational modifications, specifically phosphorylation and O-glycosylation. The different GMP forms were identified by high resolution mass spectrometry in both negative and positive mode and confirmation was achieved by tandem MS. The results showed the predominance of two genetic variants of GMP that occur as either mono- or bi-phosphorylated species. Additionally, these four forms can be modified with up to two O-glycans generally sialylated. The results demonstrate the presence of glycosylated, bi-phosphorylated forms of GMP never described before.

  12. SIZ1-Dependent Post-Translational Modification by SUMO Modulates Sugar Signaling and Metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Castro, Pedro Humberto; Verde, Nuno; Lourenço, Tiago; Magalhães, Alexandre Papadopoulos; Tavares, Rui Manuel; Bejarano, Eduardo Rodríguez; Azevedo, Herlânder

    2015-12-01

    Post-translational modification mechanisms function as switches that mediate the balance between optimum growth and the response to environmental stimuli, by regulating the activity of key proteins. SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) attachment, or sumoylation, is a post-translational modification that is essential for the plant stress response, also modulating hormonal circuits to co-ordinate developmental processes. The Arabidopsis SUMO E3 ligase SAP and Miz 1 (SIZ1) is the major SUMO conjugation enhancer in response to stress, and is implicated in several aspects of plant development. Here we report that known SUMO targets are over-represented in multiple carbohydrate-related proteins, suggesting a functional link between sumoylation and sugar metabolism and signaling in plants. We subsequently observed that SUMO-conjugated proteins accumulate in response to high doses of sugar in a SIZ1-dependent manner, and that the null siz1 mutant displays increased expression of sucrose and starch catabolic genes and shows reduced starch levels. We demonstrated that SIZ1 controls germination time and post-germination growth via osmotic and sugar-dependent signaling, respectively. Glucose was specifically linked to SUMO-sugar interplay, with high levels inducing root growth inhibition and aberrant root hair morphology in siz1. The use of sugar analogs and sugar marker gene expression analysis allowed us to implicate SIZ1 in a signaling pathway dependent on glucose metabolism, probably involving modulation of SNF1-related kinase 1 (SnRK1) activity.

  13. Multiple {gamma}-glutamylation: A novel type of post-translational modification in a diapausing Artemia cyst protein

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Mai; Ikeda, Yuka; Kanzawa, Hideaki; Sakamoto, Mika; Goto, Mina; Tsunasawa, Susumu; Uchiumi, Toshio; Odani, Shoji

    2010-03-26

    A highly hydrophilic, glutamate-rich protein was identified in the aqueous phenol extract from the cytosolic fraction of brine shrimp (Artemia franciscana) diapausing cysts and termed Artemia phenol soluble protein (PSP). Mass spectrometric analysis revealed the presence of many protein peaks around m/z 11,000, separated by 129 atomic mass units; this value corresponds to that of glutamate, which is strongly suggestive of heterogeneous polyglutamylation. Polyglutamylation has long been known as the functionally important post-translational modification of tubulins, which carry poly(L-glutamic acid) chains of heterogeneous length branching off from the main chain at the {gamma}-carboxy groups of a few specific glutamate residues. In Artemia PSP, however, Edman degradation of enzymatic peptides revealed that at least 13, and presumably 16, glutamate residues were modified by the attachment of a single L-glutamate, representing a hitherto undescribed type of post-translational modification: namely, multiple {gamma}-glutamylation or the addition of a large number of glutamate residues along the polypeptide chain. Although biological significance of PSP and its modification is yet to be established, suppression of in vitro thermal aggregation of lactate dehydrogenase by glutamylated PSP was observed.

  14. Evaluating Kinase ATP Uptake and Tyrosine Phosphorylation using Multiplexed Quantification of Chemically Labeled and Post-Translationally Modified Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Bin; Hoffman, Melissa A.; Mirza, Abu-Sayeef; Mishall, Katie M.; Li, Jiannong; Peterman, Scott M.; Smalley, Keiran S. M.; Shain, Kenneth H.; Weinberger, Paul M.; Wu, Jie; Rix, Uwe; Haura, Eric B.; Koomen, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer biologists and other healthcare researchers face an increasing challenge in addressing the molecular complexity of disease. Biomarker measurement tools and techniques now contribute to both basic science and translational research. In particular, liquid chromatography-multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (LC-MRM) for multiplexed measurements of protein biomarkers has emerged as a versatile tool for systems biology. Assays can be developed for specific peptides that report on protein expression, mutation, or post-translational modification; discovery proteomics data rapidly translated into multiplexed quantitative approaches. Complementary advances in affinity purification enrich classes of enzymes or peptides representing post-translationally modified or chemically labeled substrates. Here, we illustrate the process for the relative quantification of hundreds of peptides in a single LC-MRM experiment. Desthiobiotinylated peptides produced by activity-based protein profiling (ABPP) using ATP probes and tyrosine-phosphorylated peptides are used as examples. These targeted quantification panels can be applied to further understand the biology of human disease. PMID:25782629

  15. Dual Pili Post-translational Modifications Synergize to Mediate Meningococcal Adherence to Platelet Activating Factor Receptor on Human Airway Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Benjamin L.; Power, Peter M.; Swords, W. Edward; Weiser, Jeffery N.; Apicella, Michael A.; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Jennings, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Pili of pathogenic Neisseria are major virulence factors associated with adhesion, twitching motility, auto-aggregation, and DNA transformation. Pili of N. meningitidis are subject to several different post-translational modifications. Among these pilin modifications, the presence of phosphorylcholine (ChoP) and a glycan on the pilin protein are phase-variable (subject to high frequency, reversible on/off switching of expression). In this study we report the location of two ChoP modifications on the C-terminus of N. meningitidis pilin. We show that the surface accessibility of ChoP on pili is affected by phase variable changes to the structure of the pilin-linked glycan. We identify for the first time that the platelet activating factor receptor (PAFr) is a key, early event receptor for meningococcal adherence to human bronchial epithelial cells and tissue, and that synergy between the pilin-linked glycan and ChoP post-translational modifications is required for pili to optimally engage PAFr to mediate adherence to human airway cells. PMID:23696740

  16. The language-related transcription factor FOXP2 is post-translationally modified with small ubiquitin-like modifiers.

    PubMed

    Estruch, Sara B; Graham, Sarah A; Deriziotis, Pelagia; Fisher, Simon E

    2016-02-12

    Mutations affecting the transcription factor FOXP2 cause a rare form of severe speech and language disorder. Although it is clear that sufficient FOXP2 expression is crucial for normal brain development, little is known about how this transcription factor is regulated. To investigate post-translational mechanisms for FOXP2 regulation, we searched for protein interaction partners of FOXP2, and identified members of the PIAS family as novel FOXP2 interactors. PIAS proteins mediate post-translational modification of a range of target proteins with small ubiquitin-like modifiers (SUMOs). We found that FOXP2 can be modified with all three human SUMO proteins and that PIAS1 promotes this process. An aetiological FOXP2 mutation found in a family with speech and language disorder markedly reduced FOXP2 SUMOylation. We demonstrate that FOXP2 is SUMOylated at a single major site, which is conserved in all FOXP2 vertebrate orthologues and in the paralogues FOXP1 and FOXP4. Abolishing this site did not lead to detectable changes in FOXP2 subcellular localization, stability, dimerization or transcriptional repression in cellular assays, but the conservation of this site suggests a potential role for SUMOylation in regulating FOXP2 activity in vivo.

  17. A unified view of base excision repair: lesion-dependent protein complexes regulated by post-translational modification

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Karen H.; Sobol, Robert W.

    2007-01-01

    Base excision repair (BER) proteins act upon a significantly broad spectrum of DNA lesions that result from endogenous and exogenous sources. Multiple sub-pathways of BER (short-path or long-patch) and newly designated DNA repair pathways (e.g., SSBR and NIR) that utilize BER proteins complicate any comprehensive understanding of BER and its role in genome maintenance, chemotherapeutic response, neurodegeneration, cancer or aging. Herein, we propose a unified model of BER, comprised of three functional processes: Lesion Recognition/Strand Scission, Gap Tailoring and DNA Synthesis/Ligation, each represented by one or more multiprotein complexes and coordinated via the XRCC1/DNA Ligase III and PARP1 scaffold proteins. BER therefore may be represented by a series of repair complexes that assemble at the site of the DNA lesion and mediates repair in a coordinated fashion involving protein-protein interactions that dictate subsequent steps or sub-pathway choice. Complex formation is influenced by post-translational protein modifications that arise from the cellular state or the DNA damage response, providing an increase in specificity and efficiency to the BER pathway. In this review, we have summarized the reported BER protein-protein interactions and protein post-translational modifications and discuss the impact on DNA repair capacity and complex formation. PMID:17337257

  18. Mass-spectrometry analysis of histone post-translational modifications in pathology tissue using the PAT-H-MS approach.

    PubMed

    Noberini, Roberta; Pruneri, Giancarlo; Minucci, Saverio; Bonaldi, Tiziana

    2016-06-01

    Aberrant histone post-translational modifications (hPTMs) have been implicated with various pathologies, including cancer, and may represent useful epigenetic biomarkers. The data described here provide a mass spectrometry-based quantitative analysis of hPTMs from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues, from which histones were extracted through the recently developed PAT-H-MS method. First, we analyzed FFPE samples from mouse spleen and liver or human breast cancer up to six years old, together with their corresponding fresh frozen tissue. We then combined the PAT-H-MS approach with a histone-focused version of the super-SILAC strategy-using a mix of histones from four breast cancer cell lines as a spike-in standard- to accurately quantify hPTMs from breast cancer specimens belonging to different subtypes. The data, which are associated with a recent publication (Pathology tissue-quantitative mass spectrometry analysis to profile histone post-translational modification patterns in patient samples (Noberini, 2015) [1]), are deposited at the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PXD002669. PMID:27408908

  19. Cadmium affects microtubule organization and post-translational modifications of tubulin in seedlings of soybean (Glycine max L.)

    PubMed Central

    Gzyl, Jarosław; Chmielowska-Bąk, Jagna; Przymusiński, Roman; Gwóźdź, Edward A.

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a non-essential heavy metal, toxic to all living organisms. The microtubule (MT) cytoskeleton appears to be one of the main targets of Cd action. In this study we present, with the use of various immunological approaches, the effect of Cd at moderate (85 μM) and high (170 μM) concentrations on the structure and functioning of the MT cytoskeleton in the root cells of soybean seedlings. As the result of heavy metal action, root growth was significantly diminished and was accompanied by a reduction in mitotic activity and disturbance in the structure of the MT arrays, including randomization of the cortical MT arrangement, distorted mitotic arrays and complete depolymerization of the MTs. Biochemical analysis revealed decreased levels of various α- and β-tubulin isoforms with a parallel down-regulation of most examined α-tubulin genes. Simultaneously, Cd treatment led to differentiated changes in the level of tubulin post-translational modifications, including tyrosination, detyrosination, acetylation, and polyglutamylation. Decreased tyrosination and polyglutamylation of particular tubulin isoforms accompanied by increase in the level of specific detyrosinated and acetylated isoforms implies augmented stability and reduced turnover of the MTs during stress conditions. Taken together, the obtained results indicate the significant impact of Cd on gene expression levels and subsequent post-translational processing of tubulin, which may be related to the impairment of MT cytoskeleton functioning in root cells. PMID:26594217

  20. Tax-1 and Tax-2 similarities and differences: focus on post-translational modifications and NF-κB activation.

    PubMed

    Shirinian, Margret; Kfoury, Youmna; Dassouki, Zeina; El-Hajj, Hiba; Bazarbachi, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Although human T cell leukemia virus type 1 and 2 (HTLV-1 and HTLV-2) share similar genetic organization, they have major differences in their pathogenesis and disease manifestation. HTLV-1 is capable of transforming T lymphocytes in infected patients resulting in adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma whereas HTLV-2 is not clearly associated with lymphoproliferative diseases. Numerous studies have provided accumulating evidence on the involvement of the viral transactivators Tax-1 versus Tax-2 in T cell transformation. Tax-1 is a potent transcriptional activator of both viral and cellular genes. Tax-1 post-translational modifications and specifically ubiquitylation and SUMOylation have been implicated in nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) activation and may contribute to its transformation capacity. Although Tax-2 has similar protein structure compared to Tax-1, the two proteins display differences both in their protein-protein interaction and activation of signal transduction pathways. Recent studies on Tax-2 have suggested ubiquitylation and SUMOylation independent mechanisms of NF-κB activation. In this present review, structural and functional differences between Tax-1 and Tax-2 will be summarized. Specifically, we will address their subcellular localization, nuclear trafficking and their effect on cellular regulatory proteins. A special attention will be given to Tax-1/Tax-2 post-translational modification such as ubiquitylation, SUMOylation, phosphorylation, acetylation, NF-κB activation, and protein-protein interactions involved in oncogenecity both in vivo and in vitro.

  1. The K+ battery-regulating Arabidopsis K+ channel AKT2 is under the control of multiple post-translational steps

    PubMed Central

    Michard, Erwan; Rocha, Marcio; Gomez-Porras, Judith L; González, Wendy; Corrâa, Luiz Gustavo Guedes; Ramírez-Aguilar, Santiago J; Cuin, Tracey Ann

    2011-01-01

    Potassium (K+) is an important nutrient for plants. It serves as a cofactor of various enzymes and as the major inorganic solute maintaining plant cell turgor. In a recent study, an as yet unknown role of K+ in plant homeostasis was shown. It was demonstrated that K+ gradients in vascular tissues can serve as an energy source for phloem (re)loading processes and that the voltage-gated K+ channels of the AKT2-type play a unique role in this process. The AKT2 channel can be converted by phosphorylation of specific serine residues (S210 and S329) into a non-rectifying channel that allows a rapid efflux of K+ from the sieve element/companion cells (SE/CC) complex. The energy of this flux is used by other transporters for phloem (re)loading processes. Nonetheless, the results do indicate that post-translational modifications at S210 and S329 alone cannot explain AKT2 regulation. Here, we discuss the existence of multiple post-translational modification steps that work in concert to convert AKT2 from an inward-rectifying into a non-rectifying K+ channel. PMID:21445013

  2. Abstract and Effector-Selective Decision Signals Exhibit Qualitatively Distinct Dynamics before Delayed Perceptual Reports

    PubMed Central

    Twomey, Deirdre M.; Kelly, Simon P.

    2016-01-01

    Electrophysiological research has isolated neural signatures of decision formation in a variety of brain regions. Studies in rodents and monkeys have focused primarily on effector-selective signals that translate the emerging decision into a specific motor plan, but, more recently, research on the human brain has identified an abstract signature of evidence accumulation that does not appear to play any direct role in action preparation. The functional dissociations between these distinct signal types have only begun to be characterized, and their dynamics during decisions with deferred actions with or without foreknowledge of stimulus-effector mapping, a commonly studied task scenario in single-unit and functional imaging investigations, have not been established. Here we traced the dynamics of distinct abstract and effector-selective decision signals in the form of the broad-band centro-parietal positivity (CPP) and limb-selective β-band (8–16 and 18–30 Hz) EEG activity, respectively, during delayed-reported motion direction decisions with and without foreknowledge of direction-response mapping. With foreknowledge, the CPP and β-band signals exhibited a similar gradual build-up following evidence onset, but whereas choice-predictive β-band activity persisted up until the delayed response, the CPP dropped toward baseline after peaking. Without foreknowledge, the CPP exhibited identical dynamics, whereas choice-selective β-band activity was eliminated. These findings highlight qualitative functional distinctions between effector-selective and abstract decision signals and are of relevance to the assumptions founding functional neuroimaging investigations of decision-making. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neural signatures of evidence accumulation have been isolated in numerous brain regions. Although animal neurophysiology has largely concentrated on effector-selective decision signals that translate the emerging decision into a specific motor plan, recent research

  3. The class II transactivator (CIITA) is regulated by post-translational modification cross-talk between ERK1/2 phosphorylation, mono-ubiquitination and Lys63 ubiquitination.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Julie E; Shanderson, Ronald L; Boyd, Nathaniel H; Cacan, Ercan; Greer, Susanna F

    2015-06-19

    The class II transactivator (CIITA) is known as the master regulator for the major histocompatibility class II (MHC II) molecules. CIITA is dynamically regulated through a series of intricate post-translational modifications (PTMs). CIITA's role is to initiate transcription of MHC II genes, which are responsible for presenting extracellular antigen to CD4(+) T-cells. In the present study, we identified extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 as the kinase responsible for phosphorylating the regulatory site, Ser(280), which leads to increased levels of mono-ubiquitination and an overall increase in MHC II activity. Further, we identify that CIITA is also modified by Lys(63)-linked ubiquitination. Lys(63) ubiquitinated CIITA is concentrated in the cytoplasm and following activation of ERK1/2, CIITA phosphorylation occurs and Lys=ubiquitinated CIITA translocates to the nucleus. CIITA ubiquitination and phosphorylation perfectly demonstrates how CIITA location and activity is regulated through PTM cross-talk. Identifying CIITA PTMs and understanding how they mediate CIITA regulation is necessary due to the critical role CIITA has in the initiation of the adaptive immune response.

  4. In vivo protein crystallization in combination with highly brilliant radiation sources offers novel opportunities for the structural analysis of post-translationally modified eukaryotic proteins.

    PubMed

    Duszenko, Michael; Redecke, Lars; Mudogo, Celestin Nzanzu; Sommer, Benjamin Philip; Mogk, Stefan; Oberthuer, Dominik; Betzel, Christian

    2015-08-01

    During the last decade, the number of three-dimensional structures solved by X-ray crystallography has increased dramatically. By 2014, it had crossed the landmark of 100 000 biomolecular structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank. This tremendous increase in successfully crystallized proteins is primarily owing to improvements in cloning strategies, the automation of the crystallization process and new innovative approaches to monitor crystallization. However, these improvements are mainly restricted to soluble proteins, while the crystallization and structural analysis of membrane proteins or proteins that undergo major post-translational modifications remains challenging. In addition, the need for relatively large crystals for conventional X-ray crystallography usually prevents the analysis of dynamic processes within cells. Thus, the advent of high-brilliance synchrotron and X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) sources and the establishment of serial crystallography (SFX) have opened new avenues in structural analysis using crystals that were formerly unusable. The successful structure elucidation of cathepsin B, accomplished by the use of microcrystals obtained by in vivo crystallization in baculovirus-infected Sf9 insect cells, clearly proved that crystals grown intracellularly are very well suited for X-ray analysis. Here, methods by which in vivo crystals can be obtained, isolated and used for structural analysis by novel highly brilliant XFEL and synchrotron-radiation sources are summarized and discussed.

  5. The Crystal Structure of Giardia duodenalis 14-3-3 in the Apo Form: When Protein Post-Translational Modifications Make the Difference

    PubMed Central

    Fiorillo, Annarita; di Marino, Daniele; Bertuccini, Lucia; Via, Allegra; Pozio, Edoardo; Camerini, Serena; Ilari, Andrea; Lalle, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The 14-3-3s are a family of dimeric evolutionary conserved pSer/pThr binding proteins that play a key role in multiple biological processes by interacting with a plethora of client proteins. Giardia duodenalis is a flagellated protozoan that affects millions of people worldwide causing an acute and chronic diarrheal disease. The single giardial 14-3-3 isoform (g14-3-3), unique in the 14-3-3 family, needs the constitutive phosphorylation of Thr214 and the polyglycylation of its C-terminus to be fully functional in vivo. Alteration of the phosphorylation and polyglycylation status affects the parasite differentiation into the cyst stage. To further investigate the role of these post-translational modifications, the crystal structure of the g14-3-3 was solved in the unmodified apo form. Oligomers of g14-3-3 were observed due to domain swapping events at the protein C-terminus. The formation of filaments was supported by TEM. Mutational analysis, in combination with native PAGE and chemical cross-linking, proved that polyglycylation prevents oligomerization. In silico phosphorylation and molecular dynamics simulations supported a structural role for the phosphorylation of Thr214 in promoting target binding. Our findings highlight unique structural features of g14-3-3 opening novel perspectives on the evolutionary history of this protein family and envisaging the possibility to develop anti-giardial drugs targeting g14-3-3. PMID:24658679

  6. ELISA-PLA: A novel hybrid platform for the rapid, highly sensitive and specific quantification of proteins and post-translational modifications.

    PubMed

    Tong, Qing-He; Tao, Tao; Xie, Li-Qi; Lu, Hao-Jie

    2016-06-15

    Detection of low-abundance proteins and their post-translational modifications (PTMs) remains a great challenge. A conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is not sensitive enough to detect low-abundance PTMs and suffers from nonspecific detection. Herein, a rapid, highly sensitive and specific platform integrating ELISA with a proximity ligation assay (PLA), termed ELISA-PLA, was developed. Using ELISA-PLA, the specificity was improved by the simultaneous and proximate recognition of targets through multiple probes, and the sensitivity was significantly improved by rolling circle amplification (RCA). For GFP, the limit of detection (LOD) was decreased by two orders of magnitude compared to that of ELISA. Using site-specific phospho-antibody and pan-specific phospho-antibody, ELISA-PLA was successfully applied to quantify the phosphorylation dynamics of ERK1/2 and the overall tyrosine phosphorylation level of ERK1/2, respectively. ELISA-PLA was also used to quantify the O-GlcNAcylation of AKT, c-Fos, CREB and STAT3, which is faster and more sensitive than the conventional immunoprecipitation and western blotting (IP-WB) method. As a result, the sample consumption of ELISA-PLA was reduced 40-fold compared to IP-WB. Therefore, ELISA-PLA could be a promising platform for the rapid, sensitive and specific detection of proteins and PTMs.

  7. In vivo protein crystallization in combination with highly brilliant radiation sources offers novel opportunities for the structural analysis of post-translationally modified eukaryotic proteins.

    PubMed

    Duszenko, Michael; Redecke, Lars; Mudogo, Celestin Nzanzu; Sommer, Benjamin Philip; Mogk, Stefan; Oberthuer, Dominik; Betzel, Christian

    2015-08-01

    During the last decade, the number of three-dimensional structures solved by X-ray crystallography has increased dramatically. By 2014, it had crossed the landmark of 100 000 biomolecular structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank. This tremendous increase in successfully crystallized proteins is primarily owing to improvements in cloning strategies, the automation of the crystallization process and new innovative approaches to monitor crystallization. However, these improvements are mainly restricted to soluble proteins, while the crystallization and structural analysis of membrane proteins or proteins that undergo major post-translational modifications remains challenging. In addition, the need for relatively large crystals for conventional X-ray crystallography usually prevents the analysis of dynamic processes within cells. Thus, the advent of high-brilliance synchrotron and X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) sources and the establishment of serial crystallography (SFX) have opened new avenues in structural analysis using crystals that were formerly unusable. The successful structure elucidation of cathepsin B, accomplished by the use of microcrystals obtained by in vivo crystallization in baculovirus-infected Sf9 insect cells, clearly proved that crystals grown intracellularly are very well suited for X-ray analysis. Here, methods by which in vivo crystals can be obtained, isolated and used for structural analysis by novel highly brilliant XFEL and synchrotron-radiation sources are summarized and discussed. PMID:26249677

  8. Tissue-specific expression and post-translational modifications of plant- and bacterial-type phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase isozymes of the castor oil plant, Ricinus communis L.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Brendan; Fedosejevs, Eric T; Hill, Allyson T; Bettridge, James; Park, Joonho; Rao, Srinath K; Leach, Craig A; Plaxton, William C

    2011-11-01

    This study employs transcript profiling together with immunoblotting and co-immunopurification to assess the tissue-specific expression, protein:protein interactions, and post-translational modifications (PTMs) of plant- and bacterial-type phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) isozymes (PTPC and BTPC, respectively) in the castor plant, Ricinus communis. Previous studies established that the Class-1 PEPC (PTPC homotetramer) of castor oil seeds (COS) is activated by phosphorylation at Ser-11 and inhibited by monoubiquitination at Lys-628 during endosperm development and germination, respectively. Elimination of photosynthate supply to developing COS by depodding caused the PTPC of the endosperm and cotyledon to be dephosphorylated, and then subsequently monoubiquitinated in vivo. PTPC monoubiquitination rather than phosphorylation is widespread throughout the castor plant and appears to be the predominant PTM of Class-1 PEPC that occurs in planta. The distinctive developmental patterns of PTPC phosphorylation versus monoubiquitination indicates that these two PTMs are mutually exclusive. By contrast, the BTPC: (i) is abundant in the inner integument, cotyledon, and endosperm of developing COS, but occurs at low levels in roots and cotyledons of germinated COS, (ii) shows a unique developmental pattern in leaves such that it is present in leaf buds and young expanding leaves, but undetectable in fully expanded leaves, and (iii) tightly interacts with co-expressed PTPC to form the novel and allosterically-desensitized Class-2 PEPC heteromeric complex. BTPC and thus Class-2 PEPC up-regulation appears to be a distinctive feature of rapidly growing and/or biosynthetically active tissues that require a large anaplerotic flux from phosphoenolpyruvate to replenish tricarboxylic acid cycle C-skeletons being withdrawn for anabolism.

  9. Distinct Global Brain Dynamics and Spatiotemporal Organization of the Salience Network

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tianwen; Cai, Weidong; Ryali, Srikanth; Supekar, Kaustubh; Menon, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    One of the most fundamental features of the human brain is its ability to detect and attend to salient goal-relevant events in a flexible manner. The salience network (SN), anchored in the anterior insula and the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, plays a crucial role in this process through rapid detection of goal-relevant events and facilitation of access to appropriate cognitive resources. Here, we leverage the subsecond resolution of large multisession fMRI datasets from the Human Connectome Project and apply novel graph-theoretical techniques to investigate the dynamic spatiotemporal organization of the SN. We show that the large-scale brain dynamics of the SN are characterized by several distinctive and robust properties. First, the SN demonstrated the highest levels of flexibility in time-varying connectivity with other brain networks, including the frontoparietal network (FPN), the cingulate–opercular network (CON), and the ventral and dorsal attention networks (VAN and DAN). Second, dynamic functional interactions of the SN were among the most spatially varied in the brain. Third, SN nodes maintained a consistently high level of network centrality over time, indicating that this network is a hub for facilitating flexible cross-network interactions. Fourth, time-varying connectivity profiles of the SN were distinct from all other prefrontal control systems. Fifth, temporal flexibility of the SN uniquely predicted individual differences in cognitive flexibility. Importantly, each of these results was also observed in a second retest dataset, demonstrating the robustness of our findings. Our study provides fundamental new insights into the distinct dynamic functional architecture of the SN and demonstrates how this network is uniquely positioned to facilitate interactions with multiple functional systems and thereby support a wide range of cognitive processes in the human brain. PMID:27270215

  10. Fluctuation of similarity to detect transitions between distinct dynamical regimes in short time series.

    PubMed

    Malik, Nishant; Marwan, Norbert; Zou, Yong; Mucha, Peter J; Kurths, Jürgen

    2014-06-01

    A method to identify distinct dynamical regimes and transitions between those regimes in a short univariate time series was recently introduced [N. Malik et al., Europhys. Lett. 97, 40009 (2012)], employing the computation of fluctuations in a measure of nonlinear similarity based on local recurrence properties. In this work, we describe the details of the analytical relationships between this newly introduced measure and the well-known concepts of attractor dimensions and Lyapunov exponents. We show that the new measure has linear dependence on the effective dimension of the attractor and it measures the variations in the sum of the Lyapunov spectrum. To illustrate the practical usefulness of the method, we identify various types of dynamical transitions in different nonlinear models. We present testbed examples for the new method's robustness against noise and missing values in the time series. We also use this method to analyze time series of social dynamics, specifically an analysis of the US crime record time series from 1975 to 1993. Using this method, we find that dynamical complexity in robberies was influenced by the unemployment rate until the late 1980s. We have also observed a dynamical transition in homicide and robbery rates in the late 1980s and early 1990s, leading to increase in the dynamical complexity of these rates.

  11. Fluctuation of similarity to detect transitions between distinct dynamical regimes in short time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Nishant; Marwan, Norbert; Zou, Yong; Mucha, Peter J.; Kurths, Jürgen

    2014-06-01

    A method to identify distinct dynamical regimes and transitions between those regimes in a short univariate time series was recently introduced [N. Malik et al., Europhys. Lett. 97, 40009 (2012), 10.1209/0295-5075/97/40009], employing the computation of fluctuations in a measure of nonlinear similarity based on local recurrence properties. In this work, we describe the details of the analytical relationships between this newly introduced measure and the well-known concepts of attractor dimensions and Lyapunov exponents. We show that the new measure has linear dependence on the effective dimension of the attractor and it measures the variations in the sum of the Lyapunov spectrum. To illustrate the practical usefulness of the method, we identify various types of dynamical transitions in different nonlinear models. We present testbed examples for the new method's robustness against noise and missing values in the time series. We also use this method to analyze time series of social dynamics, specifically an analysis of the US crime record time series from 1975 to 1993. Using this method, we find that dynamical complexity in robberies was influenced by the unemployment rate until the late 1980s. We have also observed a dynamical transition in homicide and robbery rates in the late 1980s and early 1990s, leading to increase in the dynamical complexity of these rates.

  12. Analysis of Histones H3 and H4 Reveals Novel and Conserved Post-Translational Modifications in Sugarcane

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shichong; Souza, Glaucia Mendes; Garcia, Benjamin A.; Casas-Mollano, J. Armando

    2015-01-01

    Histones are the main structural components of the nucleosome, hence targets of many regulatory proteins that mediate processes involving changes in chromatin. The functional outcome of many pathways is “written” in the histones in the form of post-translational modifications that determine the final gene expression readout. As a result, modifications, alone or in combination, are important determinants of chromatin states. Histone modifications are accomplished by the addition of different chemical groups such as methyl, acetyl and phosphate. Thus, identifying and characterizing these modifications and the proteins related to them is the initial step to understanding the mechanisms of gene regulation and in the future may even provide tools for breeding programs. Several studies over the past years have contributed to increase our knowledge of epigenetic gene regulation in model organisms like Arabidopsis, yet this field remains relatively unexplored in crops. In this study we identified and initially characterized histones H3 and H4 in the monocot crop sugarcane. We discovered a number of histone genes by searching the sugarcane ESTs database. The proteins encoded correspond to canonical histones, and their variants. We also purified bulk histones and used them to map post-translational modifications in the histones H3 and H4 using mass spectrometry. Several modifications conserved in other plants, and also novel modified residues, were identified. In particular, we report O-acetylation of serine, threonine and tyrosine, a recently identified modification conserved in several eukaryotes. Additionally, the sub-nuclear localization of some well-studied modifications (i.e., H3K4me3, H3K9me2, H3K27me3, H3K9ac, H3T3ph) is described and compared to other plant species. To our knowledge, this is the first report of histones H3 and H4 as well as their post-translational modifications in sugarcane, and will provide a starting point for the study of chromatin

  13. Reassortment and distinct evolutionary dynamics of Rift Valley Fever virus genomic segments

    PubMed Central

    Freire, Caio C. M.; Iamarino, Atila; Soumaré, Peinda O. Ly; Faye, Ousmane; Sall, Amadou A.; Zanotto, Paolo M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Rift Valley Fever virus (RVFV) is a member of Bunyaviridae family that causes a febrile disease affecting mainly ruminants and occasionally humans in Africa, with symptoms that range from mid to severe. RVFV has a tri-segmented ssRNA genome that permits reassortment and could generate more virulent strains. In this study, we reveal the importance of reassortment for RVFV evolution using viral gene genealogy inference and phylodynamics. We uncovered seven events of reassortment that originated RVFV lineages with discordant origins among segments. Moreover, we also found that despite similar selection regimens, the three segments have distinct evolutionary dynamics; the longer segment L evolves at a significant lower rate. Episodes of discordance between population size estimates per segment also coincided with reassortment dating. Our results show that RVFV segments are decoupled enough to have distinct demographic histories and to evolve under different molecular rates. PMID:26100494

  14. Reassortment and distinct evolutionary dynamics of Rift Valley Fever virus genomic segments.

    PubMed

    Freire, Caio C M; Iamarino, Atila; Soumaré, Peinda O Ly; Faye, Ousmane; Sall, Amadou A; Zanotto, Paolo M A

    2015-01-01

    Rift Valley Fever virus (RVFV) is a member of Bunyaviridae family that causes a febrile disease affecting mainly ruminants and occasionally humans in Africa, with symptoms that range from mid to severe. RVFV has a tri-segmented ssRNA genome that permits reassortment and could generate more virulent strains. In this study, we reveal the importance of reassortment for RVFV evolution using viral gene genealogy inference and phylodynamics. We uncovered seven events of reassortment that originated RVFV lineages with discordant origins among segments. Moreover, we also found that despite similar selection regimens, the three segments have distinct evolutionary dynamics; the longer segment L evolves at a significant lower rate. Episodes of discordance between population size estimates per segment also coincided with reassortment dating. Our results show that RVFV segments are decoupled enough to have distinct demographic histories and to evolve under different molecular rates. PMID:26100494

  15. Reconstructing dynamic mental models of facial expressions in prosopagnosia reveals distinct representations for identity and expression.

    PubMed

    Richoz, Anne-Raphaëlle; Jack, Rachael E; Garrod, Oliver G B; Schyns, Philippe G; Caldara, Roberto

    2015-04-01

    The human face transmits a wealth of signals that readily provide crucial information for social interactions, such as facial identity and emotional expression. Yet, a fundamental question remains unresolved: does the face information for identity and emotional expression categorization tap into common or distinct representational systems? To address this question we tested PS, a pure case of acquired prosopagnosia with bilateral occipitotemporal lesions anatomically sparing the regions that are assumed to contribute to facial expression (de)coding (i.e., the amygdala, the insula and the posterior superior temporal sulcus--pSTS). We previously demonstrated that PS does not use information from the eye region to identify faces, but relies on the suboptimal mouth region. PS's abnormal information use for identity, coupled with her neural dissociation, provides a unique opportunity to probe the existence of a dichotomy in the face representational system. To reconstruct the mental models of the six basic facial expressions of emotion in PS and age-matched healthy observers, we used a novel reverse correlation technique tracking information use on dynamic faces. PS was comparable to controls, using all facial features to (de)code facial expressions with the exception of fear. PS's normal (de)coding of dynamic facial expressions suggests that the face system relies either on distinct representational systems for identity and expression, or dissociable cortical pathways to access them. Interestingly, PS showed a selective impairment for categorizing many static facial expressions, which could be accounted for by her lesion in the right inferior occipital gyrus. PS's advantage for dynamic facial expressions might instead relate to a functionally distinct and sufficient cortical pathway directly connecting the early visual cortex to the spared pSTS. Altogether, our data provide critical insights on the healthy and impaired face systems, question evidence of deficits

  16. Separation of post-translational modifications in monoclonal antibodies by exploiting subtle conformational changes under mildly acidic conditions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shiyi; Ionescu, Roxana; Peekhaus, Norbert; Leung, Jin-Yu; Ha, Sha; Vlasak, Josef

    2010-10-15

    Chromatographic separation plays a key role in the identification, quantification, and characterization of protein variants. Here we describe separation of species containing two post-translational modifications (glycosylation and methionine oxidation) in the Fc fragment of a monoclonal antibody. The method is based on cation-exchange chromatography under mildly acidic conditions that destabilize mainly the CH2 domain. Our data suggest that the separation is not mediated by the chemical modification itself, but rather by subtle structural changes induced by the chemical modification in the domain-decoupled conformation that monoclonal antibodies adopt around pH 4. Compared to other procedures already described in the literature, this method demonstrates an improved separation and allows purification of species in the native fold for additional functional characterization. This approach of separation under conditions where the protein assumes an alternative conformation could find a more general utility for the separation of chemical modifications in proteins.

  17. Post-Translational Regulation of miRNA Pathway Components, AGO1 and HYL1, in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Seok Keun; Ryu, Moon Young; Shah, Pratik; Poulsen, Christian Peter; Yang, Seong Wook

    2016-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) of proteins are essential to increase the functional diversity of the proteome. By adding chemical groups to proteins, or degrading entire proteins by phosphorylation, glycosylation, ubiquitination, neddylation, acetylation, lipidation, and proteolysis, the complexity of the proteome increases, and this then influences most biological processes. Although small RNAs are crucial regulatory elements for gene expression in most eukaryotes, PTMs of small RNA microprocessor and RNA silencing components have not been extensively investigated in plants. To date, several studies have shown that the proteolytic regulation of AGOs is important for host-pathogen interactions. DRB4 is regulated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system, and the degradation of HYL1 is modulated by a de-etiolation repressor, COP1, and an unknown cytoplasmic protease. Here, we discuss current findings on the PTMs of microprocessor and RNA silencing components in plants. PMID:27440184

  18. Temperature-dependent hyper-activation of monoglucosyldiacylglycerol synthase is post-translationally regulated in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Shimojima, Mie; Tsuchiya, Mami; Ohta, Hiroyuki

    2009-07-21

    The mechanism of monoglucosyldiacylglycerol (MGlcDG) increase following heat shock in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 was examined by measuring MGlcDG synthase (Sll1377) activity. Temperature-dependent activation of Sll1377 was observed in the membrane fraction of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, whereas the Sll1377 protein level remained unchanged, suggesting that the activity is post-translationally regulated without covalent modification of Sll1377 by soluble enzymes. Four individual mutations introduced into recombinant Sll1377 (D147, D200, R329, and R331) significantly reduced the activity and blocked temperature-dependent activation, suggesting that these amino acid residues are essential for Sll1377 activity at both normal growth temperature and the higher temperature.

  19. Protein-protein interactions involving voltage-gated sodium channels: Post-translational regulation, intracellular trafficking and functional expression.

    PubMed

    Shao, Dongmin; Okuse, Kenji; Djamgoz, Mustafa B A

    2009-07-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs), classically known to play a central role in excitability and signalling in nerves and muscles, have also been found to be expressed in a range of 'non-excitable' cells, including lymphocytes, fibroblasts and endothelia. VGSC abnormalities are associated with various diseases including epilepsy, long-QT syndrome 3, Brugada syndrome, sudden infant death syndrome and, more recently, various human cancers. Given their pivotal role in a wide range of physiological and pathophysiological processes, regulation of functional VGSC expression has been the subject of intense study. An emerging theme is post-translational regulation and macro-molecular complexing by protein-protein interactions and intracellular trafficking, leading to changes in functional VGSC expression in plasma membrane. This partially involves endoplasmic reticulum associated degradation and ubiquitin-proteasome system. Several proteins have been shown to associate with VGSCs. Here, we review the interactions involving VGSCs and the following proteins: p11, ankyrin, syntrophin, beta-subunit of VGSC, papin, ERM and Nedd4 proteins. Protein kinases A and C, as well as Ca(2+)-calmodulin dependent kinase II that have also been shown to regulate intracellular trafficking of VGSCs by changing the balance of externalization vs. internalization, and an effort is made to separate these effects from the short-term phosphorylation of mature proteins in plasma membrane. Two further modulatory mechanisms are reciprocal interactions with the cytoskeleton and, late-stage, activity-dependent regulation. Thus, the review gives an updated account of the range of post-translational molecular mechanisms regulating functional VGSC expression. However, many details of VGSC subtype-specific regulation and pathophysiological aspects remain unknown and these are highlighted throughout for completeness. PMID:19401147

  20. Tubulin tail sequences and post-translational modifications regulate closure of mitochondrial voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC).

    PubMed

    Sheldon, Kely L; Gurnev, Philip A; Bezrukov, Sergey M; Sackett, Dan L

    2015-10-30

    It was previously shown that tubulin dimer interaction with the mitochondrial outer membrane protein voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) blocks traffic through the channel and reduces oxidative metabolism and that this requires the unstructured anionic C-terminal tail peptides found on both α- and β-tubulin subunits. It was unclear whether the α- and β-tubulin tails contribute equally to VDAC blockade and what effects might be due to sequence variations in these tail peptides or to tubulin post-translational modifications, which mostly occur on the tails. The nature of the contribution of the tubulin body beyond acting as an anchor for the tails had not been clarified either. Here we present peptide-protein chimeras to address these questions. These constructs allow us to easily combine a tail peptide with different proteins or combine different tail peptides with a particular protein. The results show that a single tail grafted to an inert protein is sufficient to produce channel closure similar to that observed with tubulin. We show that the β-tail is more than an order of magnitude more potent than the α-tail and that the lower α-tail activity is largely due to the presence of a terminal tyrosine. Detyrosination activates the α-tail, and activation is reversed by the removal of the glutamic acid penultimate to the tyrosine. Nitration of tyrosine reverses the tyrosine inhibition of binding and even induces prolonged VDAC closures. Our results demonstrate that small changes in sequence or post-translational modification of the unstructured tails of tubulin result in substantial changes in VDAC closure.

  1. Tubulin tail sequences and post-translational modifications regulate closure of mitochondrial voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC).

    PubMed

    Sheldon, Kely L; Gurnev, Philip A; Bezrukov, Sergey M; Sackett, Dan L

    2015-10-30

    It was previously shown that tubulin dimer interaction with the mitochondrial outer membrane protein voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) blocks traffic through the channel and reduces oxidative metabolism and that this requires the unstructured anionic C-terminal tail peptides found on both α- and β-tubulin subunits. It was unclear whether the α- and β-tubulin tails contribute equally to VDAC blockade and what effects might be due to sequence variations in these tail peptides or to tubulin post-translational modifications, which mostly occur on the tails. The nature of the contribution of the tubulin body beyond acting as an anchor for the tails had not been clarified either. Here we present peptide-protein chimeras to address these questions. These constructs allow us to easily combine a tail peptide with different proteins or combine different tail peptides with a particular protein. The results show that a single tail grafted to an inert protein is sufficient to produce channel closure similar to that observed with tubulin. We show that the β-tail is more than an order of magnitude more potent than the α-tail and that the lower α-tail activity is largely due to the presence of a terminal tyrosine. Detyrosination activates the α-tail, and activation is reversed by the removal of the glutamic acid penultimate to the tyrosine. Nitration of tyrosine reverses the tyrosine inhibition of binding and even induces prolonged VDAC closures. Our results demonstrate that small changes in sequence or post-translational modification of the unstructured tails of tubulin result in substantial changes in VDAC closure. PMID:26306046

  2. Motif co-regulation and co-operativity are common mechanisms in transcriptional, post-transcriptional and post-translational regulation.

    PubMed

    Van Roey, Kim; Davey, Norman E

    2015-01-01

    A substantial portion of the regulatory interactions in the higher eukaryotic cell are mediated by simple sequence motifs in the regulatory segments of genes and (pre-)mRNAs, and in the intrinsically disordered regions of proteins. Although these regulatory modules are physicochemically distinct, they share an evolutionary plasticity that has facilitated a rapid growth of their use and resulted in their ubiquity in complex organisms. The ease of motif acquisition simplifies access to basal housekeeping functions, facilitates the co-regulation of multiple biomolecules allowing them to respond in a coordinated manner to changes in the cell state, and supports the integration of multiple signals for combinatorial decision-making. Consequently, motifs are indispensable for temporal, spatial, conditional and basal regulation at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional and post-translational level. In this review, we highlight that many of the key regulatory pathways of the cell are recruited by motifs and that the ease of motif acquisition has resulted in large networks of co-regulated biomolecules. We discuss how co-operativity allows simple static motifs to perform the conditional regulation that underlies decision-making in higher eukaryotic biological systems. We observe that each gene and its products have a unique set of DNA, RNA or protein motifs that encode a regulatory program to define the logical circuitry that guides the life cycle of these biomolecules, from transcription to degradation. Finally, we contrast the regulatory properties of protein motifs and the regulatory elements of DNA and (pre-)mRNAs, advocating that co-regulation, co-operativity, and motif-driven regulatory programs are common mechanisms that emerge from the use of simple, evolutionarily plastic regulatory modules. PMID:26626130

  3. A novel tyrosine-heme C−O covalent linkage in F43Y myoglobin: a new post-translational modification of heme proteins.

    PubMed

    Yan, Dao-Jing; Li, Wei; Xiang, Yu; Wen, Ge-Bo; Lin, Ying-Wu; Tan, Xiangshi

    2015-01-01

    Heme post-translational modification plays a key role in tuning the structure and function of heme proteins. We herein report a novel tyrosine-heme covalent C−O bond in an artificially produced sperm whale myoglobin (Mb) mutant, F43Y Mb, which formed spontaneously in vivo between the Tyr43 hydroxy group and the heme 4-vinyl group. This highlights the diverse chemistry of heme post-translational modifications, and lays groundwork for further investigation of the structural and functional diversity of covalently-bound heme proteins. PMID:25392956

  4. A novel tyrosine-heme C−O covalent linkage in F43Y myoglobin: a new post-translational modification of heme proteins.

    PubMed

    Yan, Dao-Jing; Li, Wei; Xiang, Yu; Wen, Ge-Bo; Lin, Ying-Wu; Tan, Xiangshi

    2015-01-01

    Heme post-translational modification plays a key role in tuning the structure and function of heme proteins. We herein report a novel tyrosine-heme covalent C−O bond in an artificially produced sperm whale myoglobin (Mb) mutant, F43Y Mb, which formed spontaneously in vivo between the Tyr43 hydroxy group and the heme 4-vinyl group. This highlights the diverse chemistry of heme post-translational modifications, and lays groundwork for further investigation of the structural and functional diversity of covalently-bound heme proteins.

  5. Contact processes with competitive dynamics in bipartite lattices: effects of distinct interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pianegonda, Salete; Fiore, Carlos E.

    2014-05-01

    The two-dimensional contact process (CP) with a competitive dynamics proposed by Martins et al (2011 Phys. Rev. E 84 011125) leads to the appearance of an unusual active-asymmetric phase, in which the system sublattices are unequally populated. It differs from the usual CP only by the fact that particles also interact with their next-nearest neighbor sites via a distinct strength creation rate, and for the inclusion of an inhibition effect, proportional to the local density. Aimed at investigating the robustness of such an asymmetric phase, in this paper we study the influence of distinct interactions for two bidimensional CPs. In the first model, the interaction between first neighbors requires a minimal neighborhood of adjacent particles for creating new offspring, whereas second neighbors interact as usual (e.g. at least one neighboring particle is required). The second model takes the opposite situation, in which the restrictive dynamics is in the interaction between next-nearest neighbor sites. Both models are investigated under mean field theory (MFT) and Monte Carlo simulations. In similarity with results by Martins et al, the inclusion of distinct sublattice interactions maintains the occurrence of an asymmetric active phase and re-entrant transition lines. In contrast, remarkable differences are presented, such as discontinuous phase transitions (even between the active phases), the appearance of tricritical points and the stabilization of active phases under larger values of control parameters. Finally, we have shown that the critical behaviors are not altered due to the change of interactions, in which the absorbing transitions belong to the directed percolation (DP) universality class, whereas second-order active phase transitions belong to the Ising universality class.

  6. The mitochondrial elongation factors MIEF1 and MIEF2 exert partially distinct functions in mitochondrial dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Tong; Yu, Rong; Jin, Shao-Bo; Han, Liwei; Lendahl, Urban; Zhao, Jian; Nistér, Monica

    2013-11-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles whose morphology is regulated by a complex balance of fission and fusion processes, and we still know relatively little about how mitochondrial dynamics is regulated. MIEF1 (also called MiD51) has recently been characterized as a key regulator of mitochondrial dynamics and in this report we explore the functions of its paralog MIEF2 (also called MiD49), to learn to what extent MIEF2 is functionally distinct from MIEF1. We show that MIEF1 and MIEF2 have many functions in common. Both are anchored in the mitochondrial outer membrane, recruit Drp1 from the cytoplasm to the mitochondrial surface and cause mitochondrial fusion, and MIEF2, like MIEF1, can interact with Drp1 and hFis1. MIEF1 and MIEF2, however, also differ in certain aspects. MIEF1 and MIEF2 are differentially expressed in human tissues during development. When overexpressed, MIEF2 exerts a stronger fusion-promoting effect than MIEF1, and in line with this, hFis1 and Mff can only partially revert the MIEF2-induced fusion phenotype, whereas MIEF1-induced fusion is reverted to a larger extent by hFis1 and Mff. MIEF2 forms high molecular weight oligomers, while MIEF1 is largely present as a dimer. Furthermore, MIEF1 and MIEF2 use distinct domains for oligomerization: in MIEF1, the region from amino acid residues 109–154 is required, whereas oligomerization of MIEF2 depends on amino acid residues 1 to 49, i.e. the N-terminal end. We also show that oligomerization of MIEF1 is not required for its mitochondrial localization and interaction with Drp1. In conclusion, our data suggest that the mitochondrial regulators MIEF1 and MIEF2 exert partially distinct functions in mitochondrial dynamics. - Highlights: • MIEF1 and MIEF2 recruit Drp1 to mitochondria and cause mitochondrial fusion. • MIEF2, like MIEF1, can interact with Drp1 and hFis1. • MIEF1 and MIEF2 are differentially expressed in human tissues during development. • MIEF2 exerts a stronger fusion

  7. Post-translational modification of osteopontin: Effects on in vitro hydroxyapatite formation and growth

    SciTech Connect

    Boskey, Adele L.; Christensen, Brian; Taleb, Hayat; Sorensen, Esben S.

    2012-03-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thrombin-cleaved fragments of milk-osteopontin effect hydroxyapatite formation differently. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer N- and C-terminal fragments promoted hydroxyapatite formation and growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A central fragment inhibited hydroxyapatite formation and growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Binding to collagen or hydroxyapatite seed crystals modified these effects. -- Abstract: The manuscript tests the hypothesis that posttranslational modification of the SIBLING family of proteins in general and osteopontin in particular modify the abilities of these proteins to regulate in vitro hydroxyapatite (HA) formation. Osteopontin has diverse effects on hydroxyapatite (HA) mineral crystallite formation and growth depending on the extent of phosphorylation. We hypothesized that different regions of full-length OPN would also have distinct effects on the mineralization process. Thrombin fragmentation of milk OPN (mOPN) was used to test this hypothesis. Three fragments were tested in a de novo HA formation assay; an N-terminal fragment (aa 1-147), a central fragment (aa 148-204) denoted SKK-fragment and a C-terminal fragment (aa 205-262). Compared to intact mOPN the C- and N-terminal fragments behaved comparably, promoting HA formation and growth, but the central SKK-fragment acted as a mineralization inhibitor. In a seeded growth experiment all fragments inhibited mineral proliferation, but the SKK-fragment was the most effective inhibitor. These effects, seen in HA-formation and seeded growth assays in a gelatin gel system and in a pH-stat experiment were lost when the protein or fragments were dephosphorylated. Effects of the fully phosphorylated protein and fragments were also altered in the presence of fibrillar collagen. The diverse effects can be explained in terms of the intrinsically disordered nature of OPN and its fragments which enable them to interact with their multiple partners.

  8. A quantitative map of the liver mitochondrial phosphoproteome reveals post-translational control of ketogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Grimsrud, Paul A.; Carson, Joshua J.; Hebert, Alex S.; Hubler, Shane L.; Niemi, Natalie M.; Bailey, Derek J.; Jochem, Adam; Stapleton, Donald S.; Keller, Mark P.; Westphall, Michael S.; Yandell, Brian S.; Attie, Alan D.; Coon, Joshua J.; Pagliarini, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that play a central role in a diverse array of metabolic processes. Elucidating mitochondrial adaptations to changing metabolic demands and the pathogenic alterations that underlie metabolic disorders represent principal challenges in cell biology. Here, we performed multiplexed quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics to chart the remodeling of the mouse liver mitochondrial proteome and phosphoproteome during both acute and chronic physiological transformations in more than 50 mice. Our analyses reveal that reversible phosphorylation is widespread in mitochondria, and is a key mechanism for regulating ketogenesis during the onset of obesity and type 2 diabetes. Specifically, we have demonstrated that phosphorylation of a conserved serine on Hmgcs2 (S456) significantly enhances its catalytic activity in response to increased ketogenic demand. Collectively, our work describes the plasticity of this organelle at high resolution and provides a framework for investigating the roles of proteome restructuring and reversible phosphorylation in mitochondrial adaptation. PMID:23140645

  9. Venus trap in the mouse embryo reveals distinct molecular dynamics underlying specification of first embryonic lineages.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Jens-Erik; Panavaite, Laura; Gunther, Stefan; Wennekamp, Sebastian; Groner, Anna C; Pigge, Anton; Salvenmoser, Stefanie; Trono, Didier; Hufnagel, Lars; Hiiragi, Takashi

    2015-08-01

    Mammalian development begins with the segregation of embryonic and extra-embryonic lineages in the blastocyst. Recent studies revealed cell-to-cell gene expression heterogeneity and dynamic cell rearrangements during mouse blastocyst formation. Thus, mechanistic understanding of lineage specification requires quantitative description of gene expression dynamics at a single-cell resolution in living embryos. However, only a few fluorescent gene expression reporter mice are available and quantitative live image analysis is limited so far. Here, we carried out a fluorescence gene-trap screen and established reporter mice expressing Venus specifically in the first lineages. Lineage tracking, quantitative gene expression and cell position analyses allowed us to build a comprehensive lineage map of mouse pre-implantation development. Our systematic analysis revealed that, contrary to the available models, the timing and mechanism of lineage specification may be distinct between the trophectoderm and the inner cell mass. While expression of our trophectoderm-specific lineage marker is upregulated in outside cells upon asymmetric divisions at 8- and 16-cell stages, the inside-specific upregulation of the inner-cell-mass marker only becomes evident at the 64-cell stage. This study thus provides a framework toward systems-level understanding of embryogenesis marked by high dynamicity and stochastic variability. PMID:26142281

  10. Distinct dynamics of ramping activity in the frontal cortex and caudate nucleus in monkeys

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The prefronto-striatal network is involved in many cognitive functions, including perceptual decision making and reward-modulated behaviors. For well-trained subjects, neural responses frequently show similar patterns in the prefrontal cortex and striatum, making it difficult to tease apart distinct regional contributions. Here I show that, despite similar mean firing rate patterns, prefrontal and striatal responses differ in other temporal dynamics for both perceptual and reward-based tasks. Compared with simulation results, the temporal dynamics of prefrontal activity are consistent with an accumulation of sensory evidence used to solve a perceptual task but not with an accumulation of reward context-related information used for the development of a reward bias. In contrast, the dynamics of striatal activity is consistent with an accumulation of reward context-related information and with an accumulation of sensory evidence during early stimulus viewing. These results suggest that prefrontal and striatal neurons may have specialized functions for different tasks even with similar average activity. PMID:26224774

  11. Venus trap in the mouse embryo reveals distinct molecular dynamics underlying specification of first embryonic lineages.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Jens-Erik; Panavaite, Laura; Gunther, Stefan; Wennekamp, Sebastian; Groner, Anna C; Pigge, Anton; Salvenmoser, Stefanie; Trono, Didier; Hufnagel, Lars; Hiiragi, Takashi

    2015-08-01

    Mammalian development begins with the segregation of embryonic and extra-embryonic lineages in the blastocyst. Recent studies revealed cell-to-cell gene expression heterogeneity and dynamic cell rearrangements during mouse blastocyst formation. Thus, mechanistic understanding of lineage specification requires quantitative description of gene expression dynamics at a single-cell resolution in living embryos. However, only a few fluorescent gene expression reporter mice are available and quantitative live image analysis is limited so far. Here, we carried out a fluorescence gene-trap screen and established reporter mice expressing Venus specifically in the first lineages. Lineage tracking, quantitative gene expression and cell position analyses allowed us to build a comprehensive lineage map of mouse pre-implantation development. Our systematic analysis revealed that, contrary to the available models, the timing and mechanism of lineage specification may be distinct between the trophectoderm and the inner cell mass. While expression of our trophectoderm-specific lineage marker is upregulated in outside cells upon asymmetric divisions at 8- and 16-cell stages, the inside-specific upregulation of the inner-cell-mass marker only becomes evident at the 64-cell stage. This study thus provides a framework toward systems-level understanding of embryogenesis marked by high dynamicity and stochastic variability.

  12. Budding yeast protein extraction and purification for the study of function, interactions, and post-translational modifications.

    PubMed

    Szymanski, Eva Paige; Kerscher, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Homogenization by bead beating is a fast and efficient way to release DNA, RNA, proteins, and metabolites from budding yeast cells, which are notoriously hard to disrupt. Here we describe the use of a bead mill homogenizer for the extraction of proteins into buffers optimized to maintain the functions, interactions and post-translational modifications of proteins. Logarithmically growing cells expressing the protein of interest are grown in a liquid growth media of choice. The growth media may be supplemented with reagents to induce protein expression from inducible promoters (e.g. galactose), synchronize cell cycle stage (e.g. nocodazole), or inhibit proteasome function (e.g. MG132). Cells are then pelleted and resuspended in a suitable buffer containing protease and/or phosphatase inhibitors and are either processed immediately or frozen in liquid nitrogen for later use. Homogenization is accomplished by six cycles of 20 sec bead-beating (5.5 m/sec), each followed by one minute incubation on ice. The resulting homogenate is cleared by centrifugation and small particulates can be removed by filtration. The resulting cleared whole cell extract (WCE) is precipitated using 20% TCA for direct analysis of total proteins by SDS-PAGE followed by Western blotting. Extracts are also suitable for affinity purification of specific proteins, the detection of post-translational modifications, or the analysis of co-purifying proteins. As is the case for most protein purification protocols, some enzymes and proteins may require unique conditions or buffer compositions for their purification and others may be unstable or insoluble under the conditions stated. In the latter case, the protocol presented may provide a useful starting point to empirically determine the best bead-beating strategy for protein extraction and purification. We show the extraction and purification of an epitope-tagged SUMO E3 ligase, Siz1, a cell cycle regulated protein that becomes both sumoylated and

  13. Simulations of Underground Structures Subjected to Dynamic Loading Using the Distinct Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, J. P.; Glenn, L. A.; Heuze, F. E.; Bonner, M. P.

    2004-07-01

    We present preliminary results from a parameter study investigating the stability of underground structures in response to explosion-induced strong ground motions. In practice, even the most sophisticated site characterization may lack key details regarding precise joint properties and orientations within the rock mass. Thus, in order to place bounds upon the predicted behavior of a given facility, an extensive series of simulations representing different realizations may be required. The influence of both construction parameters (reinforcement, rock bolts,liners) and geological parameters (joint stiffness, joint spacing and orientation, and tunnel diameter to block size ratio) must be considered. We will discuss the distinct element method (DEM) with particular emphasis on techniques for achieving improved computational efficiency, including the handling of contact detection and approaches to parallelization. We also outline the continuum approaches we employ to obtain boundary conditions for the distinct element simulations. Finally, our DEM code is used to simulate dynamic loading of a generic subterranean facility in hardrock, demonstrating the suitability of the DEM for this application.

  14. Simulations of Underground Structures Subjected to Dynamic Loading using the Distinct Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J P; Glenn, L A; Heuze, F E; Bonner, M P

    2003-07-14

    We present preliminary results from a parameter study investigating the stability of underground structures in response to explosion-induced strong ground motions. In practice, even the most sophisticated site characterization may lack key details regarding precise joint properties and orientations within the rock mass. Thus, in order to place bounds upon the predicted behavior of a given facility, an extensive series of simulations representing different realizations may be required. The influence of both construction parameters (reinforcement, rock bolts,liners) and geological parameters (joint stiffness, joint spacing and orientation, and tunnel diameter to block size ratio) must be considered. We will discuss the distinct element method (DEM) with particular emphasis on techniques for achieving improved computational efficiency, including the handling of contact detection and approaches to parallelization. We also outline the continuum approaches we employ to obtain boundary conditions for the distinct element simulations. Finally, our DEM code is used to simulate dynamic loading of a generic subterranean facility in hardrock, demonstrating the suitability of the DEM for this application.

  15. Dimeric c-di-GMP is required for post-translational regulation of alginate production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    SciTech Connect

    Whitney, John C.; Robinson, Howard; Whitfield, Gregory B.; Marmont, Lindsey S.; Yip, Patrick; Neculai, A. Mirela; Lobsanov, Yuri D.; Ohman, Dennis E.; Howell, P. Lynne

    2015-05-15

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that secretes the exopolysaccharide alginate during infection of the respiratory tract of individuals afflicted with cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Among the proteins required for alginate production, Alg44 has been identified as an inner membrane protein whose bis-(3',5')-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) binding activity post-translationally regulates alginate secretion. In this study, we report the 1.8 Å crystal structure of the cytoplasmic region of Alg44 in complex with dimeric self-intercalated c-di-GMP and characterize its dinucleotide-binding site using mutational analysis. The structure shows that the c-di-GMP binding region of Alg44 adopts a PilZ domain fold with a dimerization mode not previously observed for this family of proteins. Moreover, calorimetric binding analysis of residues in the c-di-GMP binding site demonstrate that mutation of Arg-17 and Arg-95 alters the binding stoichiometry between c-di-GMP and Alg44 from 2:1 to 1:1. Introduction of these mutant alleles on the P. aeruginosa chromosome show that the residues required for binding of dimeric c-di-GMP in vitro are also required for efficient alginate production in vivo. Our results suggest that the dimeric form of c-di-GMP represents the biologically active signaling molecule needed for the secretion of an important virulence factor produced by P. aeruginosa.

  16. Characterization and putative post-translational regulation of α- and β-tubulin gene families in Salix arbutifolia

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Guodong; Zeng, Yanfei; He, Caiyun; Zhang, Jianguo

    2016-01-01

    Microtubules, which are composed of heterodimers of α-tubulin (TUA) and β-tubulin (TUB) proteins, are closely associated with cellulose microfibril deposition and play pivotal roles in plant secondary cell wall development. In the present study, we identified eight TUA and twenty TUB genes in willow (Salix arbutifolia). Quantitative real-time PCR analysis showed that the small number of TUA gene family members relative to that of TUBs was complemented by a higher transcript copy number for each TUA gene, which is essential to the maintenance of the tubulin 1:1 heterodimer assembly. In Salix, five of eight TUAs were determined to be unusual because these contained a C-terminal methionine acid, leucine acid, glutamic acid, and glutamine acid, instead of the more typical tyrosine residue, which in turn generated the hypothesis of post-translational modifications (PTMs) that included deleucylation, demethiolation, deglutamynation, and deaspartylation. These PTMs are responsible for the removal of additional amino acid residues from TUAs prior to detyrosination, which is the first step of C-terminal PTMs. The additional PTMs of the TUA gene family might be responsible for the formation of different tubulin heterodimers that may have diverse functions for the adaptation of the woody perennial growth for Salix. PMID:26753794

  17. A Systems Biology Overview on Human Diabetic Nephropathy: From Genetic Susceptibility to Post-Transcriptional and Post-Translational Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Conserva, Francesca; Gesualdo, Loreto; Papale, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN), a microvascular complication occurring in approximately 20–40% of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), is characterized by the progressive impairment of glomerular filtration and the development of Kimmelstiel-Wilson lesions leading to end-stage renal failure (ESRD). The causes and molecular mechanisms mediating the onset of T2DM chronic complications are yet sketchy and it is not clear why disease progression occurs only in some patients. We performed a systematic analysis of the most relevant studies investigating genetic susceptibility and specific transcriptomic, epigenetic, proteomic, and metabolomic patterns in order to summarize the most significant traits associated with the disease onset and progression. The picture that emerges is complex and fascinating as it includes the regulation/dysregulation of numerous biological processes, converging toward the activation of inflammatory processes, oxidative stress, remodeling of cellular function and morphology, and disturbance of metabolic pathways. The growing interest in the characterization of protein post-translational modifications and the importance of handling large datasets using a systems biology approach are also discussed. PMID:26798653

  18. Absolute quantification of protein and post-translational modification abundance with stable isotope–labeled synthetic peptides

    PubMed Central

    Kettenbach, Arminja N; Rush, John; Gerber, Scott A

    2013-01-01

    In the analysis of biological systems, it is of interest to identify the components of the system and to monitor their changes in abundance under different conditions. The AQUA (for ‘absolute quantification’) method allows sensitive and specific targeted quantification of protein and post-translational modifications in complex protein mixtures using stable isotope–labeled peptides as internal standards. Each AQUA experiment is composed of two stages: method development and application to a biological scenario. In the method development stage, peptides from the protein of interest are chosen and then synthesized with stable isotopes such as 13C, 2H or 15N. The abundance of these internal standards and their endogenous counterparts can be measured by mass spectrometry with selected reaction monitoring or selected ion monitoring methods. Once an AQUA method is established, it can be rapidly applied to a wide range of biological samples, from tissue culture cells to human plasma and tissue. After AQUA peptide synthesis, the development, optimization and application of AQUA analyses to a specific biological problem can be achieved in ~1 week. Here we demonstrate the usefulness of this method by monitoring both Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) protein abundance in multiple lung cancer cell lines and the extent of Plk1 activation loop phosphorylation (pThr-210) during release from S phase. PMID:21293459

  19. Pathology Tissue-quantitative Mass Spectrometry Analysis to Profile Histone Post-translational Modification Patterns in Patient Samples*

    PubMed Central

    Noberini, Roberta; Uggetti, Andrea; Pruneri, Giancarlo; Minucci, Saverio

    2016-01-01

    Histone post-translational modifications (hPTMs) generate a complex combinatorial code that has been implicated with various pathologies, including cancer. Dissecting such a code in physiological and diseased states may be exploited for epigenetic biomarker discovery, but hPTM analysis in clinical samples has been hindered by technical limitations. Here, we developed a method (PAThology tissue analysis of Histones by Mass Spectrometry - PAT-H-MS) that allows to perform a comprehensive, unbiased and quantitative MS-analysis of hPTM patterns on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples. In pairwise comparisons, histone extracted from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues showed patterns similar to fresh frozen samples for 24 differentially modified peptides from histone H3. In addition, when coupled with a histone-focused version of the super-SILAC approach, this method allows the accurate quantification of modification changes among breast cancer patient samples. As an initial application of the PAThology tissue analysis of Histones by Mass Spectrometry method, we analyzed breast cancer samples, revealing significant changes in histone H3 methylation patterns among Luminal A-like and Triple Negative disease subtypes. These results pave the way for retrospective epigenetic studies that combine the power of MS-based hPTM analysis with the extensive clinical information associated with formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded archives. PMID:26463340

  20. Regulation of the Regulators: Post-Translational Modifications, Subcellular, and Spatiotemporal Distribution of Plant 14-3-3 Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Rashaun S.; Swatek, Kirby N.; Thelen, Jay J.

    2016-01-01

    14-3-3 proteins bind to and modulate the activity of phosphorylated proteins that regulate a variety of metabolic processes in eukaryotes. Multiple 14-3-3 isoforms are expressed in most organisms and display redundancy in both sequence and function. Plants contain the largest number of 14-3-3 isoforms. For example, Arabidopsis thaliana contains thirteen 14-3-3 genes, each of which is expressed. Interest in the plant 14-3-3 field has swelled over the past decade, largely due to the vast number of possibilities for 14-3-3 metabolic regulation. As the field progresses, it is essential to understand these proteins' activities at both the spatiotemporal and subcellular levels. This review summarizes current knowledge of 14-3-3 proteins in plants, including 14-3-3 interactions, regulatory functions, isoform specificity, and post-translational modifications. We begin with a historical overview and structural analysis of 14-3-3 proteins, which describes the basic principles of 14-3-3 function, and then discuss interactions and regulatory effects of plant 14-3-3 proteins in specific tissues and subcellular compartments. We conclude with a summary of 14-3-3 phosphorylation and current knowledge of the functional effects of this modification in plants. PMID:27242818

  1. Thiazolides, a New Class of Anti-influenza Molecules Targeting Viral Hemagglutinin at the Post-translational Level*

    PubMed Central

    Rossignol, Jean François; La Frazia, Simone; Chiappa, Lucia; Ciucci, Alessandra; Santoro, M. Gabriella

    2009-01-01

    The emergence of highly contagious influenza A virus strains, such as the new H1N1 swine influenza, represents a serious threat to global human health. Efforts to control emerging influenza strains focus on surveillance and early diagnosis, as well as development of effective vaccines and novel antiviral drugs. Herein we document the anti-influenza activity of the anti-infective drug nitazoxanide and its active circulating-metabolite tizoxanide and describe a class of second generation thiazolides effective against influenza A virus. Thiazolides inhibit the replication of H1N1 and different other strains of influenza A virus by a novel mechanism: they act at post-translational level by selectively blocking the maturation of the viral hemagglutinin at a stage preceding resistance to endoglycosidase H digestion, thus impairing hemagglutinin intracellular trafficking and insertion into the host plasma membrane, a key step for correct assembly and exit of the virus from the host cell. Targeting the maturation of the viral glycoprotein offers the opportunity to disrupt the production of infectious viral particles attacking the pathogen at a level different from the currently available anti-influenza drugs. The results indicate that thiazolides may represent a new class of antiviral drugs effective against influenza A infection. PMID:19638339

  2. Mitochondrial dysfunction and tissue injury by alcohol, high fat, nonalcoholic substances and pathological conditions through post-translational protein modifications.

    PubMed

    Song, Byoung-Joon; Akbar, Mohammed; Abdelmegeed, Mohamed A; Byun, Kyunghee; Lee, Bonghee; Yoon, Seung Kew; Hardwick, James P

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are critically important in providing cellular energy ATP as well as their involvement in anti-oxidant defense, fat oxidation, intermediary metabolism and cell death processes. It is well-established that mitochondrial functions are suppressed when living cells or organisms are exposed to potentially toxic agents including alcohol, high fat diets, smoking and certain drugs or in many pathophysiological states through increased levels of oxidative/nitrative stress. Under elevated nitroxidative stress, cellular macromolecules proteins, DNA, and lipids can undergo different oxidative modifications, leading to disruption of their normal, sometimes critical, physiological functions. Recent reports also indicated that many mitochondrial proteins are modified via various post-translation modifications (PTMs) and primarily inactivated. Because of the recently-emerging information, in this review, we specifically focus on the mechanisms and roles of five major PTMs (namely oxidation, nitration, phosphorylation, acetylation, and adduct formation with lipid-peroxides, reactive metabolites, or advanced glycation end products) in experimental models of alcoholic and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease as well as acute hepatic injury caused by toxic compounds. We also highlight the role of the ethanol-inducible cytochrome P450-2E1 (CYP2E1) in some of these PTM changes. Finally, we discuss translational research opportunities with natural and/or synthetic anti-oxidants, which can prevent or delay the onset of mitochondrial dysfunction, fat accumulation and tissue injury.

  3. Post-translational modifications of plant cell wall proteins and peptides: A survey from a proteomics point of view.

    PubMed

    Canut, Hervé; Albenne, Cécile; Jamet, Elisabeth

    2016-08-01

    Plant cell wall proteins (CWPs) and peptides are important players in cell walls contributing to their assembly and their remodeling during development and in response to environmental constraints. Since the rise of proteomics technologies at the beginning of the 2000's, the knowledge of CWPs has greatly increased leading to the discovery of new CWP families and to the description of the cell wall proteomes of different organs of many plants. Conversely, cell wall peptidomics data are still lacking. In addition to the identification of CWPs and peptides by mass spectrometry (MS) and bioinformatics, proteomics has allowed to describe their post-translational modifications (PTMs). At present, the best known PTMs consist in proteolytic cleavage, N-glycosylation, hydroxylation of P residues into hydroxyproline residues (O), O-glycosylation and glypiation. In this review, the methods allowing the capture of the modified proteins based on the specific properties of their PTMs as well as the MS technologies used for their characterization are briefly described. A focus is done on proteolytic cleavage leading to protein maturation or release of signaling peptides and on O-glycosylation. Some new technologies, like top-down proteomics and terminomics, are described. They aim at a finer description of proteoforms resulting from PTMs or degradation mechanisms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Proteomics--a bridge between fundamental processes and crop production, edited by Dr. Hans-Peter Mock.

  4. Dimeric c-di-GMP is required for post-translational regulation of alginate production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Whitney, John C.; Robinson, Howard; Whitfield, Gregory B.; Marmont, Lindsey S.; Yip, Patrick; Neculai, A. Mirela; Lobsanov, Yuri D.; Ohman, Dennis E.; Howell, P. Lynne

    2015-05-15

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that secretes the exopolysaccharide alginate during infection of the respiratory tract of individuals afflicted with cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Among the proteins required for alginate production, Alg44 has been identified as an inner membrane protein whose bis-(3',5')-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) binding activity post-translationally regulates alginate secretion. In this study, we report the 1.8 Å crystal structure of the cytoplasmic region of Alg44 in complex with dimeric self-intercalated c-di-GMP and characterize its dinucleotide-binding site using mutational analysis. The structure shows that the c-di-GMP binding region of Alg44 adopts a PilZmore » domain fold with a dimerization mode not previously observed for this family of proteins. Moreover, calorimetric binding analysis of residues in the c-di-GMP binding site demonstrate that mutation of Arg-17 and Arg-95 alters the binding stoichiometry between c-di-GMP and Alg44 from 2:1 to 1:1. Introduction of these mutant alleles on the P. aeruginosa chromosome show that the residues required for binding of dimeric c-di-GMP in vitro are also required for efficient alginate production in vivo. Our results suggest that the dimeric form of c-di-GMP represents the biologically active signaling molecule needed for the secretion of an important virulence factor produced by P. aeruginosa.« less

  5. Rethinking gene regulatory networks in light of alternative splicing, intrinsically disordered protein domains, and post-translational modifications

    PubMed Central

    Niklas, Karl J.; Bondos, Sarah E.; Dunker, A. Keith; Newman, Stuart A.

    2015-01-01

    Models for genetic regulation and cell fate specification characteristically assume that gene regulatory networks (GRNs) are essentially deterministic and exhibit multiple stable states specifying alternative, but pre-figured cell fates. Mounting evidence shows, however, that most eukaryotic precursor RNAs undergo alternative splicing (AS) and that the majority of transcription factors contain intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) domains whose functionalities are context dependent as well as subject to post-translational modification (PTM). Consequently, many transcription factors do not have fixed cis-acting regulatory targets, and developmental determination by GRNs alone is untenable. Modeling these phenomena requires a multi-scale approach to explain how GRNs operationally interact with the intra- and intercellular environments. Evidence shows that AS, IDP, and PTM complicate gene expression and act synergistically to facilitate and promote time- and cell-specific protein modifications involved in cell signaling and cell fate specification and thereby disrupt a strict deterministic GRN-phenotype mapping. The combined effects of AS, IDP, and PTM give proteomes physiological plasticity, adaptive responsiveness, and developmental versatility without inefficiently expanding genome size. They also help us understand how protein functionalities can undergo major evolutionary changes by buffering mutational consequences. PMID:25767796

  6. Proteomic and Glycoproteomic Profilings Reveal That Post-translational Modifications of Toxins Contribute to Venom Phenotype in Snakes.

    PubMed

    Andrade-Silva, Débora; Zelanis, André; Kitano, Eduardo S; Junqueira-de-Azevedo, Inácio L M; Reis, Marcelo S; Lopes, Aline S; Serrano, Solange M T

    2016-08-01

    Snake venoms are biological weapon systems composed of secreted proteins and peptides that are used for immobilizing or killing prey. Although post-translational modifications are widely investigated because of their importance in many biological phenomena, we currently still have little understanding of how protein glycosylation impacts the variation and stability of venom proteomes. To address these issues, here we characterized the venom proteomes of seven Bothrops snakes using a shotgun proteomics strategy. Moreover, we compared the electrophoretic profiles of native and deglycosylated venoms and, in order to assess their subproteomes of glycoproteins, we identified the proteins with affinity for three lectins with different saccharide specificities and their putative glycosylation sites. As proteinases are abundant glycosylated toxins, we examined the effect of N-deglycosylation on their catalytic activities and show that the proteinases of the seven venoms were similarly affected by removal of N-glycans. Moreover, we prospected putative glycosylation sites of transcripts of a B. jararaca venom gland data set and detected toxin family related patterns of glycosylation. Based on our global analysis, we report that Bothrops venom proteomes and glycoproteomes contain a core of components that markedly define their composition, which is conserved upon evolution in parallel to other molecular markers that determine their phylogenetic classification. PMID:27297130

  7. Mitochondrial dysfunction and tissue injury by alcohol, high fat, nonalcoholic substances and pathological conditions through post-translational protein modifications

    PubMed Central

    Song, Byoung-Joon; Akbar, Mohammed; Abdelmegeed, Mohamed A.; Byun, Kyunghee; Lee, Bonghee; Yoon, Seung Kew; Hardwick, James P.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondria are critically important in providing cellular energy ATP as well as their involvement in anti-oxidant defense, fat oxidation, intermediary metabolism and cell death processes. It is well-established that mitochondrial functions are suppressed when living cells or organisms are exposed to potentially toxic agents including alcohol, high fat diets, smoking and certain drugs or in many pathophysiological states through increased levels of oxidative/nitrative stress. Under elevated nitroxidative stress, cellular macromolecules proteins, DNA, and lipids can undergo different oxidative modifications, leading to disruption of their normal, sometimes critical, physiological functions. Recent reports also indicated that many mitochondrial proteins are modified via various post-translation modifications (PTMs) and primarily inactivated. Because of the recently-emerging information, in this review, we specifically focus on the mechanisms and roles of five major PTMs (namely oxidation, nitration, phosphorylation, acetylation, and adduct formation with lipid-peroxides, reactive metabolites, or advanced glycation end products) in experimental models of alcoholic and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease as well as acute hepatic injury caused by toxic compounds. We also highlight the role of the ethanol-inducible cytochrome P450-2E1 (CYP2E1) in some of these PTM changes. Finally, we discuss translational research opportunities with natural and/or synthetic anti-oxidants, which can prevent or delay the onset of mitochondrial dysfunction, fat accumulation and tissue injury. PMID:25465468

  8. The post-translational modification of the Clostridium difficile flagellin affects motility, cell surface properties and virulence

    PubMed Central

    Faulds-Pain, Alexandra; Twine, Susan M; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Strong, Philippa C R; Dell, Anne; Buckley, Anthony M; Douce, Gillian R; Valiente, Esmeralda; Logan, Susan M; Wren, Brendan W

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is a prominent nosocomial pathogen, proliferating and causing enteric disease in individuals with a compromised gut microflora. We characterized the post-translational modification of flagellin in C. difficile 630. The structure of the modification was solved by nuclear magnetic resonance and shown to contain an N-acetylglucosamine substituted with a phosphorylated N-methyl-l-threonine. A reverse genetics approach investigated the function of the putative four-gene modification locus. All mutants were found to have truncated glycan structures by LC-MS/MS, taking into account bioinformatic analysis, we propose that the open reading frame CD0241 encodes a kinase involved in the transfer of the phosphate to the threonine, the CD0242 protein catalyses the addition of the phosphothreonine to the N-acetylglucosamine moiety and CD0243 transfers the methyl group to the threonine. Some mutations affected motility and caused cells to aggregate to each other and abiotic surfaces. Altering the structure of the flagellin modification impacted on colonization and disease recurrence in a murine model of infection, showing that alterations in the surface architecture of C. difficile vegetative cells can play a significant role in disease. We show that motility is not a requirement for colonization, but that colonization was compromised when the glycan structure was incomplete. PMID:25135277

  9. ISPTM: an iterative search algorithm for systematic identification of post-translational modifications from complex proteome mixtures.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin; Huang, Lin; Peng, Hong; Guru, Ashu; Xue, Weihua; Hong, Sang Yong; Liu, Miao; Sharma, Seema; Fu, Kai; Caprez, Adam P; Swanson, David R; Zhang, Zhixin; Ding, Shi-Jian

    2013-09-01

    Identifying protein post-translational modifications (PTMs) from tandem mass spectrometry data of complex proteome mixtures is a highly challenging task. Here we present a new strategy, named iterative search for identifying PTMs (ISPTM), for tackling this challenge. The ISPTM approach consists of a basic search with no variable modification, followed by iterative searches of many PTMs using a small number of them (usually two) in each search. The performance of the ISPTM approach was evaluated on mixtures of 70 synthetic peptides with known modifications, on an 18-protein standard mixture with unknown modifications and on real, complex biological samples of mouse nuclear matrix proteins with unknown modifications. ISPTM revealed that many chemical PTMs were introduced by urea and iodoacetamide during sample preparation and many biological PTMs, including dimethylation of arginine and lysine, were significantly activated by Adriamycin treatment in nuclear matrix associated proteins. ISPTM increased the MS/MS spectral identification rate substantially, displayed significantly better sensitivity for systematic PTM identification compared with that of the conventional all-in-one search approach, and offered PTM identification results that were complementary to InsPecT and MODa, both of which are established PTM identification algorithms. In summary, ISPTM is a new and powerful tool for unbiased identification of many different PTMs with high confidence from complex proteome mixtures.

  10. The leader peptide is essential for the post-translational modification of the DNA-gyrase inhibitor microcin B17.

    PubMed

    Madison, L L; Vivas, E I; Li, Y M; Walsh, C T; Kolter, R

    1997-01-01

    Microcin B17 (MccB17) is a ribosomally encoded DNA-gyrase inhibitor. Ribosomally encoded antibiotics are derived from precursors containing an N-terminal leader, which is removed during maturation, and a C-terminal structural peptide. PreMccB17, the translational product of mcbA, is modified into proMccB17 by the action of three enzymes, McbB, McbC, and McbD. A chromosomally encoded peptidase then converts proMccB17 into MccB17. The role of McbB, McbC, and McbD is to convert glycine, cysteine, and serine residues present in preMccB17 into four thiazole and four oxazole rings. Using a modification-specific antibody rather than antimicrobial activity, we show that the 26-amino-acid N-terminal leader of preMccB17 is essential for the conversion of preMccB17 into proMccB17. Neither a preMccB17 peptide lacking the leader nor a preMccB17-beta-galactosidase fusion lacking the leader are post-translationally modified.

  11. The post-translational modification of the Clostridium difficile flagellin affects motility, cell surface properties and virulence.

    PubMed

    Faulds-Pain, Alexandra; Twine, Susan M; Vinogradov, Evgeny; Strong, Philippa C R; Dell, Anne; Buckley, Anthony M; Douce, Gillian R; Valiente, Esmeralda; Logan, Susan M; Wren, Brendan W

    2014-10-01

    Clostridium difficile is a prominent nosocomial pathogen, proliferating and causing enteric disease in individuals with a compromised gut microflora. We characterized the post-translational modification of flagellin in C. difficile 630. The structure of the modification was solved by nuclear magnetic resonance and shown to contain an N-acetylglucosamine substituted with a phosphorylated N-methyl-l-threonine. A reverse genetics approach investigated the function of the putative four-gene modification locus. All mutants were found to have truncated glycan structures by LC-MS/MS, taking into account bioinformatic analysis, we propose that the open reading frame CD0241 encodes a kinase involved in the transfer of the phosphate to the threonine, the CD0242 protein catalyses the addition of the phosphothreonine to the N-acetylglucosamine moiety and CD0243 transfers the methyl group to the threonine. Some mutations affected motility and caused cells to aggregate to each other and abiotic surfaces. Altering the structure of the flagellin modification impacted on colonization and disease recurrence in a murine model of infection, showing that alterations in the surface architecture of C. difficile vegetative cells can play a significant role in disease. We show that motility is not a requirement for colonization, but that colonization was compromised when the glycan structure was incomplete. PMID:25135277

  12. ISPTM: an Iterative Search Algorithm for Systematic Identification of Post-translational Modifications from Complex Proteome Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xin; Huang, Lin; Peng, Hong; Guru, Ashu; Xue, Weihua; Hong, Sang Yong; Liu, Miao; Sharma, Seema; Fu, Kai; Caprez, Adam; Swanson, David; Zhang, Zhixin; Ding, Shi-Jian

    2013-01-01

    Identifying protein post-translational modifications (PTMs) from tandem mass spectrometry data of complex proteome mixtures is a highly challenging task. Here we present a new strategy, named iterative search for identifying PTMs (ISPTM), for tackling this challenge. The ISPTM approach consists of a basic search with no variable modification, followed by iterative searches of many PTMs using a small number of them (usually two) in each search. The performance of the ISPTM approach was evaluated on mixtures of 70 synthetic peptides with known modifications, on an 18-protein standard mixture with unknown modifications and on real, complex biological samples of mouse nuclear matrix proteins with unknown modifications. ISPTM revealed that many chemical PTMs were introduced by urea and iodoacetamide during sample preparation and many biological PTMs, including dimethylation of arginine and lysine, were significantly activated by Adriamycin treatment in NM associated proteins. ISPTM increased the MS/MS spectral identification rate substantially, displayed significantly better sensitivity for systematic PTM identification than the conventional all-in-one search approach and offered PTM identification results that were complementary to InsPecT and MODa, both of which are established PTM identification algorithms. In summary, ISPTM is a new and powerful tool for unbiased identification of many different PTMs with high confidence from complex proteome mixtures. PMID:23919725

  13. Structure, function, and post-translational regulation of the catalytic and modifier subunits of glutamate cysteine ligase

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Christopher C.; Backos, Donald S.; Mohar, Isaac; White, Collin C.; Forman, Henry J.; Kavanagh, Terrance J.

    2009-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) is a tripeptide composed of glutamate, cysteine, and glycine. The first and rate-limiting step in GSH synthesis is catalyzed by glutamate cysteine ligase (GCL, previously known as γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase). GCL is a heterodimeric protein composed of catalytic (GCLC) and modifier (GCLM) subunits that are expressed from different genes. GCLC catalyzes a unique γ-carboxyl linkage from glutamate to cysteine and requires ATP and Mg++ as cofactors in this reaction. GCLM increases the Vmax and Kcat of GCLC, decreases the Km for glutamate and ATP, and increases the Ki for GSH-mediated feedback inhibition of GCL. While post-translational modifications of GCLC (e.g. phosphorylation, myristoylation, caspase-mediated cleavage) have modest effects on GCL activity, oxidative stress dramatically affects GCL holoenzyme formation and activity. Pyridine nucleotides can also modulate GCL activity in some species. Variability in GCL expression is associated with several disease phenotypes and transgenic mouse and rat models promise to be highly useful for investigating the relationships between GCL activity, GSH synthesis, and disease in humans. PMID:18812186

  14. Dimeric c-di-GMP is required for post-translational regulation of alginate production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Whitney, John C; Whitfield, Gregory B; Marmont, Lindsey S; Yip, Patrick; Neculai, A Mirela; Lobsanov, Yuri D; Robinson, Howard; Ohman, Dennis E; Howell, P Lynne

    2015-05-15

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that secretes the exopolysaccharide alginate during infection of the respiratory tract of individuals afflicted with cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Among the proteins required for alginate production, Alg44 has been identified as an inner membrane protein whose bis-(3',5')-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) binding activity post-translationally regulates alginate secretion. In this study, we report the 1.8 Å crystal structure of the cytoplasmic region of Alg44 in complex with dimeric self-intercalated c-di-GMP and characterize its dinucleotide-binding site using mutational analysis. The structure shows that the c-di-GMP binding region of Alg44 adopts a PilZ domain fold with a dimerization mode not previously observed for this family of proteins. Calorimetric binding analysis of residues in the c-di-GMP binding site demonstrate that mutation of Arg-17 and Arg-95 alters the binding stoichiometry between c-di-GMP and Alg44 from 2:1 to 1:1. Introduction of these mutant alleles on the P. aeruginosa chromosome show that the residues required for binding of dimeric c-di-GMP in vitro are also required for efficient alginate production in vivo. These results suggest that the dimeric form of c-di-GMP represents the biologically active signaling molecule needed for the secretion of an important virulence factor produced by P. aeruginosa.

  15. POTAMOS mass spectrometry calculator: computer aided mass spectrometry to the post-translational modifications of proteins. A focus on histones.

    PubMed

    Vlachopanos, A; Soupsana, E; Politou, A S; Papamokos, G V

    2014-12-01

    Mass spectrometry is a widely used technique for protein identification and it has also become the method of choice in order to detect and characterize the post-translational modifications (PTMs) of proteins. Many software tools have been developed to deal with this complication. In this paper we introduce a new, free and user friendly online software tool, named POTAMOS Mass Spectrometry Calculator, which was developed in the open source application framework Ruby on Rails. It can provide calculated mass spectrometry data in a time saving manner, independently of instrumentation. In this web application we have focused on a well known protein family of histones whose PTMs are believed to play a crucial role in gene regulation, as suggested by the so called "histone code" hypothesis. The PTMs implemented in this software are: methylations of arginines and lysines, acetylations of lysines and phosphorylations of serines and threonines. The application is able to calculate the kind, the number and the combinations of the possible PTMs corresponding to a given peptide sequence and a given mass along with the full set of the unique primary structures produced by the possible distributions along the amino acid sequence. It can also calculate the masses and charges of a fragmented histone variant, which carries predefined modifications already implemented. Additional functionality is provided by the calculation of the masses of fragments produced upon protein cleavage by the proteolytic enzymes that are most widely used in proteomics studies. PMID:25450216

  16. POTAMOS mass spectrometry calculator: computer aided mass spectrometry to the post-translational modifications of proteins. A focus on histones.

    PubMed

    Vlachopanos, A; Soupsana, E; Politou, A S; Papamokos, G V

    2014-12-01

    Mass spectrometry is a widely used technique for protein identification and it has also become the method of choice in order to detect and characterize the post-translational modifications (PTMs) of proteins. Many software tools have been developed to deal with this complication. In this paper we introduce a new, free and user friendly online software tool, named POTAMOS Mass Spectrometry Calculator, which was developed in the open source application framework Ruby on Rails. It can provide calculated mass spectrometry data in a time saving manner, independently of instrumentation. In this web application we have focused on a well known protein family of histones whose PTMs are believed to play a crucial role in gene regulation, as suggested by the so called "histone code" hypothesis. The PTMs implemented in this software are: methylations of arginines and lysines, acetylations of lysines and phosphorylations of serines and threonines. The application is able to calculate the kind, the number and the combinations of the possible PTMs corresponding to a given peptide sequence and a given mass along with the full set of the unique primary structures produced by the possible distributions along the amino acid sequence. It can also calculate the masses and charges of a fragmented histone variant, which carries predefined modifications already implemented. Additional functionality is provided by the calculation of the masses of fragments produced upon protein cleavage by the proteolytic enzymes that are most widely used in proteomics studies.

  17. Dimeric c-di-GMP Is Required for Post-translational Regulation of Alginate Production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa*

    PubMed Central

    Whitney, John C.; Whitfield, Gregory B.; Marmont, Lindsey S.; Yip, Patrick; Neculai, A. Mirela; Lobsanov, Yuri D.; Robinson, Howard; Ohman, Dennis E.; Howell, P. Lynne

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic human pathogen that secretes the exopolysaccharide alginate during infection of the respiratory tract of individuals afflicted with cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Among the proteins required for alginate production, Alg44 has been identified as an inner membrane protein whose bis-(3′,5′)-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) binding activity post-translationally regulates alginate secretion. In this study, we report the 1.8 Å crystal structure of the cytoplasmic region of Alg44 in complex with dimeric self-intercalated c-di-GMP and characterize its dinucleotide-binding site using mutational analysis. The structure shows that the c-di-GMP binding region of Alg44 adopts a PilZ domain fold with a dimerization mode not previously observed for this family of proteins. Calorimetric binding analysis of residues in the c-di-GMP binding site demonstrate that mutation of Arg-17 and Arg-95 alters the binding stoichiometry between c-di-GMP and Alg44 from 2:1 to 1:1. Introduction of these mutant alleles on the P. aeruginosa chromosome show that the residues required for binding of dimeric c-di-GMP in vitro are also required for efficient alginate production in vivo. These results suggest that the dimeric form of c-di-GMP represents the biologically active signaling molecule needed for the secretion of an important virulence factor produced by P. aeruginosa. PMID:25817996

  18. Stat5 signaling specifies basal versus stress erythropoietic responses through distinct binary and graded dynamic modalities.

    PubMed

    Porpiglia, Ermelinda; Hidalgo, Daniel; Koulnis, Miroslav; Tzafriri, Abraham R; Socolovsky, Merav

    2012-08-01

    Erythropoietin (Epo)-induced Stat5 phosphorylation (p-Stat5) is essential for both basal erythropoiesis and for its acceleration during hypoxic stress. A key challenge lies in understanding how Stat5 signaling elicits distinct functions during basal and stress erythropoiesis. Here we asked whether these distinct functions might be specified by the dynamic behavior of the Stat5 signal. We used flow cytometry to analyze Stat5 phosphorylation dynamics in primary erythropoietic tissue in vivo and in vitro, identifying two signaling modalities. In later (basophilic) erythroblasts, Epo stimulation triggers a low intensity but decisive, binary (digital) p-Stat5 signal. In early erythroblasts the binary signal is superseded by a high-intensity graded (analog) p-Stat5 response. We elucidated the biological functions of binary and graded Stat5 signaling using the EpoR-HM mice, which express a "knocked-in" EpoR mutant lacking cytoplasmic phosphotyrosines. Strikingly, EpoR-HM mice are restricted to the binary signaling mode, which rescues these mice from fatal perinatal anemia by promoting binary survival decisions in erythroblasts. However, the absence of the graded p-Stat5 response in the EpoR-HM mice prevents them from accelerating red cell production in response to stress, including a failure to upregulate the transferrin receptor, which we show is a novel stress target. We found that Stat5 protein levels decline with erythroblast differentiation, governing the transition from high-intensity graded signaling in early erythroblasts to low-intensity binary signaling in later erythroblasts. Thus, using exogenous Stat5, we converted later erythroblasts into high-intensity graded signal transducers capable of eliciting a downstream stress response. Unlike the Stat5 protein, EpoR expression in erythroblasts does not limit the Stat5 signaling response, a non-Michaelian paradigm with therapeutic implications in myeloproliferative disease. Our findings show how the binary and

  19. Cortical Layer 1 and Layer 2/3 Astrocytes Exhibit Distinct Calcium Dynamics In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Takata, Norio; Hirase, Hajime

    2008-01-01

    Cumulative evidence supports bidirectional interactions between astrocytes and neurons, suggesting glial involvement of neuronal information processing in the brain. Cytosolic calcium (Ca2+) concentration is important for astrocytes as Ca2+ surges co-occur with gliotransmission and neurotransmitter reception. Cerebral cortex is organized in layers which are characterized by distinct cytoarchitecture. We asked if astrocyte-dominant layer 1 (L1) of the somatosensory cortex was different from layer 2/3 (L2/3) in spontaneous astrocytic Ca2+ activity and if it was influenced by background neural activity. Using a two-photon laser scanning microscope, we compared spontaneous Ca2+ activity of astrocytic somata and processes in L1 and L2/3 of anesthetized mature rat somatosensory cortex. We also assessed the contribution of background neural activity to the spontaneous astrocytic Ca2+ dynamics by investigating two distinct EEG states (“synchronized” vs. “de-synchronized” states). We found that astrocytes in L1 had nearly twice higher Ca2+ activity than L2/3. Furthermore, Ca2+ fluctuations of processes within an astrocyte were independent in L1 while those in L2/3 were synchronous. Pharmacological blockades of metabotropic receptors for glutamate, ATP, and acetylcholine, as well as suppression of action potentials did not have a significant effect on the spontaneous somatic Ca2+ activity. These results suggest that spontaneous astrocytic Ca2+ surges occurred in large part intrinsically, rather than neural activity-driven. Our findings propose a new functional segregation of layer 1 and 2/3 that is defined by autonomous astrocytic activity. PMID:18575586

  20. Ecological Dynamics of Two Distinct Viruses Infecting Marine Eukaryotic Decomposer Thraustochytrids (Labyrinthulomycetes, Stramenopiles).

    PubMed

    Takao, Yoshitake; Tomaru, Yuji; Nagasaki, Keizo; Honda, Daiske

    2015-01-01

    Thraustochytrids are cosmopolitan osmotrophic or heterotrophic microorganisms that are considered as important decomposers in coastal ecosystems. However, because of a lack of estimation method for each genus or systematic group of them, relatively little is known about their ecology in situ. Previously, we reported two distinct types of virus infecting thraustochytrids (AuRNAV: reported as SssRNAV, and SmDNAV) suggesting they have wide distributions in the host-virus systems of coastal environments. Here we conducted a field survey from 2004 through 2005 to show the fluctuation pattern of thraustochytrids and their viruses in Hiroshima Bay, Japan. During the field survey, we monitored the dynamics of the two types of thraustochytrid-infecting virus: small viruses causing lysis of Aurantiochytrium sp. NIBH N1-27 (identified as AuRNAV) and the large viruses of Sicyoidochytrium minutum NBRC 102975 (similar to SmDNAV in physiology and morphology). Fluctuation patterns of the two distinct types of virus were different from each other. This may reflect the difference in the preference of organic substrates; i.e., it may be likely the host of AuRNAV (Aurantiochytrium sp.) increases utilizing algal dead bodies or feeble cells as the virus shows a large increase in abundance following raphidophyte blooms; whereas, the trophic nutrient supply for S. minutum may primarily depend on other constantly-supplied organic compounds because it did not show any significant change in abundance throughout the survey. Further study concerning the population composition of thraustochytrids and their viruses may demonstrate the microbial ecology (especially concerning the detrital food web) of marine environments. PMID:26203654

  1. Atomic-Scale Molecular Dynamics Simulations of DNA-Polycation Complexes: Two Distinct Binding Patterns.

    PubMed

    Kondinskaia, Diana A; Kostritskii, Andrei Yu; Nesterenko, Alexey M; Antipina, Alexandra Yu; Gurtovenko, Andrey A

    2016-07-14

    Synthetic cationic polymers represent a promising class of delivery vectors for gene therapy. Here, we employ atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to gain insight into the structure and properties of complexes of DNA with four linear polycations: polyethylenimine (PEI), poly-l-lysine (PLL), polyvinylamine (PVA), and polyallylamine (PAA). These polycations differ in their polymer geometries, protonation states, and hydrophobicities of their backbone chains. Overall, our results demonstrate for the first time the existence of two distinct patterns of binding of DNA with polycations. For PEI, PLL, and PAA, the complex is stabilized by the electrostatic attraction between protonated amine groups of the polycation and phosphate groups of DNA. In contrast, PVA demonstrates an alternative binding pattern as it gets embedded into the DNA major groove. It is likely that both the polymer topology and affinity of the backbone chain of PVA to the DNA groove are responsible for such behavior. The differences in binding patterns can have important biomedical implications: embedding PVA into a DNA groove makes it less sensitive to changes in the aqueous environment (pH level, ionic strength, etc.) and could therefore hinder the intracellular release of genetic material from a delivery vector, leading to lower transfection activity. PMID:27280954

  2. Enhanced Methylarginine Characterization by Post-Translational Modification-Specific Targeted Data Acquisition and Electron-Transfer Dissociation Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart-Smith, Gene; Low, Jason K. K.; Erce, Melissa A.; Wilkins, Marc R.

    2012-08-01

    When localizing protein post-translational modifications (PTMs) using liquid-chromatography (LC)-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS), existing implementations are limited by inefficient selection of PTM-carrying peptides for MS/MS, particularly when PTM site occupancy is sub-stoichiometric. The present contribution describes a method by which peptides carrying specific PTMs of interest—in this study, methylarginines—may be selectively targeted for MS/MS: peptide features are extracted from high mass accuracy single-stage MS data, searched against theoretical PTM-carrying peptide masses, and matching features are subjected to targeted data acquisition LC-MS/MS. Using trypsin digested Saccharomyces cerevisiae Npl3, in which evidence is presented for 18 methylarginine sites—17 of which fall within a glycine-arginine-rich (GAR) domain spanning <120 amino acids—it is shown that this approach outperforms conventional data dependent acquisition (DDA): when applied to a complex protein mixture featuring in vivo methylated Npl3, 95 % more ( P = 0.030) methylarginine-carrying peptides are selected for MS/MS than DDA, leading to an 86 % increase ( P = 0.044) in the number of methylated peptides producing Mascot ion scores ≥20 following electron-transfer dissociation (ETD). Notably, significantly more low abundance arginine methylated peptides (maximum ion intensities <6 × 104 cps) are selected for MS/MS using this approach relative to DDA (50 % more in a digest of purified in vitro methylated Npl3). It is also demonstrated that relative to collision-induced dissociation (CID), ETD facilitates a 586 % increase ( P = 0.016) in average Mascot ion scores of methylarginine-carrying peptides. The present PTM-specific targeted data acquisition approach, though described using methylarginine, is applicable to any ionizable PTM of known mass.

  3. dbPTM 2016: 10-year anniversary of a resource for post-translational modification of proteins.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kai-Yao; Su, Min-Gang; Kao, Hui-Ju; Hsieh, Yun-Chung; Jhong, Jhih-Hua; Cheng, Kuang-Hao; Huang, Hsien-Da; Lee, Tzong-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Owing to the importance of the post-translational modifications (PTMs) of proteins in regulating biological processes, the dbPTM (http://dbPTM.mbc.nctu.edu.tw/) was developed as a comprehensive database of experimentally verified PTMs from several databases with annotations of potential PTMs for all UniProtKB protein entries. For this 10th anniversary of dbPTM, the updated resource provides not only a comprehensive dataset of experimentally verified PTMs, supported by the literature, but also an integrative interface for accessing all available databases and tools that are associated with PTM analysis. As well as collecting experimental PTM data from 14 public databases, this update manually curates over 12 000 modified peptides, including the emerging S-nitrosylation, S-glutathionylation and succinylation, from approximately 500 research articles, which were retrieved by text mining. As the number of available PTM prediction methods increases, this work compiles a non-homologous benchmark dataset to evaluate the predictive power of online PTM prediction tools. An increasing interest in the structural investigation of PTM substrate sites motivated the mapping of all experimental PTM peptides to protein entries of Protein Data Bank (PDB) based on database identifier and sequence identity, which enables users to examine spatially neighboring amino acids, solvent-accessible surface area and side-chain orientations for PTM substrate sites on tertiary structures. Since drug binding in PDB is annotated, this update identified over 1100 PTM sites that are associated with drug binding. The update also integrates metabolic pathways and protein-protein interactions to support the PTM network analysis for a group of proteins. Finally, the web interface is redesigned and enhanced to facilitate access to this resource.

  4. dbPTM 2016: 10-year anniversary of a resource for post-translational modification of proteins.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kai-Yao; Su, Min-Gang; Kao, Hui-Ju; Hsieh, Yun-Chung; Jhong, Jhih-Hua; Cheng, Kuang-Hao; Huang, Hsien-Da; Lee, Tzong-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Owing to the importance of the post-translational modifications (PTMs) of proteins in regulating biological processes, the dbPTM (http://dbPTM.mbc.nctu.edu.tw/) was developed as a comprehensive database of experimentally verified PTMs from several databases with annotations of potential PTMs for all UniProtKB protein entries. For this 10th anniversary of dbPTM, the updated resource provides not only a comprehensive dataset of experimentally verified PTMs, supported by the literature, but also an integrative interface for accessing all available databases and tools that are associated with PTM analysis. As well as collecting experimental PTM data from 14 public databases, this update manually curates over 12 000 modified peptides, including the emerging S-nitrosylation, S-glutathionylation and succinylation, from approximately 500 research articles, which were retrieved by text mining. As the number of available PTM prediction methods increases, this work compiles a non-homologous benchmark dataset to evaluate the predictive power of online PTM prediction tools. An increasing interest in the structural investigation of PTM substrate sites motivated the mapping of all experimental PTM peptides to protein entries of Protein Data Bank (PDB) based on database identifier and sequence identity, which enables users to examine spatially neighboring amino acids, solvent-accessible surface area and side-chain orientations for PTM substrate sites on tertiary structures. Since drug binding in PDB is annotated, this update identified over 1100 PTM sites that are associated with drug binding. The update also integrates metabolic pathways and protein-protein interactions to support the PTM network analysis for a group of proteins. Finally, the web interface is redesigned and enhanced to facilitate access to this resource. PMID:26578568

  5. USP2-45 Is a Circadian Clock Output Effector Regulating Calcium Absorption at the Post-Translational Level

    PubMed Central

    Pouly, Daniel; Chenaux, Sébastien; Martin, Virginie; Babis, Maja; Koch, Rafael; Nagoshi, Emi; Katanaev, Vladimir L.; Gachon, Frédéric; Staub, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian circadian clock influences most aspects of physiology and behavior through the transcriptional control of a wide variety of genes, mostly in a tissue-specific manner. About 20 clock-controlled genes (CCGs) oscillate in virtually all mammalian tissues and are generally considered as core clock components. One of them is Ubiquitin-Specific Protease 2 (Usp2), whose status remains controversial, as it may be a cogwheel regulating the stability or activity of core cogwheels or an output effector. We report here that Usp2 is a clock output effector related to bodily Ca2+ homeostasis, a feature that is conserved across evolution. Drosophila with a whole-body knockdown of the orthologue of Usp2, CG14619 (dUsp2-kd), predominantly die during pupation but are rescued by dietary Ca2+ supplementation. Usp2-KO mice show hyperabsorption of dietary Ca2+ in small intestine, likely due to strong overexpression of the membrane scaffold protein NHERF4, a regulator of the Ca2+ channel TRPV6 mediating dietary Ca2+ uptake. In this tissue, USP2-45 is found in membrane fractions and negatively regulates NHERF4 protein abundance in a rhythmic manner at the protein level. In clock mutant animals (Cry1/Cry2-dKO), rhythmic USP2-45 expression is lost, as well as the one of NHERF4, confirming the inverse relationship between USP2-45 and NHERF4 protein levels. Finally, USP2-45 interacts in vitro with NHERF4 and endogenous Clathrin Heavy Chain. Taken together these data prompt us to define USP2-45 as the first clock output effector acting at the post-translational level at cell membranes and possibly regulating membrane permeability of Ca2+. PMID:26756164

  6. MeCP2 post-translational modifications: a mechanism to control its involvement in synaptic plasticity and homeostasis?

    PubMed Central

    Bellini, Elisa; Pavesi, Giulio; Barbiero, Isabella; Bergo, Anna; Chandola, Chetan; Nawaz, Mohammad S.; Rusconi, Laura; Stefanelli, Gilda; Strollo, Marta; Valente, Maria M.; Kilstrup-Nielsen, Charlotte; Landsberger, Nicoletta

    2014-01-01

    Although Rett syndrome (RTT) represents one of the most frequent forms of severe intellectual disability in females worldwide, we still have an inadequate knowledge of the many roles played by MeCP2 (whose mutations are responsible for most cases of RTT) and their relevance for RTT pathobiology. Several studies support a role of MeCP2 in the regulation of synaptic plasticity and homeostasis. At the molecular level, MeCP2 is described as a repressor capable of inhibiting gene transcription through chromatin compaction. Indeed, it interacts with several chromatin remodeling factors, such as HDAC-containing complexes and ATRX. Other studies have inferred that MeCP2 functions also as an activator; a role in regulating mRNA splicing and in modulating protein synthesis has also been proposed. Further, MeCP2 avidly binds both 5-methyl- and 5-hydroxymethyl-cytosine. Recent evidence suggests that it is the highly disorganized structure of MeCP2, together with its post-translational modifications (PTMs) that generate and regulate this functional versatility. Indeed, several reports have demonstrated that differential phosphorylation of MeCP2 is a key mechanism by which the methyl binding protein modulates its affinity for its partners, gene expression and cellular adaptations to stimuli and neuronal plasticity. As logic consequence, generation of phospho-defective Mecp2 knock-in mice has permitted associating alterations in neuronal morphology, circuit formation, and mouse behavioral phenotypes with specific phosphorylation events. MeCP2 undergoes various other PTMs, including acetylation, ubiquitination and sumoylation, whose functional roles remain largely unexplored. These results, together with the genome-wide distribution of MeCP2 and its capability to substitute histone H1, recall the complex regulation of histones and suggest the relevance of quickly gaining a deeper comprehension of MeCP2 PTMs, the respective writers and readers and the consequent functional outcomes

  7. Post-translational modification of H-Ras is required for activation of, but not for association with, B-Raf.

    PubMed

    Okada, T; Masuda, T; Shinkai, M; Kariya, K; Kataoka, T

    1996-03-01

    B-Raf is regulated by Ras protein and acts as a mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase kinase kinase in PC12 cells and brain. Ras protein undergoes a series of post-translational modifications on its C-terminal CAAX motif, and the modifications are critical for its function. To elucidate the role of the post-translational modifications in interaction with, and activation of, B-Raf, we have analyzed a direct association between H-Ras and B-Raf, and constructed an in vitro system for B-Raf activation by H-Ras. By using methods based on inhibition of yeast adenylyl cyclase or RasGAP activity and by in vitro binding assays, we have shown that the segment of B-Raf corresponding to amino acid 1-326 binds directly to H-Ras with a dissociation constant (Kd) comparable to that of Raf-1 and that the binding is not significantly affected by the post-translational modifications. However, when the activity of B-Raf to stimulate MAP kinase was measured by using a cell-free system derived from rat brain cytosol, we observed that the unmodified form of H-Ras possesses an almost negligible activity to activate B-Raf in vitro compared to the fully modified form. H-RasSer-181,184 mutant, which was farnesylated but not palmitoylated, was equally active as the fully modified form. These results indicate that the post-translational modifications, especially farnesylation, are required for H-Ras to activate B-Raf even though they have no apparent effect on the binding properties of H-Ras to B-Raf.

  8. PTMSearchPlus: Software Tool for Automated Protein Identification and Post-Translational and Post-Translational Modification Characterization by Integrating Accurate Intact Protein Mass and Bottom-Up Mass Spectrometric Data Searches

    SciTech Connect

    Kertesz, Vilmos; Connelly, Heather M; Erickson, Brian K; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L

    2009-01-01

    PTMSearchPlus is a software tool for the automated integration of accurate intact protein mass (AIPM) and bottom-up (BU) mass spectra searches/data in order to both confidently identify the intact proteins and to characterize their post-translational modifications (PTMs). The development of PTMSearchPlus was motivated by the desire to effectively integrate high-resolution intact protein molecular masses with bottom-up peptide MS/MS data. PTMSearchPlus requires as input both intact protein and proteolytic peptide mass spectra collected from the same protein mixture, a FASTA protein database, and a selection of possible PTMs, the types and ranges of which can be specified. The output of PTMSearchPlus is a list of intact and modified proteins matching the AIPM data concomitant with their respective peptides found by the BU search. This list also contains protein and peptide sequence coverage information, scores, etc. that can be used for further evaluation or refiltering of the results. Corresponding and annotated AIPM and BU mass spectra are also displayed for visual inspection when a listed protein or a peptide is selected. These and other controls ensure that the user can manually evaluate, modify (e.g., remove obvious false positives, low quality spectra etc.), and save the results of the automated search if necessary. Driven by the exponential growth in the number of possible peptide candidates in a BU search when multiple PTMs are probed, the advantages on search speed by limiting the total number of possible PTMs on a peptide in the BU search or by performing an AIPM predicted BU search are also discussed in addition to the integration approach. The features of PTMSearchPlus are demonstrated using both a protein standard mixture and a complex protein mixture from Escherichia coli. Experimental data revealed a unique advantage of coupling AIPM and the BU data sets that is mutually beneficial for both approaches. Namely, AIPM data can confirm that no PTM peptides

  9. Post-translational regulation of RORγt-A therapeutic target for the modulation of interleukin-17-mediated responses in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Rutz, Sascha; Eidenschenk, Celine; Kiefer, James R; Ouyang, Wenjun

    2016-08-01

    Retinoic acid-related orphan receptor gamma t (RORγt) is a nuclear receptor, which is selectively expressed by various lymphocytes. RORγt is critical for the development of secondary and tertiary lymphoid organs, and for the thymic development of the T cell lineage. RORγt has been extensively studied as the master transcription factor of IL-17 expression and Th17 cells, which are strongly associated with various inflammatory and autoimmune conditions. Given its essential role in promoting pro-inflammatory responses, it is not surprising that the expression of RORγt is tightly controlled. By its nature as a nuclear receptor, RORγt activity is also regulated in a ligand-dependent manner, which makes it an attractive drug target. In addition, multiple post-translational mechanisms, including post-translational modifications, such as acetylation and ubiquitinylation, as well as interactions with various co-factors, modulate RORγt function. Here we attempt a comprehensive review of the post-translational regulation of RORγt, an area that holds the potential to transform the way we target the RORγt/IL-17 pathway, by enabling the development of safe and highly selective modulators of RORγt activity. PMID:27481185

  10. Distinctive patterns of static and dynamic gamma motor activity during locomotion in the decerebrate cat.

    PubMed

    Taylor, A; Ellaway, P H; Durbaba, R; Rawlinson, S

    2000-12-15

    Simultaneous recordings were made from gamma (gamma) motor axons and from muscle spindle afferents of the medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscle during locomotion in decerebrate cats. The gamma-neurons were identified as static or dynamic (gammas or gammad) by correlating their behaviour during midbrain stimulation with changes in muscle spindle afferent responses to muscle stretch. On the basis of their behaviour during locomotion, gammas neurons could be divided into two groups. One group (type-1) showed strongly and smoothly modulated discharge increasing in parallel with the active muscle shortening in ankle extension, but with phase advance. The other group (type-2) also showed a modulated pattern, but with increased firing centred on the flexion phase. The proportions of the two were 13 type-1 and 7 type-2. The type-1 firing pattern accurately predicted the difference in firing frequency for secondary afferents obtained by subtracting from the recordings made during active movements the response of the same units to the movements repeated passively in the absence of fusimotor activity. The type-2 pattern also became consistent with the difference signal, when operated on by a phase lag appropriate to the effects of bag2 intrafusal fibres. These results suggest that there may be some degree of separate control of chain and bag2 intrafusal fibres. The discharge of gammad axons was also found to fluctuate with the locomotor cycle, with a pattern very distinct from that of the gammas records. The gammad firing frequency rose very suddenly from zero to a maximum at the onset of muscle shortening and continued into the beginning of lengthening. The term 'interrupted' discharge is suggested as a useful description. The timing of this discharge was shown to be appropriate for sensitising the primary afferents to detect the onset of stretch.

  11. Canavanine Alters ROS/RNS Level and Leads to Post-translational Modification of Proteins in Roots of Tomato Seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Krasuska, Urszula; Andrzejczak, Olga; Staszek, Paweł; Bogatek, Renata; Gniazdowska, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Canavanine (CAN), a structural analog of arginine (Arg), is used as a selective inhibitor of inducible NOS in mammals. CAN is incorporated into proteins’ structure in the place of Arg, leading to the formation of aberrant compounds. This non-protein amino acid is found in legumes, e.g., Canavalia ensiformis (L.) DC. or Sutherlandia frutescens (L.) R.Br. and acts as a strong toxin against herbivores or plants. Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) seedlings were treated for 24–72 h with CAN (10 or 50 μM) inhibiting root growth by 50 or 100%, without lethal effect. We determined ROS level/production in root extracts, fluorescence of DAF-FM and APF derivatives corresponding to RNS level in roots of tomato seedlings and linked CAN-induced restriction of root growth to the post-translational modifications (PTMs) of proteins: carbonylation and nitration. Both PTMs are stable markers of nitro-oxidative stress, regarded as the plant’s secondary response to phytotoxins. CAN enhanced H2O2 content and superoxide radicals generation in extracts of tomato roots and stimulated formation of protein carbonyl groups. An elevated level of carbonylated proteins was characteristic for the plants after 72 h of the culture, mainly for the roots exposed to 10 μM CAN. The proteolytic activity was stimulated by tested non-protein amino acid. CAN treatment led to decline of fluorescence of DAF-FM derivatives, and transiently stimulated fluorescence of APF derivatives. Short-term exposure of tomato seedlings to CAN lowered the protein nitration level. Activity of peroxidase, polyamine oxidase and NADPH oxidase, enzymes acting as modulators of H2O2 concentration and governing root architecture and growth were determined. Activities of all enzymes were stimulated by CAN, but no strict CAN concentration dependence was observed. We conclude, that although CAN treatment led to a decline in the nitric oxide level, PTMs observed in roots of plants exposed to CAN are linked rather to the

  12. Lysine acetylation is a common post-translational modification of key metabolic pathway enzymes of the anaerobe Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed

    Butler, Catherine A; Veith, Paul D; Nieto, Matthew F; Dashper, Stuart G; Reynolds, Eric C

    2015-10-14

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a Gram-negative anaerobe considered to be a keystone pathogen in the development of the bacterial-associated inflammatory oral disease chronic periodontitis. Although post-translational modifications (PTMs) of proteins are commonly found to modify protein function in eukaryotes and prokaryotes, PTMs such as lysine acetylation have not been examined in P. gingivalis. Lysine acetylation is the addition of an acetyl group to a lysine which removes this amino acid's positive charge and can induce changes in a protein's secondary structure and reactivity. A proteomics based approach combining immune-affinity enrichment with high sensitivity Orbitrap mass spectrometry identified 130 lysine acetylated peptides from 92 P. gingivalis proteins. The majority of these peptides (71) were attributed to 45 proteins with predicted metabolic activity; these proteins could be mapped to several P. gingivalis metabolic pathways where enzymes catalysing sequential reactions within the same pathway were often found acetylated. In particular, the catabolic pathways of complex anaerobic fermentation of amino acids to produce energy had 12 enzymes lysine acetylated. The results suggest that lysine acetylation may be an important mechanism in metabolic regulation in P. gingivalis, which is vital for P. gingivalis survival and adaptation of its metabolism throughout infection. Statement of significance. Porphyromonas gingivalis is a keystone pathogen in the development of chronic periodontitis, an inflammatory disease of the supporting tissues of the teeth. The ability of the pathogen to induce dysbiosis and disease is related to an array of specific virulence factors and metabolic regulation that enables the bacterium to proliferate in an inflamed periodontal pocket. The mechanisms P. gingivalis uses to adapt to a changing and hostile environment are poorly understood and here we show, for the first time, that enzymes of critical metabolic pathways for energy

  13. Post-translational mechanisms are associated with fertility restoration of cytoplasmic male sterility in sugar beet (Beta vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Kitazaki, Kazuyoshi; Arakawa, Takumi; Matsunaga, Muneyuki; Yui-Kurino, Rika; Matsuhira, Hiroaki; Mikami, Tetsuo; Kubo, Tomohiko

    2015-07-01

    Genetic conflict between cytoplasmically inherited elements and nuclear genes arising from their different transmission patterns can be seen in cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS), the mitochondrion-encoded inability to shed functional pollen. CMS is associated with a mitochondrial open reading frame (ORF) that is absent from non-sterility inducing mitochondria (S-orf). Nuclear genes that suppress CMS are called restorer-of-fertility (Rf) genes. Post-transcriptional and translational repression of S-orf mediates the molecular action of Rf that encodes a class of RNA-binding proteins with pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) motifs. Besides the PPR-type of Rfs, there are also non-PPR Rfs, but the molecular interactions between non-PPR Rf and S-orf have not been described. In this study, we investigated the interaction of bvORF20, a non-PPR Rf from sugar beet (Beta vulgaris), with preSatp6, the S-orf from sugar beet. Anthers expressing bvORF20 contained a protein that interacted with preSATP6 protein. Analysis of anthers and transgenic calli expressing a FLAG-tagged bvORF20 suggested the binding of preSATP6 to bvORF20. To see the effect of bvORF20 on preSATP6, which exists as a 250-kDa protein complex in CMS plants, signal bands of preSATP6 in bvORF20-expressing and non-expressing anthers were compared by immunoblotting combined with Blue Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The signal intensity of the 250-kDa band decreased significantly, and 200- and 150-kDa bands appeared in bvORF20-expressing anthers. Transgenic callus expressing bvORF20 also generated the 200- and 150-kDa bands. The 200-kDa complex is likely to include both preSATP6 and bvORF20. Post-translational interaction between preSATP6 and bvORF20 appears to alter the higher order structure of preSATP6 that may lead to fertility restoration in sugar beet.

  14. Canavanine Alters ROS/RNS Level and Leads to Post-translational Modification of Proteins in Roots of Tomato Seedlings.

    PubMed

    Krasuska, Urszula; Andrzejczak, Olga; Staszek, Paweł; Bogatek, Renata; Gniazdowska, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Canavanine (CAN), a structural analog of arginine (Arg), is used as a selective inhibitor of inducible NOS in mammals. CAN is incorporated into proteins' structure in the place of Arg, leading to the formation of aberrant compounds. This non-protein amino acid is found in legumes, e.g., Canavalia ensiformis (L.) DC. or Sutherlandia frutescens (L.) R.Br. and acts as a strong toxin against herbivores or plants. Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) seedlings were treated for 24-72 h with CAN (10 or 50 μM) inhibiting root growth by 50 or 100%, without lethal effect. We determined ROS level/production in root extracts, fluorescence of DAF-FM and APF derivatives corresponding to RNS level in roots of tomato seedlings and linked CAN-induced restriction of root growth to the post-translational modifications (PTMs) of proteins: carbonylation and nitration. Both PTMs are stable markers of nitro-oxidative stress, regarded as the plant's secondary response to phytotoxins. CAN enhanced H2O2 content and superoxide radicals generation in extracts of tomato roots and stimulated formation of protein carbonyl groups. An elevated level of carbonylated proteins was characteristic for the plants after 72 h of the culture, mainly for the roots exposed to 10 μM CAN. The proteolytic activity was stimulated by tested non-protein amino acid. CAN treatment led to decline of fluorescence of DAF-FM derivatives, and transiently stimulated fluorescence of APF derivatives. Short-term exposure of tomato seedlings to CAN lowered the protein nitration level. Activity of peroxidase, polyamine oxidase and NADPH oxidase, enzymes acting as modulators of H2O2 concentration and governing root architecture and growth were determined. Activities of all enzymes were stimulated by CAN, but no strict CAN concentration dependence was observed. We conclude, that although CAN treatment led to a decline in the nitric oxide level, PTMs observed in roots of plants exposed to CAN are linked rather to the formation of

  15. Stable-isotope-labeled Histone Peptide Library for Histone Post-translational Modification and Variant Quantification by Mass Spectrometry *

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shu; Wein, Samuel; Gonzales-Cope, Michelle; Otte, Gabriel L.; Yuan, Zuo-Fei; Afjehi-Sadat, Leila; Maile, Tobias; Berger, Shelley L.; Rush, John; Lill, Jennie R.; Arnott, David; Garcia, Benjamin A.

    2014-01-01

    To facilitate accurate histone variant and post-translational modification (PTM) quantification via mass spectrometry, we present a library of 93 synthetic peptides using Protein-Aqua™ technology. The library contains 55 peptides representing different modified forms from histone H3 peptides, 23 peptides representing H4 peptides, 5 peptides representing canonical H2A peptides, 8 peptides representing H2A.Z peptides, and peptides for both macroH2A and H2A.X. The PTMs on these peptides include lysine mono- (me1), di- (me2), and tri-methylation (me3); lysine acetylation; arginine me1; serine/threonine phosphorylation; and N-terminal acetylation. The library was subjected to chemical derivatization with propionic anhydride, a widely employed protocol for histone peptide quantification. Subsequently, the detection efficiencies were quantified using mass spectrometry extracted ion chromatograms. The library yields a wide spectrum of detection efficiencies, with more than 1700-fold difference between the peptides with the lowest and highest efficiencies. In this paper, we describe the impact of different modifications on peptide detection efficiencies and provide a resource to correct for detection biases among the 93 histone peptides. In brief, there is no correlation between detection efficiency and molecular weight, hydrophobicity, basicity, or modification type. The same types of modifications may have very different effects on detection efficiencies depending on their positions within a peptide. We also observed antagonistic effects between modifications. In a study of mouse trophoblast stem cells, we utilized the detection efficiencies of the peptide library to correct for histone PTM/variant quantification. For most histone peptides examined, the corrected data did not change the biological conclusions but did alter the relative abundance of these peptides. For a low-abundant histone H2A variant, macroH2A, the corrected data led to a different conclusion than the

  16. Reconcile Mantle Dynamic Models with Compositionally Distinct and Stable LLSVPs with the Observations of the Geoid and Dynamic Topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Zhong, S.

    2015-12-01

    The geoid has been well explained in mantle flow models with the buoyancy inferred from seismic models that in turn place constraints on mantle viscosity structure (e.g., Hager & Richards, 1989). These models often assume a whole-mantle convection with uniform composition and 1-D viscosity. However, seismic and geochemical observations suggest possible existence of chemically distinct piles under Africa and Pacific which extends hundreds of kilometers above the CMB (i.e., LLSVPs). As compositional heterogeneity would significantly alter the interpretation of seismic anomalies as buoyancy structure, important questions are whether a thermochemical mantle model based on seismic velocity anomalies can reconcile the geoid and how this may impact inference of mantle viscosity structure. In this study, we formulate mantle flow models that use buoyancy derived from seismic model S40RTS (Ritsema et al., 2011), assuming that the LLSVPs are stable with negative buoyancy. The models use temperature-, depth- and composition-dependent viscosity and are computed for the geoid, dynamic topography and flow velocity using CitcomS. Seismic anomalies are converted to buoyancy using thermal conversion factor cT for the whole mantle materials and composition conversion factor cc for the chemical piles defined as the domains with seismic slow anomaly <-0.5% and a maximum height of 500 km. The temperature-dependence viscosity gives rise to 3 orders of magnitude variations in viscosity, and horizontally averaged viscosity profile is consistent with the inferred 1-D viscosity from the geoid. The viscosity in the chemical piles is further reduced by a factor of Cvisc to represent the compositional effect. We measure the stability of the chemical piles by the RMS vertical velocities on the piles boundary. Our preferred thermochemical models with stable chemical piles reach similar variance reduction of geoid at ~64% to that for the uniform composition models. In the preferred model, cT is ~0

  17. Post-Translational Modification as a Potential Explanation of High Levels of Enzyme Polymorphism: Xanthine Dehydrogenase and Aldehyde Oxidase in DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER

    PubMed Central

    Finnerty, Victoria; Johnson, George

    1979-01-01

    Xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH) and aldehyde oxidase (AO) in Drosophila melanogaster require for their activity the action of another unlinked locus, maroon-like (mal). While the XDH and AO loci are on chromosome 3, mal maps to the X chromosome. Although functional mal gene product is required for XDH and AO activity, it is possible to examine the effects of mutant mal alleles in those cases when pairs of mutants complement to produce a partial restoration of activity. To test whether mal mediates a post-translational modification of the XDH and AO proteins, we constructed several mal heteroallelic complementing stocks of Drosophila in which the third chromosomes were co-isogenic. Since all lines were co-isogenic for the XDH and AO structural genes, any variation in these enzymes seen when comparing these stocks must have been produced by post-translational modification by mal. We examined the XDH and AO proteins in these stocks by gel-sieving electrophoresis, a procedure that permits independent characterization of a protein's charge and shape, and is capable of discriminating many variants not detected in routine electrophoresis. In every mal heteroallelic combination, there is a significant alteration in protein shape, when compared to wild type. The magnitude of differences in shape of XDH and AO is correlated both with differences in their enzyme activities and with differences in their thermal stabilities. As the body of this variation appears heritable, any functional differences resulting from these variants are of real genetic and evolutionary interest. A similar post-translational modification of XDH and AO by yet another locus, lxd, was subsequently documented in an analogous manner. The pattern of electrophoretic differences produced by mal and lxd modification is similar to that reported for electrophoretic "alleles" of XDH in natural populations. The implication is that heritable variation in electrophoretic mobility at these two enzyme loci, and

  18. Post-translational Serine/Threonine Phosphorylation and Lysine Acetylation: A Novel Regulatory Aspect of the Global Nitrogen Response Regulator GlnR in S. coelicolor M145.

    PubMed

    Amin, Rafat; Franz-Wachtel, Mirita; Tiffert, Yvonne; Heberer, Martin; Meky, Mohamed; Ahmed, Yousra; Matthews, Arne; Krysenko, Sergii; Jakobi, Marco; Hinder, Markus; Moore, Jane; Okoniewski, Nicole; Maček, Boris; Wohlleben, Wolfgang; Bera, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Soil-dwelling Streptomyces bacteria such as S.coelicolor have to constantly adapt to the nitrogen (N) availability in their habitat. Thus, strict transcriptional and post-translational control of the N-assimilation is fundamental for survival of this species. GlnR is a global response regulator that controls transcription of the genes related to the N-assimilation in S. coelicolor and other members of the Actinomycetales. GlnR represents an atypical orphan response regulator that is not activated by the phosphorylation of the conserved aspartate residue (Asp 50). We have applied transcriptional analysis, LC-MS/MS analysis and electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) to understand the regulation of GlnR in S. coelicolor M145. The expression of glnR and GlnR-target genes was revisited under four different N-defined conditions and a complex N-rich condition. Although, the expression of selected GlnR-target genes was strongly responsive to changing N-concentrations, the glnR expression itself was independent of the N-availability. Using LC-MS/MSanalysis we demonstrated that GlnR was post-translationally modified. The post-translational modifications of GlnR comprise phosphorylation of the serine/threonine residues and acetylation of lysine residues. In the complex N-rich medium GlnR was phosphorylated on six serine/threonine residues and acetylated on one lysine residue. Under defined N-excess conditions only two phosphorylated residues were detected whereas under defined N-limiting conditions no phosphorylation was observed. GlnR phosphorylation is thus clearly correlated with N-rich conditions. Furthermore, GlnR was acetylated on four lysine residues independently of the N-concentration in the defined media and on only one lysine residue in the complex N-rich medium. Using EMSAs we demonstrated that phosphorylation inhibited the binding of GlnR to its targets genes, whereas acetylation had little influence on the formation of GlnR-DNA complex. This study clearly

  19. Localization of Post-Translational Modifications in Peptide Mixtures via High-Resolution Differential Ion Mobility Separations Followed by Electron Transfer Dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baird, Matthew A.; Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.

    2016-09-01

    Precise localization of post-translational modifications (PTMs) on proteins and peptides is an outstanding challenge in proteomics. While electron transfer dissociation (ETD) has dramatically advanced PTM analyses, mixtures of localization variants that commonly coexist in cells often require prior separation. Although differential or field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) achieves broad variant resolution, the need for standards to identify the features has limited the utility of approach. Here we demonstrate full a priori characterization of variant mixtures by high-resolution FAIMS coupled to ETD and the procedures to systematically extract the FAIMS spectra for all variants from such data.

  20. Post-translational Serine/Threonine Phosphorylation and Lysine Acetylation: A Novel Regulatory Aspect of the Global Nitrogen Response Regulator GlnR in S. coelicolor M145

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Rafat; Franz-Wachtel, Mirita; Tiffert, Yvonne; Heberer, Martin; Meky, Mohamed; Ahmed, Yousra; Matthews, Arne; Krysenko, Sergii; Jakobi, Marco; Hinder, Markus; Moore, Jane; Okoniewski, Nicole; Maček, Boris; Wohlleben, Wolfgang; Bera, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    Soil-dwelling Streptomyces bacteria such as S.coelicolor have to constantly adapt to the nitrogen (N) availability in their habitat. Thus, strict transcriptional and post-translational control of the N-assimilation is fundamental for survival of this species. GlnR is a global response regulator that controls transcription of the genes related to the N-assimilation in S. coelicolor and other members of the Actinomycetales. GlnR represents an atypical orphan response regulator that is not activated by the phosphorylation of the conserved aspartate residue (Asp 50). We have applied transcriptional analysis, LC-MS/MS analysis and electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) to understand the regulation of GlnR in S. coelicolor M145. The expression of glnR and GlnR-target genes was revisited under four different N-defined conditions and a complex N-rich condition. Although, the expression of selected GlnR-target genes was strongly responsive to changing N-concentrations, the glnR expression itself was independent of the N-availability. Using LC-MS/MSanalysis we demonstrated that GlnR was post-translationally modified. The post-translational modifications of GlnR comprise phosphorylation of the serine/threonine residues and acetylation of lysine residues. In the complex N-rich medium GlnR was phosphorylated on six serine/threonine residues and acetylated on one lysine residue. Under defined N-excess conditions only two phosphorylated residues were detected whereas under defined N-limiting conditions no phosphorylation was observed. GlnR phosphorylation is thus clearly correlated with N-rich conditions. Furthermore, GlnR was acetylated on four lysine residues independently of the N-concentration in the defined media and on only one lysine residue in the complex N-rich medium. Using EMSAs we demonstrated that phosphorylation inhibited the binding of GlnR to its targets genes, whereas acetylation had little influence on the formation of GlnR-DNA complex. This study clearly

  1. The molecular basis for the post-translational addition of amino acids by L/F transferase in the N-end rule pathway.

    PubMed

    Fung, Angela Wai S; Fahlman, Richard P

    2015-01-01

    The N-end rule pathway is a conserved targeted proteolytic process observed in organisms ranging from eubacteria to mammals. The N-end rule relates the metabolic stability of a protein to its N-terminal amino acid residue. The identity of the N-terminal amino acid residue is a primary degradation signal, often referred to as an N-degron, which is recognized by the components of the N-end rule when it is a destabilizing N-terminus. N-degrons may be exposed by non-processive proteolytic cleavages or by post-translational modifications. One modification is the post-translational addition of amino acids to the N-termini of proteins, a reaction catalyzed by aminoacyl-tRNA protein transferases. The aminoacyl-tRNA protein transferase in eubacteria like Escherichia coli is L/F transferase. Recent investigations have reported unexpected observations regarding the L/F transferase catalytic mechanism and its mechanisms of substrate recognition. Additionally, recent proteome-wide identification of putative in vivo substrates facilitates hypothesis into the yet elusive biological functions of the prokaryotic N-end rule pathway. Here we summarize the recent findings on the molecular mechanisms of catalysis and substrate recognition by the E. coli L/F transferase in the prokaryotic N-end rule pathway.

  2. Role of post-translational modifications at the β-subunit ectodomain in complex association with a promiscuous plant P4-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Costa, Sara R; Marek, Magdalena; Axelsen, Kristian B; Theorin, Lisa; Pomorski, Thomas G; López-Marqués, Rosa L

    2016-06-01

    P-type ATPases of subfamily IV (P4-ATPases) constitute a major group of phospholipid flippases that form heteromeric complexes with members of the Cdc50 (cell division control 50) protein family. Some P4-ATPases interact specifically with only one β-subunit isoform, whereas others are promiscuous and can interact with several isoforms. In the present study, we used a site-directed mutagenesis approach to assess the role of post-translational modifications at the plant ALIS5 β-subunit ectodomain in the functionality of the promiscuous plant P4-ATPase ALA2. We identified two N-glycosylated residues, Asn(181) and Asn(231) Whereas mutation of Asn(231) seems to have a small effect on P4-ATPase complex formation, mutation of evolutionarily conserved Asn(181) disrupts interaction between the two subunits. Of the four cysteine residues located in the ALIS5 ectodomain, mutation of Cys(86) and Cys(107) compromises complex association, but the mutant β-subunits still promote complex trafficking and activity to some extent. In contrast, disruption of a conserved disulfide bond between Cys(158) and Cys(172) has no effect on the P4-ATPase complex. Our results demonstrate that post-translational modifications in the β-subunit have different functional roles in different organisms, which may be related to the promiscuity of the P4-ATPase. PMID:27048590

  3. Role of post-translational modifications at the β-subunit ectodomain in complex association with a promiscuous plant P4-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Sara R.; Marek, Magdalena; Axelsen, Kristian B.; Theorin, Lisa; Pomorski, Thomas G.; López-Marqués, Rosa L.

    2016-01-01

    P-type ATPases of subfamily IV (P4-ATPases) constitute a major group of phospholipid flippases that form heteromeric complexes with members of the Cdc50 (cell division control 50) protein family. Some P4-ATPases interact specifically with only one β-subunit isoform, whereas others are promiscuous and can interact with several isoforms. In the present study, we used a site-directed mutagenesis approach to assess the role of post-translational modifications at the plant ALIS5 β-subunit ectodomain in the functionality of the promiscuous plant P4-ATPase ALA2. We identified two N-glycosylated residues, Asn181 and Asn231. Whereas mutation of Asn231 seems to have a small effect on P4-ATPase complex formation, mutation of evolutionarily conserved Asn181 disrupts interaction between the two subunits. Of the four cysteine residues located in the ALIS5 ectodomain, mutation of Cys86 and Cys107 compromises complex association, but the mutant β-subunits still promote complex trafficking and activity to some extent. In contrast, disruption of a conserved disulfide bond between Cys158 and Cys172 has no effect on the P4-ATPase complex. Our results demonstrate that post-translational modifications in the β-subunit have different functional roles in different organisms, which may be related to the promiscuity of the P4-ATPase. PMID:27048590

  4. On Pantoja's problem allegedly showing a distinction between differential dynamic programming and stagewise Newton methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizutani, E.

    2015-09-01

    In this journal, Pantoja has described a deterministic optimal control problem in which his stagewise Newton procedure yields an exact optimal solution whereas differential dynamic programming (DDP) does not. This problem is also quoted by Coleman and Liao (in another journal) as a correct instance with some emphasis on the advantage of Pantoja's procedure over DDP. Pantoja argues that the problem involves nonlinear dynamics in his terminal-cost problem formulation, and therefore DDP and stagewise Newton methods are different. The purpose of this paper is to show that, while for a general nonlinear optimal control problem DDP and Pantoja's method differ, his problem has a special structure such that it is a false example of this claim; more specifically, the reason is twofold. First, he made an obvious algebraic error in his computation. Second, his example is equivalent to a problem of linear dynamics and quadratic criterion (LQ in short). It is true that when a general LQ that involves quadratic stage costs is transformed to a terminal-cost problem, the nonlinear (quadratic) state dynamics would result from each quadratic stage cost of the LQ. Yet the LQ-solution procedure remains the same, i.e., with the same discrete (Riccati) recurrence equations that can be derived by classical dynamic programming. This means that DDP obtains the exact minimum point of the transformed terminal-cost criterion just as does the Newton method. Using a standard LQ of general type, we formally prove this equivalence in its terminal-cost version even with nonlinear state dynamics.

  5. Interplay between stochasticity and negative feedback leads to pulsed dynamics and distinct gene activity patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zambrano, Samuel; Bianchi, Marco E.; Agresti, Alessandra; Molina, Nacho

    2015-08-01

    Gene expression is an inherently stochastic process that depends on the structure of the biochemical regulatory network in which the gene is embedded. Here we study the dynamical consequences of the interplay between stochastic gene switching and the widespread negative feedback regulatory loop in a simple model of a biochemical regulatory network. Using a simplified hybrid simulation approach, in which only the gene activation is modeled stochastically, we find that stochasticity in gene switching by itself can induce pulses in the system, providing also analytical insights into their origin. Furthermore, we find that this simple network is able to reproduce both exponential and peaked distributions of gene active and inactive times similar to those that have been observed experimentally. This simplified hybrid simulation approach also allows us to link these patterns to the dynamics of the system for each gene state.

  6. Specific bindings of glycine peptides of distinctly different chain length on dynamic papain surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, Katsuhiko

    2011-06-01

    We investigated the specific bindings of peptides of 1-10 glycine residues (1-10GLY) on dynamic papain surfaces via molecular dynamics and docking simulations. Although the binding specificities of 1-5GLY on papain fluctuated little with time, the binding specificities of 6-10GLY on papain considerably fluctuated with time. Some residues had a significant impact on bindings of 6-10GLY to sites near active center of papain, and some of their residues were specific for each 6GLY, 8GLY, and 10GLY. Modification of these specific residues should allow for control of binding specificity of 6GLY, 8GLY, and 10GLY to the active center.

  7. Dynamic microtubule organization and mitochondrial transport are regulated by distinct Kinesin-1 pathways

    PubMed Central

    Melkov, Anna; Simchoni, Yasmin; Alcalay, Yehonatan; Abdu, Uri

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The microtubule (MT) plus-end motor kinesin heavy chain (Khc) is well known for its role in long distance cargo transport. Recent evidence showed that Khc is also required for the organization of the cellular MT network by mediating MT sliding. We found that mutations in Khc and the gene of its adaptor protein, kinesin light chain (Klc) resulted in identical bristle morphology defects, with the upper part of the bristle being thinner and flatter than normal and failing to taper towards the bristle tip. We demonstrate that bristle mitochondria transport requires Khc but not Klc as a competing force to dynein heavy chain (Dhc). Surprisingly, we demonstrate for the first time that Dhc is the primary motor for both anterograde and retrograde fast mitochondria transport. We found that the upper part of Khc and Klc mutant bristles lacked stable MTs. When following dynamic MT polymerization via the use of GFP-tagged end-binding protein 1 (EB1), it was noted that at Khc and Klc mutant bristle tips, dynamic MTs significantly deviated from the bristle parallel growth axis, relative to wild-type bristles. We also observed that GFP-EB1 failed to concentrate as a focus at the tip of Khc and Klc mutant bristles. We propose that the failure of bristle tapering is due to defects in directing dynamic MTs at the growing tip. Thus, we reveal a new function for Khc and Klc in directing dynamic MTs during polarized cell growth. Moreover, we also demonstrate a novel mode of coordination in mitochondrial transport between Khc and Dhc. PMID:26581590

  8. Dystrophin and utrophin have distinct effects on the structural dynamics of actin

    PubMed Central

    Prochniewicz, Ewa; Henderson, Davin; Ervasti, James M.; Thomas, David D.

    2009-01-01

    We have used time-resolved spectroscopy to investigate the structural dynamics of actin interaction with dystrophin and utrophin in relationship to the pathology of muscular dystrophy. Dystrophin and utrophin bind actin in vitro with similar affinities, but the molecular contacts of these two proteins with actin are different. It has been hypothesized that the presence of two low-affinity actin-binding sites in dystrophin allows more elastic response of the actin–dystrophin–sarcolemma linkage to muscle stretches, compared with utrophin, which binds via one contiguous actin-binding domain. We have directly tested this hypothesis by determining the effects of dystrophin and utrophin on the microsecond rotational dynamics of a phosphorescent dye attached to C374 on actin, as detected by transient phosphorescence anisotropy (TPA). Binding of dystrophin or utrophin to actin resulted in significant changes in the TPA decay, increasing the final anisotropy (restricting the rotational amplitude) and decreasing the rotational correlation times (increasing the rotational rates and the torsional flexibility). This paradoxical combination of effects on actin dynamics (decreased amplitude but increased rate) has not been observed for other actin-binding proteins. Thus, when dystrophin or utrophin binds, actin becomes less like cast iron (strong but brittle) and more like steel (stronger and more resilient). At low levels of saturation, the binding of dystrophin and utrophin has similar effects, but at higher levels, utrophin caused much greater restrictions in amplitude and increases in rate. The effects of dystrophin and utrophin on actin dynamics provide molecular insight into the pathology of muscular dystrophy. PMID:19416869

  9. High resolution sequencing and modeling identifies distinct dynamic RNA regulatory strategies

    PubMed Central

    Rabani, Michal; Raychowdhury, Raktima; Jovanovic, Marko; Rooney, Michael; Stumpo, Deborah J.; Hacohen, Nir; Schier, Alexander F.; Blackshear, Perry J.; Friedman, Nir; Amit, Ido; Regev, Aviv

    2014-01-01

    Summary Cells control dynamic transitions in transcript levels by regulating transcription, processing and/or degradation through an integrated regulatory strategy. Here, we combine RNA metabolic labeling, rRNA-depleted RNA-seq, and DRiLL, a novel computational framework, to quantify the level, editing sites, and transcription, processing and degradation rates of each transcript at a splice junction resolution during the LPS response of mouse dendritic cells. Four key regulatory strategies, dominated by RNA transcription changes, generate most temporal gene expression patterns. Non-canonical strategies that also employ dynamic posttranscriptional regulation control only a minority of genes, but provide unique signal processing features. We validate Tristetraprolin (TTP) as a major regulator of RNA degradation in one non-canonical strategy. Applying DRiLL to the regulation of non-coding RNAs and to zebrafish embryogenesis demonstrates its broad utility. Our study provides a new quantitative approach to discover transcriptional and post-transcriptional events that control dynamic changes in transcript levels using RNA-Seq data. PMID:25497548

  10. Face processing regions are sensitive to distinct aspects of temporal sequence in facial dynamics.

    PubMed

    Reinl, Maren; Bartels, Andreas

    2014-11-15

    Facial movement conveys important information for social interactions, yet its neural processing is poorly understood. Computational models propose that shape- and temporal sequence sensitive mechanisms interact in processing dynamic faces. While face processing regions are known to respond to facial movement, their sensitivity to particular temporal sequences has barely been studied. Here we used fMRI to examine the sensitivity of human face-processing regions to two aspects of directionality in facial movement trajectories. We presented genuine movie recordings of increasing and decreasing fear expressions, each of which were played in natural or reversed frame order. This two-by-two factorial design matched low-level visual properties, static content and motion energy within each factor, emotion-direction (increasing or decreasing emotion) and timeline (natural versus artificial). The results showed sensitivity for emotion-direction in FFA, which was timeline-dependent as it only occurred within the natural frame order, and sensitivity to timeline in the STS, which was emotion-direction-dependent as it only occurred for decreased fear. The occipital face area (OFA) was sensitive to the factor timeline. These findings reveal interacting temporal sequence sensitive mechanisms that are responsive to both ecological meaning and to prototypical unfolding of facial dynamics. These mechanisms are temporally directional, provide socially relevant information regarding emotional state or naturalness of behavior, and agree with predictions from modeling and predictive coding theory. PMID:25132020

  11. Dynamics of centrosome translocation and microtubule organization in neocortical neurons during distinct modes of polarization.

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Akira; Sato, Toshiyuki; Ando, Ryota; Noguchi, Namiko; Masaoka, Makoto; Miyata, Takaki

    2014-05-01

    Neuronal migration and process formation require cytoskeletal organization and remodeling. Recent studies suggest that centrosome translocation is involved in initial axon outgrowth, while the role of centrosomal positioning is not clear. Here, we examine relations between centrosomal positioning, axonogenesis, and microtubule (MT) polarization in multipolar and bipolar neocortical neurons. We monitored dynamic movements of centrosomes and MT plus ends in migratory neurons in embryonic mouse cerebral slices. In locomoting bipolar neurons, the centrosome oriented toward the pia-directed leading process. Bipolar neurons displayed dense MT plus end dynamics in leading processes, while trailing processes showed clear bidirectional MTs. In migrating multipolar neurons, new processes emerged irrespective of centrosome localization, followed by centrosome reorientations toward the dominant process. Anterograde movements of MT plus ends occurred in growing processes and retrograde movements were observed after retraction of the distal tip. In multipolar neurons, axon formed by tangential extension of a dominant process and the centrosome oriented toward the growing axon, while in locomoting neurons, an axon formed opposite to the direction of migration and the centrosome localized to the base of the leading process. Our data suggest that MT organization may alter centrosomal localization and that centrosomal positioning does not necessarily direct process formation.

  12. Ice-binding proteins that accumulate on different ice crystal planes produce distinct thermal hysteresis dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Drori, Ran; Celik, Yeliz; Davies, Peter L.; Braslavsky, Ido

    2014-01-01

    Ice-binding proteins that aid the survival of freeze-avoiding, cold-adapted organisms by inhibiting the growth of endogenous ice crystals are called antifreeze proteins (AFPs). The binding of AFPs to ice causes a separation between the melting point and the freezing point of the ice crystal (thermal hysteresis, TH). TH produced by hyperactive AFPs is an order of magnitude higher than that produced by a typical fish AFP. The basis for this difference in activity remains unclear. Here, we have compared the time dependence of TH activity for both hyperactive and moderately active AFPs using a custom-made nanolitre osmometer and a novel microfluidics system. We found that the TH activities of hyperactive AFPs were time-dependent, and that the TH activity of a moderate AFP was almost insensitive to time. Fluorescence microscopy measurement revealed that despite their higher TH activity, hyperactive AFPs from two insects (moth and beetle) took far longer to accumulate on the ice surface than did a moderately active fish AFP. An ice-binding protein from a bacterium that functions as an ice adhesin rather than as an antifreeze had intermediate TH properties. Nevertheless, the accumulation of this ice adhesion protein and the two hyperactive AFPs on the basal plane of ice is distinct and extensive, but not detectable for moderately active AFPs. Basal ice plane binding is the distinguishing feature of antifreeze hyperactivity, which is not strictly needed in fish that require only approximately 1°C of TH. Here, we found a correlation between the accumulation kinetics of the hyperactive AFP at the basal plane and the time sensitivity of the measured TH. PMID:25008081

  13. Ice-binding proteins that accumulate on different ice crystal planes produce distinct thermal hysteresis dynamics.

    PubMed

    Drori, Ran; Celik, Yeliz; Davies, Peter L; Braslavsky, Ido

    2014-09-01

    Ice-binding proteins that aid the survival of freeze-avoiding, cold-adapted organisms by inhibiting the growth of endogenous ice crystals are called antifreeze proteins (AFPs). The binding of AFPs to ice causes a separation between the melting point and the freezing point of the ice crystal (thermal hysteresis, TH). TH produced by hyperactive AFPs is an order of magnitude higher than that produced by a typical fish AFP. The basis for this difference in activity remains unclear. Here, we have compared the time dependence of TH activity for both hyperactive and moderately active AFPs using a custom-made nanolitre osmometer and a novel microfluidics system. We found that the TH activities of hyperactive AFPs were time-dependent, and that the TH activity of a moderate AFP was almost insensitive to time. Fluorescence microscopy measurement revealed that despite their higher TH activity, hyperactive AFPs from two insects (moth and beetle) took far longer to accumulate on the ice surface than did a moderately active fish AFP. An ice-binding protein from a bacterium that functions as an ice adhesin rather than as an antifreeze had intermediate TH properties. Nevertheless, the accumulation of this ice adhesion protein and the two hyperactive AFPs on the basal plane of ice is distinct and extensive, but not detectable for moderately active AFPs. Basal ice plane binding is the distinguishing feature of antifreeze hyperactivity, which is not strictly needed in fish that require only approximately 1°C of TH. Here, we found a correlation between the accumulation kinetics of the hyperactive AFP at the basal plane and the time sensitivity of the measured TH.

  14. Distinctive Photosystem II Photoinactivation and Protein Dynamics in Marine Diatoms1[W

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hongyan; Cockshutt, Amanda M.; McCarthy, Avery; Campbell, Douglas A.

    2011-01-01

    Diatoms host chlorophyll a/c chloroplasts distinct from green chloroplasts. Diatoms now dominate the eukaryotic oceanic phytoplankton, in part through their exploitation of environments with variable light. We grew marine diatoms across a range of temperatures and then analyzed their PSII function and subunit turnover during an increase in light to mimic an upward mixing event. The small diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana initially responds to increased photoinactivation under blue or white light with rapid acceleration of the photosystem II (PSII) repair cycle. Increased red light provoked only modest PSII photoinactivation but triggered a rapid clearance of a subpool of PsbA. Furthermore, PsbD and PsbB content was greater than PsbA content, indicating a large pool of partly assembled PSII repair cycle intermediates lacking PsbA. The initial replacement rates for PsbD (D2) were, surprisingly, comparable to or higher than those for PsbA (D1), and even the supposedly stable PsbB (CP47) dropped rapidly upon the light shift, showing a novel aspect of rapid protein subunit turnover in the PSII repair cycle in small diatoms. Under sustained high light, T. pseudonana induces sustained nonphotochemical quenching, which correlates with stabilization of PSII function and the PsbA pool. The larger diatom Coscinodiscus radiatus showed generally similar responses but had a smaller allocation of PSII complexes relative to total protein content, with nearly equal stiochiometries of PsbA and PsbD subunits. Fast turnover of multiple PSII subunits, pools of PSII repair cycle intermediates, and photoprotective induction of nonphotochemical quenching are important interacting factors, particularly for small diatoms, to withstand and exploit high, fluctuating light. PMID:21617029

  15. Distinct T cell dynamics in lymph nodes during the induction of tolerance and immunity.

    PubMed

    Hugues, Stéphanie; Fetler, Luc; Bonifaz, Laura; Helft, Julie; Amblard, François; Amigorena, Sebastian

    2004-12-01

    Induction of immunity and peripheral tolerance requires contacts between antigen-bearing dendritic cells (DCs) and cognate T cells. Using real-time two-photon microscopy, we have analyzed the dynamics of CD8(+) T cells in lymph nodes during the induction of antigen-specific immunity or tolerance. At 15-20 h after the induction of immunity, T cells stopped moving and established prolonged interactions with DCs. In tolerogenic conditions, despite effective initial T cell activation and proliferation, naive T cells remained motile and established serial brief contacts with multiple DCs. Thus, stable DC-T cell interactions occur during the induction of priming, whereas brief contacts may contribute to the induction of T cell tolerance.

  16. Mercury dynamics in groundwater across three distinct riparian zone types of the US Midwest.

    PubMed

    Vidon, Philippe G; Mitchell, Carl P J; Jacinthe, Pierre-André; Baker, Matthew E; Liu, Xiaoqiang; Fisher, Katelin R

    2013-10-01

    Although the intense biogeochemical gradients present in riparian zones have the potential to affect mercury (Hg) cycling, Hg dynamics in riparian zones has received relatively little attention in the literature. Our study investigated groundwater filtered total mercury (THg) and methylmercury (MeHg) dynamics in three riparian zones with contrasting hydrogeomorphic (HGM) characteristics (till, alluvium, outwash) in the US Midwest. Despite high Hg deposition rates (>16 μg m(-2)) in the region, median THg (<1.05 ng L(-1)) and MeHg (<0.05 ng L(-1)) concentrations were low at the study sites. Methylmercury concentrations were significantly (p < 0.05) correlated to THg (R = 0.82), temperature (R = 0.55), and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) (R = 0.62). THg also correlated with groundwater DOC (R = 0.59). The proportion of MeHg in THg (%MeHg) was significantly correlated to temperature (R = 0.58) and MeHg (R = 0.50). Results suggest that HGM characteristics, the presence of tile drains, and the propensity for overbank flooding at a riparian site determined the extent to which stream water Hg concentrations influenced riparian groundwater Hg levels or vice versa. Differences in hydrogeomorphic characteristics between sites did not translate however in significant differences in groundwater MeHg or %MeHg. Overall, widespread Hg contamination in the most common riparian hydrogeomorphic types of the US Midwest is unlikely to be a major concern. However, for frequently flooded riparian zones located downstream from a potentially large source of Hg (e.g., concentrated urban development), Hg concentrations are likely to be higher than at other sites.

  17. Distinct temporal filtering mechanisms are engaged during dynamic increases and decreases of noxious stimulus intensity

    PubMed Central

    Mørch, Carsten Dahl; Frahm, Ken Steffen; Coghill, Robert C.; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars; Andersen, Ole Kæseler

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Physical stimuli are subject to pronounced temporal filtering during afferent processing such that changes occurring at certain rates are amplified and others are diminished. Temporal filtering of nociceptive information remains poorly understood. However, the phenomenon of offset analgesia, where a disproportional drop in perceived pain intensity is caused by a slight drop in noxious heat stimulation, indicates potent temporal filtering in the pain pathways. To develop a better understanding of how dynamic changes in a physical stimulus are constructed into an experience of pain, a transfer function between the skin temperature and the perceived pain intensity was modeled. Ten seconds of temperature-controlled near-infrared (970 nm) laser stimulations above the pain threshold with a 1°C increment, decrement, or constant temperature were applied to the dorsum of the hand of healthy human volunteers. The skin temperature was assessed by an infrared camera. Offset analgesia was evoked by laser heat stimulation. The estimated transfer functions showed shorter latencies when the temperature was increased by 1°C (0.53 seconds [0.52-0.54 seconds]) than when decreased by 1°C (1.15 seconds [1.12-1.18 seconds]) and smaller gains (increase: 0.89 [0.82-0.97]; decrease: 2.61 [1.91-3.31]). The maximal gain was observed at rates around 0.06 Hz. These results show that temperature changes occurring around 0.06 Hz are best perceived and that a temperature decrease is associated with a larger but slower change in pain perception than a comparable temperature increase. These psychophysical findings confirm the existence of differential mechanisms involved in temporal filtering of dynamic increases and decreases in noxious stimulus intensity. PMID:26035254

  18. Systematic Assessment of the Benefits and Caveats in Mining Microbial Post-Translational Modifications from Shotgun Proteomic Data; Response of Shewanella oneidensis to Chromate Exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Melissa R; Thompson, Dorothea K; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L

    2008-01-01

    Microbes are known to regulate both gene expression and protein activity through the use of post-translational modifications (PTMs). Common PTMs involved in cellular signaling and gene control include methylations, acetylations, and phosphorylations; whereas oxidations have been implicated as an indicator for stress. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a gram-negative bacterium that demonstrates both respiratory versatility and the ability to sense and adapt to diverse environmental conditions. The dataset used in this study consisted of tandem mass spectra derived from mid-log phase aerobic cultures of S. oneidensis shocked either with or without 1 mM chromate [Cr(VI)]. In this study, three algorithms (DBDigger, Sequest, and InsPecT) were evaluated for their ability to scrutinize shotgun proteomic data for evidence of PTMs. The use of conservative scoring filters for peptides or proteins versus creating a sub-database first from a non-modification search was evaluated with DBDigger. The use of higher scoring filters for peptide identifications was found to result in optimal identifications of PTM peptides with a 2% false discovery rate (FDR) for the total dataset using the DBDigger algorithm. However, the FDR climbs to about 50% when considering PTM peptides only. Sequest was evaluated as a method for confirming PTM peptides putatively identified using DBDigger; however, there was a low identification rate (~25%) for the searched spectra. InsPecT was found to have a lower FDR (~9%) than DBDigger for PTM peptides. Comparisons between InsPecT and DBDigger were made with respect to both the FDR and PTM peptide identifications. As a demonstration of this approach, a number of S. oneidensis chemotaxis proteins as well as low-abundance signal transduction proteins were identified as being post-translationally modified in response to chromate challenge.

  19. Post-translational transformation of methionine to aspartate is catalyzed by heme iron and driven by peroxide: a novel subunit-specific mechanism in hemoglobin.

    PubMed

    Strader, Michael Brad; Hicks, Wayne A; Kassa, Tigist; Singleton, Eileen; Soman, Jayashree; Olson, John S; Weiss, Mitchell J; Mollan, Todd L; Wilson, Michael T; Alayash, Abdu I

    2014-08-01

    A pathogenic V67M mutation occurs at the E11 helical position within the heme pockets of variant human fetal and adult hemoglobins (Hb). Subsequent post-translational modification of Met to Asp was reported in γ subunits of human fetal Hb Toms River (γ67(E11)Val → Met) and β subunits of adult Hb (HbA) Bristol-Alesha (β67(E11)Val → Met) that were associated with hemolytic anemia. Using kinetic, proteomic, and crystal structural analysis, we were able to show that the Met → Asp transformation involves heme cycling through its oxoferryl state in the recombinant versions of both proteins. The conversion to Met and Asp enhanced the spontaneous autoxidation of the mutants relative to wild-type HbA and human fetal Hb, and the levels of Asp were elevated with increasing levels of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Using H2(18)O2, we verified incorporation of (18)O into the Asp carboxyl side chain confirming the role of H2O2 in the oxidation of the Met side chain. Under similar experimental conditions, there was no conversion to Asp at the αMet(E11) position in the corresponding HbA Evans (α62(E11)Val → Met). The crystal structures of the three recombinant Met(E11) mutants revealed similar thioether side chain orientations. However, as in the solution experiments, autoxidation of the Hb mutant crystals leads to electron density maps indicative of Asp(E11) formation in β subunits but not in α subunits. This novel post-translational modification highlights the nonequivalence of human Hb α, β, and γ subunits with respect to redox reactivity and may have direct implications to α/β hemoglobinopathies and design of oxidatively stable Hb-based oxygen therapeutics.

  20. Biosynthetic incorporation of [3H]ethanolamine into protein synthesis elongation factor 1 alpha reveals a new post-translational protein modification.

    PubMed

    Rosenberry, T L; Krall, J A; Dever, T E; Haas, R; Louvard, D; Merrick, W C

    1989-05-01

    Biosynthetic incorporation of [3H]ethanolamine into proteins was assessed in the human erythroleukemia cell line K562. A single predominant labeled protein of about 50 kDa was observed following electrophoresis of cell extracts on polyacrylamide gels in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate. Subcellular fractionation showed this protein to distribute similarly to a 46-kDa [3H]ethanolamine-labeled protein reported previously (Tisdale, E. J., and Tartakoff, A. M. (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263, 8244-8252). In particular, the protein was enriched in cytosolic and microsomal fractions relative to plasma membrane and thus did not appear to correspond to the class of proteins with glycoinositol phospholipid anchors, the only post-translational protein modification involving ethanolamine that had been described previously. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel analysis involving isoelectric focusing followed by electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulfate indicated that the protein was very basic, and nitrocellulose blots of one- and two-dimensional gels subjected to 3H autoradiography and immunostaining with antisera to purified rabbit elongation factor (EF) 1 alpha revealed that the protein was EF-1 alpha. Copurification of rabbit EF-1 alpha and the [3H]ethanolamine-labeled protein from K562 cells further supported this identification. Analysis of tryptic fragments produced from the copurified proteins by reverse-phase high pressure liquid chromatography showed two radiolabeled peptides. Amino acid analysis demonstrated 1 residue of ethanolamine in each peptide, and peptide sequencing revealed that the ethanolamine-containing component(s) was attached to Glu301 and Glu374 in the EF-1 alpha protein sequence deduced from a human EF-1 alpha cDNA. These data confirm a new class of post-translational protein modifications involving ethanolamine. PMID:2708357

  1. DbPTM 3.0: an informative resource for investigating substrate site specificity and functional association of protein post-translational modifications.

    PubMed

    Lu, Cheng-Tsung; Huang, Kai-Yao; Su, Min-Gang; Lee, Tzong-Yi; Bretaña, Neil Arvin; Chang, Wen-Chi; Chen, Yi-Ju; Chen, Yu-Ju; Huang, Hsien-Da

    2013-01-01

    Protein modification is an extremely important post-translational regulation that adjusts the physical and chemical properties, conformation, stability and activity of a protein; thus altering protein function. Due to the high throughput of mass spectrometry (MS)-based methods in identifying site-specific post-translational modifications (PTMs), dbPTM (http://dbPTM.mbc.nctu.edu.tw/) is updated to integrate experimental PTMs obtained from public resources as well as manually curated MS/MS peptides associated with PTMs from research articles. Version 3.0 of dbPTM aims to be an informative resource for investigating the substrate specificity of PTM sites and functional association of PTMs between substrates and their interacting proteins. In order to investigate the substrate specificity for modification sites, a newly developed statistical method has been applied to identify the significant substrate motifs for each type of PTMs containing sufficient experimental data. According to the data statistics in dbPTM, >60% of PTM sites are located in the functional domains of proteins. It is known that most PTMs can create binding sites for specific protein-interaction domains that work together for cellular function. Thus, this update integrates protein-protein interaction and domain-domain interaction to determine the functional association of PTM sites located in protein-interacting domains. Additionally, the information of structural topologies on transmembrane (TM) proteins is integrated in dbPTM in order to delineate the structural correlation between the reported PTM sites and TM topologies. To facilitate the investigation of PTMs on TM proteins, the PTM substrate sites and the structural topology are graphically represented. Also, literature information related to PTMs, orthologous conservations and substrate motifs of PTMs are also provided in the resource. Finally, this version features an improved web interface to facilitate convenient access to the resource.

  2. Intravital imaging reveals distinct responses of depleting dynamic tumor-associated macrophage and dendritic cell subpopulations

    PubMed Central

    Lohela, Marja; Casbon, Amy-Jo; Olow, Aleksandra; Bonham, Lynn; Branstetter, Daniel; Weng, Ning; Smith, Jeffrey; Werb, Zena

    2014-01-01

    Tumor-infiltrating inflammatory cells comprise a major part of the stromal microenvironment and support cancer progression by multiple mechanisms. High numbers of tumor myeloid cells correlate with poor prognosis in breast cancer and are coupled with the angiogenic switch and malignant progression. However, the specific roles and regulation of heterogeneous tumor myeloid populations are incompletely understood. CSF-1 is a major myeloid cell mitogen, and signaling through its receptor CSF-1R is also linked to poor outcomes. To characterize myeloid cell function in tumors, we combined confocal intravital microscopy with depletion of CSF-1R–dependent cells using a neutralizing CSF-1R antibody in the mouse mammary tumor virus long-terminal region-driven polyoma middle T antigen breast cancer model. The depleted cells shared markers of tumor-associated macrophages and dendritic cells (M-DCs), matching the phenotype of tumor dendritic cells that take up antigens and interact with T cells. We defined functional subgroups within the M-DC population by imaging endocytic and matrix metalloproteinase activity. Anti–CSF-1R treatment altered stromal dynamics and impaired both survival of M-DCs and accumulation of new M-DCs, but did not deplete Gr-1+ neutrophils or block doxorubicin-induced myeloid cell recruitment, and had a minimal effect on lung myeloid cells. Nevertheless, prolonged treatment led to delayed tumor growth, reduced vascularity, and decreased lung metastasis. Because the myeloid infiltrate in metastatic lungs differed significantly from that in mammary tumors, the reduction in metastasis may result from the impact on primary tumors. The combination of functional analysis by intravital imaging with cellular characterization has refined our understanding of the effects of experimental targeted therapies on the tumor microenvironment. PMID:25385645

  3. Immunolocalization of tubulin isoforms and post-translational modifications in the protists Tritrichomonas foetus and Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Lopes, L C; Ribeiro, K C; Benchimol, M

    2001-07-01

    In the present report we show the distribution of multiple tubulin isoforms in Trichomonas vaginalis and Tritrichomonas foetus, flagellated parasitic protists of the urogenital tracts of human and cattle, respectively, using immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy. We used several monoclonal and polyclonal anti-tubulin antibodies from different sources and recognizing variant tubulin isoforms. Our results demonstrate that: (1) there is a heterogeneous distribution of the different tubulin isoforms in the main microtubular cell structures, such as axostyle, flagella, basal bodies, and mitotic spindle, (2) the axostyle-pelta junction is a structure with high affinity for glutamylated tubulin antibodies in T. foetus, (3) the spindle labeling is positive to anti-glutamylated tubulin and anti-alpha-tubulin (TAT1 and purchased from Amersham) antibodies in T. vaginalis but it is negative in T. foetus, (4) the nuclear matrix and the cytosol presented positive reaction using glutamylated and TAT1 (anti-alpha-tubulin) antibodies only in T. vaginalis, and (5) the Golgi complex exhibited staining using the glutamylated tubulin antibody. The present data corroborate with the idea of the existence of a heterogeneous population of microtubules in these protists and of a subset of intracytoplasmic microtubules. Microtubule diversity may reflect distinct tubulins, diverse microtubule-associated proteins, or a combination of both.

  4. Diverse and divergent protein post-translational modifications in two growth stages of a natural microbial community

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhou; Wang, Yingfeng; Yao, Qiuming; Justice, Nicholas B.; Ahn, Tae-Hyuk; Xu, Dong; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Banfield, Jillian F.; Pan, Chongle

    2014-01-01

    Detailed characterization of posttranslational modifications (PTMs) of proteins in microbial communities remains a significant challenge. Here we directly identify and quantify a broad range of PTMs (hydroxylation, methylation, citrullination, acetylation, phosphorylation, methylthiolation, S-nitrosylation and nitration) in a natural microbial community from an acid mine drainage site. Approximately 29% of the identified proteins of the dominant Leptospirillum group II bacteria are modified, and 43% of modified proteins carry multiple PTM types. Most PTM events, except S-nitrosylations, have low fractional occupancy. Notably, PTM events are detected on Cas proteins involved in antiviral defense, an aspect of Cas biochemistry not considered previously. Further, Cas PTM profiles from Leptospirillum group II differ in early versus mature biofilms. PTM patterns are divergent on orthologues of two closely related, but ecologically differentiated, Leptospirillum group II bacteria. Our results highlight the prevalence and dynamics of PTMs of proteins, with potential significance for ecological adaptation and microbial evolution.

  5. Distinct charge dynamics in battery electrodes revealed by in situ and operando soft X-ray spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaosong; Wang, Dongdong; Liu, Gao; Srinivasan, Venkat; Liu, Zhi; Hussain, Zahid; Yang, Wanli

    2013-01-01

    Developing high-performance batteries relies on material breakthroughs. During the past few years, various in situ characterization tools have been developed and have become indispensible in studying and the eventual optimization of battery materials. However, soft X-ray spectroscopy, one of the most sensitive probes of electronic states, has been mainly limited to ex situ experiments for battery research. Here we achieve in situ and operando soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy of lithium-ion battery cathodes. Taking advantage of the elemental, chemical and surface sensitivities of soft X-rays, we discover distinct lithium-ion and electron dynamics in Li(Co1/3Ni1/3Mn1/3)O2 and LiFePO4 cathodes in polymer electrolytes. The contrast between the two systems and the relaxation effect in LiFePO4 is attributed to a phase transformation mechanism, and the mesoscale morphology and charge conductivity of the electrodes. These discoveries demonstrate feasibility and power of in situ soft X-ray spectroscopy for studying integrated and dynamic effects in batteries. PMID:24100759

  6. Potato virus Y HCPro localization at distinct, dynamically related and environment-influenced structures in the cell cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    del Toro, Francisco; Fernández, Fátima Tena; Tilsner, Jens; Wright, Kathryn M; Tenllado, Francisco; Chung, Bong Nam; Praveen, Shelly; Canto, Tomas

    2014-12-01

    Potyvirus HCPro is a multifunctional protein that, among other functions, interferes with antiviral defenses in plants and mediates viral transmission by aphid vectors. We have visualized in vivo the subcellular distribution and dynamics of HCPro from Potato virus Y and its homodimers, using green, yellow, and red fluorescent protein tags or their split parts, while assessing their biological activities. Confocal microscopy revealed a pattern of even distribution of fluorescence throughout the cytoplasm, common to all these modified HCPros, when transiently expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana epidermal cells in virus-free systems. However, in some cells, distinct additional patterns, specific to some constructs and influenced by environmental conditions, were observed: i) a small number of large, amorphous cytoplasm inclusions that contained α-tubulin; ii) a pattern of numerous small, similarly sized, dot-like inclusions distributing regularly throughout the cytoplasm and associated or anchored to the cortical endoplasmic reticulum and the microtubule (MT) cytoskeleton; and iii) a pattern that smoothly coated the MT. Furthermore, mixed and intermediate forms from the last two patterns were observed, suggesting dynamic transports between them. HCPro did not colocalize with actin filaments or the Golgi apparatus. Despite its association with MT, this network integrity was required neither for HCPro suppression of silencing in agropatch assays nor for its mediation of virus transmission by aphids. PMID:25387134

  7. Potato virus Y HCPro localization at distinct, dynamically related and environment-influenced structures in the cell cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    del Toro, Francisco; Fernández, Fátima Tena; Tilsner, Jens; Wright, Kathryn M; Tenllado, Francisco; Chung, Bong Nam; Praveen, Shelly; Canto, Tomas

    2014-12-01

    Potyvirus HCPro is a multifunctional protein that, among other functions, interferes with antiviral defenses in plants and mediates viral transmission by aphid vectors. We have visualized in vivo the subcellular distribution and dynamics of HCPro from Potato virus Y and its homodimers, using green, yellow, and red fluorescent protein tags or their split parts, while assessing their biological activities. Confocal microscopy revealed a pattern of even distribution of fluorescence throughout the cytoplasm, common to all these modified HCPros, when transiently expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana epidermal cells in virus-free systems. However, in some cells, distinct additional patterns, specific to some constructs and influenced by environmental conditions, were observed: i) a small number of large, amorphous cytoplasm inclusions that contained α-tubulin; ii) a pattern of numerous small, similarly sized, dot-like inclusions distributing regularly throughout the cytoplasm and associated or anchored to the cortical endoplasmic reticulum and the microtubule (MT) cytoskeleton; and iii) a pattern that smoothly coated the MT. Furthermore, mixed and intermediate forms from the last two patterns were observed, suggesting dynamic transports between them. HCPro did not colocalize with actin filaments or the Golgi apparatus. Despite its association with MT, this network integrity was required neither for HCPro suppression of silencing in agropatch assays nor for its mediation of virus transmission by aphids.

  8. Associations between Blood and Urine Arsenic Concentrations and Global Levels of Post-Translational Histone Modifications in Bangladeshi Men and Women

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Caitlin G.; Liu, Xinhua; Hall, Megan N.; Slavkovich, Vesna; Ilievski, Vesna; Parvez, Faruque; Siddique, Abu B.; Shahriar, Hasan; Uddin, Mohammad N.; Islam, Tariqul; Graziano, Joseph H.; Costa, Max; Gamble, Mary V.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Exposure to inorganic arsenic is associated with numerous adverse health outcomes, with susceptibility differing by sex. Although evidence from in vitro studies suggests that arsenic alters post-translational histone modifications (PTHMs), evidence in humans is limited. Objectives: The objectives were to determine: a) if arsenic exposure is associated with global (percent) levels of PTHMs H3K36me2, H3K36me3, and H3K79me2 in a sex-dependent manner, and b) if %PTHMs are stable when arsenic exposure is reduced. Methods: We examined associations between arsenic, measured in blood and urine, and %PTHMs in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 317 participants enrolled in the Bangladesh Folic Acid and Creatine Trial (FACT). We also examined the stability of %PTHMs after the use of arsenic-removal water filters (n = 60). Results: Associations between natural log–transformed (ln) urinary arsenic, adjusted for creatinine (uAsCr), and %H3K36me2 differed significantly between men and women (p = 0.01). ln(uAsCr) was positively associated with %H3K36me2 in men [β = 0.12; 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.01, 0.23, p = 0.03] but was negatively associated with %H3K36me2 in women (β = –0.05; 95% CI: –0.12, 0.02, p = 0.19). The patterns of associations with blood arsenic were similar. On average, water filter use was also associated with reductions in %H3K36me2 (p < 0.01), but this did not differ significantly by sex. Arsenic was not significantly associated with %H3K36me3 or %H3K79me2 in men or women. Conclusions: Arsenic exposure was associated with %H3K36me2 in a sex-specific manner but was not associated with %H3K36me3 or %H3K79me2. Additional studies are needed to assess changes in %H3K36me2 after arsenic removal. Citation: Howe CG, Liu X, Hall MN, Slavkovich V, Ilievski V, Parvez F, Siddique AB, Shahriar H, Uddin MN, Islam T, Graziano JH, Costa M, Gamble MV. 2016. Associations between blood and urine arsenic concentrations and global levels of post-translational

  9. Characterization of a new qQq-FTICR mass spectrometer for post-translational modification analysis and top-down tandem mass spectrometry of whole proteins.

    PubMed

    Jebanathirajah, Judith A; Pittman, Jason L; Thomson, Bruce A; Budnik, Bogdan A; Kaur, Parminder; Rape, Michael; Kirschner, Marc; Costello, Catherine E; O'Connor, Peter B

    2005-12-01

    The use of a new electrospray qQq Fourier transform ion cyclotron mass spectrometer (qQq-FTICR MS) instrument for biologic applications is described. This qQq-FTICR mass spectrometer was designed for the study of post-translationally modified proteins and for top-down analysis of biologically relevant protein samples. The utility of the instrument for the analysis of phosphorylation, a common and important post-translational modification, was investigated. Phosphorylation was chosen as an example because it is ubiquitous and challenging to analyze. In addition, the use of the instrument for top-down sequencing of proteins was explored since this instrument offers particular advantages to this approach. Top-down sequencing was performed on different proteins, including commercially available proteins and biologically derived samples such as the human E2 ubiquitin conjugating enzyme, UbCH10. A good sequence tag was obtained for the human UbCH10, allowing the unambiguous identification of the protein. The instrument was built with a commercially produced front end: a focusing rf-only quadrupole (Q0), followed by a resolving quadrupole (Q1), and a LINAC quadrupole collision cell (Q2), in combination with an FTICR mass analyzer. It has utility in the analysis of samples found in substoichiometric concentrations, as ions can be isolated in the mass resolving Q1 and accumulated in Q2 before analysis in the ICR cell. The speed and efficacy of the Q2 cooling and fragmentation was demonstrated on an LCMS-compatible time scale, and detection limits for phosphopeptides in the 10 amol/muL range (pM) were demonstrated. The instrument was designed to make several fragmentation methods available, including nozzle-skimmer fragmentation, Q2 collisionally activated dissociation (Q2 CAD), multipole storage assisted dissociation (MSAD), electron capture dissociation (ECD), infrared multiphoton induced dissociation (IRMPD), and sustained off resonance irradiation (SORI) CAD, thus

  10. Cellular dynamics of regeneration reveals role of two distinct Pax7 stem cell populations in larval zebrafish muscle repair

    PubMed Central

    Pipalia, Tapan G.; Koth, Jana; Roy, Shukolpa D.; Hammond, Christina L.; Kawakami, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Heterogeneity of stem cells or their niches is likely to influence tissue regeneration. Here we reveal stem/precursor cell diversity during wound repair in larval zebrafish somitic body muscle using time-lapse 3D confocal microscopy on reporter lines. Skeletal muscle with incision wounds rapidly regenerates both slow and fast muscle fibre types. A swift immune response is followed by an increase in cells at the wound site, many of which express the muscle stem cell marker Pax7. Pax7+ cells proliferate and then undergo terminal differentiation involving Myogenin accumulation and subsequent loss of Pax7 followed by elongation and fusion to repair fast muscle fibres. Analysis of pax7a and pax7b transgenic reporter fish reveals that cells expressing each of the duplicated pax7 genes are distinctly localised in uninjured larvae. Cells marked by pax7a only or by both pax7a and pax7b enter the wound rapidly and contribute to muscle wound repair, but each behaves differently. Low numbers of pax7a-only cells form nascent fibres. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that the more numerous pax7b-marked cells frequently fuse to pre-existing fibres, contributing more strongly than pax7a-only cells to repair of damaged fibres. pax7b-marked cells are more often present in rows of aligned cells that are observed to fuse into a single fibre, but more rarely contribute to nascent regenerated fibres. Ablation of a substantial portion of nitroreductase-expressing pax7b cells with metronidazole prior to wounding triggered rapid pax7a-only cell accumulation, but this neither inhibited nor augmented pax7a-only cell-derived myogenesis and thus altered the cellular repair dynamics during wound healing. Moreover, pax7a-only cells did not regenerate pax7b cells, suggesting a lineage distinction. We propose a modified founder cell and fusion-competent cell model in which pax7a-only cells initiate fibre formation and pax7b cells contribute to fibre growth. This newly discovered cellular

  11. Subcellular Dynamics of Multifunctional Protein Regulation: Mechanisms of GAPDH Intracellular Translocation

    PubMed Central

    Sirover, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Multidimensional proteins such as glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) exhibit distinct activities unrelated to their originally identified functions. Apart from glycolysis, GAPDH participates in iron metabolism, membrane trafficking, histone biosynthesis, the maintenance of DNA integrity and receptor mediated cell signaling. Further, multifunctional proteins exhibit distinct changes in their subcellular localization reflecting their new activities. As such, GAPDH is not only a cytosolic protein but is localized in the membrane, the nucleus, polysomes, the ER and the Golgi. In addition, although the initial subcellular localizations of multifunctional proteins may be of significance, dynamic changes in intracellular distribution may occur as a consequence of those new activities. As such, regulatory mechanisms may exist through which cells control multifunctional protein expression as a function of their subcellular localization. The temporal sequence through which subcellular translocation and the acquisition of new GAPDH functions is considered as well as post-translational modification as a basis for its intracellular transport. PMID:22388977

  12. Post-translational protein modification by O-linked N-acetyl-glucosamine: Its role in mediating the adverse effects of diabetes on the heart

    PubMed Central

    McLarty, Jennifer L.; Marsh, Susan A.; Chatham, John C.

    2012-01-01

    The post-translation attachment of O-linked N-acetylglucosamine, or O-GlcNAc, to serine and threonine residues of nuclear and cytoplasmic proteins is increasingly recognized as a key regulator of diverse cellular processes. O-GlcNAc synthesis is essential for cell survival and it has been shown that acute activation of pathways, which increase cellular O-GlcNAc levels is cytoprotective; however, prolonged increases in O-GlcNAcylation have been implicated in a number of chronic diseases. Glucose metabolism via the hexosamine biosynthesis pathway plays a central role in regulating O-GlcNAc synthesis; consequently, sustained increases in O-GlcNAc levels have been implicated in glucose toxicity and insulin resistance. Studies on the role of O-GlcNAc in regulating cardiomyocyte function have grown rapidly over the past decade and there is growing evidence that increased O-GlcNAc levels contribute to the adverse effects of diabetes on the heart, including impaired contractility, calcium handling, and abnormal stress responses. Recent evidence also suggests that O-GlcNAc plays a role in epigenetic control of gene transcription. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of our current knowledge about the regulation of protein O-GlcNAcylation and to explore in more detail O-GlcNAc-mediated responses in the diabetic heart. PMID:22985933

  13. Post-translational intracellular trafficking determines the type of immune response elicited by DNA vaccines expressing Gag antigen of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1)

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Aaron; West, Kim; Rothman, Alan L; Ennis, Francis A; Lu, Shan; Wang, Shixia

    2013-01-01

    In the current study, immune responses induced by Gag DNA vaccines with different designs were evaluated in Balb/C mice. The results demonstrated that the DNA vaccine with the full length wild type gag gene (Wt-Gag) mainly produced Gag antigens intracellularly and induced a higher level of cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses, as measured by IFN-gamma ELISPOT, intracellular cytokine staining (ICS), and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) assays against a dominant CD8+ T cell epitope (AMQMLKETI). In contrast, the addition of a tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) leader sequence significantly improved overall Gag protein expression/secretion and Gag-specific antibody responses; however, Gag-specific CMI responses were decreased. The mutation of zinc-finger motif changed Gag protein expression patterns and reduced the ability to generate both CMI and antibody responses against Gag. These findings indicate that the structure and post-translational processing of antigens expressed by DNA vaccines play a critical role in eliciting optimal antibody or CMI responses. PMID:23941868

  14. Interaction proteins of invertase and invertase inhibitor in cold-stored potato tubers suggested a protein complex underlying post-translational regulation of invertase.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuan; Liu, Jun; Liu, Xun; Ou, Yongbin; Li, Meng; Zhang, Huiling; Song, Botao; Xie, Conghua

    2013-12-01

    The activity of vacuolar invertase (VI) is vital to potato cold-induced sweetening (CIS). A post-translational regulation of VI activity has been proposed which involves invertase inhibitor (VIH), but the mechanism for the interaction between VI and VIH has not been fully understood. To identify the potential partners of VI and VIH, two cDNA libraries were respectively constructed from CIS-resistant wild potato species Solanum berthaultii and CIS-sensitive potato cultivar AC035-01 for the yeast two-hybrid analysis. The StvacINV1 (one of the potato VIs) and StInvInh2B (one of the potato VIHs), previously identified to be associated with potato CIS, were used as baits to screen the two libraries. Through positive selection and sequencing, 27 potential target proteins of StvacINV1 and eight of StInvInh2B were clarified. The Kunitz-type protein inhibitors were captured by StvacINV1 in both libraries and the interaction between them was confirmed by bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay in tobacco cells, reinforcing a fundamental interaction between VI and VIH. Notably, a sucrose non-fermenting-1-related protein kinase 1 was captured by both the baits, suggesting that a protein complex could be necessary for fine turning of the invertase activity. The target proteins clarified in present research provide a route to elucidate the mechanism by which the VI activity can be subtly modulated.

  15. Analysis of phosphopeptide changes as spermatozoa acquire functional competence in the epididymis demonstrates changes in the post-translational modification of Izumo1.

    PubMed

    Baker, Mark A; Hetherington, Louise; Weinberg, Anita; Naumovski, Nenad; Velkov, Tony; Pelzing, Matthias; Dolman, Sebastiaan; Condina, Mark R; Aitken, R John

    2012-11-01

    Spermatozoa are functionally inert when they emerge from the testes. Functional competence is conferred upon these cells during a post-testicular phase of sperm maturation in the epididymis. Remarkably, this functional transformation of epididymal spermatozoa occurs in the absence of nuclear gene transcription or protein translation. To understand the cellular mechanisms underpinning epididymal maturation, we have performed a label-free, MS-based, comparative quantification of peptides from caput, corpus and caudal epididymal spermatozoa. In total, 68 phosphopeptide changes could be detected during epididymal maturation corresponding to the identification of 22 modified proteins. Included in this list are the sodium-bicarbonate cotransporter, the sperm specific serine kinase 1, AKAP4 and protein kinase A regulatory subunit. Furthermore, four phosphopeptide changes came from Izumo1, the sperm-egg fusion protein, in the cytoplasmic segment of the protein. 2D-PAGE confirmed that Izumo1 is post-translationally modified during epididymal transit. Interestingly, phosphorylation on Izumo1 was detected on residue S339 in the caput and corpus but not caudal cells. Furthermore, Izumo1 exhibited four phosphorylated residues when spermatozoa reached the cauda, which were absent from caput cells. A model is advanced suggesting that these phospho-regulations are likely to act as a scaffold for the association of adaptor proteins with Izumo1 as these cells prepare for fertilization. PMID:22954305

  16. Post-translational regulation of rice MADS29 function: homodimerization or binary interactions with other seed-expressed MADS proteins modulate its translocation into the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Nayar, Saraswati; Kapoor, Meenu; Kapoor, Sanjay

    2014-10-01

    OsMADS29 is a seed-specific MADS-box transcription factor that affects embryo development and grain filling by maintaining hormone homeostasis and degradation of cells in the nucellus and nucellar projection. Although it has a bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequence, the transiently expressed OsMADS29 monomer does not localize specifically in the nucleus. Dimerization of the monomers alters the intracellular localization fate of the resulting OsMADS29 homodimer, which then translocates into the nucleus. By generating domain-specific deletions/mutations, we show that two conserved amino acids (lysine(23) and arginine(24)) in the NLS are important for nuclear localization of the OsMADS29 homodimer. Furthermore, the analyses involving interaction of OsMADS29 with 30 seed-expressed rice MADS proteins revealed 19 more MADS-box proteins, including five E-class proteins, which interacted with OsMADS29. Eleven of these complexes were observed to be localized in the nucleus. Deletion analysis revealed that the KC region (K-box and C-terminal domain) plays a pivotal role in homodimerization. These data suggest that the biological function of OsMADS29 may not only be regulated at the level of transcription and translation as reported earlier, but also at the post-translational level by way of the interaction between OsMADS29 monomers, and between OsMADS29 and other MADS-box proteins.

  17. Post-translational regulation of rice MADS29 function: homodimerization or binary interactions with other seed-expressed MADS proteins modulate its translocation into the nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Nayar, Saraswati; Kapoor, Meenu; Kapoor, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    OsMADS29 is a seed-specific MADS-box transcription factor that affects embryo development and grain filling by maintaining hormone homeostasis and degradation of cells in the nucellus and nucellar projection. Although it has a bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequence, the transiently expressed OsMADS29 monomer does not localize specifically in the nucleus. Dimerization of the monomers alters the intracellular localization fate of the resulting OsMADS29 homodimer, which then translocates into the nucleus. By generating domain-specific deletions/mutations, we show that two conserved amino acids (lysine23 and arginine24) in the NLS are important for nuclear localization of the OsMADS29 homodimer. Furthermore, the analyses involving interaction of OsMADS29 with 30 seed-expressed rice MADS proteins revealed 19 more MADS-box proteins, including five E-class proteins, which interacted with OsMADS29. Eleven of these complexes were observed to be localized in the nucleus. Deletion analysis revealed that the KC region (K-box and C-terminal domain) plays a pivotal role in homodimerization. These data suggest that the biological function of OsMADS29 may not only be regulated at the level of transcription and translation as reported earlier, but also at the post-translational level by way of the interaction between OsMADS29 monomers, and between OsMADS29 and other MADS-box proteins. PMID:25096923

  18. An update on post-translational modifications of hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins: toward a model highlighting their contribution to plant cell wall architecture

    PubMed Central

    Hijazi, May; Velasquez, Silvia M.; Jamet, Elisabeth; Estevez, José M.; Albenne, Cécile

    2014-01-01

    Plant cell walls are composite structures mainly composed of polysaccharides, also containing a large set of proteins involved in diverse functions such as growth, environmental sensing, signaling, and defense. Research on cell wall proteins (CWPs) is a challenging field since present knowledge of their role into the structure and function of cell walls is very incomplete. Among CWPs, hydroxyproline (Hyp)-rich O-glycoproteins (HRGPs) were classified into three categories: (i) moderately glycosylated extensins (EXTs) able to form covalent scaffolds; (ii) hyperglycosylated arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs); and (iii) Hyp/proline (Pro)-Rich proteins (H/PRPs) that may be non-, weakly- or highly-glycosylated. In this review, we provide a description of the main features of their post-translational modifications (PTMs), biosynthesis, structure, and function. We propose a new model integrating HRGPs and their partners in cell walls. Altogether, they could form a continuous glyco-network with non-cellulosic polysaccharides via covalent bonds or non-covalent interactions, thus strongly contributing to cell wall architecture. PMID:25177325

  19. THE ONCOGENIC FUSION PROTEIN PAX3-FKHR HAS A GREATER POST-TRANSLATIONAL STABILITY RELATIVE TO PAX3 DURING EARLY MYOGENESIS

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Patrick J.; Hollenbach, Andrew D.

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY The childhood solid muscle tumor Alveolar Rhabdomyosarcoma (ARMS) is characterized by the t(2;13)(q35;q14) chromosomal translocation, which results in the fusion of two transcription factors important for myogenesis, Pax3 and FKHR (FOX01a). The effects of myogenic differentiation on the stability of FKHR have been well characterized. However, similar studies have yet to be performed on Pax3 or the oncogenic fusion protein Pax3-FKHR. Therefore, we demonstrate in the physiologically relevant mouse primary myoblast system that the expression of Pax3 decreases nearly 95% during the first twenty-four hours of myogenic differentiation. In contrast, there is an aberrant persistence of expression of Pax3-FKHR during this same time period. These differences in protein expression levels do not result from changes on the transcriptional nor the translational level since we observed no concomitant decrease in the levels of Pax3 or Pax3-FKHR mRNA or in the ability of both proteins to be translated. Instead, a pulse-chase analysis determined that Pax3-FKHR has a half-life significantly greater than the half-life of wild type Pax3 demonstrating for the first time that Pax3-FKHR has greater post-translational protein stability relative to wild type Pax3 during early myogenic differentiation. Finally, the persistence of expression of Pax3-FKHR prevents the terminal differentiation of primary myoblasts demonstrating a biological consequence of its aberrant expression. PMID:17698292

  20. An ion-current mutant of Paramecium tetraurelia with defects in the primary structure and post-translational N-methylation of calmodulin

    SciTech Connect

    Wallen-Friedman, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    My work on pantophobiac A{sup 2} (pntA{sup 2}), a behavioral mutant of Paramecium tetraurelia, suggest that the Ca{sup ++}-binding protein calmodulin (CaM), and post-translation N-methylation of CaM, are important for Ca{sup ++}-related ion-current function. Calmodulin from wild-type Paramecium has two sites of lysine-N-methylation. Both of these sites are almost fully methylated in vivo; thus wild-type calmodulin is a poor substrate for N-methylation in vitro. In contrast, pntA/{sup 2} CaM can be heavily N-methylated in vitro, suggesting that the mutant calmodulin is under-methylated in vivo. Amino-acid composition analysis showed that CaM lysine 115 is undermethylated in pntA{sup 2}. Once pntA{sup 2} CaM is N-methylated, the (methyl-{sup 3}H) group does not turn over in either wild-type or pntA{sup 2} cytoplasmic fractions. The methylating enzymes in pntA{sup 2} high-speed supernatant fractions are active, but may be less robust than those of the wild type, suggesting a possible control of these enzymes by CaM.

  1. Lysine methylation is an endogenous post-translational modification of tau protein in human brain and a modulator of aggregation propensity

    PubMed Central

    Funk, Kristen E.; Thomas, Stefani N.; Schafer, Kelsey N.; Cooper, Grace L.; Liao, Zhongping; Clark, David J.; Yang, Austin J.; Kuret, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    In Alzheimer disease, the microtubule-associated protein tau dissociates from the neuronal cytoskeleton and aggregates to form cytoplasmic inclusions. Although hyper-phosphorylation of tau Ser and Thr residues is an established trigger of tau misfunction and aggregation, tau modifications extend to Lys residues as well, raising the possibility that different modification signatures depress or promote aggregation propensity depending on site occupancy. To identify Lys-residue modifications associated with normal tau function, soluble tau proteins isolated from four cognitively normal human brains were characterized by mass spectrometry methods. The major detectable Lys modification was found to be methylation, which appeared in the form of mono- and di-methyl Lys residues distributed among at least eleven sites. Unlike tau phosphorylation sites, the frequency of Lys methylation was highest in the microtubule binding repeat region that mediates both microtubule binding and homotypic interactions. When purified recombinant human tau was modified in vitro through reductive methylation, its ability to promote tubulin polymerization was retained, whereas its aggregation propensity was greatly attenuated at both nucleation and extension steps. These data establish Lys methylation as part of the normal tau post-translational modification signature in human brain, and suggest that it can function in part to protect against pathological tau aggregation. PMID:24869773

  2. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae poly(A)-binding protein is subject to multiple post-translational modifications, including the methylation of glutamic acid.

    PubMed

    Low, Jason K K; Hart-Smith, Gene; Erce, Melissa A; Wilkins, Marc R

    2014-01-10

    Poly(A)-binding protein in mouse and man was recently found to be highly post-translationally modified. Here we analysed an ortholog of this protein, Pab1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, to assess the conservation and thus likely importance of these modifications. Pab1 showed the presence of six sites of methylated glutamate, five sites of lysine acetylation, and one phosphorylation of serine. Many modifications on Pab1 showed either complete conservation with those on human or mouse PABPC1, were present on nearby residues and/or were present in the same domain(s). The conservation of methylated glutamate, an unusual modification, was of particular note and suggests a conserved function. Comparison of methylated glutamate sites in human, mouse and yeast poly(A)-binding protein, along with methylation sites catalysed by CheR L-glutamyl protein methyltransferase from Salmonella typhimurium, revealed that the methylation of glutamate preferentially occurs in EE and DE motifs or other small regions of acidic amino acids. The conservation of methylated glutamate in the same protein between mouse, man and yeast suggests the presence of a eukaryotic l-glutamyl protein methyltransferase and that the modification is of functional significance.

  3. The Wheat NAC Transcription Factor TaNAC2L Is Regulated at the Transcriptional and Post-Translational Levels and Promotes Heat Stress Tolerance in Transgenic Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Weiwei; Zhang, Jinxia; Zhang, Ning; Xin, Mingming; Peng, Huiru; Hu, Zhaorong; Ni, Zhongfu; Du, Jinkun

    2015-01-01

    Heat stress poses a serious threat to global crop production. In efforts that aim to mitigate the adverse effects of heat stress on crops, a variety of genetic tools are being used to develop plants with improved thermotolerance. The characterization of important regulators of heat stress tolerance provides essential information for this aim. In this study, we examine the wheat (Triticum aestivum) NAC transcription factor gene TaNAC2L. High temperature induced TaNAC2L expression in wheat and overexpression of TaNAC2L in Arabidopsis thaliana enhanced acquired heat tolerance without causing obvious alterations in phenotype compared with wild type under normal conditions. TaNAC2L overexpression also activated the expression of heat-related genes in the transgenic Arabidopsis plants, suggesting that TaNAC2L may improve heat tolerance by regulating the expression of stress-responsive genes. Notably, TaNAC2L is also regulated at the post-translational level and might be degraded via a proteasome-mediated pathway. Thus, this wheat transcription factor may have potential uses in enhancing thermotolerance in crops.

  4. Transcriptional and post-translational regulation of S-adenosyl-L-methionine: salicylic acid carboxyl methyltransferase (SAMT) during Stephanotis floribunda flower development.

    PubMed

    Pott, Marcella B; Effmert, Uta; Piechulla, Birgit

    2003-06-01

    Methyl salicylate (MeSA) and a number of other volatiles are primarily emitted in the evening/night by Stephanotis floribunda leading to attraction of night active pollinators. A second minor emission peak for MeSA occurs in the morning/day. To understand these emission patterns, we have studied in detail the temporal regulation of the last step of the biosynthetic pathway of MeSA, the convertion of salicylic acid (SA) to MeSA catalysed by S-adenosyl-L-methionine: salicylic acid carboxyl methyltransferase (SAMT). We observed that in young flowers a maximum in SAMT activity occurs in the night, and that in flowers which were open longer than 4 days, two SAMT activity maxima occurred per day. These maxima correlated well with dawn and dusk and the previously detected MeSA emission peaks. The SAMT mRNA levels, however, have a broad maximum during the dark phase, while the SAMT protein levels continuously increase during floral development without showing daily rhythms. Furthermore, under continuous illumination (LL) the SAMT mRNA levels and activity patterns oscillate, suggesting the involvement of a circadian clock in the regulation network. Taken together, this analysis clearly demonstrates that regulation of MeSA emission occurs both at the transcriptional and post-translational levels, indicating that control at more than one level is necessary to guarantee the precise timing of volatile emission in flowers of S. floribunda. PMID:12872485

  5. Complete Workflow for Analysis of Histone Post-translational Modifications Using Bottom-up Mass Spectrometry: From Histone Extraction to Data Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sidoli, Simone; Bhanu, Natarajan V.; Karch, Kelly R.; Wang, Xiaoshi; Garcia, Benjamin A.

    2016-01-01

    Nucleosomes are the smallest structural unit of chromatin, composed of 147 base pairs of DNA wrapped around an octamer of histone proteins. Histone function is mediated by extensive post-translational modification by a myriad of nuclear proteins. These modifications are critical for nuclear integrity as they regulate chromatin structure and recruit enzymes involved in gene regulation, DNA repair and chromosome condensation. Even though a large part of the scientific community adopts antibody-based techniques to characterize histone PTM abundance, these approaches are low throughput and biased against hypermodified proteins, as the epitope might be obstructed by nearby modifications. This protocol describes the use of nano liquid chromatography (nLC) and mass spectrometry (MS) for accurate quantification of histone modifications. This method is designed to characterize a large variety of histone PTMs and the relative abundance of several histone variants within single analyses. In this protocol, histones are derivatized with propionic anhydride followed by digestion with trypsin to generate peptides of 5 - 20 aa in length. After digestion, the newly exposed N-termini of the histone peptides are derivatized to improve chromatographic retention during nLC-MS. This method allows for the relative quantification of histone PTMs spanning four orders of magnitude. PMID:27286567

  6. SlNAC1, a stress-related transcription factor, is fine-tuned on both the transcriptional and the post-translational level.

    PubMed

    Huang, Weizao; Miao, Min; Kud, Joanna; Niu, Xiangli; Ouyang, Bo; Zhang, Junhong; Ye, Zhibiao; Kuhl, Joseph C; Liu, Yongsheng; Xiao, Fangming

    2013-03-01

    The plant-specific NAC (NAM, ATAF1,2, CUC2) transcription factors play significant roles in diverse physiological processes. In this study, we determined the regulation of a stress-related tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) NAC1 (SlNAC1) transcription factor at both the transcriptional and the post-translational level. The SlNAC1 protein was found to be stable in the presence of proteasome-specific inhibitor MG132 or MG115 and ubiquitinated in plant cells, suggesting that the SlNAC1 is subject to the ubiquitin-proteasome system-mediated degradation. Deletion analysis identified a short segment of 10 amino acids (aa261-270) that was required for ubiquitin-proteasome system-mediated degradation, among which two leucine residues (L268 and L269) were critical for the protein instability of SlNAC1. Fusion of the degron (SlNAC1(191-270) ) containing these 10 amino acids to green fluorescent protein was found to be sufficient to trigger the degradation of the fusion protein. In addition, the SlNAC1 gene is strongly upregulated during Pseudomonas infection, while repression of the NAC1 ortholog in Nicotiana benthamiana resulted in enhanced susceptibility to Pseudomonas bacteria. These results suggest that rapid upregulation of the NAC1 gene resulting in more protein production is likely one of the strategies plants use to defend themselves against pathogen infection.

  7. The Wheat NAC Transcription Factor TaNAC2L Is Regulated at the Transcriptional and Post-Translational Levels and Promotes Heat Stress Tolerance in Transgenic Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Weiwei; Zhang, Jinxia; Zhang, Ning; Xin, Mingming; Peng, Huiru; Hu, Zhaorong; Ni, Zhongfu; Du, Jinkun

    2015-01-01

    Heat stress poses a serious threat to global crop production. In efforts that aim to mitigate the adverse effects of heat stress on crops, a variety of genetic tools are being used to develop plants with improved thermotolerance. The characterization of important regulators of heat stress tolerance provides essential information for this aim. In this study, we examine the wheat (Triticum aestivum) NAC transcription factor gene TaNAC2L. High temperature induced TaNAC2L expression in wheat and overexpression of TaNAC2L in Arabidopsis thaliana enhanced acquired heat tolerance without causing obvious alterations in phenotype compared with wild type under normal conditions. TaNAC2L overexpression also activated the expression of heat-related genes in the transgenic Arabidopsis plants, suggesting that TaNAC2L may improve heat tolerance by regulating the expression of stress-responsive genes. Notably, TaNAC2L is also regulated at the post-translational level and might be degraded via a proteasome-mediated pathway. Thus, this wheat transcription factor may have potential uses in enhancing thermotolerance in crops. PMID:26305210

  8. Sequential interval motif search: unrestricted database surveys of global MS/MS data sets for detection of putative post-translational modifications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Erassov, Alexandre; Halina, Patrick; Canete, Myra; Nguyen, Dinh Vo; Chung, Clement; Cagney, Gerard; Ignatchenko, Alexandr; Fong, Vincent; Emili, Andrew

    2008-10-15

    Tandem mass spectrometry is the prevailing approach for large-scale peptide sequencing in high-throughput proteomic profiling studies. Effective database search engines have been developed to identify peptide sequences from MS/MS fragmentation spectra. Since proteins are polymorphic and subject to post-translational modifications (PTM), however, computational methods for detecting unanticipated variants are also needed to achieve true proteome-wide coverage. Different from existing "unrestrictive" search tools, we present a novel algorithm, termed SIMS (for Sequential Motif Interval Search), that interprets pairs of product ion peaks, representing potential amino acid residues or "intervals", as a means of mapping PTMs or substitutions in a blind database search mode. An effective heuristic software program was likewise developed to evaluate, rank, and filter optimal combinations of relevant intervals to identify candidate sequences, and any associated PTM or polymorphism, from large collections of MS/MS spectra. The prediction performance of SIMS was benchmarked extensively against annotated reference spectral data sets and compared favorably with, and was complementary to, current state-of-the-art methods. An exhaustive discovery screen using SIMS also revealed thousands of previously overlooked putative PTMs in a compendium of yeast protein complexes and in a proteome-wide map of adult mouse cardiomyocytes. We demonstrate that SIMS, freely accessible for academic research use, addresses gaps in current proteomic data interpretation pipelines, improving overall detection coverage, and facilitating comprehensive investigations of the fundamental multiplicity of the expressed proteome.

  9. Post-Translational Modification and Secretion of Azelaic Acid Induced 1 (AZI1), a Hybrid Proline-Rich Protein from Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Pitzschke, Andrea; Xue, Hui; Persak, Helene; Datta, Sneha; Seifert, Georg J.

    2016-01-01

    Arabidopsis EARLI-type hybrid proline-rich proteins (HyPRPs) consist of a putative N-terminal secretion signal, a proline-rich domain (PRD), and a characteristic eight-cysteine-motif (8-CM). They have been implicated in biotic and abiotic stress responses. AZI1 is required for systemic acquired resistance and it has recently been identified as a target of the stress-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase MPK3. AZI1 gel migration properties strongly indicate AZI1 to undergo major post-translational modifications. These occur in a stress-independent manner and are unrelated to phosphorylation by MAPKs. As revealed by transient expression of AZI1 in Nicotiana benthamiana and Tropaeolum majus, the Arabidopsis protein is similarly modified in heterologous plant species. Proline-rich regions, resembling arabinogalactan proteins point to a possible proline hydroxylation and subsequent O-glycosylation of AZI1. Consistently, inhibition of prolyl hydroxylase reduces its apparent protein size. AZI1 secretion was examined using Arabidopsis protoplasts and seedling exudates. Employing Agrobacterium-mediated leaf infiltration of N. benthamiana, we attempted to assess long-distance movement of AZI1. In summary, the data point to AZI1 being a partially secreted protein and a likely new member of the group of hydroxyproline-rich glycoproteins. Its dual location suggests AZI1 to exert both intra- and extracellular functions. PMID:26771603

  10. Neuron Subpopulations with Different Elongation Rates and DCC Dynamics Exhibit Distinct Responses to Isolated Netrin-1 Treatment.

    PubMed

    Blasiak, Agata; Lee, Gil U; Kilinc, Devrim

    2015-09-16

    Correct wiring of the nervous system requires guidance cues, diffusible or substrate-bound proteins that steer elongating axons to their target tissues. Netrin-1, the best characterized member of the Netrins family of guidance molecules, is known to induce axon turning and modulate axon elongation rate; however, the factors regulating the axonal response to Netrin-1 are not fully understood. Using microfluidics, we treated fluidically isolated axons of mouse primary cortical neurons with Netrin-1 and characterized axon elongation rates, as well as the membrane localization of deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC), a well-established receptor of Netrin-1. The capacity to stimulate and observe a large number of individual axons allowed us to conduct distribution analyses, through which we identified two distinct neuron subpopulations based on different elongation behavior and different DCC membrane dynamics. Netrin-1 reduced the elongation rates in both subpopulations, where the effect was more pronounced in the slow growing subpopulation. Both the source of Ca(2+) influx and the basal cytosolic Ca(2+) levels regulated the effect of Netrin-1, for example, Ca(2+) efflux from the endoplasmic reticulum due to the activation of Ryanodine channels blocked Netrin-1-induced axon slowdown. Netrin-1 treatment resulted in a rapid membrane insertion of DCC, followed by a gradual internalization. DCC membrane dynamics were different in the central regions of the growth cones compared to filopodia and axon shafts, highlighting the temporal and spatial heterogeneity in the signaling events downstream of Netrin-1. Cumulatively, these results demonstrate the power of microfluidic compartmentalization and distribution analysis in describing the complex axonal Netrin-1 response. PMID:26190161

  11. Nitrate and ammonium lead to distinct global dynamic phosphorylation patterns when resupplied to nitrogen-starved Arabidopsis seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Engelsberger, Wolfgang R; Schulze, Waltraud X

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen is an essential macronutrient for plant growth and development. Inorganic nitrogen and its assimilation products control various metabolic, physiological and developmental processes. Although the transcriptional responses induced by nitrogen have been extensively studied in the past, our work here focused on the discovery of candidate proteins for regulatory events that are complementary to transcriptional changes. Most signaling pathways involve modulation of protein abundance and/or activity by protein phosphorylation. Therefore, we analyzed the dynamic changes in protein phosphorylation in membrane and soluble proteins from plants exposed to rapid changes in nutrient availability over a time course of 30 min. Plants were starved of nitrogen and subsequently resupplied with nitrogen in the form of nitrate or ammonium. Proteins with maximum change in their phosphorylation level at up to 5 min after nitrogen resupply (fast responses) included GPI-anchored proteins, receptor kinases and transcription factors, while proteins with maximum change in their phosphorylation level after 10 min of nitrogen resupply (late responses) included proteins involved in protein synthesis and degradation, as well as proteins with functions in central metabolism and hormone metabolism. Resupply of nitrogen in the form of nitrate or ammonium resulted in distinct phosphorylation patterns, mainly of proteins with signaling functions, transcription factors and transporters. PMID:22060019

  12. Dynamic recruitment of functionally distinct Swi/Snf chromatin remodeling complexes modulates Pdx1 activity in islet β cells.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Brian; Guo, Min; Reynolds, Albert; Hara, Manami; Stein, Roland

    2015-03-31

    Pdx1 is a transcription factor of fundamental importance to pancreas formation and adult islet β cell function. However, little is known about the positive- and negative-acting coregulators recruited to mediate transcriptional control. Here, we isolated numerous Pdx1-interacting factors possessing a wide range of cellular functions linked with this protein, including, but not limited to, coregulators associated with transcriptional activation and repression, DNA damage response, and DNA replication. Because chromatin remodeling activities are essential to developmental lineage decisions and adult cell function, our analysis focused on investigating the influence of the Swi/Snf chromatin remodeler on Pdx1 action. The two mutually exclusive and indispensable Swi/Snf core ATPase subunits, Brg1 and Brm, distinctly affected target gene expression in β cells. Furthermore, physiological and pathophysiological conditions dynamically regulated Pdx1 binding to these Swi/Snf complexes in vivo. We discuss how context-dependent recruitment of coregulatory complexes by Pdx1 could impact pancreas cell development and adult islet β cell activity.

  13. Nitrate and ammonium lead to distinct global dynamic phosphorylation patterns when resupplied to nitrogen-starved Arabidopsis seedlings.

    PubMed

    Engelsberger, Wolfgang R; Schulze, Waltraud X

    2012-03-01

    Nitrogen is an essential macronutrient for plant growth and development. Inorganic nitrogen and its assimilation products control various metabolic, physiological and developmental processes. Although the transcriptional responses induced by nitrogen have been extensively studied in the past, our work here focused on the discovery of candidate proteins for regulatory events that are complementary to transcriptional changes. Most signaling pathways involve modulation of protein abundance and/or activity by protein phosphorylation. Therefore, we analyzed the dynamic changes in protein phosphorylation in membrane and soluble proteins from plants exposed to rapid changes in nutrient availability over a time course of 30 min. Plants were starved of nitrogen and subsequently resupplied with nitrogen in the form of nitrate or ammonium. Proteins with maximum change in their phosphorylation level at up to 5 min after nitrogen resupply (fast responses) included GPI-anchored proteins, receptor kinases and transcription factors, while proteins with maximum change in their phosphorylation level after 10 min of nitrogen resupply (late responses) included proteins involved in protein synthesis and degradation, as well as proteins with functions in central metabolism and hormone metabolism. Resupply of nitrogen in the form of nitrate or ammonium resulted in distinct phosphorylation patterns, mainly of proteins with signaling functions, transcription factors and transporters.

  14. The Metamorphic Nature of the Tau Protein: Dynamic Flexibility Comes at a Cost.

    PubMed

    Sabbagh, Jonathan J; Dickey, Chad A

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of the microtubule associated protein tau occurs in several neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD). The tau protein is intrinsically disordered, giving it unique structural properties that can be dynamically altered by post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation and cleavage. Over the last decade, technological advances in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and structural modeling have permitted more in-depth insights into the nature of tau. These studies have helped elucidate how metamorphism of tau makes it ideally suited for dynamic microtubule regulation, but how it also facilitates tau self-assembly, oligomerization, and neurotoxicity. This review will focus on how the distinct structure of tau governs its function, accumulation, and toxicity as well as how other cellular factors such as molecular chaperones control these processes.

  15. The Metamorphic Nature of the Tau Protein: Dynamic Flexibility Comes at a Cost

    PubMed Central

    Sabbagh, Jonathan J.; Dickey, Chad A.

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of the microtubule associated protein tau occurs in several neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD). The tau protein is intrinsically disordered, giving it unique structural properties that can be dynamically altered by post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation and cleavage. Over the last decade, technological advances in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and structural modeling have permitted more in-depth insights into the nature of tau. These studies have helped elucidate how metamorphism of tau makes it ideally suited for dynamic microtubule regulation, but how it also facilitates tau self-assembly, oligomerization, and neurotoxicity. This review will focus on how the distinct structure of tau governs its function, accumulation, and toxicity as well as how other cellular factors such as molecular chaperones control these processes. PMID:26834532

  16. The Metamorphic Nature of the Tau Protein: Dynamic Flexibility Comes at a Cost.

    PubMed

    Sabbagh, Jonathan J; Dickey, Chad A

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of the microtubule associated protein tau occurs in several neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD). The tau protein is intrinsically disordered, giving it unique structural properties that can be dynamically altered by post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation and cleavage. Over the last decade, technological advances in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and structural modeling have permitted more in-depth insights into the nature of tau. These studies have helped elucidate how metamorphism of tau makes it ideally suited for dynamic microtubule regulation, but how it also facilitates tau self-assembly, oligomerization, and neurotoxicity. This review will focus on how the distinct structure of tau governs its function, accumulation, and toxicity as well as how other cellular factors such as molecular chaperones control these processes. PMID:26834532

  17. Gly25-Ser26 amyloid β-protein structural isomorphs produce distinct Aβ42 conformational dynamics and assembly characteristics.

    PubMed

    Roychaudhuri, Robin; Lomakin, Aleksey; Bernstein, Summer; Zheng, Xueyun; Condron, Margaret M; Benedek, George B; Bowers, Michael; Teplow, David B

    2014-06-26

    One of the earliest events in amyloid β-protein (Aβ) self-association is nucleation of Aβ monomer folding through formation of a turn at Gly25-Lys28. We report here the effects of structural changes at the center of the turn, Gly25-Ser26, on Aβ42 conformational dynamics and assembly. We used "click peptide" chemistry to quasi-synchronously create Aβ42 from 26-O-acyliso-Aβ42 (iAβ42) through a pH jump from 3 to 7.4. We also synthesized Nα-acetyl-Ser26-iAβ42 (Ac-iAβ42), which cannot undergo O→N acyl chemistry, to study the behavior of this ester form of Aβ42 itself at neutral pH. Data from experiments monitoring increases in β-sheet formation (thioflavin T, CD), hydrodynamic radius (RH), scattering intensity (quasielastic light scattering spectroscopy), and extent of oligomerization (ion mobility spectroscopy-mass spectrometry) were quite consistent. A rank order of Ac-iAβ42>iAβ42>Aβ42 was observed. Photochemically cross-linked iAβ42 displayed an oligomer distribution with a prominent dimer band that was not present with Aβ42. These dimers also were observed selectively in iAβ42 in ion mobility spectrometry experiments. The distinct biophysical behaviors of iAβ42 and Aβ42 appear to be due to the conversion of iAβ42 into "pure" Aβ42 monomer, a nascent form of Aβ42 that does not comprise the variety of oligomeric and aggregated states present in pre-existent Aβ42. These results emphasize the importance of the Gly25-Ser26 dipeptide in organizing Aβ42 monomer structure and thus suggest that drugs altering the interactions of this dipeptide with neighboring side-chain atoms or with the peptide backbone could be useful in therapeutic strategies targeting formation of Aβ oligomers and higher-order assemblies.

  18. Dynamics of Dual Infection with Campylobacter jejuni Strains in Chickens Reveals Distinct Strain-to-Strain Variation in Infection Ecology

    PubMed Central

    Wigley, Paul; Humphrey, Suzanne; Kemmett, Kirsty; Lacharme-Lora, Lizeth; Humphrey, Tom; Williams, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Although multiple genotypes of Campylobacter jejuni may be isolated from the same commercial broiler flock, little is known about the infection dynamics of different genotypes within individuals or their colonization sites within the gut. Single experimental infections with C. jejuni M1 (sequence type 137, clonal complex 45) and C. jejuni 13126 (sequence type 21, clonal complex 21) revealed that 13126 colonized the ceca at significantly higher levels. The dissemination and colonization sites of the two C. jejuni strains then were examined in an experimental broiler flock. Two 33-day-old broiler chickens were infected with M1 and two with 13126, and 15 birds were left unchallenged. Cloacal swabs were taken postinfection to determine the colonization and shedding of each strain. By 2 days postinfection (dpi), 8/19 birds were shedding M1 whereas none were shedding 13126. At 8 dpi, all birds were shedding both strains. At 18 dpi, liver and cecal levels of each isolate were quantified, while in 10 birds they also were quantified at nine sites throughout the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. 13126 was found throughout the GI tract, while M1 was largely restricted to the ceca and colon. The livers of 7/19 birds were culture positive for 13126 only. These data show that 13126 has a distinctly different infection biology than strain M1. It showed slower colonization of the lower GI tract but was more invasive and able to colonize at a high level throughout the GI tract. The finding that C. jejuni strains have markedly different infection ecologies within the chicken has implications for control in the poultry industry and suggests that the contamination risk of edible tissues is dependent on the isolate involved. PMID:25107966

  19. Post-translational amino acid racemization in the frog skin peptide deltorphin I in the secretion granules of cutaneous serous glands.

    PubMed

    Auvynet, Constance; Seddiki, Nabila; Dunia, Irene; Nicolas, Pierre; Amiche, Mohamed; Lacombe, Claire

    2006-01-01

    The dermal glands of the South American hylid frog Phyllomedusa bicolor synthesize and expel huge amounts of cationic, alpha-helical, 24- to 33-residue antimicrobial peptides, the dermaseptins B. These glands also produce a wide array of peptides that are similar to mammalian hormones and neuropeptides, including a heptapeptide opioid containing a D-amino acid, deltorphin I (Tyr-DAla-Phe-Asp-Val-Val-Gly NH2). Its biological activity is due to the racemization of L-Ala2 to D-Ala. The dermaseptins B and deltorphins are all derived from a single family of precursor polypeptides that have an N-terminal preprosequence that is remarkably well conserved, although the progenitor sequences giving rise to mature opioid or antimicrobial peptides are markedly different. Monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies were used to examine the cellular and ultrastructural distributions of deltorphin I and dermaseptin B in the serous glands by immunofluoresence confocal microscopy and immunogold-electron microscopy. Preprodeltorphin I and preprodermaseptins B are sorted into the regulated pathway of secretion, where they are processed to give the mature products. Deltorphin I, [l-Ala2]-deltorphin I and dermaseptin B are all stored together in secretion granules which accumulate in the cytoplasm of all serous glands. We conclude that the L- to D-amino acid isomerization of the deltorphin I occurs in the secretory granules as a post-translational event. Thus the specificity of isomerization depends on the presence of structural and/or conformational determinants in the peptide N-terminus surrounding the isomerization site.

  20. Sodium arsenite down-regulates the expression of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein via translational and post-translational mechanisms in hepatocellular carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hong; Hao, Yuqing; Wang, Lijing; Jia, Dongwei; Ruan, Yuanyuan; Gu, Jianxin

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sodium arsenite down-regulates the protein expression level of XIAP in HCC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sodium arsenite inhibits the de novo XIAP synthesis and its IRES activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sodium arsenite decreases XIAP stability and promotes its proteasomal degradation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overexpression of XIAP attenuates the pro-apoptotic effect of sodium arsenite. -- Abstract: X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) is a member of the inhibitors of apoptosis protein (IAP) family, and has been reported to exhibit elevated expression levels in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and promote cell survival, metastasis and tumor recurrence. Targeting XIAP has proven effective for the inhibition of cancer cell proliferation and restoration of cancer cell chemosensitivity. Arsenic (or sodium arsenite) is a potent anti-tumor agent used to treat patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Additionally, arsenic induces cell growth inhibition, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human HCC cells. In this study, we identified XIAP as a target for sodium arsenite-induced cytotoxicity in HCC. The exposure of HCC cell lines to sodium arsenite resulted in inhibition of XIAP expression in both a dose- and time-dependent manner. Sodium arsenite blocked the de novo XIAP synthesis and the activity of its internal ribosome entry site (IRES) element. Moreover, treatment with sodium arsenite decreased the protein stability of XIAP and induced its ubiquitin-proteasomal degradation. Overexpression of XIAP attenuated the pro-apoptotic effect of sodium arsenite in HCC. Taken together, our data demonstrate that sodium arsenite suppresses XIAP expression via translational and post-translational mechanisms in HCC.

  1. ATP citrate lyase activity is post-translationally regulated by sink strength and impacts the wax, cutin and rubber biosynthetic pathways.

    PubMed

    Xing, Shufan; van Deenen, Nicole; Magliano, Pasqualina; Frahm, Lea; Forestier, Edith; Nawrath, Christiane; Schaller, Hubert; Gronover, Christian S; Prüfer, Dirk; Poirier, Yves

    2014-07-01

    Cytosolic acetyl-CoA is involved in the synthesis of a variety of compounds, including waxes, sterols and rubber, and is generated by the ATP citrate lyase (ACL). Plants over-expressing ACL were generated in an effort to understand the contribution of ACL activity to the carbon flux of acetyl-CoA to metabolic pathways occurring in the cytosol. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants synthesizing the polyester polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) from cytosolic acetyl-CoA have reduced growth and wax content, consistent with a reduction in the availability of cytosolic acetyl-CoA to endogenous pathways. Increasing the ACL activity via the over-expression of the ACLA and ACLB subunits reversed the phenotypes associated with PHB synthesis while maintaining polymer synthesis. PHB production by itself was associated with an increase in ACL activity that occurred in the absence of changes in steady-state mRNA or protein level, indicating a post-translational regulation of ACL activity in response to sink strength. Over-expression of ACL in Arabidopsis was associated with a 30% increase in wax on stems, while over-expression of a chimeric homomeric ACL in the laticifer of roots of dandelion led to a four- and two-fold increase in rubber and triterpene content, respectively. Synthesis of PHB and over-expression of ACL also changed the amount of the cutin monomer octadecadien-1,18-dioic acid, revealing an unsuspected link between cytosolic acetyl-CoA and cutin biosynthesis. Together, these results reveal the complexity of ACL regulation and its central role in influencing the carbon flux to metabolic pathways using cytosolic acetyl-CoA, including wax and polyisoprenoids. PMID:24844815

  2. Yeast aminopeptidase I is post-translationally sorted from the cytosol to the vacuole by a mechanism mediated by its bipartite N-terminal extension.

    PubMed Central

    Seguí-Real, B; Martinez, M; Sandoval, I V

    1995-01-01

    Transport of aminopeptidase I (API) to the vacuole appears to be insensitive to blockage of the secretory pathway. Here we show that the N-terminal extension of the 61 kDa precursor of API (pAPI) is proteolytically processed in two sequential steps. The first step involves proteinase A (PrA) and produces a 55 kDa unstable intermediate (iAPI). The second step involves proteinase B (PrB) and converts iAPI into the 50 kDa stable, mature enzyme (mAPI). Reversion of the cup1 growth phenotype by a pAPI-CUP1 chimera indicates that pAPI is transported to the vacuole by a post-translational mechanism. Deletion of the first 16 amino acids results in accumulation of the truncated protein in the cytosol, indicating that pAPI is actively transported to the vacuole. The chimera pAPI-myc, constructed by fusing a myc tag to the C-terminus of pAPI, was exploited to dissect the mechanism of pAPI transport. Cell fractionation studies show the presence of iAPI-myc and mAPI in a fraction of vacuoles purified by density centrifugation. This and the sequential conversion of pAPI-myc into iAPI-myc and mAPI lacking the myc tag is consistent with insertion of pAPI into the vacuolar membrane through its N-terminal extension. The specific mechanism of API sorting demonstrates a new pathway of protein transport in vacuolar biogenesis. Images PMID:8521804

  3. Post-translationally Abnormal Collagens of Prolyl 3-Hydroxylase-2 Null Mice Offer a Pathobiological Mechanism for the High Myopia Linked to Human LEPREL1 Mutations*

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, David M.; Joeng, Kyu Sang; Werther, Rachel; Rajagopal, Abbhirami; Weis, MaryAnn; Lee, Brendan H.; Eyre, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Myopia, the leading cause of visual impairment worldwide, results from an increase in the axial length of the eyeball. Mutations in LEPREL1, the gene encoding prolyl 3-hydroxylase-2 (P3H2), have recently been identified in individuals with recessively inherited nonsyndromic severe myopia. P3H2 is a member of a family of genes that includes three isoenzymes of prolyl 3-hydroxylase (P3H), P3H1, P3H2, and P3H3. Fundamentally, it is understood that P3H1 is responsible for converting proline to 3-hydroxyproline. This limited additional knowledge also suggests that each isoenzyme has evolved different collagen sequence-preferred substrate specificities. In this study, differences in prolyl 3-hydroxylation were screened in eye tissues from P3h2-null (P3h2n/n) and wild-type mice to seek tissue-specific effects due the lack of P3H2 activity on post-translational collagen chemistry that could explain myopia. The mice were viable and had no gross musculoskeletal phenotypes. Tissues from sclera and cornea (type I collagen) and lens capsule (type IV collagen) were dissected from mouse eyes, and multiple sites of prolyl 3-hydroxylation were identified by mass spectrometry. The level of prolyl 3-hydroxylation at multiple substrate sites from type I collagen chains was high in sclera, similar to tendon. Almost every known site of prolyl 3-hydroxylation in types I and IV collagen from P3h2n/n mouse eye tissues was significantly under-hydroxylated compared with their wild-type littermates. We conclude that altered collagen prolyl 3-hydroxylation is caused by loss of P3H2. We hypothesize that this leads to structural abnormalities in multiple eye tissues, but particularly sclera, causing progressive myopia. PMID:25645914

  4. An Engineered Version of Human PON2 Opens the Way to Understand the Role of Its Post-Translational Modifications in Modulating Catalytic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Mandrich, Luigi; Cerreta, Mariangela; Manco, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    The human paraoxonase 2 (PON2) has been described as a highly specific lactonase hydrolysing the quorum sensing molecule N-(3-oxododecanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (3OC12-HSL) and having secondary esterase but not phosphotriesterase activity, in contrast with the related enzymes PON1 and PON3. It has been suggested that PON2 enzyme activity is dependent on glycosylation and its N-terminal region has been recently demonstrated to be a transmembrane domain mediating association to membranes. In the present study we describe a mutated form of PON2, lacking the above N-terminal region, which has been further stabilized by the insertion of six amino acidic substitutions. The engineered version, hence forth called rPON2, has been over-expressed in E.coli, refolded from inclusion bodies and purified, yielding an enzyme with the same characteristics as the full length enzyme. Therefore the first conclusion of this work was that the catalytic activity is independent from the N-terminus and protein glycosylation. The kinetic characterization confirmed the primary activity on 3OC12-HSL; accordingly, in vitro experiments of inhibition of the biofilm formed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PAO1) have demonstrated that rPON2 is more effective than PON1. In addition, we observed small but significant activity against organophosphorothiotes pesticides, m-parathion, coumaphos and malathion.The availability of fair amount of active protein allowed to pinpoint, by mass-spectrometry, ubiquitination of Lys 168 induced in rPON2 by HeLa extract and to correlate such post-translational modification to the modulation of catalytic activity. A mutational analysis of the modified residue confirmed the result. PMID:26656916

  5. New insights into the post-translational modification of multiple phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase isoenzymes by phosphorylation and monoubiquitination during sorghum seed development and germination.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Ballesta, Isabel; Baena, Guillermo; Gandullo, Jacinto; Wang, Liqun; She, Yi-Min; Plaxton, William Charles; Echevarría, Cristina

    2016-05-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC; E.C. 4.1.1.31) was characterized in developing and germinating sorghum seeds, focusing on the transcript and polypeptide abundance of multiple plant-type phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PTPC) genes, and the post-translational modification of each isoenzyme by phosphorylation versus monoubiquitination during germination. We observed high levels of SbPPC4 (Sb07g014960) transcripts during early development (stage I), and extensive transcript abundance of SbPPC2 (Sb02g021090) and SbPPC3 (Sb04g008720) throughout the entire life cycle of the seed. Although tandem mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of immunopurified PTPC indicated that four different PTPC isoenzymes were expressed in the developing and germinating seeds, SbPPC3 was the most abundant isozyme of the developing seed, and of the embryo and the aleurone layer of germinating seeds. In vivo phosphorylation of the different PTPC isoenzymes at their conserved N-terminal seryl phosphorylation site during germination was also established by MS/MS analysis. Furthermore, three of the four isoenzymes were partially monoubiquitinated, with MS/MS pinpointing SbPPC2 and SbPPC3 monoubiquitination at the conserved Lys-630 and Lys-624 residues, respectively. Our results demonstrate that monoubiquitination and phosphorylation simultaneously occur in vivo with different PTPC isozymes during seed germination. In addition, we show that PTPC monoubiquitination in germinating sorghum seeds always increases at stage II (emergence of the radicle), is maintained during the aerobic period of rapid cell division and reserve mobilization, and remains relatively constant until stage IV-V when coleoptiles initiate the formation of the photosynthetic tissues.

  6. ATP citrate lyase activity is post-translationally regulated by sink strength and impacts the wax, cutin and rubber biosynthetic pathways.

    PubMed

    Xing, Shufan; van Deenen, Nicole; Magliano, Pasqualina; Frahm, Lea; Forestier, Edith; Nawrath, Christiane; Schaller, Hubert; Gronover, Christian S; Prüfer, Dirk; Poirier, Yves

    2014-07-01

    Cytosolic acetyl-CoA is involved in the synthesis of a variety of compounds, including waxes, sterols and rubber, and is generated by the ATP citrate lyase (ACL). Plants over-expressing ACL were generated in an effort to understand the contribution of ACL activity to the carbon flux of acetyl-CoA to metabolic pathways occurring in the cytosol. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants synthesizing the polyester polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) from cytosolic acetyl-CoA have reduced growth and wax content, consistent with a reduction in the availability of cytosolic acetyl-CoA to endogenous pathways. Increasing the ACL activity via the over-expression of the ACLA and ACLB subunits reversed the phenotypes associated with PHB synthesis while maintaining polymer synthesis. PHB production by itself was associated with an increase in ACL activity that occurred in the absence of changes in steady-state mRNA or protein level, indicating a post-translational regulation of ACL activity in response to sink strength. Over-expression of ACL in Arabidopsis was associated with a 30% increase in wax on stems, while over-expression of a chimeric homomeric ACL in the laticifer of roots of dandelion led to a four- and two-fold increase in rubber and triterpene content, respectively. Synthesis of PHB and over-expression of ACL also changed the amount of the cutin monomer octadecadien-1,18-dioic acid, revealing an unsuspected link between cytosolic acetyl-CoA and cutin biosynthesis. Together, these results reveal the complexity of ACL regulation and its central role in influencing the carbon flux to metabolic pathways using cytosolic acetyl-CoA, including wax and polyisoprenoids.

  7. Post-translational Modifications of Recombinant Human Lysyl Oxidase-like 2 (rhLOXL2) Secreted from Drosophila S2 Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Li; Go, Eden P.; Finney, Joel; Moon, HeeJung; Lantz, Mason; Rebecchi, Kathryn; Desaire, Heather; Mure, Minae

    2013-01-01

    Human lysyl oxidase-like 2 (hLOXL2) is highly up-regulated in metastatic breast cancer cells and tissues and induces epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, the first step of metastasis/invasion. hloxl2 encodes four N-terminal scavenger receptor cysteine-rich domains and the highly conserved C-terminal lysyl oxidase (LOX) catalytic domain. Here, we assessed the extent of the post-translational modifications of hLOXL2 using truncated recombinant proteins produced in Drosophila S2 cells. The recombinant proteins are soluble, in contrast to LOX, which is consistently reported to require 2–6 m urea for solubilization. The recombinant proteins also show activity in tropoelastin oxidation. After phenylhydrazine derivatization and trypsin digestion, we used mass spectrometry to identify peptides containing the derivatized lysine tyrosylquinone cross-link at Lys-653 and Tyr-689, as well as N-linked glycans at Asn-455 and Asn-644. Disruption of N-glycosylation by site-directed mutagenesis or tunicamycin treatment completely inhibited secretion so that only small quantities of inclusion bodies were detected. The N-glycosylation site at Asn-644 in the LOX catalytic domain is not conserved in human LOX (hLOX), although the LOX catalytic domain of hLOX shares ∼50% identity and ∼70% homology with hLOXL2. The catalytic domain of hLOX was not secreted from S2 cells using the same expression system. These results suggest that the N-glycan at Asn-644 of hLOXL2 enhances the solubility and stability of the LOX catalytic domain. PMID:23319596

  8. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling requires a specific endoplasmic reticulum thioredoxin for the post-translational control of receptor presentation to the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Dong, Aiwen; Wodziak, Dariusz; Lowe, Anson W

    2015-03-27

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a well characterized receptor-tyrosine kinase that functions in development and serves a vital role in many human cancers. Understanding EGFR regulatory mechanisms, and hence approaches for clinical intervention, has focused on ligand-receptor interactions and tyrosine kinase activity. Here, we show using the NCI-H460 lung and A431 epidermoid human cancer cell lines that EGFR binding to anterior gradient homolog 2 (AGR2) in the endoplasmic reticulum is required for receptor delivery to the plasma membrane and thus EGFR signaling. Reduced AGR2 protein levels or mutation of an essential cysteine in the active site result in decreased cell surface EGFR and a concomitant decrease in signaling as reflected by AREG, EGR1, and FOS expression. Similar to previously described EGFR nulls, an AGR2 null also resulted in embryonic lethality. Consistent with its role in regulating EGFR-mediated signaling, AGR2 expression is also enhanced in many human cancers and promotes the transformed phenotype. Furthermore, EGFR-mediated signaling in NCI-H460 cells, which are resistant to the tyrosine kinase inhibitor AG1478, is also disrupted with reduced AGR2 expression. The results provide insights into why cancer prognosis or response to therapy often does not correlate with EGFR protein or RNA levels because they do not reflect delivery to the cell surface where signaling is initiated. AGR2, therefore, represents a novel post-translational regulator of EGFR-mediated signaling and a promising target for treating human cancers.

  9. New insights into the post-translational modification of multiple phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase isoenzymes by phosphorylation and monoubiquitination during sorghum seed development and germination

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Ballesta, Isabel; Baena, Guillermo; Gandullo, Jacinto; Wang, Liqun; She, Yi-Min; Plaxton, William Charles; Echevarría, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC; E.C. 4.1.1.31) was characterized in developing and germinating sorghum seeds, focusing on the transcript and polypeptide abundance of multiple plant-type phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PTPC) genes, and the post-translational modification of each isoenzyme by phosphorylation versus monoubiquitination during germination. We observed high levels of SbPPC4 (Sb07g014960) transcripts during early development (stage I), and extensive transcript abundance of SbPPC2 (Sb02g021090) and SbPPC3 (Sb04g008720) throughout the entire life cycle of the seed. Although tandem mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of immunopurified PTPC indicated that four different PTPC isoenzymes were expressed in the developing and germinating seeds, SbPPC3 was the most abundant isozyme of the developing seed, and of the embryo and the aleurone layer of germinating seeds. In vivo phosphorylation of the different PTPC isoenzymes at their conserved N-terminal seryl phosphorylation site during germination was also established by MS/MS analysis. Furthermore, three of the four isoenzymes were partially monoubiquitinated, with MS/MS pinpointing SbPPC2 and SbPPC3 monoubiquitination at the conserved Lys-630 and Lys-624 residues, respectively. Our results demonstrate that monoubiquitination and phosphorylation simultaneously occur in vivo with different PTPC isozymes during seed germination. In addition, we show that PTPC monoubiquitination in germinating sorghum seeds always increases at stage II (emergence of the radicle), is maintained during the aerobic period of rapid cell division and reserve mobilization, and remains relatively constant until stage IV–V when coleoptiles initiate the formation of the photosynthetic tissues. PMID:27194739

  10. Combined SAXS/EM Based Models of the S. elongatus Post-Translational Circadian Oscillator and its Interactions with the Output His-Kinase SasA

    SciTech Connect

    Pattanayek, Rekha; Williams, Dewight R.; Rossi, Gian; Weigand, Steven; Mori, Tetsuya; Johnson, Carl H.; Stewart, Phoebe L.; Egli, Martin

    2012-03-15

    The circadian clock in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus is composed of a post-translational oscillator (PTO) that can be reconstituted in vitro from three different proteins in the presence of ATP and a transcription-translation feedback loop (TTFL). The homo-hexameric KaiC kinase, phosphatase and ATPase alternates between hypo- and hyper-phosphorylated states over the 24-h cycle, with KaiA enhancing phosphorylation, and KaiB antagonizing KaiA and promoting KaiC subunit exchange. SasA is a His kinase that relays output signals from the PTO formed by the three Kai proteins to the TTFL. Although the crystal structures for all three Kai proteins are known, atomic resolution structures of Kai and Kai/SasA protein complexes have remained elusive. Here, we present models of the KaiAC and KaiBC complexes derived from solution small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), which are consistent with previous EM based models. We also present a combined SAXS/EM model of the KaiC/SasA complex, which has two N-terminal SasA sensory domains occupying positions on the C-terminal KaiC ring reminiscent of the orientations adopted by KaiB dimers. Using EM we demonstrate that KaiB and SasA compete for similar binding sites on KaiC. We also propose an EM based model of the ternary KaiABC complex that is consistent with the sequestering of KaiA by KaiB on KaiC during the PTO dephosphorylation phase. This work provides the first 3D-catalogue of protein-protein interactions in the KaiABC PTO and the output pathway mediated by SasA.

  11. Proteomic analysis of NME1/NDPK A null mouse liver: evidence for a post-translational regulation of annexin IV and EF-1Bα.

    PubMed

    Bruneel, Arnaud; Wendum, Dominique; Labas, Valérie; Mulner-Lorillon, Odile; Vinh, Joelle; Bosselut, Nelly; Ballot, Eric; Baudin, Bruno; Housset, Chantal; Dabernat, Sandrine; Lacombe, Marie-Lise; Boissan, Mathieu

    2011-10-01

    NME/NDPK family proteins are involved in the control of intracellular nucleotide homeostasis as well as in both physiological and pathological cellular processes, such as proliferation, differentiation, development, apoptosis, and metastasis dissemination, through mechanisms still largely unknown. One family member, NME1/NDPK-A, is a metastasis suppressor, yet the primary physiological functions of this protein are still missing. The purpose of this study was to identify new NME1/NDPK-A-dependent biological functions and pathways regulated by this gene in the liver. We analyzed the proteomes of wild-type and transgenic NME1-null mouse livers by combining two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry (matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry). We found that the levels of three proteins, namely, phenylalanine hydroxylase, annexin IV, and elongation factor 1 Bα (EF-1Bα), were strongly reduced in the cytosolic fraction of NME1(-/-) mouse livers when compared to the wild type. This was confirmed by immunoblotting analysis. No concomitant reduction in the corresponding messenger RNAs or of total protein level was observed, however, suggesting that NME1 controls annexin IV and EF-1Bα amounts by post-translational mechanisms. NME1 deletion induced a change in the subcellular location of annexin IV in hepatocytes resulting in enrichment of this protein at the plasma membrane. We also observed a redistribution of EF-1Bα in NME1(-/-) hepatocytes to an intracytoplasmic compartment that colocalized with a marker of the reticulum endoplasmic. Finally, we found reduced expression of annexin IV coincident with decreased NME1 expression in a panel of different carcinoma cell lines. Taken together, our data suggest for the first time that NME1 might regulate the subcellular trafficking of annexin IV and EF-1Bα. The potential role of these proteins in metastatic dissemination is discussed.

  12. Post-translational acquisition of ligand binding- and tyrosine kinase-domain function by the epidermal growth factor and insulin receptors.

    PubMed

    Lane, M D; Slieker, L J; Olson, T S; Martensen, T M

    1987-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and insulin receptor undergo slow post-translational modification by which they acquire hormone binding and tyrosine kinase (EGFR) function. The half-time for acquisition of EGF or insulin binding activity is 30-40 min and of tyrosine kinase activity (EGFR), is 10-15 min. Tunicamycin, an inhibitor of N-linked oligosaccharide addition, blocks acquisition of both EGF and insulin binding activity. With EGFR, activation precedes acquisition of resistance to endoglucosaminidase H (t1/2 approximately equal to 75 min), a medial Golgi event. Treatment of active high mannose receptor with endo H generates fully active aglyco-receptor; thus, core oligosaccharide addition is a prerequisite for activation, but not for EGF binding per se. EGFR is activated in and translocated from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) slowly (t1/2 approximately equal to 75 min). Since translocation rate equals the rate for acquisition of endo H resistance, transit from the ER is rate limiting for EGFR maturation. Tunicamycin inhibits exit from the ER parallel to its effect on acquisition of binding activity. Insulin proreceptor, a 210 kDa high-mannose glycopolypeptide, acquires insulin binding function (t1/2 approximately equal to 45 min) then is proteolytically cleaved (t1/2 approximately equal to 3 hr) into subunits of the mature alpha 2 beta 2 receptor. Modification giving rise to insulin binding activity is due to a conformational change in the binding domain, since human autoimmune antibody recognizes only the active species, while rabbit polyclonal antibody recognizes all forms. Newly-translated EGF proreceptor lacks a functional tyrosine domain capable of autophosphorylation; 30-40 min after translation, while still in the ER, tyrosine kinase activity is acquired. Since the kinase domain is cytoplasmic, the receptor may become phosphorylated on tyrosine before reaching the plasma membrane. PMID:3305909

  13. Effects of over-expression of the regulatory enzymes DraT and DraG on the ammonium-dependent post-translational regulation of nitrogenase reductase in Azospirillum brasilense.

    PubMed

    Huergo, Luciano F; Souza, Emanuel M; Steffens, Maria B R; Yates, M Geoffrey; Pedrosa, Fábio O; Chubatsu, Leda S

    2005-03-01

    Nitrogen fixation in Azospirillum brasilense is regulated at transcriptional and post-translational levels. Post-translational control occurs through the reversible ADP-ribosylation of dinitrogenase reductase (Fe Protein), mediated by the dinitrogenase reductase ADP-ribosyltransferase (DraT) and dinitrogenase reductase glycohydrolase (DraG). Although the DraT and DraG activities are regulated in vivo, the molecules responsible for such regulation remain unknown. We have constructed broad-host-range plasmids capable of over-expressing, upon IPTG induction, the regulatory enzymes DraT and DraG as six-histidine-N-terminal fused proteins (His). Both DraT-His and DraG-His are functional in vivo. We have analyzed the effects of DraT-His and DraG-His over-expression on the post-translational modification of Fe Protein. The DraT-His over-expression led to Fe Protein modification in the absence of ammonium addition, while cells over-expressing DraG-His showed only partial ADP-ribosylation of Fe Protein by adding ammonium. These results suggest that both DraT-His and DraG-His lose their regulation upon over-expression, possible by titrating out negative regulators.

  14. Structure of a Putative Lipoate Protein Ligase from Thermoplasma acidophilum and the Mechanism of Target Selection for Post-Translational Modification

    SciTech Connect

    McManus,E.; Luisi, B.; Perham, R.

    2006-01-01

    Lipoyl-lysine swinging arms are crucial to the reactions catalysed by the 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase multienzyme complexes. A gene encoding a putative lipoate protein ligase (LplA) of Thermoplasma acidophilum was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein, a monomer of molecular mass 29 kDa, was catalytically inactive. Crystal structures in the absence and presence of bound lipoic acid were solved at 2.1 Angstroms resolution. The protein was found to fall into the a/{beta} class and to be structurally homologous to the catalytic domains of class II aminoacyl-tRNA synthases and biotin protein ligase, BirA. Lipoic acid in LplA was bound in the same position as biotin in BirA. The structure of the T. acidophilum LplA and limited proteolysis of E. coli LplA together highlighted some key features of the post-translational modification. A loop comprising residues 71-79 in the T. acidophilumligase is proposed as interacting with the dithiolane ring of lipoic acid and discriminating against the entry of biotin. A second loop comprising residues 179-193 was disordered in the T. acidophilum structure; tryptic cleavage of the corresponding loop in the E. coli LplA under non-denaturing conditions rendered the enzyme catalytically inactive, emphasizing its importance. The putative LplA of T. acidophilum lacks a C-terminal domain found in its counterparts in E. coli (Gram-negative) or Streptococcus pneumoniae (Gram-positive). A gene encoding a protein that appears to have structural homology to the additional domain in the E. coli and S. pneumoniae enzymes was detected alongside the structural gene encoding the putative LplA in the T. acidophilum genome. It is likely that this protein is required to confer activity on the LplA as currently purified, one protein perhaps catalysing the formation of the obligatory lipoyl-AMP intermediate, and the other transferring the lipoyl group from it to the specific lysine residue in the target protein.

  15. Abnormal type I collagen post-translational modification and crosslinking in a cyclophilin B KO mouse model of recessive osteogenesis imperfecta.

    PubMed

    Cabral, Wayne A; Perdivara, Irina; Weis, MaryAnn; Terajima, Masahiko; Blissett, Angela R; Chang, Weizhong; Perosky, Joseph E; Makareeva, Elena N; Mertz, Edward L; Leikin, Sergey; Tomer, Kenneth B; Kozloff, Kenneth M; Eyre, David R; Yamauchi, Mitsuo; Marini, Joan C

    2014-06-01

    Cyclophilin B (CyPB), encoded by PPIB, is an ER-resident peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase (PPIase) that functions independently and as a component of the collagen prolyl 3-hydroxylation complex. CyPB is proposed to be the major PPIase catalyzing the rate-limiting step in collagen folding. Mutations in PPIB cause recessively inherited osteogenesis imperfecta type IX, a moderately severe to lethal bone dysplasia. To investigate the role of CyPB in collagen folding and post-translational modifications, we generated Ppib-/- mice that recapitulate the OI phenotype. Knock-out (KO) mice are small, with reduced femoral areal bone mineral density (aBMD), bone volume per total volume (BV/TV) and mechanical properties, as well as increased femoral brittleness. Ppib transcripts are absent in skin, fibroblasts, femora and calvarial osteoblasts, and CyPB is absent from KO osteoblasts and fibroblasts on western blots. Only residual (2-11%) collagen prolyl 3-hydroxylation is detectable in KO cells and tissues. Collagen folds more slowly in the absence of CyPB, supporting its rate-limiting role in folding. However, treatment of KO cells with cyclosporine A causes further delay in folding, indicating the potential existence of another collagen PPIase. We confirmed and extended the reported role of CyPB in supporting collagen lysyl hydroxylase (LH1) activity. Ppib-/- fibroblast and osteoblast collagen has normal total lysyl hydroxylation, while increased collagen diglycosylation is observed. Liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) analysis of bone and osteoblast type I collagen revealed site-specific alterations of helical lysine hydroxylation, in particular, significantly reduced hydroxylation of helical crosslinking residue K87. Consequently, underhydroxylated forms of di- and trivalent crosslinks are strikingly increased in KO bone, leading to increased total crosslinks and decreased helical hydroxylysine- to lysine-derived crosslink ratios. The altered crosslink

  16. Abnormal Type I Collagen Post-translational Modification and Crosslinking in a Cyclophilin B KO Mouse Model of Recessive Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Cabral, Wayne A.; Perdivara, Irina; Weis, MaryAnn; Terajima, Masahiko; Blissett, Angela R.; Chang, Weizhong; Perosky, Joseph E.; Makareeva, Elena N.; Mertz, Edward L.; Leikin, Sergey; Tomer, Kenneth B.; Kozloff, Kenneth M.; Eyre, David R.; Yamauchi, Mitsuo; Marini, Joan C.

    2014-01-01

    Cyclophilin B (CyPB), encoded by PPIB, is an ER-resident peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase (PPIase) that functions independently and as a component of the collagen prolyl 3-hydroxylation complex. CyPB is proposed to be the major PPIase catalyzing the rate-limiting step in collagen folding. Mutations in PPIB cause recessively inherited osteogenesis imperfecta type IX, a moderately severe to lethal bone dysplasia. To investigate the role of CyPB in collagen folding and post-translational modifications, we generated Ppib−/− mice that recapitulate the OI phenotype. Knock-out (KO) mice are small, with reduced femoral areal bone mineral density (aBMD), bone volume per total volume (BV/TV) and mechanical properties, as well as increased femoral brittleness. Ppib transcripts are absent in skin, fibroblasts, femora and calvarial osteoblasts, and CyPB is absent from KO osteoblasts and fibroblasts on western blots. Only residual (2–11%) collagen prolyl 3-hydroxylation is detectable in KO cells and tissues. Collagen folds more slowly in the absence of CyPB, supporting its rate-limiting role in folding. However, treatment of KO cells with cyclosporine A causes further delay in folding, indicating the potential existence of another collagen PPIase. We confirmed and extended the reported role of CyPB in supporting collagen lysyl hydroxylase (LH1) activity. Ppib−/− fibroblast and osteoblast collagen has normal total lysyl hydroxylation, while increased collagen diglycosylation is observed. Liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) analysis of bone and osteoblast type I collagen revealed site-specific alterations of helical lysine hydroxylation, in particular, significantly reduced hydroxylation of helical crosslinking residue K87. Consequently, underhydroxylated forms of di- and trivalent crosslinks are strikingly increased in KO bone, leading to increased total crosslinks and decreased helical hydroxylysine- to lysine-derived crosslink ratios. The altered

  17. Modulation of farnesoid X receptor results in post-translational modification of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 in the liver

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Yan; Li, Guodong; Dong, Yafeng; Zhou, Helen H.; Kong, Bo; Aleksunes, Lauren M.; Richardson, Jason R.; Li, Fei; Guo, Grace L.

    2013-01-15

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a bile acid-activated transcription factor belonging to the nuclear receptor superfamily. FXR deficiency in mice results in cholestasis, metabolic disorders, and tumorigenesis in liver and intestine. FXR is known to contribute to pathogenesis by regulating gene transcription; however, changes in the post-transcriptional modification of proteins associated with FXR modulation have not been determined. In the current study, proteomic analysis of the livers of wild-type (WT) and FXR knockout (FXR-KO) mice treated with a FXR synthetic ligand or vehicle was performed. The results identified five proteins as novel FXR targets. Since FXR deficiency in mice leads to liver tumorigenesis, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase family, member 1 (Parp1) that is important for DNA repair, was validated in the current study by quantitative real-time PCR, and 1- and 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis/western blot. The results showed that Parp1 mRNA levels were not altered by FXR genetic status or by agonist treatment. However, total Parp1 protein levels were increased in FXR-KO mice as early as 3 month old. Interestingly, total Parp1 protein levels were increased in WT mice in an age-dependent manner (from 3 to 18 months), but not in FXR-KO mice. Finally, activation of FXR in WT mice resulted in reduction of phosporylated Parp1 protein in the liver without affecting total Parp1 protein levels. In conclusion, this study reveals that FXR genetic status and agonist treatment affects basal levels and phosphorylation state of Parp1, respectively. These alterations, in turn, may be associated with the hepatobiliary alterations observed in FXR-KO mice and participate in FXR agonist-induced protection in the liver. -- Highlights: ► Proteomic analysis identified novel FXR targets. ► FXR modification altered post-translational modification of the Parp1 protein. ► Altered Parp1 function may contribute to mechanisms of FXR regulation of liver functions.

  18. Post-translational Modification of Ribosomal Proteins - Structural and Functional Characterization of RimO from Thermotoga Maritima, A Radiacal S-Adenosylmethionine Methylthiotransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Arragain, S.; Garcia-Serres, R; Blondin, G; Douki, T; Clemancey, M; Latour, J; Forouhar, F; Neely, H; Montelione, G; et. al.

    2010-01-01

    Post-translational modifications of ribosomal proteins are important for the accuracy of the decoding machinery. A recent in vivo study has shown that the rimO gene is involved in generation of the 3-methylthio derivative of residue Asp-89 in ribosomal protein S12 (Anton, B. P., Saleh, L., Benner, J. S., Raleigh, E. A., Kasif, S., and Roberts, R. J. (2008) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 105, 1826-1831). This reaction is formally identical to that catalyzed by MiaB on the C2 of adenosine 37 near the anticodon of several tRNAs. We present spectroscopic evidence that Thermotoga maritima RimO, like MiaB, contains two [4Fe-4S] centers, one presumably bound to three invariant cysteines in the central radical S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) domain and the other to three invariant cysteines in the N-terminal UPF0004 domain. We demonstrate that holo-RimO can specifically methylthiolate the aspartate residue of a 20-mer peptide derived from S12, yielding a mixture of mono- and bismethylthio derivatives. Finally, we present the 2.0 {angstrom} crystal structure of the central radical AdoMet and the C-terminal TRAM (tRNA methyltransferase 2 and MiaB) domains in apo-RimO. Although the core of the open triose-phosphate isomerase (TIM) barrel of the radical AdoMet domain was conserved, RimO showed differences in domain organization compared with other radical AdoMet enzymes. The unusually acidic TRAM domain, likely to bind the basic S12 protein, is located at the distal edge of the radical AdoMet domain. The basic S12 protein substrate is likely to bind RimO through interactions with both the TRAM domain and the concave surface of the incomplete TIM barrel. These biophysical results provide a foundation for understanding the mechanism of methylthioation by radical AdoMet enzymes in the MiaB/RimO family.

  19. Post-translational Modification of Ribosomal Proteins: Structural and Functional Characterization of RimO from Thermotoga maritima, a Radical S-adenosylmethionine methylthiotransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Arragain, S.; Latour, J; Forouhar, F; Neely, H; Montelione, G; Hunt, J; Mulliez, E; Fontecave, M; Atta, M; et al.

    2010-01-01

    Post-translational modifications of ribosomal proteins are important for the accuracy of the decoding machinery. A recent in vivo study has shown that the rimO gene is involved in generation of the 3-methylthio derivative of residue Asp-89 in ribosomal protein S12 (Anton, B. P., Saleh, L., Benner, J. S., Raleigh, E. A., Kasif, S., and Roberts, R. J. (2008) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 105, 1826-1831). This reaction is formally identical to that catalyzed by MiaB on the C2 of adenosine 37 near the anticodon of several tRNAs. We present spectroscopic evidence that Thermotoga maritima RimO, like MiaB, contains two [4Fe-4S] centers, one presumably bound to three invariant cysteines in the central radical S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) domain and the other to three invariant cysteines in the N-terminal UPF0004 domain. We demonstrate that holo-RimO can specifically methylthiolate the aspartate residue of a 20-mer peptide derived from S12, yielding a mixture of mono- and bismethylthio derivatives. Finally, we present the 2.0 {angstrom} crystal structure of the central radical AdoMet and the C-terminal TRAM (tRNA methyltransferase 2 and MiaB) domains in apo-RimO. Although the core of the open triose-phosphate isomerase (TIM) barrel of the radical AdoMet domain was conserved, RimO showed differences in domain organization compared with other radical AdoMet enzymes. The unusually acidic TRAM domain, likely to bind the basic S12 protein, is located at the distal edge of the radical AdoMet domain. The basic S12 protein substrate is likely to bind RimO through interactions with both the TRAM domain and the concave surface of the incomplete TIM barrel. These biophysical results provide a foundation for understanding the mechanism of methylthioation by radical AdoMet enzymes in the MiaB/RimO family.

  20. Rapid Throughput Analysis Demonstrates that Chemicals with Distinct Seizurogenic Mechanisms Differentially Alter Ca2+ Dynamics in Networks Formed by Hippocampal Neurons in Culture

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhengyu; Zou, Xiaohan; Cui, Yanjun; Hulsizer, Susan; Lein, Pamela J.; Wulff, Heike

    2015-01-01

    Primary cultured hippocampal neurons (HN) form functional networks displaying synchronous Ca2+ oscillations (SCOs) whose patterns influence plasticity. Whether chemicals with distinct seizurogenic mechanisms differentially alter SCO patterns was investigated using mouse HN loaded with the Ca2+ indicator fluo-4-AM. Intracellular Ca2+ dynamics were recorded from 96 wells simultaneously in real-time using fluorescent imaging plate reader. Although quiescent at 4 days in vitro (DIV), HN acquired distinctive SCO patterns as they matured to form extensive dendritic networks by 16 DIV. Challenge with kainate, a kainate receptor (KAR) agonist, 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), a K+ channel blocker, or pilocarpine, a muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist, caused distinct changes in SCO dynamics. Kainate at <1 µM produced a rapid rise in baseline Ca2+ (Phase I response) associated with high-frequency and low-amplitude SCOs (Phase II response), whereas SCOs were completely repressed with >1 µM kainate. KAR competitive antagonist CNQX [6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione] (1-10 µM) normalized Ca2+ dynamics to the prekainate pattern. Pilocarpine lacked Phase I activity but caused a sevenfold prolongation of Phase II SCOs without altering either their frequency or amplitude, an effect normalized by atropine (0.3–1 µM). 4-AP (1–30 µM) elicited a delayed Phase I response associated with persistent high-frequency, low-amplitude SCOs, and these disturbances were mitigated by pretreatment with the KCa activator SKA-31 [naphtho[1,2-d]thiazol-2-ylamine]. Consistent with its antiepileptic and neuroprotective activities, nonselective voltage-gated Na+ and Ca2+ channel blocker lamotrigine partially resolved kainate- and pilocarpine-induced Ca2+ dysregulation. This rapid throughput approach can discriminate among distinct seizurogenic mechanisms that alter Ca2+ dynamics in neuronal networks and may be useful in screening antiepileptic drug candidates. PMID:25583085

  1. Assessing the Relative Impact of Distinct Ionospheric Outflow Populations on Geospace Dynamics using Multi-Fluid Global MHD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brambles, O.; Lotko, W.; Ouellette, J.; Zhang, B.; Lyon, J.; Wiltberger, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Satellite observations and numerical modeling studies have demonstrated that ionospheric ion outflows of different species, source locations and energies populate and interact with distinct regions of the magnetosphere, and therefore can have profoundly different impacts on the coupled solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere (SWMI) system. In previous modeling studies, multi-fluid global simulations of the SWMI interaction typically use one fluid to model the solar wind and a second fluid to represent the outflowing ions. These studies are limited as they are incapable of tracking multiple, distinct ionosphere-sourced ion populations. Either significant ion populations and their influence must be excluded from the simulation or multiple ion populations must be combined into a single fluid. In this study, a multi-fluid adaption of the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry (MFLFM) model that is capable of including numerous separate fluids is used to: (1) evaluate how different outflowing ion populations propagate in the magnetosphere and enter the tail, (2) determine their resulting magnetospheric distribution, and (3) calculate their relative impacts on SWMI coupling. The outflow flux for each population is regulated using causally driven models based on empirical data. These models include specifications for transversely accelerated O+ originating from the cusp and nightside auroral region, H+ polar wind outflow and the plasmasphere. The outflow distributions and hemispheric outflow flux resulting from these models, and their resulting composition in the magnetosphere are validated using satellite data. The effects of each individual ion source on dayside reconnection, electrodynamic magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling and magnetotail processes are evaluated. Among other effects, we find that ionospheric ions that are entrained directly into the warm plasma cloak are more effective at reducing the dayside reconnection potential than ions that are transported further downtail and are

  2. Decreased expression of plastidial adenylate kinase in potato tubers results in an enhanced rate of respiration and a stimulation of starch synthesis that is attributable to post-translational redox-activation of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Sandra N; Tiessen, Axel; Fernie, Alisdair R; Geigenberger, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Adenine nucleotides are of general importance for many aspects of cell function, but their role in the regulation of biosynthetic processes is still unclear. It was previously reported that decreased expression of plastidial adenylate kinase, catalysing the interconversion of ATP and AMP to ADP, leads to increased adenylate pools and starch content in transgenic potato tubers. However, the underlying mechanisms were not elucidated. Here, it is shown that decreased expression of plastidial adenylate kinase in growing tubers leads to increased rates of respiratory oxygen consumption and increased carbon fluxes into starch. Increased rates of starch synthesis were accompanied by post-translational redox-activation of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase), catalysing the key regulatory step of starch synthesis in the plastid, while there were no substantial changes in metabolic intermediates or sugar levels. A similar increase in post-translational redox-activation of AGPase was found after supplying adenine to wild-type potato tuber discs to increase adenine nucleotide levels. Results provide first evidence for a link between redox-activation of AGPase and adenine nucleotide levels in plants.

  3. Quantification of oxidative post-translational modifications of cysteine thiols of p21ras associated with redox modulation of activity using isotope-coded affinity tags (ICAT) and mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Sethuraman, Mahadevan; Clavreul, Nicolas; Huang, Hua; McComb, Mark E; Costello, Catherine E; Cohen, Richard A

    2007-01-01

    p21ras GTPase is the protein product of the most commonly mutated human oncogene and has been identified as a target for reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS). Post-translational modification of reactive thiols, by reversible S-glutathiolation and S-nitrosation, and potentially also by irreversible oxidation, may have significant effects on p21ras activity. Here we used an isotope-coded affinity tag (ICAT) and mass spectrometry to quantitate the reversible and irreversible oxidative post-translational thiol modifications of p21ras caused by peroxynitrite (ONOO−) or glutathione disulfide (GSSG). The activity of p21ras was significantly increased following exposure to GSSG, but not to ONOO−. The results of LC-MS/MS analysis of tryptic peptides of p21ras treated with ONOO− showed that ICAT labeling of Cys118 was decreased by 47%, whereas Cys80 was not significantly affected and was thereby shown to be less reactive. The extent of S-glutathiolation of Cys118 by GSSG was 53%, and that of the terminal cysteines was 85%, as estimated by the decrease in ICAT labeling. The changes in ICAT labeling caused by GSSG were reversible by chemical reduction, but those caused by peroxynitrite were irreversible. The quantitative changes in thiol modification caused by GSSG associated with increased activity demonstrate the potential importance of redox modulation of p21ras. PMID:17320764

  4. Histone H1 Variants in Arabidopsis Are Subject to Numerous Post-Translational Modifications, Both Conserved and Previously Unknown in Histones, Suggesting Complex Functions of H1 in Plants.

    PubMed

    Kotliński, Maciej; Rutowicz, Kinga; Kniżewski, Łukasz; Palusiński, Antoni; Olędzki, Jacek; Fogtman, Anna; Rubel, Tymon; Koblowska, Marta; Dadlez, Michał; Ginalski, Krzysztof; Jerzmanowski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Linker histones (H1s) are conserved and ubiquitous structural components of eukaryotic chromatin. Multiple non-allelic variants of H1, which differ in their DNA/nucleosome binding properties, co-exist in animal and plant cells and have been implicated in the control of genetic programs during development and differentiation. Studies in mammals and Drosophila have revealed diverse post-translational modifications of H1s, most of which are of unknown function. So far, it is not known how this pattern compares with that of H1s from other major lineages of multicellular Eukaryotes. Here, we show that the two main H1variants of a model flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana are subject to a rich and diverse array of post-translational modifications. The distribution of these modifications in the H1 molecule, especially in its globular domain (GH1), resembles that occurring in mammalian H1s, suggesting that their functional significance is likely to be conserved. While the majority of modifications detected in Arabidopsis H1s, including phosphorylation, acetylation, mono- and dimethylation, formylation, crotonylation and propionylation, have also been reported in H1s of other species, some others have not been previously identified in histones.

  5. Distinct Sonic Hedgehog signaling dynamics specify floor plate and ventral neuronal progenitors in the vertebrate neural tube.

    PubMed

    Ribes, Vanessa; Balaskas, Nikolaos; Sasai, Noriaki; Cruz, Catarina; Dessaud, Eric; Cayuso, Jordi; Tozer, Samuel; Yang, Lin Lin; Novitch, Ben; Marti, Elisa; Briscoe, James

    2010-06-01

    The secreted ligand Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) organizes the pattern of cellular differentiation in the ventral neural tube. For the five neuronal subtypes, increasing levels and durations of Shh signaling direct progenitors to progressively more ventral identities. Here we demonstrate that this mode of action is not applicable to the generation of the most ventral cell type, the nonneuronal floor plate (FP). In chick and mouse embryos, FP specification involves a biphasic response to Shh signaling that controls the dynamic expression of key transcription factors. During gastrulation and early somitogenesis, FP induction depends on high levels of Shh signaling. Subsequently, however, prospective FP cells become refractory to Shh signaling, and this is a prerequisite for the elaboration of their identity. This prompts a revision to the model of graded Shh signaling in the neural tube, and provides insight into how the dynamics of morphogen signaling are deployed to extend the patterning capacity of a single ligand. In addition, we provide evidence supporting a common scheme for FP specification by Shh signaling that reconciles mechanisms of FP development in teleosts and amniotes.

  6. Distinct 3D Architecture and Dynamics of the Human HtrA2(Omi) Protease and Its Mutated Variants.

    PubMed

    Gieldon, Artur; Zurawa-Janicka, Dorota; Jarzab, Miroslaw; Wenta, Tomasz; Golik, Przemyslaw; Dubin, Grzegorz; Lipinska, Barbara; Ciarkowski, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    HtrA2(Omi) protease controls protein quality in mitochondria and plays a major role in apoptosis. Its HtrA2S306A mutant (with the catalytic serine routinely disabled for an X-ray study to avoid self-degradation) is a homotrimer whose subunits contain the serine protease domain (PD) and the regulatory PDZ domain. In the inactive state, a tight interdomain interface limits penetration of both PDZ-activating ligands and PD substrates into their respective target sites. We successfully crystalized HtrA2V226K/S306A, whose active counterpart HtrA2V226K has had higher proteolytic activity, suggesting higher propensity to opening the PD-PDZ interface than that of the wild type HtrA2. Yet, the crystal structure revealed the HtrA2V226K/S306A architecture typical of the inactive protein. To get a consistent interpretation of crystallographic data in the light of kinetic results, we employed molecular dynamics (MD). V325D inactivating mutant was used as a reference. Our simulations demonstrated that upon binding of a specific peptide ligand NH2-GWTMFWV-COOH, the PDZ domains open more dynamically in the wild type protease compared to the V226K mutant, whereas the movement is not observed in the V325D mutant. The movement relies on a PDZ vs. PD rotation which opens the PD-PDZ interface in a lid-like (budding flower-like in trimer) fashion. The noncovalent hinges A and B are provided by two clusters of interfacing residues, harboring V325D and V226K in the C- and N-terminal PD barrels, respectively. The opening of the subunit interfaces progresses in a sequential manner during the 50 ns MD simulation. In the systems without the ligand only minor PDZ shifts relative to PD are observed, but the interface does not open. Further activation-associated events, e.g. PDZ-L3 positional swap seen in any active HtrA protein (vs. HtrA2), were not observed. In summary, this study provides hints on the mechanism of activation of wtHtrA2, the dynamics of the inactive HtrA2V325D, but does not

  7. Distinct 3D Architecture and Dynamics of the Human HtrA2(Omi) Protease and Its Mutated Variants.

    PubMed

    Gieldon, Artur; Zurawa-Janicka, Dorota; Jarzab, Miroslaw; Wenta, Tomasz; Golik, Przemyslaw; Dubin, Grzegorz; Lipinska, Barbara; Ciarkowski, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    HtrA2(Omi) protease controls protein quality in mitochondria and plays a major role in apoptosis. Its HtrA2S306A mutant (with the catalytic serine routinely disabled for an X-ray study to avoid self-degradation) is a homotrimer whose subunits contain the serine protease domain (PD) and the regulatory PDZ domain. In the inactive state, a tight interdomain interface limits penetration of both PDZ-activating ligands and PD substrates into their respective target sites. We successfully crystalized HtrA2V226K/S306A, whose active counterpart HtrA2V226K has had higher proteolytic activity, suggesting higher propensity to opening the PD-PDZ interface than that of the wild type HtrA2. Yet, the crystal structure revealed the HtrA2V226K/S306A architecture typical of the inactive protein. To get a consistent interpretation of crystallographic data in the light of kinetic results, we employed molecular dynamics (MD). V325D inactivating mutant was used as a reference. Our simulations demonstrated that upon binding of a specific peptide ligand NH2-GWTMFWV-COOH, the PDZ domains open more dynamically in the wild type protease compared to the V226K mutant, whereas the movement is not observed in the V325D mutant. The movement relies on a PDZ vs. PD rotation which opens the PD-PDZ interface in a lid-like (budding flower-like in trimer) fashion. The noncovalent hinges A and B are provided by two clusters of interfacing residues, harboring V325D and V226K in the C- and N-terminal PD barrels, respectively. The opening of the subunit interfaces progresses in a sequential manner during the 50 ns MD simulation. In the systems without the ligand only minor PDZ shifts relative to PD are observed, but the interface does not open. Further activation-associated events, e.g. PDZ-L3 positional swap seen in any active HtrA protein (vs. HtrA2), were not observed. In summary, this study provides hints on the mechanism of activation of wtHtrA2, the dynamics of the inactive HtrA2V325D, but does not

  8. Distinct 3D Architecture and Dynamics of the Human HtrA2(Omi) Protease and Its Mutated Variants

    PubMed Central

    Gieldon, Artur; Zurawa-Janicka, Dorota; Jarzab, Miroslaw; Wenta, Tomasz; Golik, Przemyslaw; Dubin, Grzegorz; Lipinska, Barbara; Ciarkowski, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    HtrA2(Omi) protease controls protein quality in mitochondria and plays a major role in apoptosis. Its HtrA2S306A mutant (with the catalytic serine routinely disabled for an X-ray study to avoid self-degradation) is a homotrimer whose subunits contain the serine protease domain (PD) and the regulatory PDZ domain. In the inactive state, a tight interdomain interface limits penetration of both PDZ-activating ligands and PD substrates into their respective target sites. We successfully crystalized HtrA2V226K/S306A, whose active counterpart HtrA2V226K has had higher proteolytic activity, suggesting higher propensity to opening the PD-PDZ interface than that of the wild type HtrA2. Yet, the crystal structure revealed the HtrA2V226K/S306A architecture typical of the inactive protein. To get a consistent interpretation of crystallographic data in the light of kinetic results, we employed molecular dynamics (MD). V325D inactivating mutant was used as a reference. Our simulations demonstrated that upon binding of a specific peptide ligand NH2-GWTMFWV-COOH, the PDZ domains open more dynamically in the wild type protease compared to the V226K mutant, whereas the movement is not observed in the V325D mutant. The movement relies on a PDZ vs. PD rotation which opens the PD-PDZ interface in a lid-like (budding flower-like in trimer) fashion. The noncovalent hinges A and B are provided by two clusters of interfacing residues, harboring V325D and V226K in the C- and N-terminal PD barrels, respectively. The opening of the subunit interfaces progresses in a sequential manner during the 50 ns MD simulation. In the systems without the ligand only minor PDZ shifts relative to PD are observed, but the interface does not open. Further activation-associated events, e.g. PDZ-L3 positional swap seen in any active HtrA protein (vs. HtrA2), were not observed. In summary, this study provides hints on the mechanism of activation of wtHtrA2, the dynamics of the inactive HtrA2V325D, but does not

  9. Dynamics of EEG Rhythms Support Distinct Visual Selection Mechanisms in Parietal Cortex: A Simultaneous Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation and EEG Study

    PubMed Central

    Spadone, Sara; Tosoni, Annalisa; Sestieri, Carlo; Romani, Gian Luca; Della Penna, Stefania; Corbetta, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Using repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), we have recently shown a functional anatomical distinction in human parietal cortex between regions involved in maintaining attention to a location [ventral intraparietal sulcus (vIPS)] and a region involved in shifting attention between locations [medial superior parietal lobule (mSPL)]. In particular, while rTMS interference over vIPS impaired target discrimination at contralateral attended locations, interference over mSPL affected performance following shifts of attention regardless of the visual field (Capotosto et al., 2013). Here, using rTMS interference in conjunction with EEG recordings of brain rhythms during the presentation of cues that indicate to either shift or maintain spatial attention, we tested whether this functional anatomical segregation involves different mechanisms of rhythm synchronization. The transient inactivation of vIPS reduced the amplitude of the expected parieto-occipital low-α (8–10 Hz) desynchronization contralateral to the cued location. Conversely, the transient inactivation of mSPL, compared with vIPS, reduced the high-α (10–12 Hz) desynchronization induced by shifting attention into both visual fields. Furthermore, rTMS induced a frequency-specific delay of task-related modulation of brain rhythms. Specifically, rTMS over vIPS or mSPL during maintenance (stay cues) or shifting (shift cues) of spatial attention, respectively, caused a delay of α parieto-occipital desynchronization. Moreover, rTMS over vIPS during stay cues caused a delay of δ (2–4 Hz) frontocentral synchronization. These findings further support the anatomo-functional subdivision of the dorsal attention network in subsystems devoted to shifting or maintaining covert visuospatial attention and indicate that these mechanisms operate in different frequency channels linking frontal to parieto-occipital visual regions. PMID:25589765

  10. Transcriptome analysis of different developmental stages of amphioxus reveals dynamic changes of distinct classes of genes during development

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kevin Yi; Chen, Yuan; Zhang, Zuming; Ng, Patrick Kwok-Shing; Zhou, Wayne Junwei; Zhang, Yinfeng; Liu, Minghua; Chen, Junyuan; Mao, Bingyu; Tsui, Stephen Kwok-Wing

    2016-01-01

    Vertebrates diverged from other chordates approximately 500 million years ago and have adopted several modifications of developmental processes. Amphioxus is widely used in evolutionary developmental biology research, such as on the basic patterning mechanisms involved in the chordate body plan and the origin of vertebrates. The fast development of next-generation sequencing has advanced knowledge of the genomic organization of amphioxus; however, many aspects of gene regulation during amphioxus development have not been fully characterized. In this study, we applied high-throughput sequencing on the transcriptomes of 13 developmental stages of Chinese amphioxus to gain a comprehensive understanding of transcriptional processes occurring from the fertilized egg to the adult stage. The expression levels of 3,423 genes were significantly changed (FDR ≤ 0.01). All of these genes were included in a clustering analysis, and enrichment of biological functions associated with these clusters was determined. Significant changes were observed in several important processes, including the down-regulation of the cell cycle and the up-regulation of translation. These results should build a foundation for identifying developmentally important genes, especially those regulatory factors involved in amphioxus development, and advance understanding of the developmental dynamics in vertebrates. PMID:26979494

  11. Dynamic regulation of aquaporin-4 water channels in neurological disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Ying; Tran, Minh; Linninger, Andreas A.

    2015-01-01

    Aquaporin-4 water channels play a central role in brain water regulation in neurological disorders. Aquaporin-4 is abundantly expressed at the astroglial endfeet facing the cerebral vasculature and the pial membrane, and both its expression level and subcellular localization significantly influence brain water transport. However, measurements of aquaporin-4 levels in animal models of brain injury often report opposite trends of change at the injury core and the penumbra. Furthermore, aquaporin-4 channels play a beneficial role in brain water clearance in vasogenic edema, but a detrimental role in cytotoxic edema and exacerbate cell swelling. In light of current evidence, we still do not have a complete understanding of the role of aquaporin-4 in brain water transport. In this review, we propose that the regulatory mechanisms of aquaporin-4 at the transcriptional, translational, and post-translational levels jointly regulate water permeability in the short and long time scale after injury. Furthermore, in order to understand why aquaporin-4 channels play opposing roles in cytotoxic and vasogenic edema, we discuss experimental evidence on the dynamically changing osmotic gradients between blood, extracellular space, and the cytosol during the formation of cytotoxic and vasogenic edema. We conclude with an emerging picture of the distinct osmotic environments in cytotoxic and vasogenic edema, and propose that the directions of aquaporin-4-mediated water clearance in these two types of edema are distinct. The difference in water clearance pathways may provide an explanation for the conflicting observations of the roles of aquaporin-4 in edema resolution. PMID:26526878

  12. Dynamic regulation of aquaporin-4 water channels in neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Ying; Tran, Minh; Linninger, Andreas A

    2015-10-01

    Aquaporin-4 water channels play a central role in brain water regulation in neurological disorders. Aquaporin-4 is abundantly expressed at the astroglial endfeet facing the cerebral vasculature and the pial membrane, and both its expression level and subcellular localization significantly influence brain water transport. However, measurements of aquaporin-4 levels in animal models of brain injury often report opposite trends of change at the injury core and the penumbra. Furthermore, aquaporin-4 channels play a beneficial role in brain water clearance in vasogenic edema, but a detrimental role in cytotoxic edema and exacerbate cell swelling. In light of current evidence, we still do not have a complete understanding of the role of aquaporin-4 in brain water transport. In this review, we propose that the regulatory mechanisms of aquaporin-4 at the transcriptional, translational, and post-translational levels jointly regulate water permeability in the short and long time scale after injury. Furthermore, in order to understand why aquaporin-4 channels play opposing roles in cytotoxic and vasogenic edema, we discuss experimental evidence on the dynamically changing osmotic gradients between blood, extracellular space, and the cytosol during the formation of cytotoxic and vasogenic edema. We conclude with an emerging picture of the distinct osmotic environments in cytotoxic and vasogenic edema, and propose that the directions of aquaporin-4-mediated water clearance in these two types of edema are distinct. The difference in water clearance pathways may provide an explanation for the conflicting observations of the roles of aquaporin-4 in edema resolution. PMID:26526878

  13. Relationship of the Topological Distances and Activities between mPGES-1 and COX-2 versus COX-1: Implications of the Different Post-Translational Endoplasmic Reticulum Organizations of COX-1 and COX-2.

    PubMed

    Akasaka, Hironari; So, Shui-Ping; Ruan, Ke-He

    2015-06-16

    In vascular inflammation, prostaglandin E2 (PGE₂) is largely biosynthesized by microsomal PGE₂ synthase-1 (mPGES-1), competing with other downstream eicosanoid-synthesizing enzymes, such as PGIS, a synthase of a vascular protector prostacyclin (PGI₂), to isomerize the cyclooxygenase (COX)-2-derived prostaglandin H2 (PGH₂). In this study, we found that a majority of the product from the cells co-expressing human COX-2, mPGES-1, and PGIS was PGE₂. We hypothesize that the molecular and cellular mechanisms are related to the post-translational endoplasmic reticulum (ER) arrangement of those enzymes. A set of fusion enzymes, COX-2-linker [10 amino acids (aa)]-PGIS and COX-2-linker (22 amino acids)-PGIS, were created as "The Bioruler", in which the 10 and 22 amino acids are defined linkers with known helical structures and distances (14.4 and 30.8 Å, respectively). Our experiments have shown that the efficiency of PGI₂ biosynthesis was reduced when the separation distance increased from 10 to 22 amino acids. When COX-2-10aa-PGIS (with a 14.4 Å separation) was co-expressed with mPGES-1 on the ER membrane, a major product was PGE₂, but not PGI₂. However, expression of COX-2-10aa-PGIS and mPGES-1 on a separated ER with a distance of ≫30.8 Å reduced the level of PGE₂ production. These data indicated that the mPGES-1 is "complex-likely" colocalized with COX-2 within a distance of 14.4 Å. In addition, the cells co-expressing COX-1-10aa-PGIS and mPGES-1 produced PGI₂ mainly, but not PGE₂. This indicates that mPGES-1 is expressed much farther from COX-1. These findings have led to proposed models showing the different post-translational ER organization between COX-2 and COX-1 with respect to the topological arrangement of the mPGES-1 during vascular inflammation.

  14. Determination of the covalent structure of an N- and C-terminally blocked glycoprotein from endocuticle of Locusta migratoria. Combined use of plasma desorption mass spectrometry and Edman degradation to study post-translationally modified proteins.

    PubMed

    Talbo, G; Højrup, P; Rahbek-Nielsen, H; Andersen, S O; Roepstorff, P

    1991-01-30

    The complete structure of protein isolated from endocuticle of sexually mature locusts, Locusta migratoria, has been determined by a combination of automatic Edman degradation and plasma desorption mass spectrometry. The protein is extensively post-translationally modified. The N-terminal is 5-oxoproline (pyroglutamic acid) and the C-terminal proline residue is amidated. Furthermore, the protein is glycosylated by a single N-acetyl-galactosamine residue at one, two or three threonines. The N-terminal sequence was obtained by analysing the N-acetylated N,O-permethylated derivative using plasma desorption mass spectrometry. The position and type of carbohydrate were determined by combining an HPLC-based carbohydrate analysis with the peak pattern of the phenylthiohydantoin derivative in automatic sequencing and with mass information on peptides. The protein has pronounced similarity to cuticular proteins from larvae of diptera and lepidoptera, but only slight resemblance to the previously sequenced locust exocuticular proteins. This indicates a similarity between soft larval cuticles and locust endocuticle, a similarity which may extend to their mechanical properties. PMID:1997327

  15. Molecular cloning and characterization of Vigna mungo processing enzyme 1 (VmPE-1), an asparaginyl endopeptidase possibly involved in post-translational processing of a vacuolar cysteine endopeptidase (SH-EP).

    PubMed

    Okamoto, T; Minamikawa, T

    1999-01-01

    Asparaginyl endopeptidase is a cysteine endopeptidase that has strict substrate specificity toward the carboxy side of asparagine residues. Vigna mungo processing enzyme 1, termed VmPE-1, occurs in the cotyledons of germinated seeds of V. mungo, and is possibly involved in the post-translational processing of a vacuolar cysteine endopeptidase, designated SH-EP, which degrades seed storage protein. VmPE-1 also showed a substrate specificity to asparagine residues, and its enzymatic activity was inhibited by NEM but not E-64. In addition, purified VmPE-1 had a potential to process the recombinant SH-EP precursor to its intermediate in vitro. cDNA clones for VmPE-1 and its homologue, named VmPE-1A, were identified and sequenced, and their expressions in the cotyledons of V. mungo seedlings and other organs were investigated. VmPE-1 mRNA and SH-EP mRNA were expressed in germinated seeds at the same stage of germination although the enzymatic activity of VmPE-1 rose prior to that of SH-EP. The level of VmPE-1A mRNA continued increasing as germination proceeded. In roots, stems and leaves of fully grown plants, and in hypocotyls, VmPE-1 and VmPE-1A were little expressed. We discuss possible functions of VmPE-1 and VmPE-1A in the cotyledons of germinated seeds.

  16. Copy Number Suppressors of the Aspergillus nidulans nimA1 Mitotic Kinase Display Distinctive and Highly Dynamic Cell Cycle-Regulated Locations▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Ukil, Leena; Varadaraj, Archana; Govindaraghavan, Meera; Liu, Hui-Lin; Osmani, Stephen A.

    2008-01-01

    The Aspergillus nidulans NIMA kinase is essential for mitosis and is the founding member of the conserved NIMA-related kinase (Nek) family of protein kinases. To gain insight into NIMA function, a copy number suppression screen has been completed that defines three proteins termed MCNA, MCNB, and MCNC (multi-copy-number suppressor of nimA1 A, B, and C). All display a distinctive and dynamic cell cycle-specific distribution. MCNC has weak similarity to Saccharomyces cerevisiae Def1 within a shared CUE-like domain. MCNC, like Def1, is a cytoplasmic protein with slow mobility during sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and its deletion causes polarization defects and a small colony phenotype. MCNC enters nuclei during mitosis. In contrast, MCNB is a nuclear protein displaying increased nuclear levels as cells progress through interphase but is lost from nuclei at mitosis. MCNB is highly related to the Schizosaccharomyces pombe forkhead transcription factor Sep1 and is likely a transcriptional activator of nimA. Most surprisingly, MCNA, a protein restricted to the aspergilli and pathogenic systemic dimorphic fungi (the Eurotiomycetes), defines a nuclear body located near nucleoli at the nuclear periphery of G2 nuclei. During progression through mitosis, the MCNA body is excluded from nuclei. Cytoplasmic MCNA bodies then diminish during early stages of interphase, and single MCNA bodies are formed within nuclei as interphase progresses. Three sites of MCNA phosphorylation were mapped and mutated to implicate proline-directed phosphorylation in the equal segregation of MCNA during the cell cycle. The data indicate all three MCN proteins likely have cell cycle functions. PMID:18931041

  17. Stat3 isoforms, alpha and beta, demonstrate distinct intracellular dynamics with prolonged nuclear retention of Stat3beta mapping to its unique C-terminal end.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying; Qiu, Jihui; Dong, Shuo; Redell, Michele S; Poli, Valeria; Mancini, Michael A; Tweardy, David J

    2007-11-30

    Two isoforms of Stat3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3) are expressed in cells, alpha (p92) and beta (p83), both derived from a single gene by alternative mRNA splicing. The 55-residue C-terminal transactivation domain of Stat3alpha is deleted in Stat3beta and replaced by seven unique C-terminal residues (CT7) whose function remains uncertain. We subcloned the open reading frames of Stat3alpha and Stat3beta into the C terminus of green fluorescent protein (GFP). Fluorescent microscopic analysis of HEK293T cells transiently transfected with GFP-Stat3alpha or GFP-Stat3beta revealed similar kinetics and cytokine concentration dependence of nuclear accumulation; these findings were confirmed by high throughput microscope analysis of murine embryonic fibroblasts that lacked endogenous Stat3 but stably expressed either GFP-Stat3alpha or GFP-Stat3beta. However, although time to half-maximal cytoplasmic reaccumulation after cytokine withdrawal was 15 min for GFP-Stat3alpha, it was >180 min for GFP-Stat3beta. Furthermore, although the intranuclear mobility of GFP-Stat3alpha was rapid and increased with cytokine stimulation, the intranuclear mobility of GFP-Stat3beta in unstimulated cells was slower than that of GFP-Stat3alpha in unstimulated cells and was slowed further following cytokine stimulation. Deletion of the unique CT7 domain from Stat3beta eliminated prolonged nuclear retention but did not alter its intranuclear mobility. Thus, Stat3alpha and Stat3beta have distinct intracellular dynamics, with Stat3beta exhibiting prolonged nuclear retention and reduced intranuclear mobility especially following ligand stimulation. Prolonged nuclear retention, but not reduced intranuclear mobility, mapped to the CT7 domain of Stat3beta.

  18. Post-translational Regulation of Nitrate Reductase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrate reductase (NR) catalyzes the reduction of nitrate to nitrite, which is the first step in the nitrate assimilation pathway, but can also reduce nitrite to nitric oxide (NO), an important signaling molecule that is thought to mediate a wide array of of developmental and physiological processes...

  19. A mutational mimic analysis of histone H3 post-translational modifications: specific sites influence the conformational state of H3/H4, causing either positive or negative supercoiling of DNA.

    PubMed

    White, Rachel H; Keberlein, Melissa; Jackson, Vaughn

    2012-10-16

    Histone H3 has specific sites of post-translational modifications that serve as epigenetic signals to cellular machinery to direct various processes. Mutational mimics of these modifications (glutamine for acetylation, methionine and leucine for methylation, and glutamic acid for phosphorylation) were constructed at the relevant sites of the major histone variant, H3.2, and their effects on the conformational equilibrium of the H3/H4 tetramer at physiological ionic strength were determined when bound to or free of DNA. The deposition vehicle used for this analysis was NAP1, nucleosome assembly protein 1. Acetylation mimics in the N-terminus preferentially stabilized the left-handed conformer (DNA negatively supercoiled), and mutations within the globular region preferred the right-handed conformer (DNA positively supercoiled). The methylation mimics in the N-terminus tended to maintain characteristics similar to those of wild-type H3/H4; i.e., the conformational equilibrium maintains similar levels of both left- and right-handed conformers. Phosphorylation mimics facilitated a mixed effect, i.e., when at serines, the left-handed conformer, and at threonines, a mixture of both conformers. When double mutations were present, the conformational equilibrium was shifted dramatically, either leftward or rightward depending on the specific sites. In contrast, these mutations tended not to affect the direction and extent of supercoiling for variants H3.1 and H3.3. Variant H3.3 promoted only the left-handed conformer, and H3.1 tended to maintain both conformers. Additional experiments indicate the importance of a propagation mechanism for ensuring the formation of a particular superhelical state over an extended region of the DNA. The potential relevance of these results to the maintenance of epigenetic information on a gene is discussed.

  20. A mutational mimic analysis of histone H3 post-translational modifications: specific sites influence the conformational state of H3/H4, causing either positive or negative supercoiling of DNA.

    PubMed

    White, Rachel H; Keberlein, Melissa; Jackson, Vaughn

    2012-10-16

    Histone H3 has specific sites of post-translational modifications that serve as epigenetic signals to cellular machinery to direct various processes. Mutational mimics of these modifications (glutamine for acetylation, methionine and leucine for methylation, and glutamic acid for phosphorylation) were constructed at the relevant sites of the major histone variant, H3.2, and their effects on the conformational equilibrium of the H3/H4 tetramer at physiological ionic strength were determined when bound to or free of DNA. The deposition vehicle used for this analysis was NAP1, nucleosome assembly protein 1. Acetylation mimics in the N-terminus preferentially stabilized the left-handed conformer (DNA negatively supercoiled), and mutations within the globular region preferred the right-handed conformer (DNA positively supercoiled). The methylation mimics in the N-terminus tended to maintain characteristics similar to those of wild-type H3/H4; i.e., the conformational equilibrium maintains similar levels of both left- and right-handed conformers. Phosphorylation mimics facilitated a mixed effect, i.e., when at serines, the left-handed conformer, and at threonines, a mixture of both conformers. When double mutations were present, the conformational equilibrium was shifted dramatically, either leftward or rightward depending on the specific sites. In contrast, these mutations tended not to affect the direction and extent of supercoiling for variants H3.1 and H3.3. Variant H3.3 promoted only the left-handed conformer, and H3.1 tended to maintain both conformers. Additional experiments indicate the importance of a propagation mechanism for ensuring the formation of a particular superhelical state over an extended region of the DNA. The potential relevance of these results to the maintenance of epigenetic information on a gene is discussed. PMID:23003102

  1. The E3 Ubiquitin Ligases, HUWE1 and NEDD4-1, Are Involved in the Post-translational Regulation of the ABCG1 and ABCG4 Lipid Transporters*

    PubMed Central

    Aleidi, Shereen M.; Howe, Vicky; Sharpe, Laura J.; Yang, Alryel; Rao, Geetha; Brown, Andrew J.; Gelissen, Ingrid C.

    2015-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCG1 has an essential role in cellular cholesterol homeostasis, and dysregulation has been associated with a number of high burden diseases. Previous studies reported that ABCG1 is ubiquitinated and degraded via the ubiquitin proteasome system. However, so far the molecular mechanism, including the identity of any of the rate-limiting ubiquitination enzymes, or E3 ligases, is unknown. Using liquid chromatography mass spectrometry, we identified two HECT domain E3 ligases associated with ABCG1, named HUWE1 (HECT, UBA, and WWE domain containing 1, E3 ubiquitin protein ligase) and NEDD4-1 (Neural precursor cell-expressed developmentally down regulated gene 4), of which the latter is the founding member of the NEDD4 family of ubiquitin ligases. Silencing both HUWE1 and NEDD4-1 in cells overexpressing human ABCG1 significantly increased levels of the ABCG1 monomeric and dimeric protein forms, however ABCA1 protein expression was unaffected. In addition, ligase silencing increased ABCG1-mediated cholesterol export to HDL in cells overexpressing the transporter as well as in THP-1 macrophages. Reciprocally, overexpression of both ligases resulted in a significant reduction in protein levels of both the ABCG1 monomeric and dimeric forms. Like ABCG1, ABCG4 protein levels and cholesterol export activity were significantly increased after silencing both HUWE1 and NEDD4-1 in cells overexpressing this closely related ABC half-transporter. In summary, we have identified for the first time two E3 ligases that are fundamental enzymes in the post-translational regulation of ABCG1 and ABCG4 protein levels and cellular cholesterol export activity. PMID:26296893

  2. Sub-proteome S-nitrosylation analysis in Brassica juncea hints at the regulation of Brassicaceae specific as well as other vital metabolic pathway(s) by nitric oxide and suggests post-translational modifications cross-talk.

    PubMed

    Sehrawat, Ankita; Deswal, Renu

    2014-12-01

    Abiotic stress affects the normal physiology of the plants and results in crop loss. Brassica juncea is an oil yielding crop affected by abiotic stress. In future, over 30% yield loss by abiotic stress is predicted in India. Understanding the mechanism of plant response to stress would help in developing stress tolerant crops. Nitric oxide (NO) is now viewed as a remarkably important signaling molecule, involved in regulating stress responses. S-Nitrosylation is a NO based post-translational modification (PTM), linked with the regulation of many physiologically relevant targets. In the last decade, over 700 functionally varied S-nitrosylated proteins were identified, which suggested broad-spectrum regulation. To understand the physiological significance of S-nitrosylation, it was analyzed in cold stress. Functional categorization and validation of some of the B. juncea S-nitrosylated targets, suggested that NO produced during stress regulates cellular detoxification by modulating enzymes of ascorbate glutathione cycle, superoxide dismutase, glutathione S-transferase and glyoxalase I by S-nitrosylation in crude, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) depleted and apoplastic fractions. Interestingly, S-nitrosylation of enzymes associated with glucosinolate hydrolysis pathway, suggests a novel regulation of this Brassicaceae specific pathway by NO. Moreover, identification of enzymes of Glycolysis and Calvin cycle in crude and RuBisCO depleted fractions showed the regulation of metabolic as well as photosynthetic pathways by S-nitrosylation. S-Nitrosylation of cell wall modifying and proteolytic enzymes in the apoplast suggested differential and spatial regulation by S-nitrosylation. To have an overview of physiological role(s) of NO, collective information on NO based signaling (mainly by S-nitrosylation) is presented in this review.

  3. Novel Antimicrobial Peptides EeCentrocins 1, 2 and EeStrongylocin 2 from the Edible Sea Urchin Echinus esculentus Have 6-Br-Trp Post-Translational Modifications.

    PubMed

    Solstad, Runar Gjerp; Li, Chun; Isaksson, Johan; Johansen, Jostein; Svenson, Johan; Stensvåg, Klara; Haug, Tor

    2016-01-01

    The global problem of microbial resistance to antibiotics has resulted in an urgent need to develop new antimicrobial agents. Natural antimicrobial peptides are considered promising candidates for drug development. Echinoderms, which rely on innate immunity factors in the defence against harmful microorganisms, are sources of novel antimicrobial peptides. This study aimed to isolate and characterise antimicrobial peptides from the Edible sea urchin Echinus esculentus. Using bioassay-guided purification and cDNA cloning, three antimicrobial peptides were characterised from the haemocytes of the sea urchin; two heterodimeric peptides and a cysteine-rich peptide. The peptides were named EeCentrocin 1 and 2 and EeStrongylocin 2, respectively, due to their apparent homology to the published centrocins and strongylocins isolated from the green sea urchin Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis. The two centrocin-like peptides EeCentrocin 1 and 2 are intramolecularly connected via a disulphide bond to form a heterodimeric structure, containing a cationic heavy chain of 30 and 32 amino acids and a light chain of 13 amino acids. Additionally, the light chain of EeCentrocin 2 seems to be N-terminally blocked by a pyroglutamic acid residue. The heavy chains of EeCentrocins 1 and 2 were synthesised and shown to be responsible for the antimicrobial activity of the natural peptides. EeStrongylocin 2 contains 6 cysteines engaged in 3 disulphide bonds. A fourth peptide (Ee4635) was also discovered but not fully characterised. Using mass spectrometric and NMR analyses, EeCentrocins 1 and 2, EeStrongylocin 2 and Ee4635 were all shown to contain post-translationally brominated Trp residues in the 6 position of the indole ring. PMID:27007817

  4. Post-translational heterocyclic backbone modifications in the 43-peptide antibiotic microcin B17. Structure elucidation and NMR study of a 13C,15N-labelled gyrase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Bayer, A; Freund, S; Jung, G

    1995-12-01

    Microcin B17 (McB17), the first known gyrase inhibitor of peptidic nature, is produced by ribosomal synthesis and post-translational modification of the 69-residue precursor protein by an Escherichia coli strain. To elucidate the chemical structure of the mature 43-residue peptide antibiotic, fermentation and purification protocols were established and optimized which allowed the isolation and purification of substantial amounts of highly pure McB17 (non-labelled, 15N-labelled and 13C/15N-labelled peptide. By ultraviolet-absorption spectroscopy. HPLC-electrospray mass spectrometry and GC-mass spectrometry, amino acid analysis, protein sequencing, and, in particular, multidimensional NMR, we could demonstrate and unequivocally prove that the enzymic modification of the precursor backbone at Gly-Cys and Gly-Ser segments leads to the formation of 2-aminomethylthiazole-4-carboxylic acid and 2-aminomethyloxazole-4-carboxylic acid, respectively. In addition, two bicyclic modifications 2-(2-aminomethyloxazolyl)thiazole-4-carboxylic acid and 2-(2-aminomethylthiazolyl)oxazole-4-carboxylic acid were found that consist of directly linked thiazole and oxazole rings derived from one Gly-Ser-Cys and one Gly-Cys-Ser segment. Analogous to the thiazole and oxazole rings found in antitumor peptides of microbial and marine origin, these heteroaromatic ring systems of McB17 presumably play an important role in its gyrase-inhibiting activity, e.g. interacting with the DNA to trap the covalent protein-DNA intermediate of the breakage-reunion reaction of the gyrase.

  5. Novel Antimicrobial Peptides EeCentrocins 1, 2 and EeStrongylocin 2 from the Edible Sea Urchin Echinus esculentus Have 6-Br-Trp Post-Translational Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Solstad, Runar Gjerp; Li, Chun; Isaksson, Johan; Johansen, Jostein; Svenson, Johan; Stensvåg, Klara; Haug, Tor

    2016-01-01

    The global problem of microbial resistance to antibiotics has resulted in an urgent need to develop new antimicrobial agents. Natural antimicrobial peptides are considered promising candidates for drug development. Echinoderms, which rely on innate immunity factors in the defence against harmful microorganisms, are sources of novel antimicrobial peptides. This study aimed to isolate and characterise antimicrobial peptides from the Edible sea urchin Echinus esculentus. Using bioassay-guided purification and cDNA cloning, three antimicrobial peptides were characterised from the haemocytes of the sea urchin; two heterodimeric peptides and a cysteine-rich peptide. The peptides were named EeCentrocin 1 and 2 and EeStrongylocin 2, respectively, due to their apparent homology to the published centrocins and strongylocins isolated from the green sea urchin Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis. The two centrocin-like peptides EeCentrocin 1 and 2 are intramolecularly connected via a disulphide bond to form a heterodimeric structure, containing a cationic heavy chain of 30 and 32 amino acids and a light chain of 13 amino acids. Additionally, the light chain of EeCentrocin 2 seems to be N-terminally blocked by a pyroglutamic acid residue. The heavy chains of EeCentrocins 1 and 2 were synthesised and shown to be responsible for the antimicrobial activity of the natural peptides. EeStrongylocin 2 contains 6 cysteines engaged in 3 disulphide bonds. A fourth peptide (Ee4635) was also discovered but not fully characterised. Using mass spectrometric and NMR analyses, EeCentrocins 1 and 2, EeStrongylocin 2 and Ee4635 were all shown to contain post-translationally brominated Trp residues in the 6 position of the indole ring. PMID:27007817

  6. Adjustment of diurnal starch turnover to short days: depletion of sugar during the night leads to a temporary inhibition of carbohydrate utilization, accumulation of sugars and post-translational activation of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase in the following light period.

    PubMed

    Gibon, Yves; Bläsing, Oliver E; Palacios-Rojas, Natalia; Pankovic, Dejana; Hendriks, Janneke H M; Fisahn, Joachim; Höhne, Melanie; Günther, Manuela; Stitt, Mark

    2004-09-01

    A larger proportion of the fixed carbon is retained as starch in the leaf in short days, providing a larger store to support metabolism and carbon export during the long night. The mechanisms that facilitate this adjustment of the sink-source balance are unknown. Starchless pgm mutants were analysed to discover responses that are triggered when diurnal starch turnover is disturbed. Sugars accumulated to high levels during the day, and fell to very low levels by the middle of the night. Sugars rose rapidly in the roots and rosette after illumination, and decreased later in the light period. Global transcript profiling revealed only small differences between pgm and Col0 at the end of the day but large differences at the end of the night, when pgm resembled Col0 after a 4-6 h prolongation of the night and many genes required for biosynthesis and growth were repressed [Plant J. 37 (2004) 914]. It is concluded that transient sugar depletion at the end of the night inhibits carbon utilization at the start of the ensuing light period. A second set of experiments investigated the stimulation of starch synthesis in response to short days in wild-type Col0. In short days, sugars were very low in the roots and rosette at the end of the dark period, and after illumination accumulated rapidly in both organs to levels that were higher than in long days. The response resembles pgm, except that carbohydrate accumulated in the leaf as starch instead of sugars. A similar response was found after transfer from long to short days. Inclusion of sugar in the rooting medium attenuated the stimulation of starch synthesis. Post-translational activation of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) was increased in pgm, and in Col0 in short days. It is concluded that starch synthesis is stimulated in short day conditions because sugar depletion at the end of the night triggers a temporary inhibition of growth and carbohydrate utilization in the first part of the light period, leading to

  7. PC1/3 and PC2 gene expression and post-translational endoproteolytic pro-opiomelanocortin processing is regulated by photoperiod in the seasonal Siberian hamster (Phodopus sungorus).

    PubMed

    Helwig, M; Khorooshi, R M H; Tups, A; Barrett, P; Archer, Z A; Exner, C; Rozman, J; Braulke, L J; Mercer, J G; Klingenspor, M

    2006-06-01

    A remarkable feature of the seasonal adaptation displayed by the Siberian hamster (Phodopus sungorus) is the ability to decrease food intake and body weight (by up to 40%) in response to shortening photoperiod. The regulating neuroendocrine systems involved in this adaptation and their neuroanatomical and molecular bases are poorly understood. We investigated the effect of photoperiod on the expression of prohormone convertases 1 (PC1/3) and 2 (PC2) and the endoproteolytic processing of the neuropeptide precursor pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) within key energy balance regulating centres of the hypothalamus. We compared mRNA levels and protein distribution of PC1/3, PC2, POMC, adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH), alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH), beta-endorphin and orexin-A in selected hypothalamic areas of long day (LD, 16:8 h light:dark), short day (SD, 8:16 h light:dark) and natural-day (ND, photoperiod depending on time of the year) acclimated Siberian hamsters. The gene expression of PC2 was significantly higher within the arcuate nucleus (ARC, P < 0.01) in SD and in ND (versus LD), and is reflected in the day length profile between October and April in the latter. PC1/3 gene expression in the ARC and lateral hypothalamus was higher in ND but not in SD compared to the respective LD controls. The immunoreactivity of PC1/3 cleaved neuropeptide ACTH in the ARC and PC1/3-colocalised orexin-A in the lateral hypothalamus were not affected by photoperiod changes. However, increased levels of PC2 mRNA and protein were associated with higher abundance of the mature neuropeptides alpha-MSH and beta-endorphin (P < 0.01) in SD. This study provides a possible explanation for previous paradoxical findings showing lower food intake in SD associated with decreased POMC mRNA levels. Our results suggest that a major part of neuroendocrine body weight control in seasonal adaptation may be effected by post-translational processing mediated by the prohormone convertases PC1

  8. Copper Induces Apoptosis of Neuroblastoma Cells Via Post-translational Regulation of the Expression of Bcl-2-family Proteins and the tx Mouse is a Better Model of Hepatic than Brain Cu Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Chan, Hsien W; Liu, Tianbing; Verdile, Giuseppe; Bishop, Glenda; Haasl, Ryan J; Smith, Mark A; Perry, George; Martins, Ralph N; Atwood, Craig S

    2008-01-01

    The basic mechanism(s) by which altered Cu homeostasis is toxic to hepatocytes and neurons, the two major cell types affected in copper storage diseases such as Wilson's disease (WD), remain unclear. Using human M17 neuroblastoma cells as a model to examine Cu toxicity, we found that there was a time- and concentration-dependent induction of neuronal death, such that at 24 h there was a approximately 50 % reduction in viability with 25 muM Cu-glycine(2). Cu-glycine(2) (25:50 muM) treatment for 24 h significantly altered the expression of 296 genes, including 8 genes involved with apoptosis (BCL2-associated athanogene 3, BCL2/adenovirus E1B 19kDa interacting protein caspase 5, regulator of Fas-induced apoptosis, V-jun sarcoma virus 17 oncogene homolog, claudin 5, prostaglandin E receptor 3 and protein tyrosine phosphatase, non-receptor type 6). Surprisingly, changes in the expression of more 'traditional' apoptotic genes (Bcl-2, Bax, Bak and Bad) did not vary more than 20 %. To test whether the induction of apoptosis in neuroblastoma cells was via post-translational mechanisms, we measured the protein expression of these apoptotic markers in M17 neuroblastoma cells treated with Cu-glycine(2) (0-100 muM) for 24-48 h. Compared with glycine treated cells, Cu-glycine(2) reduced Bcl-2 expression by 50 %, but increased Bax and Bak expression by 130% and 400 %, respectively. To assess whether Cu also induced apoptotic cell death in a mouse model of WD, we measured the expression of these apoptotic markers in the liver and brain of mice expressing an ATP7b gene mutation (tx(J) mice) at 10 months of age (near the end of their lives when overt liver pathology is displayed). Changes in the liver expression of these apoptotic markers in tx(J) mice compared to background mice mirrored those of Cu treated neuroblastoma cells. In contrast, few changes in apoptotic protein expression were detected in the brain between tx(J) and background mice, indicating the tx(J) mouse is a good

  9. Novel Mechanism of Impaired Function of Organic Anion-Transporting Polypeptide 1B3 in Human Hepatocytes: Post-Translational Regulation of OATP1B3 by Protein Kinase C Activation

    PubMed Central

    Powell, John; Farasyn, Taleah; Köck, Kathleen; Meng, Xiaojie; Pahwa, Sonia; Brouwer, Kim L. R.

    2014-01-01

    The organic anion-transporting polypeptide (OATP) 1B3 is a membrane transport protein that mediates hepatic uptake of many drugs and endogenous compounds. Currently, determination of OATP-mediated drug-drug interactions in vitro is focused primarily on direct substrate inhibition. Indirect inhibition of OATP1B3 activity is under-appreciated. OATP1B3 has putative protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylation sites. Studies were designed to determine the effect of PKC activation on OATP1B3-mediated transport in human hepatocytes using cholecystokinin-8 (CCK-8), a specific OATP1B3 substrate, as the probe. A PKC activator, phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), did not directly inhibit [3H]CCK-8 accumulation in human sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCH). However, pretreatment with PMA for as little as 10 minutes rapidly decreased [3H]CCK-8 accumulation. Treatment with a PKC inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide (BIM) I prior to PMA treatment blocked the inhibitory effect of PMA, indicating PKC activation is essential for downregulating OATP1B3 activity. PMA pretreatment did not affect OATP1B3 mRNA or total protein levels. To determine the mechanism(s) underlying the indirect inhibition of OATP1B3 activity upon PKC activation, adenoviral vectors expressing FLAG-Myc-tagged OATP1B3 (Ad-OATP1B3) were transduced into human hepatocytes; surface expression and phosphorylation of OATP1B3 were determined by biotinylation and by an anti–phosphor-Ser/Thr/Tyr antibody, respectively. PMA pretreatment markedly increased OATP1B3 phosphorylation without affecting surface or total OATP1B3 protein levels. In conclusion, PKC activation rapidly decreases OATP1B3 transport activity by post-translational regulation of OATP1B3. These studies elucidate a novel indirect inhibitory mechanism affecting hepatic uptake mediated by OATP1B3, and provide new insights into predicting OATP-mediated drug interactions between OATP substrates and kinase modulator drugs/endogenous compounds. PMID:25200870

  10. PTMSearchPlus: A Software Tool for Automated Protein Identification and Post-Translational Modification Characterization by Integrating Accurate Intact Protein Mass and Bottom-Up Mass Spectrometric Data Searches

    SciTech Connect

    Kertesz, Vilmos; Connelly, Heather M; Erickson, Brian K; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L

    2009-01-01

    PTMSearchPlus is a software tool for the automated integration of accurate intact protein mass (AIPM) and bottom-up (BU) mass spectra searches/data in order to both confidently identify the intact proteins and to characterize their post-translational modifications (PTMs). The development of PTMSearchPlus was motivated by the desire to effectively integrate high resolution intact protein molecular masses with bottom-up peptide MS/MS data. PTMSearchPlus requires as input both intact protein and proteolytic peptide mass spectra collected from the same protein mixture, a FASTA protein database, and a selection of possible PTMs, the types and ranges of which can be specified. The output of PTMSearchPlus is a list of intact and modified proteins matching the AIPM data concomitant with their respective peptides found by the BU search. This list also contains protein and peptide sequence coverage information, scores, etc. that can be used for further evaluation or refiltering of the results. Corresponding and annotated AIPM and BU mass spectra are also displayed for visual inspection when a listed protein or a peptide is selected. These and other controls ensure that the user can manually evaluate, modify (e.g. remove obvious false positives, low quality spectra etc.), and save the results of the automated search if necessary. Driven by the exponential growth in the number of possible peptide candidates in a BU search when multiple PTMs are probed, the advantages on search speed by limiting the total number of possible PTMs on a peptide in the BU search or by performing an AIPM predicted BU search are also discussed in addition to the integration approach. The features of PTMSearchPlus are demonstrated using both a protein standard mixture and a complex protein mixture from Escherichia coli. Experimental data revealed a unique advantage of coupling AIPM and the BU datasets that is mutually beneficial for both approaches. Namely, AIPM data can confirm that no PTM peptides

  11. The leader peptide of mutacin 1140 has distinct structural components compared to related class I lantibiotics.

    PubMed

    Escano, Jerome; Stauffer, Byron; Brennan, Jacob; Bullock, Monica; Smith, Leif

    2014-12-01

    Lantibiotics are ribosomally synthesized peptide antibiotics composed of an N-terminal leader peptide that promotes the core peptide's interaction with the post translational modification (PTM) enzymes. Following PTMs, mutacin 1140 is transported out of the cell and the leader peptide is cleaved to yield the antibacterial peptide. Mutacin 1140 leader peptide is structurally unique compared to other class I lantibiotic leader peptides. Herein, we further our understanding of the structural differences of mutacin 1140 leader peptide with regard to other class I leader peptides. We have determined that the length of the leader peptide is important for the biosynthesis of mutacin 1140. We have also determined that mutacin 1140 leader peptide contains a novel four amino acid motif compared to related lantibiotics. PTM enzyme recognition of the leader peptide appears to be evolutionarily distinct from related class I lantibiotics. Our study on mutacin 1140 leader peptide provides a basis for future studies aimed at understanding its interaction with the PTM enzymes.

  12. A Distinct Class of Slow (∼0.2–2 Hz) Intrinsically Bursting Layer 5 Pyramidal Neurons Determines UP/DOWN State Dynamics in the Neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Gunner, David; Bao, Ying; Connelly, William M.; Isaac, John T.R.; Hughes, Stuart W.; Crunelli, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    During sleep and anesthesia, neocortical neurons exhibit rhythmic UP/DOWN membrane potential states. Although UP states are maintained by synaptic activity, the mechanisms that underlie the initiation and robust rhythmicity of UP states are unknown. Using a physiologically validated model of UP/DOWN state generation in mouse neocortical slices whereby the cholinergic tone present in vivo is reinstated, we show that the regular initiation of UP states is driven by an electrophysiologically distinct subset of morphologically identified layer 5 neurons, which exhibit intrinsic rhythmic low-frequency burst firing at ∼0.2–2 Hz. This low-frequency bursting is resistant to block of glutamatergic and GABAergic transmission but is absent when slices are maintained in a low Ca2+ medium (an alternative, widely used model of cortical UP/DOWN states), thus explaining the lack of rhythmic UP states and abnormally prolonged DOWN states in this condition. We also characterized the activity of various other pyramidal and nonpyramidal neurons during UP/DOWN states and found that an electrophysiologically distinct subset of layer 5 regular spiking pyramidal neurons fires earlier during the onset of network oscillations compared with all other types of neurons recorded. This study, therefore, identifies an important role for cell-type-specific neuronal activity in driving neocortical UP states. PMID:25855163

  13. Gait dynamics in Parkinson’s disease: Common and distinct behavior among stride length, gait variability, and fractal-like scaling

    PubMed Central

    Hausdorff, Jeffrey M.

    2009-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a common, debilitating neurodegenerative disease. Gait disturbances are a frequent cause of disability and impairment for patients with PD. This article provides a brief introduction to PD and describes the gait changes typically seen in patients with this disease. A major focus of this report is an update on the study of the fractal properties of gait in PD, the relationship between this feature of gait and stride length and gait variability, and the effects of different experimental conditions on these three gait properties. Implications of these findings are also briefly described. This update highlights the idea that while stride length, gait variability, and fractal scaling of gait are all impaired in PD, distinct mechanisms likely contribute to and are responsible for the regulation of these disparate gait properties. PMID:19566273

  14. The lateral membrane organization and dynamics of myelin proteins PLP and MBP are dictated by distinct galactolipids and the extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Ozgen, Hande; Schrimpf, Waldemar; Hendrix, Jelle; de Jonge, Jenny C; Lamb, Don C; Hoekstra, Dick; Kahya, Nicoletta; Baron, Wia

    2014-01-01

    In the central nervous system, lipid-protein interactions are pivotal for myelin maintenance, as these interactions regulate protein transport to the myelin membrane as well as the molecular organization within the sheath. To improve our understanding of the fundamental properties of myelin, we focused here on the lateral membrane organization and dynamics of peripheral membrane protein 18.5-kDa myelin basic protein (MBP) and transmembrane protein proteolipid protein (PLP) as a function of the typical myelin lipids galactosylceramide (GalC), and sulfatide, and exogenous factors such as the extracellular matrix proteins laminin-2 and fibronectin, employing an oligodendrocyte cell line, selectively expressing the desired galactolipids. The dynamics of MBP were monitored by z-scan point fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS), while PLP dynamics in living cells were investigated by circular scanning FCS. The data revealed that on an inert substrate the diffusion rate of 18.5-kDa MBP increased in GalC-expressing cells, while the diffusion coefficient of PLP was decreased in sulfatide-containing cells. Similarly, when cells were grown on myelination-promoting laminin-2, the lateral diffusion coefficient of PLP was decreased in sulfatide-containing cells. In contrast, PLP's diffusion rate increased substantially when these cells were grown on myelination-inhibiting fibronectin. Additional biochemical analyses revealed that the observed differences in lateral diffusion coefficients of both proteins can be explained by differences in their biophysical, i.e., galactolipid environment, specifically with regard to their association with lipid rafts. Given the persistence of pathological fibronectin aggregates in multiple sclerosis lesions, this fundamental insight into the nature and dynamics of lipid-protein interactions will be instrumental in developing myelin regenerative strategies.

  15. Self-Catalyzed Assembly of Peptide Scaffolded Nanozyme as a Dynamic Biosensing System.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Huang, Yue; Yu, Yue; Li, Genxi; Karamanos, Yannis

    2016-02-01

    In this work, a new strategy of biosensor design is developed based on the assembly of amyloid beta and its multiple interactions with other bioactive species. These interactions can enable amyloid beta peptide as a multifunctional sensing element, so the immobilization of sensing probe and the step-by-step modification of the sensing interface have all been dispensed with. Instead, the kinetics of the assembly of a peptide-based catalytic network serves to convert the quantity of analyte into amplified signal readout. The designed dynamic assembling and biosensing system has also been successfully applied in detecting the activity of polyglutamylation, an essential post translation modification controlling cell skeleton and cell cycle, in biological complex samples. Further studies reveal that the serum abundance of a polyglutamylase, tubulin tyrosine ligase-like protein 12, may show parallel with the degree of development of prostate cancer and the discrimination between early cancerous development and benign conditions. And the obtained result is more distinct than that based on PSA detection, the current gold standard. This study may also point to the prospective of extending this design strategy to broader range of biosensing applications in the future.

  16. Time lapse in vivo microscopy reveals distinct dynamics of microglia-tumor environment interactions-a new role for the tumor perivascular space as highway for trafficking microglia.

    PubMed

    Bayerl, Simon Heinrich; Niesner, Raluca; Cseresnyes, Zoltan; Radbruch, Helena; Pohlan, Julian; Brandenburg, Susan; Czabanka, Marcus Alexander; Vajkoczy, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Microglial cells are critical for glioma growth and progression. However, only little is known about intratumoral microglial behavior and the dynamic interaction with the tumor. Currently the scarce understanding of microglial appearance in malignant gliomas merely originates from histological studies and in vitro investigations. In order to understand the pattern of microglia activity, motility and migration we designed an intravital study in an orthotopic murine glioma model using CX3CR1-eGFP(GFP/wt) mice. We analysed the dynamics of intratumoral microglia accumulation and activity, as well as microglia/tumor blood vessel interaction by epi-illumination and 2-photon laser scanning microscopy. We further investigated cellular and tissue function, including the enzyme activity of intratumoral and microglial NADPH oxidase measured by in vivo fluorescence lifetime imaging. We identified three morphological phenotypes of tumor-associated microglia cells with entirely different motility patterns. We found that NADPH oxidase activation is highly divergent in these microglia subtypes leading to different production levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). We observed that microglia motility is highest within the perivascular niche, suggesting relevance of microglia/tumor blood vessel interactions. In line, reduction of tumor blood vessels by antivascular therapy confirmed the relevance of the tumor vessel compartment on microglia biology in brain tumors. In summary, we provide new insights into in vivo microglial behavior, regarding both morphology and function, in malignant gliomas. GLIA 2016;64:1210-1226.

  17. Comparison of DNA hydration patterns obtained using two distinct computational methods, molecular dynamics simulation and three-dimensional reference interaction site model theory.

    PubMed

    Yonetani, Yoshiteru; Maruyama, Yutaka; Hirata, Fumio; Kono, Hidetoshi

    2008-05-14

    Because proteins and DNA interact with each other and with various small molecules in the presence of water molecules, we cannot ignore their hydration when discussing their structural and energetic properties. Although high-resolution crystal structure analyses have given us a view of tightly bound water molecules on their surface, the structural data are still insufficient to capture the detailed configurations of water molecules around the surface of these biomolecules. Thanks to the invention of various computational algorithms, computer simulations can now provide an atomic view of hydration. Here, we describe the apparent patterns of DNA hydration calculated by using two different computational methods: Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and three-dimensional reference interaction site model (3D-RISM) theory. Both methods are promising for obtaining hydration properties, but until now there have been no thorough comparisons of the calculated three-dimensional distributions of hydrating water. This rigorous comparison showed that MD and 3D-RISM provide essentially similar hydration patterns when there is sufficient sampling time for MD and a sufficient number of conformations to describe molecular flexibility for 3D-RISM. This suggests that these two computational methods can be used to complement one another when evaluating the reliability of the calculated hydration patterns. PMID:18532849

  18. Comparison of DNA hydration patterns obtained using two distinct computational methods, molecular dynamics simulation and three-dimensional reference interaction site model theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yonetani, Yoshiteru; Maruyama, Yutaka; Hirata, Fumio; Kono, Hidetoshi

    2008-05-01

    Because proteins and DNA interact with each other and with various small molecules in the presence of water molecules, we cannot ignore their hydration when discussing their structural and energetic properties. Although high-resolution crystal structure analyses have given us a view of tightly bound water molecules on their surface, the structural data are still insufficient to capture the detailed configurations of water molecules around the surface of these biomolecules. Thanks to the invention of various computational algorithms, computer simulations can now provide an atomic view of hydration. Here, we describe the apparent patterns of DNA hydration calculated by using two different computational methods: Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and three-dimensional reference interaction site model (3D-RISM) theory. Both methods are promising for obtaining hydration properties, but until now there have been no thorough comparisons of the calculated three-dimensional distributions of hydrating water. This rigorous comparison showed that MD and 3D-RISM provide essentially similar hydration patterns when there is sufficient sampling time for MD and a sufficient number of conformations to describe molecular flexibility for 3D-RISM. This suggests that these two computational methods can be used to complement one another when evaluating the reliability of the calculated hydration patterns.

  19. Distinct plasma-membrane PtdIns(4)P and PtdIns(4,5)P2 dynamics in secretagogue-stimulated beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Wuttke, Anne; Sågetorp, Jenny; Tengholm, Anders

    2010-05-01

    Phosphoinositides regulate numerous processes in various subcellular compartments. Whereas many stimuli trigger changes in the plasma-membrane PtdIns(4,5)P(2) concentration, little is known about its precursor, PtdIns(4)P, in particular whether there are stimulus-induced alterations independent of those of PtdIns(4,5)P(2). We investigated plasma-membrane PtdIns(4)P and PtdIns(4,5)P(2) dynamics in insulin-secreting MIN6 cells using fluorescent translocation biosensors and total internal reflection microscopy. Loss of PtdIns(4,5)P(2) induced by phospholipase C (PLC)-activating receptor agonists or stimulatory glucose concentrations was paralleled by increased PtdIns(4)P levels. In addition, glucose-stimulated cells regularly showed anti-synchronous oscillations of the two lipids. Whereas glucose-induced PtdIns(4)P elevation required voltage-gated Ca(2+) entry and was mimicked by membrane-depolarizing stimuli, the receptor-induced response was Ca(2+) independent, but sensitive to protein kinase C (PKC) inhibition and mimicked by phorbol ester stimulation. We conclude that glucose and PLC-activating receptor stimuli trigger Ca(2+)- and PKC-dependent changes in the plasma-membrane PtdIns(4)P concentration that are independent of the effects on PtdIns(4,5)P(2). These findings indicate that enhanced formation of PtdIns(4)P, apart from ensuring efficient replenishment of the PtdIns(4,5)P(2) pool, might serve an independent signalling function by regulating the association of PtdIns(4)P-binding proteins with the plasma membrane.

  20. Quantitative Evaluation of Diffusion and Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MR in Tumor Parenchyma and Peritumoral Area for Distinction of Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing; Yang, Zhi-yun; Luo, Bo-ning; Yang, Jian-yong; Chu, Jian-ping

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To quantitatively evaluate the diagnostic efficiency of parameters from diffusion and dynamic contrast-enhanced MR which based on tumor parenchyma (TP) and peritumoral (PT) area in classification of brain tumors. Methods 45 patients (male: 23, female: 22; mean age: 46 y) were prospectively recruited and they underwent conventional, DCE-MR and DWI examination. With each tumor, 10–15 regions of interest (ROIs) were manually placed on TP and PT area. ADC and permeability parameters (Ktrans, Ve, Kep and iAUC) were calculated and their diagnostic efficiency was assessed. Results In TP, all permeability parameters and ADC value could significantly discriminate Low- from High grade gliomas (HGG) (p<0.001); among theses parameters, Ve demonstrated the highest diagnostic power (iAUC: 0.79, cut-off point: 0.15); the most sensitive and specific index for gliomas grading were Ktrans (84%) and Kep (89%). While, in PT area, only Ktrans could help in gliomas grading (P = 0.009, cut-off point: 0.03 min-1). Moreover, in TP, mean Ve and iAUC of primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) and metastases were significantly higher than that in HGG (p<0.003). Further, in PT area, mean Ktrans (p≤0.004) could discriminate PCNSL from HGG and ADC (p≤0.003) could differentiate metastases with HGG. Conclusions Quantitative ADC and permeability parameters from Diffusion and DCE-MR in TP and PT area, especially DCE-MR, can aid in gliomas grading and brain tumors discrimination. Their combined application is strongly recommended in the differential diagnosis of these tumor entities. PMID:26384329

  1. Identification of Distinct Conformations of the Angiotensin-II Type 1 Receptor Associated with the Gq/11 Protein Pathway and the β-Arrestin Pathway Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Cabana, Jérôme; Holleran, Brian; Leduc, Richard; Escher, Emanuel; Guillemette, Gaétan; Lavigne, Pierre

    2015-06-19

    Biased signaling represents the ability of G protein-coupled receptors to engage distinct pathways with various efficacies depending on the ligand used or on mutations in the receptor. The angiotensin-II type 1 (AT1) receptor, a prototypical class A G protein-coupled receptor, can activate various effectors upon stimulation with the endogenous ligand angiotensin-II (AngII), including the Gq/11 protein and β-arrestins. It is believed that the activation of those two pathways can be associated with distinct conformations of the AT1 receptor. To verify this hypothesis, microseconds of molecular dynamics simulations were computed to explore the conformational landscape sampled by the WT-AT1 receptor, the N111G-AT1 receptor (constitutively active and biased for the Gq/11 pathway), and the D74N-AT1 receptor (biased for the β-arrestin1 and -2 pathways) in their apo-forms and in complex with AngII. The molecular dynamics simulations of the AngII-WT-AT1, N111G-AT1, and AngII-N111G-AT1 receptors revealed specific structural rearrangements compared with the initial and ground state of the receptor. Simulations of the D74N-AT1 receptor revealed that the mutation stabilizes the receptor in the initial ground state. The presence of AngII further stabilized the ground state of the D74N-AT1 receptor. The biased agonist [Sar(1),Ile(8)]AngII also showed a preference for the ground state of the WT-AT1 receptor compared with AngII. These results suggest that activation of the Gq/11 pathway is associated with a specific conformational transition stabilized by the agonist, whereas the activation of the β-arrestin pathway is linked to the stabilization of the ground state of the receptor.

  2. Identification of Distinct Conformations of the Angiotensin-II Type 1 Receptor Associated with the Gq/11 Protein Pathway and the β-Arrestin Pathway Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations*

    PubMed Central

    Cabana, Jérôme; Holleran, Brian; Leduc, Richard; Escher, Emanuel; Guillemette, Gaétan; Lavigne, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Biased signaling represents the ability of G protein-coupled receptors to engage distinct pathways with various efficacies depending on the ligand used or on mutations in the receptor. The angiotensin-II type 1 (AT1) receptor, a prototypical class A G protein-coupled receptor, can activate various effectors upon stimulation with the endogenous ligand angiotensin-II (AngII), including the Gq/11 protein and β-arrestins. It is believed that the activation of those two pathways can be associated with distinct conformations of the AT1 receptor. To verify this hypothesis, microseconds of molecular dynamics simulations were computed to explore the conformational landscape sampled by the WT-AT1 receptor, the N111G-AT1 receptor (constitutively active and biased for the Gq/11 pathway), and the D74N-AT1 receptor (biased for the β-arrestin1 and -2 pathways) in their apo-forms and in complex with AngII. The molecular dynamics simulations of the AngII-WT-AT1, N111G-AT1, and AngII-N111G-AT1 receptors revealed specific structural rearrangements compared with the initial and ground state of the receptor. Simulations of the D74N-AT1 receptor revealed that the mutation stabilizes the receptor in the initial ground state. The presence of AngII further stabilized the ground state of the D74N-AT1 receptor. The biased agonist [Sar1,Ile8]AngII also showed a preference for the ground state of the WT-AT1 receptor compared with AngII. These results suggest that activation of the Gq/11 pathway is associated with a specific conformational transition stabilized by the agonist, whereas the activation of the β-arrestin pathway is linked to the stabilization of the ground state of the receptor. PMID:25934394

  3. Phytochrome-Interacting Factors Have Both Shared and Distinct Biological Roles

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jinkil; Choi, Giltsu

    2013-01-01

    Phytochromes are plant photoreceptors that perceive red and far-red light. Upon the perception of light in Arabidopsis, light-activated phytochromes enter the nucleus and act on a set of interacting proteins, modulating their activities and thereby altering the expression levels of ∼10% of the organism’s entire gene complement. Phytochrome-interacting factors (PIFs) belonging to Arabidopsis basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) subgroup 15 are key interacting proteins that play negative roles in light responses. Their activities are post-translationally countered by light-activated phytochromes, which promote the degradation of PIFs and directly or indirectly inhibit their binding to DNA. The PIFs share a high degree of similarity, but examinations of pif single and multiple mutants have indicated that they have shared and distinct functions in various developmental and physiological processes. These are believed to stem from differences in both intrinsic protein properties and their gene expression patterns. In an effort to clarify the basis of these shared and distinct functions, we compared recently published genome-wide ChIP data, developmental gene expression maps, and responses to various stimuli for the various PIFs. Based on our observations, we propose that the biological roles of PIFs stem from their shared and distinct DNA binding targets and specific gene expression patterns. PMID:23708772

  4. Social conformity despite individual preferences for distinctiveness.

    PubMed

    Smaldino, Paul E; Epstein, Joshua M

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate that individual behaviours directed at the attainment of distinctiveness can in fact produce complete social conformity. We thus offer an unexpected generative mechanism for this central social phenomenon. Specifically, we establish that agents who have fixed needs to be distinct and adapt their positions to achieve distinctiveness goals, can nevertheless self-organize to a limiting state of absolute conformity. This seemingly paradoxical result is deduced formally from a small number of natural assumptions and is then explored at length computationally. Interesting departures from this conformity equilibrium are also possible, including divergence in positions. The effect of extremist minorities on these dynamics is discussed. A simple extension is then introduced, which allows the model to generate and maintain social diversity, including multimodal distinctiveness distributions. The paper contributes formal definitions, analytical deductions and counterintuitive findings to the literature on individual distinctiveness and social conformity.

  5. Human germline and pan-cancer variomes and their distinct functional profiles.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yang; Karagiannis, Konstantinos; Zhang, Haichen; Dingerdissen, Hayley; Shamsaddini, Amirhossein; Wan, Quan; Simonyan, Vahan; Mazumder, Raja

    2014-10-01

    Identification of non-synonymous single nucleotide variations (nsSNVs) has exponentially increased due to advances in Next-Generation Sequencing technologies. The functional impacts of these variations have been difficult to ascertain because the corresponding knowledge about sequence functional sites is quite fragmented. It is clear that mapping of variations to sequence functional features can help us better understand the pathophysiological role of variations. In this study, we investigated the effect of nsSNVs on more than 17 common types of post-translational modification (PTM) sites, active sites and binding sites. Out of 1 705 285 distinct nsSNVs on 259 216 functional sites we identified 38 549 variations that significantly affect 10 major functional sites. Furthermore, we found distinct patterns of site disruptions due to germline and somatic nsSNVs. Pan-cancer analysis across 12 different cancer types led to the identification of 51 genes with 106 nsSNV affected functional sites found in 3 or more cancer types. 13 of the 51 genes overlap with previously identified Significantly Mutated Genes (Nature. 2013 Oct 17;502(7471)). 62 mutations in these 13 genes affecting functional sites such as DNA, ATP binding and various PTM sites occur across several cancers and can be prioritized for additional validation and investigations.

  6. Differential Palmit(e)oylation of Wnt1 on C93 and S224 Residues Has Overlapping and Distinct Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Galli, Lisa M.; Burrus, Laura W.

    2011-01-01

    Though the mechanisms by which cytosolic/intracellular proteins are regulated by the post-translational addition of palmitate adducts is well understood, little is known about how this lipid modification affects secreted ligands, such as Wnts. Here we use mutational analysis to show that differential modification of the two known palmit(e)oylated residues of Wnt1, C93 and S224, has both overlapping and distinct consequences. Though the relative roles of each residue are similar with respect to stability and secretion, two distinct biological assays in L cells show that modification of C93 primarily modulates signaling via a ß-catenin independent pathway while S224 is crucial for ß-catenin dependent signaling. In addition, pharmacological inhibition of Porcupine (Porcn), an upstream regulator of Wnt, by IWP1, specifically inhibited ß-catenin dependent signaling. Consistent with these observations, mapping of amino acids in peptide domains containing C93 and S224 demonstrate that acylation of C93 is likely to be Porcn-independent while that of S224 is Porcn-dependent. Cumulatively, our data strongly suggest that C93 and S224 are modified by distinct enzymes and that the differential modification of these sites has the potential to influence Wnt signaling pathway choice. PMID:22046319

  7. Carnosic acid sensitized TRAIL-mediated apoptosis through down-regulation of c-FLIP and Bcl-2 expression at the post translational levels and CHOP-dependent up-regulation of DR5, Bim, and PUMA expression in human carcinoma caki cells

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jae Hoon; Kwon, Taeg Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Carnosic acid is a phenolic diterpene from rosmarinus officinalis, and has multiple functions, such as anti-inflammatory, anti-viral, and anti-tumor activity. In this study, we examined whether carnosic acid could sensitize TRAIL-mediated apoptosis in human renal carcinoma Caki cells. We found that carnosic acid markedly induced TRAIL-mediated apoptosis in human renal carcinoma (Caki, ACHN, and A498), and human hepatocellular carcinoma (SK-HEP-1), and human breast carcinoma (MDA-MB-231) cells, but not normal cells (TMCK-1 and HSF). Carnosic acid induced down-regulation of c-FLIP and Bcl-2 expression at the post-translational levels, and the over-expression of c-FLIP and Bcl-2 markedly blocked carnosic acid-induced TRAIL sensitization. Furthermore, carnosic acid induced death receptor (DR)5, Bcl-2 interacting mediator of cell death (Bim), and p53 up-regulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) expression at the transcriptional levels via CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-homologous protein (CHOP). Down-regulation of CHOP expression by siRNA inhibited DR5, Bim, and PUMA expression, and attenuated carnosic acid plus TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Taken together, our study demonstrates that carnosic acid enhances sensitization against TRAIL-mediated apoptosis through the down-regulation of c-FLIP and Bcl-2 expression, and up-regulation of ER stress-mediated DR5, Bim, and PUMA expression at the transcriptional levels. PMID:25596735

  8. The leader peptide of mutacin 1140 has distinct structural components compared to related class I lantibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Escano, Jerome; Stauffer, Byron; Brennan, Jacob; Bullock, Monica; Smith, Leif

    2014-01-01

    Lantibiotics are ribosomally synthesized peptide antibiotics composed of an N-terminal leader peptide that promotes the core peptide's interaction with the post translational modification (PTM) enzymes. Following PTMs, mutacin 1140 is transported out of the cell and the leader peptide is cleaved to yield the antibacterial peptide. Mutacin 1140 leader peptide is structurally unique compared to other class I lantibiotic leader peptides. Herein, we further our understanding of the structural differences of mutacin 1140 leader peptide with regard to other class I leader peptides. We have determined that the length of the leader peptide is important for the biosynthesis of mutacin 1140. We have also determined that mutacin 1140 leader peptide contains a novel four amino acid motif compared to related lantibiotics. PTM enzyme recognition of the leader peptide appears to be evolutionarily distinct from related class I lantibiotics. Our study on mutacin 1140 leader peptide provides a basis for future studies aimed at understanding its interaction with the PTM enzymes. PMID:25400246

  9. Foundations of Distinctive Feature Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baltaxe, Christiane A. M.

    This treatise on the theoretical and historical foundations of distinctive feature theory traces the evolution of the distinctive features concept in the context of related notions current in linguistic theory, discusses the evolution of individual distinctive features, and criticizes certain acoustic and perceptual correlates attributed to these…

  10. EMdeCODE: a novel algorithm capable of reading words of epigenetic code to predict enhancers and retroviral integration sites and to identify H3R2me1 as a distinctive mark of coding versus non-coding genes.

    PubMed

    Santoni, Federico Andrea

    2013-02-01

    Existence of some extra-genetic (epigenetic) codes has been postulated since the discovery of the primary genetic code. Evident effects of histone post-translational modifications or DNA methylation over the efficiency and the regulation of DNA processes are supporting this postulation. EMdeCODE is an original algorithm that approximate the genomic distribution of given DNA features (e.g. promoter, enhancer, viral integration) by identifying relevant ChIPSeq profiles of post-translational histone marks or DNA binding proteins and combining them in a supermark. EMdeCODE kernel is essentially a two-step procedure: (i) an expectation-maximization process calculates the mixture of epigenetic factors that maximize the Sensitivity (recall) of the association with the feature under study; (ii) the approximated density is then recursively trimmed with respect to a control dataset to increase the precision by reducing the number of false positives. EMdeCODE densities improve significantly the prediction of enhancer loci and retroviral integration sites with respect to previous methods. Importantly, it can also be used to extract distinctive factors between two arbitrary conditions. Indeed EMdeCODE identifies unexpected epigenetic profiles specific for coding versus non-coding RNA, pointing towards a new role for H3R2me1 in coding regions.

  11. SUCROSE SYNTHASE: ELUCIDATION OF COMPLEX POST-TRANSLATIONAL REGULATORY MECHANISMS

    SciTech Connect

    Steven C. Huber

    2009-05-12

    Studies have focused on the enzyme sucrose synthase, which plays an important role in the metabolism of sucrose in seeds and tubers. There are three isoforms of SUS in maize, referred to as SUS1, SUS-SH1, and SUS2. SUS is generally considered to be tetrameric protein but recent evidence suggests that SUS can also occur as a dimeric protein. The formation of tetrameric SUS is regulated by sucrose concentration in vitro and this could also be an important factor in the cellular localization of the protein. We found that high sucrose concentrations, which promote tetramer formation, also inhibit the binding of SUS1 to actin filaments in vitro. Previously, high sucrose concentrations were shown to promote SUS association with the plasma membrane. The specific regions of the SUS molecule involved in oligomerization are not known, but we identified a region of the SUS1 moelcule by bioinformatic analysis that was predicted to form a coiled coil. We demonstrated that this sequence could, in fact, self-associate as predicted for a coiled coil, but truncation analysis with the full-length recombinant protein suggested that it was not responsible for formation of dimers or tetramers. However, the coiled coil may function in binding of other proteins to SUS1. Overall, sugar availability may differentially influence the binding of SUS to cellular structures, and these effects may be mediated by changes in the oligomeric nature of the enzyme.

  12. The regulation of p53 by phosphorylation: a model for how distinct signals integrate into the p53 pathway.

    PubMed

    Maclaine, Nicola J; Hupp, Ted R

    2009-05-01

    The tumour suppressor p53 is a transcription factor that has evolved the ability to integrate distinct environmental signals including DNA damage, virus infection, and cytokine signaling into a common biological outcome that maintains normal cellular control. Mutations in p53 switch the cellular transcription program resulting in deregulation of the stress responses that normally maintain cell and tissue integrity. Transgenic studies in mice have indicated that changes in the specific activity of p53 can have profound effects not only on cancer development, but also on organism aging. As the specific activity of p53 is regulated at a post-translational level by sets of enzymes that mediate phosphorylation, acetylation, methylation, and ubiquitin-like modifications, it is likely that physiological modifiers of the aging function of p53 would be enzymes that catalyze such covalent modifications. We demonstrate that distinct stress-activated kinases, including ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), casein kinase 1 (CK1) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), mediate phosphorylation of a key phospho-acceptor site in the p53 transactivation domain in response to diverse stresses including ionizing radiation, DNA virus infection, and elevation in the intracellular AMP/ATP ratio. As diseases linked to aging can involve activation of p53-dependent changes in cellular protective pathways, the development of specific physiological models might further shed light on the role of p53 kinases in modifying age-related diseases. PMID:20157532

  13. Dynamics of ubiquitin-mediated signalling: insights from mathematical modelling and experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Lan K

    2016-05-01

    Post-translational modification of cellular proteins by ubiquitin is a pivotal regulatory event that controls not only protein degradation, but also a variety of non-proteolytic functions. Ubiquitination is involved in a broad array of physiological processes, and its dysregulation has been associated with many human diseases, including neuronal disorders and cancers. Ubiquitin-mediated signalling has thus come to the forefront of biomedical research. It is increasingly apparent that ubiquitination is a highly complex and dynamic process, evidenced by a myriad of ways of ubiquitin chain formation, tightly regulatory mechanisms involving E3 ligases and deubiquitinating enzymes and extensive crosstalk with other post-translational modifications. To unravel the complexity of ubiquitination and understand the dynamic properties of ubiquitin-mediated signalling are challenging, but critical topics in ubiquitin research, which will undoubtedly benefit our effort in developing strategies that could target ubiquitin signalling for therapeutics. Computational modelling and model-based approaches are emerging as promising tools that help tackle the complexity and provide useful frameworks for quantitative and dynamical analysis of ubiquitin signalling. In this article, I will discuss recent advances in our understanding of the dynamic behaviour of ubiquitination from both theoretical and experimental studies, and aspects of ubiquitin signalling that may have major dynamical consequences. It is expected the discussed issues will be of relevant interest to both the ubiquitin and systems biology fields.

  14. Distinct expression, localization and function of two Rab7 proteins encoded by paralogous genes in a free-living model eukaryote.

    PubMed

    Osińska, Magdalena; Wiejak, Jolanta; Wypych, Emilia; Bilski, Henryk; Bartosiewicz, Rafał; Wyroba, Elżbieta

    2011-01-01

    Rab7 GTPases are involved in membrane trafficking in the late endosomal/lysosomal pathway. In Paramecium octaurelia Rab7a and Rab7b are encoded by paralogous genes. Antipeptide antibodies generated against divergent C-termini recognize Rab7a of 22.5 kDa and Rab7b of 25 kDa, respectively. In 2D gel electrophoresis two immunoreactive spots were identified for Rab7b at pI about 6.34 and about 6.18 and only one spot for Rab7a of pI about 6.34 suggesting post-translational modification of Rab7b. Mass spectrometry revealed eight identical phosphorylated residues in the both proteins. ProQ Emerald staining and ConA overlay of immunoprecipitated Rab7b indicated its putative glycosylation that was further supported by a faster electrophoretic mobility of this protein upon deglycosylation. Such a post-translational modification and substitution of Ala(140) in Rab7a for Ser(140) in Rab7b may result in distinct targeting to the oral apparatus where Rab7b associates with the microtubular structures as revealed by STED confocal and electron microscopy. Rab7a was mapped to phagosomal compartment. Absolute qReal-Time PCR analysis revealed that expression of Rab7a was 2.6-fold higher than that of Rab7b. Upon latex internalization it was further 2-fold increased for Rab7a and only slightly for Rab7b. Post-transcriptional gene silencing of rab7a suppressed phagosome formation by 70 % and impaired their acidification. Ultrastructural analysis with double immunogold labeling revealed that this effect was due to the lack of V-ATPase recruitment to phagolysosomes. No significant phenotype changes were noticed in cells upon rab7b silencing. In conclusion, Rab7b acquired a new function, whereas Rab7a can be assigned to the phagolysosomal pathway.

  15. Counselor Identity: Conformity or Distinction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLaughlin, Jerry E.; Boettcher, Kathryn

    2009-01-01

    The authors explore 3 debates in other disciplines similar to counseling's identity debate in order to learn about common themes and outcomes. Conformity, distinction, and cohesion emerged as common themes. They conclude that counselors should retain their distinctive, humanistic approach rather than conforming to the dominant, medical approach.

  16. Is Face Distinctiveness Gender Based?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baudouin, Jean-Yves; Gallay, Mathieu

    2006-01-01

    Two experiments were carried out to study the role of gender category in evaluations of face distinctiveness. In Experiment 1, participants had to evaluate the distinctiveness and the femininity-masculinity of real or artificial composite faces. The composite faces were created by blending either faces of the same gender (sexed composite faces,…

  17. Optimal Distinctiveness Signals Membership Trust.

    PubMed

    Leonardelli, Geoffrey J; Loyd, Denise Lewin

    2016-07-01

    According to optimal distinctiveness theory, sufficiently small minority groups are associated with greater membership trust, even among members otherwise unknown, because the groups are seen as optimally distinctive. This article elaborates on the prediction's motivational and cognitive processes and tests whether sufficiently small minorities (defined by relative size; for example, 20%) are associated with greater membership trust relative to mere minorities (45%), and whether such trust is a function of optimal distinctiveness. Two experiments, examining observers' perceptions of minority and majority groups and using minimal groups and (in Experiment 2) a trust game, revealed greater membership trust in minorities than majorities. In Experiment 2, participants also preferred joining minorities over more powerful majorities. Both effects occurred only when minorities were 20% rather than 45%. In both studies, perceptions of optimal distinctiveness mediated effects. Discussion focuses on the value of relative size and optimal distinctiveness, and when membership trust manifests. PMID:27140657

  18. Distinct types of eigenvector localization in networks

    PubMed Central

    Pastor-Satorras, Romualdo; Castellano, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    The spectral properties of the adjacency matrix provide a trove of information about the structure and function of complex networks. In particular, the largest eigenvalue and its associated principal eigenvector are crucial in the understanding of nodes’ centrality and the unfolding of dynamical processes. Here we show that two distinct types of localization of the principal eigenvector may occur in heterogeneous networks. For synthetic networks with degree distribution P(q) ~ q−γ, localization occurs on the largest hub if γ > 5/2; for γ < 5/2 a new type of localization arises on a mesoscopic subgraph associated with the shell with the largest index in the K-core decomposition. Similar evidence for the existence of distinct localization modes is found in the analysis of real-world networks. Our results open a new perspective on dynamical processes on networks and on a recently proposed alternative measure of node centrality based on the non-backtracking matrix. PMID:26754565

  19. Modeling the dynamics of the nucleosome at various levels.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onufriev, Alexey; Fenley, Andrew; Zmuda-Ruscio, Jory; Adams, David

    2007-03-01

    The primary level of DNA compaction in eukaryotic organisms is the nucleosome, yet details of its dynamics are not fully understood. While the whole nucleosome must be highly stable, protective of its genetic material, at the same time its tightly wrapped DNA should be highly accessible, easily revealing its information content. A combination of atom-level classical molecular dynamics and a course-grained continuum description provide insights into the functioning of the system. In particular, the nucleosomal DNA appears to be considerably more flexible than what can be expected based on its canonical persistence length. A coarse-grained electrostatic model of the nucleosome explains how its stability can be modulated with small environmental changes as well as post-translational modifications. Implications for the nucleosome assembly process in vivo are discussed.

  20. Neuropeptidomics Mass Spectrometry Reveals Signaling Networks Generated by Distinct Protease Pathways in Human Systems.

    PubMed

    Hook, Vivian; Bandeira, Nuno

    2015-12-01

    Neuropeptides regulate intercellular signaling as neurotransmitters of the central and peripheral nervous systems, and as peptide hormones in the endocrine system. Diverse neuropeptides of distinct primary sequences of various lengths, often with post-translational modifications, coordinate and integrate regulation of physiological functions. Mass spectrometry-based analysis of the diverse neuropeptide structures in neuropeptidomics research is necessary to define the full complement of neuropeptide signaling molecules. Human neuropeptidomics has notable importance in defining normal and dysfunctional neuropeptide signaling in human health and disease. Neuropeptidomics has great potential for expansion in translational research opportunities for defining neuropeptide mechanisms of human diseases, providing novel neuropeptide drug targets for drug discovery, and monitoring neuropeptides as biomarkers of drug responses. In consideration of the high impact of human neuropeptidomics for health, an observed gap in this discipline is the few published articles in human neuropeptidomics compared with, for example, human proteomics and related mass spectrometry disciplines. Focus on human neuropeptidomics will advance new knowledge of the complex neuropeptide signaling networks participating in the fine control of neuroendocrine systems. This commentary review article discusses several human neuropeptidomics accomplishments that illustrate the rapidly expanding diversity of neuropeptides generated by protease processing of pro-neuropeptide precursors occurring within the secretory vesicle proteome. Of particular interest is the finding that human-specific cathepsin V participates in producing enkephalin and likely other neuropeptides, indicating unique proteolytic mechanisms for generating human neuropeptides. The field of human neuropeptidomics has great promise to solve new mechanisms in disease conditions, leading to new drug targets and therapeutic agents for human

  1. AAA+ proteases and their role in distinct stages along the Vibrio cholerae lifecycle.

    PubMed

    Pressler, Katharina; Vorkapic, Dina; Lichtenegger, Sabine; Malli, Gerald; Barilich, Benjamin P; Cakar, Fatih; Zingl, Franz G; Reidl, Joachim; Schild, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    The facultative human pathogen Vibrio cholerae has to adapt to different environmental conditions along its lifecycle by means of transcriptional, translational and post-translational regulation. This study provides a first comprehensive analysis regarding the contribution of the cytoplasmic AAA+ proteases Lon, ClpP and HslV to distinct features of V. cholerae behaviour, including biofilm formation, motility, cholera toxin expression and colonization fitness in the mouse model. While absence of HslV did not yield to any altered phenotype compared to wildtype, absence of Lon or ClpP resulted in significantly reduced colonization in vivo. In addition, a Δlon deletion mutant showed altered biofilm formation and increased motility, which could be correlated with higher expression of V. cholerae flagella gene class IV. Concordantly, we could show by immunoblot analysis, that Lon is the main protease responsible for proteolytic control of FliA, which is required for class IV flagella gene transcription, but also downregulates virulence gene expression. FliA becomes highly sensitive to proteolytic degradation in absence of its anti-sigma factor FlgM, a scenario reported to occur during mucosal penetration due to FlgM secretion through the broken flagellum. Our results confirm that the high stability of FliA in the absence of Lon results in less cholera toxin and toxin corgulated pilus production under virulence gene inducing conditions and in the presence of a damaged flagellum. Thus, the data presented herein provide a molecular explanation on how V. cholerae can achieve full expression of virulence genes during early stages of colonization, despite FliA getting liberated from the anti-sigma factor FlgM. PMID:27345492

  2. Neuropeptidomics Mass Spectrometry Reveals Signaling Networks Generated by Distinct Protease Pathways in Human Systems.

    PubMed

    Hook, Vivian; Bandeira, Nuno

    2015-12-01

    Neuropeptides regulate intercellular signaling as neurotransmitters of the central and peripheral nervous systems, and as peptide hormones in the endocrine system. Diverse neuropeptides of distinct primary sequences of various lengths, often with post-translational modifications, coordinate and integrate regulation of physiological functions. Mass spectrometry-based analysis of the diverse neuropeptide structures in neuropeptidomics research is necessary to define the full complement of neuropeptide signaling molecules. Human neuropeptidomics has notable importance in defining normal and dysfunctional neuropeptide signaling in human health and disease. Neuropeptidomics has great potential for expansion in translational research opportunities for defining neuropeptide mechanisms of human diseases, providing novel neuropeptide drug targets for drug discovery, and monitoring neuropeptides as biomarkers of drug responses. In consideration of the high impact of human neuropeptidomics for health, an observed gap in this discipline is the few published articles in human neuropeptidomics compared with, for example, human proteomics and related mass spectrometry disciplines. Focus on human neuropeptidomics will advance new knowledge of the complex neuropeptide signaling networks participating in the fine control of neuroendocrine systems. This commentary review article discusses several human neuropeptidomics accomplishments that illustrate the rapidly expanding diversity of neuropeptides generated by protease processing of pro-neuropeptide precursors occurring within the secretory vesicle proteome. Of particular interest is the finding that human-specific cathepsin V participates in producing enkephalin and likely other neuropeptides, indicating unique proteolytic mechanisms for generating human neuropeptides. The field of human neuropeptidomics has great promise to solve new mechanisms in disease conditions, leading to new drug targets and therapeutic agents for human

  3. Neuropeptidomics Mass Spectrometry Reveals Signaling Networks Generated by Distinct Protease Pathways in Human Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hook, Vivian; Bandeira, Nuno

    2015-12-01

    Neuropeptides regulate intercellular signaling as neurotransmitters of the central and peripheral nervous systems, and as peptide hormones in the endocrine system. Diverse neuropeptides of distinct primary sequences of various lengths, often with post-translational modifications, coordinate and integrate regulation of physiological functions. Mass spectrometry-based analysis of the diverse neuropeptide structures in neuropeptidomics research is necessary to define the full complement of neuropeptide signaling molecules. Human neuropeptidomics has notable importance in defining normal and dysfunctional neuropeptide signaling in human health and disease. Neuropeptidomics has great potential for expansion in translational research opportunities for defining neuropeptide mechanisms of human diseases, providing novel neuropeptide drug targets for drug discovery, and monitoring neuropeptides as biomarkers of drug responses. In consideration of the high impact of human neuropeptidomics for health, an observed gap in this discipline is the few published articles in human neuropeptidomics compared with, for example, human proteomics and related mass spectrometry disciplines. Focus on human neuropeptidomics will advance new knowledge of the complex neuropeptide signaling networks participating in the fine control of neuroendocrine systems. This commentary review article discusses several human neuropeptidomics accomplishments that illustrate the rapidly expanding diversity of neuropeptides generated by protease processing of pro-neuropeptide precursors occurring within the secretory vesicle proteome. Of particular interest is the finding that human-specific cathepsin V participates in producing enkephalin and likely other neuropeptides, indicating unique proteolytic mechanisms for generating human neuropeptides. The field of human neuropeptidomics has great promise to solve new mechanisms in disease conditions, leading to new drug targets and therapeutic agents for human

  4. Biosimilarity Versus Manufacturing Change: Two Distinct Concepts.

    PubMed

    Declerck, Paul; Farouk-Rezk, Mourad; Rudd, Pauline M

    2016-02-01

    As products of living cells, biologics are far more complicated than small molecular-weight drugs not only with respect to size and structural complexity but also their sensitivity to manufacturing processes and post-translational changes. Most of the information on the manufacturing process of biotherapeutics is proprietary and hence not fully accessible to the public. This information gap represents a key challenge for biosimilar developers and plays a key role in explaining the differences in regulatory pathways required to demonstrate biosimilarity versus those required to ensure that a change in manufacturing process did not have implications on safety and efficacy. Manufacturing process changes are frequently needed for a variety of reasons including response to regulatory requirements, up scaling production, change in facility, change in raw materials, improving control of quality (consistency) or optimising production efficiency. The scope of the change is usually a key indicator of the scale of analysis required to evaluate the quality. In most cases, where the scope of the process change is limited, only quality and analytical studies should be sufficient while comparative clinical studies can be required in case of major changes (e.g., cell line changes). Biosimilarity exercises have been addressed differently by regulators on the understanding that biosimilar developers start with fundamental differences being a new cell line and also a knowledge gap of the innovator's processes, including culture media, purification processes, and potentially different formulations, and are thus required to ensure that differences from innovators do not result in differences in efficacy and safety.

  5. Educational Psychology: The Distinctive Contribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, R. J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper, written in the twenty-first anniversary year of the journal "Educational Psychology in Practice", attempts to uncover those distinctive aspects of the discipline and the practice of applied psychology in general and educational psychology in particular. After considering some of the reasons for attempting this task at this point in…

  6. China English: Its Distinctive Features

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Wei-dong; Dai, Wei-ping

    2011-01-01

    This paper attempts to expound that China English boasting its own distinctive features on the levels of phonology, words, sentences and discourse has been playing an irreplaceable role in intercultural activities, though still in its infancy and in the process of developing and perfecting itself, and it now makes every effort to move towards…

  7. Distinctive Characteristics of Educational Donors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Russell N., III.

    2008-01-01

    Examining the charitable behavior of 56,663 US households, this paper evaluates the distinctive characteristics of educational donors as compared with donors to noneducational charitable organizations and with nondonors. In general, educational donors had significantly greater income, wealth, and education than other donors. Educational donors…

  8. Visualization of DNA double-strand break repair in live bacteria reveals dynamic recruitment of Bacillus subtilis RecF, RecO and RecN proteins to distinct sites on the nucleoids.

    PubMed

    Kidane, Dawit; Sanchez, Humberto; Alonso, Juan C; Graumann, Peter L

    2004-06-01

    We have found that SMC-like RecN protein, RecF and RecO proteins that are involved in DNA recombination play an important role in DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair in Bacillus subtilis. Upon induction of DNA DSBs, RecN, RecO and RecF localized as a discrete focus on the nucleoids in a majority of cells, whereas two or three foci were rarely observed. RecN, RecO and RecF co-localized to the induced foci, with RecN localizing first, while RecO localized later, followed by RecF. Thus, three repair proteins were differentially recruited to distinct sites on the nucleoids, potentially constituting active DSB repair centres (RCs). RecF did not form regular foci in the absence of RecN and failed to form any foci in recO cells, demonstrating a central role for RecN and RecO in initializing the formation of RCs. RecN/O/F foci were detected in recA, recG or recU mutant cells, indicating that the proteins act upstream of proteins involved in synapsis or post-synapsis. In the absence of exogenous DNA damage, RCs were rare, but they accumulated in recA and recU cells, suggesting that DSBs occur frequently in the absence of RecA or RecU. The results suggest a model in which RecN that forms multimers in solution and high-molecular-weight complexes in cells containing DSBs initiates the formation of RCs that mediate DSB repair with the homologous sister chromosome, which presents a novel concept for DSB repair in prokaryotes. PMID:15186413

  9. Accumulation of distinct prelamin A variants in human diploid fibroblasts differentially affects cell homeostasis

    SciTech Connect

    Candelario, Jose; Borrego, Stacey; Reddy, Sita; Comai, Lucio

    2011-02-01

    Lamin A is a component of the nuclear lamina that plays a major role in the structural organization and function of the nucleus. Lamin A is synthesized as a prelamin A precursor which undergoes four sequential post-translational modifications to generate mature lamin A. Significantly, a large number of point mutations in the LMNA gene cause a range of distinct human disorders collectively known as laminopathies. The mechanisms by which mutations in lamin A affect cell function and cause disease are unclear. Interestingly, recent studies have suggested that alterations in the normal lamin A pathway can contribute to cellular dysfunction. Specifically, we and others have shown, at the cellular level, that in the absence of mutations or altered splicing events, increased expression of wild-type prelamin A results in a growth defective phenotype that resembles that of cells expressing the mutant form of lamin A, termed progerin, associated with Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria syndrome (HGPS). Remarkably, the phenotypes of cells expressing elevated levels of wild-type prelamin A can be reversed by either treatment with farnesyltransferase inhibitors or overexpression of ZMPSTE24, a critical prelamin A processing enzyme, suggesting that minor increases in the steady-state levels of one or more prelamin A intermediates is sufficient to induce cellular toxicity. Here, to investigate the molecular basis of the lamin A pathway toxicity, we characterized the phenotypic changes occurring in cells expressing distinct prelamin A variants mimicking specific prelamin A processing intermediates. This analysis demonstrates that distinct prelamin A variants differentially affect cell growth, nuclear membrane morphology, nuclear distribution of lamin A and the fundamental process of transcription. Expression of prelamin A variants that are constitutively farnesylated induced the formation of lamin A aggregates and dramatic changes in nuclear membrane morphology, which led to reduced

  10. Histone H3 K79 methylation states play distinct roles in UV-induced sister chromatid exchange and cell cycle checkpoint arrest in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Rossodivita, Alyssa A.; Boudoures, Anna L.; Mecoli, Jonathan P.; Steenkiste, Elizabeth M.; Karl, Andrea L.; Vines, Eudora M.; Cole, Arron M.; Ansbro, Megan R.; Thompson, Jeffrey S.

    2014-01-01

    Histone post-translational modifications have been shown to contribute to DNA damage repair. Prior studies have suggested that specific H3K79 methylation states play distinct roles in the response to UV-induced DNA damage. To evaluate these observations, we examined the effect of altered H3K79 methylation patterns on UV-induced G1/S checkpoint response and sister chromatid exchange (SCE). We found that the di- and trimethylated states both contribute to activation of the G1/S checkpoint to varying degrees, depending on the synchronization method, although methylation is not required for checkpoint in response to high levels of UV damage. In contrast, UV-induced SCE is largely a product of the trimethylated state, which influences the usage of gene conversion versus popout mechanisms. Regulation of H3K79 methylation by H2BK123 ubiquitylation is important for both checkpoint function and SCE. H3K79 methylation is not required for the repair of double-stranded breaks caused by transient HO endonuclease expression, but does play a modest role in survival from continuous exposure. The overall results provide evidence for the participation of H3K79 methylation in UV-induced recombination repair and checkpoint activation, and further indicate that the di- and trimethylation states play distinct roles in these DNA damage response pathways. PMID:24748660

  11. Non-monotonic Response to Monotonic Stimulus: Regulation of Glyoxylate Shunt Gene-Expression Dynamics in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Gennaro, Maria L.; Igoshin, Oleg A.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how dynamical responses of biological networks are constrained by underlying network topology is one of the fundamental goals of systems biology. Here we employ monotone systems theory to formulate a theorem stating necessary conditions for non-monotonic time-response of a biochemical network to a monotonic stimulus. We apply this theorem to analyze the non-monotonic dynamics of the σB-regulated glyoxylate shunt gene expression in Mycobacterium tuberculosis cells exposed to hypoxia. We first demonstrate that the known network structure is inconsistent with observed dynamics. To resolve this inconsistency we employ the formulated theorem, modeling simulations and optimization along with follow-up dynamic experimental measurements. We show a requirement for post-translational modulation of σB activity in order to reconcile the network dynamics with its topology. The results of this analysis make testable experimental predictions and demonstrate wider applicability of the developed methodology to a wide class of biological systems. PMID:26900694

  12. Non-monotonic Response to Monotonic Stimulus: Regulation of Glyoxylate Shunt Gene-Expression Dynamics in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Ascensao, Joao A; Datta, Pratik; Hancioglu, Baris; Sontag, Eduardo; Gennaro, Maria L; Igoshin, Oleg A

    2016-02-01

    Understanding how dynamical responses of biological networks are constrained by underlying network topology is one of the fundamental goals of systems biology. Here we employ monotone systems theory to formulate a theorem stating necessary conditions for non-monotonic time-response of a biochemical network to a monotonic stimulus. We apply this theorem to analyze the non-monotonic dynamics of the σB-regulated glyoxylate shunt gene expression in Mycobacterium tuberculosis cells exposed to hypoxia. We first demonstrate that the known network structure is inconsistent with observed dynamics. To resolve this inconsistency we employ the formulated theorem, modeling simulations and optimization along with follow-up dynamic experimental measurements. We show a requirement for post-translational modulation of σB activity in order to reconcile the network dynamics with its topology. The results of this analysis make testable experimental predictions and demonstrate wider applicability of the developed methodology to a wide class of biological systems. PMID:26900694

  13. IVUS coronary volume alignment for distinct phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Monica Mitiko Soares; Lemos, Pedro Alves; Furuie, Sergio Shiguemi

    2009-02-01

    Image-based intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) cardiac phase detection allows coronary volume reconstruction in different phases. Consecutive volumes are not necessarily spatially aligned due to longitudinal movement of the catheter. Besides ordinary pullback velocity, there is a relative longitudinal movement of the heart vessel walls and the transducer, due to myocardial contraction. In this manuscript, we aim to spatially align cardiac phase coronary IVUS volumes. In addition, we want to investigate this non-linear longitudinal catheter movement. With this purpose, we have analyzed 120 simulated IVUS images and 10 real IVUS pullbacks. We implemented the following methodology. Firstly, we built IVUS volume for each distinct phase. Secondly, each IVUS volume was transformed into a parametric signal of average frame intensity. We have used these signals to make correlation in space with a reference one. Then we estimated the spatial distance between the distinct IVUS volumes and the reference. We have tested in simulated images and real examinations. We have also observed similar pattern in real IVUS examinations. This spatial alignment method is feasible and useful as a step towards dynamic studies of IVUS examination.

  14. Distinct patterns of seasonal Greenland glacier velocity

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Twila; Joughin, Ian; Smith, Ben; van den Broeke, Michiel R; van de Berg, Willem Jan; Noël, Brice; Usher, Mika

    2014-01-01

    Predicting Greenland Ice Sheet mass loss due to ice dynamics requires a complete understanding of spatiotemporal velocity fluctuations and related control mechanisms. We present a 5 year record of seasonal velocity measurements for 55 marine-terminating glaciers distributed around the ice sheet margin, along with ice-front position and runoff data sets for each glacier. Among glaciers with substantial speed variations, we find three distinct seasonal velocity patterns. One pattern indicates relatively high glacier sensitivity to ice-front position. The other two patterns are more prevalent and appear to be meltwater controlled. These patterns reveal differences in which some subglacial systems likely transition seasonally from inefficient, distributed hydrologic networks to efficient, channelized drainage, while others do not. The difference may be determined by meltwater availability, which in some regions may be influenced by perennial firn aquifers. Our results highlight the need to understand subglacial meltwater availability on an ice sheet-wide scale to predict future dynamic changes. Key Points First multi-region seasonal velocity measurements show regional differences Seasonal velocity fluctuations on most glaciers appear meltwater controlled Seasonal development of efficient subglacial drainage geographically divided PMID:25821275

  15. Distinct Pathways Mediate the Sorting of Tail-Anchored Proteins to the Plastid Outer Envelope

    PubMed Central

    Dhanoa, Preetinder K.; Richardson, Lynn G. L.; Smith, Matthew D.; Gidda, Satinder K.; Henderson, Matthew P. A.; Andrews, David W.; Mullen, Robert T.

    2010-01-01

    Background Tail-anchored (TA) proteins are a distinct class of membrane proteins that are sorted post-translationally to various organelles and function in a number of important cellular processes, including redox reactions, vesicular trafficking and protein translocation. While the molecular targeting signals and pathways responsible for sorting TA proteins to their correct intracellular destinations in yeasts and mammals have begun to be characterized, relatively little is known about TA protein biogenesis in plant cells, especially for those sorted to the plastid outer envelope. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we investigated the biogenesis of three plastid TA proteins, including the 33-kDa and 34-kDa GTPases of the translocon at the outer envelope of chloroplasts (Toc33 and Toc34) and a novel 9-kDa protein of unknown function that we define here as an outer envelope TA protein (OEP9). Using a combination of in vivo and in vitro assays we show that OEP9 utilizes a different sorting pathway than that used by Toc33 and Toc34. For instance, while all three TA proteins interact with the cytosolic OEP chaperone/receptor, AKR2A, the plastid targeting information within OEP9 is distinct from that within Toc33 and Toc34. Toc33 and Toc34 also appear to differ from OEP9 in that their insertion is dependent on themselves and the unique lipid composition of the plastid outer envelope. By contrast, the insertion of OEP9 into the plastid outer envelope occurs in a proteinaceous-dependent, but Toc33/34-independent manner and membrane lipids appear to serve primarily to facilitate normal thermodynamic integration of this TA protein. Conclusions/Significance Collectively, the results provide evidence in support of at least two sorting pathways for plastid TA outer envelope proteins and shed light on not only the complex diversity of pathways involved in the targeting and insertion of proteins into plastids, but also the molecular mechanisms that underlie the delivery of TA

  16. Dementia: Continuum or Distinct Entity?

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Glenn D.

    2009-01-01

    The latent structure of dementia was examined in a group of 10,775 older adults with indicators derived from a neuropsychological test battery. Subjecting these data to taxometric analysis using mean above minus below a cut (MAMBAC), maximum covariance (MAXCOV), and latent mode factor analysis (L-Mode) produced results more consistent with dementia as a dimensional (lying along a continuum) than categorical (representing a distinct entity) construct. A second study conducted on a group of 2375 21-to-64-year olds produced similar results. These findings denote that dementia, as measured by deficits in episodic memory, attention/concentration, executive function, and language, differs quantitatively rather than qualitatively from the cognitive status of non-demented adults. The implications of these results for classification, assessment, etiology, and prevention are discussed. PMID:20677881

  17. Distinct responses to reduplicated chromosomes require distinct Mad2 responses

    PubMed Central

    Stormo, Benjamin M; Fox, Donald T

    2016-01-01

    Duplicating chromosomes once each cell cycle produces sister chromatid pairs, which separate accurately at anaphase. In contrast, reduplicating chromosomes without separation frequently produces polytene chromosomes, a barrier to accurate mitosis. Chromosome reduplication occurs in many contexts, including: polytene tissue development, polytene tumors, and following treatment with mitosis-blocking chemotherapeutics. However, mechanisms responding to or resolving polyteny during mitosis are poorly understood. Here, using Drosophila, we uncover two distinct reduplicated chromosome responses. First, when reduplicated polytene chromosomes persist into metaphase, an anaphase delay prevents tissue malformation and apoptosis. Second, reduplicated polytene chromosomes can also separate prior to metaphase through a spindle-independent mechanism termed Separation-Into-Recent-Sisters (SIRS). Both reduplication responses require the spindle assembly checkpoint protein Mad2. While Mad2 delays anaphase separation of metaphase polytene chromosomes, Mad2’s control of overall mitotic timing ensures efficient SIRS. Our results pinpoint mechanisms enabling continued proliferation after genome reduplication, a finding with implications for cancer progression and prevention. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15204.001 PMID:27159240

  18. Temperature activated coupling in topologically distinct semiconductor nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biccari, F.; Bietti, S.; Cavigli, L.; Vinattieri, A.; Nötzel, R.; Gurioli, M.; Sanguinetti, S.

    2016-10-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the emission of individual GaAs/AlGaAs complex nano-systems composed of two concentric and topologically distinct quantum nanostructures, namely, a quantum dot and a quantum ring. Time resolved, temperature and excitation power density dependence of the photoluminescence from single and ensemble dot/ring structures have been used in order to determine the carrier dynamics. Despite the small spatial separation between the dot and the ring, the exciton dynamics in the two nanostructures is completely decoupled at low temperatures. At higher temperatures, we observe a clear change in the carrier dynamics, which shows the onset of the coupling between the two nanostructures. We attribute such change in carrier dynamics to the breaking of topology induced selection rules which allows the transfer of the carriers between the dot and the ring via an electronic quantum state, common to the two nanostructures.

  19. Reservoir floodplains support distinct fish assemblages

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miranda, Leandro E.; Wigen, S. L.; Dagel, Jonah D.

    2014-01-01

    Reservoirs constructed on floodplain rivers are unique because the upper reaches of the impoundment may include extensive floodplain environments. Moreover, reservoirs that experience large periodic water level fluctuations as part of their operational objectives seasonally inundate and dewater floodplains in their upper reaches, partly mimicking natural inundations of river floodplains. In four flood control reservoirs in Mississippi, USA, we explored the dynamics of connectivity between reservoirs and adjacent floodplains and the characteristics of fish assemblages that develop in reservoir floodplains relative to those that develop in reservoir bays. Although fish species richness in floodplains and bays were similar, species composition differed. Floodplains emphasized fish species largely associated with backwater shallow environments, often resistant to harsh environmental conditions. Conversely, dominant species in bays represented mainly generalists that benefit from the continuous connectivity between the bay and the main reservoir. Floodplains in the study reservoirs provided desirable vegetated habitats at lower water level elevations, earlier in the year, and more frequently than in bays. Inundating dense vegetation in bays requires raising reservoir water levels above the levels required to reach floodplains. Therefore, aside from promoting distinct fish assemblages within reservoirs and helping promote diversity in regulated rivers, reservoir floodplains are valued because they can provide suitable vegetated habitats for fish species at elevations below the normal pool, precluding the need to annually flood upland vegetation that would inevitably be impaired by regular flooding. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  20. Two distinct crystallization processes in supercooled liquid.

    PubMed

    Tane, Masakazu; Kimizuka, Hajime; Ichitsubo, Tetsu

    2016-05-21

    Using molecular dynamics simulations we show that two distinct crystallization processes, depending on the temperature at which crystallization occurs, appear in a supercooled liquid. As a model for glass-forming materials, an Al2O3 model system, in which both the glass transition and crystallization from the supercooled liquid can be well reproduced, is employed. Simulations in the framework of an isothermal-isobaric ensemble indicate that the calculated time-temperature-transformation curve for the crystallization to γ(defect spinel)-Al2O3 exhibited a typical nose shape, as experimentally observed in various glass materials. During annealing above the nose temperature, the structure of the supercooled liquid does not change before the crystallization, because of the high atomic mobility (material transport). Thus, the crystallization is governed by the abrupt crystal nucleation, which results in the formation of a stable crystal structure. In contrast, during annealing below the nose temperature, the structure of the supercooled liquid gradually changes before the crystallization, and the formed crystal structure is less stable than that formed above the nose temperature, because of the restricted material transport. PMID:27208956

  1. Three distinct reversing modes in the geodynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallet, Y.; Pavlov, V. E.

    2016-03-01

    The data that describe the long-term reversing behavior of the geodynamo show strong and sudden changes in magnetic reversal frequency. This concerns both the onset and the end of superchrons and most probably the occurrence of episodes characterized by extreme geomagnetic reversal frequency (>10-15 rev./Myr). To account for the complexity observed in geomagnetic reversal frequency evolution, we propose a simple scenario in which the geodynamo operates in three distinct reversing modes: i—a "normal" reversing mode generating geomagnetic polarity reversals according to a stationary random process, with on average a reversal rate of ˜3 rev./Myr; ii—a non-reversing "superchron" mode characterizing long time intervals without reversal; iii—a hyper-active reversing mode characterized by an extreme geomagnetic reversal frequency. The transitions between the different reversing modes would be sudden, i.e., on the Myr time scale. Following previous studies, we suggest that in the past, the occurrence of these transitions has been modulated by thermal conditions at the core-mantle boundary governed by mantle dynamics. It might also be possible that they were more frequent during the Precambrian, before the nucleation of the inner core, because of a stronger influence on geodynamo activity of the thermal conditions at the core-mantle boundary.

  2. Two distinct crystallization processes in supercooled liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tane, Masakazu; Kimizuka, Hajime; Ichitsubo, Tetsu

    2016-05-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations we show that two distinct crystallization processes, depending on the temperature at which crystallization occurs, appear in a supercooled liquid. As a model for glass-forming materials, an Al2O3 model system, in which both the glass transition and crystallization from the supercooled liquid can be well reproduced, is employed. Simulations in the framework of an isothermal-isobaric ensemble indicate that the calculated time-temperature-transformation curve for the crystallization to γ(defect spinel)-Al2O3 exhibited a typical nose shape, as experimentally observed in various glass materials. During annealing above the nose temperature, the structure of the supercooled liquid does not change before the crystallization, because of the high atomic mobility (material transport). Thus, the crystallization is governed by the abrupt crystal nucleation, which results in the formation of a stable crystal structure. In contrast, during annealing below the nose temperature, the structure of the supercooled liquid gradually changes before the crystallization, and the formed crystal structure is less stable than that formed above the nose temperature, because of the restricted material transport.

  3. Neurodegeneration and microtubule dynamics: death by a thousand cuts

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Jyoti; Ratnakaran, Neena; Koushika, Sandhya P.

    2015-01-01

    Microtubules form important cytoskeletal structures that play a role in establishing and maintaining neuronal polarity, regulating neuronal morphology, transporting cargo, and scaffolding signaling molecules to form signaling hubs. Within a neuronal cell, microtubules are found to have variable lengths and can be both stable and dynamic. Microtubule associated proteins, post-translational modifications of tubulin subunits, microtubule severing enzymes, and signaling molecules are all known to influence both stable and dynamic pools of microtubules. Microtubule dynamics, the process of interconversion between stable and dynamic pools, and the proportions of these two pools have the potential to influence a wide variety of cellular processes. Reduced microtubule stability has been observed in several neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), and tauopathies like Progressive Supranuclear Palsy. Hyperstable microtubules, as seen in Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia (HSP), also lead to neurodegeneration. Therefore, the ratio of stable and dynamic microtubules is likely to be important for neuronal function and perturbation in microtubule dynamics might contribute to disease progression. PMID:26441521

  4. Triton College: One Institution's Search for Distinctiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsend, Barbara K.; Catanzaro, James L.

    1989-01-01

    Recounts Triton College's efforts to identify its distinctive elements. Reviews empirical evidence showing that Triton's school schedule, curricular offerings, and continuing education and support services are distinctive among local colleges. Discusses students' and staff members' perceptions of Triton. Considers the value of the research to the…

  5. 14 CFR 1252.411 - Age distinctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Age distinctions. 1252.411 Section 1252.411 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF AGE IN... Procedures § 1252.411 Age distinctions. There are no Federal statutes or regulations containing...

  6. 14 CFR 1252.411 - Age distinctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Age distinctions. 1252.411 Section 1252.411 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF AGE IN... Procedures § 1252.411 Age distinctions. There are no Federal statutes or regulations containing...

  7. 14 CFR 1252.411 - Age distinctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Age distinctions. 1252.411 Section 1252.411 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF AGE IN... Procedures § 1252.411 Age distinctions. There are no Federal statutes or regulations containing...

  8. 14 CFR 1252.411 - Age distinctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Age distinctions. 1252.411 Section 1252.411 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF AGE IN... Procedures § 1252.411 Age distinctions. There are no Federal statutes or regulations containing...

  9. Evidence for a Distinct Kind of Noun.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soja, Nancy N.

    1994-01-01

    Examined the spontaneous speech of four children and their parents for use of determiners with NP-type nouns and count nouns. Found that the parents made a clear distinction between the two kinds of nouns, omitting determiners with the NP-type nouns but not with the count nouns. The children all made the same distinction by four years of age. (HTH)

  10. Structural aspects of the solvation shell of lysine and acetylated lysine: A Car-Parrinello and classical molecular dynamics investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Carnevale, V.; Raugei, S.

    2009-12-14

    Lysine acetylation is a post-translational modification, which modulates the affinity of protein-protein and/or protein-DNA complexes. Its crucial role as a switch in signaling pathways highlights the relevance of charged chemical groups in determining the interactions between water and biomolecules. A great effort has been recently devoted to assess the reliability of classical molecular dynamics simulations in describing the solvation properties of charged moieties. In the spirit of these investigations, we performed classical and Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations on lysine and acetylated-lysine in aqueous solution. A comparative analysis between the two computational schemes is presented with a focus on the first solvation shell of the charged groups. An a