Science.gov

Sample records for distinct functional domains

  1. Evolution of distinct EGF domains with specific functions

    PubMed Central

    Wouters, Merridee A.; Rigoutsos, Isidore; Chu, Carmen K.; Feng, Lina L.; Sparrow, Duncan B.; Dunwoodie, Sally L.

    2005-01-01

    EGF domains are extracellular protein modules cross-linked by three intradomain disulfides. Past studies suggest the existence of two types of EGF domain with three-disulfides, human EGF-like (hEGF) domains and complement C1r-like (cEGF) domains, but to date no functional information has been related to the two different types, and they are not differentiated in sequence or structure databases. We have developed new sequence patterns based on the different C-termini to search specifically for the two types of EGF domains in sequence databases. The exhibited sensitivity and specificity of the new pattern-based method represents a significant advancement over the currently available sequence detection techniques. We re-annotated EGF sequences in the latest release of Swiss-Prot looking for functional relationships that might correlate with EGF type. We show that important post-translational modifications of three-disulfide EGFs, including unusual forms of glycosylation and post-translational proteolytic processing, are dependent on EGF subtype. For example, EGF domains that are shed from the cell surface and mediate intercellular signaling are all hEGFs, as are all human EGF receptor family ligands. Additional experimental data suggest that functional specialization has accompanied subtype divergence. Based on our structural analysis of EGF domains with three-disulfide bonds and comparison to laminin and integrin-like EGF domains with an additional inter-domain disulfide, we propose that these hEGF and cEGF domains may have arisen from a four-disulfide ancestor by selective loss of different cysteine residues. PMID:15772310

  2. Functional diversity of Robo receptor immunoglobulin domains promotes distinct axon guidance decisions.

    PubMed

    Evans, Timothy A; Bashaw, Greg J

    2010-03-23

    Recognition molecules of the immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily control axon guidance in the developing nervous system. Ig-like domains are among the most widely represented protein domains in the human genome, and the number of Ig superfamily proteins is strongly correlated with cellular complexity. In Drosophila, three Roundabout (Robo) Ig superfamily receptors respond to their common Slit ligand to regulate axon guidance at the midline: Robo and Robo2 mediate midline repulsion, Robo2 and Robo3 control longitudinal pathway selection, and Robo2 can promote midline crossing. How these closely related receptors mediate distinct guidance functions is not understood. We report that the differential functions of Robo2 and Robo3 are specified by their ectodomains and do not reflect differences in cytoplasmic signaling. Functional modularity of Robo2's ectodomain facilitates multiple guidance decisions: Ig1 and Ig3 of Robo2 confer lateral positioning activity, whereas Ig2 confers promidline crossing activity. Robo2's distinct functions are not dependent on greater Slit affinity but are instead due in part to differences in multimerization and receptor-ligand stoichiometry conferred by Robo2's Ig domains. Together, our findings suggest that diverse responses to the Slit guidance cue are imparted by intrinsic structural differences encoded in the extracellular Ig domains of the Robo receptors.

  3. Tagging methyl-CpG-binding domain proteins reveals different spatiotemporal expression and supports distinct functions.

    PubMed

    Wood, Kathleen H; Johnson, Brian S; Welsh, Sarah A; Lee, Jun Y; Cui, Yue; Krizman, Elizabeth; Brodkin, Edward S; Blendy, Julie A; Robinson, Michael B; Bartolomei, Marisa S; Zhou, Zhaolan

    2016-04-01

    DNA methylation is recognized by methyl-CpG-binding domain (MBD) proteins. Multiple MBDs are linked to neurodevelopmental disorders in humans and mice. However, the functions of MBD2 are poorly understood. We characterized Mbd2 knockout mice and determined spatiotemporal expression of MBDs and MBD2-NuRD (nucleosome remodeling deacetylase) interactions. We analyzed behavioral phenotypes, generated biotin-tagged MBD1 and MBD2 knockin mice, and performed biochemical studies of MBD2-NuRD. Most behavioral measures are minimally affected in Mbd2 knockout mice. In contrast to other MBDs, MBD2 shows distinct expression patterns. Unlike most MBDs, MBD2 is ubiquitously expressed in all tissues examined and appears dispensable for brain functions measured in this study. We provide novel genetic tools and reveal new directions to investigate MBD2 functions in vivo.

  4. Tagging methyl-CpG-binding domain proteins reveals different spatiotemporal expression and supports distinct functions

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Kathleen H; Johnson, Brian S; Welsh, Sarah A; Lee, Jun Y; Cui, Yue; Krizman, Elizabeth; Brodkin, Edward S; Blendy, Julie A; Robinson, Michael B; Bartolomei, Marisa S; Zhou, Zhaolan

    2016-01-01

    Aim: DNA methylation is recognized by methyl-CpG-binding domain (MBD) proteins. Multiple MBDs are linked to neurodevelopmental disorders in humans and mice. However, the functions of MBD2 are poorly understood. We characterized Mbd2 knockout mice and determined spatiotemporal expression of MBDs and MBD2–NuRD (nucleosome remodeling deacetylase) interactions. Experimental procedures: We analyzed behavioral phenotypes, generated biotin-tagged MBD1 and MBD2 knockin mice, and performed biochemical studies of MBD2–NuRD. Results: Most behavioral measures are minimally affected in Mbd2 knockout mice. In contrast to other MBDs, MBD2 shows distinct expression patterns. Conclusion: Unlike most MBDs, MBD2 is ubiquitously expressed in all tissues examined and appears dispensable for brain functions measured in this study. We provide novel genetic tools and reveal new directions to investigate MBD2 functions in vivo. PMID:27066839

  5. Replication-coupled chromatin assembly of newly synthesized histones: distinct functions for the histone tail domains.

    PubMed

    Ejlassi-Lassallette, Aïda; Thiriet, Christophe

    2012-02-01

    The maintenance of the genome during replication requires the assembly of nucleosomes with newly synthesized histones. Achieving the deposition of newly synthesized histones in chromatin implies their transport from the cytoplasm to the nucleus at the replication sites. Several lines of evidence have revealed critical functions of the histone tail domains in these conserved cellular processes. In this review, we discuss the role of the amino termini of the nucleosome building blocks, H2A/H2B and H3/H4, in different model systems. The experimental data showed that H2A/H2B tails and H3/H4 tails display distinct functions in nuclear import and chromatin assembly. Furthermore, we describe recent studies exploiting the unique properties of the slime mold, Physarum polycephalum , that have advanced understanding of the function of the highly conserved replication-dependent diacetylation of H4.

  6. The Proteomic Investigation of Chromatin Functional Domains Reveals Novel Synergisms among Distinct Heterochromatin Components*

    PubMed Central

    Soldi, Monica; Bonaldi, Tiziana

    2013-01-01

    Chromatin is a highly dynamic, well-structured nucleoprotein complex of DNA and proteins that controls virtually all DNA transactions. Chromatin dynamicity is regulated at specific loci by the presence of various associated proteins, histones, post-translational modifications, histone variants, and DNA methylation. Until now the characterization of the proteomic component of chromatin domains has been held back by the challenge of enriching distinguishable, homogeneous regions for subsequent mass spectrometry analysis. Here we describe a modified protocol for chromatin immunoprecipitation combined with quantitative proteomics based on stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture to identify known and novel histone modifications, variants, and complexes that specifically associate with silent and active chromatin domains. Our chromatin proteomics strategy revealed unique functional interactions among various chromatin modifiers, suggesting new regulatory pathways, such as a heterochromatin-specific modulation of DNA damage response involving H2A.X and WICH, both enriched in silent domains. Chromatin proteomics expands the arsenal of tools for deciphering how all the distinct protein components act together to enforce a given region-specific chromatin status. PMID:23319141

  7. The distinct C-terminal acidic domains of HMGB proteins are functionally relevant in Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    de Abreu da Silva, Isabel Caetano; Carneiro, Vitor Coutinho; Vicentino, Amanda Roberta Revoredo; Aguilera, Estefania Anahi; Mohana-Borges, Ronaldo; Thiengo, Silvana; Fernandez, Monica Ammon; Fantappié, Marcelo Rosado

    2016-04-01

    The Schistosoma mansoni High Mobility Group Box (HMGB) proteins SmHMGB1, SmHMGB2 and SmHMGB3 share highly conserved HMG box DNA binding domains but have significantly different C-terminal acidic tails. Here, we used three full-length and tailless forms of the S. mansoni HMGB proteins to examine the functional roles of their acidic tails. DNA binding assays revealed that the different lengths of the acidic tails among the three SmHMGB proteins significantly and distinctively influenced their DNA transactions. Spectroscopic analyses indicated that the longest acidic tail of SmHMGB3 contributes to the structural stabilisation of this protein. Using immunohistochemical analysis, we showed distinct patterns of SmHMGB1, SmHMGB2 and SmHMGB3 expression in different tissues of adult worms. RNA interference approaches indicated a role for SmHMGB2 and SmHMGB3 in the reproductive system of female worms, whereas for SmHMGB1 no clear phenotype was observed. Schistosome HMGB proteins can be phosphorylated, acetylated and methylated. Importantly, the acetylation and methylation of schistosome HMGBs were greatly enhanced upon removal of the acidic tail. These data support the notion that the C-terminal acidic tails dictate the differences in the structure, expression and function of schistosome HMGB proteins. Copyright © 2016 Australian Society for Parasitology Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Plasmodium alveolins possess distinct but structurally and functionally related multi-repeat domains.

    PubMed

    Al-Khattaf, Fatimah S; Tremp, Annie Z; Dessens, Johannes T

    2015-02-01

    The invasive and motile life stages of malaria parasites (merozoite, ookinete and sporozoite) possess a distinctive cortical structure termed the pellicle. The pellicle is characterised by a double-layered 'inner membrane complex' (IMC) located underneath the plasma membrane, which is supported by a cytoskeletal structure termed the subpellicular network (SPN). The SPN consists of intermediate filaments, whose major constituents include a family of proteins called alveolins. Here, we re-appraise the alveolins in the genus Plasmodium with respect to their repertoire, structure and interrelatedness. Amongst 13 family members identified, we distinguish two domain types that, albeit distinct at the primary structure level, are structurally related and contain tandem repeats with a consensus 12-amino acid periodicity. Analysis in Plasmodium berghei of the most divergent alveolin, PbIMC1d, reveals a zoite-specific expression in ookinetes and a subcellular localisation in the pellicle, consistent with its predicted role as a SPN component. Knockout of PbIMC1d gives rise to a wild-type phenotype with respect to ookinete morphogenesis, tensile strength, gliding motility and infectivity, presenting the first example of apparent functional redundancy amongst alveolin family members.

  9. Distinct intracellular sAC-cAMP domains regulate ER calcium signaling and OXPHOS function.

    PubMed

    Valsecchi, Federica; Konrad, Csaba; D'Aurelio, Marilena; Ramos-Espiritu, Lavoisier S; Stepanova, Anna; Burstein, Suzanne R; Galkin, Alexander; Magranè, Jordi; Starkov, Anatoly; Buck, Jochen; Levin, Lonny R; Manfredi, Giovanni

    2017-09-01

    cAMP regulates a wide variety of physiological functions in mammals. This single second messenger can regulate multiple, seemingly disparate functions within independently regulated cell compartments. We previously identified one such compartment inside the matrix of the mitochondria, where soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) regulates oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). We now show that sAC KO fibroblasts have a defect in OXPHOS activity and attempt to compensate for this defect by increasing OXPHOS proteins. Importantly, sAC KO cells also exhibit decreased probability of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) release associated with diminished phosphorylation of the inositol 3-phosphate receptor. Restoring sAC expression exclusively in the mitochondrial matrix rescues OXPHOS activity and reduces its biogenesis, indicating that these phenotypes are regulated by intramitochondrial sAC. In contrast, ER Ca(2+) release is only rescued when sAC expression is restored throughout the cell. Thus, we show that functionally distinct, sAC-defined, intracellular cAMP signaling domains regulate metabolism and Ca(2+) signaling. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  10. Distinct protein domains and expression patterns confer divergent axon guidance functions for Drosophila Robo receptors.

    PubMed

    Spitzweck, Bettina; Brankatschk, Marko; Dickson, Barry J

    2010-02-05

    The orthogonal array of axon pathways in the Drosophila CNS is constructed in part under the control of three Robo family axon guidance receptors: Robo1, Robo2 and Robo3. Each of these receptors is responsible for a distinct set of guidance decisions. To determine the molecular basis for these functional specializations, we used homologous recombination to create a series of 9 "robo swap" alleles: expressing each of the three Robo receptors from each of the three robo loci. We demonstrate that the lateral positioning of longitudinal axon pathways relies primarily on differences in gene regulation, not distinct combinations of Robo proteins as previously thought. In contrast, specific features of the Robo1 and Robo2 proteins contribute to their distinct functions in commissure formation. These specializations allow Robo1 to prevent crossing and Robo2 to promote crossing. These data demonstrate how diversification of expression and structure within a single family of guidance receptors can shape complex patterns of neuronal wiring.

  11. Distinct roles for extracellular and intracellular domains in neuroligin function at inhibitory synapses

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Quynh-Anh; Horn, Meryl E; Nicoll, Roger A

    2016-01-01

    Neuroligins (NLGNs) are postsynaptic cell adhesion molecules that interact trans-synaptically with neurexins to mediate synapse development and function. NLGN2 is only at inhibitory synapses while NLGN3 is at both excitatory and inhibitory synapses. We found that NLGN3 function at inhibitory synapses in rat CA1 depends on the presence of NLGN2 and identified a domain in the extracellular region that accounted for this functional difference between NLGN2 and 3 specifically at inhibitory synapses. We further show that the presence of a cytoplasmic tail (c-tail) is indispensible, and identified two domains in the c-tail that are necessary for NLGN function at inhibitory synapses. These domains point to a gephyrin-dependent mechanism that is disrupted by an autism-associated mutation at R705 and a gephyrin-independent mechanism reliant on a putative phosphorylation site at S714. Our work highlights unique and separate roles for the extracellular and intracellular regions in specifying and carrying out NLGN function respectively. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19236.001 PMID:27805570

  12. Distinct roles for extracellular and intracellular domains in neuroligin function at inhibitory synapses.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Quynh-Anh; Horn, Meryl E; Nicoll, Roger A

    2016-11-02

    Neuroligins (NLGNs) are postsynaptic cell adhesion molecules that interact trans-synaptically with neurexins to mediate synapse development and function. NLGN2 is only at inhibitory synapses while NLGN3 is at both excitatory and inhibitory synapses. We found that NLGN3 function at inhibitory synapses in rat CA1 depends on the presence of NLGN2 and identified a domain in the extracellular region that accounted for this functional difference between NLGN2 and 3 specifically at inhibitory synapses. We further show that the presence of a cytoplasmic tail (c-tail) is indispensible, and identified two domains in the c-tail that are necessary for NLGN function at inhibitory synapses. These domains point to a gephyrin-dependent mechanism that is disrupted by an autism-associated mutation at R705 and a gephyrin-independent mechanism reliant on a putative phosphorylation site at S714. Our work highlights unique and separate roles for the extracellular and intracellular regions in specifying and carrying out NLGN function respectively.

  13. Distinct and redundant roles of the non-muscle myosin II isoforms and functional domains.

    PubMed

    Wang, Aibing; Ma, Xuefei; Conti, Mary Anne; Adelstein, Robert S

    2011-10-01

    We propose that the in vivo functions of NM II (non-muscle myosin II) can be divided between those that depend on the N-terminal globular motor domain and those less dependent on motor activity but more dependent on the C-terminal domain. The former, being more dependent on the kinetic properties of NM II to translocate actin filaments, are less amenable to substitution by different NM II isoforms, whereas the in vivo functions of the latter, which involve the structural properties of NM II to cross-link actin filaments, are more amenable to substitution. In light of this hypothesis, we examine the ability of NM II-A, as well as a motor-compromised form of NM II-B, to replace NM II-B and rescue neuroepithelial cell-cell adhesion defects and hydrocephalus in the brain of NM II-B-depleted mice. We also examine the ability of NM II-B as well as chimaeric forms of NM II (II-A head and II-B tail and vice versa) to substitute for NM II-A in cell-cell adhesions in II-A-ablated mice. However, we also show that certain functions, such as neuronal cell migration in the developing brain and vascularization of the mouse embryo and placenta, specifically require NM II-B and II-A respectively.

  14. Two functionally distinct domains generated by in vivo cleavage of Nup145p: a novel biogenesis pathway for nucleoporins.

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, M T; Siniossoglou, S; Podtelejnikov, S; Bénichou, J C; Mann, M; Dujon, B; Hurt, E; Fabre, E

    1997-01-01

    Nup145p is an essential yeast nucleoporin involved in nuclear export of polyadenylated RNAs. We demonstrate here that Nup145p is cleaved in vivo to yield two functionally distinct domains: a carboxy-terminal domain (C-Nup145p) which is located at the nuclear pore complex (NPC) and assembles into the Nup84p complex, and a GLFG-containing amino-terminal domain (N-Nup145p) which is not part of this complex. Whereas the essential C-Nup145p accomplishes the functions required for efficient mRNA export and normal NPC distribution, N-Nup145p, which is homologous to the GLFG-containing nucleoporins Nup100p and Nup116p, is not necessary for cell growth. However, the N-Nup145p becomes essential in a nup188 mutant background. Strikingly, generation of a free N-domain is a prerequisite for complementation of this peculiar synthetic lethal mutant. These data suggest that N- and C-domains of Nup145p perform independent functions, and that the in vivo cleavage observed is of functional importance. PMID:9305650

  15. Distinct functions of the Drosophila Nup153 and Nup214 FG domains in nuclear protein transport.

    PubMed

    Sabri, Nafiseh; Roth, Peggy; Xylourgidis, Nikos; Sadeghifar, Fatemeh; Adler, Jeremy; Samakovlis, Christos

    2007-08-13

    The phenylanine-glycine (FG)-rich regions of several nucleoporins both bind to nuclear transport receptors and collectively provide a diffusion barrier to the nuclear pores. However, the in vivo roles of FG nucleoporins in transport remain unclear. We have inactivated 30 putative nucleoporins in cultured Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells by RNA interference and analyzed the phenotypes on importin alpha/beta-mediated import and CRM1-dependent protein export. The fly homologues of FG nucleoporins Nup358, Nup153, and Nup54 are selectively required for import. The FG repeats of Nup153 are necessary for its function in transport, whereas the remainder of the protein maintains pore integrity. Inactivation of the CRM1 cofactor RanBP3 decreased the nuclear accumulation of CRM1 and protein export. We report a surprisingly antagonistic relationship between RanBP3 and the Nup214 FG region in determining CRM1 localization and its function in protein export. Our data suggest that peripheral metazoan FG nucleoporins have distinct functions in nuclear protein transport events.

  16. The ExbD Periplasmic Domain Contains Distinct Functional Regions for Two Stages in TonB Energization

    PubMed Central

    Ollis, Anne A.; Kumar, Aruna

    2012-01-01

    The TonB system of Gram-negative bacteria energizes the active transport of diverse nutrients through high-affinity TonB-gated outer membrane transporters using energy derived from the cytoplasmic membrane proton motive force. Cytoplasmic membrane proteins ExbB and ExbD harness the proton gradient to energize TonB, which directly contacts and transmits this energy to ligand-loaded transporters. In Escherichia coli, the periplasmic domain of ExbD appears to transition from proton motive force-independent to proton motive force-dependent interactions with TonB, catalyzing the conformational changes of TonB. A 10-residue deletion scanning analysis showed that while all regions except the extreme amino terminus of ExbD were indispensable for function, distinct roles for the amino- and carboxy-terminal regions of the ExbD periplasmic domain were evident. Like residue D25 in the ExbD transmembrane domain, periplasmic residues 42 to 61 facilitated the conformational response of ExbD to proton motive force. This region appears to be important for transmitting signals between the ExbD transmembrane domain and carboxy terminus. The carboxy terminus, encompassing periplasmic residues 62 to 141, was required for initial assembly with the periplasmic domain of TonB, a stage of interaction required for ExbD to transmit its conformational response to proton motive force to TonB. Residues 92 to 121 were important for all three interactions previously observed for formaldehyde-cross-linked ExbD: ExbD homodimers, TonB-ExbD heterodimers, and ExbD-ExbB heterodimers. The distinct requirement of this ExbD region for interaction with ExbB raised the possibility of direct interaction with the few residues of ExbB known to occupy the periplasm. PMID:22493019

  17. The ExbD periplasmic domain contains distinct functional regions for two stages in TonB energization.

    PubMed

    Ollis, Anne A; Kumar, Aruna; Postle, Kathleen

    2012-06-01

    The TonB system of gram-negative bacteria energizes the active transport of diverse nutrients through high-affinity TonB-gated outer membrane transporters using energy derived from the cytoplasmic membrane proton motive force. Cytoplasmic membrane proteins ExbB and ExbD harness the proton gradient to energize TonB, which directly contacts and transmits this energy to ligand-loaded transporters. In Escherichia coli, the periplasmic domain of ExbD appears to transition from proton motive force-independent to proton motive force-dependent interactions with TonB, catalyzing the conformational changes of TonB. A 10-residue deletion scanning analysis showed that while all regions except the extreme amino terminus of ExbD were indispensable for function, distinct roles for the amino- and carboxy-terminal regions of the ExbD periplasmic domain were evident. Like residue D25 in the ExbD transmembrane domain, periplasmic residues 42 to 61 facilitated the conformational response of ExbD to proton motive force. This region appears to be important for transmitting signals between the ExbD transmembrane domain and carboxy terminus. The carboxy terminus, encompassing periplasmic residues 62 to 141, was required for initial assembly with the periplasmic domain of TonB, a stage of interaction required for ExbD to transmit its conformational response to proton motive force to TonB. Residues 92 to 121 were important for all three interactions previously observed for formaldehyde-cross-linked ExbD: ExbD homodimers, TonB-ExbD heterodimers, and ExbD-ExbB heterodimers. The distinct requirement of this ExbD region for interaction with ExbB raised the possibility of direct interaction with the few residues of ExbB known to occupy the periplasm.

  18. Paget disease of bone-associated UBA domain mutations of SQSTM1 exert distinct effects on protein structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Goode, Alice; Long, Jed E.; Shaw, Barry; Ralston, Stuart H.; Visconti, Micaela Rios; Gianfrancesco, Fernando; Esposito, Teresa; Gennari, Luigi; Merlotti, Daniela; Rendina, Domenico; Rea, Sarah L.; Sultana, Melanie; Searle, Mark S.; Layfield, Robert

    2014-01-01

    SQSTM1 mutations are common in patients with Paget disease of bone (PDB), with most affecting the C-terminal ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domain of the SQSTM1 protein. We performed structural and functional analyses of two UBA domain mutations, an I424S mutation relatively common in UK PDB patients, and an A427D mutation associated with a severe phenotype in Southern Italian patients. Both impaired SQSTM1's ubiquitin-binding function in pull-down assays and resulted in activation of basal NF-κB signalling, compared to wild-type, in reporter assays. We found evidence for a relationship between the ability of different UBA domain mutants to activate NF-κB signalling in vitro and number of affected sites in vivo in 1152 PDB patients from the UK and Italy, with A427D-SQSTM1 producing the greatest level of activation (relative to wild-type) of all PDB mutants tested to date. NMR and isothermal titration calorimetry studies were able to demonstrate that I424S is associated with global structural changes in the UBA domain, resulting in 10-fold weaker UBA dimer stability than wild-type and reduced ubiquitin-binding affinity of the UBA monomer. Our observations provide insights into the role of SQSTM1-mediated NF-κB signalling in PDB aetiology, and demonstrate that different mutations in close proximity within loop 2/helix 3 of the SQSTM1 UBA domain exert distinct effects on protein structure and stability, including indirect effects at the UBA/ubiquitin-binding interface. PMID:24642144

  19. Expression analysis of Arabidopsis XH/XS-domain proteins indicates overlapping and distinct functions for members of this gene family

    PubMed Central

    Butt, Haroon; Luschnig, Christian

    2014-01-01

    RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) is essential for de novo DNA methylation in higher plants, and recent reports established novel elements of this silencing pathway in the model organism Arabidopsis thaliana. INVOLVED IN DE NOVO DNA METHYLATION 2 (IDN2) and the closely related FACTOR OF DNA METHYLATION (FDM) are members of a plant-specific family of dsRNA-binding proteins characterized by conserved XH/XS domains and implicated in the regulation of RdDM at chromatin targets. Genetic analyses have suggested redundant as well as non-overlapping activities for different members of the gene family. However, detailed insights into the function of XH/XS-domain proteins are still elusive. By the generation and analysis of higher-order mutant combinations affected in IDN2 and further members of the gene family, we have provided additional evidence for their redundant activity. Distinct roles for members of the XH/XS-domain gene family were indicated by differences in their expression and subcellular localization. Fluorescent protein-tagged FDM genes were expressed either in nuclei or in the cytoplasm, suggestive of activities of XH/XS-domain proteins in association with chromatin as well as outside the nuclear compartment. In addition, we observed altered location of a functional FDM1–VENUS reporter from the nucleus into the cytoplasm under conditions when availability of further FDM proteins was limited. This is suggestive of a mechanism by which redistribution of XH/XS-domain proteins could compensate for the loss of closely related proteins. PMID:24574485

  20. Distinct Domains of Yeast Cortical Tag Proteins Bud8p and Bud9p Confer Polar Localization and Functionality

    PubMed Central

    Krappmann, Anne-Brit; Taheri, Naimeh; Heinrich, Melanie

    2007-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, diploid yeast cells follow a bipolar budding program, which depends on the two transmembrane glycoproteins Bud8p and Bud9p that potentially act as cortical tags to mark the cell poles. Here, we have performed systematic structure-function analyses of Bud8p and Bud9p to identify functional domains. We find that polar transport of Bud8p and Bud9p does not depend on N-terminal sequences but instead on sequences in the median part of the proteins and on the C-terminal parts that contain the transmembrane domains. We show that the guanosine diphosphate (GDP)/guanosine triphosphate (GTP) exchange factor Bud5p, which is essential for bud site selection and physically interacts with Bud8p, also interacts with Bud9p. Regions of Bud8p and Bud9p predicted to reside in the extracellular space are likely to confer interaction with the N-terminal region of Bud5p, implicating indirect interactions between the cortical tags and the GDP/GTP exchange factor. Finally, we have identified regions of Bud8p and Bud9p that are required for interaction with the cortical tag protein Rax1p. In summary, our study suggests that Bud8p and Bud9p carry distinct domains for delivery of the proteins to the cell poles, for interaction with the general budding machinery and for association with other cortical tag proteins. PMID:17581861

  1. Distinct Domains of CheA Confer Unique Functions in Chemotaxis and Cell Length in Azospirillum brasilense Sp7.

    PubMed

    Gullett, Jessica M; Bible, Amber; Alexandre, Gladys

    2017-07-01

    Chemotaxis is the movement of cells in response to gradients of diverse chemical cues. Motile bacteria utilize a conserved chemotaxis signal transduction system to bias their motility and navigate through a gradient. A central regulator of chemotaxis is the histidine kinase CheA. This cytoplasmic protein interacts with membrane-bound receptors, which assemble into large polar arrays, to propagate the signal. In the alphaproteobacterium Azospirillum brasilense, Che1 controls transient increases in swimming speed during chemotaxis, but it also biases the cell length at division. However, the exact underlying molecular mechanisms for Che1-dependent control of multiple cellular behaviors are not known. Here, we identify specific domains of the CheA1 histidine kinase implicated in modulating each of these functions. We show that CheA1 is produced in two isoforms: a membrane-anchored isoform produced as a fusion with a conserved seven-transmembrane domain of unknown function (TMX) at the N terminus and a soluble isoform similar to prototypical CheA. Site-directed and deletion mutagenesis combined with behavioral assays confirm the role of CheA1 in chemotaxis and implicate the TMX domain in mediating changes in cell length. Fluorescence microscopy further reveals that the membrane-anchored isoform is distributed around the cell surface while the soluble isoform localizes at the cell poles. Together, the data provide a mechanism for the role of Che1 in controlling multiple unrelated cellular behaviors via acquisition of a new domain in CheA1 and production of distinct functional isoforms.IMPORTANCE Chemotaxis provides a significant competitive advantage to bacteria in the environment, and this function has been transferred laterally multiple times, with evidence of functional divergence in different genomic contexts. The molecular principles that underlie functional diversification of chemotaxis in various genomic contexts are unknown. Here, we provide a molecular

  2. Tropomyosin variants describe distinct functional subcellular domains in differentiated vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Gallant, Cynthia; Appel, Sarah; Graceffa, Philip; Leavis, Paul; Lin, Jim Jung-Ching; Gunning, Peter W; Schevzov, Galina; Chaponnier, Christine; DeGnore, Jon; Lehman, William; Morgan, Kathleen G

    2011-06-01

    Tropomyosin (Tm) is known to be an important gatekeeper of actin function. Tm isoforms are encoded by four genes, and each gene produces several variants by alternative splicing, which have been proposed to play roles in motility, proliferation, and apoptosis. Smooth muscle studies have focused on gizzard smooth muscle, where a heterodimer of Tm from the α-gene (Tmsm-α) and from the β-gene (Tmsm-β) is associated with contractile filaments. In this study we examined Tm in differentiated mammalian vascular smooth muscle (dVSM). Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC MS/MS) analysis and Western blot screening with variant-specific antibodies revealed that at least five different Tm proteins are expressed in this tissue: Tm6 (Tmsm-α) and Tm2 from the α-gene, Tm1 (Tmsm-β) from the β-gene, Tm5NM1 from the γ-gene, and Tm4 from the δ-gene. Tm6 is by far most abundant in dVSM followed by Tm1, Tm2, Tm5NM1, and Tm4. Coimmunoprecipitation and coimmunofluorescence studies demonstrate that Tm1 and Tm6 coassociate with different actin isoforms and display different intracellular localizations. Using an antibody specific for cytoplasmic γ-actin, we report here the presence of a γ-actin cortical cytoskeleton in dVSM cells. Tm1 colocalizes with cortical cytoplasmic γ-actin and coprecipitates with γ-actin. Tm6, on the other hand, is located on contractile bundles. These data indicate that Tm1 and Tm6 do not form a classical heterodimer in dVSM but rather describe different functional cellular compartments.

  3. Modulation of elasticity in functionally distinct domains of the tropomyosin coiled-coil.

    PubMed

    Lakkaraju, Sirish Kaushik; Hwang, Wonmuk

    2009-03-01

    Alpha-helical coiled-coils are common protein structural motifs. Whereas vast information is available regarding their structure, folding, and stability, far less is known about their elastic properties, even though they play mechanical roles in many cases such as tropomyosin in muscle contraction or neck stalks of kinesin or myosin motor proteins. Using computer simulations, we characterized elastic properties of coiled-coils, either globally or locally. Global bending stiffness of standard leucine zipper coiled-coils was calculated using normal mode analysis. Mutations in hydrophobic residues involved in the knob-into-hole interface between the two alpha-helices affect elasticity significantly, whereas charged side chains forming inter-helical salt bridges do not. This suggests that coiled-coils with less regular heptad periodicity may have regional variations in flexibility. We show this by the flexibility map of tropomyosin, which was constructed by a local fluctuation analysis. Overall, flexibility varies by more than twofold and increases towards the C-terminal region of the molecule. Describing the coiled-coil as a twisted tape, it is generally more flexible in the splay bending than in the bending of the broad face. Actin binding sites in alpha zones show local rigidity minima. Broken core regions due to acidic residues at the hydrophobic face such as the Asp137 and the Glu218 are found to be the most labile with moduli for splay and broad face bending as 70 nm and 116 nm respectively. Such variation in flexibility could be relevant to the tropomyosin function, especially for moving across the non-uniform surface of F-actin to regulate myosin binding.

  4. Modulation of elasticity in functionally distinct domains of the tropomyosin coiled-coil

    PubMed Central

    Lakkaraju, Sirish Kaushik; Hwang, Wonmuk

    2009-01-01

    Alpha-helical coiled-coils are common protein structural motifs. Whereas vast information is available regarding their structure, folding, and stability, far less is known about their elastic properties, even though they play mechanical roles in many cases such as tropomyosin in muscle contraction or neck stalks of kinesin or myosin motor proteins. Using computer simulations, we characterized elastic properties of coiled-coils, either globally or locally. Global bending stiffness of standard leucine zipper coiled-coils was calculated using normal mode analysis. Mutations in hydrophobic residues involved in the knob-into-hole interface between the two α-helices affect elasticity significantly, whereas charged side chains forming inter-helical salt bridges do not. This suggests that coiled-coils with less regular heptad periodicity may have regional variations in flexibility. We show this by the flexibility map of tropomyosin, which was constructed by a local fluctuation analysis. Overall, flexibility varies by more than twofold and increases towards the C-terminal region of the molecule. Describing the coiled-coil as a twisted tape, it is generally more flexible in the splay bending than in the bending of the broad face. Actin binding sites in α zones show local rigidity minima. Broken core regions due to acidic residues at the hydrophobic face such as the Asp137 and the Glu218 are found to be the most labile with moduli for splay and broad face bending as 70 nm and 116 nm respectively. Such variation in flexibility could be relevant to the tropomyosin function, especially for moving across the non-uniform surface of F-actin to regulate myosin binding. PMID:19830262

  5. FENS-1 and DFCP1 are FYVE domain-containing proteins with distinct functions in the endosomal and Golgi compartments.

    PubMed

    Ridley, S H; Ktistakis, N; Davidson, K; Anderson, K E; Manifava, M; Ellson, C D; Lipp, P; Bootman, M; Coadwell, J; Nazarian, A; Erdjument-Bromage, H; Tempst, P; Cooper, M A; Thuring, J W; Lim, Z Y; Holmes, A B; Stephens, L R; Hawkins, P T

    2001-11-01

    FENS-1 and DFCP1 are recently discovered proteins containing one or two FYVE-domains respectively. We show that the FYVE domains in these proteins can bind PtdIns3P in vitro with high specificity over other phosphoinositides. Exogenously expressed FENS-1 localises to early endosomes: this localisation requires an intact FYVE domain and is sensitive to wortmannin inhibition. The isolated FYVE domain of FENS-1 also localises to endosomes. These results are consistent with current models of FYVE-domain function in this cellular compartment. By contrast, exogenously expressed DFCP1 displays a predominantly Golgi, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and vesicular distribution with little or no overlap with FENS-1 or other endosomal markers. Overexpression of DFCP1 was found to cause dispersal of the Golgi compartment defined by giantin and gpp130-staining. Disruption of the FYVE domains of DFCP1 causes a shift to more condensed and compact Golgi structures and overexpression of this mutant was found to confer significant protection to the Golgi against brefeldin-induced dispersal. These properties of DFCP1 are surprising, and suggest FYVE domain-localisation and function may not be exclusively endosomal. Movies available on-line

  6. Structural and Functional Modularity of the Orange Carotenoid Protein: Distinct Roles for the N- and C-Terminal Domains in Cyanobacterial Photoprotection[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Leverenz, Ryan L.; Jallet, Denis; Li, Ming-De; Mathies, Richard A.; Kirilovsky, Diana; Kerfeld, Cheryl A.

    2014-01-01

    The orange carotenoid protein (OCP) serves as a sensor of light intensity and an effector of phycobilisome (PB)–associated photoprotection in cyanobacteria. Structurally, the OCP is composed of two distinct domains spanned by a single carotenoid chromophore. Functionally, in response to high light, the OCP converts from a dark-stable orange form, OCPO, to an active red form, OCPR. The C-terminal domain of the OCP has been implicated in the dynamic response to light intensity and plays a role in switching off the OCP’s photoprotective response through its interaction with the fluorescence recovery protein. The function of the N-terminal domain, which is uniquely found in cyanobacteria, is unclear. To investigate its function, we isolated the N-terminal domain in vitro using limited proteolysis of native OCP. The N-terminal domain retains the carotenoid chromophore; this red carotenoid protein (RCP) has constitutive PB fluorescence quenching activity comparable in magnitude to that of active, full-length OCPR. A comparison of the spectroscopic properties of the RCP with OCPR indicates that critical protein–chromophore interactions within the C-terminal domain are weakened in the OCPR form. These results suggest that the C-terminal domain dynamically regulates the photoprotective activity of an otherwise constitutively active carotenoid binding N-terminal domain. PMID:24399299

  7. Distinct functions for ERKs?

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, Alison C

    2006-01-01

    The Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK signaling pathway is one of the best understood signal routes in cells. Recent studies add complexity to this cascade by indicating that the two ERK kinases, ERK1 (p44ERK1) and ERK2 (p42ERK2), may have distinct functions. PMID:16879721

  8. Novel exons in the tbx5 gene locus generate protein isoforms with distinct expression domains and function.

    PubMed

    Yamak, Abir; Georges, Romain O; Sheikh-Hassani, Massomeh; Morin, Martin; Komati, Hiba; Nemer, Mona

    2015-03-13

    TBX5 is the gene mutated in Holt-Oram syndrome, an autosomal dominant disorder with complex heart and limb deformities. Its protein product is a member of the T-box family of transcription factors and an evolutionarily conserved dosage-sensitive regulator of heart and limb development. Understanding TBX5 regulation is therefore of paramount importance. Here we uncover the existence of novel exons and provide evidence that TBX5 activity may be extensively regulated through alternative splicing to produce protein isoforms with differing N- and C-terminal domains. These isoforms are also present in human heart, indicative of an evolutionarily conserved regulatory mechanism. The newly identified isoforms have different transcriptional properties and can antagonize TBX5a target gene activation. Droplet Digital PCR as well as immunohistochemistry with isoform-specific antibodies reveal differential as well as overlapping expression domains. In particular, we find that the predominant isoform in skeletal myoblasts is Tbx5c, and we show that it is dramatically up-regulated in differentiating myotubes and is essential for myotube formation. Mechanistically, TBX5c antagonizes TBX5a activation of pro-proliferative signals such as IGF-1, FGF-10, and BMP4. The results provide new insight into Tbx5 regulation and function that will further our understanding of its role in health and disease. The finding of new exons in the Tbx5 locus may also be relevant to mutational screening especially in the 30% of Holt-Oram syndrome patients with no mutations in the known TBX5a exons.

  9. Genes encoding proteins with peritrophin A-type chitin-binding domains in Tribolium castaneum are grouped into three distinct families based on phylogeny, expression and function.

    PubMed

    Jasrapuria, Sinu; Arakane, Yasuyuki; Osman, Gamal; Kramer, Karl J; Beeman, Richard W; Muthukrishnan, Subbaratnam

    2010-03-01

    different orders suggests that ChtBD2s are ancient protein domains whose affinity for chitin in extracellular matrices has been exploited many times for a range of biological functions. The differences in the expression profiles of PMPs and CPAPs indicate that even though they share the peritrophin A motif for chitin binding, these three families of proteins have quite distinct biological functions.

  10. Distinct functional domains within the acidic cluster of tegument protein pp28 required for trafficking and cytoplasmic envelopment of human cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jun-Young; Jeon, Hyejin; Hong, Sookyung; Britt, William J

    2016-10-01

    Human cytomegalovirus UL99-encoded tegument protein pp28 contains a 16 aa acidic cluster that is required for pp28 trafficking to the assembly compartment (AC) and the virus assembly. However, functional signals within the acidic cluster of pp28 remain undefined. Here, we demonstrated that an acidic cluster rather than specific sorting signals was required for trafficking to the AC. Recombinant viruses with chimeric pp28 proteins expressing non-native acidic clusters exhibited delayed viral growth kinetics and decreased production of infectious virus, indicating that the native acidic cluster of pp28 was essential for wild-type virus assembly. These results suggested that the acidic cluster of pp28 has distinct functional domains required for trafficking and for efficient virus assembly. The first half (aa 44-50) of the acidic cluster was sufficient for pp28 trafficking, whereas the native acidic cluster consisting of aa 51-59 was required for the assembly of wild-type levels of infectious virus.

  11. Distinct functional and conformational states of the human lymphoid tyrosine phosphatase catalytic domain can be targeted by choice of the inhibitor chemotype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidović, Dušica; Xie, Yuli; Rinderspacher, Alison; Deng, Shi-Xian; Landry, Donald W.; Chung, Caty; Smith, Deborah H.; Tautz, Lutz; Schürer, Stephan C.

    2011-09-01

    The lymphoid tyrosine phosphatase (LYP), encoded by the PTPN22 gene, has recently been identified as a promising drug target for human autoimmunity diseases. Like the majority of protein-tyrosine phosphatases LYP can adopt two functionally distinct forms determined by the conformation of the WPD-loop. The WPD-loop plays an important role in the catalytic dephosphorylation by protein-tyrosine phosphatases. Here we investigate the binding modes of two chemotypes of small molecule LYP inhibitors with respect to both protein conformations using computational modeling. To evaluate binding in the active form, we built a LYP protein structure model of high quality. Our results suggest that the two different compound classes investigated, bind to different conformations of the LYP phosphatase domain. Binding to the closed form is facilitated by an interaction with Asp195 in the WPD-loop, presumably stabilizing the active conformation. The analysis presented here is relevant for the design of inhibitors that specifically target either the closed or the open conformation of LYP in order to achieve better selectivity over phosphatases with similar binding sites.

  12. Modeling Protein Domain Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Jones, Carleton "Buck"; Hull, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    This simple but effective laboratory exercise helps students understand the concept of protein domain function. They use foam beads, Styrofoam craft balls, and pipe cleaners to explore how domains within protein active sites interact to form a functional protein. The activity allows students to gain content mastery and an understanding of the…

  13. Modeling Protein Domain Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Jones, Carleton "Buck"; Hull, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    This simple but effective laboratory exercise helps students understand the concept of protein domain function. They use foam beads, Styrofoam craft balls, and pipe cleaners to explore how domains within protein active sites interact to form a functional protein. The activity allows students to gain content mastery and an understanding of the…

  14. Functional characterization of a StyS sensor kinase reveals distinct domains associated with intracellular and extracellular sensing of styrene in P. putida CA-3.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Niall D; Mooney, Aisling; O'Mahony, Mark; Dobson, Alan Dw

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial two-component systems (TCSs) are of vital importance in the translation of rapidly changing environmental conditions into appropriate cellular regulatory responses enabling adaptation, growth, and survival. The diverse range of environmental signals that TCSs can process, coupled with discrete modular domains within TCS proteins, offers considerable potential for the rational design of bio-sensor and/or bio-reporter strains. In this study we functionally characterize the multi-domain StyS sensor kinase associated with sensing of the aromatic pollutant styrene by Pseudomonas putida CA-3. Deletion analysis of discrete domains was performed and the ability of the truncated StyS sensor proteins to activate a cognate reporter system in an E. coli host assessed. The essential histidine kinase and PAS input domains were identified for StyS dependent activation of the reporter system. However, co-expression of an ABC-transporter protein StyE, previously linked to styrene transport in P. putida CA-3, enabled activation of the reporter system with a StyS construct containing a non-essential PAS input domain, suggesting a novel role for intracellular detection and/or activation. Site directed mutagenesis and amino acid deletions were employed to further characterize the PAS sensing domains of both input regions. The potential implications of these findings in the use of multi-domain sensor kinases in rational design strategies and the potential link between transport and intracellular sensing are discussed.

  15. Functional characterization of a StyS sensor kinase reveals distinct domains associated with intracellular and extracellular sensing of styrene in P. putida CA-3

    PubMed Central

    O'Leary, Niall D; Mooney, Aisling; O'Mahony, Mark; Dobson, Alan DW

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial two-component systems (TCSs) are of vital importance in the translation of rapidly changing environmental conditions into appropriate cellular regulatory responses enabling adaptation, growth, and survival. The diverse range of environmental signals that TCSs can process, coupled with discrete modular domains within TCS proteins, offers considerable potential for the rational design of bio-sensor and/or bio-reporter strains. In this study we functionally characterize the multi-domain StyS sensor kinase associated with sensing of the aromatic pollutant styrene by Pseudomonas putida CA-3. Deletion analysis of discrete domains was performed and the ability of the truncated StyS sensor proteins to activate a cognate reporter system in an E. coli host assessed. The essential histidine kinase and PAS input domains were identified for StyS dependent activation of the reporter system. However, co-expression of an ABC-transporter protein StyE, previously linked to styrene transport in P. putida CA-3, enabled activation of the reporter system with a StyS construct containing a non-essential PAS input domain, suggesting a novel role for intracellular detection and/or activation. Site directed mutagenesis and amino acid deletions were employed to further characterize the PAS sensing domains of both input regions. The potential implications of these findings in the use of multi-domain sensor kinases in rational design strategies and the potential link between transport and intracellular sensing are discussed. PMID:24637704

  16. Gain-of-function Mutations Cluster in Distinct Regions Associated with the Signaling Pathway in the PAS Domain of the Aerotaxis Receptor, Aer

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Asharie J.; Watts, Kylie J.; Johnson, Mark S.; Taylor, Barry L.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The Aer receptor monitors internal energy (redox) levels in Escherichia coli with an FAD-containing PAS domain. Here, we randomly mutagenized the region encoding residues 14 to 119 of the PAS domain and found 72 aerotaxis-defective mutants, 24 of which were gain-of-function, signal-on mutants. The mutations were mapped onto an Aer homology model based on the structure of the PAS-FAD domain in NifL from Azotobacter vinlandii. Signal-on lesions clustered in the FAD binding pocket, the β-scaffolding and in the N-cap loop. We suggest that the signal-on lesions mimic the “signal-on” state of the PAS domain, and therefore may be markers for the signal-in and signal-out regions of this domain. We propose that the reduction of FAD rearranges the FAD binding pocket in a way that repositions the β-scaffolding and the N-cap loop. The resulting conformational changes are likely to be conveyed directly to the HAMP domain, and on to the kinase control module. In support of this hypothesis, we demonstrated disulfide band formation between cysteines substituted at residues N98C or I114C in the PAS β-scaffold and residue Q248C in the HAMP AS-2 helix. PMID:20545849

  17. Distinct function of COAR and B3 domains of maize VP1 in induction of ectopic gene expression and plant developmental phenotypes in Arabidopsis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Maize VP1 enhancement of ABA sensitivity in roots is B3 independent. ABA and VP1 mediated suppression of auxin induced lateral root development is B3 independent. Arabidopsis transgenic system to delineate B3 dependent and COAR domain dependent regulatory functions of VP1. Analyses of ectopic ABA re...

  18. Distinct functions of the laminin β LN domain and collagen IV during cardiac extracellular matrix formation and stabilization of alary muscle attachments revealed by EMS mutagenesis in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Drosophila heart (dorsal vessel) is a relatively simple tubular organ that serves as a model for several aspects of cardiogenesis. Cardiac morphogenesis, proper heart function and stability require structural components whose identity and ways of assembly are only partially understood. Structural components are also needed to connect the myocardial tube with neighboring cells such as pericardial cells and specialized muscle fibers, the so-called alary muscles. Results Using an EMS mutagenesis screen for cardiac and muscular abnormalities in Drosophila embryos we obtained multiple mutants for two genetically interacting complementation groups that showed similar alary muscle and pericardial cell detachment phenotypes. The molecular lesions underlying these defects were identified as domain-specific point mutations in LamininB1 and Cg25C, encoding the extracellular matrix (ECM) components laminin β and collagen IV α1, respectively. Of particular interest within the LamininB1 group are certain hypomorphic mutants that feature prominent defects in cardiac morphogenesis and cardiac ECM layer formation, but in contrast to amorphic mutants, only mild defects in other tissues. All of these alleles carry clustered missense mutations in the laminin LN domain. The identified Cg25C mutants display weaker and largely temperature-sensitive phenotypes that result from glycine substitutions in different Gly-X-Y repeats of the triple helix-forming domain. While initial basement membrane assembly is not abolished in Cg25C mutants, incorporation of perlecan is impaired and intracellular accumulation of perlecan as well as the collagen IV α2 chain is detected during late embryogenesis. Conclusions Assembly of the cardiac ECM depends primarily on laminin, whereas collagen IV is needed for stabilization. Our data underscore the importance of a correctly assembled ECM particularly for the development of cardiac tissues and their lateral connections. The mutational

  19. Distinct functions of the laminin β LN domain and collagen IV during cardiac extracellular matrix formation and stabilization of alary muscle attachments revealed by EMS mutagenesis in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Hollfelder, Dominik; Frasch, Manfred; Reim, Ingolf

    2014-06-17

    The Drosophila heart (dorsal vessel) is a relatively simple tubular organ that serves as a model for several aspects of cardiogenesis. Cardiac morphogenesis, proper heart function and stability require structural components whose identity and ways of assembly are only partially understood. Structural components are also needed to connect the myocardial tube with neighboring cells such as pericardial cells and specialized muscle fibers, the so-called alary muscles. Using an EMS mutagenesis screen for cardiac and muscular abnormalities in Drosophila embryos we obtained multiple mutants for two genetically interacting complementation groups that showed similar alary muscle and pericardial cell detachment phenotypes. The molecular lesions underlying these defects were identified as domain-specific point mutations in LamininB1 and Cg25C, encoding the extracellular matrix (ECM) components laminin β and collagen IV α1, respectively. Of particular interest within the LamininB1 group are certain hypomorphic mutants that feature prominent defects in cardiac morphogenesis and cardiac ECM layer formation, but in contrast to amorphic mutants, only mild defects in other tissues. All of these alleles carry clustered missense mutations in the laminin LN domain. The identified Cg25C mutants display weaker and largely temperature-sensitive phenotypes that result from glycine substitutions in different Gly-X-Y repeats of the triple helix-forming domain. While initial basement membrane assembly is not abolished in Cg25C mutants, incorporation of perlecan is impaired and intracellular accumulation of perlecan as well as the collagen IV α2 chain is detected during late embryogenesis. Assembly of the cardiac ECM depends primarily on laminin, whereas collagen IV is needed for stabilization. Our data underscore the importance of a correctly assembled ECM particularly for the development of cardiac tissues and their lateral connections. The mutational analysis suggests that the β6/β3/

  20. Functional domains in tetraspanin proteins.

    PubMed

    Stipp, Christopher S; Kolesnikova, Tatiana V; Hemler, Martin E

    2003-02-01

    Exciting new findings have emerged about the structure, function and biochemistry of tetraspanin proteins. Five distinct tetraspanin regions have now been delineated linking structural features to specific functions. Within the large extracellular loop of tetraspanins, there is a variable region that mediates specific interactions with other proteins, as well as a more highly conserved region that has been suggested to mediate homodimerization. Within the transmembrane region, the four tetraspanin transmembrane domains are probable sites of both intra- and inter-molecular interactions that are crucial during biosynthesis and assembly of the network of tetraspanin-linked membrane proteins known as the 'tetraspanin web'. In the intracellular juxtamembrane region, palmitoylation of cysteine residues also contributes to tetraspanin web assembly, and the C-terminal cytoplasmic tail region could provide specific functional links to cytoskeletal or signaling proteins.

  1. The adhesion GPCR GPR126 has distinct, domain-dependent functions in Schwann cell development mediated by interaction with Laminin-211

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Sarah C.; Luo, Rong; Liebscher, Ines; Giera, Stefanie; Jeong, Sung-jin; Mogha, Amit; Ghidinelli, Monica; Feltri, M. Laura; Schöneberg, Torsten; Piao, Xianhua; Monk, Kelly R.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Myelin ensheathes axons to allow rapid propagation of action potentials and proper nervous system function. In the peripheral nervous system, Schwann cells (SCs) radially sort axons into a 1:1 relationship before wrapping an axonal segment to form myelin. SC myelination requires the adhesion G protein-coupled receptor GPR126, which undergoes autoproteolytic cleavage into an N-terminal fragment (NTF) and a 7-transmembrane-containing C-terminal fragment (CTF). Here, we show that GPR126 has domain-specific functions in SC development whereby the NTF is necessary and sufficient for axon sorting while the CTF promotes wrapping through cAMP elevation. These biphasic roles of GPR126 are governed by interactions with Laminin-211, which we define as a novel ligand for GPR126 that modulates receptor signaling via a tethered agonist. Our work suggests a model in which Laminin-211 mediates GPR126-induced cAMP levels to control early and late stages of SC development. PMID:25695270

  2. Hydrophobic mismatch sorts SNARE proteins into distinct membrane domains

    PubMed Central

    Milovanovic, Dragomir; Honigmann, Alf; Koike, Seiichi; Göttfert, Fabian; Pähler, Gesa; Junius, Meike; Müllar, Stefan; Diederichsen, Ulf; Janshoff, Andreas; Grubmüller, Helmut; Risselada, Herre J.; Eggeling, Christian; Hell, Stefan W.; van den Bogaart, Geert; Jahn, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    The clustering of proteins and lipids in distinct microdomains is emerging as an important principle for the spatial patterning of biological membranes. Such domain formation can be the result of hydrophobic and ionic interactions with membrane lipids as well as of specific protein–protein interactions. Here using plasma membrane-resident SNARE proteins as model, we show that hydrophobic mismatch between the length of transmembrane domains (TMDs) and the thickness of the lipid membrane suffices to induce clustering of proteins. Even when the TMDs differ in length by only a single residue, hydrophobic mismatch can segregate structurally closely homologous membrane proteins in distinct membrane domains. Domain formation is further fine-tuned by interactions with polyanionic phosphoinositides and homo and heterotypic protein interactions. Our findings demonstrate that hydrophobic mismatch contributes to the structural organization of membranes. PMID:25635869

  3. Hydrophobic mismatch sorts SNARE proteins into distinct membrane domains.

    PubMed

    Milovanovic, Dragomir; Honigmann, Alf; Koike, Seiichi; Göttfert, Fabian; Pähler, Gesa; Junius, Meike; Müllar, Stefan; Diederichsen, Ulf; Janshoff, Andreas; Grubmüller, Helmut; Risselada, Herre J; Eggeling, Christian; Hell, Stefan W; van den Bogaart, Geert; Jahn, Reinhard

    2015-01-30

    The clustering of proteins and lipids in distinct microdomains is emerging as an important principle for the spatial patterning of biological membranes. Such domain formation can be the result of hydrophobic and ionic interactions with membrane lipids as well as of specific protein-protein interactions. Here using plasma membrane-resident SNARE proteins as model, we show that hydrophobic mismatch between the length of transmembrane domains (TMDs) and the thickness of the lipid membrane suffices to induce clustering of proteins. Even when the TMDs differ in length by only a single residue, hydrophobic mismatch can segregate structurally closely homologous membrane proteins in distinct membrane domains. Domain formation is further fine-tuned by interactions with polyanionic phosphoinositides and homo and heterotypic protein interactions. Our findings demonstrate that hydrophobic mismatch contributes to the structural organization of membranes.

  4. Molecular mechanisms of protein-cholesterol interactions in plasma membranes: Functional distinction between topological (tilted) and consensus (CARC/CRAC) domains.

    PubMed

    Fantini, Jacques; Di Scala, Coralie; Baier, Carlos J; Barrantes, Francisco J

    2016-09-01

    The molecular mechanisms that control the multiple possible modes of protein association with membrane cholesterol are remarkably convergent. These mechanisms, which include hydrogen bonding, CH-π stacking and dispersion forces, are used by a wide variety of extracellular proteins (e.g. microbial or amyloid) and membrane receptors. Virus fusion peptides penetrate the membrane of host cells with a tilted orientation that is compatible with a transient interaction with cholesterol; this tilted orientation is also characteristic of the process of insertion of amyloid proteins that subsequently form oligomeric pores in the plasma membrane of brain cells. Membrane receptors that are associated with cholesterol generally display linear consensus binding motifs (CARC and CRAC) characterized by a triad of basic (Lys/Arg), aromatic (Tyr/phe) and aliphatic (Leu/Val) amino acid residues. In some cases, the presence of both CARC and CRAC within the same membrane-spanning domain allows the simultaneous binding of two cholesterol molecules, one in each membrane leaflet. In this review the molecular basis and the functional significance of the different modes of protein-cholesterol interactions in plasma membranes are discussed.

  5. Genes encoding proteins with peritrophin A-type chitin-binding domains in Tribolium castaneum are grouped into three distinct families based on phylogeny, expression and function

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study is focused on the characterization and expression of genes in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, encoding proteins that possess six-cysteine-containing chitin-binding domains (CBDs) related to the peritrophin A domain (ChtBD2). An exhaustive bioinformatics search of the genome of...

  6. Distinct Functional Domains Contribute to Degradation of the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor (LDLR) by the E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Inducible Degrader of the LDLR (IDOL)

    PubMed Central

    Sorrentino, Vincenzo; Scheer, Lilith; Santos, Ana; Reits, Eric; Bleijlevens, Boris; Zelcer, Noam

    2011-01-01

    We recently identified the liver X receptor-regulated E3 ubiquitin ligase inducible degrader of the LDL receptor (IDOL) as a modulator of lipoprotein metabolism. Acting as an E3 ubiquitin ligase, IDOL triggers ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR). We demonstrate here that this outcome requires the conserved FERM and RING domains present in IDOL. The RING domain promotes ubiquitination in vitro and Lys-63-specific ubiquitination of the LDLR in vivo in response to IDOL or liver X receptor activation. We further identify RING residues that differentially influence ubiquitination of the LDLR or stability of IDOL. The FERM domain interacts with the LDLR and in living cells co-localizes with the receptor at the plasma membrane. Homology modeling revealed a phosphotyrosine-binding element embedded in the FERM domain. Mutating residues within this region or residues in the LDLR preceding the NPVY endocytosis motif abrogate LDLR degradation by IDOL. Collectively, our results indicate that both the FERM and RING domains are required for promoting lysosomal degradation of the LDLR by IDOL. Our findings may facilitate development of structure-based IDOL inhibitors aimed at increasing LDLR abundance in therapeutic strategies to treat cardiovascular disease. PMID:21734303

  7. Two distinct variants of erythrocyte spectrin beta IV domain.

    PubMed

    Pothier, B; Alloisio, N; Morlé, L; Maréchal, J; Barthélemy, H; Ducluzeau, M T; Dorier, A; Delaunay, J

    1989-11-01

    We report two distinct variants affecting the beta IV domain of erythrocyte spectrin, designated spectrin Saint-Chamond and spectrin Tlemcen. They were discovered in a French family and an Algerian individual, respectively. They appeared clinically and morphologically asymptomatic in the heterozygous state. In two-dimensional maps of spectrin partial digests, both mutants were manifested by cathodic shifts (with no change of the molecular weights) of the peptides that cover the N-terminal region of spectrin beta IV domain. The relevance of the abnormal peptides to the beta IV domain was established by quantitative analysis and by Western blotting using anti-beta IV domain-specific antibodies. These two variants are thus far the most distal variants of spectrin to be defined on an unequivocal structural basis.

  8. The C-Terminal Region of Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus Nucleoprotein Contains Distinct and Segregable Functional Domains Involved in NP-Z Interaction and Counteraction of the Type I Interferon Response▿

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Riaño, Emilio; Cheng, Benson Yee Hin; de la Torre, Juan Carlos; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis

    2011-01-01

    Several arenaviruses cause hemorrhagic fever (HF) disease in humans that is associated with high morbidity and significant mortality. Arenavirus nucleoprotein (NP), the most abundant viral protein in infected cells and virions, encapsidates the viral genome RNA, and this NP-RNA complex, together with the viral L polymerase, forms the viral ribonucleoprotein (vRNP) that directs viral RNA replication and gene transcription. Formation of infectious arenavirus progeny requires packaging of vRNPs into budding particles, a process in which arenavirus matrix-like protein (Z) plays a central role. In the present study, we have characterized the NP-Z interaction for the prototypic arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). The LCMV NP domain that interacted with Z overlapped with a previously documented C-terminal domain that counteracts the host type I interferon (IFN) response. However, we found that single amino acid mutations that affect the anti-IFN function of LCMV NP did not disrupt the NP-Z interaction, suggesting that within the C-terminal region of NP different amino acid residues critically contribute to these two distinct and segregable NP functions. A similar NP-Z interaction was confirmed for the HF arenavirus Lassa virus (LASV). Notably, LCMV NP interacted similarly with both LCMV Z and LASV Z, while LASV NP interacted only with LASV Z. Our results also suggest the presence of a conserved protein domain within NP but with specific amino acid residues playing key roles in determining the specificity of NP-Z interaction that may influence the viability of reassortant arenaviruses. In addition, this NP-Z interaction represents a potential target for the development of antiviral drugs to combat human-pathogenic arenaviruses. PMID:21976642

  9. Delineating distinct heme-scavenging and -binding functions of domains in MF6p/helminth defense molecule (HDM) proteins from parasitic flatworms.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Sernández, Victoria; Mezo, Mercedes; González-Warleta, Marta; Perteguer, María J; Gárate, Teresa; Romarís, Fernanda; Ubeira, Florencio M

    2017-05-26

    MF6p/FhHDM-1 is a small protein secreted by the parasitic flatworm (trematode) Fasciola hepatica that belongs to a broad family of heme-binding proteins (MF6p/helminth defense molecules (HDMs)). MF6p/HDMs are of interest for understanding heme homeostasis in trematodes and as potential targets for the development of new flukicides. Moreover, interest in these molecules has also increased because of their immunomodulatory properties. Here we have extended our previous findings on the mechanism of MF6p/HDM-heme interactions and mapped the protein regions required for heme binding and for other biological functions. Our data revealed that MF6p/FhHDM-1 forms high-molecular-weight complexes when associated with heme and that these complexes are reorganized by a stacking procedure to form fibril-like and granular nanostructures. Furthermore, we showed that MF6p/FhHDM-1 is a transitory heme-binding protein as protein·heme complexes can be disrupted by contact with an apoprotein (e.g. apomyoglobin) with higher affinity for heme. We also demonstrated that (i) the heme-binding region is located in the MF6p/FhHDM-1 C-terminal moiety, which also inhibits the peroxidase-like activity of heme, and (ii) MF6p/HDMs from other trematodes, such as Opisthorchis viverrini and Paragonimus westermani, also bind heme. Finally, we observed that the N-terminal, but not the C-terminal, moiety of MF6p/HDMs has a predicted structural analogy with cell-penetrating peptides and that both the entire protein and the peptide corresponding to the N-terminal moiety of MF6p/FhHDM-1 interact in vitro with cell membranes in hemin-preconditioned erythrocytes. Our findings suggest that MF6p/HDMs can transport heme in trematodes and thereby shield the parasite from the harmful effects of heme. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. SH3 Domains Differentially Stimulate Distinct Dynamin I Assembly Modes and G Domain Activity

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Sai; Collett, Michael; Robinson, Phillip J.

    2015-01-01

    Dynamin I is a highly regulated GTPase enzyme enriched in nerve terminals which mediates vesicle fission during synaptic vesicle endocytosis. One regulatory mechanism involves its interactions with proteins containing Src homology 3 (SH3) domains. At least 30 SH3 domain-containing proteins bind dynamin at its proline-rich domain (PRD). Those that stimulate dynamin activity act by promoting its oligomerisation. We undertook a systematic parallel screening of 13 glutathione-S-transferase (GST)-tagged endocytosis-related SH3 domains on dynamin binding, GTPase activity and oligomerisation. No correlation was found between dynamin binding and their potency to stimulate GTPase activity. There was limited correlation between the extent of their ability to stimulate dynamin activity and the level of oligomerisation, indicating an as yet uncharacterised allosteric coupling of the PRD and G domain. We examined the two variants, dynamin Iab and Ibb, which differ in the alternately splice middle domain α2 helix. They responded differently to the panel of SH3s, with the extent of stimulation between the splice variants varying greatly between the SH3s. This study reveals that SH3 binding can act as a heterotropic allosteric regulator of the G domain via the middle domain α2 helix, suggesting an involvement of this helix in communicating the PRD-mediated allostery. This indicates that SH3 binding both stabilises multiple conformations of the tetrameric building block of dynamin, and promotes assembly of dynamin-SH3 complexes with distinct rates of GTP hydrolysis. PMID:26659814

  11. Functional domain walls in multiferroics.

    PubMed

    Meier, Dennis

    2015-11-25

    During the last decade a wide variety of novel and fascinating correlation phenomena has been discovered at domain walls in multiferroic bulk systems, ranging from unusual electronic conductance to inseparably entangled spin and charge degrees of freedom. The domain walls represent quasi-2D functional objects that can be induced, positioned, and erased on demand, bearing considerable technological potential for future nanoelectronics. Most of the challenges that remain to be solved before turning related device paradigms into reality, however, still fall in the field of fundamental condensed matter physics and materials science. In this topical review seminal experimental findings gained on electric and magnetic domain walls in multiferroic bulk materials are addressed. A special focus is put on the physical properties that emerge at so-called charged domain walls and the added functionality that arises from coexisting magnetic order. The research presented in this review highlights that we are just entering a whole new world of intriguing nanoscale physics that is yet to be explored in all its details. The goal is to draw attention to the persistent challenges and identify future key directions for the research on functional domain walls in multiferroics.

  12. Distinct Interaction Modes of the Kinesin-13 Motor Domain with the Microtubule

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Chandrima; Benoit, Matthieu P.M.H.; DePaoli, Vania; Diaz-Valencia, Juan D.; Asenjo, Ana B.; Gerfen, Gary J.; Sharp, David J.; Sosa, Hernando

    2016-01-01

    Kinesins-13s are members of the kinesin superfamily of motor proteins that depolymerize microtubules (MTs) and have no motile activity. Instead of generating unidirectional movement over the MT lattice, like most other kinesins, kinesins-13s undergo one-dimensional diffusion (ODD) and induce depolymerization at the MT ends. To understand the mechanism of ODD and the origin of the distinct kinesin-13 functionality, we used ensemble and single-molecule fluorescence polarization microscopy to analyze the behavior and conformation of Drosophila melanogaster kinesin-13 KLP10A protein constructs bound to the MT lattice. We found that KLP10A interacts with the MT in two coexisting modes: one in which the motor domain binds with a specific orientation to the MT lattice and another where the motor domain is very mobile and able to undergo ODD. By comparing the orientation and dynamic behavior of mutated and deletion constructs we conclude that 1) the Kinesin-13 class specific neck domain and loop-2 help orienting the motor domain relative to the MT. 2) During ODD the KLP10A motor-domain changes orientation rapidly (rocks or tumbles). 3) The motor domain alone is capable of undergoing ODD. 4) A second tubulin binding site in the KLP10A motor domain is not critical for ODD. 5) The neck domain is not the element preventing KLP10A from binding to the MT lattice like motile kinesins. PMID:27074684

  13. Structural and Functional Analysis of Multi-Interface Domains

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Liang; Hoi, Steven C. H.; Wong, Limsoon; Hamp, Tobias; Li, Jinyan

    2012-01-01

    A multi-interface domain is a domain that can shape multiple and distinctive binding sites to contact with many other domains, forming a hub in domain-domain interaction networks. The functions played by the multiple interfaces are usually different, but there is no strict bijection between the functions and interfaces as some subsets of the interfaces play the same function. This work applies graph theory and algorithms to discover fingerprints for the multiple interfaces of a domain and to establish associations between the interfaces and functions, based on a huge set of multi-interface proteins from PDB. We found that about 40% of proteins have the multi-interface property, however the involved multi-interface domains account for only a tiny fraction (1.8%) of the total number of domains. The interfaces of these domains are distinguishable in terms of their fingerprints, indicating the functional specificity of the multiple interfaces in a domain. Furthermore, we observed that both cooperative and distinctive structural patterns, which will be useful for protein engineering, exist in the multiple interfaces of a domain. PMID:23272073

  14. Apo raver1 structure reveals distinct RRM domain orientations

    SciTech Connect

    Rangarajan, Erumbi S.; Lee, Jun Hyuck; Izard, Tina

    2012-09-17

    Raver1 is a multifunctional protein that modulates both alternative splicing and focal adhesion assembly by binding to the nucleoplasmic splicing repressor polypyrimidine tract protein (PTB) or to the cytoskeletal proteins vinculin and {alpha}-actinin. The amino-terminal region of raver1 has three RNA recognition motif (RRM1, RRM2, and RRM3) domains, and RRM1 interacts with the vinculin tail (Vt) domain and vinculin mRNA. We previously determined the crystal structure of the raver1 RRM1-3 domains in complex with Vt at 2.75 {angstrom} resolution. Here, we report crystal structure of the unbound raver1 RRM1-3 domains at 2 {angstrom} resolution. The apo structure reveals that a bound sulfate ion disrupts an electrostatic interaction between the RRM1 and RRM2 domains, triggering a large relative domain movement of over 30{sup o}. Superposition with other RNA-bound RRM structures places the sulfate ion near the superposed RNA phosphate group suggesting that this is the raver1 RNA binding site. While several single and some tandem RRM domain structures have been described, to the best of our knowledge, this is the second report of a three-tandem RRM domain structure.

  15. Three Distinct Domains Contribute to Nuclear Transport of Murine Foxp3

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, Wayne W.; Özkaynak, Engin

    2009-01-01

    Foxp3, a 47-kDa transcription factor, is necessary for the function of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs), with an essential role in the control of self-reactive T cells and in preventing autoimmunity. Activation of Tregs by TCR engagement results in upregulation of Foxp3 expression, followed by its rapid nuclear transport and binding to chromatin. Here, we identify three distinct Foxp3 domains that contribute to nuclear transport. The first domain (Domain 1) comprises the C-terminal 12 amino acids. The second domain (Domain 2) is located immediately N-terminal to the forkhead domain (FHD), recently reported to be a binding site for the runt-related transcription factor 1/acute myeloid leukemia 1 (Runx1/AML1). The third domain (Domain 3) is located within the N-terminal first 51 amino acids. Unlike the known nuclear localization signals (NLSs), none of these three regions are rich in basic residues and do not bear any similarity to known monopartite or bipartite NLSs that have one or more clusters of basic amino acids. The basic arginine-lysine-lysine-arginine (RKKR) sequence, located 12-aa from the C-terminal end of Foxp3 was previously reported to be a nuclear localization signal (NLS) for several proteins, including for a GFP-Foxp3 hybrid. Evidence is provided here that in the full-length native Foxp3 RKKR does not function as an NLS. The data reported in this study indicates that Foxp3 achieves nuclear transport by binding to other nuclear factors and co-transporting with them to the nucleus. PMID:19924293

  16. DISTINCT FUNCTIONS OF SOCIAL SUPPORT AND COGNITIVE FUNCTION AMONG OLDER ADULTS

    PubMed Central

    Sims, Regina C.; Hosey, Megan; Levy, Shellie-Anne; Whitfield, Keith E.; Katzel, Leslie I.; Waldstein, Shari R.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Study Context Social support has been shown to buffer cognitive decline in older adults; however, few studies have examined the association of distinct functions of perceived social support and cognitive function. The current study examined the relations between distinct functions of social support and numerous cognitive domains in older adults. Methods Data were derived from a cross-sectional, correlational study of cardiovascular risk factors, cognitive function, and neuroimaging. The participants were 175 older adults with a mean age of 66.32. A number of neuropsychological tests and the Interpersonal Support Evaluation List were administered. Multiple linear regression analyses were conducted to determine cross-sectional relations of social support to cognitive function after controlling for age, gender, education, depressive symptomatology, systolic blood pressure, body-mass index, total cholesterol, and fasting glucose. Results No significant positive relations were found between distinct functions of social support and cognitive function in any domain; however, inverse relations emerged such that greater social support across several functions was associated with poorer nonverbal memory and response inhibition. Conclusion Results suggest that the receipt of social support may be a burden for some older adults. Within the current study, fluid cognitive abilities reflected this phenomenon. The mechanism through which social support is associated with poorer cognitive function in some domains deserves further exploration. PMID:24467699

  17. Distinct functions of social support and cognitive function among older adults.

    PubMed

    Sims, Regina C; Hosey, Megan; Levy, Shellie-Anne; Whitfield, Keith E; Katzel, Leslie I; Waldstein, Shari R

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/STUDY CONTEXT: Social support has been shown to buffer cognitive decline in older adults; however, few studies have examined the association of distinct functions of perceived social support and cognitive function. The current study examined the relations between distinct functions of social support and numerous cognitive domains in older adults. Data were derived from a cross-sectional, correlational study of cardiovascular risk factors, cognitive function, and neuroimaging. The participants were 175 older adults with a mean age of 66.32. A number of neuropsychological tests and the Interpersonal Support Evaluation List were administered. Multiple linear regression analyses were conducted to determine cross-sectional relations of social support to cognitive function after controlling for age, gender, education, depressive symptomatology, systolic blood pressure, body mass index, total cholesterol, and fasting glucose. No significant positive relations were found between distinct functions of social support and cognitive function in any domain; however, inverse relations emerged such that greater social support across several functions was associated with poorer nonverbal memory and response inhibition. Results suggest that the receipt of social support may be a burden for some older adults. Within the current study, fluid cognitive abilities reflected this phenomenon. The mechanism through which social support is associated with poorer cognitive function in some domains deserves further exploration.

  18. Morphologically and Functionally Distinct Lipid Droplet Subpopulations

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuyan; Wang, Yang; Cui, Liujuan; Deng, Yaqin; Xu, Shimeng; Yu, Jinhai; Cichello, Simon; Serrero, Ginette; Ying, Yunshu; Liu, Pingsheng

    2016-01-01

    Lipid droplet (LD), a multi-functional organelle, is often found to associate with other cellular membranous structures and vary in size in a given cell, which may be related to their functional diversity. Here we established a method to separate LD subpopulations from isolated CHO K2 LDs into three different size categories. The subpopulation with smallest LDs was nearly free of ER and other membranous structures while those with larger LDs contained intact ER. These distinct subpopulations of LDs differed in their protein composition and ability to recruit proteins. This method was also applicable to LDs obtained from other sources, such as Huh7 cells, mouse liver and brown adipose tissue, et al. We developed an in vitro assay requiring only isolated LDs, Coenzyme A, and ATP to drive lipid synthesis. The LD subpopulation nearly depleted of ER was able to incorporate fatty acids into triacylglycerol and phospholipids. Together, our data demonstrate that LDs in a given cell are heterogeneous in size and function, and suggest that LDs are one of cellular lipid synthetic organelles. PMID:27386790

  19. Cooperative unfolding of distinctive mechanoreceptor domains transduces force into signals

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Lining; Chen, Yunfeng; Xue, Lingzhou; Du, Xiaoping; Zhu, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    How cells sense their mechanical environment and transduce forces into biochemical signals is a crucial yet unresolved question in mechanobiology. Platelets use receptor glycoprotein Ib (GPIb), specifically its α subunit (GPIbα), to signal as they tether and translocate on von Willebrand factor (VWF) of injured arterial surfaces against blood flow. Force elicits catch bonds to slow VWF–GPIbα dissociation and unfolds the GPIbα leucine-rich repeat domain (LRRD) and juxtamembrane mechanosensitive domain (MSD). How these mechanical processes trigger biochemical signals remains unknown. Here we analyze these extracellular events and the resulting intracellular Ca2+ on a single platelet in real time, revealing that LRRD unfolding intensifies Ca2+ signal whereas MSD unfolding affects the type of Ca2+ signal. Therefore, LRRD and MSD are analog and digital force transducers, respectively. The >30 nm macroglycopeptide separating the two domains transmits force on the VWF–GPIbα bond (whose lifetime is prolonged by LRRD unfolding) to the MSD to enhance its unfolding, resulting in unfolding cooperativity at an optimal force. These elements may provide design principles for a generic mechanosensory protein machine. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15447.001 PMID:27434669

  20. Knowledge of the human body: a distinct semantic domain.

    PubMed

    Coslett, H Branch; Saffran, Eleanor M; Schwoebel, John

    2002-08-13

    Patients with selective deficits in the naming and comprehension of animals, plants, and artifacts have been reported. These descriptions of specific semantic category deficits have contributed substantially to the understanding of the architecture of semantic representations. This study sought to further understanding of the organization of the semantic system by demonstrating that another semantic category, knowledge of the human body, may be selectively preserved. The performance of a patient with semantic dementia was compared with the performance of healthy controls on a variety of tasks assessing distinct types of body representations, including the body schema, body image, and body structural description. Despite substantial deficits on tasks involving language and knowledge of the world generally, the patient performed normally on all tests of body knowledge except body part naming; even in this naming task, however, her performance with body parts was significantly better than on artifacts. The demonstration that body knowledge may be preserved despite substantial semantic deficits involving other types of semantic information argues that body knowledge is a distinct and dissociable semantic category. These data are interpreted as support for a model of semantics that proposes that knowledge is distributed across different cortical regions reflecting the manner in which the information was acquired.

  1. Domain-specific knowledge systems in the brain the animate-inanimate distinction.

    PubMed

    Caramazza, A; Shelton, J R

    1998-01-01

    We claim that the animate and inanimate conceptual categories represent evolutionarily adapted domain-specific knowledge systems that are subserved by distinct neural mechanisms, thereby allowing for their selective impairment in conditions of brain damage. On this view, (some of) the category-specific deficits that have recently been reported in the cognitive neuropsychological literature - for example, the selective damage or sparing of knowledge about animals - are truly categorical effects. Here, we articulate and defend this thesis against the dominant, reductionist theory of category-specific deficits, which holds that the categorical nature of the deficits is the result of selective damage to noncategorically organized visual or functional semantic subsystems. On the latter view, the sensory/functional dimension provides the fundamental organizing principle of the semantic system. Since, according to the latter theory, sensory and functional properties are differentially important in determining the meaning of the members of different semantic categories, selective damage to the visual or the functional semantic subsystem will result in a category-like deficit. A review of the literature and the results of a new case of category-specific deficit will show that the domain-specific knowledge framework provides a better account of category-specific deficits than the sensory/functional dichotomy theory.

  2. Transcriptional activation by the acidic domain of Vmw65 requires the integrity of the domain and involves additional determinants distinct from those necessary for TFIIB binding.

    PubMed

    Walker, S; Greaves, R; O'Hare, P

    1993-09-01

    In this work we have examined the requirements for activity of the acidic domain of Vmw65 (VP16) by deletion and site-directed mutagenesis of the region in the context of GAL4 fusion proteins. The results indicate that the present interpretation of what actually constitutes the activation domain is not correct. We demonstrate, using a promoter with one target site which is efficiently activated by the wild-type (wt) fusion protein, that amino acids distal to residue 453 are critical for activity. Truncation of the domain or substitution of residues in the distal region almost completely abrogate activity. However, inactivating mutations within the distal region are complemented by using a promoter containing multiple target sites. Moreover, duplication of the proximal region, but not the distal region, restores the ability to activate a promoter with a single target site. These results indicate some distinct qualitative difference between the proximal and distal regions. We have also examined the binding of nuclear proteins to the wt domain and to a variant with the distal region inactivated by mutation. The lack of activity of this variant is not explained by a lack of binding of TFIIB, a protein previously reported to be the likely target of the acidic domain. Therefore some additional function is involved in transcriptional activation by the acid domain, and determinants distinct from those involved in TFIIB binding are required for this function. Analysis of the total protein profiles binding to the wt and mutant domains has demonstrated the selective binding to the wt domain of a 135-kDa polypeptide, which is therefore a candidate component involved in this additional function. This is the first report to provide evidence for the proposal of a multiplicity of interactions within the acidic domain, by uncoupling requirements for one function from those for another.

  3. Sushi domains confer distinct trafficking profiles on GABAB receptors

    PubMed Central

    Hannan, Saad; Wilkins, Megan E.; Smart, Trevor G.

    2012-01-01

    GABAB receptors mediate slow inhibitory neurotransmission in the brain and feature during excitatory synaptic plasticity, as well as various neurological conditions. These receptors are obligate heterodimers composed of GABABR1 and R2 subunits. The two predominant R1 isoforms differ by the presence of two complement control protein modules or Sushi domains (SDs) in the N terminus of R1a. By using live imaging, with an α-bungarotoxin-binding site (BBS) and fluorophore-linked bungarotoxin, we studied how R2 stabilizes R1b subunits at the cell surface. Heterodimerization with R2 reduced the rate of internalization of R1b, compared with R1b homomers. However, R1aR2 heteromers exhibited increased cell surface stability compared with R1bR2 receptors in hippocampal neurons, suggesting that for receptors containing the R1a subunit, the SDs play an additional role in the surface stability of GABAB receptors. Both SDs were necessary to increase the stability of R1aR2 because single deletions caused the receptors to be internalized at the same rate and extent as R1bR2 receptors. Consistent with these findings, a chimera formed from the metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR)2 and the SDs from R1a increased the surface stability of mGluR2. These results suggest a role for SDs in stabilizing cell surface receptors that could impart different pre- and postsynaptic trafficking itineraries on GABAB receptors, thereby contributing to their physiological and pathological roles. PMID:22778417

  4. Natural Microbial Assemblages Reflect Distinct Organismal and Functional Partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilmes, P.; Andersson, A.; Kalnejais, L. H.; Verberkmoes, N. C.; Lefsrud, M. G.; Wexler, M.; Singer, S. W.; Shah, M.; Bond, P. L.; Thelen, M. P.; Hettich, R. L.; Banfield, J. F.

    2007-12-01

    The ability to link microbial community structure to function has long been a primary focus of environmental microbiology. With the advent of community genomic and proteomic techniques, along with advances in microscopic imaging techniques, it is now possible to gain insights into the organismal and functional makeup of microbial communities. Biofilms growing within highly acidic solutions inside the Richmond Mine (Iron Mountain, Redding, California) exhibit distinct macro- and microscopic morphologies. They are composed of microorganisms belonging to the three domains of life, including archaea, bacteria and eukarya. The proportion of each organismal type depends on sampling location and developmental stage. For example, mature biofilms floating on top of acid mine drainage (AMD) pools exhibit layers consisting of a densely packed bottom layer of the chemoautolithotroph Leptospirillum group II, a less dense top layer composed mainly of archaea, and fungal filaments spanning across the entire biofilm. The expression of cytochrome 579 (the most highly abundant protein in the biofilm, believed to be central to iron oxidation and encoded by Leptospirillum group II) is localized at the interface of the biofilm with the AMD solution, highlighting that biofilm architecture is reflected at the functional gene expression level. Distinct functional partitioning is also apparent in a biological wastewater treatment system that selects for distinct polyphosphate accumulating organisms. Community genomic data from " Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis" dominated activated sludge has enabled high mass-accuracy shotgun proteomics for identification of key metabolic pathways. Comprehensive genome-wide alignment of orthologous proteins suggests distinct partitioning of protein variants involved in both core-metabolism and specific metabolic pathways among the dominant population and closely related species. In addition, strain- resolved proteogenomic analysis of the AMD biofilms

  5. DEP domains: structurally similar but functionally different.

    PubMed

    Consonni, Sarah V; Maurice, Madelon M; Bos, Johannes L

    2014-05-01

    The Dishevelled, EGL-10 and pleckstrin (DEP) domain is a globular protein domain that is present in about ten human protein families with well-defined structural features. A picture is emerging that DEP domains mainly function in the spatial and temporal control of diverse signal transduction events by recruiting proteins to the plasma membrane. DEP domains can interact with various partners at the membrane, including phospholipids and membrane receptors, and their binding is subject to regulation.

  6. Structural and functional diversity of Topologically Associating Domains.

    PubMed

    Dekker, Job; Heard, Edith

    2015-10-07

    Recent studies have shown that chromosomes in a range of organisms are compartmentalized in different types of chromatin domains. In mammals, chromosomes form compartments that are composed of smaller Topologically Associating Domains (TADs). TADs are thought to represent functional domains of gene regulation but much is still unknown about the mechanisms of their formation and how they exert their regulatory effect on embedded genes. Further, similar domains have been detected in other organisms, including flies, worms, fungi and bacteria. Although in all these cases these domains appear similar as detected by 3C-based methods, their biology appears to be quite distinct with differences in the protein complexes involved in their formation and differences in their internal organization. Here we outline our current understanding of such domains in different organisms and their roles in gene regulation.

  7. Epigenetic and genetic deregulation in cancer target distinct signaling pathway domains

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yang; Teschendorff, Andrew E.

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is characterized by both genetic and epigenetic alterations. While cancer driver mutations and copy-number alterations have been studied at a systems-level, relatively little is known about the systems-level patterns exhibited by their epigenetic counterparts. Here we perform a pan-cancer wide systems-level analysis, mapping candidate cancer-driver DNA methylation (DNAm) alterations onto a human interactome. We demonstrate that functional DNAm alterations in cancer tend to map to nodes of lower connectivity and inter-connectivity, compared to the corresponding alterations at the genomic level. We find that epigenetic alterations are relatively over-represented in extracellular and transmembrane signaling domains, whereas cancer genes undergoing amplification or deletion tend to be enriched within the intracellular domain. A pan-cancer wide meta-analysis identifies WNT and chemokine signaling, as two key pathways where epigenetic deregulation preferentially targets extracellular components. We further pinpoint specific chemokine ligands/receptors whose epigenetic deregulation associates with key epigenetic enzymes, representing potential targets for epigenetic therapy. Our results suggest that epigenetic deregulation in cancer not only targets tissue-specific transcription factors, but also modulates signaling within the extra-cellular domain, providing novel system-level insight into the potential distinctive role of genetic and epigenetic alterations in cancer. PMID:27899617

  8. Functions and Functional Domains of the GTPase Cdc42p

    PubMed Central

    Kozminski, Keith G.; Chen, Ann J.; Rodal, Avital A.; Drubin, David G.

    2000-01-01

    Cdc42p, a Rho family GTPase of the Ras superfamily, is a key regulator of cell polarity and morphogenesis in eukaryotes. Using 37 site-directed cdc42 mutants, we explored the functions and interactions of Cdc42p in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cytological and genetic analyses of these cdc42 mutants revealed novel and diverse phenotypes, showing that Cdc42p possesses at least two distinct essential functions and acts as a nodal point of cell polarity regulation in vivo. In addition, mapping the functional data for each cdc42 mutation onto a structural model of the protein revealed as functionally important a surface of Cdc42p that is distinct from the canonical protein-interacting domains (switch I, switch II, and the C terminus) identified previously in members of the Ras superfamily. This region overlaps with a region (α5-helix) recently predicted by structural models to be a specificity determinant for Cdc42p-protein interactions. PMID:10637312

  9. Structure and function of KH domains.

    PubMed

    Valverde, Roberto; Edwards, Laura; Regan, Lynne

    2008-06-01

    The hnRNP K homology (KH) domain was first identified in the protein human heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) 14 years ago. Since then, KH domains have been identified as nucleic acid recognition motifs in proteins that perform a wide range of cellular functions. KH domains bind RNA or ssDNA, and are found in proteins associated with transcriptional and translational regulation, along with other cellular processes. Several diseases, e.g. fragile X mental retardation syndrome and paraneoplastic disease, are associated with the loss of function of a particular KH domain. Here we discuss the progress made towards understanding both general and specific features of the molecular recognition of nucleic acids by KH domains. The typical binding surface of KH domains is a cleft that is versatile but that can typically accommodate only four unpaired bases. Van der Waals forces and hydrophobic interactions and, to a lesser extent, electrostatic interactions, contribute to the nucleic acid binding affinity. 'Augmented' KH domains or multiple copies of KH domains within a protein are two strategies that are used to achieve greater affinity and specificity of nucleic acid binding. Isolated KH domains have been seen to crystallize as monomers, dimers and tetramers, but no published data support the formation of noncovalent higher-order oligomers by KH domains in solution. Much attention has been given in the literature to a conserved hydrophobic residue (typically Ile or Leu) that is present in most KH domains. The interest derives from the observation that an individual with this Ile mutated to Asn, in the KH2 domain of fragile X mental retardation protein, exhibits a particularly severe form of the syndrome. The structural effects of this mutation in the fragile X mental retardation protein KH2 domain have recently been reported. We discuss the use of analogous point mutations at this position in other KH domains to dissect both structure and function.

  10. Structure and Function of KH Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Valverde, R.; Regan, E

    2008-01-01

    The hnRNP K homology (KH) domain was first identified in the protein human heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) 14 years ago. Since then, KH domains have been identified as nucleic acid recognition motifs in proteins that perform a wide range of cellular functions. KH domains bind RNA or ssDNA, and are found in proteins associated with transcriptional and translational regulation, along with other cellular processes. Several diseases, e.g. fragile X mental retardation syndrome and paraneoplastic disease, are associated with the loss of function of a particular KH domain. Here we discuss the progress made towards understanding both general and specific features of the molecular recognition of nucleic acids by KH domains. The typical binding surface of KH domains is a cleft that is versatile but that can typically accommodate only four unpaired bases. Van der Waals forces and hydrophobic interactions and, to a lesser extent, electrostatic interactions, contribute to the nucleic acid binding affinity. 'Augmented' KH domains or multiple copies of KH domains within a protein are two strategies that are used to achieve greater affinity and specificity of nucleic acid binding. Isolated KH domains have been seen to crystallize as monomers, dimers and tetramers, but no published data support the formation of noncovalent higher-order oligomers by KH domains in solution. Much attention has been given in the literature to a conserved hydrophobic residue (typically Ile or Leu) that is present in most KH domains. The interest derives from the observation that an individual with this Ile mutated to Asn, in the KH2 domain of fragile X mental retardation protein, exhibits a particularly severe form of the syndrome. The structural effects of this mutation in the fragile X mental retardation protein KH2 domain have recently been reported. We discuss the use of analogous point mutations at this position in other KH domains to dissect both structure and function.

  11. Functional innovation from changes in protein domains and their combinations.

    PubMed

    Lees, Jonathan G; Dawson, Natalie L; Sillitoe, Ian; Orengo, Christine A

    2016-06-01

    Domains are the functional building blocks of proteins. In this work we discuss how domains can contribute to the evolution of new functions. Domains themselves can evolve through various mechanisms, altering their intrinsic function. Domains can also facilitate functional innovations by combining with other domains to make novel proteins. We discuss the mechanisms by which domain and domain combinations support functional innovations. We highlight interesting examples where changes in domain combination promote changes at the domain level.

  12. Distinct functional domains in nesprin-1{alpha} and nesprin-2{beta} bind directly to emerin and both interactions are disrupted in X-linked Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, Matthew A.; Davies, John D.; Zhang Qiuping; Emerson, Lindsay J.; Hunt, James; Shanahan, Catherine M.; Ellis, Juliet A. . E-mail: juliet.ellis@kcl.ac.uk

    2007-08-01

    Emerin and specific isoforms of nesprin-1 and -2 are nuclear membrane proteins which are binding partners in multi-protein complexes spanning the nuclear envelope. We report here the characterisation of the residues both in emerin and in nesprin-1{alpha} and -2{beta} which are involved in their interaction and show that emerin requires nesprin-1 or -2 to retain it at the nuclear membrane. Using several protein-protein interaction methods, we show that residues 368 to 627 of nesprin-1{alpha} and residues 126 to 219 of nesprin-2{beta}, which show high homology to one another, both mediate binding to emerin residues 140-176. This region has previously been implicated in binding to F-actin, {beta}-catenin and lamin A/C suggesting that it is critical for emerin function. Confirmation that these protein domains interact in vivo was shown using GFP-dominant negative assays. Exogenous expression of either of these nesprin fragments in mouse myoblast C2C12 cells displaced endogenous emerin from the nuclear envelope and reduced the targeting of newly synthesised emerin. Furthermore, we are the first to report that emerin mutations which give rise to X-linked Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy, disrupt binding to both nesprin-1{alpha} and -2{beta} isoforms, further indicating a role of nesprins in the pathology of Emery-Dreifuss muscular dystrophy.

  13. Analysis of Exocyst Subunit EXO70 Family Reveals Distinct Membrane Polar Domains in Tobacco Pollen Tubes.

    PubMed

    Sekereš, Juraj; Pejchar, Přemysl; Šantrůček, Jiří; Vukašinović, Nemanja; Žárský, Viktor; Potocký, Martin

    2017-03-01

    The vesicle-tethering complex exocyst is one of the crucial cell polarity regulators. The EXO70 subunit is required for the targeting of the complex and is represented by many isoforms in angiosperm plant cells. This diversity could be partly responsible for the establishment and maintenance of membrane domains with different composition. To address this hypothesis, we employed the growing pollen tube, a well-established cell polarity model system, and performed large-scale expression, localization, and functional analysis of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) EXO70 isoforms. Various isoforms localized to different regions of the pollen tube plasma membrane, apical vesicle-rich inverted cone region, nucleus, and cytoplasm. The overexpression of major pollen-expressed EXO70 isoforms resulted in growth arrest and characteristic phenotypic deviations of tip swelling and apical invaginations. NtEXO70A1a and NtEXO70B1 occupied two distinct and mutually exclusive plasma membrane domains. Both isoforms partly colocalized with the exocyst subunit NtSEC3a at the plasma membrane, possibly forming different exocyst complex subpopulations. NtEXO70A1a localized to the small area previously characterized as the site of exocytosis in the tobacco pollen tube, while NtEXO70B1 surprisingly colocalized with the zone of clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Both NtEXO70A1a and NtEXO70B1 colocalized to different degrees with markers for the anionic signaling phospholipids phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and phosphatidic acid. In contrast, members of the EXO70 C class, which are specifically expressed in tip-growing cells, exhibited exocytosis-related functional effects in pollen tubes despite the absence of apparent plasma membrane localization. Taken together, our data support the existence of multiple membrane-trafficking domains regulated by different EXO70-containing exocyst complexes within a single cell. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Dystrophin colocalizes with beta-spectrin in distinct subsarcolemmal domains in mammalian skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Duchenne's muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by the absence or drastic decrease of the structural protein, dystrophin, and is characterized by sarcolemmal lesions in skeletal muscle due to the stress of contraction. Dystrophin has been localized to the sarcolemma, but its organization there is not known. We report immunofluorescence studies which show that dystrophin is concentrated, along with the major muscle isoform of beta-spectrin, in three distinct domains at the sarcolemma: in elements overlying both I bands and M lines, and in occasional strands running along the longitudinal axis of the myofiber. Vinculin, which has previously been found at the sarcolemma overlying the I bands and in longitudinal strands, was present in the same three structures as spectrin and dystrophin. Controls demonstrated that the labeling was intracellular. Comparison to labeling of the lipid bilayer and of the extracellular matrix showed that the labeling for spectrin and dystrophin is associated with the intact sarcolemma and is not a result of processing artifacts. Dystrophin is not required for this lattice- like organization, as similar domains containing spectrin but not dystrophin are present in muscle from the mdx mouse and from humans with Duchenne's muscular dystrophy. We discuss the possibility that dystrophin and spectrin, along with vinculin, may function to link the contractile apparatus to the sarcolemma of normal skeletal muscle. PMID:1577872

  15. Functional divergence in the Arabidopsis LOB-domain gene family

    PubMed Central

    Mangeon, Amanda; Lin, Wan-ching; Springer, Patricia S.

    2012-01-01

    The Arabidopsis LOB-domain (LBD) gene family is composed by 43 members divided in two classes based on amino acid conservation within the LOB-domain. The LOB domain is known to be responsible for DNA binding and protein-protein interactions. There is very little functional information available for most genes in the LBD family and many lbd single mutants do not exhibit conspicuous phenotypes. One plausible explanation for the limited loss-of-function phenotypes observed in this family is that LBD genes exhibit significant functional redundancy. Here we discuss an example of one phylogenetic subgroup of the LBD family, in which genes that are closely related based on phylogeny exhibit distinctly different expression patterns and do not have overlapping functions. We discuss the challenges of using phylogenetic analyses to predict redundancy in gene families. PMID:23073009

  16. TIM-3 Regulates Distinct Functions in Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ocaña-Guzman, Ranferi; Torre-Bouscoulet, Luis; Sada-Ovalle, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    The transmembrane protein TIM-3 is a type I protein expressed by sub-types of lymphoid cells, such as lymphocytes Th1, Th17, Tc1, NK, as well as in myeloid cells. Scientific evidence indicates that this molecule acts as a negative regulator of T lymphocyte activation and that its expression is modified in viral infections or autoimmune diseases. In addition to evidence from lymphoid cells, the function of TIM-3 has been investigated in myeloid cells, such as monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells (DC), where studies have demonstrated that it can regulate cytokine production, cell activation, and the capture of apoptotic bodies. Despite these advances, the function of TIM-3 in myeloid cells and the molecular mechanisms that this protein regulates are not yet fully understood. This review examines the most recent evidence concerning the function of TIM-3 when expressed in myeloid cells, primarily macrophages, and the potential impact of that function on the field of basic immunology.

  17. J domain independent functions of J proteins.

    PubMed

    Ajit Tamadaddi, Chetana; Sahi, Chandan

    2016-07-01

    Heat shock proteins of 40 kDa (Hsp40s), also called J proteins, are obligate partners of Hsp70s. Via their highly conserved and functionally critical J domain, J proteins interact and modulate the activity of their Hsp70 partners. Mutations in the critical residues in the J domain often result in the null phenotype for the J protein in question. However, as more J proteins have been characterized, it is becoming increasingly clear that a significant number of J proteins do not "completely" rely on their J domains to carry out their cellular functions, as previously thought. In some cases, regions outside the highly conserved J domain have become more important making the J domain dispensable for some, if not for all functions of a J protein. This has profound effects on the evolution of such J proteins. Here we present selected examples of J proteins that perform J domain independent functions and discuss this in the context of evolution of J proteins with dispensable J domains and J-like proteins in eukaryotes.

  18. TIM-3 Regulates Distinct Functions in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ocaña-Guzman, Ranferi; Torre-Bouscoulet, Luis; Sada-Ovalle, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    The transmembrane protein TIM-3 is a type I protein expressed by sub-types of lymphoid cells, such as lymphocytes Th1, Th17, Tc1, NK, as well as in myeloid cells. Scientific evidence indicates that this molecule acts as a negative regulator of T lymphocyte activation and that its expression is modified in viral infections or autoimmune diseases. In addition to evidence from lymphoid cells, the function of TIM-3 has been investigated in myeloid cells, such as monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells (DC), where studies have demonstrated that it can regulate cytokine production, cell activation, and the capture of apoptotic bodies. Despite these advances, the function of TIM-3 in myeloid cells and the molecular mechanisms that this protein regulates are not yet fully understood. This review examines the most recent evidence concerning the function of TIM-3 when expressed in myeloid cells, primarily macrophages, and the potential impact of that function on the field of basic immunology. PMID:27379093

  19. Temporal stability and representational distinctiveness: Key functions of orthographic working memory

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Vanessa; Fischer-Baum, Simon; Capasso, Rita; Miceli, Gabriele; Rapp, Brenda

    2012-01-01

    A primary goal of working memory research has been to understand the mechanisms that permit working memory systems to effectively maintain the identity and order of the elements held in memory for sufficient time as to allow for their selection and transfer to subsequent processing stages. Based on the performance of two individuals with acquired dysgraphia affecting orthographic WM (the graphemic buffer) we present evidence of two distinct and dissociable functions of orthographic WM. One function is responsible for maintaining the temporal stability of letters held in orthographic WM, while the other is responsible for maintaining their representational distinctiveness. The failure to maintain temporal stability and representational distinctiveness give rise, respectively, to decay and interference effects that manifest themselves in distinctive error patterns, including distinct serial position effects. The findings we report have implications beyond our understanding of orthographic WM, as the need to maintain temporal stability and representational distinctiveness in WM is common across cognitive domains. PMID:22248210

  20. Two structurally distinct domains of the nucleoporin Nup170 cooperate to tether a subset of nucleoporins to nuclear pores

    PubMed Central

    Flemming, Dirk; Sarges, Phillip; Stelter, Philipp; Hellwig, Andrea; Böttcher, Bettina

    2009-01-01

    How individual nucleoporins (Nups) perform their role in nuclear pore structure and function is largely unknown. In this study, we examined the structure of purified Nup170 to obtain clues about its function. We show that Nup170 adopts a crescent moon shape with two structurally distinct and separable domains, a β-propeller N terminus and an α-solenoid C terminus. To address the individual roles of each domain, we expressed these domains separately in yeast. Notably, overexpression of the Nup170 C domain was toxic in nup170Δ cells and caused accumulation of several Nups in cytoplasmic foci. Further experiments indicated that the C-terminal domain anchors Nup170 to nuclear pores, whereas the N-terminal domain functions to recruit or retain a subset of Nups, including Nup159, Nup188, and Pom34, at nuclear pores. We conclude that Nup170 performs its role as a structural adapter between cytoplasmically oriented Nups and the nuclear pore membrane. PMID:19414606

  1. The activation domain of a basic helix-loop-helix protein is masked by repressor interaction with domains distinct from that required for transcription regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Jayaraman, P S; Hirst, K; Goding, C R

    1994-01-01

    While there are many examples of protein-protein interactions modulating the DNA-binding activity of transcription factors, little is known of the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of the transcription activation function. Using a two-hybrid system we show here that transcription repression of the basic domain/helix-loop-helix factor PHO4 is mediated by complex formation with the PHO80 repressor. In contrast to other systems, such as inhibition of GAL4 by GAL80 or of p53 by MDM2, where repression is mediated by direct interaction at regions overlapping the transcription activation domain, interaction with PHO80 involves two regions of PHO4 distinct from those involved in transcription activation or DNA-binding and dimerization. The possibility that repression of PHO4 by PHO80 may represent a general mechanism of transcription control, including regulation of the cell-type-specific transcription activation domain of c-Jun, is discussed. Images PMID:8187772

  2. The structure of a conserved piezo channel domain reveals a topologically distinct β sandwich fold.

    PubMed

    Kamajaya, Aron; Kaiser, Jens T; Lee, Jonas; Reid, Michelle; Rees, Douglas C

    2014-10-07

    Piezo has recently been identified as a family of eukaryotic mechanosensitive channels composed of subunits containing over 2,000 amino acids, without recognizable sequence similarity to other channels. Here, we present the crystal structure of a large, conserved extramembrane domain located just before the last predicted transmembrane helix of C. elegans PIEZO, which adopts a topologically distinct β sandwich fold. The structure was also determined of a point mutation located on a conserved surface at the position equivalent to the human PIEZO1 mutation found in dehydrated hereditary stomatocytosis patients (M2225R). While the point mutation does not change the overall domain structure, it does alter the surface electrostatic potential that may perturb interactions with a yet-to-be-identified ligand or protein. The lack of structural similarity between this domain and any previously characterized fold, including those of eukaryotic and bacterial channels, highlights the distinctive nature of the Piezo family of eukaryotic mechanosensitive channels.

  3. The C2 Domains of Human Synaptotagmin 1 Have Distinct Mechanical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Fuson, Kerry L.; Ma, Liang; Sutton, R. Bryan; Oberhauser, Andres F.

    2009-01-01

    Synaptotagmin 1 (Syt1) is the Ca+2 receptor for fast, synchronous vesicle fusion in neurons. Because membrane fusion is an inherently mechanical, force-driven event, Syt1 must be able to adapt to the energetics of the fusion apparatus. Syt1 contains two C2 domains (C2A and C2B) that are homologous in sequence and three-dimensional in structure; yet, a number of observations have suggested that they have distinct biochemical and biological properties. In this study, we analyzed the mechanical stability of the C2A and C2B domains of human Syt1 using single-molecule atomic force microscopy. We found that stretching the C2AB domains of Syt1 resulted in two distinct unfolding force peaks. The larger force peak of ∼100 pN was identified as C2B and the second peak of ∼50 pN as C2A. Furthermore, a significant fraction of C2A domains unfolded through a low force intermediate that was not observed in C2B. We conclude that these domains have different mechanical properties. We hypothesize that a relatively small stretching force may be sufficient to deform the effector-binding regions of the C2A domain and modulate the affinity for soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF) attachment protein receptors (SNAREs), phospholipids, and Ca+2. PMID:19186144

  4. An introduction to recognizing functional domains.

    PubMed

    Stormo, Gary D

    2006-10-01

    This unit provides an overview of issues involved in domain recognition in protein and DNA sequences. It opens with a discussion of the two primary methods of domain representation, namely consensus sequences and alignment matrices (e.g., the log-odds matrix). The unit continues with a brief overview of some of the resources available for identifying functional domains in nucleotide sequences (e.g., TRANSFAC). In addition, it reviews databases such as Pfam, InterPro and Blocks, which are available for protein analysis.

  5. Two distinct functions for PI3-kinases in macropinocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Hoeller, Oliver; Bolourani, Parvin; Clark, Jonathan; Stephens, Len R.; Hawkins, Phillip T.; Weiner, Orion D.; Weeks, Gerald; Kay, Robert R.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Class-1 PI3-kinases are major regulators of the actin cytoskeleton, whose precise contributions to chemotaxis, phagocytosis and macropinocytosis remain unresolved. We used systematic genetic ablation to examine this question in growing Dictyostelium cells. Mass spectroscopy shows that a quintuple mutant lacking the entire genomic complement of class-1 PI3-kinases retains only 10% of wild-type PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 levels. Chemotaxis to folate and phagocytosis of bacteria proceed normally in the quintuple mutant but macropinocytosis is abolished. In this context PI3-kinases show specialized functions, only one of which is directly linked to gross PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 levels: macropinosomes originate in patches of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3, with associated F-actin-rich ruffles, both of which depend on PI3-kinase 1/2 (PI3K1/2) but not PI3K4, whereas conversion of ruffles into vesicles requires PI3K4. A biosensor derived from the Ras-binding domain of PI3K1 suggests that Ras is activated throughout vesicle formation. Binding assays show that RasG and RasS interact most strongly with PI3K1/2 and PI3K4, and single mutants of either Ras have severe macropinocytosis defects. Thus, the fundamental function of PI3-kinases in growing Dictyostelium cells is in macropinocytosis where they have two distinct functions, supported by at least two separate Ras proteins. PMID:23843627

  6. Embryonic domains of the aorta derived from diverse origins exhibit distinct properties that converge into a common phenotype in the adult.

    PubMed

    Pfaltzgraff, Elise R; Shelton, Elaine L; Galindo, Cristi L; Nelms, Brian L; Hooper, Christopher W; Poole, Stanley D; Labosky, Patricia A; Bader, David M; Reese, Jeff

    2014-04-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) are derived from distinct embryonic origins. Vessels originating from differing smooth muscle cell populations have distinct vascular and pathological properties involving calcification, atherosclerosis, and structural defects such as aneurysm and coarctation. We hypothesized that domains within a single vessel, such as the aorta, vary in phenotype based on embryonic origin. Gene profiling and myographic analyses demonstrated that embryonic ascending and descending aortic domains exhibited distinct phenotypes. In vitro analyses demonstrated that VSMCs from each region were dissimilar in terms of cytoskeletal and migratory properties, and retention of different gene expression patterns. Using the same analysis, we found that these same two domains are indistinguishable in the adult vessel. Our data demonstrate that VSMCs from different embryonic origins are functionally distinct in the embryonic mouse, but converge to assume a common phenotype in the aorta of healthy adults. These findings have fundamental implications for aortic development, function and disease progression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Association of astrocytes with neurons and astrocytes derived from distinct progenitor domains in the subpallium

    PubMed Central

    Torigoe, Makio; Yamauchi, Kenta; Zhu, Yan; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Murakami, Fujio

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes play pivotal roles in metabolism and homeostasis as well as in neural development and function in a manner thought to depend on their region-specific diversity. In the mouse spinal cord, astrocytes and neurons, which are derived from a common progenitor domain (PD) and controlled by common PD-specific transcription factors, migrate radially and share their final positions. However, whether astrocytes can only interact with neurons from common PDs in the brain remains unknown. Here, we focused on subpallium-derived cells, because the subpallium generates neurons that show a diverse mode of migration. We tracked their fate by in utero electroporation of plasmids that allow for chromosomal integration of transgenes or of a Cre recombinase expression vector to reporter mice. We also used an Nkx2.1Cre mouse line to fate map the cells originating from the medial ganglionic eminence and preoptic area. We find that although neurons and astrocytes are labeled in various regions, only neurons are labeled in the neocortex, hippocampus and olfactory bulb. Furthermore, we find astrocytes derived from an Nkx 2.1-negative PD are associated with neurons from the Nkx2.1+ PD. Thus, forebrain astrocytes can associate with neurons as well as astrocytes derived from a distinct PD. PMID:26193445

  8. Conserved interaction between distinct Krüppel-associated box domains and the transcriptional intermediary factor 1 β

    PubMed Central

    Abrink, Magnus; Ortiz, José A.; Mark, Charlotta; Sanchez, Cecilia; Looman, Camilla; Hellman, Lars; Chambon, Pierre; Losson, Régine

    2001-01-01

    The Krüppel-associated box (KRAB) domain, originally identified as a 75-aa sequence present in numerous Krüppel-type zinc-finger proteins, is a potent DNA-binding-dependent transcriptional repression domain that is believed to function through interaction with the transcriptional intermediary factor 1 (TIF1) β. On the basis of sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis, we have recently defined three distinct subfamilies of KRAB domains. In the present study, individual members of each subfamily were tested for transcriptional repression and interaction with TIF1β and two other closely related family members (TIF1α and TIF1γ). All KRAB variants were shown, (i) to repress transcription when targeted to DNA through fusion to a heterologous DNA-binding domain in mammalian cells, and (ii) to interact specifically with TIF1β, but not with TIF1α or TIF1γ. Taken together, these results implicate TIF1β as a common transcriptional corepressor for the three distinct subfamilies of KRAB zinc-finger proteins and suggest a high degree of conservation in the molecular mechanism underlying their transcriptional repression activity. PMID:11171966

  9. Distinct Functional Modules for Discrete and Rhythmic Forelimb Movements in the Mouse Motor Cortex.

    PubMed

    Hira, Riichiro; Terada, Shin-Ichiro; Kondo, Masashi; Matsuzaki, Masanori

    2015-09-30

    Movements of animals are composed of two fundamental dynamics: discrete and rhythmic movements. Although the movements with distinct dynamics are thought to be differently processed in the CNS, it is unclear how they are represented in the cerebral cortex. Here, we investigated the cortical representation of movement dynamics by developing prolonged transcranial optogenetic stimulation (pTOS) using awake, channelrhodopsin-2 transgenic mice. We found two domains that induced discrete forelimb movements in the forward and backward directions, and these sandwiched a domain that generated rhythmic forelimb movements. The forward discrete movement had an intrinsic velocity profile and the rhythmic movement had an intrinsic oscillation frequency. Each of the forward discrete and rhythmic domains possessed intracortical synaptic connections within its own domain, independently projected to the spinal cord, and weakened the neuronal activity and movement induction of the other domain. pTOS-induced movements were also classified as ethologically relevant movements. Forepaw-to-mouth movement was mapped in a part of the forward discrete domain, while locomotion-like movement was in a part of the rhythmic domain. Interestingly, photostimulation of the rhythmic domain resulted in a nonrhythmic, continuous lever-pull movement when a lever was present. The motor cortex possesses functional modules for distinct movement dynamics, and these can adapt to environmental constraints for purposeful movements. Significance statement: Animal behavior has discrete and rhythmic components, such as reaching and locomotion. It is unclear how these movements with distinct dynamics are represented in the cerebral cortex. We investigated the dynamics of movements induced by long-duration transcranial photostimulation on the dorsal cortex of awake channelrhodopsin-2 transgenic mice. We found two domains causing forward and backward discrete forelimb movements and a domain for rhythmic forelimb

  10. Distinct cytoplasmic domains in Plexin-A4 mediate diverse responses to semaphorin 3A in developing mammalian neurons.

    PubMed

    Mlechkovich, Guy; Peng, Sheng-Shiang; Shacham, Vered; Martinez, Edward; Gokhman, Irena; Minis, Adi; Tran, Tracy S; Yaron, Avraham

    2014-03-11

    Guidance receptor signaling is crucial for neural circuit formation and elicits diverse cellular events in specific neurons. We found that signaling from the guidance cue semaphorin 3A diverged through distinct cytoplasmic domains in its receptor Plexin-A4 to promote disparate cellular behavior in different neuronal cell types. Plexin-A4 has three main cytoplasmic domains--C1, Hinge/RBD, and C2--and interacts with family members of the Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor FARP proteins. We show that growth cone collapse occurred in Plexin-A4-deficient dorsal root ganglion sensory neurons reconstituted with Plexin-A4 containing either the Hinge/RBD or C2 domain, whereas both of the Hinge/RBD and C1 domains were required for dendritic arborization in cortical neurons. Although knockdown studies indicated that both the collapse and arborization responses involved FARP2, mutations in the cytoplasmic region of Plexin-A4 that reduced its interaction with FARP2 strongly inhibited semaphorin 3A-induced dendritic branching but not growth cone collapse, suggesting that different degrees of interaction are required for the two responses or that developing axons have an indirect path to FARP2 activation. Thus, our study provided insights into the multifunctionality of guidance receptors, in particular showing that the semaphorin 3A signal diverges through specific functions of the modular domains of Plexin-A4.

  11. CDD/SPARCLE: functional classification of proteins via subfamily domain architectures.

    PubMed

    Marchler-Bauer, Aron; Bo, Yu; Han, Lianyi; He, Jane; Lanczycki, Christopher J; Lu, Shennan; Chitsaz, Farideh; Derbyshire, Myra K; Geer, Renata C; Gonzales, Noreen R; Gwadz, Marc; Hurwitz, David I; Lu, Fu; Marchler, Gabriele H; Song, James S; Thanki, Narmada; Wang, Zhouxi; Yamashita, Roxanne A; Zhang, Dachuan; Zheng, Chanjuan; Geer, Lewis Y; Bryant, Stephen H

    2017-01-04

    NCBI's Conserved Domain Database (CDD) aims at annotating biomolecular sequences with the location of evolutionarily conserved protein domain footprints, and functional sites inferred from such footprints. An archive of pre-computed domain annotation is maintained for proteins tracked by NCBI's Entrez database, and live search services are offered as well. CDD curation staff supplements a comprehensive collection of protein domain and protein family models, which have been imported from external providers, with representations of selected domain families that are curated in-house and organized into hierarchical classifications of functionally distinct families and sub-families. CDD also supports comparative analyses of protein families via conserved domain architectures, and a recent curation effort focuses on providing functional characterizations of distinct subfamily architectures using SPARCLE: Subfamily Protein Architecture Labeling Engine. CDD can be accessed at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Structure/cdd/cdd.shtml.

  12. Individual domains of Tensin2 exhibit distinct subcellular localisations and migratory effects.

    PubMed

    Hafizi, Sassan; Sernstad, Emma; Swinny, Jerome D; Gomez, Maria F; Dahlbäck, Björn

    2010-01-01

    Tensins are large intracellular proteins believed to link the extracellular matrix to the cytoskeleton via integrins. Tensins are multidomain proteins consisting of homologous C1, PTPase, C2, SH2 and PTB domains. Full-length Tensin proteins can undergo cleavage inside cells, thus yielding domains in isolation that may have discrete subcellular localisations and downstream effects. We expressed different isoforms of Tensin2 and their individual domains as recombinant green fluorescent protein (GFP)-fusion constructs in DU145 human prostate cancer cells. Under fluorescence confocal microscopy, the isolated domains of Tensin2 all displayed discrete distributions throughout the cytoplasm and the nucleus. In particular, partial constructs containing the C1 domain localised preferentially to the nucleus, including the isolated C1 domain and the PTPase domain. In contrast, all three full-length isoforms of Tensin2 were present exclusively in discrete punctate bodies throughout the cytoplasm. This punctate staining showed colocalisation with the tumour suppressor protein DLC-1 as well as with actin (phalloidin). Furthermore, DU145 cells transiently expressing partial Tensin2 constructs containing the PTB domain showed an increased haptotactic migration. In addition, stimulation of renal carcinoma cells stably expressing Tensin2 by the survival factor Gas6 caused phosphorylation of its receptor Axl, but no effect on Tensin2, which was already maximally phosphorylated at time 0. In conclusion, our results indicate that differential proteolytic cleavage of Tensin2 can liberate domains with discrete localisations and functions, which has implications for the role of Tensins in cancer cell survival and motility.

  13. Microdissection of Shoot Meristem Functional Domains

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaolan; Ohtsu, Kazuhiro; Zhou, Ruilian; Sarkar, Ananda; Hargreaves, Sarah; Elshire, Robert J.; Eudy, Douglas; Pawlowska, Teresa; Ware, Doreen; Janick-Buckner, Diane; Buckner, Brent; Timmermans, Marja C. P.; Schnable, Patrick S.; Nettleton, Dan; Scanlon, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    The shoot apical meristem (SAM) maintains a pool of indeterminate cells within the SAM proper, while lateral organs are initiated from the SAM periphery. Laser microdissection–microarray technology was used to compare transcriptional profiles within these SAM domains to identify novel maize genes that function during leaf development. Nine hundred and sixty-two differentially expressed maize genes were detected; control genes known to be upregulated in the initiating leaf (P0/P1) or in the SAM proper verified the precision of the microdissections. Genes involved in cell division/growth, cell wall biosynthesis, chromatin remodeling, RNA binding, and translation are especially upregulated in initiating leaves, whereas genes functioning during protein fate and DNA repair are more abundant in the SAM proper. In situ hybridization analyses confirmed the expression patterns of six previously uncharacterized maize genes upregulated in the P0/P1. P0/P1-upregulated genes that were also shown to be downregulated in leaf-arrested shoots treated with an auxin transport inhibitor are especially implicated to function during early events in maize leaf initiation. Reverse genetic analyses of asceapen1 (asc1), a maize D4-cyclin gene upregulated in the P0/P1, revealed novel leaf phenotypes, less genetic redundancy, and expanded D4-CYCLIN function during maize shoot development as compared to Arabidopsis. These analyses generated a unique SAM domain-specific database that provides new insight into SAM function and a useful platform for reverse genetic analyses of shoot development in maize. PMID:19424435

  14. Microdissection of shoot meristem functional domains.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Lionel; Strable, Josh; Zhang, Xiaolan; Ohtsu, Kazuhiro; Zhou, Ruilian; Sarkar, Ananda; Hargreaves, Sarah; Elshire, Robert J; Eudy, Douglas; Pawlowska, Teresa; Ware, Doreen; Janick-Buckner, Diane; Buckner, Brent; Timmermans, Marja C P; Schnable, Patrick S; Nettleton, Dan; Scanlon, Michael J

    2009-05-01

    The shoot apical meristem (SAM) maintains a pool of indeterminate cells within the SAM proper, while lateral organs are initiated from the SAM periphery. Laser microdissection-microarray technology was used to compare transcriptional profiles within these SAM domains to identify novel maize genes that function during leaf development. Nine hundred and sixty-two differentially expressed maize genes were detected; control genes known to be upregulated in the initiating leaf (P0/P1) or in the SAM proper verified the precision of the microdissections. Genes involved in cell division/growth, cell wall biosynthesis, chromatin remodeling, RNA binding, and translation are especially upregulated in initiating leaves, whereas genes functioning during protein fate and DNA repair are more abundant in the SAM proper. In situ hybridization analyses confirmed the expression patterns of six previously uncharacterized maize genes upregulated in the P0/P1. P0/P1-upregulated genes that were also shown to be downregulated in leaf-arrested shoots treated with an auxin transport inhibitor are especially implicated to function during early events in maize leaf initiation. Reverse genetic analyses of asceapen1 (asc1), a maize D4-cyclin gene upregulated in the P0/P1, revealed novel leaf phenotypes, less genetic redundancy, and expanded D4-CYCLIN function during maize shoot development as compared to Arabidopsis. These analyses generated a unique SAM domain-specific database that provides new insight into SAM function and a useful platform for reverse genetic analyses of shoot development in maize.

  15. Isolation and characterization of distinct domains of sarcolemma and T-tubules from rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, P; Rosemblatt, M; Testar, X; Palacín, M; Zorzano, A

    1995-01-01

    1. Several cell-surface domains of sarcolemma and T-tubule from skeletal-muscle fibre were isolated and characterized. 2. A protocol of subcellular fractionation was set up that involved the sequential low- and high-speed homogenization of rat skeletal muscle followed by KCl washing, Ca2+ loading and sucrose-density-gradient centrifugation. This protocol led to the separation of cell-surface membranes from membranes enriched in sarcoplasmic reticulum and intracellular GLUT4-containing vesicles. 3. Agglutination of cell-surface membranes using wheat-germ agglutinin allowed the isolation of three distinct cell-surface membrane domains: sarcolemmal fraction 1 (SM1), sarcolemmal fraction 2 (SM2) and a T-tubule fraction enriched in protein tt28 and the alpha 2-component of dihydropyridine receptor. 4. Fractions SM1 and SM2 represented distinct sarcolemmal subcompartments based on different compositions of biochemical markers: SM2 was characterized by high levels of beta 1-integrin and dystrophin, and SM1 was enriched in beta 1-integrin but lacked dystrophin. 5. The caveolae-associated molecule caveolin was very abundant in SM1, SM2 and T-tubules, suggesting the presence of caveolae or caveolin-rich domains in these cell-surface membrane domains. In contrast, clathrin heavy chain was abundant in SM1 and T-tubules, but only trace levels were detected in SM2. 6. Immunoadsorption of T-tubule vesicles with antibodies against protein tt28 and against GLUT4 revealed the presence of GLUT4 in T-tubules under basal conditions and it also allowed the identification of two distinct pools of T-tubules showing different contents of tt28 and dihydropyridine receptors. 7. Our data on distribution of clathrin and dystrophin reveal the existence of subcompartments in sarcolemma from muscle fibre, featuring selective mutually exclusive components. T-tubules contain caveolin and clathrin suggesting that they contain caveolin- and clathrin-rich domains. Furthermore, evidence for the

  16. Distinctive Pattern of Behavioral Functioning in Angelman Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summers, Jane A.; Feldman, Maurice A.

    1999-01-01

    A study compared 27 participants with Angelman syndrome to clinical and community participants (n=948) with developmental disabilities of mixed etiology to determine whether Angelman syndrome is associated with a distinctive patterns of behavioral functioning. Those with Angelman syndrome had significantly lower scores on measures of irritability…

  17. The axon degeneration gene SARM1 is evolutionarily distinct from other TIR domain-containing proteins.

    PubMed

    Malapati, Harsha; Millen, Spencer M; J Buchser, William

    2017-08-01

    Many forms of neurodegenerative disease are characterized by Wallerian degeneration, an active program of axonal destruction. Recently, the important player which enacts Wallerian degeneration was discovered, the multidomain protein SARM1. Since the SARM1 protein has classically been thought of as an innate immune molecule, its role in Wallerian degeneration has raised questions on the evolutionary forces acting on it. Here, we synthesize a picture of SARM1's evolution through various organisms by examining the molecular and genetic changes of SARM1 and the genes around it. Using proteins that possess domains homologous to SARM1, we established distances and Ka/Ks values through 5671 pairwise species-species comparisons. We demonstrate that SARM1 diverged across species in a pattern similar to other SAM domain-containing proteins. This is surprising, because it was expected that SARM1 would behave more like its TIR domain relatives. Going along with this divorce from TIR, we also noted that SARM1's TIR is under stronger purifying selection than the rest of the TIR domain-containing proteins (remaining highly conserved). In addition, SARM1's synteny analysis reveals that the surrounding gene cluster is highly conserved, functioning as a potential nexus of gene functionality across species. Taken together, SARM1 demonstrates a unique evolutionary pattern, separate from the TIR domain protein family.

  18. Catalytic and substrate promiscuity: distinct multiple chemistries catalysed by the phosphatase domain of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Bharath; Marks, Hanna; Mitra, Sreyoshi; Smalley, David M; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2016-07-15

    The presence of latent activities in enzymes is posited to underlie the natural evolution of new catalytic functions. However, the prevalence and extent of such substrate and catalytic ambiguity in evolved enzymes is difficult to address experimentally given the order-of-magnitude difference in the activities for native and, sometimes, promiscuous substrate/s. Further, such latent functions are of special interest when the activities concerned do not fall into the domain of substrate promiscuity. In the present study, we show a special case of such latent enzyme activity by demonstrating the presence of two mechanistically distinct reactions catalysed by the catalytic domain of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase isoform δ (PTPRδ). The primary catalytic activity involves the hydrolysis of a phosphomonoester bond (C─O─P) with high catalytic efficiency, whereas the secondary activity is the hydrolysis of a glycosidic bond (C─O─C) with poorer catalytic efficiency. This enzyme also displays substrate promiscuity by hydrolysing diester bonds while being highly discriminative for its monoester substrates. To confirm these activities, we also demonstrated their presence on the catalytic domain of protein tyrosine phosphatase Ω (PTPRΩ), a homologue of PTPRδ. Studies on the rate, metal-ion dependence, pH dependence and inhibition of the respective activities showed that they are markedly different. This is the first study that demonstrates a novel sugar hydrolase and diesterase activity for the phosphatase domain (PD) of PTPRδ and PTPRΩ. This work has significant implications for both understanding the evolution of enzymatic activity and the possible physiological role of this new chemistry. Our findings suggest that the genome might harbour a wealth of such alternative latent enzyme activities in the same protein domain that renders our knowledge of metabolic networks incomplete. © 2016 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the

  19. Catalytic and substrate promiscuity: Distinct multiple chemistries catalyzed by the phosphatase domain of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Bharath; Marks, Hanna; Mitra, Sreyoshi; Smalley, David M.; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    The presence of latent activities in enzymes is posited to underlie the natural evolution of new catalytic functions. However, the prevalence and extent of such substrate and catalytic ambiguity in evolved enzymes is difficult to address experimentally given the order-of-magnitude difference in the activities for native and, sometimes, promiscuous substrate/s. Further, such latent functions are of special interest when the activities concerned do not fall into the domain of substrate promiscuity. Here, we show a special case of such latent enzyme activity by demonstrating the presence of two mechanistically distinct reactions catalyzed by the catalytic domain of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase isoform delta (PTPRδ). The primary catalytic activity involves the hydrolysis of a phosphomonoester bond (C-O-P) with high catalytic efficiency, while the secondary activity is the hydrolysis of a glycosidic bond (C-O-C) with poorer catalytic efficiency. This enzyme also displays substrate promiscuity by hydrolyzing diester bonds while being highly discriminative for its monoester substrates. To confirm these activities, we also demonstrated their presence on the catalytic domain of PTPRΩ, a homologue of PTPRδ. Studies on the rate, metal-ion dependence, pH dependence and inhibition of the respective activities showed that they are markedly different. This is the first study that demonstrates a novel sugar hydrolase and diesterase activity for the phosphatase domain of PTPRδ and PTPRΩ. This work has significant implications for both understanding the evolution of enzymatic activity and the possible physiological role of this new chemistry. Our findings suggest that the genome might harbor a wealth of such alternative latent enzyme activities in the same protein domain that renders our knowledge of metabolic networks incomplete. PMID:27208174

  20. Two distinct forms of functional lateralization in the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Gotts, Stephen J.; Jo, Hang Joon; Wallace, Gregory L.; Saad, Ziad S.; Cox, Robert W.; Martin, Alex

    2013-01-01

    The hemispheric lateralization of certain faculties in the human brain has long been held to be beneficial for functioning. However, quantitative relationships between the degree of lateralization in particular brain regions and the level of functioning have yet to be established. Here we demonstrate that two distinct forms of functional lateralization are present in the left vs. the right cerebral hemisphere, with the left hemisphere showing a preference to interact more exclusively with itself, particularly for cortical regions involved in language and fine motor coordination. In contrast, right-hemisphere cortical regions involved in visuospatial and attentional processing interact in a more integrative fashion with both hemispheres. The degree of lateralization present in these distinct systems selectively predicted behavioral measures of verbal and visuospatial ability, providing direct evidence that lateralization is associated with enhanced cognitive ability. PMID:23959883

  1. Discoidin domain receptor functions in physiological and pathological conditions

    PubMed Central

    Leitinger, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    The discoidin domain receptors, DDR1 and DDR2, are non-integrin collagen receptors that are members of the receptor tyrosine kinase family. Both DDRs bind a number of different collagen types and play important roles in embryo development. Dysregulated DDR function is associated with progression of various human diseases, including fibrosis, arthritis and cancer. By interacting with key components of the extracellular matrix and displaying distinct activation kinetics, the DDRs form a unique subfamily of receptor tyrosine kinases. DDR-facilitated cellular functions include cell migration, cell survival, proliferation and differentiation, as well as remodelling of extracellular matrices. This review summarises the current knowledge of DDR-ligand interactions, DDR-initiated signal pathways and the molecular mechanisms that regulate receptor function. Also discussed are the roles of DDRs in development and disease progression. PMID:24725424

  2. Different Functions of Phylogenetically Distinct Bacterial Complex I Isozymes

    PubMed Central

    Spero, Melanie A.; Brickner, Joshua R.; Mollet, Jordan T.; Pisithkul, Tippapha; Amador-Noguez, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (complex I) is a bioenergetic enzyme that transfers electrons from NADH to quinone, conserving the energy of this reaction by contributing to the proton motive force. While the importance of NADH oxidation to mitochondrial aerobic respiration is well documented, the contribution of complex I to bacterial electron transport chains has been tested in only a few species. Here, we analyze the function of two phylogenetically distinct complex I isozymes in Rhodobacter sphaeroides, an alphaproteobacterium that contains well-characterized electron transport chains. We found that R. sphaeroides complex I activity is important for aerobic respiration and required for anaerobic dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) respiration (in the absence of light), photoautotrophic growth, and photoheterotrophic growth (in the absence of an external electron acceptor). Our data also provide insight into the functions of the phylogenetically distinct R. sphaeroides complex I enzymes (complex IA and complex IE) in maintaining a cellular redox state during photoheterotrophic growth. We propose that the function of each isozyme during photoheterotrophic growth is either NADH synthesis (complex IA) or NADH oxidation (complex IE). The canonical alphaproteobacterial complex I isozyme (complex IA) was also shown to be important for routing electrons to nitrogenase-mediated H2 production, while the horizontally acquired enzyme (complex IE) was dispensable in this process. Unlike the singular role of complex I in mitochondria, we predict that the phylogenetically distinct complex I enzymes found across bacterial species have evolved to enhance the functions of their respective electron transport chains. IMPORTANCE Cells use a proton motive force (PMF), NADH, and ATP to support numerous processes. In mitochondria, complex I uses NADH oxidation to generate a PMF, which can drive ATP synthesis. This study analyzed the function of complex I in bacteria, which contain more

  3. Human fibronectin contains distinct adhesion- and motility-promoting domains for metastatic melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    The active migration of tumor cells through extracellular matrices has been proposed to play a role in certain aspects of metastasis. Metastatic tumor cells migrate in vitro in response to substratum-bound adhesive glycoproteins such as fibronectin. The present studies use affinity-purified proteolytic fragments of fibronectin to determine the nature of adhesion- and/or motility-promoting domains within the protein. Two distinct fragments were identified with cell adhesion- promoting activities. By a number of criteria, the adhesive activity promoted by these two fragments was distinct. One fragment, a 75-kD tryptic fragment purified by monoclonal antibody chromatography, promoted the adhesion, spreading, and haptotactic motility of melanoma cells. Experiments using a synthetic cell attachment peptide in solution indicated that at least part of the attachment activity exhibited by the 75-kD fragment is mediated by the sequence arg-gly-asp- ser. It was not possible to demonstrate migration-stimulating activity using a small (11.5 kD) peptic fragment containing this sequence (Pierschbacher, M.D., E. G. Hayman, and E. Ruoslahti, 1981, Cell, 26:259-267) suggesting that another cell-binding activity within the 75 kD fragment distinct from arg-gly-asp-ser might be required for motility. The second fragment that stimulated melanoma adhesion was a 33-kD tryptic/catheptic carboxyl-terminal heparin-binding fragment, which is localized to the A chain of fibronectin. This fragment promotes adhesion and spreading but not the motility of these cells. Melanoma adhesion to this heparin-binding fragment was sensitive to the effects of cycloheximide, which contrasted adhesion to the haptotaxis- promoting fragment. Importantly, these studies illustrate that haptotaxis in response to fibronectin is not due to simple adhesion gradients of this protein. The results are discussed in light of a model for multiple distinct cell surface constituents mediating cell adhesion and motility on

  4. Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and Mycoplasma flocculare differential domains from orthologous surface proteins induce distinct cellular immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Leal, Fernanda Munhoz Dos Anjos; Virginio, Veridiana Gomes; Martello, Carolina Lumertz; Paes, Jéssica Andrade; Borges, Thiago J; Jaeger, Natália; Bonorino, Cristina; Ferreira, Henrique Bunselmeyer

    2016-07-15

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and Mycoplasma flocculare are two genetically close species found in the swine respiratory tract. Despite their similarities, while M. hyopneumoniae is the causative agent of porcine enzootic pneumonia, M. flocculare is a commensal bacterium. Genomic and transcriptional comparative analyses so far failed to explain the difference in pathogenicity between these two species. We then hypothesized that such difference might be, at least in part, explained by amino acid sequence and immunological or functional differences between ortholog surface proteins. In line with that, it was verified that approximately 85% of the ortholog surface proteins from M. hyopneumoniae 7448 and M. flocculare present one or more differential domains. To experimentally assess possible immunological implications of this kind of difference, the extracellular differential domains from one pair of orthologous surface proteins (MHP7448_0612, from M. hyopneumoniae, and MF_00357, from M. flocculare) were expressed in E. coli and used to immunize mice. The recombinant polypeptides (rMHP61267-169 and rMF35767-196, respectively) induced distinct cellular immune responses. While, rMHP61267-169 induced both Th1 and Th2 responses, rMF35767-196 induced just an early pro-inflammatory response. These results indicate that immunological properties determined by differential domains in orthologous surface protein might play a role in pathogenicity, contributing to elicit specific and differential immune responses against each species.

  5. A distinct switch in interactions of the histone H4 tail domain upon salt-dependent folding of nucleosome arrays.

    PubMed

    Pepenella, Sharon; Murphy, Kevin J; Hayes, Jeffrey J

    2014-09-26

    The core histone tail domains mediate inter-nucleosomal interactions that direct folding and condensation of nucleosome arrays into higher-order chromatin structures. The histone H4 tail domain facilitates inter-array interactions by contacting both the H2A/H2B acidic patch and DNA of neighboring nucleosomes. Likewise, H4 tail-H2A contacts stabilize array folding. However, whether the H4 tail domains stabilize array folding via inter-nucleosomal interactions with the DNA of neighboring nucleosomes remains unclear. We utilized defined oligonucleosome arrays containing a single specialized nucleosome with a photo-inducible cross-linker in the N terminus of the H4 tail to characterize these interactions. We observed that the H4 tail participates exclusively in intra-array interactions with DNA in unfolded arrays. These interactions are diminished during array folding, yet no inter-nucleosome, intra-array H4 tail-DNA contacts are observed in condensed chromatin. However, we document contacts between the N terminus of the H4 tail and H2A. Installation of acetylation mimics known to disrupt H4-H2A surface interactions did not increase observance of H4-DNA inter-nucleosomal interactions. These results suggest the multiple functions of the H4 tail require targeted distinct interactions within condensed chromatin.

  6. The two distinctive metal ion binding domains of the wheat metallothionein Ec-1.

    PubMed

    Peroza, Estevão A; Kaabi, Ali Al; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Wellenreuther, Gerd; Freisinger, Eva

    2009-03-01

    Metallothioneins are small cysteine-rich proteins believed to play a role, among others, in the homeostasis of essential metal ions such as Zn(II) and Cu(I). Recently, we could show that wheat E(c)-1 is coordinating its six Zn(II) ions in form of metal-thiolate clusters analogously to the vertebrate metallothioneins. Specifically, two Zn(II) ions are bound in the N-terminal and four in the C-terminal domain. In the following, we will present evidence for the relative independence of the two domains from each other with respect to their metal ion binding abilities, and uncover three intriguing peculiarities of the protein. Firstly, one Zn(II) ion of the N-terminal domain is relative resistant to complete replacement with Cd(II) indicating the presence of a Zn(II)-binding site with increased stability. Secondly, the C-terminal domain is able to coordinate an additional fifth metal ion, though with reduced affinity, which went undetected so far. Finally, reconstitution of apoE(c)-1 with an excess of Zn(II) shows a certain amount of sub-stoichiometrically metal-loaded species. The possible relevance of these finding for the proposed biological functions of wheat E(c)-1 will be discussed. In addition, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements on both, the full-length and the truncated protein, provide final evidence for His participation in metal ion binding.

  7. Hox genes define distinct progenitor sub-domains within the second heart field.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Nicolas; Roux, Marine; Ryckebüsch, Lucile; Niederreither, Karen; Dollé, Pascal; Moon, Anne; Capecchi, Mario; Zaffran, Stéphane

    2011-05-15

    Much of the heart, including the atria, right ventricle and outflow tract (OFT) is derived from a progenitor cell population termed the second heart field (SHF) that contributes progressively to the embryonic heart during cardiac looping. Several studies have revealed anterior-posterior patterning of the SHF, since the anterior region (anterior heart field) contributes to right ventricular and OFT myocardium whereas the posterior region gives rise to the atria. We have previously shown that Retinoic Acid (RA) signal participates to this patterning. We now show that Hoxb1, Hoxa1, and Hoxa3, as downstream RA targets, are expressed in distinct sub-domains within the SHF. Our genetic lineage tracing analysis revealed that Hoxb1, Hoxa1 and Hoxa3-expressing cardiac progenitor cells contribute to both atria and the inferior wall of the OFT, which subsequently gives rise to myocardium at the base of pulmonary trunk. By contrast to Hoxb1(Cre), the contribution of Hoxa1-enhIII-Cre and Hoxa3(Cre)-labeled cells is restricted to the distal regions of the OFT suggesting that proximo-distal patterning of the OFT is related to SHF sub-domains characterized by combinatorial Hox genes expression. Manipulation of RA signaling pathways showed that RA is required for the correct deployment of Hox-expressing SHF cells. This report provides new insights into the regulatory gene network in SHF cells contributing to the atria and sub-pulmonary myocardium.

  8. Hox genes define distinct progenitor sub-domains within the second heart field

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, Nicolas; Roux, Marine; Ryckebüsch, Lucile; Niederreither, Karen; Dollé, Pascal; Moon, Anne; Capecchi, Mario; Zaffran, Stéphane

    2011-01-01

    Much of the heart, including the atria, right ventricle and outflow tract (OFT) is derived from a progenitor cell population termed the second heart field (SHF) that contributes progressively to the embryonic heart during cardiac looping. Several studies have revealed anterior-posterior patterning of the SHF, since the anterior region (anterior heart field) contributes to right ventricular and OFT myocardium whereas the posterior region gives rise to the atria. We have previously shown that Retinoic Acid (RA) signal participates to this patterning. We now show that Hoxb1, Hoxa1, and Hoxa3, as downstream RA targets, are expressed in distinct sub-domains within the SHF. Our genetic lineage tracing analysis revealed that Hoxb1, Hoxa1 and Hoxa3-expressing cardiac progenitor cells contribute to both atria and the inferior wall of the OFT, which subsequently gives rise to myocardium at the base of pulmonary trunk. By contrast to Hoxb1Cre, the contribution of Hoxa1-enhIII-Cre and Hoxa3Cre-labeled cells is restricted to the distal regions of the OFT suggesting that proximo-distal patterning of the OFT is related to SHF sub-domains characterized by combinatorial Hox genes expression. Manipulation of RA signaling pathways showed that RA is required for the correct deployment of Hox-expressing SHF cells. This report provides new insights into the regulatory gene network in SHF cells contributing to the atria and sub-pulmonary myocardium. PMID:21385575

  9. Functional Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bower, Bradley A.

    Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SDOCT) is a high-speed, high resolution imaging modality capable of structural and functional characterization of tissue microstructure. SDOCT fills a niche between histology and ultrasound imaging, providing non-contact, non-invasive backscattering amplitude and phase from a sample. Due to the translucent nature of the tissue, ophthalmic imaging is an ideal space for SDOCT imaging. Structural imaging of the retina has provided new insights into ophthalmic disease. The phase component of SDOCT images remains largely underexplored, though. While Doppler SDOCT has been explored in a research setting, it has yet to gain traction in the clinic. Other, functional exploitations of the phase are possible and necessary to expand the utility of SDOCT. Spectral Domain Phase Microscopy (SDPM) is an extension of SDOCT that is capable of resolving sub-wavelength displacements within a focal volume. Application of sub-wavelength displacement measurement imaging could provide a new method for non-invasive optophysiological measurement. This body of work encompasses both hardware and software design and development for implementation of SDOCT. Structural imaging was proven in both the lab and the clinic. Coarse phase changes associated with Doppler flow frequency shifts were recorded and a study was conducted to validate Doppler measurement. Fine phase changes were explored through SDPM applications. Preliminary optophysiology data was acquired to study the potential of sub-wavelength measurements in the retina. To remove the complexity associated with in-vivo human retinal imaging, a first principles approach using isolated nerve samples was applied using standard SDPM and a depthencoded technique for measuring conduction velocity. Results from amplitude as well as both coarse and fine phase processing are presented. In-vivo optophysiology using SDPM is a promising avenue for exploration, and projects furthering or extending this body

  10. Design of protein function leaps by directed domain interface evolution

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jin; Koide, Akiko; Makabe, Koki; Koide, Shohei

    2008-01-01

    Most natural proteins performing sophisticated tasks contain multiple domains where an active site is located at the domain interface. Comparative structural analyses suggest that major leaps in protein function occur through gene recombination events that connect two or more protein domains to generate a new active site, frequently occurring at the newly created domain interface. However, such functional leaps by combination of unrelated domains have not been directly demonstrated. Here we show that highly specific and complex protein functions can be generated by joining a low-affinity peptide-binding domain with a functionally inert second domain and subsequently optimizing the domain interface. These directed evolution processes dramatically enhanced both affinity and specificity to a level unattainable with a single domain, corresponding to >500-fold and >2,000-fold increases of affinity and specificity, respectively. An x-ray crystal structure revealed that the resulting “affinity clamp” had clamshell architecture as designed, with large additional binding surface contributed by the second domain. The affinity clamps having a single-nanomolar dissociation constant outperformed a monoclonal antibody in immunochemical applications. This work establishes evolutionary paths from isolated domains with primitive function to multidomain proteins with sophisticated function and introduces a new protein-engineering concept that allows for the generation of highly functional affinity reagents to a predefined target. The prevalence and variety of natural interaction domains suggest that numerous new functions can be designed by using directed domain interface evolution. PMID:18445649

  11. Design of protein function leaps by directed domain interface evolution.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jin; Koide, Akiko; Makabe, Koki; Koide, Shohei

    2008-05-06

    Most natural proteins performing sophisticated tasks contain multiple domains where an active site is located at the domain interface. Comparative structural analyses suggest that major leaps in protein function occur through gene recombination events that connect two or more protein domains to generate a new active site, frequently occurring at the newly created domain interface. However, such functional leaps by combination of unrelated domains have not been directly demonstrated. Here we show that highly specific and complex protein functions can be generated by joining a low-affinity peptide-binding domain with a functionally inert second domain and subsequently optimizing the domain interface. These directed evolution processes dramatically enhanced both affinity and specificity to a level unattainable with a single domain, corresponding to >500-fold and >2,000-fold increases of affinity and specificity, respectively. An x-ray crystal structure revealed that the resulting "affinity clamp" had clamshell architecture as designed, with large additional binding surface contributed by the second domain. The affinity clamps having a single-nanomolar dissociation constant outperformed a monoclonal antibody in immunochemical applications. This work establishes evolutionary paths from isolated domains with primitive function to multidomain proteins with sophisticated function and introduces a new protein-engineering concept that allows for the generation of highly functional affinity reagents to a predefined target. The prevalence and variety of natural interaction domains suggest that numerous new functions can be designed by using directed domain interface evolution.

  12. Functional domains of yeast hexokinase 2

    PubMed Central

    Peláez, Rafael; Herrero, Pilar; Moreno, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Hkx2 (hexokinase 2) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae was one of the first metabolic enzymes described as a multifunctional protein. Hxk2 has a double subcellular localization: it functions as a glycolytic enzyme in the cytoplasm and as a regulator of gene transcription of several Mig1-regulated genes in the nucleus. To get more insights into the structure–function relationships of the Hxk2 protein, we followed two different approaches. In the first, we deleted the last eight amino acids of Hxk2 and replaced Ser304 with phenylalanine to generate Hxk2wca. Analysis of this mutant demonstrated that these domains play an essential role in the catalytic activity of yeast Hxk2, but has no effect on the regulatory function of this protein. In the second, we analysed whether amino acids from Lys6 to Met15 of Hxk2 (Hxk2wrf) are essential for the regulatory role of Hxk2 and whether there is an effect on the hexose kinase activity of this protein. In the present paper, we report that the Hxk2wca mutant protein interacts with the Mig1 transcriptional repressor and the Snf1 protein kinase in the nucleus at the level of the SUC2–Mig1 repressor complex. We have demonstrated that Hxk2wca maintained full regulatory function because the glucose-repression signalling of the wild-type machinery is maintained. We also report that the Hxk2wrf mutant allele is incapable of glucose repression signalling because it does not interact with Mig1 at the level of the SUC2–Mig1 repressor complex. The two mutants, Hxk2wca and Hxk2wrf retain single functions, as a transcriptional factor or as an enzyme with hexose-phosphorylating activity, but have lost the original bifunctionality of Hxk2. PMID:20815814

  13. Functional domains of yeast hexokinase 2.

    PubMed

    Peláez, Rafael; Herrero, Pilar; Moreno, Fernando

    2010-11-15

    Hkx2 (hexokinase 2) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae was one of the first metabolic enzymes described as a multifunctional protein. Hxk2 has a double subcellular localization: it functions as a glycolytic enzyme in the cytoplasm and as a regulator of gene transcription of several Mig1-regulated genes in the nucleus. To get more insights into the structure-function relationships of the Hxk2 protein, we followed two different approaches. In the first, we deleted the last eight amino acids of Hxk2 and replaced Ser³⁰⁴ with phenylalanine to generate Hxk2(wca). Analysis of this mutant demonstrated that these domains play an essential role in the catalytic activity of yeast Hxk2, but has no effect on the regulatory function of this protein. In the second, we analysed whether amino acids from Lys⁶ to Met¹⁵ of Hxk2 (Hxk2(wrf)) are essential for the regulatory role of Hxk2 and whether there is an effect on the hexose kinase activity of this protein. In the present paper, we report that the Hxk2(wca) mutant protein interacts with the Mig1 transcriptional repressor and the Snf1 protein kinase in the nucleus at the level of the SUC2-Mig1 repressor complex. We have demonstrated that Hxk2(wca) maintained full regulatory function because the glucose-repression signalling of the wild-type machinery is maintained. We also report that the Hxk2(wrf) mutant allele is incapable of glucose repression signalling because it does not interact with Mig1 at the level of the SUC2-Mig1 repressor complex. The two mutants, Hxk2(wca) and Hxk2(wrf) retain single functions, as a transcriptional factor or as an enzyme with hexose-phosphorylating activity, but have lost the original bifunctionality of Hxk2.

  14. The functional requirement of two structural domains within telomerase RNA emerged early in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Podlevsky, Joshua D; Li, Yang; Chen, Julian J-L

    2016-11-16

    Telomerase emerged during evolution as a prominent solution to the eukaryotic linear chromosome end-replication problem. Telomerase minimally comprises the catalytic telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) and telomerase RNA (TR) that provides the template for telomeric DNA synthesis. While the TERT protein is well-conserved across taxa, TR is highly divergent amongst distinct groups of species. Herein, we have identified the essential functional domains of TR from the basal eukaryotic species Trypanosoma brucei, revealing the ancestry of TR comprising two distinct structural core domains that can assemble in trans with TERT and reconstitute active telomerase enzyme in vitro The upstream essential domain of T. brucei TR, termed the template core, constitutes three short helices in addition to the 11-nt template. Interestingly, the trypanosome template core domain lacks the ubiquitous pseudoknot found in all known TRs, suggesting later evolution of this critical structural element. The template-distal domain is a short stem-loop, termed equivalent CR4/5 (eCR4/5). While functionally similar to vertebrate and fungal CR4/5, trypanosome eCR4/5 is structurally distinctive, lacking the essential P6.1 stem-loop. Our functional study of trypanosome TR core domains suggests that the functional requirement of two discrete structural domains is a common feature of TRs and emerged early in telomerase evolution.

  15. A crack problem with four distinct harmonic functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sih, G. C.; Kassir, M. K.

    1972-01-01

    The problem of an elastic solid containing a semi-infinite plane crack subjected to concentrated shears parallel to the edge of the crack is considered. A closed form solution using four distinct harmonic functions (none of which can be taken arbitrarily) is found to satisfy the finite displacement and inverse square root stress singularity at the edge of the crack. Explicit expressions in terms of elementary functions are given for the distribution of stress and displacement in the solid. These are obtained by employing Fourier and Kontorovich-Lebedev integral transforms and certain singular solutions of Laplace equations in three dimensions. The variations of the intensity of the local stress field along the crack border are shown graphically. An example is presented, which is in contrast with the conclusion established in the literature that one of the four Papkovich-Neuber functions in three-dimensional elasticity may be arbitrarily set to zero.

  16. Galectins distinctively regulate central monocyte and macrophage function.

    PubMed

    Paclik, Daniela; Werner, Lael; Guckelberger, Olaf; Wiedenmann, Bertram; Sturm, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    Monocytes and macrophages link the innate and adaptive immune systems and protect the host from the outside world. In inflammatory disorders their activation leads to tissue damage. Galectins have emerged as central regulators of the immune system. However, if they regulate monocyte/macrophage physiology is still unknown. Binding of Gal-1, Gal-2, Gal-3 and Gal-4 to monocytes/macrophages, activation, cytokine secretion and apoptosis were determined by FACS, migration by Transwell system and phagocytosis by phagotest. Supernatants from macrophages co-cultured with galectins revealed their influence on T-cell function. In our study Gal-1, Gal-2, Gal-4, and partly Gal-3 bound to monocytes/macrophages. Galectins prevented Salmonella-induced MHCII upregulation. Cytokine release was distinctly induced by different galectins. T-cell activation was significantly restricted by supernatants of macrophages co-cultured in the presence of Gal-2 or Gal-4. Furthermore, all galectins tested significantly inhibited monocyte migration. Finally, we showed for the first time that galectins induce potently monocyte, but not macrophage apoptosis. Our study provides evidence that galectins distinctively modulate central monocyte/macrophage function. By inhibiting T-cell function via macrophage priming, we show that galectins link the innate and adaptive immune systems and provide new insights into the action of sugar-binding proteins. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Auditory abnormalities in autism: toward functional distinctions among findings.

    PubMed

    Kellerman, Gabriella R; Fan, Jin; Gorman, Jack M

    2005-09-01

    Recently, findings on a wide range of auditory abnormalities among individuals with autism have been reported. To date, functional distinctions among these varied findings are poorly established. Such distinctions should be of interest to clinicians and researchers alike given their potential therapeutic and experimental applications. This review suggests three general trends among these findings as a starting point for future analyses. First, studies of auditory perception of linguistic and social auditory stimuli among individuals with autism generally have found impaired perception versus normal controls. Such findings may correlate with impaired language and communication skills and social isolation observed among individuals with autism. Second, studies of auditory perception of pitch and music among individuals with autism generally have found enhanced perception versus normal controls. These findings may correlate with the restrictive and highly focused behaviors observed among individuals with autism. Third, findings on the auditory perception of non-linguistic, non-musical stimuli among autism patients resist any generalized conclusions. Ultimately, as some researchers have already suggested, the distinction between impaired global processing and enhanced local processing may prove useful in making sense of apparently discordant findings on auditory abnormalities among individuals with autism.

  18. Structure and function of WD40 domain proteins.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chao; Min, Jinrong

    2011-03-01

    The WD40 domain exhibits a β-propeller architecture, often comprising seven blades. The WD40 domain is one of the most abundant domains and also among the top interacting domains in eukaryotic genomes. In this review, we will discuss the identification, definition and architecture of the WD40 domains. WD40 domain proteins are involved in a large variety of cellular processes, in which WD40 domains function as a protein-protein or protein-DNA interaction platform. WD40 domain mediates molecular recognition events mainly through the smaller top surface, but also through the bottom surface and sides. So far, no WD40 domain has been found to display enzymatic activity. We will also discuss the different binding modes exhibited by the large versatile family of WD40 domain proteins. In the last part of this review, we will discuss how post-translational modifications are recognized by WD40 domain proteins.

  19. Distinct Domains of Complexins Bind SNARE Complexes and Clamp Fusion in Vitro*

    PubMed Central

    Giraudo, Claudio G.; Garcia-Diaz, Alejandro; Eng, William S.; Yamamoto, Ai; Melia, Thomas J.; Rothman, James E.

    2008-01-01

    In regulated exocytosis, the core membrane fusion machinery proteins, the SNARE proteins, are assisted by a group of regulatory factors in order to couple membrane fusion to an increase of intracellular calcium ion (Ca2+) concentration. Complexin-I and synaptotagmin-I have been shown to be key elements for this tightly regulated process. Many studies suggest that complexin-I can arrest the fusion reaction and that synaptotagmin-I can release the complexin-I blockage in a calcium-dependent manner. Although the actual molecular mechanism by which they exert their function is still unknown, recent in vivo experiments postulate that domains of complexin-I produce different effects on neurotransmitter release. Herein, by using an in vitro flipped SNARE cell fusion assay, we have identified and characterized the minimal functional domains of complexin-I necessary to couple calcium and synaptotagmin-I to membrane fusion. Moreover, we provide evidence that other isoforms of complexin, complexin-II, -III, and -IV, can also be functionally coupled to synaptotagmin-I and calcium. These correspond closely to results from in vivo experiments, providing further validation of the physiological relevance of the flipped SNARE system. PMID:18499660

  20. Distinct domains of complexins bind SNARE complexes and clamp fusion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Giraudo, Claudio G; Garcia-Diaz, Alejandro; Eng, William S; Yamamoto, Ai; Melia, Thomas J; Rothman, James E

    2008-07-25

    In regulated exocytosis, the core membrane fusion machinery proteins, the SNARE proteins, are assisted by a group of regulatory factors in order to couple membrane fusion to an increase of intracellular calcium ion (Ca(2+)) concentration. Complexin-I and synaptotagmin-I have been shown to be key elements for this tightly regulated process. Many studies suggest that complexin-I can arrest the fusion reaction and that synaptotagmin-I can release the complexin-I blockage in a calcium-dependent manner. Although the actual molecular mechanism by which they exert their function is still unknown, recent in vivo experiments postulate that domains of complexin-I produce different effects on neurotransmitter release. Herein, by using an in vitro flipped SNARE cell fusion assay, we have identified and characterized the minimal functional domains of complexin-I necessary to couple calcium and synaptotagmin-I to membrane fusion. Moreover, we provide evidence that other isoforms of complexin, complexin-II, -III, and -IV, can also be functionally coupled to synaptotagmin-I and calcium. These correspond closely to results from in vivo experiments, providing further validation of the physiological relevance of the flipped SNARE system.

  1. Analysis of Exocyst Subunit EXO70 Family Reveals Distinct Membrane Polar Domains in Tobacco Pollen Tubes1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Šantrůček, Jiří; Vukašinović, Nemanja

    2017-01-01

    The vesicle-tethering complex exocyst is one of the crucial cell polarity regulators. The EXO70 subunit is required for the targeting of the complex and is represented by many isoforms in angiosperm plant cells. This diversity could be partly responsible for the establishment and maintenance of membrane domains with different composition. To address this hypothesis, we employed the growing pollen tube, a well-established cell polarity model system, and performed large-scale expression, localization, and functional analysis of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) EXO70 isoforms. Various isoforms localized to different regions of the pollen tube plasma membrane, apical vesicle-rich inverted cone region, nucleus, and cytoplasm. The overexpression of major pollen-expressed EXO70 isoforms resulted in growth arrest and characteristic phenotypic deviations of tip swelling and apical invaginations. NtEXO70A1a and NtEXO70B1 occupied two distinct and mutually exclusive plasma membrane domains. Both isoforms partly colocalized with the exocyst subunit NtSEC3a at the plasma membrane, possibly forming different exocyst complex subpopulations. NtEXO70A1a localized to the small area previously characterized as the site of exocytosis in the tobacco pollen tube, while NtEXO70B1 surprisingly colocalized with the zone of clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Both NtEXO70A1a and NtEXO70B1 colocalized to different degrees with markers for the anionic signaling phospholipids phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and phosphatidic acid. In contrast, members of the EXO70 C class, which are specifically expressed in tip-growing cells, exhibited exocytosis-related functional effects in pollen tubes despite the absence of apparent plasma membrane localization. Taken together, our data support the existence of multiple membrane-trafficking domains regulated by different EXO70-containing exocyst complexes within a single cell. PMID:28082718

  2. Different functional modes of BAR domain proteins in formation and plasticity of mammalian postsynapses.

    PubMed

    Kessels, Michael M; Qualmann, Britta

    2015-09-01

    A plethora of cell biological processes involve modulations of cellular membranes. By using extended lipid-binding interfaces, some proteins have the power to shape membranes by attaching to them. Among such membrane shapers, the superfamily of Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs (BAR) domain proteins has recently taken center stage. Extensive structural work on BAR domains has revealed a common curved fold that can serve as an extended membrane-binding interface to modulate membrane topologies and has allowed the grouping of the BAR domain superfamily into subfamilies with structurally slightly distinct BAR domain subtypes (N-BAR, BAR, F-BAR and I-BAR). Most BAR superfamily members are expressed in the mammalian nervous system. Neurons are elaborately shaped and highly compartmentalized cells. Therefore, analyses of synapse formation and of postsynaptic reorganization processes (synaptic plasticity) - a basis for learning and memory formation - has unveiled important physiological functions of BAR domain superfamily members. These recent advances, furthermore, have revealed that the functions of BAR domain proteins include different aspects. These functions are influenced by the often complex domain organization of BAR domain proteins. In this Commentary, we review these recent insights and propose to classify BAR domain protein functions into (1) membrane shaping, (2) physical integration, (3) action through signaling components, and (4) suppression of other BAR domain functions. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  3. Comparative Analysis of RNA Families Reveals Distinct Repertoires for Each Domain of Life

    PubMed Central

    Hoeppner, Marc P.; Gardner, Paul P.; Poole, Anthony M.

    2012-01-01

    The RNA world hypothesis, that RNA genomes and catalysts preceded DNA genomes and genetically-encoded protein catalysts, has been central to models for the early evolution of life on Earth. A key part of such models is continuity between the earliest stages in the evolution of life and the RNA repertoires of extant lineages. Some assessments seem consistent with a diverse RNA world, yet direct continuity between modern RNAs and an RNA world has not been demonstrated for the majority of RNA families, and, anecdotally, many RNA functions appear restricted in their distribution. Despite much discussion of the possible antiquity of RNA families, no systematic analyses of RNA family distribution have been performed. To chart the broad evolutionary history of known RNA families, we performed comparative genomic analysis of over 3 million RNA annotations spanning 1446 families from the Rfam 10 database. We report that 99% of known RNA families are restricted to a single domain of life, revealing discrete repertoires for each domain. For the 1% of RNA families/clans present in more than one domain, over half show evidence of horizontal gene transfer (HGT), and the rest show a vertical trace, indicating the presence of a complex protein synthesis machinery in the Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA) and consistent with the evolutionary history of the most ancient protein-coding genes. However, with limited interdomain transfer and few RNA families exhibiting demonstrable antiquity as predicted under RNA world continuity, our results indicate that the majority of modern cellular RNA repertoires have primarily evolved in a domain-specific manner. PMID:23133357

  4. Comparative analysis of RNA families reveals distinct repertoires for each domain of life.

    PubMed

    Hoeppner, Marc P; Gardner, Paul P; Poole, Anthony M

    2012-01-01

    The RNA world hypothesis, that RNA genomes and catalysts preceded DNA genomes and genetically-encoded protein catalysts, has been central to models for the early evolution of life on Earth. A key part of such models is continuity between the earliest stages in the evolution of life and the RNA repertoires of extant lineages. Some assessments seem consistent with a diverse RNA world, yet direct continuity between modern RNAs and an RNA world has not been demonstrated for the majority of RNA families, and, anecdotally, many RNA functions appear restricted in their distribution. Despite much discussion of the possible antiquity of RNA families, no systematic analyses of RNA family distribution have been performed. To chart the broad evolutionary history of known RNA families, we performed comparative genomic analysis of over 3 million RNA annotations spanning 1446 families from the Rfam 10 database. We report that 99% of known RNA families are restricted to a single domain of life, revealing discrete repertoires for each domain. For the 1% of RNA families/clans present in more than one domain, over half show evidence of horizontal gene transfer (HGT), and the rest show a vertical trace, indicating the presence of a complex protein synthesis machinery in the Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA) and consistent with the evolutionary history of the most ancient protein-coding genes. However, with limited interdomain transfer and few RNA families exhibiting demonstrable antiquity as predicted under RNA world continuity, our results indicate that the majority of modern cellular RNA repertoires have primarily evolved in a domain-specific manner.

  5. ELK1 uses different DNA binding modes to regulate functionally distinct classes of target genes.

    PubMed

    Odrowaz, Zaneta; Sharrocks, Andrew D

    2012-01-01

    Eukaryotic transcription factors are grouped into families and, due to their similar DNA binding domains, often have the potential to bind to the same genomic regions. This can lead to redundancy at the level of DNA binding, and mechanisms are required to generate specific functional outcomes that enable distinct gene expression programmes to be controlled by a particular transcription factor. Here we used ChIP-seq to uncover two distinct binding modes for the ETS transcription factor ELK1. In one mode, other ETS transcription factors can bind regulatory regions in a redundant fashion; in the second, ELK1 binds in a unique fashion to another set of genomic targets. Each binding mode is associated with different binding site features and also distinct regulatory outcomes. Furthermore, the type of binding mode also determines the control of functionally distinct subclasses of genes and hence the phenotypic response elicited. This is demonstrated for the unique binding mode where a novel role for ELK1 in controlling cell migration is revealed. We have therefore uncovered an unexpected link between the type of binding mode employed by a transcription factor, the subsequent gene regulatory mechanisms used, and the functional categories of target genes controlled.

  6. Functional regions of the mouse interleukin-10 receptor cytoplasmic domain.

    PubMed Central

    Ho, A S; Wei, S H; Mui, A L; Miyajima, A; Moore, K W

    1995-01-01

    The functions of wild-type and mutant mouse interleukin-10 receptors (mIL-10R) expressed in murine Ba/F3 cells were studied. As observed previously, IL-10 stimulates proliferation of IL-10R-expressing Ba/F3 cells. Accumulation of viable cells in the proliferation assay is to a significant extent balanced by concomitant cell death. Moreover, growth in IL-10 also induces a previously unrecognized response, differentiation of the cells, as evidenced both by formation of large clusters of cells in cultures with IL-10 and by induction or enhancement of expression of several cell surface antigens, including CD32/16, CD2, LECAM-1 (v-selectin), and heat-stable antigen. Two distinct functional regions near the C terminus of the mIL-10R cytoplasmic domain which mediate proliferation were identified; one of these regions also mediates the differentiation response. A third region proximal to the transmembrane domain was identified; removal of this region renders the cell 10- to 100-fold more sensitive to IL-10 in the proliferation assay. In cells expressing both wild-type and mutant IL-10R, stimulation with IL-10 leads to tyrosine phosphorylation of the kinases JAK1 and TYK2 but not JAK2 or JAK3 under the conditions tested. PMID:7544437

  7. Automated retinal fovea type distinction in spectral-domain optical coherence tomography of retinal vein occlusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jing; Waldstein, Sebastian M.; Gerendas, Bianca S.; Langs, Georg; Simader, Christian; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula

    2015-03-01

    Spectral-domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT) is a non-invasive modality for acquiring high- resolution, three-dimensional (3D) cross-sectional volumetric images of the retina and the subretinal layers. SD-OCT also allows the detailed imaging of retinal pathology, aiding clinicians in the diagnosis of sight degrading diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), glaucoma and retinal vein occlusion (RVO). Disease diagnosis, assessment, and treatment will require a patient to undergo multiple OCT scans, possibly using multiple scanners, to accurately and precisely gauge disease activity, progression and treatment success. However, cross-vendor imaging and patient movement may result in poor scan spatial correlation potentially leading to incorrect diagnosis or treatment analysis. The retinal fovea is the location of the highest visual acuity and is present in all patients, thus it is critical to vision and highly suitable for use as a primary landmark for cross-vendor/cross-patient registration for precise comparison of disease states. However, the location of the fovea in diseased eyes is extremely challenging to locate due to varying appearance and the presence of retinal layer destroying pathology. Thus categorising and detecting the fovea type is an important prior stage to automatically computing the fovea position. Presented here is an automated cross-vendor method for fovea distinction in 3D SD-OCT scans of patients suffering from RVO, categorising scans into three distinct types. OCT scans are preprocessed by motion correction and noise filing followed by segmentation using a kernel graph-cut approach. A statistically derived mask is applied to the resulting scan creating an ROI around the probable fovea location from which the uppermost retinal surface is delineated. For a normal appearance retina, minimisation to zero thickness is computed using the top two retinal surfaces. 3D local minima detection and layer thickness analysis are used

  8. Specific residues within the alpha 2 integrin subunit cytoplasmic domain regulate migration and cell cycle progression via distinct MAPK pathways.

    PubMed

    Klekotka, P A; Santoro, S A; Wang, H; Zutter, M M

    2001-08-24

    The alpha(2) integrin subunit cytoplasmic domain is necessary for epidermal growth factor (EGF)-stimulated chemotactic migration and insulin-dependent entry into S-phase of mammary epithelial cells adherent to type I collagen. Truncation mutants revealed that the seven amino acids, KYEKMTK, in addition to the GFFKR motif were sufficient for these functions. Mutation of tyrosine 1134 to alanine inhibited the ability of the cells to phosphorylate p38 MAPK and to migrate in response to EGF but had only a modest effect on the ability of the cells to induce sustained phosphorylation of the ERK MAPK, to up-regulate cyclin E and cdk2 expression, and to enter S-phase when adherent to type I collagen. Conversely, mutation of the lysine 1136 inhibited the ability of the cells to increase cyclin E and cdk2 expression, to maintain long term phosphorylation of the ERK MAPK, and to enter S-phase but had no effect on the ability of the cells to phosphorylate the p38 MAPK or to migrate on type I collagen in response to EGF. Methionine 1137 was essential for both migration and entry into S-phase. Thus, distinctly different structural elements of the alpha(2) integrin cytoplasmic domain are required to engage the signaling pathways leading to cell migration or cell cycle progression.

  9. Compositionally distinct nuclear pore complexes of functionally distinct dimorphic nuclei in the ciliate Tetrahymena

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Masaaki; Osakada, Hiroko; Mori, Chie; Fukuda, Yasuhiro; Nagao, Koji; Obuse, Chikashi

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The nuclear pore complex (NPC), a gateway for nucleocytoplasmic trafficking, is composed of ∼30 different proteins called nucleoporins. It remains unknown whether the NPCs within a species are homogeneous or vary depending on the cell type or physiological condition. Here, we present evidence for compositionally distinct NPCs that form within a single cell in a binucleated ciliate. In Tetrahymena thermophila, each cell contains both a transcriptionally active macronucleus (MAC) and a germline micronucleus (MIC). By combining in silico analysis, mass spectrometry analysis for immuno-isolated proteins and subcellular localization analysis of GFP-fused proteins, we identified numerous novel components of MAC and MIC NPCs. Core members of the Nup107–Nup160 scaffold complex were enriched in MIC NPCs. Strikingly, two paralogs of Nup214 and of Nup153 localized exclusively to either the MAC or MIC NPCs. Furthermore, the transmembrane components Pom121 and Pom82 localize exclusively to MAC and MIC NPCs, respectively. Our results argue that functional nuclear dimorphism in ciliates is likely to depend on the compositional and structural specificity of NPCs. PMID:28386019

  10. Compositionally distinct nuclear pore complexes of functionally distinct dimorphic nuclei in ciliate Tetrahymena.

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Masaaki; Osakada, Hiroko; Mori, Chie; Fukuda, Yasuhiro; Nagao, Koji; Obuse, Chikashi; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Haraguchi, Tokuko

    2017-04-06

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC), a gateway for nucleocytoplasmic trafficking, is composed of about 30 different proteins called nucleoporins. It remains unknown whether the NPCs within a species are homogeneous or vary depending on the cell type, or physiological condition. Here, we present evidence for compositionally distinct NPCs that form within a single cell in a binucleated ciliate. In Tetrahymena thermophila, each cell contains both a transcriptionally-active macronucleus (MAC) and a germline micronucleus (MIC). By combining in silico analysis, mass spectrometry analysis for immuno-isolated proteins, and subcellular localization analysis of GFP fused proteins, we identified numerous novel components of MAC and MIC NPCs. Core members of the Nup107-160 scaffold complex were enriched in MIC NPCs. Strikingly, two paralogs of Nup214 and of Nup153 localized exclusively to either MAC or MIC NPCs. Furthermore, the transmembrane components Pom121 and Pom82 localize exclusively to MAC and MIC NPCs, respectively. Our results argue that functional nuclear dimorphism in ciliates is likely to depend on compositional and structural specificity of NPCs.

  11. Synaptotagmins are trafficked to distinct subcellular domains including the postsynaptic compartment.

    PubMed

    Adolfsen, Bill; Saraswati, Sudipta; Yoshihara, Motojiro; Littleton, J Troy

    2004-07-19

    The synaptotagmin family has been implicated in calcium-dependent neurotransmitter release, although Synaptotagmin 1 is the only isoform demonstrated to control synaptic vesicle fusion. Here, we report the characterization of the six remaining synaptotagmin isoforms encoded in the Drosophila genome, including homologues of mammalian Synaptotagmins 4, 7, 12, and 14. Like Synaptotagmin 1, Synaptotagmin 4 is ubiquitously present at synapses, but localizes to the postsynaptic compartment. The remaining isoforms were not found at synapses (Synaptotagmin 7), expressed at very low levels (Synaptotagmins 12 and 14), or in subsets of putative neurosecretory cells (Synaptotagmins alpha and beta). Consistent with their distinct localizations, overexpression of Synaptotagmin 4 or 7 cannot functionally substitute for the loss of Synaptotagmin 1 in synaptic transmission. Our results indicate that synaptotagmins are differentially distributed to unique subcellular compartments. In addition, the identification of a postsynaptic synaptotagmin suggests calcium-dependent membrane-trafficking functions on both sides of the synapse. Copyright The Rockerfeller University Press

  12. Synaptotagmins are trafficked to distinct subcellular domains including the postsynaptic compartment

    PubMed Central

    Adolfsen, Bill; Saraswati, Sudipta; Yoshihara, Motojiro; Littleton, J. Troy

    2004-01-01

    The synaptotagmin family has been implicated in calcium-dependent neurotransmitter release, although Synaptotagmin 1 is the only isoform demonstrated to control synaptic vesicle fusion. Here, we report the characterization of the six remaining synaptotagmin isoforms encoded in the Drosophila genome, including homologues of mammalian Synaptotagmins 4, 7, 12, and 14. Like Synaptotagmin 1, Synaptotagmin 4 is ubiquitously present at synapses, but localizes to the postsynaptic compartment. The remaining isoforms were not found at synapses (Synaptotagmin 7), expressed at very low levels (Synaptotagmins 12 and 14), or in subsets of putative neurosecretory cells (Synaptotagmins α and β). Consistent with their distinct localizations, overexpression of Synaptotagmin 4 or 7 cannot functionally substitute for the loss of Synaptotagmin 1 in synaptic transmission. Our results indicate that synaptotagmins are differentially distributed to unique subcellular compartments. In addition, the identification of a postsynaptic synaptotagmin suggests calcium-dependent membrane-trafficking functions on both sides of the synapse. PMID:15263020

  13. Functional domains of the floral regulator AGAMOUS: characterization of the DNA binding domain and analysis of dominant negative mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Mizukami, Y; Huang, H; Tudor, M; Hu, Y; Ma, H

    1996-01-01

    The Arabidopsis MADS box gene AGAMOUS (AG) controls reproductive organ identity and floral meristem determinacy. The AG protein binds in vitro to DNA sequences similar to the targets of known MADS domain transcription factors. Whereas most plant MADS domain proteins begin with the MADS domain, AG and its orthologs contain a region N-terminal to the MADS domain. All plant MADS domain proteins share another region with moderate sequence similarity called the K domain. Neither the region (I region) that lies between the MADS and K domains nor the C-terminal region is conserved. We show here that the AG MADS domain and the I region are necessary and sufficient for DNA binding in vitro and that AG binds to DNA as a dimer. To investigate the in vivo function of the regions of AG not required for in vitro DNA binding, we introduced several AG constructs into wild-type plants and characterized their floral phenotypes. We show that transgenic Arabidopsis plants with a 35S-AG construct encoding an AG protein lacking the N-terminal region produced apetala 2 (ap2)-like flowers similar to those ectopically expressing AG proteins retaining the N-terminal region. This result suggests that the N-terminal region is not required to produce the ap2-like phenotype. In addition, transformants with a 35S-AG construct encoding an AG protein lacking the C-terminal region produced ag-like flowers, indicating that this truncated AG protein inhibits normal AG function. Finally, transformants with a 35S-AG construct encoding an AG protein lacking both K and C regions produced flowers with more stamens and carpels. The phenotypes of the AG transformants demonstrate that both the K domain and the C-terminal region have important and distinct in vivo functions. We discuss possible mechanisms through which AG may regulate downstream genes. PMID:8672883

  14. Expression and evolution of functionally distinct haemoglobin genes in plants.

    PubMed

    Hunt, P W; Watts, R A; Trevaskis, B; Llewelyn, D J; Burnell, J; Dennis, E S; Peacock, W J

    2001-11-01

    Haemoglobin genes have been found in a number of plant species, but the number of genes known has been too small to allow effective evolutionary inferences. We present nine new non-symbiotic haemoglobin sequences from a range of plants, including class 1 haemoglobins from cotton, Citrus and tomato, class 2 haemoglobins from cotton, tomato, sugar beet and canola and two haemoglobins from the non-vascular plants, Marchantia polymorpha (a liverwort) and Physcomitrella patens (a moss). Our molecular phylogenetic analysis of all currently known non-symbiotic haemoglobin genes and a selection of symbiotic haemoglobins have confirmed the existence of two distinct classes of haemoglobin genes in the dicots. It is likely that all dicots have both class 1 and class 2 non-symbiotic haemoglobin genes whereas in monocots we have detected only class 1 genes. The symbiotic haemoglobins from legumes and Casuarina are related to the class 2 non-symbiotic haemoglobins, whilst the symbiotic haemoglobin from Parasponia groups with the class 1 non-symbiotic genes. Probably, there have been two independent recruitments of symbiotic haemoglobins. Although the functions of the two non-symbiotic haemoglobins remain unknown, their patterns of expression within plants suggest different functions. We examined the expression in transgenic plants of the two non-symbiotic haemoglobins from Arabidopsis using promoter fusions to a GUS reporter gene. The Arabidopsis GLB1 and GLB2 genes are likely to be functionally distinct. The class 2 haemoglobin gene (GLB2) is expressed in the roots, leaves and inflorescence and can be induced in young plants by cytokinin treatment in contrast to the class 1 gene (GLB1) which is active in germinating seedlings and can be induced by hypoxia and increased sucrose supply, but not by cytokinin treatment.

  15. Distinct physiological functions of thiol peroxidase isoenzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Park, S G; Cha, M K; Jeong, W; Kim, I H

    2000-02-25

    A new type of peroxidase ("thiol peroxidase"; TPx) having cysteine as the primary site of catalysis has been discovered from prokaryotes to eukaryotes. In addition to two yeast TPx isoforms (TSA I and TSA II/AHPC1) previously described, three additional TPx homologues were identified by analysis of the open reading frame data base for Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Three novel isoforms showed a distinct thiol peroxidase activity supported by thioredoxin, and appeared to be distinctively localized in cytoplasm, mitochondria, and nucleus. Each isoform was named after its subcellular localization such as cytoplasmic TPx I (cTPx I or TSA I), cTPx II, cTPx III (TSA II/AHPC1), mitochondrial TPx (mTPx), and nuclear TPx (nTPx). Their transcriptional activities suggest that cTPx I and cTPx III are the most predominant isoforms among the five type isoforms. Transcriptional activities of TPx isoenzymes during yeast life span were quite different from each other. Unlike other TPx null mutants, cTPx I null mutant was hypersensitive to various oxidants except for 4-nitroquinoline N-oxide. The null mutant was more resistant toward 4-nitroquinoline N-oxide and acidic culture than its wild type. The severe growth retardation of cTPx II mutant resulted in accumulation of G(1)-phased cells. Based on kinetic properties of five isoforms, their subcellular localizations, and distinct physiology of each null mutant, we discussed the physiological functions of five types of TPx isoenzymes in yeast throughout the full growth cycle.

  16. Distinct domains of the limbic system-associated membrane protein (LAMP) mediate discrete effects on neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Eagleson, Kathie L; Pimenta, Aurea F; Burns, Mary M; Fairfull, Liane D; Cornuet, Pamela K; Zhang, Li; Levitt, Pat

    2003-11-01

    The limbic system-associated membrane protein (LAMP) is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored glycoprotein with three immunoglobulin (Ig) domains that can either enhance or inhibit neurite outgrowth depending upon the neuronal population examined. In the present study, we investigate the domains responsible for these activities. Domain deletion revealed that the N-terminal IgI domain is necessary and sufficient for the neurite-promoting activity observed in hippocampal neurons. In contrast, inhibition of neurite outgrowth in SCG neurons, which is mediated by heterophilic interactions, requires full-length LAMP, although selective inhibition of the second Ig domain, but not the first or third domains, prevented the inhibitory effect. This indicates that the IgII domain of LAMP harbors the neurite-inhibiting activity, but only in the context of the full-length configuration. Covasphere-binding analyses demonstrate IgI/IgI interactions, but no interaction between IgII and any other domain, consistent with the biological activities that each domain mediates. The data suggest that LAMP may serve as a bifunctional guidance molecule, with distinct structural domains contributing to the promotion and inhibition of neurite outgrowth.

  17. Distinct functional programming of human fetal and adult monocytes.

    PubMed

    Krow-Lucal, Elisabeth R; Kim, Charles C; Burt, Trevor D; McCune, Joseph M

    2014-03-20

    Preterm birth affects 1 out of 9 infants in the United States and is the leading cause of long-term neurologic handicap and infant mortality, accounting for 35% of all infant deaths in 2008. Although cytokines including interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin-10 (IL-10), IL-6, and IL-1 are produced in response to in utero infection and are strongly associated with preterm labor, little is known about how human fetal immune cells respond to these cytokines. We demonstrate that fetal and adult CD14(+)CD16(-) classical monocytes are distinct in terms of basal transcriptional profiles and in phosphorylation of signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) in response to cytokines. Fetal monocytes phosphorylate canonical and noncanonical STATs and respond more strongly to IFN-γ, IL-6, and IL-4 than adult monocytes. We demonstrate a higher ratio of SOCS3 to IL-6 receptor in adult monocytes than in fetal monocytes, potentially explaining differences in STAT phosphorylation. Additionally, IFN-γ signaling results in upregulation of antigen presentation and costimulatory machinery in adult, but not fetal, monocytes. These findings represent the first evidence that primary human fetal and adult monocytes are functionally distinct, potentially explaining how these cells respond differentially to cytokines implicated in development, in utero infections, and the pathogenesis of preterm labor.

  18. Local interneurons define functionally distinct regions within lobster olfactory glomeruli

    PubMed

    Wachowiak; Diebel; Ache

    1997-01-01

    Whole-cell recording coupled with biocytin injection revealed four types of interneurons intrinsic to the olfactory lobe (OL) of the spiny lobster Panulirus argus. Each type of neuron had a distinct pattern of arborization within the three anatomically defined regions of OL glomeruli (cap, subcap and base). Type I interneurons innervated all three regions, while types II, III and IV branched only in the cap, subcap and base, respectively. Type I interneurons responded to electrical stimulation of the antennular (olfactory) nerve with a burst of 1­20 action potentials and a 1­10 s depolarization. Type II (cap) interneurons responded to the same input with a burst of 1­3 action potentials followed by a shorter hyperpolarization. Type III (subcap) interneurons responded with a burst of 1­6 action potentials followed by a delayed, 0.5­4 s depolarization. Type IV (base) interneurons responded with a brief depolarization or a burst of 1­3 action potentials followed by a 1 s hyperpolarization. The regionalized arborization and the different response properties of the type II, III and IV interneurons strongly imply that lobster olfactory glomeruli contain functionally distinct regions, a feature that should be useful in understanding the multiple synaptic pathways involved in processing olfactory input.

  19. The essential functions of KREPB4 are developmentally distinct and required for endonuclease association with editosomes.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Suzanne M; Stuart, Kenneth

    2017-08-11

    Uridine insertion and deletion RNA editing generates functional mitochondrial mRNAs in Trypanosoma brucei, and several transcripts are differentially edited in bloodstream (BF) and procyclic form (PF) cells correlating with changes in mitochondrial function. Editing is catalyzed by three ∼20S editosomes that have a common set of 12 proteins, but are typified by mutually exclusive RNase III KREN1, N2, and N3 endonucleases with distinct cleavage specificities. KREPB4 is a common editosome protein that has a degenerate RNase III domain lacking conserved catalytic residues, in addition to zinc-finger and Pumilio/fem-3 mRNA binding factor (PUF) motifs. Here we show that KREPB4 is essential for BF and PF growth, in vivo RNA editing, and editosome integrity, but that loss of KREPB4 has differential effects on editosome component and complexes between BF and PF cells. We used targeted mutagenesis to investigate the functions of the conserved PUF and RNase III domains in both life-cycle stages and show that the PUF motif is not essential for function in BF or PF. In contrast, specific mutations in the RNase III domain severely inhibit BF and PF growth and editing, and disrupt ~20S editosomes, while others indicate that the RNase III domain is noncatalytic. We further show that KREPB4, specifically the noncatalytic RNase III domain, is required for the association of KREN1, N2, and N3 with PF editosomes. These results, combined with previous studies, support a model in which KREPB4 acts as a pseudoenzyme to form the noncatalytic half of an RNase III heterodimer with the editing endonucleases. Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  20. Interaction between Functional Domains of Bacillus thuringiensis Insecticidal Crystal Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Rang, Cécile; Vachon, Vincent; de Maagd, Ruud A.; Villalon, Mario; Schwartz, Jean-Louis; Bosch, Dirk; Frutos, Roger; Laprade, Raynald

    1999-01-01

    Interactions among the three structural domains of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1 toxins were investigated by functional analysis of chimeric proteins. Hybrid genes were prepared by exchanging the regions coding for either domain I or domain III among Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac, Cry1C, and Cry1E. The activity of the purified trypsin-activated chimeric toxins was evaluated by testing their effects on the viability and plasma membrane permeability of Sf9 cells. Among the parental toxins, only Cry1C was active against these cells and only chimeras possessing domain II from Cry1C were functional. Combination of domain I from Cry1E with domains II and III from Cry1C, however, resulted in an inactive toxin, indicating that domain II from an active toxin is necessary, but not sufficient, for activity. Pores formed by chimeric toxins in which domain I was from Cry1Ab or Cry1Ac were slightly smaller than those formed by toxins in which domain I was from Cry1C. The properties of the pores formed by the chimeras are therefore likely to result from an interaction between domain I and domain II or III. Domain III appears to modulate the activity of the chimeric toxins: combination of domain III from Cry1Ab with domains I and II of Cry1C gave a protein which was more strongly active than Cry1C. PMID:10388684

  1. The Anthropocene is functionally and stratigraphically distinct from the Holocene.

    PubMed

    Waters, Colin N; Zalasiewicz, Jan; Summerhayes, Colin; Barnosky, Anthony D; Poirier, Clément; Gałuszka, Agnieszka; Cearreta, Alejandro; Edgeworth, Matt; Ellis, Erle C; Ellis, Michael; Jeandel, Catherine; Leinfelder, Reinhold; McNeill, J R; Richter, Daniel deB; Steffen, Will; Syvitski, James; Vidas, Davor; Wagreich, Michael; Williams, Mark; Zhisheng, An; Grinevald, Jacques; Odada, Eric; Oreskes, Naomi; Wolfe, Alexander P

    2016-01-08

    Human activity is leaving a pervasive and persistent signature on Earth. Vigorous debate continues about whether this warrants recognition as a new geologic time unit known as the Anthropocene. We review anthropogenic markers of functional changes in the Earth system through the stratigraphic record. The appearance of manufactured materials in sediments, including aluminum, plastics, and concrete, coincides with global spikes in fallout radionuclides and particulates from fossil fuel combustion. Carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus cycles have been substantially modified over the past century. Rates of sea-level rise and the extent of human perturbation of the climate system exceed Late Holocene changes. Biotic changes include species invasions worldwide and accelerating rates of extinction. These combined signals render the Anthropocene stratigraphically distinct from the Holocene and earlier epochs. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  2. The FN400 is functionally distinct from the N400.

    PubMed

    Bridger, Emma K; Bader, Regine; Kriukova, Olga; Unger, Kerstin; Mecklinger, Axel

    2012-11-15

    The FN400 refers to the early midfrontally-distributed difference between ERPs elicited by old and new items, which operates in a way consistent with a neural marker of familiarity-based recognition. Double dissociations between the FN400 and a later ERP index of recollection provide some of the most compelling evidence in support of dual-process models to date. It has recently been claimed, however, that there is no evidence that the FN400 is functionally distinct from the N400 index of implicit semantic priming (Voss, J., and Federmeier, K., FN400 potentials are functionally identical to N400 potentials and reflect semantic processing during recognition testing, Psychophysiology, 48, 532-546, 2011), challenging inferences made on the basis of this effect. We argue that the design employed to make this claim is flawed because it comprised a semantic priming manipulation embedded within a continuous recognition test which enabled recognition contrasts to be confounded by semantic processes in a number of ways. Here, ERPs were recorded from a design which avoided these confounds by employing a semantic priming paradigm which also served as the encoding phase for a surprise subsequent recognition test phase. An N400 effect elicited in the semantic priming task demonstrated the established centro-parietal maximum, whereas the difference between correctly responded to old and new ERPs in the recognition test was maximal over frontal sites in the same time window. When direct comparisons of the electrophysiological correlates of semantic priming and episodic recognition are recorded in a paradigm in which the two are not confounded, the FN400 reflects a qualitatively distinct effect from the N400. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Novel functions of CCM1 delimit the relationship of PTB/PH domains.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Dubey, Pallavi; Padarti, Akhil; Zhang, Aileen; Patel, Rinkal; Patel, Vipulkumar; Cistola, David; Badr, Ahmed

    2017-10-01

    Three NPXY motifs and one FERM domain in CCM1 makes it a versatile scaffold protein for tethering the signaling components together within the CCM signaling complex (CSC). The cellular role of CCM1 protein remains inadequately expounded. Both phosphotyrosine binding (PTB) and pleckstrin homology (PH) domains were recognized as structurally related but functionally distinct domains. By utilizing molecular cloning, protein binding assays and RT-qPCR to identify novel cellular partners of CCM1 and its cellular expression patterns; by screening candidate PTB/PH proteins and subsequently structurally simulation in combining with current X-ray crystallography and NMR data to defined the essential structure of PTB/PH domain for NPXY-binding and the relationship among PTB, PH and FERM domain(s). We identified a group of 28 novel cellular partners of CCM1, all of which contain either PTB or PH domain(s), and developed a novel classification system for these PTB/PH proteins based on their relationship with different NPXY motifs of CCM1. Our results demonstrated that CCM1 has a wide spectrum of binding to different PTB/PH proteins and perpetuates their specificity to interact with certain PTB/PH domains through selective combination of three NPXY motifs. We also demonstrated that CCM1 can be assembled into oligomers through intermolecular interaction between its F3 lobe in FERM domain and one of the three NPXY motifs. Despite being embedded in FERM domain as F3 lobe, F3 module acts as a fully functional PH domain to interact with NPXY motif. The most salient feature of the study was that both PTB and PH domains are structurally and functionally comparable, suggesting that PTB domain is likely evolved from PH domain with polymorphic structural additions at its N-terminus. A new β1A-strand of the PTB domain was discovered and new minimum structural requirement of PTB/PH domain for NPXY motif-binding was determined. Based on our data, a novel theory of structure, function and

  4. Structure and Function of the TIR Domain from the Grape NLR Protein RPV1.

    PubMed

    Williams, Simon J; Yin, Ling; Foley, Gabriel; Casey, Lachlan W; Outram, Megan A; Ericsson, Daniel J; Lu, Jiang; Boden, Mikael; Dry, Ian B; Kobe, Bostjan

    2016-01-01

    The N-terminal Toll/interleukin-1 receptor/resistance protein (TIR) domain has been shown to be both necessary and sufficient for defense signaling in the model plants flax and Arabidopsis. In examples from these organisms, TIR domain self-association is required for signaling function, albeit through distinct interfaces. Here, we investigate these properties in the TIR domain containing resistance protein RPV1 from the wild grapevine Muscadinia rotundifolia. The RPV1 TIR domain, without additional flanking sequence present, is autoactive when transiently expressed in tobacco, demonstrating that the TIR domain alone is capable of cell-death signaling. We determined the crystal structure of the RPV1 TIR domain at 2.3 Å resolution. In the crystals, the RPV1 TIR domain forms a dimer, mediated predominantly through residues in the αA and αE helices ("AE" interface). This interface is shared with the interface discovered in the dimeric complex of the TIR domains from the Arabidopsis RPS4/RRS1 resistance protein pair. We show that surface-exposed residues in the AE interface that mediate the dimer interaction in the crystals are highly conserved among plant TIR domain-containing proteins. While we were unable to demonstrate self-association of the RPV1 TIR domain in solution or using yeast 2-hybrid, mutations of surface-exposed residues in the AE interface prevent the cell-death autoactive phenotype. In addition, mutation of residues known to be important in the cell-death signaling function of the flax L6 TIR domain were also shown to be required for RPV1 TIR domain mediated cell-death. Our data demonstrate that multiple TIR domain surfaces control the cell-death function of the RPV1 TIR domain and we suggest that the conserved AE interface may have a general function in TIR-NLR signaling.

  5. Structure and Function of the TIR Domain from the Grape NLR Protein RPV1

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Simon J.; Yin, Ling; Foley, Gabriel; Casey, Lachlan W.; Outram, Megan A.; Ericsson, Daniel J.; Lu, Jiang; Boden, Mikael; Dry, Ian B.; Kobe, Bostjan

    2016-01-01

    The N-terminal Toll/interleukin-1 receptor/resistance protein (TIR) domain has been shown to be both necessary and sufficient for defense signaling in the model plants flax and Arabidopsis. In examples from these organisms, TIR domain self-association is required for signaling function, albeit through distinct interfaces. Here, we investigate these properties in the TIR domain containing resistance protein RPV1 from the wild grapevine Muscadinia rotundifolia. The RPV1 TIR domain, without additional flanking sequence present, is autoactive when transiently expressed in tobacco, demonstrating that the TIR domain alone is capable of cell-death signaling. We determined the crystal structure of the RPV1 TIR domain at 2.3 Å resolution. In the crystals, the RPV1 TIR domain forms a dimer, mediated predominantly through residues in the αA and αE helices (“AE” interface). This interface is shared with the interface discovered in the dimeric complex of the TIR domains from the Arabidopsis RPS4/RRS1 resistance protein pair. We show that surface-exposed residues in the AE interface that mediate the dimer interaction in the crystals are highly conserved among plant TIR domain-containing proteins. While we were unable to demonstrate self-association of the RPV1 TIR domain in solution or using yeast 2-hybrid, mutations of surface-exposed residues in the AE interface prevent the cell-death autoactive phenotype. In addition, mutation of residues known to be important in the cell-death signaling function of the flax L6 TIR domain were also shown to be required for RPV1 TIR domain mediated cell-death. Our data demonstrate that multiple TIR domain surfaces control the cell-death function of the RPV1 TIR domain and we suggest that the conserved AE interface may have a general function in TIR-NLR signaling. PMID:28008335

  6. Functional domains of the poliovirus receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Koike, Satoshi; Ise, Iku; Nomoto, Akio )

    1991-05-15

    A number of mutant cDNAs of the human poliovirus receptor were constructed to identify essential regions of the molecule as the receptor. All mutant cDNAs carrying the sequence coding for the entire N-terminal immunoglobulin-like domain (domain I) confer permissiveness for poliovirus to mouse L cells, but a mutant cDNA lacking the sequence for domain I does not. The transformants permissive for poliovirus were able to bind the virus and were also recognized by monoclonal antibody D171, which competes with poliovirus for the cellular receptor. These results strongly suggest that the poliovirus binding site resides in domain I of the receptor. Mutant cDNAs for the sequence encoding the intracellular peptide were also constructed and expressed in mouse L cells. Susceptibility of these cells to poliovirus revealed that the entire putative cytoplasmic domain is not essential for virus infection. Thus, the cytoplasmic domain of the molecule appears not to play a role in the penetration of poliovirus.

  7. Two distinct domains of Bicoid mediate its transcriptional downregulation by the Torso pathway.

    PubMed

    Janody, F; Sturny, R; Schaeffer, V; Azou, Y; Dostatni, N

    2001-06-01

    The transcriptional activity of the Bicoid morphogen is directly downregulated by the Torso signal transduction cascade at the anterior pole of the Drosophila embryo. This regulation does not involve the homeodomain or direct phosphorylation of Bicoid. We analyse the transcriptional regulation of Bicoid in response to the Torso pathway, using Bicoid variants and fusion proteins between the Bicoid domains and the Gal4 DNA-binding domain. We show that Bicoid possesses three autonomous activation domains. Two of these domains, the serine/threonine-rich and the acidic domains, are downregulated by Torso, whereas the third activation domain, which is rich in glutamine, is not. The alanine-rich domain, previously described as an activation domain in vitro, has a repressive activity that is independent of Torso. Thus, Bicoid downregulation by Torso results from a competition between the glutamine-rich domain that is insensitive to Torso and the serine/threonine-rich and acidic activation domains downregulated by Torso. The alanine-rich domain contributes to this process indirectly by reducing the global activity of the protein and in particular the activity of the glutamine-rich domain that might otherwise prevent downregulation by Torso.

  8. Acetylation mimics within individual core histone tail domains indicate distinct roles in regulating the stability of higher-order chromatin structure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaodong; Hayes, Jeffrey J

    2008-01-01

    Nucleosome arrays undergo salt-dependent self-association into large oligomers in a process thought to recapitulate essential aspects of higher-order tertiary chromatin structure formation. Lysine acetylation within the core histone tail domains inhibits self-association, an effect likely related to its role in facilitating transcription. As acetylation of specific tail domains may encode distinct functions, we investigated biochemical and self-association properties of model nucleosome arrays containing combinations of native and mutant core histones with lysine-to-glutamine substitutions to mimic acetylation. Acetylation mimics within the tail domains of H2B and H4 caused the largest inhibition of array self-association, while modification of the H3 tail uniquely affected the stability of DNA wrapping within individual nucleosomes. In addition, the effect of acetylation mimics on array self-association is inconsistent with a simple charge neutralization mechanism. For example, acetylation mimics within the H2A tail can have either a positive or negative effect on self-association, dependent upon the acetylation state of the other tails and nucleosomal repeat length. Finally, we demonstrate that glutamine substitutions and lysine acetylation within the H4 tail domain have identical effects on nucleosome array self-association. Our results indicate that acetylation of specific tail domains plays distinct roles in the regulation of chromatin structure.

  9. Minicollagen cysteine-rich domains encode distinct modes of polymerization to form stable nematocyst capsules

    PubMed Central

    Tursch, Anja; Mercadante, Davide; Tennigkeit, Jutta; Gräter, Frauke; Özbek, Suat

    2016-01-01

    The stinging capsules of cnidarians, nematocysts, function as harpoon-like organelles with unusual biomechanical properties. The nanosecond discharge of the nematocyst requires a dense protein network of the capsule structure withstanding an internal pressure of up to 150 bar. Main components of the capsule are short collagens, so-called minicollagens, that form extended polymers by disulfide reshuffling of their cysteine-rich domains (CRDs). Although CRDs have identical cysteine patterns, they exhibit different structures and disulfide connectivity at minicollagen N and C-termini. We show that the structurally divergent CRDs have different cross-linking potentials in vitro and in vivo. While the C-CRD can participate in several simultaneous intermolecular disulfides and functions as a cystine knot after minicollagen synthesis, the N-CRD is monovalent. Our combined experimental and computational analyses reveal the cysteines in the C-CRD fold to exhibit a higher structural propensity for disulfide bonding and a faster kinetics of polymerization. During nematocyst maturation, the highly reactive C-CRD is instrumental in efficient cross-linking of minicollagens to form pressure resistant capsules. The higher ratio of C-CRD folding types evidenced in the medusozoan lineage might have fostered the evolution of novel, predatory nematocyst types in cnidarians with a free-swimming medusa stage. PMID:27166560

  10. Microdissection of Shoot Meristem Functional Domains

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The shoot apical meristem (SAM) maintains a pool of indeterminate cells within the SAM proper, while lateral organs are initiated from the SAM periphery. Laser microdissection–microarray technology was used to compare transcriptional profiles within these SAM domains to identify novel maize genes th...

  11. Evolution of Domain Architectures and Catalytic Functions of Enzymes in Metabolic Systems

    PubMed Central

    Suen, Summit; Lu, Henry Horng-Shing; Yeang, Chen-Hsiang

    2012-01-01

    Domain architectures and catalytic functions of enzymes constitute the centerpieces of a metabolic network. These types of information are formulated as a two-layered network consisting of domains, proteins, and reactions—a domain–protein–reaction (DPR) network. We propose an algorithm to reconstruct the evolutionary history of DPR networks across multiple species and categorize the mechanisms of metabolic systems evolution in terms of network changes. The reconstructed history reveals distinct patterns of evolutionary mechanisms between prokaryotic and eukaryotic networks. Although the evolutionary mechanisms in early ancestors of prokaryotes and eukaryotes are quite similar, more novel and duplicated domain compositions with identical catalytic functions arise along the eukaryotic lineage. In contrast, prokaryotic enzymes become more versatile by catalyzing multiple reactions with similar chemical operations. Moreover, different metabolic pathways are enriched with distinct network evolution mechanisms. For instance, although the pathways of steroid biosynthesis, protein kinases, and glycosaminoglycan biosynthesis all constitute prominent features of animal-specific physiology, their evolution of domain architectures and catalytic functions follows distinct patterns. Steroid biosynthesis is enriched with reaction creations but retains a relatively conserved repertoire of domain compositions and proteins. Protein kinases retain conserved reactions but possess many novel domains and proteins. In contrast, glycosaminoglycan biosynthesis has high rates of reaction/protein creations and domain recruitments. Finally, we elicit and validate two general principles underlying the evolution of DPR networks: 1) duplicated enzyme proteins possess similar catalytic functions and 2) the majority of novel domains arise to catalyze novel reactions. These results shed new lights on the evolution of metabolic systems. PMID:22936075

  12. Architecture and function of metallopeptidase catalytic domains

    PubMed Central

    Cerdà-Costa, Núria; Gomis-Rüth, Francesc Xavier

    2014-01-01

    The cleavage of peptide bonds by metallopeptidases (MPs) is essential for life. These ubiquitous enzymes participate in all major physiological processes, and so their deregulation leads to diseases ranging from cancer and metastasis, inflammation, and microbial infection to neurological insults and cardiovascular disorders. MPs cleave their substrates without a covalent intermediate in a single-step reaction involving a solvent molecule, a general base/acid, and a mono-or dinuclear catalytic metal site. Most monometallic MPs comprise a short metal-binding motif (HEXXH), which includes two metal-binding histidines and a general base/acid glutamate, and they are grouped into the zincin tribe of MPs. The latter divides mainly into the gluzincin and metzincin clans. Metzincins consist of globular ∼130–270-residue catalytic domains, which are usually preceded by N-terminal pro-segments, typically required for folding and latency maintenance. The catalytic domains are often followed by C-terminal domains for substrate recognition and other protein–protein interactions, anchoring to membranes, oligomerization, and compartmentalization. Metzincin catalytic domains consist of a structurally conserved N-terminal subdomain spanning a five-stranded β-sheet, a backing helix, and an active-site helix. The latter contains most of the metal-binding motif, which is here characteristically extended to HEXXHXXGXX(H,D). Downstream C-terminal subdomains are generally shorter, differ more among metzincins, and mainly share a conserved loop—the Met-turn—and a C-terminal helix. The accumulated structural data from more than 300 deposited structures of the 12 currently characterized metzincin families reviewed here provide detailed knowledge of the molecular features of their catalytic domains, help in our understanding of their working mechanisms, and form the basis for the design of novel drugs. PMID:24596965

  13. Sequence analysis of the non-recurring C-terminal domains shows that insect lipoprotein receptors constitute a distinct group of LDL receptor family members.

    PubMed

    Rodenburg, Kees W; Smolenaars, Marcel M W; Van Hoof, Dennis; Van der Horst, Dick J

    2006-04-01

    Lipoprotein-mediated delivery of lipids in mammals involves endocytic receptors of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor (LDLR) family. In contrast, in insects, the lipoprotein, lipophorin (Lp), functions as a reusable lipid shuttle in lipid delivery, and these animals, therefore, were not supposed to use endocytic receptors. However, recent data indicate additional endocytic uptake of Lp, mediated by a Lp receptor (LpR) of the LDLR family. The two N-terminal domains of LDLR family members are involved in ligand binding and dissociation, respectively, and are composed of a mosaic of multiple repeats. The three C-terminal domains, viz., the optional O-linked glycosylation domain, the transmembrane domain, and the intracellular domain, are of a non-repetitive sequence. The present classification of newly discovered LDLR family members, including the LpRs, bears no relevance to physiological function. Therefore, as a novel approach, the C-terminal domains of LDLR family members across the entire animal kingdom were used to perform a sequence comparison analysis in combination with a phylogenetic tree analysis. The LpRs appeared to segregate into a specific group distinct from the groups encompassing the other family members, and each of the three C-terminal domains of the insect receptors is composed of unique set of sequence motifs. Based on conservation of sequence motifs and organization of these motifs in the domains, LpR resembles most the groups of the LDLRs, very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) receptors, and vitellogenin receptors. However, in sequence aspects in which LpR deviates from these three receptor groups, it most notably resembles LDLR-related protein-2, or megalin. These features might explain the functional differences disclosed between insect and mammalian lipoprotein receptors.

  14. Synthetic actin-binding domains reveal compositional constraints for function.

    PubMed

    Lorenzi, Maria; Gimona, Mario

    2008-01-01

    The actin-binding domains of many proteins consist of a canonical type 1/type 2 arrangement of the structurally conserved calponin homology domain. Using the actin-binding domain of alpha-actinin-1 as a scaffold we have generated synthetic actin-binding domains by altering position and composition of the calponin homology domains. We show that the presence of two calponin homology domains alone and in the context of an actin-binding domain is not sufficient for actin-binding, and that both single and homotypic type 2 calponin homology domain tandems fail to bind to actin in vitro and in transfected cells. In contrast, single and tandem type 1 calponin homology domain arrays bind actin directly but result in defective turnover rates on actin filaments, and in aberrant actin bundling when introduced into the full-length alpha-actinin molecule. An actin-binding domain harboring the calponin homology domains in an inverted position, however, functions both in isolation and in the context of the dimeric alpha-actinin molecule. Our data demonstrate that the dynamics and specificity of actin-binding via actin-binding domains requires both the filament binding properties of the type 1, and regulation by type 2 calponin homology domains, and appear independent of their position.

  15. CBS domains: structure, function, and pathology in human proteins.

    PubMed

    Ignoul, Sofie; Eggermont, Jan

    2005-12-01

    The cystathionine-beta-synthase (CBS) domain is an evolutionarily conserved protein domain that is present in the proteome of archaebacteria, prokaryotes, and eukaryotes. CBS domains usually come in tandem repeats and are found in cytosolic and membrane proteins performing different functions (metabolic enzymes, kinases, and channels). Crystallographic studies of bacterial CBS domains have shown that two CBS domains form an intramolecular dimeric structure (CBS pair). Several human hereditary diseases (homocystinuria, retinitis pigmentosa, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, myotonia congenital, etc.) can be caused by mutations in CBS domains of, respectively, cystathionine-beta-synthase, inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase, AMP kinase, and chloride channels. Despite their clinical relevance, it remains to be established what the precise function of CBS domains is and how they affect the structural and/or functional properties of an enzyme, kinase, or channel. Depending on the protein in which they occur, CBS domains have been proposed to affect multimerization and sorting of proteins, channel gating, and ligand binding. However, recent experiments revealing that CBS domains can bind adenosine-containing ligands such ATP, AMP, or S-adenosylmethionine have led to the hypothesis that CBS domains function as sensors of intracellular metabolites.

  16. Functional and topological characteristics of mammalian regulatory domains

    PubMed Central

    Symmons, Orsolya; Uslu, Veli Vural; Tsujimura, Taro; Ruf, Sandra; Nassari, Sonya; Schwarzer, Wibke; Ettwiller, Laurence; Spitz, François

    2014-01-01

    Long-range regulatory interactions play an important role in shaping gene-expression programs. However, the genomic features that organize these activities are still poorly characterized. We conducted a large operational analysis to chart the distribution of gene regulatory activities along the mouse genome, using hundreds of insertions of a regulatory sensor. We found that enhancers distribute their activities along broad regions and not in a gene-centric manner, defining large regulatory domains. Remarkably, these domains correlate strongly with the recently described TADs, which partition the genome into distinct self-interacting blocks. Different features, including specific repeats and CTCF-binding sites, correlate with the transition zones separating regulatory domains, and may help to further organize promiscuously distributed regulatory influences within large domains. These findings support a model of genomic organization where TADs confine regulatory activities to specific but large regulatory domains, contributing to the establishment of specific gene expression profiles. PMID:24398455

  17. An information theory framework for dynamic functional domain connectivity.

    PubMed

    Vergara, Victor M; Miller, Robyn; Calhoun, Vince

    2017-06-01

    Dynamic functional network connectivity (dFNC) analyzes time evolution of coherent activity in the brain. In this technique dynamic changes are considered for the whole brain. This paper proposes an information theory framework to measure information flowing among subsets of functional networks call functional domains. Our method aims at estimating bits of information contained and shared among domains. The succession of dynamic functional states is estimated at the domain level. Information quantity is based on the probabilities of observing each dynamic state. Mutual information measurement is then obtained from probabilities across domains. Thus, we named this value the cross domain mutual information (CDMI). Strong CDMIs were observed in relation to the subcortical domain. Domains related to sensorial input, motor control and cerebellum form another CDMI cluster. Information flow among other domains was seldom found. Other methods of dynamic connectivity focus on whole brain dFNC matrices. In the current framework, information theory is applied to states estimated from pairs of multi-network functional domains. In this context, we apply information theory to measure information flow across functional domains. Identified CDMI clusters point to known information pathways in the basal ganglia and also among areas of sensorial input, patterns found in static functional connectivity. In contrast, CDMI across brain areas of higher level cognitive processing follow a different pattern that indicates scarce information sharing. These findings show that employing information theory to formally measured information flow through brain domains reveals additional features of functional connectivity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Identification of the functional domains of ANT-1, a novel coactivator of the androgen receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Fan Shuli; Goto, Kiminobu; Chen Guangchun; Morinaga, Hidetaka; Nomura, Masatoshi; Okabe, Taijiro; Nawata, Hajime; Yanase, Toshihiko . E-mail: yanase@intmed3.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp

    2006-03-03

    Previously, we identified a transcriptional coactivator for the activation function-1 (AF-1) domain of the human androgen receptor (AR) and designated it androgen receptor N-terminal domain transactivating protein-1 (ANT-1). This coactivator, which contains multiple tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) motifs from amino acid (aa) 294, is identical to a component of U5 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles and binds specifically to the AR or glucocorticoid receptor. Here, we identified four distinct functional domains. The AR-AF-1-binding domain, which bound to either aa 180-360 or 360-532 in AR-AF-1, clearly overlapped with TAU-1 and TAU-5. This domain and the subnuclear speckle formation domain in ANT-1 were assigned within the TPR motifs, while the transactivating and nuclear localization signal domains resided within the N-terminal sequence. The existence of these functional domains may further support the idea that ANT-1 can function as an AR-AF-1-specific coactivator while mediating a transcription-splicing coupling.

  19. LIM Domain Only-2 (LMO2) Induces T-Cell Leukemia by Two Distinct Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Goodings, Charnise; Cleveland, Susan; Mathias, Elizabeth; Hardaway, J. Andrew; Elliott, Natalina; Yi, Yajun; Chen, Xi; Downing, James; Mullighan, Charles; Swing, Deborah A.; Tessarollo, Lino; Li, Liqi; Love, Paul; Jenkins, Nancy A.; Copeland, Neal G.; Thompson, Mary Ann; Du, Yang; Davé, Utpal P.

    2014-01-01

    The LMO2 oncogene is deregulated in the majority of human T-cell leukemia cases and in most gene therapy-induced T-cell leukemias. We made transgenic mice with enforced expression of Lmo2 in T-cells by the CD2 promoter/enhancer. These transgenic mice developed highly penetrant T-ALL by two distinct patterns of gene expression: one in which there was concordant activation of Lyl1, Hhex, and Mycn or alternatively, with Notch1 target gene activation. Most strikingly, this gene expression clustering was conserved in human Early T-cell Precursor ALL (ETP-ALL), where LMO2, HHEX, LYL1, and MYCN were most highly expressed. We discovered that HHEX is a direct transcriptional target of LMO2 consistent with its concordant gene expression. Furthermore, conditional inactivation of Hhex in CD2-Lmo2 transgenic mice markedly attenuated T-ALL development, demonstrating that Hhex is a crucial mediator of Lmo2's oncogenic function. The CD2-Lmo2 transgenic mice offer mechanistic insight into concordant oncogene expression and provide a model for the highly treatment-resistant ETP-ALL subtype. PMID:24465765

  20. Recombinant spider silk genetically functionalized with affinity domains.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Ronnie; Thatikonda, Naresh; Lindberg, Diana; Rising, Anna; Johansson, Jan; Nygren, Per-Åke; Hedhammar, My

    2014-05-12

    Functionalization of biocompatible materials for presentation of active protein domains is an area of growing interest. Herein, we describe a strategy for functionalization of recombinant spider silk via gene fusion to affinity domains of broad biotechnological use. Four affinity domains of different origin and structure; the IgG-binding domains Z and C2, the albumin-binding domain ABD, and the biotin-binding domain M4, were all successfully produced as soluble silk fusion proteins under nondenaturing purification conditions. Silk films and fibers produced from the fusion proteins were demonstrated to be chemically and thermally stable. Still, the bioactive domains are concluded to be folded and accessible, since their respective targets could be selectively captured from complex samples, including rabbit serum and human plasma. Interestingly, materials produced from mixtures of two different silk fusion proteins displayed combined binding properties, suggesting that tailor-made materials with desired stoichiometry and surface distributions of several binding domains can be produced. Further, use of the IgG binding ability as a general mean for presentation of desired biomolecules could be demonstrated for a human vascular endothelial growth factor (hVEGF) model system, via a first capture of anti-VEGF IgG to silk containing the Z-domain, followed by incubation with hVEGF. Taken together, this study demonstrates the potential of recombinant silk, genetically functionalized with affinity domains, for construction of biomaterials capable of presentation of almost any desired biomolecule.

  1. A Bimodal Distribution of Two Distinct Categories of Intrinsically Disordered Structures with Separate Functions in FG Nucleoporins*

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Justin; Phillips, Joshua L.; Patel, Samir; Goldfien, Gabriel; Calestagne-Morelli, Alison; Huang, Hans; Reza, Ryan; Acheson, Justin; Krishnan, Viswanathan V.; Newsam, Shawn; Gopinathan, Ajay; Lau, Edmond Y.; Colvin, Michael E.; Uversky, Vladimir N.; Rexach, Michael F.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) gate the only conduits for nucleocytoplasmic transport in eukaryotes. Their gate is formed by nucleoporins containing large intrinsically disordered domains with multiple phenylalanine-glycine repeats (FG domains). In combination, these are hypothesized to form a structurally and chemically homogeneous network of random coils at the NPC center, which sorts macromolecules by size and hydrophobicity. Instead, we found that FG domains are structurally and chemically heterogeneous. They adopt distinct categories of intrinsically disordered structures in non-random distributions. Some adopt globular, collapsed coil configurations and are characterized by a low charge content. Others are highly charged and adopt more dynamic, extended coil conformations. Interestingly, several FG nucleoporins feature both types of structures in a bimodal distribution along their polypeptide chain. This distribution functionally correlates with the attractive or repulsive character of their interactions with collapsed coil FG domains displaying cohesion toward one another and extended coil FG domains displaying repulsion. Topologically, these bipartite FG domains may resemble sticky molten globules connected to the tip of relaxed or extended coils. Within the NPC, the crowding of FG nucleoporins and the segregation of their disordered structures based on their topology, dimensions, and cohesive character could force the FG domains to form a tubular gate structure or transporter at the NPC center featuring two separate zones of traffic with distinct physicochemical properties. PMID:20368288

  2. A bimodal distribution of two distinct categories of intrinsically disordered structures with separate functions in FG nucleoporins.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Justin; Phillips, Joshua L; Patel, Samir; Goldfien, Gabriel; Calestagne-Morelli, Alison; Huang, Hans; Reza, Ryan; Acheson, Justin; Krishnan, Viswanathan V; Newsam, Shawn; Gopinathan, Ajay; Lau, Edmond Y; Colvin, Michael E; Uversky, Vladimir N; Rexach, Michael F

    2010-10-01

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) gate the only conduits for nucleocytoplasmic transport in eukaryotes. Their gate is formed by nucleoporins containing large intrinsically disordered domains with multiple phenylalanine-glycine repeats (FG domains). In combination, these are hypothesized to form a structurally and chemically homogeneous network of random coils at the NPC center, which sorts macromolecules by size and hydrophobicity. Instead, we found that FG domains are structurally and chemically heterogeneous. They adopt distinct categories of intrinsically disordered structures in non-random distributions. Some adopt globular, collapsed coil configurations and are characterized by a low charge content. Others are highly charged and adopt more dynamic, extended coil conformations. Interestingly, several FG nucleoporins feature both types of structures in a bimodal distribution along their polypeptide chain. This distribution functionally correlates with the attractive or repulsive character of their interactions with collapsed coil FG domains displaying cohesion toward one another and extended coil FG domains displaying repulsion. Topologically, these bipartite FG domains may resemble sticky molten globules connected to the tip of relaxed or extended coils. Within the NPC, the crowding of FG nucleoporins and the segregation of their disordered structures based on their topology, dimensions, and cohesive character could force the FG domains to form a tubular gate structure or transporter at the NPC center featuring two separate zones of traffic with distinct physicochemical properties.

  3. Microtubule motors mediate endosomal sorting by maintaining functional domain organization.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Sylvie D; Townley, Anna K; Danson, Chris M; Cullen, Peter J; Stephens, David J

    2013-06-01

    Many microtubule motors have been shown to couple to endosomal membranes. These motors include dynein in addition to many different kinesin family members. Sorting nexins (SNXs) are central to the organization and function of endosomes. These proteins can actively shape endosomal membranes and couple directly or indirectly to the minus-end microtubule motor dynein. Motor proteins acting on endosomes drive their motility, dictate their morphology and affect cargo segregation. We have used well-characterized members of the SNX family to elucidate motor coupling using high-resolution light microscopy coupled with depletion of specific microtubule motors. Endosomal domains labelled with SNX1, SNX4 and SNX8 couple to discrete combinations of dynein and kinesin motors. These specific combinations govern the structure and motility of each SNX-coated membrane in addition to the segregation of distinct functional endosomal subdomains. Taken together, our data show that these key features of endosome dynamics are governed by the same set of opposing microtubule motors. Thus, microtubule motors help to define the mosaic layout of endosomes that underpins cargo sorting.

  4. Modelling protein functional domains in signal transduction using Maude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sriram, M. G.

    2003-01-01

    Modelling of protein-protein interactions in signal transduction is receiving increased attention in computational biology. This paper describes recent research in the application of Maude, a symbolic language founded on rewriting logic, to the modelling of functional domains within signalling proteins. Protein functional domains (PFDs) are a critical focus of modern signal transduction research. In general, Maude models can simulate biological signalling networks and produce specific testable hypotheses at various levels of abstraction. Developing symbolic models of signalling proteins containing functional domains is important because of the potential to generate analyses of complex signalling networks based on structure-function relationships.

  5. Modular protein domains: an engineering approach toward functional biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Lin, Charng-Yu; Liu, Julie C

    2016-08-01

    Protein domains and peptide sequences are a powerful tool for conferring specific functions to engineered biomaterials. Protein sequences with a wide variety of functionalities, including structure, bioactivity, protein-protein interactions, and stimuli responsiveness, have been identified, and advances in molecular biology continue to pinpoint new sequences. Protein domains can be combined to make recombinant proteins with multiple functionalities. The high fidelity of the protein translation machinery results in exquisite control over the sequence of recombinant proteins and the resulting properties of protein-based materials. In this review, we discuss protein domains and peptide sequences in the context of functional protein-based materials, composite materials, and their biological applications.

  6. Modelling protein functional domains in signal transduction using Maude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sriram, M. G.

    2003-01-01

    Modelling of protein-protein interactions in signal transduction is receiving increased attention in computational biology. This paper describes recent research in the application of Maude, a symbolic language founded on rewriting logic, to the modelling of functional domains within signalling proteins. Protein functional domains (PFDs) are a critical focus of modern signal transduction research. In general, Maude models can simulate biological signalling networks and produce specific testable hypotheses at various levels of abstraction. Developing symbolic models of signalling proteins containing functional domains is important because of the potential to generate analyses of complex signalling networks based on structure-function relationships.

  7. Specialized Information Processing Deficits and Distinct Metabolomic Profiles Following TM-Domain Disruption of Nrg1.

    PubMed

    O'Tuathaigh, Colm M P; Mathur, Naina; O'Callaghan, Matthew J; MacIntyre, Lynsey; Harvey, Richard; Lai, Donna; Waddington, John L; Pickard, Benjamin S; Watson, David G; Moran, Paula M

    2017-09-01

    Although there is considerable genetic and pathologic evidence for an association between neuregulin 1 (NRG1) dysregulation and schizophrenia, the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms remain unclear. Mutant mice containing disruption of the transmembrane (TM) domain of the NRG1 gene constitute a heuristic model for dysregulation of NRG1-ErbB4 signaling in schizophrenia. The present study focused on hitherto uncharacterized information processing phenotypes in this mutant line. Using a mass spectrometry-based metabolomics approach, we also quantified levels of unique metabolites in brain. Across 2 different sites and protocols, Nrg1 mutants demonstrated deficits in prepulse inhibition, a measure of sensorimotor gating, that is, disrupted in schizophrenia; these deficits were partially reversed by acute treatment with second, but not first-, generation antipsychotic drugs. However, Nrg1 mutants did not show a specific deficit in latent inhibition, a measure of selective attention that is also disrupted in schizophrenia. In contrast, in a "what-where-when" object recognition memory task, Nrg1 mutants displayed sex-specific (males only) disruption of "what-when" performance, indicative of impaired temporal aspects of episodic memory. Differential metabolomic profiling revealed that these behavioral phenotypes were accompanied, most prominently, by alterations in lipid metabolism pathways. This study is the first to associate these novel physiological mechanisms, previously independently identified as being abnormal in schizophrenia, with disruption of NRG1 function. These data suggest novel mechanisms by which compromised neuregulin function from birth might lead to schizophrenia-relevant behavioral changes in adulthood. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center.

  8. Intellectual Growth in Children as a Function of Domain Specific and Domain General Working Memory Subgroups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanson, H. Lee

    2011-01-01

    This study examined whether children's growth on measures of fluid (Raven Colored Progressive Matrices) and crystallized (reading and math achievement) intelligence was attributable to domain-specific or domain-general functions of working memory (WM). A sample of 290 elementary school children was tested on measures of intelligence across three…

  9. Ultrastructure and function of the fractalkine mucin domain in CX(3)C chemokine domain presentation.

    PubMed

    Fong, A M; Erickson, H P; Zachariah, J P; Poon, S; Schamberg, N J; Imai, T; Patel, D D

    2000-02-11

    Fractalkine (FKN), a CX(3)C chemokine/mucin hybrid molecule on endothelium, functions as an adhesion molecule to capture and induce firm adhesion of a subset of leukocytes in a selectin- and integrin-independent manner. We hypothesized that the FKN mucin domain may be important for its function in adhesion, and tested the ability of secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) fusion proteins containing the entire extracellular region (FKN-SEAP), the chemokine domain (CX3C-SEAP), or the mucin domain (mucin-SEAP) to support firm adhesion under flow. CX3C-SEAP induced suboptimal firm adhesion of resting peripheral blood mononuclear cells, compared with FKN-SEAP, and mucin-SEAP induced no firm adhesion. CX3C-SEAP and FKN-SEAP bound to CX(3)CR1 with similar affinities. By electron microscopy, fractalkine was 29 nm in length with a long stalk (mucin domain), and a globular head (CX(3)C). To test the function of the mucin domain, a chimeric protein replacing the mucin domain with a rod-like segment of E-selectin was constructed. This chimeric protein gave the same adhesion of peripheral blood mononuclear cells as intact FKN, both when immobilized on glass and when expressed on the cell surface. This implies that the function of the mucin domain is to provide a stalk, extending the chemokine domain away from the endothelial cell surface to present it to flowing leukocytes.

  10. Distinct self-interaction domains promote Multi Sex Combs accumulation in and formation of the Drosophila histone locus body.

    PubMed

    Terzo, Esteban A; Lyons, Shawn M; Poulton, John S; Temple, Brenda R S; Marzluff, William F; Duronio, Robert J

    2015-04-15

    Nuclear bodies (NBs) are structures that concentrate proteins, RNAs, and ribonucleoproteins that perform functions essential to gene expression. How NBs assemble is not well understood. We studied the Drosophila histone locus body (HLB), a NB that concentrates factors required for histone mRNA biosynthesis at the replication-dependent histone gene locus. We coupled biochemical analysis with confocal imaging of both fixed and live tissues to demonstrate that the Drosophila Multi Sex Combs (Mxc) protein contains multiple domains necessary for HLB assembly. An important feature of this assembly process is the self-interaction of Mxc via two conserved N-terminal domains: a LisH domain and a novel self-interaction facilitator (SIF) domain immediately downstream of the LisH domain. Molecular modeling suggests that the LisH and SIF domains directly interact, and mutation of either the LisH or the SIF domain severely impairs Mxc function in vivo, resulting in reduced histone mRNA accumulation. A region of Mxc between amino acids 721 and 1481 is also necessary for HLB assembly independent of the LisH and SIF domains. Finally, the C-terminal 195 amino acids of Mxc are required for recruiting FLASH, an essential histone mRNA-processing factor, to the HLB. We conclude that multiple domains of the Mxc protein promote HLB assembly in order to concentrate factors required for histone mRNA biosynthesis.

  11. Do Distinct Functional Dyspepsia Subtypes Exist in Children?

    PubMed

    Turco, Rossella; Russo, Marina; Martinelli, Massimo; Castiello, Rosa; Coppola, Vincenzo; Miele, Erasmo; Staiano, Annamaria

    2016-03-01

    Two different subtypes of functional dyspepsia (FD) are recognized in adults: epigastric pain syndrome (EPS) and postprandial distress syndrome (PDS). The aim of the study was to assess the presence of FD subtypes in childhood at diagnosis and to observe changes at follow-up. A total of 100 patients with a diagnosis of FD based on pediatric Rome III criteria were consecutively enrolled. FD subtypes were successively classified through adult Rome III classification. Children were revaluated after 6 months of follow-up (T1). At T0, 17 (17%) of 100 patients were classified as EPS, whereas 47 (47%) of 100 patients fulfilled criteria for PDS. In 36 (36%) of 100 children an overlap between the 2 subtypes was identified. Nausea was significantly higher in PDS and overlap groups when compared with EPS (χ = 21.7, P = 0.0001; χ = 20.7, P = 0.0001). Headache was significantly increased in PDS and overlap groups compared with patients with EPS (χ = 9.8, P = 0.001; χ = 13.1, P = 0.0001, respectively). At T1 among children belonging to PDS group at enrolment, 9 of 47 (19.1%) changed to EPS group, and 9 of 47 (19.1%) changed to the overlap group. Five (29.4%) of 17 patients and 2 (11.8%) of 17 children diagnosed as having EPS at T0 switched to PDS and overlap group, respectively. Of the 36 patients with overlap at enrollment, 11 (30.6%) satisfied criteria for PDS, and 7 (19.4%) switched to EPS group. Two distinct FD subtypes are identifiable in pediatric population. A high percentage of overlap and a variation of subtype over time were found, suggesting a common pathophysiologic mechanism.

  12. Dynamic Remodeling of Microbial Biofilms by Functionally Distinct Exopolysaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Chew, Su Chuen; Kundukad, Binu; Seviour, Thomas; van der Maarel, Johan R. C.; Yang, Liang; Rice, Scott A.; Doyle, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Biofilms are densely populated communities of microbial cells protected and held together by a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances. The structure and rheological properties of the matrix at the microscale influence the retention and transport of molecules and cells in the biofilm, thereby dictating population and community behavior. Despite its importance, quantitative descriptions of the matrix microstructure and microrheology are limited. Here, particle-tracking microrheology in combination with genetic approaches was used to spatially and temporally study the rheological contributions of the major exopolysaccharides Pel and Psl in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Psl increased the elasticity and effective cross-linking within the matrix, which strengthened its scaffold and appeared to facilitate the formation of microcolonies. Conversely, Pel reduced effective cross-linking within the matrix. Without Psl, the matrix becomes more viscous, which facilitates biofilm spreading. The wild-type biofilm decreased in effective cross-linking over time, which would be advantageous for the spreading and colonization of new surfaces. This suggests that there are regulatory mechanisms to control production of the exopolysaccharides that serve to remodel the matrix of developing biofilms. The exopolysaccharides were also found to have profound effects on the spatial organization and integration of P. aeruginosa in a mixed-species biofilm model of P. aeruginosa-Staphylococcus aureus. Pel was required for close association of the two species in mixed-species microcolonies. In contrast, Psl was important for P. aeruginosa to form single-species biofilms on top of S. aureus biofilms. Our results demonstrate that Pel and Psl have distinct physical properties and functional roles during biofilm formation. PMID:25096883

  13. Extensions of PDZ domains as important structural and functional elements.

    PubMed

    Wang, Conan K; Pan, Lifeng; Chen, Jia; Zhang, Mingjie

    2010-08-01

    'Divide and conquer' has been the guiding strategy for the study of protein structure and function. Proteins are divided into domains with each domain having a canonical structural definition depending on its type. In this review, we push forward with the interesting observation that many domains have regions outside of their canonical definition that affect their structure and function; we call these regions 'extensions'. We focus on the highly abundant PDZ (PSD-95, DLG1 and ZO-1) domain. Using bioinformatics, we find that many PDZ domains have potential extensions and we developed an openly-accessible website to display our results ( http://bcz102.ust.hk/pdzex/ ). We propose, using well-studied PDZ domains as illustrative examples, that the roles of PDZ extensions can be classified into at least four categories: 1) protein dynamics-based modulation of target binding affinity, 2) provision of binding sites for macro-molecular assembly, 3) structural integration of multi-domain modules, and 4) expansion of the target ligand-binding pocket. Our review highlights the potential structural and functional importance of domain extensions, highlighting the significance of looking beyond the canonical boundaries of protein domains in general.

  14. ABCA1, ABCG1, and ABCG4 are distributed to distinct membrane meso-domains and disturb detergent-resistant domains on the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Sano, Osamu; Ito, Shiho; Kato, Reiko; Shimizu, Yuji; Kobayashi, Aya; Kimura, Yasuhisa; Kioka, Noriyuki; Hanada, Kentaro; Ueda, Kazumitsu; Matsuo, Michinori

    2014-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette A1 (ABCA1), ABCG1, and ABCG4 are lipid transporters that mediate the efflux of cholesterol from cells. To analyze the characteristics of these lipid transporters, we examined and compared their distributions and lipid efflux activity on the plasma membrane. The efflux of cholesterol mediated by ABCA1 and ABCG1, but not ABCG4, was affected by a reduction of cellular sphingomyelin levels. Detergent solubility and gradient density ultracentrifugation assays indicated that ABCA1, ABCG1, and ABCG4 were distributed to domains that were solubilized by Triton X-100 and Brij 96, resistant to Triton X-100 and Brij 96, and solubilized by Triton X-100 but resistant to Brij 96, respectively. Furthermore, ABCG1, but not ABCG4, was colocalized with flotillin-1 on the plasma membrane. The amounts of cholesterol extracted by methyl-β-cyclodextrin were increased by ABCA1, ABCG1, or ABCG4, suggesting that cholesterol in non-raft domains was increased. Furthermore, ABCG1 and ABCG4 disturbed the localization of caveolin-1 to the detergent-resistant domains and the binding of cholera toxin subunit B to the plasma membrane. These results suggest that ABCA1, ABCG1, and ABCG4 are localized to distinct membrane meso-domains and disturb the meso-domain structures by reorganizing lipids on the plasma membrane; collectively, these observations may explain the different substrate profiles and lipid efflux roles of these transporters.

  15. Functional dependence of neuroligin on a new non-PDZ intracellular domain

    PubMed Central

    Shipman, Seth L; Schnell, Eric; Hirai, Takaaki; Chen, Bo-Shiun; Roche, Katherine W; Nicoll, Roger A

    2011-01-01

    Neuroligins, a family of postsynaptic adhesion molecules, are important in synaptogenesis through a well-characterized trans-synaptic interaction with neurexin. In addition, neuroligins are thought to drive postsynaptic assembly through binding of their intracellular domain to PSD-95. However, there is little direct evidence to support the functional necessity of the neuroligin intracellular domain in postsynaptic development. We found that presence of endogenous neuroligin obscured the study of exogenous mutated neuroligin. We therefore used chained microRNAs in rat organotypic hippocampal slices to generate a reduced background of endogenous neuroligin. On this reduced background, we found that neuroligin function was critically dependent on the cytoplasmic tail. However, this function required neither the PDZ ligand nor any other previously described cytoplasmic binding domain, but rather required a previously unknown conserved region. Mutation of a single critical residue in this region inhibited neuroligin-mediated excitatory synaptic potentiation. Finally, we found a functional distinction between neuroligins 1 and 3. PMID:21532576

  16. Dissection of a human septin: definition and characterization of distinct domains within human SEPT4.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Wanius; de Araújo, Ana Paula Ulian; Neto, Mario de Oliveira; Ballestero, Michel R M; Polikarpov, Igor; Tanaka, Manami; Tanaka, Tomoo; Garratt, Richard Charles

    2006-11-21

    The septins are a conserved family of guanosine-5'-triphosphate (GTP)-binding proteins. In mammals they are involved in a variety of cellular processes, such as cytokinesis, exocytosis, and vesicle trafficking. Specifically, SEPT4 has also been shown to be expressed in both human colorectal cancer and malignant melanoma, as well as being involved in neurodegenerative disorders. However, many of the details of the modes of action of septins in general remain unclear, and little is known of their detailed molecular architecture. Here, we define explicitly and characterize the domains of human SEPT4. Regions corresponding to the N-terminal, GTPase, and C-terminal domains as well as the latter two together were successfully expressed in Escherichia coli in soluble form and purified by affinity and size-exclusion chromatographies. The purified domains were analyzed by circular dichroism spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, and small-angle X-ray scattering, as well as with bioinformatics tools. Of the three major domains that comprise SEPT4, the N-terminal domain contains little regular secondary structure and may be intrinsically unstructured. The central GTPase domain is a mixed alpha/beta structure, probably based on an open beta sheet. As defined here, it is catalytically active and forms stable homodimers in vitro. The C-terminal domain also forms homodimers and can be divided into two regions, the second of which is alpha-helical and consistent with a coiled-coil structure. These studies should provide a useful basis for future biophysical studies of SEPT4, including the structural basis for their involvement in diseases such as cancer and neurodegenerative disorders.

  17. Function-selective domain architecture plasticity potentials in eukaryotic genome evolution.

    PubMed

    Linkeviciute, Viktorija; Rackham, Owen J L; Gough, Julian; Oates, Matt E; Fang, Hai

    2015-12-01

    To help evaluate how protein function impacts on genome evolution, we introduce a new concept of 'architecture plasticity potential' - the capacity to form distinct domain architectures - both for an individual domain, or more generally for a set of domains grouped by shared function. We devise a scoring metric to measure the plasticity potential for these domain sets, and evaluate how function has changed over time for different species. Applying this metric to a phylogenetic tree of eukaryotic genomes, we find that the involvement of each function is not random but highly selective. For certain lineages there is strong bias for evolution to involve domains related to certain functions. In general eukaryotic genomes, particularly animals, expand complex functional activities such as signalling and regulation, but at the cost of reducing metabolic processes. We also observe differential evolution of transcriptional regulation and a unique evolutionary role of channel regulators; crucially this is only observable in terms of the architecture plasticity potential. Our findings provide a new layer of information to understand the significance of function in eukaryotic genome evolution. A web search tool, available at http://supfam.org/Pevo, offers a wide spectrum of options for exploring functional importance in eukaryotic genome evolution. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Dynamic remodeling of microbial biofilms by functionally distinct exopolysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Chew, Su Chuen; Kundukad, Binu; Seviour, Thomas; van der Maarel, Johan R C; Yang, Liang; Rice, Scott A; Doyle, Patrick; Kjelleberg, Staffan

    2014-08-05

    Biofilms are densely populated communities of microbial cells protected and held together by a matrix of extracellular polymeric substances. The structure and rheological properties of the matrix at the microscale influence the retention and transport of molecules and cells in the biofilm, thereby dictating population and community behavior. Despite its importance, quantitative descriptions of the matrix microstructure and microrheology are limited. Here, particle-tracking microrheology in combination with genetic approaches was used to spatially and temporally study the rheological contributions of the major exopolysaccharides Pel and Psl in Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. Psl increased the elasticity and effective cross-linking within the matrix, which strengthened its scaffold and appeared to facilitate the formation of microcolonies. Conversely, Pel reduced effective cross-linking within the matrix. Without Psl, the matrix becomes more viscous, which facilitates biofilm spreading. The wild-type biofilm decreased in effective cross-linking over time, which would be advantageous for the spreading and colonization of new surfaces. This suggests that there are regulatory mechanisms to control production of the exopolysaccharides that serve to remodel the matrix of developing biofilms. The exopolysaccharides were also found to have profound effects on the spatial organization and integration of P. aeruginosa in a mixed-species biofilm model of P. aeruginosa-Staphylococcus aureus. Pel was required for close association of the two species in mixed-species microcolonies. In contrast, Psl was important for P. aeruginosa to form single-species biofilms on top of S. aureus biofilms. Our results demonstrate that Pel and Psl have distinct physical properties and functional roles during biofilm formation. Importance: Most bacteria grow as biofilms in the environment or in association with eukaryotic hosts. Removal of biofilms that form on surfaces is a challenge in clinical

  19. Membrane-bound mucin modular domains: from structure to function.

    PubMed

    Jonckheere, Nicolas; Skrypek, Nicolas; Frénois, Frédéric; Van Seuningen, Isabelle

    2013-06-01

    Mucins belong to a heterogeneous family of large O-glycoproteins composed of a long peptidic chain called apomucin on which are linked hundreds of oligosaccharidic chains. Among mucins, membrane-bound mucins are modular proteins and have a structural organization usually containing Pro/Thr/Ser-rich O-glycosylated domains (PTS), EGF-like and SEA domains. Via these modular domains, the membrane-bound mucins participate in cell signalling and cell interaction with their environment in normal and pathological conditions. Moreover, the recent knowledge of these domains and their biological activities led to the development of new therapeutic approaches involving mucins. In this review, we show 3D structures of EGF and SEA domains. We also describe the functional features of the evolutionary conserved domains of membrane-bound mucins and discuss consequences of splice events.

  20. Domain mobility in proteins: functional and evolutionary implications.

    PubMed

    Basu, Malay Kumar; Poliakov, Eugenia; Rogozin, Igor B

    2009-05-01

    A substantial fraction of eukaryotic proteins contains multiple domains, some of which show a tendency to occur in diverse domain architectures and can be considered mobile (or 'promiscuous'). These promiscuous domains are typically involved in protein-protein interactions and play crucial roles in interaction networks, particularly those contributing to signal transduction. They also play a major role in creating diversity of protein domain architecture in the proteome. It is now apparent that promiscuity is a volatile and relatively fast-changing feature in evolution, and that only a few domains retain their promiscuity status throughout evolution. Many such domains attained their promiscuity status independently in different lineages. Only recently, we have begun to understand the diversity of protein domain architectures and the role the promiscuous domains play in evolution of this diversity. However, many of the biological mechanisms of protein domain mobility remain shrouded in mystery. In this review, we discuss our present understanding of protein domain promiscuity, its evolution and its role in cellular function.

  1. Temporally and spatially distinct theta oscillations dissociate a language-specific from a domain-general processing mechanism across the age trajectory.

    PubMed

    Beese, Caroline; Meyer, Lars; Vassileiou, Benedict; Friederici, Angela D

    2017-09-11

    The cognitive functionality of neural oscillations is still highly debated, as different functions have been associated with identical frequency ranges. Theta band oscillations, for instance, were proposed to underlie both language comprehension and domain-general cognitive abilities. Here we show that the ageing brain can provide an answer to the open question whether it is one and the same theta oscillation underlying those functions, thereby resolving a long-standing paradox. While better cognitive functioning is predicted by low theta power in the brain at rest, resting state (RS) theta power declines with age, but sentence comprehension deteriorates in old age. We resolve this paradox showing that sentence comprehension declines due to changes in RS theta power within domain-general brain networks known to support successful sentence comprehension, while low RS theta power within the left-hemispheric dorso-frontal language network predicts intact sentence comprehension. The two RS theta networks were also found to functionally decouple relative to their independent internal coupling. Thus, both temporally and spatially distinct RS theta oscillations dissociate a language-specific from a domain-general processing mechanism.

  2. Aperiodic topological order in the domain configurations of functional materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Fei-Ting; Cheong, Sang-Wook

    2017-03-01

    In numerous functional materials, such as steels, ferroelectrics and magnets, new functionalities can be achieved through the engineering of the domain structures, which are associated with the ordering of certain parameters within the material. The recent progress in technologies that enable imaging at atomic-scale spatial resolution has transformed our understanding of domain topology, revealing that, along with simple stripe-like or irregularly shaped domains, intriguing vortex-type topological domain configurations also exist. In this Review, we present a new classification scheme of 'Zm Zn domains with Zl vortices' for 2D macroscopic domain structures with m directional variants and n translational antiphases. This classification, together with the concepts of topological protection and topological charge conservation, can be applied to a wide range of materials, such as multiferroics, improper ferroelectrics, layered transition metal dichalcogenides and magnetic superconductors, as we discuss using selected examples. The resulting topological considerations provide a new basis for the understanding of the formation, kinetics, manipulation and property optimization of domains and domain boundaries in functional materials.

  3. Functional Implications of Domain Organization Within Prokaryotic Rhomboid Proteases.

    PubMed

    Panigrahi, Rashmi; Lemieux, M Joanne

    2015-01-01

    Intramembrane proteases are membrane embedded enzymes that cleave transmembrane substrates. This interesting class of enzyme and its water mediated substrate cleavage mechanism occurring within the hydrophobic lipid bilayer has drawn the attention of researchers. Rhomboids are a family of ubiquitous serine intramembrane proteases. Bacterial forms of rhomboid proteases are mainly composed of six transmembrane helices that are preceded by a soluble N-terminal domain. Several crystal structures of the membrane domain of the E. coli rhomboid protease ecGlpG have been solved. Independently, the ecGlpG N-terminal cytoplasmic domain structure was solved using both NMR and protein crystallography. Despite these structures, we still do not know the structure of the full-length protein, nor do we know the functional role of these domains in the cell. This chapter will review the structural and functional roles of the different domains associated with prokaryotic rhomboid proteases. Lastly, we will address questions remaining in the field.

  4. Direct activation and anti-repression functions of GAL4-VP16 use distinct molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, J G; Chambon, P

    1995-01-01

    In order to determine whether the molecular mechanisms used for direct activation by GAL4-VP16 are the same as those used for anti-repression, we have employed monoclonal antibodies specific for the VP16 activation domain. In the absence of added repressors, GAL4-VP16 was able to stimulate transcription from a template containing GAL4-binding sites, and the antibodies raised against the VP16 activation domain failed to inhibit this direct activation. GAL4-VP16 also was able to prevent histone H1-mediated repression by a mechanism that was strongly dependent on the presence of specific GAL4-binding elements in the promoter. However, in contrast to the assays conducted in the absence of repressors, the antibodies were strong inhibitors of GAL4-VP16-activated transcription in the presence of histone H1. Thus the binding of the antibodies distinguished between the direct activation and anti-repression functions of GAL4-VP16, indicating that these functions operate through distinct molecular mechanisms. The anti-repression-specific mechanism that is inhibitable by the antibodies acted at an early stage of preinitiation complex formation. Deletions of individual subdomains of the VP16 activation domain demonstrated that there was not a discrete subdomain responsible for the anti-repression function of GAL4-VP16. Thus, the inhibitory effect of the antibodies appeared to be due to the location of the epitope within the activator protein rather than to some inherent biochemical property of that region of the protein that is required specifically for anti-repression. The inhibitory effect of the antibodies also ruled out the possibility that steric exclusion of repressor proteins from the promoter was the sole means of anti-repression by the transcriptional activator. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8554536

  5. Distinct Roles for Laminin Globular Domains in Laminin α1 Chain Mediated Rescue of Murine Laminin α2 Chain Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Gawlik, Kinga I.; Åkerlund, Mikael; Carmignac, Virginie; Elamaa, Harri; Durbeej, Madeleine

    2010-01-01

    Background Laminin α2 chain mutations cause congenital muscular dystrophy with dysmyelination neuropathy (MDC1A). Previously, we demonstrated that laminin α1 chain ameliorates the disease in mice. Dystroglycan and integrins are major laminin receptors. Unlike laminin α2 chain, α1 chain binds the receptors by separate domains; laminin globular (LG) domains 4 and LG1-3, respectively. Thus, the laminin α1 chain is an excellent tool to distinguish between the roles of dystroglycan and integrins in the neuromuscular system. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we provide insights into the functions of laminin α1LG domains and the division of their roles in MDC1A pathogenesis and rescue. Overexpression of laminin α1 chain that lacks the dystroglycan binding LG4-5 domains in α2 chain deficient mice resulted in prolonged lifespan and improved health. Importantly, diaphragm and heart muscles were corrected, whereas limb muscles were dystrophic, indicating that different muscles have different requirements for LG4-5 domains. Furthermore, the regenerative capacity of the skeletal muscle did not depend on laminin α1LG4-5. However, this domain was crucial for preventing apoptosis in limb muscles, essential for myelination in peripheral nerve and important for basement membrane assembly. Conclusions/Significance These results show that laminin α1LG domains and consequently their receptors have disparate functions in the neuromuscular system. Understanding these interactions could contribute to design and optimization of future medical treatment for MDC1A patients. PMID:20657839

  6. Disgust trait modulates frontal-posterior coupling as a function of disgust domain.

    PubMed

    Borg, Charmaine; de Jong, Peter J; Renken, Remco J; Georgiadis, Janniko R

    2013-03-01

    Following the two-stage model of disgust, 'core disgust' (e.g. elicited by rotten food) is extended to stimuli that remind us of our animal nature 'AR disgust' (e.g. mutilations, animalistic instincts). There is ample evidence that core and AR represent distinct domains of disgust elicitors. Moreover, people show large differences in their tendency to respond with disgust to potential disgust elicitors (propensity), as well as in their appraisal of experiencing disgust (sensitivity). Thus these traits may be important moderators of people's response patterns. Here, we aimed to find brain mechanisms associated with these distinct disgust domains and traits, as well as the interaction between them. The right ventrolateral occipitotemporal cortex, which preferentially responded to visual AR, was functionally coupled to the middle cingulate cortex (MCC), thalamus and prefrontal cortex (medial, dorsolateral), as a function of disgust domain. Coupling with the anterior part of MCC was modulated by disgust 'propensity', which was strongest during AR. Coupling with anterior insula and ventral premotor cortex was weaker, but relied fully on this domain-trait interaction. Disgust 'sensitivity' modulated left anterior insula activity irrespective of domain, and did not affect functional connectivity. Thus a frontal-posterior network that interacts with disgust 'propensity' dissects AR and core disgust.

  7. Domain coloring of complex functions: an implementation-oriented introduction.

    PubMed

    Poelke, Konstantin; Polthier, Konrad

    2012-01-01

    This article gives a short overview of domain coloring for complex functions that have four-dimensional function graphs and therefore can't be visualized traditionally. The authors discuss several color schemes, focus on various aspects of complex functions, and provide Java-like pseudocode examples explaining the crucial ideas of the coloring algorithms to allow for easy reproduction.

  8. Chlamydia trachomatis Tarp harbors distinct G and F actin binding domains that bundle actin filaments.

    PubMed

    Jiwani, Shahanawaz; Alvarado, Stephenie; Ohr, Ryan J; Romero, Adriana; Nguyen, Brenda; Jewett, Travis J

    2013-02-01

    All species of Chlamydia undergo a unique developmental cycle that transitions between extracellular and intracellular environments and requires the capacity to invade new cells for dissemination. A chlamydial protein called Tarp has been shown to nucleate actin in vitro and is implicated in bacterial entry into human cells. Colocalization studies of ectopically expressed enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-Tarp indicate that actin filament recruitment is restricted to the C-terminal half of the effector protein. Actin filaments are presumably associated with Tarp via an actin binding alpha helix that is also required for actin nucleation in vitro, but this has not been investigated. Tarp orthologs from C. pneumoniae, C. muridarum, and C. caviae harbor between 1 and 4 actin binding domains located in the C-terminal half of the protein, but C. trachomatis serovar L2 has only one characterized domain. In this work, we examined the effects of domain-specific mutations on actin filament colocalization with EGFP-Tarp. We now demonstrate that actin filament colocalization with Tarp is dependent on two novel F-actin binding domains that endow the Tarp effector with actin-bundling activity. Furthermore, Tarp-mediated actin bundling did not require actin nucleation, as the ability to bundle actin filaments was observed in mutant Tarp proteins deficient in actin nucleation. These data shed molecular insight on the complex cytoskeletal rearrangements required for C. trachomatis entry into host cells.

  9. An archaeal sRNA targeting cis- and trans-encoded mRNAs via two distinct domains

    PubMed Central

    Jäger, Dominik; Pernitzsch, Sandy R.; Richter, Andreas S.; Backofen, Rolf; Sharma, Cynthia M.; Schmitz, Ruth A.

    2012-01-01

    We report on the characterization and target analysis of the small (s)RNA162 in the methanoarchaeon Methanosarcina mazei. Using a combination of genetic approaches, transcriptome analysis and computational predictions, the bicistronic MM2441-MM2440 mRNA encoding the transcription factor MM2441 and a protein of unknown function was identified as a potential target of this sRNA, which due to processing accumulates as three stabile 5′ fragments in late exponential growth. Mobility shift assays using various mutants verified that the non-structured single-stranded linker region of sRNA162 (SLR) base-pairs with the MM2440-MM2441 mRNA internally, thereby masking the predicted ribosome binding site of MM2441. This most likely leads to translational repression of the second cistron resulting in dis-coordinated operon expression. Analysis of mutant RNAs in vivo confirmed that the SLR of sRNA162 is crucial for target interactions. Furthermore, our results indicate that sRNA162-controlled MM2441 is involved in regulating the metabolic switch between the carbon sources methanol and methylamine. Moreover, biochemical studies demonstrated that the 5′ end of sRNA162 targets the 5′-untranslated region of the cis-encoded MM2442 mRNA. Overall, this first study of archaeal sRNA/mRNA-target interactions unraveled that sRNA162 acts as an antisense (as)RNA on cis- and trans-encoded mRNAs via two distinct domains, indicating that cis-encoded asRNAs can have larger target regulons than previously anticipated. PMID:22965121

  10. Morphogenesis of the mouse neural plate depends on distinct roles of cofilin 1 in apical and basal epithelial domains

    PubMed Central

    Grego-Bessa, Joaquim; Hildebrand, Jeffrey; Anderson, Kathryn V.

    2015-01-01

    The genetic control of mammalian epithelial polarity and dynamics can be studied in vivo at cellular resolution during morphogenesis of the mouse neural tube. The mouse neural plate is a simple epithelium that is transformed into a columnar pseudostratified tube over the course of ∼24 h. Apical F-actin is known to be important for neural tube closure, but the precise roles of actin dynamics in the neural epithelium are not known. To determine how the organization of the neural epithelium and neural tube closure are affected when actin dynamics are blocked, we examined the cellular basis of the neural tube closure defect in mouse mutants that lack the actin-severing protein cofilin 1 (CFL1). Although apical localization of the adherens junctions, the Par complex, the Crumbs complex and SHROOM3 is normal in the mutants, CFL1 has at least two distinct functions in the apical and basal domains of the neural plate. Apically, in the absence of CFL1 myosin light chain does not become phosphorylated, indicating that CFL1 is required for the activation of apical actomyosin required for neural tube closure. On the basal side of the neural plate, loss of CFL1 has the opposite effect on myosin: excess F-actin and myosin accumulate and the ectopic myosin light chain is phosphorylated. The basal accumulation of F-actin is associated with the assembly of ectopic basal tight junctions and focal disruptions of the basement membrane, which eventually lead to a breakdown of epithelial organization. PMID:25742799

  11. Distinct enzyme combinations in AKAP signalling complexes permit functional diversity.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, Naoto; Langeberg, Lorene K; Scott, John D

    2005-11-01

    Specificity in cell signalling can be influenced by the targeting of different enzyme combinations to substrates. The A-kinase anchoring protein AKAP79/150 is a multivalent scaffolding protein that coordinates the subcellular localization of second-messenger-regulated enzymes, such as protein kinase A, protein kinase C and protein phosphatase 2B. We developed a new strategy that combines RNA interference of the endogenous protein with a protocol that selects cells that have been rescued with AKAP79/150 forms that are unable to anchor selected enzymes. Using this approach, we show that AKAP79/150 coordinates different enzyme combinations to modulate the activity of two distinct neuronal ion channels: AMPA-type glutamate receptors and M-type potassium channels. Utilization of distinct enzyme combinations in this manner provides a means to expand the repertoire of cellular events that the same AKAP modulates.

  12. How do physicians become medical experts? A test of three competing theories: distinct domains, independent influence and encapsulation models.

    PubMed

    Violato, Claudio; Gao, Hong; O'Brien, Mary Claire; Grier, David; Shen, E

    2017-07-12

    The distinction between basic sciences and clinical knowledge which has led to a theoretical debate on how medical expertise is developed has implications for medical school and lifelong medical education. This longitudinal, population based observational study was conducted to test the fit of three theories-knowledge encapsulation, independent influence, distinct domains-of the development of medical expertise employing structural equation modelling. Data were collected from 548 physicians (292 men-53.3%; 256 women-46.7%; mean age = 24.2 years on admission) who had graduated from medical school 2009-2014. They included (1) Admissions data of undergraduate grade point average and Medical College Admission Test sub-test scores, (2) Course performance data from years 1, 2, and 3 of medical school, and (3) Performance on the NBME exams (i.e., Step 1, Step 2 CK, and Step 3). Statistical fit indices (Goodness of Fit Index-GFI; standardized root mean squared residual-SRMR; root mean squared error of approximation-RSMEA) and comparative fit [Formula: see text] of three theories of cognitive development of medical expertise were used to assess model fit. There is support for the knowledge encapsulation three factor model of clinical competency (GFI = 0.973, SRMR = 0.043, RSMEA = 0.063) which had superior fit indices to both the independent influence and distinct domains theories ([Formula: see text] vs [Formula: see text] [[Formula: see text

  13. Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling (SOCS) 5 Utilises Distinct Domains for Regulation of JAK1 and Interaction with the Adaptor Protein Shc-1

    PubMed Central

    Linossi, Edmond M.; Chandrashekaran, Indu R.; Kolesnik, Tatiana B.; Murphy, James M.; Webb, Andrew I.; Willson, Tracy A.; Kedzierski, Lukasz; Bullock, Alex N.; Babon, Jeffrey J.; Norton, Raymond S.; Nicola, Nicos A.; Nicholson, Sandra E.

    2013-01-01

    Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling (SOCS)5 is thought to act as a tumour suppressor through negative regulation of JAK/STAT and epidermal growth factor (EGF) signaling. However, the mechanism/s by which SOCS5 acts on these two distinct pathways is unclear. We show for the first time that SOCS5 can interact directly with JAK via a unique, conserved region in its N-terminus, which we have termed the JAK interaction region (JIR). Co-expression of SOCS5 was able to specifically reduce JAK1 and JAK2 (but not JAK3 or TYK2) autophosphorylation and this function required both the conserved JIR and additional sequences within the long SOCS5 N-terminal region. We further demonstrate that SOCS5 can directly inhibit JAK1 kinase activity, although its mechanism of action appears distinct from that of SOCS1 and SOCS3. In addition, we identify phosphoTyr317 in Shc-1 as a high-affinity substrate for the SOCS5-SH2 domain and suggest that SOCS5 may negatively regulate EGF and growth factor-driven Shc-1 signaling by binding to this site. These findings suggest that different domains in SOCS5 contribute to two distinct mechanisms for regulation of cytokine and growth factor signaling. PMID:23990909

  14. MLLT1 YEATS domain mutations in clinically distinctive Favourable Histology Wilms tumours | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Wilms tumour is an embryonal tumour of childhood that closely resembles the developing kidney. Genomic changes responsible for the development of the majority of Wilms tumours remain largely unknown. Here we identify recurrent mutations within Wilms tumours that involve the highly conserved YEATS domain of MLLT1 (ENL), a gene known to be involved in transcriptional elongation during early development. The mutant MLLT1 protein shows altered binding to acetylated histone tails.

  15. Structural similarities and functional diversity of eukaryotic discoidin-like domains.

    PubMed

    Kiedzierska, A; Smietana, K; Czepczynska, H; Otlewski, J

    2007-09-01

    The discoidin domain is a approximately 150 amino acid motif common in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic proteins. It is found in a variety of extracellular, intracellular and transmembrane multidomain proteins characterized by a considerable functional diversity, mostly involved in developmental processes. The biological role of the domain depends on its interactions with different molecules, including growth factors, phospholipids and lipids, galactose or its derivatives, and collagen. The conservation of the motif, as well as the serious physiological consequences of discoidin domain disorders underscore the importance of the fold, while the ability to accommodate such an extraordinarily broad range of ligand molecules makes it a fascinating research target. In present review we characterize the distinctive features of discoidin domains and briefly outline the biological role of this module in various eukaryotic proteins.

  16. Limited proteolysis differentially modulates the stability and subcellular localization of domains of RPGRIP1 that are distinctly affected by mutations in Leber's congenital amaurosis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xinrong; Guruju, Mallikarjuna; Oswald, John; Ferreira, Paulo A

    2005-05-15

    The retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator (RPGR) protein interacts with the retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator interacting protein-1 (RPGRIP1). Genetic lesions in the cognate genes lead to distinct and severe human retinal dystrophies. The biological role of these proteins in retinal function and pathogenesis of retinal diseases is elusive. Here, we present the first physiological assay of the role of RPGRIP1 and mutations therein. We found that the monoallelic and homozygous mutations, DeltaE1279 and D1114G, in the RPGR-interacting domain (RID) of RPGRIP1, enhance and abolish, respectively, its interaction in vivo with RPGR without affecting the stability of RID. In contrast to RID(WT) and RID(D1114G), chemical genetics shows that the interaction of RID(DeltaE1279) with RPGR is resistant to various stress treatments such as osmotic, pH and heat-shock stimuli. Hence, RID(D1114G) and RID(DeltaE1279) constitute loss- and gain-of-function mutations. Moreover, we find that the isoforms, bRPGRIP1 and bRPGRIP1b, undergo limited proteolysis constitutively in vivo in the cytoplasm compartment. This leads to the relocation and accumulation of a small and stable N-terminal domain of approximately 7 kDa to the nucleus, whereas the cytosolic C-terminal domain of RPGRIP1 is degraded and short-lived. The RID(D1114G) and RID(DeltaE1279) mutations exhibit strong cis-acting and antagonistic biological effects on the nuclear relocation, subcellular distribution and proteolytic cleavage of RPGRIP1 and/or domains thereof. These data support distinct and spatiotemporal subcellular-specific roles to RPGRIP1. A novel RPGRIP1-mediated nucleocytoplasmic crosstalk and transport pathway regulated by RID, and hence by RPGR, emerges with implications in the molecular pathogenesis of retinopathies, and a model to other diseases.

  17. Two Distinct Central Serotonin Receptors with Different Physiological Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peroutka, Stephen J.; Lebovitz, Richard M.; Snyder, Solomon H.

    1981-05-01

    Two distinct serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) receptors designated serotonin 1 and serotonin 2 bind tritium-labeled serotonin and tritium-labeled spiroperidol, respectively. Drug potencies at serotonin 2 sites, but not at serotonin 1 sites, predict their effects on the ``serotonin behavioral syndrome,'' indicating that serotonin 2 sites mediate these behaviors. The limited correlation of drug effects with regulation by guanine nucleotides suggests that serotonin 1 sites might be linked to adenylate cyclase. Drug specificities of serotonin-elicited synaptic inhibition and excitation may reflect serotonin 1 and serotonin 2 receptor interactions, respectively.

  18. Tight junction-associated MARVEL proteins marveld3, tricellulin, and occludin have distinct but overlapping functions.

    PubMed

    Raleigh, David R; Marchiando, Amanda M; Zhang, Yong; Shen, Le; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Wang, Yingmin; Long, Manyuan; Turner, Jerrold R

    2010-04-01

    In vitro studies have demonstrated that occludin and tricellulin are important for tight junction barrier function, but in vivo data suggest that loss of these proteins can be overcome. The presence of a heretofore unknown, yet related, protein could explain these observations. Here, we report marvelD3, a novel tight junction protein that, like occludin and tricellulin, contains a conserved four-transmembrane MARVEL (MAL and related proteins for vesicle trafficking and membrane link) domain. Phylogenetic tree reconstruction; analysis of RNA and protein tissue distribution; immunofluorescent and electron microscopic examination of subcellular localization; characterization of intracellular trafficking, protein interactions, dynamic behavior, and siRNA knockdown effects; and description of remodeling after in vivo immune activation show that marvelD3, occludin, and tricellulin have distinct but overlapping functions at the tight junction. Although marvelD3 is able to partially compensate for occludin or tricellulin loss, it cannot fully restore function. We conclude that marvelD3, occludin, and tricellulin define the tight junction-associated MARVEL protein family. The data further suggest that these proteins are best considered as a group with both redundant and unique contributions to epithelial function and tight junction regulation.

  19. Membrane lipid domains distinct from cholesterol/sphingomyelin-rich rafts are involved in the ABCA1-mediated lipid secretory pathway.

    PubMed

    Mendez, A J; Lin, G; Wade, D P; Lawn, R M; Oram, J F

    2001-02-02

    Efflux of excess cellular cholesterol mediated by lipid-poor apolipoproteins occurs by an active mechanism distinct from passive diffusion and is controlled by the ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCA1. Here we examined whether ABCA1-mediated lipid efflux involves the selective removal of lipids associated with membrane rafts, plasma membrane domains enriched in cholesterol and sphingomyelin. ABCA1 was not associated with cholesterol and sphingolipid-rich membrane raft domains based on detergent solubility and lack of colocalization with marker proteins associated with raft domains. Lipid efflux to apoA-I was accounted for by decreases in cellular lipids not associated with cholesterol/sphingomyelin-rich membranes. Treating cells with filipin, to disrupt raft structure, or with sphingomyelinase, to digest plasma membrane sphingomyelin, did not impair apoA-I-mediated cholesterol or phosphatidylcholine efflux. In contrast, efflux of cholesterol to high density lipoproteins (HDL) or plasma was partially accounted for by depletion of cholesterol from membrane rafts. Additionally, HDL-mediated cholesterol efflux was partially inhibited by filipin and sphingomyelinase treatment. Apo-A-I-mediated cholesterol efflux was absent from fibroblasts with nonfunctional ABCA1 (Tangier disease cells), despite near normal amounts of cholesterol associated with raft domains and normal abilities of plasma and HDL to deplete cholesterol from these domains. Thus, the involvement of membrane rafts in cholesterol efflux applies to lipidated HDL particles but not to lipid-free apoA-I. We conclude that cholesterol and sphingomyelin-rich membrane rafts do not provide lipid for efflux promoted by apolipoproteins through the ABCA1-mediated lipid secretory pathway and that ABCA1 is not associated with these domains.

  20. The putative LEF-1 proteins from two distinct Choristoneura fumiferana multiple nucleopolyhedroviruses share domain homology to eukaryotic primases.

    PubMed

    Barrett, J W; Lauzon, H A; Mercuri, P S; Krell, P J; Sohi, S S; Arif, B M

    1996-01-01

    We have identified the lef-1 genes from two multiple nucleopolyhedroviruses that infect natural populations of Choristoneura fumiferana. The lef-1 genes in both viruses are directly upstream and in the opposite orientation of their respective ecdysteroid UDP-glucosyltransferase (egt) genes. This gene organization pattern is similar to that found in the genomes of AcMNPV and of OpMNPV. As well, the coding regions and putative protein sequences share a high degree of similarity. Alignment of the predicted amino acid sequences of all known baculovirus lef-1 genes suggests that the LEF-1 proteins have a relatively high degree of conservation, particularly at four identified and distinct domains. Moreover, LEF-1 proteins bear clear similarity to some eukaryotic primases, predominately at three of the four domains where certain amino acids are absolutely conserved.

  1. Recognition of β–Calcineurin by the Domains of Calmodulin: Thermodynamic and Structural Evidence for Distinct Roles †

    PubMed Central

    O’Donnell, Susan E.; Yu, Liping; Fowler, Andrew; Shea, Madeline A.

    2010-01-01

    Calcineurin (CaN, PP2B, PPP3), a heterodimeric Ca2+-calmodulin-dependent Ser/Thr phosphatase, regulates swimming in Paramecia, stress responses in yeast, and T-cell activation and cardiac hypertrophy in humans. Calcium binding to CaNB (the regulatory subunit) triggers conformational change in CaNA (the catalytic subunit). Two isoforms of CaNA (α, β) are both abundant in brain and heart and activated by calcium-saturated calmodulin (CaM). The individual contribution of each domain of CaM to regulation of calcineurin is not known. Hydrodynamic analyses of (Ca2+)4-CaM1-148 bound to βCaNp, a peptide representing its CaM-binding domain, indicated a 1:1 stoichiometry. βCaNp binding to CaM increased the affinity of calcium for the N- and C-domains equally, thus preserving intrinsic domain differences, and the preference of calcium for sites III and IV. The equilibrium constants for individual calcium-saturated CaM domains dissociating from βCaNp were ~1 μM. A limiting Kd ≤ 1 nM was measured directly for full-length CaM, while thermodynamic linkage analysis indicated that it was approximately 1 pM. βCaNp binding to 15N-(Ca2+)4-CaM1-148 monitored by 15N/1HN HSQC NMR showed that association perturbed the N-domain of CaM more than its C-domain. NMR resonance assignments of CaM and βCaNp, and interpretation of intermolecular NOEs observed in the 13C-edited and 12C-14N-filtered 3D NOESY spectrum indicated anti-parallel binding. The sole aromatic residue (Phe) located near the βCaNp C-terminus was in close contact with several residues of the N-domain of CaM outside the hydrophobic cleft. These structural and thermodynamic properties would permit the domains of CaM to have distinct physiological roles in regulating activation of βCaN. PMID:21287611

  2. The RafC1 Cysteine-Rich Domain Contains Multiple Distinct Regulatory Epitopes Which Control Ras-Dependent Raf Activation

    PubMed Central

    Daub, Martina; Jöckel, Johannes; Quack, Thomas; Weber, Christoph K.; Schmitz, Frank; Rapp, Ulf R.; Wittinghofer, Alfred; Block, Christoph

    1998-01-01

    Activation of c-Raf-1 (referred to as Raf) by Ras is a pivotal step in mitogenic signaling. Raf activation is initiated by binding of Ras to the regulatory N terminus of Raf. While Ras binding to residues 51 to 131 is well understood, the role of the RafC1 cysteine-rich domain comprising residues 139 to 184 has remained elusive. To resolve the function of the RafC1 domain, we have performed an exhaustive surface scanning mutagenesis. In our study, we defined a high-resolution map of multiple distinct functional epitopes within RafC1 that are required for both negative control of the kinase and the positive function of the protein. Activating mutations in three different epitopes enhanced Ras-dependent Raf activation, while only some of these mutations markedly increased Raf basal activity. One contiguous inhibitory epitope consisting of S177, T182, and M183 clearly contributed to Ras-Raf binding energy and represents the putative Ras binding site of the RafC1 domain. The effects of all RafC1 mutations on Ras binding and Raf activation were independent of Ras lipid modification. The inhibitory mutation L160A is localized to a position analogous to the phorbol ester binding site in the protein kinase C C1 domain, suggesting a function in cofactor binding. Complete inhibition of Ras-dependent Raf activation was achieved by combining mutations K144A and L160A, which clearly demonstrates an absolute requirement for correct RafC1 function in Ras-dependent Raf activation. PMID:9774683

  3. Filamin actin-binding and titin-binding fulfill distinct functions in Z-disc cohesion

    PubMed Central

    González-Morales, Nicanor

    2017-01-01

    Many proteins contribute to the contractile properties of muscles, most notably myosin thick filaments, which are anchored at the M-line, and actin thin filaments, which are anchored at the Z-discs that border each sarcomere. In humans, mutations in the actin-binding protein Filamin-C result in myopathies, but the underlying molecular function is not well understood. Here we show using Drosophila indirect flight muscle that the filamin ortholog Cheerio in conjunction with the giant elastic protein titin plays a crucial role in keeping thin filaments stably anchored at the Z-disc. We identify the filamin domains required for interaction with the titin ortholog Sallimus, and we demonstrate a genetic interaction of filamin with titin and actin. Filamin mutants disrupting the actin- or the titin-binding domain display distinct phenotypes, with Z-discs breaking up in parallel or perpendicularly to the myofibril, respectively. Thus, Z-discs require filamin to withstand the strong contractile forces acting on them. PMID:28732005

  4. Identical folds used for distinct mechanical functions of the bacterial flagellar rod and hook

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Takashi; Kato, Takayuki; Hiraoka, Koichi D.; Miyata, Tomoko; Minamino, Tohru; Chevance, Fabienne F. V.; Hughes, Kelly T.; Namba, Keiichi

    2017-01-01

    The bacterial flagellum is a motile organelle driven by a rotary motor, and its axial portions function as a drive shaft (rod), a universal joint (hook) and a helical propeller (filament). The rod and hook are directly connected to each other, with their subunit proteins FlgG and FlgE having 39% sequence identity, but show distinct mechanical properties; the rod is straight and rigid as a drive shaft whereas the hook is flexible in bending as a universal joint. Here we report the structure of the rod and comparison with that of the hook. While these two structures have the same helical symmetry and repeat distance and nearly identical folds of corresponding domains, the domain orientations differ by ∼7°, resulting in tight and loose axial subunit packing in the rod and hook, respectively, conferring the rigidity on the rod and flexibility on the hook. This provides a good example of versatile use of a protein structure in biological organisms. PMID:28120828

  5. Differential antibiosis against Helicoverpa armigera exerted by distinct inhibitory repeat domains of Capsicum annuum proteinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Rakesh S; Gupta, Vidya S; Giri, Ashok P

    2014-05-01

    Plant defensive serine proteinase inhibitors (PIs) are known to have negative impact on digestive physiology of herbivore insects and thus have a crucial role in plant protection. Here, we have assessed the efficacy and specificity of three previously characterized inhibitory repeat domain (IRD) variants from Capsicum annuum PIs viz., IRD-7, -9 and -12 against gut proteinases from Helicoverpa armigera. Comparative study of in silico binding energy revealed that IRD-9 possesses higher affinity towards H. armigera serine proteinases as compared to IRD-7 and -12. H. armigera fed on artificial diet containing 5 TIU/g of recombinant IRD proteins exhibited differential effects on larval growth, survival rate and other nutritional parameters. Major digestive gut trypsin and chymotrypsin genes were down regulated in the IRD fed larvae, while few of them were up-regulated, this indicate alterations in insect digestive physiology. The results corroborated with proteinase activity assays and zymography. These findings suggest that the sequence variations among PIs reflect in their efficacy against proteinases in vitro and in vivo, which also could be used for developing tailor-made multi-domain inhibitor gene(s).

  6. Disgust trait modulates frontal-posterior coupling as a function of disgust domain

    PubMed Central

    de Jong, Peter J.; Renken, Remco J.; Georgiadis, Janniko R.

    2013-01-01

    Following the two-stage model of disgust, ‘core disgust’ (e.g. elicited by rotten food) is extended to stimuli that remind us of our animal nature ‘AR disgust’ (e.g. mutilations, animalistic instincts). There is ample evidence that core and AR represent distinct domains of disgust elicitors. Moreover, people show large differences in their tendency to respond with disgust to potential disgust elicitors (propensity), as well as in their appraisal of experiencing disgust (sensitivity). Thus these traits may be important moderators of people's response patterns. Here, we aimed to find brain mechanisms associated with these distinct disgust domains and traits, as well as the interaction between them. The right ventrolateral occipitotemporal cortex, which preferentially responded to visual AR, was functionally coupled to the middle cingulate cortex (MCC), thalamus and prefrontal cortex (medial, dorsolateral), as a function of disgust domain. Coupling with the anterior part of MCC was modulated by disgust ‘propensity’, which was strongest during AR. Coupling with anterior insula and ventral premotor cortex was weaker, but relied fully on this domain–trait interaction. Disgust ‘sensitivity’ modulated left anterior insula activity irrespective of domain, and did not affect functional connectivity. Thus a frontal-posterior network that interacts with disgust ‘propensity’ dissects AR and core disgust. PMID:22258801

  7. MLLT1 YEATS domain mutations in clinically distinctive Favourable Histology Wilms tumours

    PubMed Central

    Perlman, Elizabeth J.; Gadd, Samantha; Arold, Stefan T.; Radhakrishnan, Anand; Gerhard, Daniela S.; Jennings, Lawrence; Huff, Vicki; Guidry Auvil, Jaime M.; Davidsen, Tanja M.; Dome, Jeffrey S.; Meerzaman, Daoud; Hsu, Chih Hao; Nguyen, Cu; Anderson, James; Ma, Yussanne; Mungall, Andrew J.; Moore, Richard A.; Marra, Marco A.; Mullighan, Charles G.; Ma, Jing; Wheeler, David A.; Hampton, Oliver A.; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Ross, Nicole; Smith, Malcolm A.

    2015-01-01

    Wilms tumour is an embryonal tumour of childhood that closely resembles the developing kidney. Genomic changes responsible for the development of the majority of Wilms tumours remain largely unknown. Here we identify recurrent mutations within Wilms tumours that involve the highly conserved YEATS domain of MLLT1 (ENL), a gene known to be involved in transcriptional elongation during early development. The mutant MLLT1 protein shows altered binding to acetylated histone tails. Moreover, MLLT1-mutant tumours show an increase in MYC gene expression and HOX dysregulation. Patients with MLLT1-mutant tumours present at a younger age and have a high prevalence of precursor intralobar nephrogenic rests. These data support a model whereby activating MLLT1 mutations early in renal development result in the development of Wilms tumour. PMID:26635203

  8. Distinct polymer physics principles govern chromatin dynamics in mouse and Drosophila topological domains.

    PubMed

    Ea, Vuthy; Sexton, Tom; Gostan, Thierry; Herviou, Laurie; Baudement, Marie-Odile; Zhang, Yunzhe; Berlivet, Soizik; Le Lay-Taha, Marie-Noëlle; Cathala, Guy; Lesne, Annick; Victor, Jean-Marc; Fan, Yuhong; Cavalli, Giacomo; Forné, Thierry

    2015-08-15

    In higher eukaryotes, the genome is partitioned into large "Topologically Associating Domains" (TADs) in which the chromatin displays favoured long-range contacts. While a crumpled/fractal globule organization has received experimental supports at higher-order levels, the organization principles that govern chromatin dynamics within these TADs remain unclear. Using simple polymer models, we previously showed that, in mouse liver cells, gene-rich domains tend to adopt a statistical helix shape when no significant locus-specific interaction takes place. Here, we use data from diverse 3C-derived methods to explore chromatin dynamics within mouse and Drosophila TADs. In mouse Embryonic Stem Cells (mESC), that possess large TADs (median size of 840 kb), we show that the statistical helix model, but not globule models, is relevant not only in gene-rich TADs, but also in gene-poor and gene-desert TADs. Interestingly, this statistical helix organization is considerably relaxed in mESC compared to liver cells, indicating that the impact of the constraints responsible for this organization is weaker in pluripotent cells. Finally, depletion of histone H1 in mESC alters local chromatin flexibility but not the statistical helix organization. In Drosophila, which possesses TADs of smaller sizes (median size of 70 kb), we show that, while chromatin compaction and flexibility are finely tuned according to the epigenetic landscape, chromatin dynamics within TADs is generally compatible with an unconstrained polymer configuration. Models issued from polymer physics can accurately describe the organization principles governing chromatin dynamics in both mouse and Drosophila TADs. However, constraints applied on this dynamics within mammalian TADs have a peculiar impact resulting in a statistical helix organization.

  9. Expression of the bifunctional Bacillus subtilis TatAd protein in Escherichia coli reveals distinct TatA/B-family and TatB-specific domains.

    PubMed

    Barnett, James P; Lawrence, Janna; Mendel, Sharon; Robinson, Colin

    2011-08-01

    In the Tat protein export pathway of Gram-negative bacteria, TatA and TatB are homologous proteins that carry out distinct and essential functions in separate sub-complexes. In contrast, Gram-positive Tat systems usually lack TatB and the TatA protein is bifunctional. We have used a mutagenesis approach to delineate TatA/B-type domains in the bifunctional TatAd protein from Bacillus subtilis. This involved expression of mutated TatAd variants in Escherichia coli and tests to determine whether the variants could function as TatA or TatB by complementing E. coli tatA and/or tatB mutants. We show that mutations in the C-terminal half of the transmembrane span and the subsequent FGP 'hinge' motif are critical for TatAd function with its partner TatCd subunit, and the same determinants are required for complementation of either tatA or tatB mutants in Escherichia coli. This is thus a critical domain in both TatA and TatB proteins. In contrast, substitution of a series of residues at the N-terminus specifically blocks the ability of TatAd to substitute for E. coli TatB. The results point to the presence of a universally conserved domain in the TatA/B-family, together with a separate N-terminal domain that is linked to the TatB-type function in Gram-negative bacteria.

  10. Functional domains of interferon regulatory factor I (IRF-1).

    PubMed Central

    Schaper, F; Kirchhoff, S; Posern, G; Köster, M; Oumard, A; Sharf, R; Levi, B Z; Hauser, H

    1998-01-01

    Interferon (IFN) regulatory factors (IRFs) are a family of transcription factors among which are IRF-1, IRF-2, and IFN consensus sequence binding protein (ICSBP). These factors share sequence homology in the N-terminal DNA-binding domain. IRF-1 and IRF-2 are further related and have additional homologous sequences within their C-termini. Whereas IRF-2 and ICSBP are identified as transcriptional repressors, IRF-1 is an activator. In the present work, the identification of functional domains in murine IRF-1 with regard to DNA-binding, nuclear translocation, heterodimerization with ICSBP and transcriptional activation are demonstrated. The minimal DNA-binding domain requires the N-terminal 124 amino acids plus an arbitrary C-terminal extension. By using mutants of IRF-1 fusion proteins with green fluorescent protein and monitoring their distribution in living cells, a nuclear location signal (NLS) was identified and found to be sufficient for nuclear translocation. Heterodimerization was confirmed by a two-hybrid system adapted to mammalian cells. The heterodimerization domain in IRF-1 was defined by studies in vitro and was shown to be homologous with a sequence in IRF-2, suggesting that IRF-2 also heterodimerizes with ICSBP through this sequence. An acidic domain in IRF-1 was found to be required and to be sufficient for transactivation. Epitope mapping of IRF-1 showed that regions within the NLS, the heterodimerization domain and the transcriptional activation domain are exposed for possible contacts with interacting proteins. PMID:9742224

  11. Intein Clustering Suggests Functional Importance in Different Domains of Life

    PubMed Central

    Novikova, Olga; Jayachandran, Pradeepa; Kelley, Danielle S.; Morton, Zachary; Merwin, Samantha; Topilina, Natalya I.; Belfort, Marlene

    2016-01-01

    Inteins, also called protein introns, are self-splicing mobile elements found in all domains of life. A bioinformatic survey of genomic data highlights a biased distribution of inteins among functional categories of proteins in both bacteria and archaea, with a strong preference for a single network of functions containing replisome proteins. Many nonorthologous, functionally equivalent replicative proteins in bacteria and archaea carry inteins, suggesting a selective retention of inteins in proteins of particular functions across domains of life. Inteins cluster not only in proteins with related roles but also in specific functional units of those proteins, like ATPase domains. This peculiar bias does not fully fit the models describing inteins exclusively as parasitic elements. In such models, evolutionary dynamics of inteins is viewed primarily through their mobility with the intein homing endonuclease (HEN) as the major factor of intein acquisition and loss. Although the HEN is essential for intein invasion and spread in populations, HEN dynamics does not explain the observed biased distribution of inteins among proteins in specific functional categories. We propose that the protein splicing domain of the intein can act as an environmental sensor that adapts to a particular niche and could increase the chance of the intein becoming fixed in a population. We argue that selective retention of some inteins might be beneficial under certain environmental stresses, to act as panic buttons that reversibly inhibit specific networks, consistent with the observed intein distribution. PMID:26609079

  12. Intein Clustering Suggests Functional Importance in Different Domains of Life.

    PubMed

    Novikova, Olga; Jayachandran, Pradeepa; Kelley, Danielle S; Morton, Zachary; Merwin, Samantha; Topilina, Natalya I; Belfort, Marlene

    2016-03-01

    Inteins, also called protein introns, are self-splicing mobile elements found in all domains of life. A bioinformatic survey of genomic data highlights a biased distribution of inteins among functional categories of proteins in both bacteria and archaea, with a strong preference for a single network of functions containing replisome proteins. Many nonorthologous, functionally equivalent replicative proteins in bacteria and archaea carry inteins, suggesting a selective retention of inteins in proteins of particular functions across domains of life. Inteins cluster not only in proteins with related roles but also in specific functional units of those proteins, like ATPase domains. This peculiar bias does not fully fit the models describing inteins exclusively as parasitic elements. In such models, evolutionary dynamics of inteins is viewed primarily through their mobility with the intein homing endonuclease (HEN) as the major factor of intein acquisition and loss. Although the HEN is essential for intein invasion and spread in populations, HEN dynamics does not explain the observed biased distribution of inteins among proteins in specific functional categories. We propose that the protein splicing domain of the intein can act as an environmental sensor that adapts to a particular niche and could increase the chance of the intein becoming fixed in a population. We argue that selective retention of some inteins might be beneficial under certain environmental stresses, to act as panic buttons that reversibly inhibit specific networks, consistent with the observed intein distribution.

  13. KRAS insertion mutations are oncogenic and exhibit distinct functional properties

    PubMed Central

    White, Yasmine; Bagchi, Aditi; Van Ziffle, Jessica; Inguva, Anagha; Bollag, Gideon; Zhang, Chao; Carias, Heidi; Dickens, David; Loh, Mignon; Shannon, Kevin; Firestone, Ari J.

    2016-01-01

    Oncogenic KRAS mutations introduce discrete amino acid substitutions that reduce intrinsic Ras GTPase activity and confer resistance to GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs). Here we discover a partial duplication of the switch 2 domain of K-Ras encoding a tandem repeat of amino acids G60_A66dup in a child with an atypical myeloproliferative neoplasm. K-Ras proteins containing this tandem duplication or a similar five amino acid E62_A66dup mutation identified in lung and colon cancers transform the growth of primary myeloid progenitors and of Ba/F3 cells. Recombinant K-RasG60_A66dup and K-RasE62_A66dup proteins display reduced intrinsic GTP hydrolysis rates, accumulate in the GTP-bound conformation and are resistant to GAP-mediated GTP hydrolysis. Remarkably, K-Ras proteins with switch 2 insertions are impaired for PI3 kinase binding and Akt activation, and are hypersensitive to MEK inhibition. These studies illuminate a new class of oncogenic KRAS mutations and reveal unexpected plasticity in oncogenic Ras proteins that has diagnostic and therapeutic implications. PMID:26854029

  14. Coordinated and Distinct Functions of Velvet Proteins in Fusarium verticillioides

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Nan; Zhang, Hanxing; Hu, Chengcheng; Wang, Wenzhao; Calvo, Ana M.; Harris, Steven D.; Chen, She

    2014-01-01

    Velvet-domain-containing proteins are broadly distributed within the fungal kingdom. In the corn pathogen Fusarium verticillioides, previous studies showed that the velvet protein F. verticillioides VE1 (FvVE1) is critical for morphological development, colony hydrophobicity, toxin production, and pathogenicity. In this study, tandem affinity purification of FvVE1 revealed that FvVE1 can form a complex with the velvet proteins F. verticillioides VelB (FvVelB) and FvVelC. Phenotypic characterization of gene knockout mutants showed that, as in the case of FvVE1, FvVelB regulated conidial size, hyphal hydrophobicity, fumonisin production, and oxidant resistance, while FvVelC was dispensable for these biological processes. Comparative transcriptional analysis of eight genes involved in the ROS (reactive oxygen species) removal system revealed that both FvVE1 and FvVelB positively regulated the transcription of a catalase-encoding gene, F. verticillioides CAT2 (FvCAT2). Deletion of FvCAT2 resulted in reduced oxidant resistance, providing further explanation of the regulation of oxidant resistance by velvet proteins in the fungal kingdom. PMID:24792348

  15. Distinct Brca1 Mutations Differentially Reduce Hematopoietic Stem Cell Function.

    PubMed

    Mgbemena, Victoria E; Signer, Robert A J; Wijayatunge, Ranjula; Laxson, Travis; Morrison, Sean J; Ross, Theodora S

    2017-01-24

    BRCA1 is a well-known DNA repair pathway component and a tissue-specific tumor suppressor. However, its role in hematopoiesis is uncertain. Here, we report that a cohort of patients heterozygous for BRCA1 mutations experienced more hematopoietic toxicity from chemotherapy than those with BRCA2 mutations. To test whether this reflects a requirement for BRCA1 in hematopoiesis, we generated mice with Brca1 mutations in hematopoietic cells. Mice homozygous for a null Brca1 mutation in the embryonic hematopoietic system (Vav1-iCre;Brca1(F22-24/F22-24)) developed hematopoietic defects in early adulthood that included reduced hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Although mice homozygous for a huBRCA1 knockin allele (Brca1(BRCA1/BRCA1)) were normal, mice with a mutant huBRCA1/5382insC allele and a null allele (Mx1-Cre;Brca1(F22-24/5382insC)) had severe hematopoietic defects marked by a complete loss of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Our data show that Brca1 is necessary for HSC maintenance and normal hematopoiesis and that distinct mutations lead to different degrees of hematopoietic dysfunction.

  16. Diversity of Structure and Function of Response Regulator Output Domains

    PubMed Central

    Galperin, Michael Y.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Response regulators (RRs) within two-component signal transduction systems control a variety of cellular processes. Most RRs contain DNA-binding output domains and serve as transcriptional regulators. Other RR types contain RNA-binding, ligand-binding, protein-binding or transporter output domains and exert regulation at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional or post-translational levels. In a significant fraction of RRs, output domains are enzymes that themselves participate in signal transduction: methylesterases, adenylate or diguanylate cyclases, c-di-GMP-specific phosphodiesterases, histidine kinases, serine/threonine protein kinases and protein phosphatases. In addition, there remain output domains whose functions are still unknown. Patterns of the distribution of various RR families are generally conserved within key microbial lineages and can be used to trace adaptations of various species to their unique ecological niches. PMID:20226724

  17. Diversity of structure and function of response regulator output domains.

    PubMed

    Galperin, Michael Y

    2010-04-01

    Response regulators (RRs) within two-component signal transduction systems control a variety of cellular processes. Most RRs contain DNA-binding output domains and serve as transcriptional regulators. Other RR types contain RNA-binding, ligand-binding, protein-binding or transporter output domains and exert regulation at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional or post-translational levels. In a significant fraction of RRs, output domains are enzymes that themselves participate in signal transduction: methylesterases, adenylate or diguanylate cyclases, c-di-GMP-specific phosphodiesterases, histidine kinases, serine/threonine protein kinases and protein phosphatases. In addition, there remain output domains whose functions are still unknown. Patterns of the distribution of various RR families are generally conserved within key microbial lineages and can be used to trace adaptations of various species to their unique ecological niches.

  18. Cellular functions of phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate and FYVE domain proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Gillooly, D J; Simonsen, A; Stenmark, H

    2001-01-01

    PtdIns3P is a phosphoinositide 3-kinase product that has been strongly implicated in regulating membrane trafficking in both mammalian and yeast cells. PtdIns3P has been shown to be specifically located on membranes associated with the endocytic pathway. Proteins that contain FYVE zinc-finger domains are recruited to PtdIns3P-containing membranes. Structural information is now available concerning the interaction between FYVE domains and PtdIns3P. A number of proteins have been identified which contain a FYVE domain, and in this review we discuss the functions of PtdIns3P and its FYVE-domain-containing effector proteins in membrane trafficking, cytoskeletal regulation and receptor signalling. PMID:11284710

  19. The distinctive role of executive functions in implicit emotion regulation.

    PubMed

    Sperduti, Marco; Makowski, Dominique; Arcangeli, Margherita; Wantzen, Prany; Zalla, Tiziana; Lemaire, Stéphane; Dokic, Jérôme; Pelletier, Jérôme; Piolino, Pascale

    2017-02-01

    Several theoretical models stress the role of executive functions in emotion regulation (ER). However, most of the previous studies on ER employed explicit regulatory strategies that could have engaged executive functions, beyond regulatory processes per se. Recently, there has been renewed interest in implicit forms of ER, believed to be closer to daily-life requirements. While various studies have shown that implicit and explicit ER engage partially overlapping neurocognitive processes, the contribution of different executive functions in implicit ER has not been investigated. In the present study, we presented participants with negatively valenced pictures of varying emotional intensity preceded by short texts describing them as either fictional or real. This manipulation was meant to induce a spontaneous emotional down-regulation. We recorded electrodermal activity (EDA) and subjective reports of emotion arousal. Executive functions (updating, switching, and inhibition) were also assessed. No difference was found between the fictional and real condition on EDA. A diminished self-reported arousal was observed, however, when pictures were described as fictional for high- and mild-intensity material, but not for neutral material. The amount of down-regulation in the fictional condition was found to be predicted by interindividual variability in updating performances, but not by the other measures of executive functions, suggesting its implication even in implicit forms of ER. The relationship between down-regulation and updating was significant only for high-intensity material. We discuss the role of updating in relation to the consciousness of one's emotional state.

  20. The distinction in radiobiology between medical and public health functions

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, V.P.; Wielopolski, L.

    1995-12-31

    Starting with the classical threshold-sigmoid Medical-Toxicological plot, reasons are advanced for why the coordinates of this function are not appropriate for the analysis of Public Health-Epidemiological data. Misunderstanding with respect to both the level of biological organization and the word ``dose`` are pointed out, which explain why Public Health-Epidemiological data, anomalously, yield linear functions on medical-toxicological coordinates. It is then shown why substantially different coordinates must be used to obtain a function that describes properly and completely the cancer data obtained from epidemiological studies on the atomic bomb survivors. Arguments are put forth that seriously weaken the current interpretation of the ``linear, no-threshold hypothesis``. Reasons are advanced for why, if the amount of radiation energy is expressed in the proper terms, the numerical value for the cancer ``risk coefficient`` becomes substantially smaller than it now is.

  1. Nuclear stability and transcriptional directionality separate functionally distinct RNA species.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Robin; Refsing Andersen, Peter; Valen, Eivind; Core, Leighton J; Bornholdt, Jette; Boyd, Mette; Heick Jensen, Torben; Sandelin, Albin

    2014-11-12

    Mammalian genomes are pervasively transcribed, yielding a complex transcriptome with high variability in composition and cellular abundance. Although recent efforts have identified thousands of new long non-coding (lnc) RNAs and demonstrated a complex transcriptional repertoire produced by protein-coding (pc) genes, limited progress has been made in distinguishing functional RNA from spurious transcription events. This is partly due to present RNA classification, which is typically based on technical rather than biochemical criteria. Here we devise a strategy to systematically categorize human RNAs by their sensitivity to the ribonucleolytic RNA exosome complex and by the nature of their transcription initiation. These measures are surprisingly effective at correctly classifying annotated transcripts, including lncRNAs of known function. The approach also identifies uncharacterized stable lncRNAs, hidden among a vast majority of unstable transcripts. The predictive power of the approach promises to streamline the functional analysis of known and novel RNAs.

  2. Structures and Functions of the Multiple KOW Domains of Transcription Elongation Factor Spt5

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Peter A.; Li, Sheng; Zhang, Mincheng; Yamada, Kentaro; Takagi, Yuichiro; Hartzog, Grant A.

    2015-01-01

    The eukaryotic Spt4-Spt5 heterodimer forms a higher-order complex with RNA polymerase II (and I) to regulate transcription elongation. Extensive genetic and functional data have revealed diverse roles of Spt4-Spt5 in coupling elongation with chromatin modification and RNA-processing pathways. A mechanistic understanding of the diverse functions of Spt4-Spt5 is hampered by challenges in resolving the distribution of functions among its structural domains, including the five KOW domains in Spt5, and a lack of their high-resolution structures. We present high-resolution crystallographic results demonstrating that distinct structures are formed by the first through third KOW domains (KOW1-Linker1 [K1L1] and KOW2-KOW3) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Spt5. The structure reveals that K1L1 displays a positively charged patch (PCP) on its surface, which binds nucleic acids in vitro, as shown in biochemical assays, and is important for in vivo function, as shown in growth assays. Furthermore, assays in yeast have shown that the PCP has a function that partially overlaps that of Spt4. Synthesis of our results with previous evidence suggests a model in which Spt4 and the K1L1 domain of Spt5 form functionally overlapping interactions with nucleic acids upstream of the transcription bubble, and this mechanism may confer robustness on processes associated with transcription elongation. PMID:26217010

  3. Are The Dorsal and Ventral Hippocampus functionally distinct structures?

    PubMed Central

    Fanselow, Michael S.; Dong, Hong-Wei

    2009-01-01

    One literature treats the hippocampus as a purely cognitive structure involved in memory; another treats it as a regulator of emotion whose dysfunction leads to psychopathology. We review behavioral, anatomical, and gene expression studies that together support a functional segmentation into 3 hippocampal compartments dorsal, intermediate and ventral. The dorsal hippocampus, which corresponds to the posterior hippocampus in primates, performs primarily cognitive functions. The ventral (anterior in primates) relates to stress, emotion and affect. Strikingly, gene expression in the dorsal hippocampus correlates with cortical regions involved in information processing, while genes expressed in the ventral hippocampus correlate with regions involved in emotion and stress (amygdala and hypothalamus). PMID:20152109

  4. VgrG and PAAR Proteins Define Distinct Versions of a Functional Type VI Secretion System

    PubMed Central

    Cianfanelli, Francesca R.; Alcoforado Diniz, Juliana; Guo, Manman; De Cesare, Virginia; Trost, Matthias; Coulthurst, Sarah J.

    2016-01-01

    The Type VI secretion system (T6SS) is widespread among bacterial pathogens and acts as an effective weapon against competitor bacteria and eukaryotic hosts by delivering toxic effector proteins directly into target cells. The T6SS utilises a bacteriophage-like contractile machinery to expel a puncturing device based on a tube of Hcp topped with a VgrG spike, which can be extended by a final tip from a PAAR domain-containing protein. Effector proteins are believed to be delivered by specifically associating with particular Hcp, VgrG or PAAR proteins, either covalently (‘specialised’) or non-covalently (‘cargo’ effectors). Here we used the T6SS of the opportunistic pathogen Serratia marcescens, together with integratecd genetic, proteomic and biochemical approaches, to elucidate the role of specific VgrG and PAAR homologues in T6SS function and effector specificity, revealing new aspects and unexpected subtleties in effector delivery by the T6SS. We identified effectors, both cargo and specialised, absolutely dependent on a particular VgrG for delivery to target cells, and discovered that other cargo effectors can show a preference for a particular VgrG. The presence of at least one PAAR protein was found to be essential for T6SS function, consistent with designation as a ‘core’ T6SS component. We showed that specific VgrG-PAAR combinations are required to assemble a functional T6SS and that the three distinct VgrG-PAAR assemblies in S. marcescens exhibit distinct effector specificity and efficiency. Unexpectedly, we discovered that two different PAAR-containing Rhs proteins can functionally pair with the same VgrG protein. Showing that accessory EagR proteins are involved in these interactions, native VgrG-Rhs-EagR complexes were isolated and specific interactions between EagR and cognate Rhs proteins identified. This study defines an essential yet flexible role for PAAR proteins in the T6SS and highlights the existence of distinct versions of the

  5. The mitochondrial elongation factors MIEF1 and MIEF2 exert partially distinct functions in mitochondrial dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Tong; Yu, Rong; Jin, Shao-Bo; Han, Liwei; Lendahl, Urban; Zhao, Jian; Nistér, Monica

    2013-11-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles whose morphology is regulated by a complex balance of fission and fusion processes, and we still know relatively little about how mitochondrial dynamics is regulated. MIEF1 (also called MiD51) has recently been characterized as a key regulator of mitochondrial dynamics and in this report we explore the functions of its paralog MIEF2 (also called MiD49), to learn to what extent MIEF2 is functionally distinct from MIEF1. We show that MIEF1 and MIEF2 have many functions in common. Both are anchored in the mitochondrial outer membrane, recruit Drp1 from the cytoplasm to the mitochondrial surface and cause mitochondrial fusion, and MIEF2, like MIEF1, can interact with Drp1 and hFis1. MIEF1 and MIEF2, however, also differ in certain aspects. MIEF1 and MIEF2 are differentially expressed in human tissues during development. When overexpressed, MIEF2 exerts a stronger fusion-promoting effect than MIEF1, and in line with this, hFis1 and Mff can only partially revert the MIEF2-induced fusion phenotype, whereas MIEF1-induced fusion is reverted to a larger extent by hFis1 and Mff. MIEF2 forms high molecular weight oligomers, while MIEF1 is largely present as a dimer. Furthermore, MIEF1 and MIEF2 use distinct domains for oligomerization: in MIEF1, the region from amino acid residues 109–154 is required, whereas oligomerization of MIEF2 depends on amino acid residues 1 to 49, i.e. the N-terminal end. We also show that oligomerization of MIEF1 is not required for its mitochondrial localization and interaction with Drp1. In conclusion, our data suggest that the mitochondrial regulators MIEF1 and MIEF2 exert partially distinct functions in mitochondrial dynamics. - Highlights: • MIEF1 and MIEF2 recruit Drp1 to mitochondria and cause mitochondrial fusion. • MIEF2, like MIEF1, can interact with Drp1 and hFis1. • MIEF1 and MIEF2 are differentially expressed in human tissues during development. • MIEF2 exerts a stronger fusion

  6. Phospholipid binding to the FAK catalytic domain impacts function

    PubMed Central

    Schaller, Michael D.

    2017-01-01

    Focal adhesion kinase is an essential nonreceptor tyrosine kinase that plays an important role in development, in homeostasis and in the progression of human disease. Multiple stimuli activate FAK, which requires a change in structure from an autoinhibited to activated conformation. In the autoinhibited conformation the FERM domain associates with the catalytic domain of FAK and PI(4,5)P2 binding to the FERM domain plays a role in the release of autoinhibition, activating the enzyme. An in silico model of FAK/PI(4,5)P2 interaction suggests that residues on the catalytic domain interact with PI(4,5)P2, in addition to the known FERM domain PI(4,5)P2 binding site. This study was undertaken to test the significance of this in silico observation. Mutations designed to disrupt the putative PI(4,5)P2 binding site were engineered into FAK. These mutants exhibited defects in phosphorylation and failed to completely rescue the phenotype associated with fak -/- phenotype fibroblasts demonstrating the importance of these residues in FAK function. The catalytic domain of FAK exhibited PI(4,5)P2 binding in vitro and binding activity was lost upon mutation of putative PI(4,5)P2 binding site basic residues. However, binding was not selective for PI(4,5)P2, and the catalytic domain bound to several phosphatidylinositol phosphorylation variants. The mutant exhibiting the most severe biological defect was defective for phosphatidylinositol phosphate binding, supporting the model that catalytic domain phospholipid binding is important for biochemical and biological function. PMID:28222177

  7. Arguments for two distinct gonadotropic activities triggered by different domains of the ovary maturating parsin of Locusta migratoria.

    PubMed

    Girardie, J; Geoffre, S; Delbecque, J -P.; Girardie, A

    1998-11-01

    To complete previous results concerning the role of the ovary maturating parsin of Locusta migratoria (Lom OMP), we determined, by an enzyme immunoassay, the titers of circulating ecdysteroids and analyzed circulating vitellogenin (Vg) and oöcyte growth following (1) suppression of 20 hydroxyecdysone (20E) and (2) injection of the Lom OMP, either as an entire molecule in allatectomized adults or as smaller peptides in allatectomized fifth-instar larvae females. Titers of ecdysteroids appeared unrelated to the presence of circulating Vg but increased during the first phase of vitellogenesis and injection of OMP accelerated the occurrence of circulating 20E. Nevertheless, immunoneutralization of 20E at the beginning of adult life delayed but did not prevent rapid oöcyte growth contrary to immunoneutralization of Lom OMP suggesting an additive gonadotropic effect of the neurohormone, distinct from that of 20E. Of two synthetic peptides corresponding to the C- and N-terminal gonadotropic domains of the OMP, respectively, only the C-terminal peptide was able to induce Vg in allatectomized larvae. After metamorphosis, injection of OMP did not induce Vg in adults allatectomized at the beginning of imaginal life but improved the maintenance of circulating Vg in adults allatectomized after Vg appeared in the haemolymph. This result suggests that OMP either delays the Vg mRNA decay or increases the translation of Vg mRNA. Thus, Lom OMP appears to have two distinct roles: an ecdysteroidogenic effect triggered by its C-terminal domain with the ovary as the target tissue and a protecting effect on Vg mRNA probably triggered by its other gonadotropic domain, the N-terminal, with the fat body as the target tissue.

  8. Tryptophan Scanning Mutagenesis Identifies the Molecular Determinants of Distinct Barttin Functions*

    PubMed Central

    Wojciechowski, Daniel; Fischer, Martin; Fahlke, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    CLC-K chloride channels are expressed in the kidney and in the inner ear and require the accessory subunit barttin for proper function and membrane insertion. Barttin exerts multiple functions on CLC-proteins: it modifies protein stability and intracellular trafficking as well as channel activity, ion conduction, and gating. So far, the molecular determinants of these distinct barttin functions have remained elusive. Here we performed serial perturbation mutagenesis to identify the sequence determinants of barttin function. Barttin consists of two transmembrane helices followed by a long intracellular carboxyl terminus, and earlier work demonstrated that the transmembrane core of barttin suffices for most effects on the α-subunit. We individually substituted every amino acid of the predicted transmembrane core (amino acids 9–26 and 35–55) with tryptophan, co-expressed mutant barttin with hClC-Ka or V166E rClC-K1, and characterized CLC-K/barttin channels by patch clamp techniques, biochemistry, and confocal microscopy. The majority of mutations left the chaperone function of barttin, i.e. the effects on endoplasmic reticulum exit and surface membrane insertion, unaffected. In contrast, tryptophan insertion at multiple positions resulted in impaired activity of hClC-Ka/barttin and changes in gating of V166E rClC-K1/barttin. These results demonstrate that mutations in a cluster of hydrophobic residues within transmembrane domain 1 affect barttin-CLC-K interaction and impair gating modification by the accessory subunit. Whereas tight interaction is necessary for functional modification, even impaired association of barttin and CLC-K suffices for normal intracellular trafficking. Our findings allow definition of a likely interaction surface and clarify the mechanisms underlying CLC-K channel modification by barttin. PMID:26063802

  9. A novel functionally distinct subtype of striatal neuropeptide Y interneuron.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez-Sandoval, Osvaldo; Tecuapetla, Fatuel; Unal, Bengi; Shah, Fulva; Koós, Tibor; Tepper, James M

    2011-11-16

    We investigated the properties of neostriatal neuropeptide Y (NPY)-expressing interneurons in transgenic GFP (green fluorescent protein)-NPY reporter mice. In vitro whole-cell recordings and biocytin staining demonstrated the existence of a novel class of neostriatal NPY-expressing GABAergic interneurons that exhibit electrophysiological, neurochemical, and morphological properties strikingly different from those of previously described NPY-containing, plateau-depolarization low-threshold spike (NPY-PLTS) interneurons. The novel NPY interneuron type (NPY-neurogliaform) differed from previously described NPY-PLTS interneurons by exhibiting a significantly lower input resistance and hyperpolarized membrane potential, regular, nonaccommodating spiking in response to depolarizing current injections, and an absence of plateau depolarizations or low-threshold spikes. NPY-neurogliaform interneurons were also easily distinguished morphologically by their dense, compact, and highly branched dendritic and local axonal arborizations that contrasted sharply with the sparse and extended axonal and dendritic arborizations of NPY-PLTS interneurons. Furthermore, NPY-neurogliaform interneurons did not express immunofluorescence for somatostatin or nitric oxide synthase that was ubiquitous in NPY-PLTS interneurons. IPSP/Cs could only rarely be elicited in spiny projection neurons (SPNs) in paired recordings with NPY-PLTS interneurons. In contrast, the probability of SPN innervation by NPY-neurogliaform interneurons was extremely high, the synapse very reliable (no failures were observed), and the resulting postsynaptic response was a slow, GABA(A) receptor-mediated IPSC that has not been previously described in striatum but that has been elicited from NPY-GABAergic neurogliaform interneurons in cortex and hippocampus. These properties suggest unique and distinctive roles for NPY-PLTS and NPY-neurogliaform interneurons in the integrative properties of the neostriatum.

  10. A NOVEL FUNCTIONALLY DISTINCT SUBTYPE OF STRIATAL NPY INTERNEURON

    PubMed Central

    Ibáñez-Sandoval, Osvaldo; Tecuapetla, Fatuel; Unal, Bengi; Shah, Fulva; Koós, Tibor; Tepper, James M.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the properties of neostriatal neuropeptide Y (NPY)-expressing interneurons in transgenic green fluorescent protein (GFP)-NPY reporter mice. In vitro whole cell recordings and biocytin staining demonstrated the existence of a novel class of neostriatal NPY-expressing GABAergic interneurons that exhibit electrophysiological, neurochemical and morphological properties strikingly different from those of previously described NPY-containing, plateau-depolarization low-threshold spike (NPY-PLTS) interneurons. The novel NPY interneuron type (NPY-neurogliaform) differed from previously described NPY-PLTS interneurons by exhibiting a significantly lower input resistance and hyperpolarized membrane potential, regular, non-accommodating spiking in response to depolarizing current injections and an absence of plateau depolarizations or low threshold spikes. NPY-neurogliaform interneurons were also easily distinguished morphologically by their dense compact and highly branched dendritic and local axonal arborizations that contrasted sharply with the sparse and extended axonal and dendritic arborizations of NPY-PLTS interneurons. Further, NPY-neurogliaform interneurons did not express immunofluorescence for somatostatin or nitric oxide synthase that was ubiquitous in NPY-PLTS interneurons. IPSP/Cs could only rarely be elicited in spiny projection neurons (SPN) in paired recordings with NPY-PLTS interneurons. In contrast, the probability of SPN innervation by NPY-neurogliaform interneurons was extremely high, the synapse very reliable (no failures were observed), and the resulting postsynaptic response was a slow, GABAA receptor-mediated inhibitory postsynaptic current (IPSC) that has not been previously described in striatum, but that has been elicited from NPY-GABAergic neurogliaform interneurons in cortex and hippocampus. These properties suggest unique and distinctive roles for NPY-PLTS and NPY-neurogliaform interneurons in the integrative properties of the

  11. Phylogeography of Y-Chromosome Haplogroup I Reveals Distinct Domains of Prehistoric Gene Flow in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Rootsi, Siiri; Magri, Chiara; Kivisild, Toomas; Benuzzi, Giorgia; Help, Hela; Bermisheva, Marina; Kutuev, Ildus; Barać, Lovorka; Peričić, Marijana; Balanovsky, Oleg; Pshenichnov, Andrey; Dion, Daniel; Grobei, Monica; Zhivotovsky, Lev A.; Battaglia, Vincenza; Achilli, Alessandro; Al-Zahery, Nadia; Parik, Jüri; King, Roy; Cinnioğlu, Cengiz; Khusnutdinova, Elsa; Rudan, Pavao; Balanovska, Elena; Scheffrahn, Wolfgang; Simonescu, Maya; Brehm, Antonio; Goncalves, Rita; Rosa, Alexandra; Moisan, Jean-Paul; Chaventre, Andre; Ferak, Vladimir; Füredi, Sandor; Oefner, Peter J.; Shen, Peidong; Beckman, Lars; Mikerezi, Ilia; Terzić, Rifet; Primorac, Dragan; Cambon-Thomsen, Anne; Krumina, Astrida; Torroni, Antonio; Underhill, Peter A.; Santachiara-Benerecetti, A. Silvana; Villems, Richard; Semino, Ornella

    2004-01-01

    To investigate which aspects of contemporary human Y-chromosome variation in Europe are characteristic of primary colonization, late-glacial expansions from refuge areas, Neolithic dispersals, or more recent events of gene flow, we have analyzed, in detail, haplogroup I (Hg I), the only major clade of the Y phylogeny that is widespread over Europe but virtually absent elsewhere. The analysis of 1,104 Hg I Y chromosomes, which were identified in the survey of 7,574 males from 60 population samples, revealed several subclades with distinct geographic distributions. Subclade I1a accounts for most of Hg I in Scandinavia, with a rapidly decreasing frequency toward both the East European Plain and the Atlantic fringe, but microsatellite diversity reveals that France could be the source region of the early spread of both I1a and the less common I1c. Also, I1b*, which extends from the eastern Adriatic to eastern Europe and declines noticeably toward the southern Balkans and abruptly toward the periphery of northern Italy, probably diffused after the Last Glacial Maximum from a homeland in eastern Europe or the Balkans. In contrast, I1b2 most likely arose in southern France/Iberia. Similarly to the other subclades, it underwent a postglacial expansion and marked the human colonization of Sardinia ∼9,000 years ago. PMID:15162323

  12. Stat3 recruitment by two distinct ligand-induced, tyrosine-phosphorylated docking sites in the interleukin-10 receptor intracellular domain.

    PubMed

    Weber-Nordt, R M; Riley, J K; Greenlund, A C; Moore, K W; Darnell, J E; Schreiber, R D

    1996-11-01

    Recent work has shown that IL-10 induces activation of the JAK-STAT signaling pathway. To define the mechanism underlying signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) protein recruitment to the interleukin 10 (IL-10) receptor, the STAT proteins activated by IL-10 in different cell populations were first defined using electrophoretic mobility shift assays. In all cells tested, IL-10 activated Stat1 and Stat3 and induced the formation of three distinct DNA binding complexes that contained different combinations of these two transcription factors. IL-10 also activated Stat5 in Ba/F3 cells that stably expressed the murine IL-10 receptor. Using a structure-function mutagenesis approach, two tyrosine residues (Tyr427 and Tyr477) in the intracellular domain of the murine IL-10 receptor were found to be redundantly required for receptor function and for activation of Stat3 but not for Stat1 or Stat5. Twelve amino acid peptides encompassing either of these two tyrosine residues in phosphorylated form coprecipitated Stat3 but not Stat1 and blocked IL-10-induced Stat3 phosphorylation in a cell-free system. In contrast, tyrosine-phosphorylated peptides containing Tyr374 or Tyr396 did not interact with Stat3 or block Stat3 activation. These data demonstrate that Stat3 but not Stat1 or Stat5 is directly recruited to the ligand-activated IL-10 receptor by binding to specific but redundant receptor intracellular domain sequences containing phosphotyrosine. This study thus supports the concept that utilization of distinct STAT proteins by different cytokine receptors is dependent on the expression of particular ligand-activatable, tyrosine-containing STAT docking sites in receptor intracellular domains.

  13. TLR-exosomes exhibit distinct kinetics and effector function

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Swetha; Su, Michelle; Ravishankar, Shashidhar; Moore, James; Head, PamelaSara; Dixon, J. Brandon; Vannberg, Fredrik

    2017-01-01

    The innate immune system is vital to rapidly responding to pathogens and Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a critical component of this response. Nanovesicular exosomes play a role in immunity, but to date their exact contribution to the dissemination of the TLR response is unknown. Here we show that exosomes from TLR stimulated cells can largely recapitulate TLR activation in distal cells in vitro. We can abrogate the action-at-a-distance signaling of exosomes by UV irradiation, demonstrating that RNA is crucial for their effector function. We are the first to show that exosomes derived from poly(I:C) stimulated cells induce in vivo macrophage M1-like polarization within murine lymph nodes. These poly(I:C) exosomes demonstrate enhanced trafficking to the node and preferentially recruit neutrophils as compared to control exosomes. This work definitively establishes the differential effector function for exosomes in communicating the TLR activation state of the cell of origin. PMID:28290538

  14. Spatial Segregation of γ-Secretase and Substrates in Distinct Membrane Domains*

    PubMed Central

    Vetrivel, Kulandaivelu S.; Cheng, Haipeng; Kim, Seong-Hun; Chen, Ying; Barnes, Natalie Y.; Parent, Ange‘le T.; Sisodia, Sangram S.; Thinakaran, Gopal

    2005-01-01

    γ-Secretase facilitates the regulated intramembrane proteolysis of select type I membrane proteins that play diverse physiological roles in multiple cell types and tissue. In this study, we used biochemical approaches to examine the distribution of amyloid precursor protein (APP) and several additional γ-secretase substrates in membrane microdomains. We report that APP C-terminal fragments (CTFs) and γ-secretase reside in Lubrol WX detergent-insoluble membranes (DIM) of cultured cells and adult mouse brain. APP CTFs that accumulate in cells lacking γ-secretase activity preferentially associate with DIM. Cholesterol depletion and magnetic im-munoisolation studies indicate recruitment of APP CTFs into cholesterol- and sphingolipid-rich lipid rafts, and co-residence of APP CTFs, PS1, and syntaxin 6 in DIM patches derived from the trans-Golgi network. Photoaffinity cross-linking studies provided evidence for the preponderance of active γ-secretase in lipid rafts of cultured cells and adult brain. Remarkably, unlike the case of APP, CTFs derived from Notch1, Jagged2, deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC), and N-cadherin remain largely detergent-soluble, indicative of their spatial segregation in non-raft domains. In embryonic brain, the majority of PS1 and nicastrin is present in Lubrol WX-soluble membranes, wherein the CTFs derived from APP, Notch1, DCC, and N-cadherin also reside. We suggest that γ-secretase residence in non-raft membranes facilitates proteolysis of diverse substrates during embryonic development but that the translocation of γ-secretase to lipid rafts in adults ensures processing of certain substrates, including APP CTFs, while limiting processing of other potential substrates. PMID:15886206

  15. Distinct Neurobehavioural Effects of Cannabidiol in Transmembrane Domain Neuregulin 1 Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Long, Leonora E.; Chesworth, Rose; Huang, Xu-Feng; Wong, Alexander; Spiro, Adena; McGregor, Iain S.; Arnold, Jonathon C.; Karl, Tim

    2012-01-01

    The cannabis constituent cannabidiol (CBD) possesses anxiolytic and antipsychotic properties. We have previously shown that transmembrane domain neuregulin 1 mutant (Nrg1 TM HET) mice display altered neurobehavioural responses to the main psychoactive constituent of cannabis, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol. Here we investigated whether Nrg1 TM HET mice respond differently to CBD and whether CBD reverses schizophrenia-related phenotypes expressed by these mice. Adult male Nrg1 TM HET and wild type-like littermates (WT) received vehicle or CBD (1, 50 or 100 mg/kg i.p.) for 21 days. During treatment and 48 h after withdrawal we measured behaviour, whole blood CBD concentrations and autoradiographic receptor binding. Nrg1 HET mice displayed locomotor hyperactivity, PPI deficits and reduced 5-HT2A receptor binding density in the substantia nigra, but these phenotypes were not reversed by CBD. However, long-term CBD (50 and 100 mg/kg) selectively enhanced social interaction in Nrg1 TM HET mice. Furthermore, acute CBD (100 mg/kg) selectively increased PPI in Nrg1 TM HET mice, although tolerance to this effect was manifest upon repeated CBD administration. Long-term CBD (50 mg/kg) also selectively increased GABAA receptor binding in the granular retrosplenial cortex in Nrg1 TM HET mice and reduced 5-HT2A binding in the substantia nigra in WT mice. Nrg1 appears necessary for CBD-induced anxiolysis since only WT mice developed decreased anxiety-related behaviour with repeated CBD treatment. Altered pharmacokinetics in mutant mice could not explain our findings since no genotype differences existed in CBD blood concentrations. Here we demonstrate that Nrg1 modulates acute and long-term neurobehavioural effects of CBD, which does not reverse the schizophrenia-relevant phenotypes. PMID:22509273

  16. Distinct Modulations of Human Capsaicin Receptor by Protons and Magnesium through Different Domains*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shu; Poon, Kinning; Oswald, Robert E.; Chuang, Huai-hu

    2010-01-01

    The capsaicin receptor (TRPV1) is a nonselective cation channel that integrates multiple painful stimuli, including capsaicin, protons, and heat. Protons facilitate the capsaicin- and heat-induced currents by decreasing thermal threshold or increasing agonist potency for TRPV1 activation (Tominaga, M., Caterina, M. J., Malmberg, A. B., Rosen, T. A., Gilbert, H., Skinner, K., Raumann, B. E., Basbaum, A. I., and Julius, D. (1998) Neuron 21, 531–543). In the presence of saturating capsaicin, rat TRPV1 (rTRPV1) reaches full activation, with no further stimulation by protons. Human TRPV1 (hTRPV1), a species ortholog with high homology to rTRPV1, is potentiated by extracellular protons and magnesium, even at saturating capsaicin. We investigated the structural basis for protons and magnesium modulation of fully capsaicin-bound human receptors. By analysis of chimeric channels between hTRPV1 and rTRPV1, we found that transmembrane domain 1–4 (TM1–4) of TRPV1 determines whether protons can further open the fully capsaicin-bound receptors. Mutational analysis identified a titratable glutamate residue (Glu-536) in the linker between TM3 and TM4 critical for further stimulation of fully liganded hTRPV1. In contrast, hTRPV1 TM5–6 is required for magnesium augmentation of capsaicin efficacy. Our results demonstrate that capsaicin efficacy of hTRPV1 correlates with the extracellular ion milieu and unravel the relevant structural basis of modulation by protons and magnesium. PMID:20145248

  17. Functional Diversification of Hsp40: Distinct J-Protein Functional Requirements for Two Prions Allow for Chaperone-Dependent Prion Selection

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Milan J.; Sporn, Zachary A.; Hines, Justin K.

    2014-01-01

    Yeast prions are heritable amyloid aggregates of functional yeast proteins; their propagation to subsequent cell generations is dependent upon fragmentation of prion protein aggregates by molecular chaperone proteins. Mounting evidence indicates the J-protein Sis1 may act as an amyloid specificity factor, recognizing prion and other amyloid aggregates and enabling Ssa and Hsp104 to act in prion fragmentation. Chaperone interactions with prions, however, can be affected by variations in amyloid-core structure resulting in distinct prion variants or ‘strains’. Our genetic analysis revealed that Sis1 domain requirements by distinct variants of [PSI +] are strongly dependent upon overall variant stability. Notably, multiple strong [PSI +] variants can be maintained by a minimal construct of Sis1 consisting of only the J-domain and glycine/phenylalanine-rich (G/F) region that was previously shown to be sufficient for cell viability and [RNQ +] prion propagation. In contrast, weak [PSI +] variants are lost under the same conditions but maintained by the expression of an Sis1 construct that lacks only the G/F region and cannot support [RNQ +] propagation, revealing mutually exclusive requirements for Sis1 function between these two prions. Prion loss is not due to [PSI +]-dependent toxicity or dependent upon a particular yeast genetic background. These observations necessitate that Sis1 must have at least two distinct functional roles that individual prions differentially require for propagation and which are localized to the glycine-rich domains of the Sis1. Based on these distinctions, Sis1 plasmid-shuffling in a [PSI +]/[RNQ +] strain permitted J-protein-dependent prion selection for either prion. We also found that, despite an initial report to the contrary, the human homolog of Sis1, Hdj1, is capable of [PSI +] prion propagation in place of Sis1. This conservation of function is also prion-variant dependent, indicating that only one of the two Sis1-prion

  18. Functional diversification of hsp40: distinct j-protein functional requirements for two prions allow for chaperone-dependent prion selection.

    PubMed

    Harris, Julia M; Nguyen, Phil P; Patel, Milan J; Sporn, Zachary A; Hines, Justin K

    2014-07-01

    Yeast prions are heritable amyloid aggregates of functional yeast proteins; their propagation to subsequent cell generations is dependent upon fragmentation of prion protein aggregates by molecular chaperone proteins. Mounting evidence indicates the J-protein Sis1 may act as an amyloid specificity factor, recognizing prion and other amyloid aggregates and enabling Ssa and Hsp104 to act in prion fragmentation. Chaperone interactions with prions, however, can be affected by variations in amyloid-core structure resulting in distinct prion variants or 'strains'. Our genetic analysis revealed that Sis1 domain requirements by distinct variants of [PSI+] are strongly dependent upon overall variant stability. Notably, multiple strong [PSI+] variants can be maintained by a minimal construct of Sis1 consisting of only the J-domain and glycine/phenylalanine-rich (G/F) region that was previously shown to be sufficient for cell viability and [RNQ+] prion propagation. In contrast, weak [PSI+] variants are lost under the same conditions but maintained by the expression of an Sis1 construct that lacks only the G/F region and cannot support [RNQ+] propagation, revealing mutually exclusive requirements for Sis1 function between these two prions. Prion loss is not due to [PSI+]-dependent toxicity or dependent upon a particular yeast genetic background. These observations necessitate that Sis1 must have at least two distinct functional roles that individual prions differentially require for propagation and which are localized to the glycine-rich domains of the Sis1. Based on these distinctions, Sis1 plasmid-shuffling in a [PSI+]/[RNQ+] strain permitted J-protein-dependent prion selection for either prion. We also found that, despite an initial report to the contrary, the human homolog of Sis1, Hdj1, is capable of [PSI+] prion propagation in place of Sis1. This conservation of function is also prion-variant dependent, indicating that only one of the two Sis1-prion functions may have

  19. Structural and Functional Relationships between the Lectin and Arm Domains of Calreticulin*

    PubMed Central

    Pocanschi, Cosmin L.; Kozlov, Guennadi; Brockmeier, Ulf; Brockmeier, Achim; Williams, David B.; Gehring, Kalle

    2011-01-01

    Calreticulin and calnexin are key components in maintaining the quality control of glycoprotein folding within the endoplasmic reticulum. Although their lectin function of binding monoglucosylated sugar moieties of glycoproteins is well documented, their chaperone activity in suppressing protein aggregation is less well understood. Here, we use a series of deletion mutants of calreticulin to demonstrate that its aggregation suppression function resides primarily within its lectin domain. Using hydrophobic peptides as substrate mimetics, we show that aggregation suppression is mediated through a single polypeptide binding site that exhibits a Kd for peptides of 0.5–1 μm. This site is distinct from the oligosaccharide binding site and differs from previously identified sites of binding to thrombospondin and GABARAP (4-aminobutyrate type A receptor-associated protein). Although the arm domain of calreticulin was incapable of suppressing aggregation or binding hydrophobic peptides on its own, it did contribute to aggregation suppression in the context of the whole molecule. The high resolution x-ray crystal structure of calreticulin with a partially truncated arm domain reveals a marked difference in the relative orientations of the arm and lectin domains when compared with calnexin. Furthermore, a hydrophobic patch was detected on the arm domain that mediates crystal packing and may contribute to calreticulin chaperone function. PMID:21652723

  20. Domain-specific functions of Stardust in Drosophila embryonic development

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Leonie; Feicht, Sabine; Sun, Rui; Sen, Arnab

    2016-01-01

    In Drosophila, the adaptor protein Stardust is essential for the stabilization of the polarity determinant Crumbs in various epithelial tissues, including the embryonic epidermis, the follicular epithelium and photoreceptor cells of the compound eye. In turn, Stardust recruits another adaptor protein, PATJ, to the subapical region to support adherens junction formation and morphogenetic events. Moreover, Stardust binds to Lin-7, which is dispensable in epithelial cells but functions in postsynaptic vesicle fusion. Finally, Stardust has been reported to bind directly to PAR-6, thereby linking the Crumbs–Stardust–PATJ complex to the PAR-6/aPKC complex. PAR-6 and aPKC are also capable of directly binding Bazooka (the Drosophila homologue of PAR-3) to form the PAR/aPKC complex, which is essential for apical–basal polarity and cell–cell contact formation in most epithelia. However, little is known about the physiological relevance of these interactions in the embryonic epidermis of Drosophila in vivo. Thus, we performed a structure–function analysis of the annotated domains with GFP-tagged Stardust and evaluated the localization and function of the mutant proteins in epithelial cells of the embryonic epidermis. The data presented here confirm a crucial role of the PDZ domain in binding Crumbs and recruiting the protein to the subapical region. However, the isolated PDZ domain is not capable of being recruited to the cortex, and the SH3 domain is essential to support the binding to Crumbs. Notably, the conserved N-terminal regions (ECR1 and ECR2) are not crucial for epithelial polarity. Finally, the GUK domain plays an important role for the protein's function, which is not directly linked to Crumbs stabilization, and the L27N domain is essential for epithelial polarization independently of recruiting PATJ. PMID:28018665

  1. Interdependence of the rad50 hook and globular domain functions.

    PubMed

    Hohl, Marcel; Kochańczyk, Tomasz; Tous, Cristina; Aguilera, Andrés; Krężel, Artur; Petrini, John H J

    2015-02-05

    Rad50 contains a conserved Zn(2+) coordination domain (the Rad50 hook) that functions as a homodimerization interface. Hook ablation phenocopies Rad50 deficiency in all respects. Here, we focused on rad50 mutations flanking the Zn(2+)-coordinating hook cysteines. These mutants impaired hook-mediated dimerization, but recombination between sister chromatids was largely unaffected. This may reflect that cohesin-mediated sister chromatid interactions are sufficient for double-strand break repair. However, Mre11 complex functions specified by the globular domain, including Tel1 (ATM) activation, nonhomologous end joining, and DNA double-strand break end resection were affected, suggesting that dimerization exerts a broad influence on Mre11 complex function. These phenotypes were suppressed by mutations within the coiled-coil and globular ATPase domains, suggesting a model in which conformational changes in the hook and globular domains are transmitted via the extended coils of Rad50. We propose that transmission of spatial information in this manner underlies the regulation of Mre11 complex functions.

  2. Interdependence of the Rad50 hook and globular domain functions

    PubMed Central

    Hohl, Marcel; Kochańczyk, Tomasz; Tous, Cristina; Aguilera, Andrés; Krężel, Artur; Petrini, John H J

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Rad50 contains a conserved Zn2+ coordination domain (the Rad50 hook) that functions as a homodimerization interface. Hook ablation phenocopies Rad50 deficiency in all respects. Here we focused on rad50 mutations flanking the Zn2+-coordinating hook cysteines. These mutants impaired hook-mediated dimerization, but recombination between sister chromatids was largely unaffected. This may reflect that cohesin-mediated sister chromatid interactions are sufficient for double strand break repair. However, Mre11 complex functions specified by the globular domain, including Tel1 (ATM) activation, nonhomologous end-joining, and DNA double strand break end resection were affected, suggesting that dimerization exerts a broad influence on Mre11 complex function. These phenotypes were suppressed by mutations within the coiled coil and globular ATPase domain, suggesting a model in which conformational changes in the hook and globular domains are transmitted via the extended coils of Rad50. We propose that transmission of spatial information in this manner underlies the regulation of Mre11 complex functions. PMID:25601756

  3. Integral estimates for differentiable functions on irregular domains

    SciTech Connect

    Besov, Oleg V

    2011-02-11

    Integral representations for functions and their partial derivatives in terms of some fixed system of partial derivatives are constructed on irregular domains in a Euclidean space. Embedding theorems for Sobolev-type spaces into a Lebesgue space are established and the norms of the derivatives are estimated. Bibliography: 17 titles.

  4. Stand-Alone EAL Domain Proteins Form a Distinct Subclass of EAL Proteins Involved in Regulation of Cell Motility and Biofilm Formation in Enterobacteria.

    PubMed

    El Mouali, Youssef; Kim, Hyunhee; Ahmad, Irfan; Brauner, Annelie; Liu, Ying; Skurnik, Mikael; Galperin, Michael Y; Römling, Ute

    2017-09-15

    The second messenger cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP) is almost ubiquitous among bacteria as are the c-di-GMP turnover proteins, which mediate the transition between motility and sessility. EAL domain proteins have been characterized as c-di-GMP-specific phosphodiesterases. While most EAL domain proteins contain additional, usually N-terminal, domains, there is a distinct family of proteins with stand-alone EAL domains, exemplified by Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium proteins STM3611 (YhjH/PdeH), a c-di-GMP-specific phosphodiesterase, and the enzymatically inactive STM1344 (YdiV/CdgR) and STM1697, which regulate bacterial motility through interaction with the flagellar master regulator, FlhDC. We have analyzed the phylogenetic distribution of EAL-only proteins and their potential functions. Genes encoding EAL-only proteins were found in various bacterial phyla, although most of them were seen in proteobacteria, particularly enterobacteria. Based on the conservation of the active site residues, nearly all stand-alone EAL domains encoded by genomes from phyla other than proteobacteria appear to represent functional phosphodiesterases. Within enterobacteria, EAL-only proteins were found to cluster either with YhjH or with one of the subfamilies of YdiV-related proteins. EAL-only proteins from Shigella flexneri, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Yersinia enterocolitica were tested for their ability to regulate swimming and swarming motility and formation of the red, dry, and rough (rdar) biofilm morphotype. In these tests, YhjH-related proteins S4210, KPN_01159, KPN_03274, and YE4063 displayed properties typical of enzymatically active phosphodiesterases, whereas S1641 and YE1324 behaved like members of the YdiV/STM1697 subfamily, with Yersinia enterocolitica protein YE1324 shown to downregulate motility in its native host. Of two closely related EAL-only proteins, YE2225 is an active phosphodiesterase, while YE1324 appears to interact with FlhD. These results suggest

  5. Functional properties of extracellular domains of transducer receptor gp130.

    PubMed

    Kostjukova, M N; Tupitsyn, N N

    2011-04-01

    Cytokine receptor molecules have been shown to have extracellular domains of complex structure and a multi-step activation system. Glycoprotein gp130 is a typical transducer of cytokine signal; it functions by forming multicomponent receptor complexes and transferring signals of tens of cytokines from the IL-6 family. Structural organization and basic functioning principles of gp130 are well known, as well as related signal pathways, which function during normal differentiation and are involved in pathogenesis of many tumors. The role of gp130 in IL-6-dependent tumors is best studied. In this review, based on extensive accumulated data, we examine the functional significance of certain parts of gp130 extracellular domains. Potentials of a recently developed method for estimation of receptor activation at the level of epitope structure are discussed.

  6. Mapping a kingdom-specific functional domain of squalene synthase.

    PubMed

    Linscott, Kristin B; Niehaus, Thomas D; Zhuang, Xun; Bell, Stephen A; Chappell, Joe

    2016-09-01

    Squalene synthase catalyzes the first committed step in sterol biosynthesis and consists of both an amino-terminal catalytic domain and a carboxy-terminal domain tethering the enzyme to the ER membrane. While the overall architecture of this enzyme is identical in eukaryotes, it was previously shown that plant and animal genes cannot complement a squalene synthase knockout mutation in yeast unless the carboxy-terminal domain is swapped for one of fungal origin. This implied a unique component of the fungal carboxy-terminal domain was responsible for the complementation phenotype. To identify this motif, we used Saccharomyces cerevisiae with a squalene synthase knockout mutation, and expressed intact and chimeric squalene synthases originating from fungi, plants, and animals. In contrast to previous observations, all enzymes tested could partially complement the knockout mutation when the genes were weakly expressed. However, when highly expressed, non-fungal squalene synthases could not complement the yeast mutation and instead led to the accumulation of a toxic intermediate(s) as defined by mutations of genes downstream in the ergosterol pathway. Restoration of the complete complementation phenotype was mapped to a 26-amino acid hinge region linking the catalytic and membrane-spanning domains specific to fungal squalene synthases. Over-expression of the C-terminal domain containing a hinge domain from fungi, not from animals or plants, led to growth inhibition of wild-type yeast. Because this hinge region is unique to and highly conserved within each kingdom of life, the data suggests that the hinge domain plays an essential functional role, such as assembly of ergosterol multi-enzyme complexes in fungi. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Clarifying the Nature of the Distinctiveness by Domain Interaction in Conceptual Structure: Comment on Cree, McNorgan, and McRae (2006)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Kirsten I.; Salamoura, Angeliki; Randall, Billi; Moss, Helen; Tyler, Lorraine K.

    2008-01-01

    The conceptual structure account of semantic memory (CSA; L. K. Tyler & H. E. Moss, 2001) claims that feature correlation (the degree to which features co-occur) and feature distinctiveness (the number of concepts in which a feature occurs) interact with domains of knowledge (e.g., living vs. nonliving) such that the distinctive features of…

  8. Clarifying the Nature of the Distinctiveness by Domain Interaction in Conceptual Structure: Comment on Cree, McNorgan, and McRae (2006)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Kirsten I.; Salamoura, Angeliki; Randall, Billi; Moss, Helen; Tyler, Lorraine K.

    2008-01-01

    The conceptual structure account of semantic memory (CSA; L. K. Tyler & H. E. Moss, 2001) claims that feature correlation (the degree to which features co-occur) and feature distinctiveness (the number of concepts in which a feature occurs) interact with domains of knowledge (e.g., living vs. nonliving) such that the distinctive features of…

  9. Fungi have three tetraspanin families with distinct functions

    PubMed Central

    Lambou, Karine; Tharreau, Didier; Kohler, Annegret; Sirven, Catherine; Marguerettaz, Mélanie; Barbisan, Crystel; Sexton, Adrienne C; Kellner, Ellen M; Martin, Francis; Howlett, Barbara J; Orbach, Marc J; Lebrun, Marc-Henri

    2008-01-01

    Background Tetraspanins are small membrane proteins that belong to a superfamily encompassing 33 members in human and mouse. These proteins act as organizers of membrane-signalling complexes. So far only two tetraspanin families have been identified in fungi. These are Pls1, which is required for pathogenicity of the plant pathogenic ascomycetes, Magnaporthe grisea, Botrytis cinerea and Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, and Tsp2, whose function is unknown. In this report, we describe a third family of tetraspanins (Tsp3) and a new family of tetraspanin-like proteins (Tpl1) in fungi. We also describe expression of some of these genes in M. grisea and a basidiomycete, Laccaria bicolor, and also their functional analysis in M. grisea. Results The exhaustive search for tetraspanins in fungal genomes reveals that higher fungi (basidiomycetes and ascomycetes) contain three families of tetraspanins (Pls1, Tsp2 and Tsp3) with different distribution amongst phyla. Pls1 is found in ascomycetes and basidiomycetes, whereas Tsp2 is restricted to basidiomycetes and Tsp3 to ascomycetes. A unique copy of each of PLS1 and TSP3 was found in ascomycetes in contrast to TSP2, which has several paralogs in the basidiomycetes, Coprinus cinereus and Laccaria bicolor. A tetraspanin-like family (Tpl1) was also identified in ascomycetes. Transcriptional analyses in various tissues of L. bicolor and M. grisea showed that PLS1 and TSP2 are expressed in all tissues in L. bicolor and that TSP3 and TPL1 are overexpressed in the sexual fruiting bodies (perithecia) and mycelia of M. grisea, suggesting that these genes are not pseudogenes. Phenotypic analysis of gene replacementmutants Δtsp3 and Δtpl1 of M. grisea revealed a reduction of the pathogenicity only on rice, in contrast to Δpls1 mutants, which are completely non-pathogenic on barley and rice. Conclusion A new tetraspanin family (Tsp3) and a tetraspanin-like protein family (Tpl1) have been identified in fungi. Functional analysis by gene

  10. Distinct Functional Connectivities Predict Clinical Response with Emotion Regulation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Fresco, David M; Roy, Amy K; Adelsberg, Samantha; Seeley, Saren; García-Lesy, Emmanuel; Liston, Conor; Mennin, Douglas S

    2017-01-01

    Despite the success of available medical and psychosocial treatments, a sizable subgroup of individuals with commonly co-occurring disorders, generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and major depressive disorder (MDD), fail to make sufficient treatment gains thereby prolonging their deficits in life functioning and satisfaction. Clinically, these patients often display temperamental features reflecting heightened sensitivity to underlying motivational systems related to threat/safety and reward/loss (e.g., somatic anxiety) as well as inordinate negative self-referential processing (e.g., worry, rumination). This profile may reflect disruption in two important neural networks associated with emotional/motivational salience (e.g., salience network) and self-referentiality (e.g., default network, DN). Emotion Regulation Therapy (ERT) was developed to target this hypothesized profile and its neurobehavioral markers. In the present study, 22 GAD patients (with and without MDD) completed resting state MRI scans before receiving 16 sessions of ERT. To test study these hypotheses, we examined the associations between baseline patterns of intrinsic functional connectivity (iFC) of the insula and of hubs within the DN (anterior and dorsal medial prefrontal cortex [MPFC] and posterior cingulate cortex [PCC]) and treatment-related changes in worry, somatic anxiety symptoms and decentering. Results suggest that greater treatment linked reductions in worry were associated with iFC clusters in both the insular and parietal cortices. Greater treatment linked gains in decentering, a metacognitive process that involves the capacity to observe items that arise in the mind with healthy psychological distance that is targeted by ERT, was associated with iFC clusters in the anterior and posterior DN. The current study adds to the growing body of research implicating disruptions in the default and salience networks as promising targets of treatment for GAD with and without co-occurring MDD.

  11. Distinct Functional Connectivities Predict Clinical Response with Emotion Regulation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Fresco, David M.; Roy, Amy K.; Adelsberg, Samantha; Seeley, Saren; García-Lesy, Emmanuel; Liston, Conor; Mennin, Douglas S.

    2017-01-01

    Despite the success of available medical and psychosocial treatments, a sizable subgroup of individuals with commonly co-occurring disorders, generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and major depressive disorder (MDD), fail to make sufficient treatment gains thereby prolonging their deficits in life functioning and satisfaction. Clinically, these patients often display temperamental features reflecting heightened sensitivity to underlying motivational systems related to threat/safety and reward/loss (e.g., somatic anxiety) as well as inordinate negative self-referential processing (e.g., worry, rumination). This profile may reflect disruption in two important neural networks associated with emotional/motivational salience (e.g., salience network) and self-referentiality (e.g., default network, DN). Emotion Regulation Therapy (ERT) was developed to target this hypothesized profile and its neurobehavioral markers. In the present study, 22 GAD patients (with and without MDD) completed resting state MRI scans before receiving 16 sessions of ERT. To test study these hypotheses, we examined the associations between baseline patterns of intrinsic functional connectivity (iFC) of the insula and of hubs within the DN (anterior and dorsal medial prefrontal cortex [MPFC] and posterior cingulate cortex [PCC]) and treatment-related changes in worry, somatic anxiety symptoms and decentering. Results suggest that greater treatment linked reductions in worry were associated with iFC clusters in both the insular and parietal cortices. Greater treatment linked gains in decentering, a metacognitive process that involves the capacity to observe items that arise in the mind with healthy psychological distance that is targeted by ERT, was associated with iFC clusters in the anterior and posterior DN. The current study adds to the growing body of research implicating disruptions in the default and salience networks as promising targets of treatment for GAD with and without co-occurring MDD

  12. Protein function annotation using protein domain family resources.

    PubMed

    Das, Sayoni; Orengo, Christine A

    2016-01-15

    As a result of the genome sequencing and structural genomics initiatives, we have a wealth of protein sequence and structural data. However, only about 1% of these proteins have experimental functional annotations. As a result, computational approaches that can predict protein functions are essential in bridging this widening annotation gap. This article reviews the current approaches of protein function prediction using structure and sequence based classification of protein domain family resources with a special focus on functional families in the CATH-Gene3D resource.

  13. The functional domain grouping of microtubule associated proteins

    PubMed Central

    Deane, Charlotte M; Wakefield, James G

    2008-01-01

    Microtubules (MTs), which play crucial roles in normal cell function, are regulated by MT associated proteins (MAPs). Using a combinatorial approach that includes biochemistry, proteomics and bioinformatics, we have recently identified 270 putative MAPs from Drosophila embryos and characterized some of those required for correct progression through mitosis. Here we identify functional groups of these MAPs using a reciprocal hits sequence alignment technique and assign InterPro functional domains to 28 previously uncharacterized proteins. This approach gives insight into the potential functions of MAPs and how their roles may affect MTs. PMID:19704789

  14. Distinct Prion Domain Sequences Ensure Efficient Amyloid Propagation by Promoting Chaperone Binding or Processing In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Langlois, Christine R.; Serio, Tricia R.

    2016-01-01

    Prions are a group of proteins that can adopt a spectrum of metastable conformations in vivo. These alternative states change protein function and are self-replicating and transmissible, creating protein-based elements of inheritance and infectivity. Prion conformational flexibility is encoded in the amino acid composition and sequence of the protein, which dictate its ability not only to form an ordered aggregate known as amyloid but also to maintain and transmit this structure in vivo. But, while we can effectively predict amyloid propensity in vitro, the mechanism by which sequence elements promote prion propagation in vivo remains unclear. In yeast, propagation of the [PSI+] prion, the amyloid form of the Sup35 protein, has been linked to an oligopeptide repeat region of the protein. Here, we demonstrate that this region is composed of separable functional elements, the repeats themselves and a repeat proximal region, which are both required for efficient prion propagation. Changes in the numbers of these elements do not alter the physical properties of Sup35 amyloid, but their presence promotes amyloid fragmentation, and therefore maintenance, by molecular chaperones. Rather than acting redundantly, our observations suggest that these sequence elements make complementary contributions to prion propagation, with the repeat proximal region promoting chaperone binding to and the repeats promoting chaperone processing of Sup35 amyloid. PMID:27814358

  15. Distinct functional determinants of influenza hemagglutinin-mediated membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    Ivanovic, Tijana; Harrison, Stephen C

    2015-01-01

    Membrane fusion is the critical step for infectious cell penetration by enveloped viruses. We have previously used single-virion measurements of fusion kinetics to study the molecular mechanism of influenza-virus envelope fusion. Published data on fusion inhibition by antibodies to the 'stem' of influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA) now allow us to incorporate into simulations the provision that some HAs are inactive. We find that more than half of the HAs are unproductive even for virions with no bound antibodies, but that the overall mechanism is extremely robust. Determining the fraction of competent HAs allows us to determine their rates of target-membrane engagement. Comparison of simulations with data from H3N2 and H1N1 viruses reveals three independent functional variables of HA-mediated membrane fusion closely linked to neutralization susceptibility. Evidence for compensatory changes in the evolved mechanism sets the stage for studies aiming to define the molecular constraints on HA evolvability. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11009.001 PMID:26613408

  16. Functional diversity of potassium channel voltage-sensing domains

    PubMed Central

    Islas, León D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Voltage-gated potassium channels or Kv's are membrane proteins with fundamental physiological roles. They are composed of 2 main functional protein domains, the pore domain, which regulates ion permeation, and the voltage-sensing domain, which is in charge of sensing voltage and undergoing a conformational change that is later transduced into pore opening. The voltage-sensing domain or VSD is a highly conserved structural motif found in all voltage-gated ion channels and can also exist as an independent feature, giving rise to voltage sensitive enzymes and also sustaining proton fluxes in proton-permeable channels. In spite of the structural conservation of VSDs in potassium channels, there are several differences in the details of VSD function found across variants of Kvs. These differences are mainly reflected in variations in the electrostatic energy needed to open different potassium channels. In turn, the differences in detailed VSD functioning among voltage-gated potassium channels might have physiological consequences that have not been explored and which might reflect evolutionary adaptations to the different roles played by Kv channels in cell physiology. PMID:26794852

  17. Functional diversity of potassium channel voltage-sensing domains.

    PubMed

    Islas, León D

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channels or Kv's are membrane proteins with fundamental physiological roles. They are composed of 2 main functional protein domains, the pore domain, which regulates ion permeation, and the voltage-sensing domain, which is in charge of sensing voltage and undergoing a conformational change that is later transduced into pore opening. The voltage-sensing domain or VSD is a highly conserved structural motif found in all voltage-gated ion channels and can also exist as an independent feature, giving rise to voltage sensitive enzymes and also sustaining proton fluxes in proton-permeable channels. In spite of the structural conservation of VSDs in potassium channels, there are several differences in the details of VSD function found across variants of Kvs. These differences are mainly reflected in variations in the electrostatic energy needed to open different potassium channels. In turn, the differences in detailed VSD functioning among voltage-gated potassium channels might have physiological consequences that have not been explored and which might reflect evolutionary adaptations to the different roles played by Kv channels in cell physiology.

  18. Structure and function of regulator of G protein signaling homology domains.

    PubMed

    Tesmer, John J G

    2009-01-01

    All regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins contain a conserved domain of approximately 130 amino acids that binds to activated heterotrimeric G protein α subunits (Gα) and accelerates their rate of GTP hydrolysis. Homologous domains are found in at least six other protein families, including a family of Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors (RhoGEFs) and the G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs). Although some of the RhoGEF and GRK RGS-like domains can also bind to activated Gα subunits, they do so in distinct ways and with much lower levels of GTPase activation. In other protein families, the domains have as of yet no obvious relationship to heterotrimeric G protein signaling. These RGS homology (RH) domains are now recognized as mediators of extraordinarily diverse protein-protein interactions. Through these interactions, they play roles that range from enzyme to molecular scaffold to signal transducing module. In this review, the atomic structures of RH domains from RGS proteins, Axins, RhoGEFs, and GRKs are compared in light of what is currently known about their functional roles.

  19. Distinct transcriptional regulation and function of the human BACE2 and BACE1 genes.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiulian; Wang, Yingcheng; Qing, Hong; Christensen, Michelle A; Liu, Yunqiang; Zhou, Weihui; Tong, Yigang; Xiao, Cuiying; Huang, Yi; Zhang, Sizhong; Liu, Xiehe; Song, Weihong

    2005-05-01

    Amyloid beta protein (Abeta) is the principal component of neuritic plaques in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Abeta is derived from beta amyloid precursor protein (APP) by beta- and gamma-secretases. Beta-site APP cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) has been identified as the major beta-secretase. BACE2 is the homolog of BACE1. The BACE2 gene is on chromosome 21 and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of AD. However, the function of BACE2 in Abeta generation is controversial. Some studies have shown that BACE2 cleaved APP at the beta-site whereas other studies showed it cleaved around the alpha-secretase site. To elucidate the involvement of BACE2 in AD pathogenesis, we compared BACE2 and BACE1 gene regulation and their functions in Abeta generation. We cloned and functionally characterized the human BACE2 promoter. The BACE2 gene is controlled by a TATA-less promoter. Though Sp1 can regulate both BACE1 and BACE2 genes, comparative sequence analysis and transcription factor prediction showed little similarity between the two promoters. BACE1 increased APP cleavage at the beta-site and Abeta production whereas BACE2 did not. Overexpression of BACE2 significantly increased sAPP levels in conditioned media but markedly reduced Abeta production. Knockdown of BACE2 resulted in increased APP C83. Our data indicate that despite being homologous in amino acid sequence, BACE2 and BACE1 have distinct functions and transcriptional regulation. BACE2 is not a beta-secretase, but processes APP within the Abeta domain at a site downstream of the alpha-secretase cleavage site. Our data argue against BACE2 being involved in the formation of neuritic plaques in AD.

  20. Diet-induced docosahexaenoic acid non-raft domains and lymphocyte function.

    PubMed

    Raza Shaikh, Saame

    2010-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is an n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) that generally suppresses the function of T lymphocytes and antigen presenting cells (APCs). An emerging mechanism by which DHA modifies lymphocyte function is through changes in the organization of sphingolipid/cholesterol lipid raft membrane domains. Two contradictory models have been proposed to explain how DHA exerts its effects through changes in raft organization. The biophysical model, developed in model membranes, shows that DHA-containing phospholipids form unique non-raft membrane domains, that are organizationally distinct from lipid rafts, which serve to alter the conformation and/or lateral organization of lymphocyte proteins. In contrast, the cellular model on DHA and rafts shows that DHA suppresses lymphocyte function, in part, by directly incorporating into lipid rafts and altering protein activity. To reconcile opposing biophysical and cellular viewpoints, a major revision to existing models is presented herein. Based largely on quantitative microscopy data, it is proposed that DHA, consumed through the diet, modifies lymphocyte function, in part, through the formation of nanometer scale DHA-rich domains. These nano-scale domains disrupt the optimal raft-dependent clustering of proteins necessary for initial signaling. The data covered in this review highlights the importance of understanding how dietary n-3 PUFAs modify lymphocyte membranes, which is essential toward developing these fatty acids as therapeutic agents for treating inflammatory diseases.

  1. Wind-instrument reflection function measurements in the time domain.

    PubMed

    Keefe, D H

    1996-04-01

    Theoretical and computational analyses of wind-instrument sound production in the time domain have emerged as useful tools for understanding musical instrument acoustics, yet there exist few experimental measurements of the air-column response directly in the time domain. A new experimental, time-domain technique is proposed to measure the reflection function response of woodwind and brass-instrument air columns. This response is defined at the location of sound regeneration in the mouthpiece or double reed. A probe assembly comprised of an acoustic source and microphone is inserted directly into the air column entryway using a foam plug to ensure a leak-free fit. An initial calibration phase involves measurements on a single cylindrical tube of known dimensions. Measurements are presented on an alto saxophone and euphonium. The technique has promise for testing any musical instrument air columns using a single probe assembly and foam plugs over a range of diameters typical of air-column entryways.

  2. Functional analysis of the nuclear LIM domain interactor NLI.

    PubMed Central

    Jurata, L W; Gill, G N

    1997-01-01

    LIM homeodomain and LIM-only (LMO) transcription factors contain two tandemly arranged Zn2+-binding LIM domains capable of mediating protein-protein interactions. These factors have restricted patterns of expression, are found in invertebrates as well as vertebrates, and are required for cell type specification in a variety of developing tissues. A recently identified, widely expressed protein, NLI, binds with high affinity to the LIM domains of LIM homeodomain and LMO proteins in vitro and in vivo. In this study, a 38-amino-acid fragment of NLI was found to be sufficient for the association of NLI with nuclear LIM domains. In addition, NLI was shown to form high affinity homodimers through the amino-terminal 200 amino acids, but dimerization of NLI was not required for association with the LIM homeodomain protein Lmxl. Chemical cross-linking analysis revealed higher-order complexes containing multiple NLI molecules bound to Lmx1, indicating that dimerization of NLI does not interfere with LIM domain interactions. Additionally, NLI formed complexes with Lmx1 on the rat insulin I promoter and inhibited the LIM domain-dependent synergistic transcriptional activation by Lmx1 and the basic helix-loop-helix protein E47 from the rat insulin I minienhancer. These studies indicate that NLI contains at least two functionally independent domains and may serve as a negative regulator of synergistic transcriptional responses which require direct interaction via LIM domains. Thus, NLI may regulate the transcriptional activity of LIM homeodomain proteins by determining specific partner interactions. PMID:9315627

  3. Functional and topological diversity of LOV domain photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Glantz, Spencer T.; Carpenter, Eric J.; Melkonian, Michael; Boyden, Edward S.; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Chow, Brian Y.

    2016-01-01

    Light–oxygen–voltage sensitive (LOV) flavoproteins are ubiquitous photoreceptors that mediate responses to environmental cues. Photosensory inputs are transduced into signaling outputs via structural rearrangements in sensor domains that consequently modulate the activity of an effector domain or multidomain clusters. Establishing the diversity in effector function and sensor–effector topology will inform what signaling mechanisms govern light-responsive behaviors across multiple kingdoms of life and how these signals are transduced. Here, we report the bioinformatics identification of over 6,700 candidate LOV domains (including over 4,000 previously unidentified sequences from plants and protists), and insights from their annotations for ontological function and structural arrangements. Motif analysis identified the sensors from ∼42 million ORFs, with strong statistical separation from other flavoproteins and non-LOV members of the structurally related Per-aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT)-Sim family. Conserved-domain analysis determined putative light-regulated function and multidomain topologies. We found that for certain effectors, sensor–effector linker length is discretized based on both phylogeny and the preservation of α-helical heptad repeats within an extended coiled-coil linker structure. This finding suggests that preserving sensor–effector orientation is a key determinant of linker length, in addition to ancestry, in LOV signaling structure–function. We found a surprisingly high prevalence of effectors with functions previously thought to be rare among LOV proteins, such as regulators of G protein signaling, and discovered several previously unidentified effectors, such as lipases. This work highlights the value of applying genomic and transcriptomic technologies to diverse organisms to capture the structural and functional variation in photosensory proteins that are vastly important in adaptation, photobiology, and

  4. Functional and topological diversity of LOV domain photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Glantz, Spencer T; Carpenter, Eric J; Melkonian, Michael; Gardner, Kevin H; Boyden, Edward S; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Chow, Brian Y

    2016-03-15

    Light-oxygen-voltage sensitive (LOV) flavoproteins are ubiquitous photoreceptors that mediate responses to environmental cues. Photosensory inputs are transduced into signaling outputs via structural rearrangements in sensor domains that consequently modulate the activity of an effector domain or multidomain clusters. Establishing the diversity in effector function and sensor-effector topology will inform what signaling mechanisms govern light-responsive behaviors across multiple kingdoms of life and how these signals are transduced. Here, we report the bioinformatics identification of over 6,700 candidate LOV domains (including over 4,000 previously unidentified sequences from plants and protists), and insights from their annotations for ontological function and structural arrangements. Motif analysis identified the sensors from ∼42 million ORFs, with strong statistical separation from other flavoproteins and non-LOV members of the structurally related Per-aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT)-Sim family. Conserved-domain analysis determined putative light-regulated function and multidomain topologies. We found that for certain effectors, sensor-effector linker length is discretized based on both phylogeny and the preservation of α-helical heptad repeats within an extended coiled-coil linker structure. This finding suggests that preserving sensor-effector orientation is a key determinant of linker length, in addition to ancestry, in LOV signaling structure-function. We found a surprisingly high prevalence of effectors with functions previously thought to be rare among LOV proteins, such as regulators of G protein signaling, and discovered several previously unidentified effectors, such as lipases. This work highlights the value of applying genomic and transcriptomic technologies to diverse organisms to capture the structural and functional variation in photosensory proteins that are vastly important in adaptation, photobiology, and optogenetics.

  5. Structural and Functional Dissection of the Abp1 ADFH Actin-binding Domain Reveals Versatile In Vivo Adapter Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Quintero-Monzon,O.; Rodal, A.; Strokopytov, B.; Almo, S.; Goode, B.

    2005-01-01

    Abp1 is a multidomain protein that regulates the Arp2/3 complex and links proteins involved in endocytosis to the actin cytoskeleton. All of the proposed cellular functions of Abp1 involve actin filament binding, yet the actin binding site(s) on Abp1 have not been identified, nor has the importance of actin binding for Abp1 localization and function in vivo been tested. Here, we report the crystal structure of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Abp1 actin-binding actin depolymerizing factor homology (ADFH) domain and dissect its activities by mutagenesis. Abp1-ADFH domain and ADF/cofilin structures are similar, and they use conserved surfaces to bind actin; however, there are also key differences that help explain their differential effects on actin dynamics. Using point mutations, we demonstrate that actin binding is required for localization of Abp1 in vivo, the lethality caused by Abp1 overexpression, and the ability of Abp1 to activate Arp2/3 complex. Furthermore, we genetically uncouple ABP1 functions that overlap with SAC6, SLA1, and SLA2, showing they require distinct combinations of activities and interactions. Together, our data provide the first structural and functional view of the Abp1-actin interaction and show that Abp1 has distinct cellular roles as an adapter, linking different sets of ligands for each function.

  6. Concurrent Vaccination with two distinct vaccine platforms targeting the same antigen generates phenotypically and functionally distinct T-cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Boehm, Amanda L.; Higgins, Jack; Franzusoff, Alex; Schlom, Jeffrey; Hodge, James W.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Studies comparing two or more vaccine platforms have historically evaluated each platform based on its ability to induce an immune response and may conclude that one vaccine is more efficacious than the other(s), leading to a recommendation for development of the more effective vaccine for clinical studies. Alternatively, these studies have documented the advantages of a diversified prime and boost regimen due to amplification of the antigen-specific T-cell population. We hypothesize here that two vaccine platforms targeting the same antigen might induce shared and distinct antigen-specific T-cell populations, and examined the possibility that two distinct vaccines could be used concomitantly. Experimental design Using recombinant poxvirus and yeast vaccines, we compared the T-cell populations induced by these two platforms in terms of serum cytokine response, T-cell gene expression, T-cell receptor phenotype, antigen-specific cytokine expression, T-cell avidity, and T-cell antigen-specific tumor cell lysis. Results These studies demonstrate for the first time that vaccination with a recombinant poxvirus platform (rV/F-CEA/TRICOM) or a heat-killed yeast vaccine platform (yeast-CEA) elicits T-cell populations with both shared and unique phenotypic and functional characteristics. Furthermore, both the antigen and the vector play a role in the induction of distinct T-cell populations. Conclusions In this study, we demonstrate that concurrent administration of two vaccines targeting the same antigen induces a more diverse T-cell population that leads to enhanced antitumor efficacy. These studies provide the rationale for future clinical studies investigating concurrent administration of vaccine platforms targeting a single antigen to enhance the antigen-specific immune response. PMID:19756595

  7. Functional electronic inversion layers at ferroelectric domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mundy, J. A.; Schaab, J.; Kumagai, Y.; Cano, A.; Stengel, M.; Krug, I. P.; Gottlob, D. M.; Doğanay, H.; Holtz, M. E.; Held, R.; Yan, Z.; Bourret, E.; Schneider, C. M.; Schlom, D. G.; Muller, D. A.; Ramesh, R.; Spaldin, N. A.; Meier, D.

    2017-06-01

    Ferroelectric domain walls hold great promise as functional two-dimensional materials because of their unusual electronic properties. Particularly intriguing are the so-called charged walls where a polarity mismatch causes local, diverging electrostatic potentials requiring charge compensation and hence a change in the electronic structure. These walls can exhibit significantly enhanced conductivity and serve as a circuit path. The development of all-domain-wall devices, however, also requires walls with controllable output to emulate electronic nano-components such as diodes and transistors. Here we demonstrate electric-field control of the electronic transport at ferroelectric domain walls. We reversibly switch from resistive to conductive behaviour at charged walls in semiconducting ErMnO3. We relate the transition to the formation--and eventual activation--of an inversion layer that acts as the channel for the charge transport. The findings provide new insight into the domain-wall physics in ferroelectrics and foreshadow the possibility to design elementary digital devices for all-domain-wall circuitry.

  8. From shared to distinct self–other representations in empathy: evidence from neurotypical function and socio-cognitive disorders

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Neuroscientific research has identified two fundamental components of empathy: shared emotional representations between self and other, and self–other distinction. The concept of shared representations suggests that during empathy, we co-represent another person's affect by engaging brain and bodily functions underpinning the first-hand experience of the emotion we are empathizing with. This possible grounding of empathy in our own emotional experiences explains the necessity for self–other distinction, which is the capacity to correctly distinguish between our own affective representations and those related to the other. In spite of the importance of these two components in empathy, several aspects still remain controversial. This paper addresses some of them and focuses on (i) the distinction between shared activations versus representations, raising the question what shared representations entail in terms of the underlying neural mechanisms, (ii) the possible mechanisms behind self–other distinction in the cognitive and the affective domains, and whether they have distinct neural underpinnings and (iii) the consequences associated with a selective impairment of one of the two components, thereby addressing their importance in mental disorders such as autism spectrum disorders, psychopathy and alexithymia. PMID:26644601

  9. From shared to distinct self-other representations in empathy: evidence from neurotypical function and socio-cognitive disorders.

    PubMed

    Lamm, C; Bukowski, H; Silani, G

    2016-01-19

    Neuroscientific research has identified two fundamental components of empathy: shared emotional representations between self and other, and self-other distinction. The concept of shared representations suggests that during empathy, we co-represent another person's affect by engaging brain and bodily functions underpinning the first-hand experience of the emotion we are empathizing with. This possible grounding of empathy in our own emotional experiences explains the necessity for self-other distinction, which is the capacity to correctly distinguish between our own affective representations and those related to the other. In spite of the importance of these two components in empathy, several aspects still remain controversial. This paper addresses some of them and focuses on (i) the distinction between shared activations versus representations, raising the question what shared representations entail in terms of the underlying neural mechanisms, (ii) the possible mechanisms behind self-other distinction in the cognitive and the affective domains, and whether they have distinct neural underpinnings and (iii) the consequences associated with a selective impairment of one of the two components, thereby addressing their importance in mental disorders such as autism spectrum disorders, psychopathy and alexithymia.

  10. Measles virus recognizes its receptor, CD46, via two distinct binding domains within SCR1-2.

    PubMed

    Manchester, M; Gairin, J E; Patterson, J B; Alvarez, J; Liszewski, M K; Eto, D S; Atkinson, J P; Oldstone, M B

    1997-06-23

    Measles virus (MV) enters cells by attachment of the viral hemagglutinin to the major cell surface receptor CD46 (membrane cofactor protein). CD46 is a transmembrane glycoprotein whose ectodomain is largely composed of four conserved modules called short consensus repeats (SCRs). We have previously shown that MV interacts with SCR1 and SCR2 of CD46. (M. Manchester et al. (1995) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 92, 2303-2307) Here we report mapping the MV interaction with SCR1 and SCR2 of CD46 using a combination of peptide inhibition and mutagenesis studies. By testing a series of overlapping peptides corresponding to the 126 amino acid SCR1-2 region for inhibition of MV infection, two domains were identified that interacted with MV. One domain was found within SCR1 (amino acids 37-56) and another within SCR2 (amino acids 85-104). These results were confirmed by constructing chimeras with complementary regions from structurally similar, but non-MV-binding, SCRs of decay accelerating factor (DAF; CD55). These results indicate that MV contacts at least two distinct sites within SCR1-2.

  11. The C-terminal Domains of Apoptotic BH3-only Proteins Mediate Their Insertion into Distinct Biological Membranes.

    PubMed

    Andreu-Fernández, Vicente; García-Murria, María J; Bañó-Polo, Manuel; Martin, Juliette; Monticelli, Luca; Orzáez, Mar; Mingarro, Ismael

    2016-11-25

    Changes in the equilibrium of pro- and anti-apoptotic members of the B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) protein family in the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) induce structural changes that commit cells to apoptosis. Bcl-2 homology-3 (BH3)-only proteins participate in this process by either activating pro-apoptotic effectors or inhibiting anti-apoptotic components and by promoting MOM permeabilization. The association of BH3-only proteins with MOMs is necessary for the activation and amplification of death signals; however, the nature of this association remains controversial, as these proteins lack a canonical transmembrane sequence. Here we used an in vitro expression system to study the insertion capacity of hydrophobic C-terminal regions of the BH3-only proteins Bik, Bim, Noxa, Bmf, and Puma into microsomal membranes. An Escherichia coli complementation assay was used to validate the results in a cellular context, and peptide insertions were modeled using molecular dynamics simulations. We also found that some of the C-terminal domains were sufficient to direct green fluorescent protein fusion proteins to specific membranes in human cells, but the domains did not activate apoptosis. Thus, the hydrophobic regions in the C termini of BH3-only members associated in distinct ways with various biological membranes, suggesting that a detailed investigation of the entire process of apoptosis should include studying the membranes as a setting for protein-protein and protein-membrane interactions. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Identification of distinct biological functions for four 3′-5′ RNA polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Long, Yicheng; Abad, Maria G.; Olson, Erik D.; Carrillo, Elisabeth Y.; Jackman, Jane E.

    2016-01-01

    The superfamily of 3′-5′ polymerases synthesize RNA in the opposite direction to all other DNA/RNA polymerases, and its members include eukaryotic tRNAHis guanylyltransferase (Thg1), as well as Thg1-like proteins (TLPs) of unknown function that are broadly distributed, with family members in all three domains of life. Dictyostelium discoideum encodes one Thg1 and three TLPs (DdiTLP2, DdiTLP3 and DdiTLP4). Here, we demonstrate that depletion of each of the genes results in a significant growth defect, and that each protein catalyzes a unique biological reaction, taking advantage of specialized biochemical properties. DdiTLP2 catalyzes a mitochondria-specific tRNAHis maturation reaction, which is distinct from the tRNAHis maturation reaction typically catalyzed by Thg1 enzymes on cytosolic tRNA. DdiTLP3 catalyzes tRNA repair during mitochondrial tRNA 5′-editing in vivo and in vitro, establishing template-dependent 3′-5′ polymerase activity of TLPs as a bona fide biological activity for the first time since its unexpected discovery more than a decade ago. DdiTLP4 is cytosolic and, surprisingly, catalyzes robust 3′-5′ polymerase activity on non-tRNA substrates, strongly implying further roles for TLP 3′-5′ polymerases in eukaryotes. PMID:27484477

  13. Amino acid coevolution reveals three-dimensional structure and functional domains of insect odorant receptors.

    PubMed

    Hopf, Thomas A; Morinaga, Satoshi; Ihara, Sayoko; Touhara, Kazushige; Marks, Debora S; Benton, Richard

    2015-01-13

    Insect odorant receptors (ORs) comprise an enormous protein family that translates environmental chemical signals into neuronal electrical activity. These heptahelical receptors are proposed to function as ligand-gated ion channels and/or to act metabotropically as G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Resolving their signalling mechanism has been hampered by the lack of tertiary structural information and primary sequence similarity to other proteins. We use amino acid evolutionary covariation across these ORs to define restraints on structural proximity of residue pairs, which permit de novo generation of three-dimensional models. The validity of our analysis is supported by the location of functionally important residues in highly constrained regions of the protein. Importantly, insect OR models exhibit a distinct transmembrane domain packing arrangement to that of canonical GPCRs, establishing the structural unrelatedness of these receptor families. The evolutionary couplings and models predict odour binding and ion conduction domains, and provide a template for rationale structure-activity dissection.

  14. Evolution of function in the "two dinucleotide binding domains" flavoproteins.

    PubMed

    Ojha, Sunil; Meng, Elaine C; Babbitt, Patricia C

    2007-07-01

    Structural and biochemical constraints force some segments of proteins to evolve more slowly than others, often allowing identification of conserved structural or sequence motifs that can be associated with substrate binding properties, chemical mechanisms, and molecular functions. We have assessed the functional and structural constraints imposed by cofactors on the evolution of new functions in a superfamily of flavoproteins characterized by two-dinucleotide binding domains, the "two dinucleotide binding domains" flavoproteins (tDBDF) superfamily. Although these enzymes catalyze many different types of oxidation/reduction reactions, each is initiated by a stereospecific hydride transfer reaction between two cofactors, a pyridine nucleotide and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD). Sequence and structural analysis of more than 1,600 members of the superfamily reveals new members and identifies details of the evolutionary connections among them. Our analysis shows that in all of the highly divergent families within the superfamily, these cofactors adopt a conserved configuration optimal for stereospecific hydride transfer that is stabilized by specific interactions with amino acids from several motifs distributed among both dinucleotide binding domains. The conservation of cofactor configuration in the active site restricts the pyridine nucleotide to interact with FAD from the re-side, limiting the flow of electrons from the re-side to the si-side. This directionality of electron flow constrains interactions with the different partner proteins of different families to occur on the same face of the cofactor binding domains. As a result, superimposing the structures of tDBDFs aligns not only these interacting proteins, but also their constituent electron acceptors, including heme and iron-sulfur clusters. Thus, not only are specific aspects of the cofactor-directed chemical mechanism conserved across the superfamily, the constraints they impose are manifested in the

  15. Engagement of two distinct binding domains on CCL17 is required for signaling through CCR4 and establishment of localized inflammatory conditions in the lung.

    PubMed

    Santulli-Marotto, Sandra; Boakye, Ken; Lacy, Eilyn; Wu, Sheng-Jiun; Luongo, Jennifer; Kavalkovich, Karl; Coelho, Ana; Hogaboam, Cory M; Ryan, Mary

    2013-01-01

    CCL17 (TARC) function can be completely abolished by mAbs that block either one of two distinct sites required for CCR4 signaling. This chemokine is elevated in sera of asthma patients and is responsible for establishing inflammatory sites through CCR4-mediated recruitment of immune cells. CCL17 shares the GPCR CCR4, with CCL22 (MDC) but these two chemokines differentially affect the immune response. To better understand chemokine mediated effects through CCR4, we have generated chimeric anti-mouse CCL17 surrogate antibodies that inhibit function of this ligand in vitro and in vivo. The affinities of the surrogate antibodies for CCL17 range from 685 pM for B225 to 4.9 nM for B202. One antibody, B202, also exhibits weak binding to CCL22 (KD∼2 µM) and no binding to CCL22 is detectable with the second antibody, B225. In vitro, both antibodies inhibit CCL17-mediated calcium mobilization, β-arrestin recruitment and chemotaxis; B202 can also partially inhibit CCL22-mediated β-arrestin recruitment. Both B202 and B225 antibodies neutralize CCL17 in vivo as demonstrated by reduction of methacholine-induced airway hyperreactivity in the A. fumigatus model of asthma. That both antibodies block CCL17 function but only B202 shows any inhibition of CCL22 function suggests that they bind CCL17 at different sites. Competition binding studies confirm that these two antibodies recognize unique epitopes that are non-overlapping despite the small size of CCL17. Taking into consideration the data from both the functional and binding studies, we propose that effective engagement of CCR4 by CCL17 involves two distinct binding domains and interaction with both is required for signaling.

  16. Structural Basis and Function of XRN2-Binding by XTB Domains

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Hannes; Katic, Iskra; Gut, Heinz; Großhans, Helge

    2016-01-01

    The ribonuclease XRN2 is an essential player in RNA metabolism. In Caenorhabditis elegans, XRN2 functions with PAXT-1, which shares a putative XRN2-binding domain (XTBD) with otherwise unrelated mammalian proteins. Here, we characterize structure and function of an XTBD – XRN2 complex. Although XTBD stably interconnects two XRN2 domains through numerous interacting residues, mutation of a single critical residue suffices to disrupt XTBD – XRN2 complexes in vitro, and recapitulates paxt-1 null mutant phenotypes in vivo. Demonstrating conservation of function, vertebrate XTBD-containing proteins bind XRN2 in vitro, and human CDKN2AIPNL (C2AIL) can substitute for PAXT-1 in vivo. In vertebrates, where three distinct XTBD-containing proteins exist, XRN2 may partition to distinct stable heterodimeric complexes, likely differing in subcellular localization or function. In C. elegans, complex formation with the unique PAXT-1 serves to preserve the stability of XRN2 in the absence of substrate. PMID:26779609

  17. Mapping of Functional Subdomains in the Terminal Protein Domain of Hepatitis B Virus Polymerase.

    PubMed

    Clark, Daniel N; Flanagan, John M; Hu, Jianming

    2017-02-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) encodes a multifunction reverse transcriptase or polymerase (P), which is composed of several domains. The terminal protein (TP) domain is unique to HBV and related hepadnaviruses and is required for specifically binding to the viral pregenomic RNA (pgRNA). Subsequently, the TP domain is necessary for pgRNA packaging into viral nucleocapsids and the initiation of viral reverse transcription for conversion of the pgRNA to viral DNA. Uniquely, the HBV P protein initiates reverse transcription via a protein priming mechanism using the TP domain as a primer. No structural homologs or high-resolution structure exists for the TP domain. Secondary structure prediction identified three disordered loops in TP with highly conserved sequences. A meta-analysis of mutagenesis studies indicated these predicted loops are almost exclusively where functionally important residues are located. Newly constructed TP mutations revealed a priming loop in TP which plays a specific role in protein-primed DNA synthesis beyond simply harboring the site of priming. Substitutions of potential sites of phosphorylation surrounding the priming site demonstrated that these residues are involved in interactions critical for priming but are unlikely to be phosphorylated during viral replication. Furthermore, the first 13 and 66 TP residues were shown to be dispensable for protein priming and pgRNA binding, respectively. Combining current and previous mutagenesis work with sequence analysis has increased our understanding of TP structure and functions by mapping specific functions to distinct predicted secondary structures and will facilitate antiviral targeting of this unique domain.

  18. Structural and Functional Analysis of Domains of the Progesterone Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Krista K.; Roemer, Sarah C.; Churchill, Mair E.A.; Edwards, Dean P.

    2015-01-01

    Steroid hormone receptors are multi-domain proteins composed of conserved well-structured regions, such as ligand (LBD) and DNA binding domains (DBD), plus other naturally unstructured regions including the amino-terminal domain (NTD) and the hinge region between the LBD and DBD. The hinge is more than just a flexible region between the DBD and LBD and is capable of binding co-regulatory proteins and the minor groove of DNA flanking hormone response elements. Because the hinge can directly participate in DNA binding it has also been termed the carboxyl terminal extension (CTE) of the DNA binding domain. The CTE and NTD are dynamic regions of the receptor that can adopt multiple conformations depending on the environment of interacting proteins and DNA. Both regions have important regulatory roles for multiple receptor functions that are related to the ability of the CTE and NTD to form multiple active conformations. This review focuses on studies of the CTE and NTD of progesterone receptor (PR), as well as related work with other steroid/nuclear receptors. PMID:21803119

  19. Structural and functional analysis of domains of the progesterone receptor.

    PubMed

    Hill, Krista K; Roemer, Sarah C; Churchill, Mair E A; Edwards, Dean P

    2012-01-30

    Steroid hormone receptors are multi-domain proteins composed of conserved well-structured regions, such as ligand (LBD) and DNA binding domains (DBD), plus other naturally unstructured regions including the amino-terminal domain (NTD) and the hinge region between the LBD and DBD. The hinge is more than just a flexible region between the DBD and LBD and is capable of binding co-regulatory proteins and the minor groove of DNA flanking hormone response elements. Because the hinge can directly participate in DNA binding it has also been termed the carboxyl terminal extension (CTE) of the DNA binding domain. The CTE and NTD are dynamic regions of the receptor that can adopt multiple conformations depending on the environment of interacting proteins and DNA. Both regions have important regulatory roles for multiple receptor functions that are related to the ability of the CTE and NTD to form multiple active conformations. This review focuses on studies of the CTE and NTD of progesterone receptor (PR), as well as related work with other steroid/nuclear receptors.

  20. Crystal structure of a functional dimer of the PhoQ sensor domain.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Jonah; Bingman, Craig A; Reyngold, Marsha; Hendrickson, Wayne A; Waldburger, Carey D

    2008-05-16

    The PhoP-PhoQ two-component system is a well studied bacterial signaling system that regulates virulence and stress response. Catalytic activity of the histidine kinase sensor protein PhoQ is activated by low extracellular concentrations of divalent cations such as Mg2+, and subsequently the response regulator PhoP is activated in turn through a classic phosphotransfer pathway that is typical in such systems. The PhoQ sensor domains of enteric bacteria contain an acidic cluster of residues (EDDDDAE) that has been implicated in direct binding to divalent cations. We have determined crystal structures of the wild-type Escherichia coli PhoQ periplasmic sensor domain and of a mutant variant in which the acidic cluster was neutralized to conservative uncharged residues (QNNNNAQ). The PhoQ domain structure is similar to that of DcuS and CitA sensor domains, and this PhoQ-DcuS-CitA (PDC) sensor fold is seen to be distinct from the superficially similar PAS domain fold. Analysis of the wild-type structure reveals a dimer that allows for the formation of a salt bridge across the dimer interface between Arg-50' and Asp-179 and with nickel ions bound to aspartate residues in the acidic cluster. The physiological importance of the salt bridge to in vivo PhoQ function has been confirmed by mutagenesis. The mutant structure has an alternative, non-physiological dimeric association.

  1. Genomic microarray analysis reveals distinct locations for the CENP-A binding domains in three human chromosome 13q32 neocentromeres.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Alicia; Mahmood, Radma; Li, Shulan; Cheung, Fanny; Yoda, Kinya; Warburton, Peter E

    2003-10-15

    Human neocentromeres are fully functional centromeres that provide mitotic stability to rearranged chromosomes that have separated from endogenous centromeres. A disproportionate number of neocentromeres has been observed in certain regions such as chromosome 3q (n=6), 15q (n=9) and 13q32 (n=7), suggesting that these regions contain DNA sequences with a high propensity for neocentromere formation. Therefore, we have addressed the role of primary DNA sequence in neocentromere formation by asking whether multiple independent neocentromeres that were cytologically localized to chromosome 13q32 are in fact localized to the same underlying genomic DNA. Analysis of four independent 13q32 neocentromeres using simultaneous FISH with ordered YAC probes and immunofluorescence with antibodies to CENP-C have localized three neocentromeres to a distal approximately 7 Mb domain in chromosome 13q32, and one to an overlapping proximal domain of approximately 7 Mb. DNA was obtained from three of these neocentromeres by CENP-A chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and used to screen ordered BACs using both a slot-blotted BAC pool approach and a genomic microarray that contiguously spans 13q31.3-13q33.1. The CENP-A binding domains from each of these neocentromeres was identified to distinct genomic locations of approximately 130, 215 and 275 kb within an approximately 6.5 Mb region. Thus, the lack of coincidence of these neocentromeres to the same underlying DNA sequence refutes the idea of a DNA sequence based neocentromere 'hotspot' in 13q32 and further supports the sequence-independent epigenetic formation of human neocentromeres. The screening of genomic microarrays with ChIP DNA provides a powerful method to identify mammalian DNA sequences associated with particular functional chromatin states.

  2. [Respiratory domain of revised amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Functional Rating Scale].

    PubMed

    Lima, Sandra E; Pessolano, Fernando A; Monteiro, Sergio G; De Vito, Eduardo L

    2009-01-01

    Virtually all patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis will complain of dyspnea, which is perhaps the most distressing symptom of this devastating disease. The objective was to correlate respiratory domain of ALSFRS-R with forced vital capacity and maximal static pressures in the mouth. We designed a prospective study in 20 consecutive patients without dyspnea during 24 months. The global decline of ALSFRS-R was from 34.3 +/- 10.3 to 22.1 +/- 8.0 (p = 0.0325), the contribution of respiratory domain was irrelevant. Those who referred dyspnea (n: 12), forced vital capacity fell 41 +/- 21% of the initial value but with similar value of fall (46 +/- 23%) 8 patients did not referred dyspnea. Total score of ALSFRS-R correlated with forced vital capacity (litres), r: 0.73, p = 0.0016 and maximal inspiratory pressure (cm H2O), r: 0.84, p = 0.0038, but the fall of the forced vital capacity (%) did not correlate with dyspnea (r(s): 0.23, p = 0.1400). There was a moderate correlation between dyspnea and maximal inspiratory pressure (%), r(s): 0.58, p = 0.0300 and between dyspnea and maximal expiratory pressure (%), r(s): 0.49, p = 0.0400. We concluded that the respiratory functional deterioration could not be predicted using respiratory domain of ALSFRS-R. This suggests that respiratory domain of this scale does not replace to respiratory function testing measurements and, due to the respiratory insufficiency could not be clinically evident; performing pulmonary function tests provides an objective view and permit to make anticipatory actions.

  3. Independent transport and sorting of functionally distinct protein families in Tetrahymena thermophila dense core secretory granules.

    PubMed

    Rahaman, Abdur; Miao, Wei; Turkewitz, Aaron P

    2009-10-01

    Dense core granules (DCGs) in Tetrahymena thermophila contain two protein classes. Proteins in the first class, called granule lattice (Grl), coassemble to form a crystalline lattice within the granule lumen. Lattice expansion acts as a propulsive mechanism during DCG release, and Grl proteins are essential for efficient exocytosis. The second protein class, defined by a C-terminal beta/gamma-crystallin domain, is poorly understood. Here, we have analyzed the function and sorting of Grt1p (granule tip), which was previously identified as an abundant protein in this family. Cells lacking all copies of GRT1, together with the closely related GRT2, accumulate wild-type levels of docked DCGs. Unlike cells disrupted in any of the major GRL genes, DeltaGRT1 DeltaGRT2 cells show no defect in secretion, indicating that neither exocytic fusion nor core expansion depends on GRT1. These results suggest that Grl protein sorting to DCGs is independent of Grt proteins. Consistent with this, the granule core lattice in DeltaGRT1 DeltaGRT2 cells appears identical to that in wild-type cells by electron microscopy, and the only biochemical component visibly absent is Grt1p itself. Moreover, gel filtration showed that Grl and Grt proteins in cell homogenates exist in nonoverlapping complexes, and affinity-isolated Grt1p complexes do not contain Grl proteins. These data demonstrate that two major classes of proteins in Tetrahymena DCGs are likely to be independently transported during DCG biosynthesis and play distinct roles in granule function. The role of Grt1p may primarily be postexocytic; consistent with this idea, DCG contents from DeltaGRT1 DeltaGRT2 cells appear less adhesive than those from the wild type.

  4. Distinct functions of dispersed GATA factor complexes at an endogenous gene locus.

    PubMed

    Grass, Jeffrey A; Jing, Huie; Kim, Shin-Il; Martowicz, Melissa L; Pal, Saumen; Blobel, Gerd A; Bresnick, Emery H

    2006-10-01

    The reciprocal expression of GATA-1 and GATA-2 during hematopoiesis is an important determinant of red blood cell development. Whereas Gata2 is preferentially transcribed early in hematopoiesis, elevated GATA-1 levels result in GATA-1 occupancy at sites upstream of the Gata2 locus and transcriptional repression. GATA-2 occupies these sites in the transcriptionally active locus, suggesting that a "GATA switch" abrogates GATA-2-mediated positive autoregulation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) coupled with genomic microarray analysis and quantitative ChIP analysis with GATA-1-null cells expressing an estrogen receptor ligand binding domain fusion to GATA-1 revealed additional GATA switches 77 kb upstream of Gata2 and within intron 4 at +9.5 kb. Despite indistinguishable GATA-1 occupancy at -77 kb and +9.5 kb versus other GATA switch sites, GATA-1 functioned uniquely at the different regions. GATA-1 induced histone deacetylation at and near Gata2 but not at the -77 kb region. The -77 kb region, which was DNase I hypersensitive in both active and inactive states, conferred equivalent enhancer activities in GATA-1- and GATA-2-expressing cells. By contrast, the +9.5 kb region exhibited considerably stronger enhancer activity in GATA-2- than in GATA-1-expressing cells, and other GATA switch sites were active only in GATA-1- or GATA-2-expressing cells. Chromosome conformation capture analysis demonstrated higher-order interactions between the -77 kb region and Gata2 in the active and repressed states. These results indicate that dispersed GATA factor complexes function via long-range chromatin interactions and qualitatively distinct activities to regulate Gata2 transcription.

  5. Crystal Structure of the Human, FIC-Domain Containing Protein HYPE and Implications for Its Functions

    PubMed Central

    Bunney, Tom D.; Cole, Ambrose R.; Broncel, Malgorzata; Esposito, Diego; Tate, Edward W.; Katan, Matilda

    2014-01-01

    Summary Protein AMPylation, the transfer of AMP from ATP to protein targets, has been recognized as a new mechanism of host-cell disruption by some bacterial effectors that typically contain a FIC-domain. Eukaryotic genomes also encode one FIC-domain protein, HYPE, which has remained poorly characterized. Here we describe the structure of human HYPE, solved by X-ray crystallography, representing the first structure of a eukaryotic FIC-domain protein. We demonstrate that HYPE forms stable dimers with structurally and functionally integrated FIC-domains and with TPR-motifs exposed for protein-protein interactions. As HYPE also uniquely possesses a transmembrane helix, dimerization is likely to affect its positioning and function in the membrane vicinity. The low rate of autoAMPylation of the wild-type HYPE could be due to autoinhibition, consistent with the mechanism proposed for a number of putative FIC AMPylators. Our findings also provide a basis to further consider possible alternative cofactors of HYPE and distinct modes of target-recognition. PMID:25435325

  6. Crystal structure of the human, FIC-domain containing protein HYPE and implications for its functions.

    PubMed

    Bunney, Tom D; Cole, Ambrose R; Broncel, Malgorzata; Esposito, Diego; Tate, Edward W; Katan, Matilda

    2014-12-02

    Protein AMPylation, the transfer of AMP from ATP to protein targets, has been recognized as a new mechanism of host-cell disruption by some bacterial effectors that typically contain a FIC-domain. Eukaryotic genomes also encode one FIC-domain protein,HYPE, which has remained poorly characterized.Here we describe the structure of human HYPE, solved by X-ray crystallography, representing the first structure of a eukaryotic FIC-domain protein. We demonstrate that HYPE forms stable dimers with structurally and functionally integrated FIC-domains and with TPR-motifs exposed for protein-protein interactions. As HYPE also uniquely possesses a transmembrane helix, dimerization is likely to affect its positioning and function in the membrane vicinity. The low rate of auto AMPylation of the wild-type HYPE could be due to autoinhibition, consistent with the mechanism proposed for a number of putative FIC AMPylators. Our findings also provide a basis to further consider possible alternative cofactors of HYPE and distinct modes of target-recognition.

  7. Phenotypic lentivirus screens to identify functional single domain antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Florian I.; Hanke, Leo; Morin, Benjamin; Brewer, Rebeccah; Brusic, Vesna; Whelan, Sean P.J.; Ploegh, Hidde L.

    2016-01-01

    Manipulation of proteins is key in assessing their in vivo function. While genetic ablation is straightforward, reversible and specific perturbation of protein function remains a challenge. Single domain antibody fragments, such as camelid-derived VHHs, can serve as inhibitors or activators of intracellular protein function, but functional testing of identified VHHs is laborious. To address this challenge, we developed a lentiviral screening approach to identify VHHs that elicit a phenotype when expressed intracellularly. We identified 19 antiviral VHHs that protect human A549 cells from lethal infection with influenza A virus (IAV) or vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), respectively. Both negative-sense RNA viruses are vulnerable to VHHs uniquely specific for their respective nucleoproteins. Antiviral VHHs prevented nuclear import of viral ribonucleoproteins or mRNA transcription, respectively, and may provide clues for novel antiviral reagents. In principle, the screening approach described here should be applicable to identify inhibitors of any pathogen or biological pathway. PMID:27573105

  8. Functional Analysis of GLRX5 Mutants Reveals Distinct Functionalities of GLRX5 Protein.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gang; Wang, Yongwei; Anderson, Gregory J; Camaschella, Clara; Chang, Yanzhong; Nie, Guangjun

    2016-01-01

    Glutaredoxin 5 (GLRX5) is a 156 amino acid mitochondrial protein that plays an essential role in mitochondrial iron-sulfur cluster transfer. Mutations in this protein were reported to result in sideroblastic anemia and variant nonketotic hyperglycinemia in human. Recently, we have characterized a Chinese congenital sideroblastic anemia patient who has two compound heterozygous missense mutations (c. 301 A>C and c. 443 T>C) in his GLRX5 gene. Herein, we developed a GLRX5 knockout K562 cell line and studied the biochemical functions of the identified pathogenic mutations and other conserved amino acids with predicted essential functions. We observed that the K101Q mutation (due to c. 301 A>C mutation) may prevent the binding of [Fe-S] to GLRX5 protein, while L148S (due to c. 443 T>C mutation) may interfere with [Fe-S] transfer from GLRX5 to iron regulatory protein 1 (IRP1), mitochondrial aconitase (m-aconitase) and ferrochelatase. We also demonstrated that L148S is functionally complementary to the K51del mutant with respect to Fe/S-ferrochelatase, Fe/S-IRP1, Fe/S-succinate dehydrogenase, and Fe/S-m-aconitase biosynthesis and lipoylation of pyruvate dehydrogenase complex and α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the mutations of highly conserved amino acid residues in GLRX5 protein can have different effects on downstream Fe/S proteins. Collectively, our current work demonstrates that GLRX5 protein is multifunctional in [Fe-S] protein synthesis and maturation and defects of the different amino acids of the protein will lead to distinct effects on downstream Fe/S biosynthesis.

  9. Motor function domains in alternating hemiplegia of childhood.

    PubMed

    Masoud, Melanie; Gordon, Kelly; Hall, Amanda; Jasien, Joan; Lardinois, Kara; Uchitel, Julie; Mclean, Melissa; Prange, Lyndsey; Wuchich, Jeffrey; Mikati, Mohamad A

    2017-08-01

    To characterize motor function profiles in alternating hemiplegia of childhood, and to investigate interrelationships between these domains and with age. We studied a cohort of 23 patients (9 males, 14 females; mean age 9y 4mo, range 4mo-43y) who underwent standardized tests to assess gross motor, upper extremity motor control, motor speech, and dysphagia functions. Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS), Gross Motor Function Measure-88 (GMFM-88), Manual Ability Classification System (MACS), and Revised Melbourne Assessment (MA2) scales manifested predominantly mild impairments; motor speech, moderate to severe; Modified Dysphagia Outcome and Severity Scale (M-DOSS), mild-to moderate deficits. GMFCS correlated with GMFM-88 scores (Pearson's correlation, p=0.002), MACS (p=0.038), and MA2 fluency (p=0.005) and accuracy (p=0.038) scores. GMFCS did not correlate with motor speech (p=0.399), MA2 dexterity (p=0.247), range of motion (p=0.063), or M-DOSS (p=0.856). Motor speech was more severely impaired than the GMFCS (p<0.013). There was no correlation between any of the assessment tools and age (p=0.210-0.798). Our data establish a detailed profile of motor function in alternating hemiplegia of childhood, argue against the presence of worse motor function in older patients, identify tools helpful in evaluating this population, and identify oropharyngeal function as the more severely affected domain, suggesting that brain areas controlling this function are more affected than others. © 2017 Mac Keith Press.

  10. Functional replacement and positional dependence of homologous and heterologous L domains in equine infectious anemia virus replication.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Chen, Chaoping; Puffer, Bridget A; Montelaro, Ronald C

    2002-02-01

    We have previously demonstrated by Gag polyprotein budding assays that the Gag p9 protein of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) utilizes a unique YPDL motif as a late assembly domain (L domain) to facilitate release of the budding virus particle from the host cell plasma membrane (B. A. Puffer, L. J. Parent, J. W. Wills, and R. C. Montelaro, J. Virol. 71:6541-6546, 1997). To characterize in more detail the role of the YPDL L domain in the EIAV life cycle, we have examined the replication properties of a series of EIAV proviral mutants in which the parental YPDL L domain was replaced by a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) PTAP or Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) PPPY L domain in the p9 protein or by proviruses in which the parental YPDL or HIV-1 PTAP L domain was inserted in the viral matrix protein. The replication properties of these L-domain variants were examined with respect to Gag protein expression and processing, virus particle production, and virus infectivity. The data from these experiments indicate that (i) the YPDL L domain of p9 is required for replication competence (assembly and infectivity) in equine cell cultures, including the natural target equine macrophages; (ii) all of the functions of the YPDL L domain in the EIAV life cycle can be replaced by replacement of the parental YPDL sequence in p9 with the PTAP L-domain segment of HIV-1 p6 or the PPPY L domain of RSV p2b; and (iii) the assembly, but not infectivity, functions of the EIAV proviral YPDL substitution mutants can be partially rescued by inclusions of YPDL and PTAP L-domain sequences in the C-terminal region of the EIAV MA protein. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the EIAV YPDL L domain mediates distinct functions in viral budding and infectivity and that the HIV-1 PTAP and RSV PPPY L domains can effectively facilitate these dual replication functions in the context of the p9 protein. In light of the fact that YPDL, PTAP, and PPPY domains evidently have distinct

  11. Functional Replacement and Positional Dependence of Homologous and Heterologous L Domains in Equine Infectious Anemia Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Li, Feng; Chen, Chaoping; Puffer, Bridget A.; Montelaro, Ronald C.

    2002-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated by Gag polyprotein budding assays that the Gag p9 protein of equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) utilizes a unique YPDL motif as a late assembly domain (L domain) to facilitate release of the budding virus particle from the host cell plasma membrane (B. A. Puffer, L. J. Parent, J. W. Wills, and R. C. Montelaro, J. Virol. 71:6541-6546, 1997). To characterize in more detail the role of the YPDL L domain in the EIAV life cycle, we have examined the replication properties of a series of EIAV proviral mutants in which the parental YPDL L domain was replaced by a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) PTAP or Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) PPPY L domain in the p9 protein or by proviruses in which the parental YPDL or HIV-1 PTAP L domain was inserted in the viral matrix protein. The replication properties of these L-domain variants were examined with respect to Gag protein expression and processing, virus particle production, and virus infectivity. The data from these experiments indicate that (i) the YPDL L domain of p9 is required for replication competence (assembly and infectivity) in equine cell cultures, including the natural target equine macrophages; (ii) all of the functions of the YPDL L domain in the EIAV life cycle can be replaced by replacement of the parental YPDL sequence in p9 with the PTAP L-domain segment of HIV-1 p6 or the PPPY L domain of RSV p2b; and (iii) the assembly, but not infectivity, functions of the EIAV proviral YPDL substitution mutants can be partially rescued by inclusions of YPDL and PTAP L-domain sequences in the C-terminal region of the EIAV MA protein. Taken together, these data demonstrate that the EIAV YPDL L domain mediates distinct functions in viral budding and infectivity and that the HIV-1 PTAP and RSV PPPY L domains can effectively facilitate these dual replication functions in the context of the p9 protein. In light of the fact that YPDL, PTAP, and PPPY domains evidently have distinct

  12. Defining the boundaries: structure and function of LOB domain proteins.

    PubMed

    Majer, Christine; Hochholdinger, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The plant-specific LBD (Lateral Organ Boundaries Domain) gene family is essential in the regulation of plant lateral organ development and is involved in the regulation of anthocyanin and nitrogen metabolism. LBD proteins contain a characteristic LOB domain composed of a C-motif required for DNA-binding, a conserved glycine residue, and a leucine-zipper-like sequence required for protein-protein interactions. Recently, several LBD genes associated with mutant phenotypes related to almost all aspects of plant development, including embryo, root, leaf, and inflorescence development have been functionally characterized. These novel insights contribute to a better understanding of the molecular definition of boundaries between organs or boundaries between organs and meristems and the regulation of these processes by environmental cues and phytohormones.

  13. Interaction of the amyloid precursor protein-like protein 1 (APLP1) E2 domain with heparan sulfate involves two distinct binding modes

    SciTech Connect

    Dahms, Sven O.; Mayer, Magnus C.; Roeser, Dirk; Multhaup, Gerd; Than, Manuel E.

    2015-03-01

    Two X-ray structures of APLP1 E2 with and without a heparin dodecasaccharide are presented, revealing two distinct binding modes of the protein to heparan sulfate. The data provide a mechanistic explanation of how APP-like proteins bind to heparan sulfates and how they specifically recognize nonreducing structures of heparan sulfates. Beyond the pathology of Alzheimer’s disease, the members of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) family are essential for neuronal development and cell homeostasis in mammals. APP and its paralogues APP-like protein 1 (APLP1) and APP-like protein 2 (APLP2) contain the highly conserved heparan sulfate (HS) binding domain E2, which effects various (patho)physiological functions. Here, two crystal structures of the E2 domain of APLP1 are presented in the apo form and in complex with a heparin dodecasaccharide at 2.5 Å resolution. The apo structure of APLP1 E2 revealed an unfolded and hence flexible N-terminal helix αA. The (APLP1 E2){sub 2}–(heparin){sub 2} complex structure revealed two distinct binding modes, with APLP1 E2 explicitly recognizing the heparin terminus but also interacting with a continuous heparin chain. The latter only requires a certain register of the sugar moieties that fits to a positively charged surface patch and contributes to the general heparin-binding capability of APP-family proteins. Terminal binding of APLP1 E2 to heparin specifically involves a structure of the nonreducing end that is very similar to heparanase-processed HS chains. These data reveal a conserved mechanism for the binding of APP-family proteins to HS and imply a specific regulatory role of HS modifications in the biology of APP and APP-like proteins.

  14. Functional Significance of SRJ Domain Mutations in CITED2

    PubMed Central

    Cosgrove, Catherine; Braganca, Jose; Cuenda, Ana; Bamforth, Simon D.; Schneider, Jürgen E.; Watkins, Hugh; Keavney, Bernard; Davies, Benjamin; Bhattacharya, Shoumo

    2012-01-01

    CITED2 is a transcriptional co-activator with 3 conserved domains shared with other CITED family members and a unique Serine-Glycine Rich Junction (SRJ) that is highly conserved in placental mammals. Loss of Cited2 in mice results in cardiac and aortic arch malformations, adrenal agenesis, neural tube and placental defects, and partially penetrant defects in left-right patterning. By screening 1126 sporadic congenital heart disease (CHD) cases and 1227 controls, we identified 19 variants, including 5 unique non-synonymous sequence variations (N62S, R92G, T166N, G180-A187del and A187T) in patients. Many of the CHD-specific variants identified in this and previous studies cluster in the SRJ domain. Transient transfection experiments show that T166N mutation impairs TFAP2 co-activation function and ES cell proliferation. We find that CITED2 is phosphorylated by MAPK1 in vitro at T166, and that MAPK1 activation enhances the coactivation function of CITED2 but not of CITED2-T166N. In order to investigate the functional significance in vivo, we generated a T166N mutation of mouse Cited2. We also used PhiC31 integrase-mediated cassette exchange to generate a Cited2 knock-in allele replacing the mouse Cited2 coding sequence with human CITED2 and with a mutant form deleting the entire SRJ domain. Mouse embryos expressing only CITED2-T166N or CITED2-SRJ-deleted alleles surprisingly show no morphological abnormalities, and mice are viable and fertile. These results indicate that the SRJ domain is dispensable for these functions of CITED2 in mice and that mutations clustering in the SRJ region are unlikely to be the sole cause of the malformations observed in patients with sporadic CHD. Our results also suggest that coding sequence mutations observed in case-control studies need validation using in vivo models and that predictions based on structural conservation and in vitro functional assays, or even in vivo global loss of function models, may be insufficient. PMID:23082118

  15. Human GATA-3 trans-activation, DNA-binding, and nuclear localization activities are organized into distinct structural domains.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Z; Gu, L; Romeo, P H; Bories, D; Motohashi, H; Yamamoto, M; Engel, J D

    1994-01-01

    GATA-3 is a zinc finger transcription factor which is expressed in a highly restricted and strongly conserved tissue distribution pattern in vertebrate organisms, specifically, in a subset of hematopoietic cells, in cells within the central and peripheral nervous systems, in the kidney, and in placental trophoblasts. Tissue-specific cellular genes regulated by GATA-3 have been identified in T lymphocytes and the placenta, while GATA-3-regulated genes in the nervous system and kidney have not yet been defined. We prepared monoclonal antibodies with which we could dissect the biochemical and functional properties of human GATA-3. The results of these experiments show some anticipated phenotypes, for example, the definition of discrete domains required for specific DNA-binding site recognition (amino acids 303 to 348) and trans activation (amino acids 30 to 74). The signaling sequence for nuclear localization of human GATA-3 is a property conferred by sequences within and surrounding the amino finger (amino acids 249 to 311) of the protein, thereby assigning a function to this domain and thus explaining the curious observation that this zinc finger is dispensable for DNA binding by the GATA family of transcription factors. Images PMID:8114750

  16. Efficient time-domain model of the graphene dielectric function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prokopeva, Ludmila J.; Kildishev, Alexander V.

    2013-09-01

    A honey-comb monolayer lattice of carbon atoms, graphene, is not only ultra-thin, ultra-light, flexible and strong, but also highly conductive when doped and exhibits strong interaction with electromagnetic radiation in the spectral range from microwaves to the ultraviolet. Moreover, this interaction can be effectively controlled electrically. High flexibility and conductivity makes graphene an attractive material for numerous photonic applications requiring transparent conducting electrodes: touchscreens, liquid crystal displays, organic photovoltaic cells, and organic light-emitting diodes. Meanwhile, its tunability makes it desirable for optical modulators, tunable filters and polarizers. This paper deals with the basics of the time-domain modeling of the graphene dielectric function under a random-phase approximation. We focus at applicability of Padé approximants to the interband dielectric function (IDF) of single layer graphene. Our study is centered on the development of a two-critical points approximation (2CPA) of the IDF within a single-electron framework with negligible carrier scattering and a realistic range of chemical potential at room temperature. This development is successfully validated by comparing reflection and transmission spectra computed by a numerical method in time-domain versus semi-analytical calculations in frequency domain. Finally, we sum up our results - (1) high-quality approximation, (2) tunability, and (3) second-order accurate numerical FDTD implementation of the 2CPA of IDF demonstrated across the desired range of the chemical potential to temperature ratios (4 - 23). Finally, we put forward future directions for time-domain modeling of optical response of graphene with wide range of tunable and fabrication-dependent parameters, including other broadening factors and variations of temperature and chemical potentials.

  17. Yeast DNA ligase IV mutations reveal a nonhomologous end joining function of BRCT1 distinct from XRCC4/Lif1 binding

    PubMed Central

    Chiruvella, Kishore K.; Renard, Brian M.; Birkeland, Shanda R.; Sunder, Sham; Liang, Zhuobin; Wilson, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    LIG4/Dnl4 is the DNA ligase that (re)joins DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) via nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), an activity supported by binding of its tandem BRCT domains to the ligase accessory protein XRCC4/Lif1. We screened a panel of 88 distinct ligase mutants to explore the structure-function relationships of the yeast Dnl4 BRCT domains and inter-BRCT linker in NHEJ. Screen results suggested two distinct classes of BRCT mutations with differential effects on Lif1 interaction as compared to NHEJ completion. Validated constructs confirmed that D800K and GG(868:869)AA mutations, which target the Lif1 binding interface, showed a severely defective Dnl4-Lif1 interaction but a less consistent and often small decrease in NHEJ activity in some assays, as well as nearly normal levels of Dnl4 accumulation at DSBs. In contrast, mutants K742A and KTT(742:744)ATA, which target the β3-α2 region of the first BRCT domain, substantially decreased NHEJ function commensurate with a large defect in Dnl4 recruitment to DSBs, despite a comparatively greater preservation of the Lif1 interaction. Together, these separation-of-function mutants indicate that Dnl4 BRCT1 supports DSB recruitment and NHEJ in a manner distinct from Lif1 binding and reveal a complexity of Dnl4 BRCT domain functions in support of stable DSB association. PMID:25457772

  18. Yeast DNA ligase IV mutations reveal a nonhomologous end joining function of BRCT1 distinct from XRCC4/Lif1 binding.

    PubMed

    Chiruvella, Kishore K; Renard, Brian M; Birkeland, Shanda R; Sunder, Sham; Liang, Zhuobin; Wilson, Thomas E

    2014-12-01

    LIG4/Dnl4 is the DNA ligase that (re)joins DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) via nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), an activity supported by binding of its tandem BRCT domains to the ligase accessory protein XRCC4/Lif1. We screened a panel of 88 distinct ligase mutants to explore the structure–function relationships of the yeast Dnl4 BRCT domains and inter-BRCT linker in NHEJ. Screen results suggested two distinct classes of BRCT mutations with differential effects on Lif1 interaction as compared to NHEJ completion. Validated constructs confirmed that D800K and GG(868:869)AA mutations, which target the Lif1 binding interface, showed a severely defective Dnl4–Lif1 interaction but a less consistent and often small decrease in NHEJ activity in some assays, as well as nearly normal levels of Dnl4 accumulation at DSBs. In contrast, mutants K742A and KTT(742:744)ATA, which target the β3-α2 region of the first BRCT domain, substantially decreased NHEJ function commensurate with a large defect in Dnl4 recruitment to DSBs, despite a comparatively greater preservation of the Lif1 interaction. Together, these separation-of-function mutants indicate that Dnl4 BRCT1 supports DSB recruitment and NHEJ in a manner distinct from Lif1 binding and reveal a complexity of Dnl4 BRCT domain functions in support of stable DSB association.

  19. Natural-like function in artificial WW domains.

    PubMed

    Russ, William P; Lowery, Drew M; Mishra, Prashant; Yaffe, Michael B; Ranganathan, Rama

    2005-09-22

    Protein sequences evolve through random mutagenesis with selection for optimal fitness. Cooperative folding into a stable tertiary structure is one aspect of fitness, but evolutionary selection ultimately operates on function, not on structure. In the accompanying paper, we proposed a model for the evolutionary constraint on a small protein interaction module (the WW domain) through application of the SCA, a statistical analysis of multiple sequence alignments. Construction of artificial protein sequences directed only by the SCA showed that the information extracted by this analysis is sufficient to engineer the WW fold at atomic resolution. Here, we demonstrate that these artificial WW sequences function like their natural counterparts, showing class-specific recognition of proline-containing target peptides. Consistent with SCA predictions, a distributed network of residues mediates functional specificity in WW domains. The ability to recapitulate natural-like function in designed sequences shows that a relatively small quantity of sequence information is sufficient to specify the global energetics of amino acid interactions.

  20. Phylogenomic and functional domain analysis of polyketide synthases in Fusarium

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Daren W.; Butchko, Robert A.; Baker, Scott E.; Proctor, Robert H.

    2012-02-01

    Fusarium species are ubiquitous in nature, cause a range of plant diseases, and produce a variety of chemicals often referred to as secondary metabolites. Although some fungal secondary metabolites affect plant growth or protect plants from other fungi and bacteria, their presence in grain based food and feed is more often associated with a variety of diseases in plants and in animals. Many of these structurally diverse metabolites are derived from a family of related enzymes called polyketide synthases (PKSs). A search of genomic sequence of Fusarium verticillioides, F. graminearum, F. oxysporum and Nectria haematococca (anamorph F. solani) identified a total of 58 PKS genes. To gain insight into how this gene family evolved and to guide future studies, we conducted a phylogenomic and functional domain analysis. The resulting genealogy suggested that Fusarium PKSs represent 34 different groups responsible for synthesis of different core metabolites. The analyses indicate that variation in the Fusarium PKS gene family is due to gene duplication and loss events as well as enzyme gain-of-function due to the acquisition of new domains or of loss-of-function due to nucleotide mutations. Transcriptional analysis indicate that the 16 F. verticillioides PKS genes are expressed under a range of conditions, further evidence that they are functional genes that confer the ability to produce secondary metabolites.

  1. The Dof domain, a zinc finger DNA-binding domain conserved only in higher plants, truly functions as a Cys2/Cys2 Zn finger domain.

    PubMed

    Umemura, Yoshimi; Ishiduka, Tomoko; Yamamoto, Rie; Esaka, Muneharu

    2004-03-01

    The Dof (DNA-binding with one finger) proteins are plant transcription factors that have a highly conserved DNA-binding domain, called the Dof domain. The Dof domain, which is composed of 52 amino acid residues, is similar to the Cys2/Cys2 zinc finger DNA-binding domain of GATA1 and steroid hormone receptors, but has a longer putative loop than that in the case of these zinc finger domains. The DNA-binding function of ascorbate oxidase gene binding protein (AOBP), a Dof protein, was investigated by gel retardation analysis. When Cys was replaced by His, the Dof domain could not function as a Cys3/His- or a Cys2/His2-type zinc finger. The characteristic longer loop was essential for DNA-binding activity. Furthermore, heavy metals such as Co(II), Ni(II), Cd(II), Cu(II), Hg(II), Fe(II), and Fe(III) inhibited the DNA-binding activity of the Dof domain. Manganese ion as well as zinc ion was coordinated by the Dof domain in vitro. On the other hand, the analysis using inductively coupled argon plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) showed that the Dof domain contained zinc ion but not manganese ion. Thus, the Dof domain was proved to function as a Cys2/Cys2 zinc finger domain.

  2. Distinct Cell Guidance Pathways Controlled by the Rac and Rho GEF Domains of UNC-73/TRIO in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Marcus-Gueret, Nancy; Schmidt, Kristopher L.; Stringham, Eve G.

    2012-01-01

    The cytoskeleton regulator UNC-53/NAV2 is required for both the anterior and posterior outgrowth of several neurons as well as that of the excretory cell while the kinesin-like motor VAB-8 is essential for most posteriorly directed migrations in Caenorhabditis elegans. Null mutations in either unc-53 or vab-8 result in reduced posterior excretory canal outgrowth, while double null mutants display an enhanced canal extension defect, suggesting the genes act in separate pathways to control this posteriorly directed outgrowth. Genetic analysis of putative interactors of UNC-53 or VAB-8, and cell-specific rescue experiments suggest that VAB-8, SAX-3/ROBO, SLT-1/Slit, and EVA-1 are functioning together in the outgrowth of the excretory canals, while UNC-53 appears to function in a parallel pathway with UNC-71/ADAM. The known VAB-8 interactor, the Rac/Rho GEF UNC-73/TRIO operates in both pathways, as isoform specific alleles exhibit enhancement of the phenotype in double-mutant combination with either unc-53 or vab-8. On the basis of these results, we propose a bipartite model for UNC-73/TRIO activity in excretory canal extension: a cell autonomous function that is mediated by the Rho-specific GEF domain of the UNC-73E isoform in conjunction with UNC-53 and UNC-71 and a cell nonautonomous function that is mediated by the Rac-specific GEF domain of the UNC-73B isoform, through partnering with VAB-8 and the receptors SAX-3 and EVA-1. PMID:21996675

  3. Structure of N-Terminal Domain of NPC1 Reveals Distinct Subdomains for Binding and Transfer of Cholesterol

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Hyock Joo; Abi-Mosleh, Lina; Wang, Michael L.; Deisenhofer, Johann; Goldstein, Joseph L.; Brown, Michael S.; Infante, Rodney E.

    2010-09-21

    LDL delivers cholesterol to lysosomes by receptor-mediated endocytosis. Exit of cholesterol from lysosomes requires two proteins, membrane-bound Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1) and soluble NPC2. NPC2 binds cholesterol with its isooctyl side chain buried and its 3{beta}-hydroxyl exposed. Here, we describe high-resolution structures of the N-terminal domain (NTD) of NPC1 and complexes with cholesterol and 25-hydroxycholesterol. NPC1(NTD) binds cholesterol in an orientation opposite to NPC2: 3{beta}-hydroxyl buried and isooctyl side chain exposed. Cholesterol transfer from NPC2 to NPC1(NTD) requires reorientation of a helical subdomain in NPC1(NTD), enlarging the opening for cholesterol entry. NPC1 with point mutations in this subdomain (distinct from the binding subdomain) cannot accept cholesterol from NPC2 and cannot restore cholesterol exit from lysosomes in NPC1-deficient cells. We propose a working model wherein after lysosomal hydrolysis of LDL-cholesteryl esters, cholesterol binds NPC2, which transfers it to NPC1(NTD), reversing its orientation and allowing insertion of its isooctyl side chain into the outer lysosomal membranes.

  4. Human DNA-Damage-Inducible 2 Protein Is Structurally and Functionally Distinct from Its Yeast Ortholog

    PubMed Central

    Sivá, Monika; Svoboda, Michal; Veverka, Václav; Trempe, Jean-François; Hofmann, Kay; Kožíšek, Milan; Hexnerová, Rozálie; Sedlák, František; Belza, Jan; Brynda, Jiří; Šácha, Pavel; Hubálek, Martin; Starková, Jana; Flaisigová, Iva; Konvalinka, Jan; Šašková, Klára Grantz

    2016-01-01

    Although Ddi1-like proteins are conserved among eukaryotes, their biological functions remain poorly characterized. Yeast Ddi1 has been implicated in cell cycle regulation, DNA-damage response, and exocytosis. By virtue of its ubiquitin-like (UBL) and ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domains, it has been proposed to serve as a proteasomal shuttle factor. All Ddi1-like family members also contain a highly conserved retroviral protease-like (RVP) domain with unknown substrate specificity. While the structure and biological function of yeast Ddi1 have been investigated, no such analysis is available for the human homologs. To address this, we solved the 3D structures of the human Ddi2 UBL and RVP domains and identified a new helical domain that extends on either side of the RVP dimer. While Ddi1-like proteins from all vertebrates lack a UBA domain, we identify a novel ubiquitin-interacting motif (UIM) located at the C-terminus of the protein. The UIM showed a weak yet specific affinity towards ubiquitin, as did the Ddi2 UBL domain. However, the full-length Ddi2 protein is unable to bind to di-ubiquitin chains. While proteomic analysis revealed no activity, implying that the protease requires other factors for activation, our structural characterization of all domains of human Ddi2 sets the stage for further characterization. PMID:27461074

  5. Distinct Quantitative Computed Tomography Emphysema Patterns Are Associated with Physiology and Function in Smokers

    PubMed Central

    San José Estépar, Raúl; Mendoza, Carlos S.; Hersh, Craig P.; Laird, Nan; Crapo, James D.; Lynch, David A.; Silverman, Edwin K.; Washko, George R.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Emphysema occurs in distinct pathologic patterns, but little is known about the epidemiologic associations of these patterns. Standard quantitative measures of emphysema from computed tomography (CT) do not distinguish between distinct patterns of parenchymal destruction. Objectives: To study the epidemiologic associations of distinct emphysema patterns with measures of lung-related physiology, function, and health care use in smokers. Methods: Using a local histogram-based assessment of lung density, we quantified distinct patterns of low attenuation in 9,313 smokers in the COPDGene Study. To determine if such patterns provide novel insights into chronic obstructive pulmonary disease epidemiology, we tested for their association with measures of physiology, function, and health care use. Measurements and Main Results: Compared with percentage of low-attenuation area less than −950 Hounsfield units (%LAA-950), local histogram-based measures of distinct CT low-attenuation patterns are more predictive of measures of lung function, dyspnea, quality of life, and health care use. These patterns are strongly associated with a wide array of measures of respiratory physiology and function, and most of these associations remain highly significant (P < 0.005) after adjusting for %LAA-950. In smokers without evidence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, the mild centrilobular disease pattern is associated with lower FEV1 and worse functional status (P < 0.005). Conclusions: Measures of distinct CT emphysema patterns provide novel information about the relationship between emphysema and key measures of physiology, physical function, and health care use. Measures of mild emphysema in smokers with preserved lung function can be extracted from CT scans and are significantly associated with functional measures. PMID:23980521

  6. Crystal Structures and Thermodynamic Analysis Reveal Distinct Mechanisms of CD28 Phosphopeptide Binding to the Src Homology 2 (SH2) Domains of Three Adaptor Proteins.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Satomi; Numoto, Nobutaka; Ogawa, Shuhei; Morii, Hisayuki; Ikura, Teikichi; Abe, Ryo; Ito, Nobutoshi; Oda, Masayuki

    2017-01-20

    Full activation of T cells and differentiation into effector T cells are essential for many immune responses and require co-stimulatory signaling via the CD28 receptor. Extracellular ligand binding to CD28 recruits protein-tyrosine kinases to its cytoplasmic tail, which contains a YMNM motif. Following phosphorylation of the tyrosine, the proteins growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (Grb2), Grb2-related adaptor downstream of Shc (Gads), and p85 subunit of phosphoinositide 3-kinase may bind to pYMNM (where pY is phosphotyrosine) via their Src homology 2 (SH2) domains, leading to downstream signaling to distinct immune pathways. These three adaptor proteins bind to the same site on CD28 with variable affinity, and all are important for CD28-mediated co-stimulatory function. However, the mechanism of how these proteins recognize and compete for CD28 is unclear. To visualize their interactions with CD28, we have determined the crystal structures of Gads SH2 and two p85 SH2 domains in complex with a CD28-derived phosphopeptide. The high resolution structures obtained revealed that, whereas the CD28 phosphopeptide bound to Gads SH2 is in a bent conformation similar to that when bound to Grb2 SH2, it adopts a more extended conformation when bound to the N- and C-terminal SH2 domains of p85. These differences observed in the peptide-protein interactions correlated well with the affinity and other thermodynamic parameters for each interaction determined by isothermal titration calorimetry. The detailed insight into these interactions reported here may inform the development of compounds that specifically inhibit the association of CD28 with these adaptor proteins to suppress excessive T cell responses, such as in allergies and autoimmune diseases. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Surface responses and desirability functions to determine optimal granulation domains.

    PubMed

    Giry, K; Viana, M; Genty, M; Wüthrich, P; Chulia, D

    2010-09-01

    Single pot mixer-granulator-dryer (high-shear granulator with in situ double jacket vacuum drying) and multiphase equipment (high-shear granulator associated with fluid bed dryer) are classically used for wet granulation. At present time, industrial production imperatives may require to switch one formulation from one equipment to another. To compare the two processes and to define, for each of them, the optimal formulation domain, experiments were organized according to Doehlert experimental designs. Response surfaces were used to identify the levels of each factor (binder and filler ratios) inducing the more satisfying responses. The contribution of binder and filler ratios to granule properties was highlighted according to the process. Then the desirability function was used to determine and compare the optimal formulation domain for each process. In the studied formulation domain and for the considered equipment, the transposition from a single pot to a multiphase high-shear granulation process did not seem to raise difficulties; the same formulations were out of specification for both processes and other trials, the technological properties were maintained or improved in the Fielder/Niro equipment.

  8. Structure-function analysis of the NB-ARC domain of plant disease resistance proteins.

    PubMed

    van Ooijen, Gerben; Mayr, Gabriele; Kasiem, Mobien M A; Albrecht, Mario; Cornelissen, Ben J C; Takken, Frank L W

    2008-01-01

    Resistance (R) proteins in plants are involved in pathogen recognition and subsequent activation of innate immune responses. Most resistance proteins contain a central nucleotide-binding domain. This so-called NB-ARC domain consists of three subdomains: NB, ARC1, and ARC2. The NB-ARC domain is a functional ATPase domain, and its nucleotide-binding state is proposed to regulate activity of the R protein. A highly conserved methionine-histidine-aspartate (MHD) motif is present at the carboxy-terminus of ARC2. An extensive mutational analysis of the MHD motif in the R proteins I-2 and Mi-1 is reported. Several novel autoactivating mutations of the MHD invariant histidine and conserved aspartate were identified. The combination of MHD mutants with autoactivating hydrolysis mutants in the NB subdomain showed that the autoactivation phenotypes are not additive. This finding indicates an important regulatory role for the MHD motif in the control of R protein activity. To explain these observations, a three-dimensional model of the NB-ARC domain of I-2 was built, based on the APAF-1 template structure. The model was used to identify residues important for I-2 function. Substitution of the selected residues resulted in the expected distinct phenotypes. Based on the model, it is proposed that the MHD motif fulfils the same function as the sensor II motif found in AAA+ proteins (ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities)-co-ordination of the nucleotide and control of subdomain interactions. The presented 3D model provides a framework for the formulation of hypotheses on how mutations in the NB-ARC exert their effects.

  9. Solution NMR structures of the C-domain of Tetrahymena cytoskeletal protein Tcb2 reveal distinct calcium-induced structural rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Kilpatrick, Adina M; Honts, Jerry E; Sleister, Heidi M; Fowler, C Andrew

    2016-11-01

    Tcb2 is a calcium-binding protein that localizes to the membrane-associated skeleton of the ciliated protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila with hypothesized roles in ciliary movement, cell cortex signaling, and pronuclear exchange. Tcb2 has also been implicated in a unique calcium-triggered, ATP-independent type of contractility exhibited by filamentous networks isolated from the Tetrahymena cytoskeleton. To gain insight into Tcb2's structure-function relationship and contractile properties, we determined solution NMR structures of its C-terminal domain in the calcium-free and calcium-bound states. The overall architecture is similar to other calcium-binding proteins, with paired EF-hand calcium-binding motifs. Comparison of the two structures reveals that Tcb2-C's calcium-induced conformational transition differs from the prototypical calcium sensor calmodulin, suggesting that the two proteins play distinct functional roles in Tetrahymena and likely have different mechanisms of target recognition. Future studies of the full-length protein and the identification of Tcb2 cellular targets will help establish the molecular basis of Tcb2 function and its unique contractile properties. Proteins 2016; 84:1748-1756. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Functional domains within the human immunodeficiency virus type 2 envelope protein required to enhance virus production.

    PubMed

    Abada, Paolo; Noble, Beth; Cannon, Paula M

    2005-03-01

    Primate lentiviruses code for a protein that stimulates virus production. In human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), the activity is provided by the accessory protein, Vpu, while in HIV-2 and simian immunodeficiency virus it is a property of the envelope (Env) glycoprotein. Using a group of diverse retroviruses and cell types, we have confirmed the functional equivalence of the two proteins. However, despite these similarities, the two proteins have markedly different functional domains. While the Vpu activity is associated primarily with its membrane-spanning region, we have determined that the HIV-2 Env activity requires both the cytoplasmic tail and ectodomain of the protein, with the membrane-spanning domain being less important. Within the Env cytoplasmic tail, we further defined the necessary sequence as a membrane-proximal tyrosine-based motif. Providing the two Env regions separately as distinct CD8 chimeric proteins did not increase virus release. This suggests that the two domains must be either contained within a single protein or closely associated within a multiprotein oligomer, such as the Env trimer, in order to function. Finally, we observed that wild-type levels of incorporation of the HIV-2 Env into budding viruses were not required for this activity.

  11. Functional Domains within the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 2 Envelope Protein Required To Enhance Virus Production

    PubMed Central

    Abada, Paolo; Noble, Beth; Cannon, Paula M.

    2005-01-01

    Primate lentiviruses code for a protein that stimulates virus production. In human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), the activity is provided by the accessory protein, Vpu, while in HIV-2 and simian immunodeficiency virus it is a property of the envelope (Env) glycoprotein. Using a group of diverse retroviruses and cell types, we have confirmed the functional equivalence of the two proteins. However, despite these similarities, the two proteins have markedly different functional domains. While the Vpu activity is associated primarily with its membrane-spanning region, we have determined that the HIV-2 Env activity requires both the cytoplasmic tail and ectodomain of the protein, with the membrane-spanning domain being less important. Within the Env cytoplasmic tail, we further defined the necessary sequence as a membrane-proximal tyrosine-based motif. Providing the two Env regions separately as distinct CD8 chimeric proteins did not increase virus release. This suggests that the two domains must be either contained within a single protein or closely associated within a multiprotein oligomer, such as the Env trimer, in order to function. Finally, we observed that wild-type levels of incorporation of the HIV-2 Env into budding viruses were not required for this activity. PMID:15731257

  12. Evolutionary Algorithms for Boolean Functions in Diverse Domains of Cryptography.

    PubMed

    Picek, Stjepan; Carlet, Claude; Guilley, Sylvain; Miller, Julian F; Jakobovic, Domagoj

    2016-01-01

    The role of Boolean functions is prominent in several areas including cryptography, sequences, and coding theory. Therefore, various methods for the construction of Boolean functions with desired properties are of direct interest. New motivations on the role of Boolean functions in cryptography with attendant new properties have emerged over the years. There are still many combinations of design criteria left unexplored and in this matter evolutionary computation can play a distinct role. This article concentrates on two scenarios for the use of Boolean functions in cryptography. The first uses Boolean functions as the source of the nonlinearity in filter and combiner generators. Although relatively well explored using evolutionary algorithms, it still presents an interesting goal in terms of the practical sizes of Boolean functions. The second scenario appeared rather recently where the objective is to find Boolean functions that have various orders of the correlation immunity and minimal Hamming weight. In both these scenarios we see that evolutionary algorithms are able to find high-quality solutions where genetic programming performs the best.

  13. Distinct Growth Factor Families Are Recruited in Unique Spatiotemporal Domains during Long-Term Memory Formation in Aplysia californica.

    PubMed

    Kopec, Ashley M; Philips, Gary T; Carew, Thomas J

    2015-06-03

    Several growth factors (GFs) have been implicated in long-term memory (LTM), but no single GF can support all of the plastic changes that occur during memory formation. Because GFs engage highly convergent signaling cascades that often mediate similar functional outcomes, the relative contribution of any particular GF to LTM is difficult to ascertain. To explore this question, we determined the unique contribution of distinct GF families (signaling via TrkB and TGF-βr-II) to LTM formation in Aplysia. We demonstrate that TrkB and TGF-βr-II signaling are differentially recruited during two-trial training in both time (by trial 1 or 2, respectively) and space (in distinct subcellular compartments). These GFs independently regulate MAPK activation and synergistically regulate gene expression. We also show that trial 1 TrkB and trial 2 TGF-βr-II signaling are required for LTM formation. These data support the view that GFs engaged in LTM formation are interactive components of a complex molecular network.

  14. What is your patient’s cognitive profile? Three distinct subgroups of cognitive function in persons with heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Misty A.W.; Schaefer, Julie T.; Gunstad, John; Dolansky, Mary A.; Redle, Joseph D.; Josephson, Richard; Moore, Shirley M.; Hughes, Joel W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine whether patients with heart failure (HF) have distinct profiles of cognitive impairment. Background Cognitive impairment is common in HF. Recent work found three cognitive profiles in HF patients— (1) intact, (2) impaired, and (3) memory-impaired. We examined the reproducibility of these profiles and clarified mechanisms. Methods HF patients (68.6±9.7years; N=329) completed neuropsychological testing. Composite scores were created for cognitive domains and used to identify clusters via agglomerative-hierarchical cluster analysis. Results A 3-cluster solution emerged. Cluster 1 (n=109) had intact cognition. Cluster 2 (n=123) was impaired across all domains. Cluster 3 (n=97) had impaired memory only. Clusters differed in age, race, education, SES, IQ, BMI, and diabetes (ps ≤.026) but not in mood, anxiety, cardiovascular, or pulmonary disease (ps≥.118). Conclusions We replicated three distinct patterns of cognitive function in persons with HF. These profiles may help providers offer tailored care to patients with different cognitive and clinical needs. PMID:25510559

  15. Strong functional patterns in the evolution of eukaryotic genomes revealed by the reconstruction of ancestral protein domain repertoires

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Genome size and complexity, as measured by the number of genes or protein domains, is remarkably similar in most extant eukaryotes and generally exhibits no correlation with their morphological complexity. Underlying trends in the evolution of the functional content and capabilities of different eukaryotic genomes might be hidden by simultaneous gains and losses of genes. Results We reconstructed the domain repertoires of putative ancestral species at major divergence points, including the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA). We show that, surprisingly, during eukaryotic evolution domain losses in general outnumber domain gains. Only at the base of the animal and the vertebrate sub-trees do domain gains outnumber domain losses. The observed gain/loss balance has a distinct functional bias, most strikingly seen during animal evolution, where most of the gains represent domains involved in regulation and most of the losses represent domains with metabolic functions. This trend is so consistent that clustering of genomes according to their functional profiles results in an organization similar to the tree of life. Furthermore, our results indicate that metabolic functions lost during animal evolution are likely being replaced by the metabolic capabilities of symbiotic organisms such as gut microbes. Conclusions While protein domain gains and losses are common throughout eukaryote evolution, losses oftentimes outweigh gains and lead to significant differences in functional profiles. Results presented here provide additional arguments for a complex last eukaryotic common ancestor, but also show a general trend of losses in metabolic capabilities and gain in regulatory complexity during the rise of animals. PMID:21241503

  16. Identification of distinct SET/TAF-Iβ domains required for core histone binding and quantitative characterisation of the interaction

    PubMed Central

    Karetsou, Zoe; Emmanouilidou, Anastasia; Sanidas, Ioannis; Liokatis, Stamatis; Nikolakaki, Eleni; Politou, Anastasia S; Papamarcaki, Thomais

    2009-01-01

    Background The assembly of nucleosomes to higher-order chromatin structures is finely tuned by the relative affinities of histones for chaperones and nucleosomal binding sites. The myeloid leukaemia protein SET/TAF-Iβ belongs to the NAP1 family of histone chaperones and participates in several chromatin-based mechanisms, such as chromatin assembly, nucleosome reorganisation and transcriptional activation. To better understand the histone chaperone function of SET/TAF-Iβ, we designed several SET/TAF-Iβ truncations, examined their structural integrity by circular Dichroism and assessed qualitatively and quantitatively the histone binding properties of wild-type protein and mutant forms using GST-pull down experiments and fluorescence spectroscopy-based binding assays. Results Wild type SET/TAF-Iβ binds to histones H2B and H3 with Kd values of 2.87 and 0.15 μM, respectively. The preferential binding of SET/TAF-Iβ to histone H3 is mediated by its central region and the globular part of H3. On the contrary, the acidic C-terminal tail and the amino-terminal dimerisation domain of SET/TAF-Iβ, as well as the H3 amino-terminal tail, are dispensable for this interaction. Conclusion This type of analysis allowed us to assess the relative affinities of SET/TAF-Iβ for different histones and identify the domains of the protein required for effective histone recognition. Our findings are consistent with recent structural studies of SET/TAF-Iβ and can be valuable to understand the role of SET/TAF-Iβ in chromatin function. PMID:19358706

  17. Purification, Cellular Levels, and Functional Domains of LMF1

    PubMed Central

    Babilonia-Rosa, Melissa; Neher, Saskia B.

    2014-01-01

    Over a third of the US adult population has hypertriglyceridemia, resulting in an increased risk of atherosclerosis, pancreatitis, and metabolic syndrome. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL)1, a dimeric enzyme, is the main lipase responsible for TG clearance from the blood after food intake. LPL requires an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident, transmembrane protein known as lipase maturation factor 1 (LMF1) for secretion and enzymatic activity. LMF1 is believed to act as a client specific chaperone for dimeric lipases, but the precise mechanism by which LMF1 functions is not understood. Here, we examine which domains of LMF1 contribute to dimeric lipase maturation by assessing the function of truncation variants. N-terminal truncations of LMF1 show that all the domains are necessary for LPL maturation. Fluorescence microscopy and protease protection assays confirmed that these variants were properly oriented in the ER. We measured cellular levels of LMF1 and found that it is expressed at low levels and each molecule of LMF1 promotes the maturation of 50 or more molecules of LPL. Thus we provide evidence for the critical role of the N-terminus of LMF1 for the maturation of LPL and relevant ratio of chaperone to substrate. PMID:24909692

  18. Uncertainty Analysis via Failure Domain Characterization: Polynomial Requirement Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crespo, Luis G.; Munoz, Cesar A.; Narkawicz, Anthony J.; Kenny, Sean P.; Giesy, Daniel P.

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes an uncertainty analysis framework based on the characterization of the uncertain parameter space. This characterization enables the identification of worst-case uncertainty combinations and the approximation of the failure and safe domains with a high level of accuracy. Because these approximations are comprised of subsets of readily computable probability, they enable the calculation of arbitrarily tight upper and lower bounds to the failure probability. A Bernstein expansion approach is used to size hyper-rectangular subsets while a sum of squares programming approach is used to size quasi-ellipsoidal subsets. These methods are applicable to requirement functions whose functional dependency on the uncertainty is a known polynomial. Some of the most prominent features of the methodology are the substantial desensitization of the calculations from the uncertainty model assumed (i.e., the probability distribution describing the uncertainty) as well as the accommodation for changes in such a model with a practically insignificant amount of computational effort.

  19. Uncertainty Analysis via Failure Domain Characterization: Unrestricted Requirement Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crespo, Luis G.; Kenny, Sean P.; Giesy, Daniel P.

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes an uncertainty analysis framework based on the characterization of the uncertain parameter space. This characterization enables the identification of worst-case uncertainty combinations and the approximation of the failure and safe domains with a high level of accuracy. Because these approximations are comprised of subsets of readily computable probability, they enable the calculation of arbitrarily tight upper and lower bounds to the failure probability. The methods developed herein, which are based on nonlinear constrained optimization, are applicable to requirement functions whose functional dependency on the uncertainty is arbitrary and whose explicit form may even be unknown. Some of the most prominent features of the methodology are the substantial desensitization of the calculations from the assumed uncertainty model (i.e., the probability distribution describing the uncertainty) as well as the accommodation for changes in such a model with a practically insignificant amount of computational effort.

  20. Capturing distinct KCNQ2 channel resting states by metal ion bridges in the voltage-sensor domain.

    PubMed

    Gourgy-Hacohen, Orit; Kornilov, Polina; Pittel, Ilya; Peretz, Asher; Attali, Bernard; Paas, Yoav

    2014-12-01

    Although crystal structures of various voltage-gated K(+) (Kv) and Na(+) channels have provided substantial information on the activated conformation of the voltage-sensing domain (VSD), the topology of the VSD in its resting conformation remains highly debated. Numerous studies have investigated the VSD resting state in the Kv Shaker channel; however, few studies have explored this issue in other Kv channels. Here, we investigated the VSD resting state of KCNQ2, a K(+) channel subunit belonging to the KCNQ (Kv7) subfamily of Kv channels. KCNQ2 can coassemble with the KCNQ3 subunit to mediate the IM current that regulates neuronal excitability. In humans, mutations in KCNQ2 are associated with benign neonatal forms of epilepsy or with severe epileptic encephalopathy. We introduced cysteine mutations into the S4 transmembrane segment of the KCNQ2 VSD and determined that external application of Cd(2+) profoundly reduced the current amplitude of S4 cysteine mutants S195C, R198C, and R201C. Based on reactivity with the externally accessible endogenous cysteine C106 in S1, we infer that each of the above S4 cysteine mutants forms Cd(2+) bridges to stabilize a channel closed state. Disulfide bonds and metal bridges constrain the S4 residues S195, R198, and R201 near C106 in S1 in the resting state, and experiments using concatenated tetrameric constructs indicate that this occurs within the same VSD. KCNQ2 structural models suggest that three distinct resting channel states have been captured by the formation of different S4-S1 Cd(2+) bridges. Collectively, this work reveals that residue C106 in S1 can be very close to several N-terminal S4 residues for stabilizing different KCNQ2 resting conformations.

  1. Capturing distinct KCNQ2 channel resting states by metal ion bridges in the voltage-sensor domain

    PubMed Central

    Gourgy-Hacohen, Orit; Kornilov, Polina; Pittel, Ilya; Peretz, Asher

    2014-01-01

    Although crystal structures of various voltage-gated K+ (Kv) and Na+ channels have provided substantial information on the activated conformation of the voltage-sensing domain (VSD), the topology of the VSD in its resting conformation remains highly debated. Numerous studies have investigated the VSD resting state in the Kv Shaker channel; however, few studies have explored this issue in other Kv channels. Here, we investigated the VSD resting state of KCNQ2, a K+ channel subunit belonging to the KCNQ (Kv7) subfamily of Kv channels. KCNQ2 can coassemble with the KCNQ3 subunit to mediate the IM current that regulates neuronal excitability. In humans, mutations in KCNQ2 are associated with benign neonatal forms of epilepsy or with severe epileptic encephalopathy. We introduced cysteine mutations into the S4 transmembrane segment of the KCNQ2 VSD and determined that external application of Cd2+ profoundly reduced the current amplitude of S4 cysteine mutants S195C, R198C, and R201C. Based on reactivity with the externally accessible endogenous cysteine C106 in S1, we infer that each of the above S4 cysteine mutants forms Cd2+ bridges to stabilize a channel closed state. Disulfide bonds and metal bridges constrain the S4 residues S195, R198, and R201 near C106 in S1 in the resting state, and experiments using concatenated tetrameric constructs indicate that this occurs within the same VSD. KCNQ2 structural models suggest that three distinct resting channel states have been captured by the formation of different S4–S1 Cd2+ bridges. Collectively, this work reveals that residue C106 in S1 can be very close to several N-terminal S4 residues for stabilizing different KCNQ2 resting conformations. PMID:25385787

  2. Distinct deformational history of two contrasting tectonic domains in the Chinese Altai: Their significance in understanding accretionary orogenic process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Sun, Min; Schulmann, Karel; Zhao, Guochun; Wu, Qihang; Jiang, Yingde; Guy, Alexandra; Wang, Yuejun

    2015-04-01

    The Chinese Altai, a key component of the western Central Asian Orogenic Belt, is considered to be formed through multiple accretions of different terranes. However, the deformational histories of each terrane (tectonic domain), i.e. structural records before and after the accretion, are rarely studied, which has hindered our understanding of the accretionary processes. To fill the gap, a systematic macro- and microscopic structural analysis was carried out on two contrasting litho-tectonic units, i.e. the early Paleozoic low-grade Alegedayi Ophiolitic Complex (AOC) juxtaposed to the high grade Tarlang Granitic Massif (TGM). Selected rock samples were analyzed using zircon U-Pb isotopic dating to constrain the timing of polyphase deformation. Our structural and geochronological data suggest that the two litho-tectonic units were initially detached and located in different crustal levels and experienced distinct phases of deformation under contrasting P-T conditions. They were mutually accreted with each other in the early Devonian and jointly underwent a WNW-ESE-directed shortening deformational event (D1) at ˜390 Ma. The change of tectonic regime was further enhanced by a subsequent NNE-SSW-directed shortening deformation (D2) after ˜ 380 Ma. The shortening process ended before the crustal-scale sinistral strike-slip shearing deformation along the Erqis fault zone at 290 - 240 Ma. Results of this study provide solid field-based evidence for a model that the Chinese Altai initially underwent a nearly E-W-oriented subduction-accretional event in the middle Paleozoic, before it was reoriented to a nearly N-S-oriented convergence.

  3. CCAAT/Enhancer Binding Protein alpha uses distinct domains to prolong pituitary cells in the Growth 1 and DNA Synthesis phases of the cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Weiqun; Enwright, John F; Hyun, William; Day, Richard N; Schaufele, Fred

    2002-01-01

    Background A number of transcription factors coordinate differentiation by simultaneously regulating gene expression and cell proliferation. CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha (C/EBPα) is a basic/leucine zipper transcription factor that integrates transcription with proliferation to regulate the differentiation of tissues involved in energy balance. In the pituitary, C/EBPα regulates the transcription of a key metabolic regulator, growth hormone. Results We examined the consequences of C/EBPα expression on proliferation of the transformed, mouse GHFT1-5 pituitary progenitor cell line. In contrast to mature pituitary cells, GHFT1-5 cells do not contain C/EBPα. Ectopic expression of C/EBPα in the progenitor cells resulted in prolongation of both growth 1 (G1) and the DNA synthesis (S) phases of the cell cycle. Transcription activation domain 1 and 2 of C/EBPα were required for prolongation of G1, but not of S. Some transcriptionally inactive derivatives of C/EBPα remained competent for G1 and S phase prolongation. C/EBPα deleted of its leucine zipper dimerization functions was as effective as full-length C/EBPα in prolonging G1 and S. Conclusion We found that C/EBPα utilizes mechanistically distinct activities to prolong the cell cycle in G1 and S in pituitary progenitor cells. G1 and S phase prolongation did not require that C/EBPα remained transcriptionally active or retained the ability to dimerize via the leucine zipper. G1, but not S, arrest required a domain overlapping with C/EBPα transcription activation functions 1 and 2. Separation of mechanisms governing proliferation and transcription permits C/EBPα to regulate gene expression independently of its effects on proliferation. PMID:11914124

  4. Modular structure of chromosomal proteins HMG-14 and HMG-17: Definition of a transcriptional enhancement domain distinct from the nucleosomal binding domain

    SciTech Connect

    Trieschmann, L.; Postnikov, Y.V.; Rickers, A.; Bustin, M.

    1995-12-01

    This report describes how deletion mutants and peptides were used to identify the transcriptional enhancement domain and the nucleosome binding domain of two chromosomal proteins, HMG-14 and HMG-17. The research indicates that mutations involving C-terminal amino acids significantly reduces the ability of the nucleoproteins to enhance transcription from chromatin templates. 42 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  5. The HIV-1 envelope transmembrane domain binds TLR2 through a distinct dimerization motif and inhibits TLR2-mediated responses.

    PubMed

    Reuven, Eliran Moshe; Ali, Mohammad; Rotem, Etai; Schwarzer, Roland; Schwarzter, Roland; Gramatica, Andrea; Futerman, Anthony H; Shai, Yechiel

    2014-08-01

    HIV-1 uses a number of means to manipulate the immune system, to avoid recognition and to highjack signaling pathways. HIV-1 infected cells show limited Toll-Like Receptor (TLR) responsiveness via as yet unknown mechanisms. Using biochemical and biophysical approaches, we demonstrate that the trans-membrane domain (TMD) of the HIV-1 envelope (ENV) directly interacts with TLR2 TMD within the membrane milieu. This interaction attenuates TNFα, IL-6 and MCP-1 secretion in macrophages, induced by natural ligands of TLR2 both in in vitro and in vivo models. This was associated with decreased levels of ERK phosphorylation. Furthermore, mutagenesis demonstrated the importance of a conserved GxxxG motif in driving this interaction within the membrane milieu. The administration of the ENV TMD in vivo to lipotechoic acid (LTA)/Galactosamine-mediated septic mice resulted in a significant decrease in mortality and in tissue damage, due to the weakening of systemic macrophage activation. Our findings suggest that the TMD of ENV is involved in modulation of the innate immune response during HIV infection. Furthermore, due to the high functional homology of viral ENV proteins this function may be a general character of viral-induced immune modulation.

  6. The HIV-1 Envelope Transmembrane Domain Binds TLR2 through a Distinct Dimerization Motif and Inhibits TLR2-Mediated Responses

    PubMed Central

    Rotem, Etai; Schwarzter, Roland; Gramatica, Andrea; Futerman, Anthony H.; Shai, Yechiel

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 uses a number of means to manipulate the immune system, to avoid recognition and to highjack signaling pathways. HIV-1 infected cells show limited Toll-Like Receptor (TLR) responsiveness via as yet unknown mechanisms. Using biochemical and biophysical approaches, we demonstrate that the trans-membrane domain (TMD) of the HIV-1 envelope (ENV) directly interacts with TLR2 TMD within the membrane milieu. This interaction attenuates TNFα, IL-6 and MCP-1 secretion in macrophages, induced by natural ligands of TLR2 both in in vitro and in vivo models. This was associated with decreased levels of ERK phosphorylation. Furthermore, mutagenesis demonstrated the importance of a conserved GxxxG motif in driving this interaction within the membrane milieu. The administration of the ENV TMD in vivo to lipotechoic acid (LTA)/Galactosamine-mediated septic mice resulted in a significant decrease in mortality and in tissue damage, due to the weakening of systemic macrophage activation. Our findings suggest that the TMD of ENV is involved in modulation of the innate immune response during HIV infection. Furthermore, due to the high functional homology of viral ENV proteins this function may be a general character of viral-induced immune modulation. PMID:25121610

  7. Simplified Interpretation of the Erectile Function Domain of the International Index of Erectile Function.

    PubMed

    Cappelleri, Joseph C; Tseng, Li-Jung; Luo, Xuemei; Stecher, Vera; Lue, Tom F

    2016-04-01

    This report describes a post hoc analysis of data from a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, flexible-dose, sildenafil trial in men with erectile dysfunction. To simplify interpretation of erectile function (EF) domain scores of the International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF). Men at least 18 years old with erectile dysfunction were randomized to receive sildenafil or placebo for 12 weeks. Men taking nitrates or nitric oxide donors were excluded. Responses for each IIEF EF domain question (questions 1-5 and 15) were combined into two broad categories ("success" for responses of the two most favorable categories of a question and "no success" for other responses). Each question was expressed in a logistic regression model (sildenafil and placebo groups combined) as a function of overall EF domain score. IIEF EF domain score and items. A four-point increase in the IIEF EF domain score was associated with an odds ratio of success of 6.1 for getting an erection, 29.2 for having a firm erection, 10.0 for able to penetrate,12.8 for maintaining erection, 4.0 for maintaining erection to completion, and 3.7 for erection confidence. An EF domain score of 22 was associated with a probability of success of 81% for getting an erection, 86% for having a firm erection, 89% for able to penetrate, 67% for maintaining an erection, 70% for maintaining an erection to completion, and 32% for erection confidence. For an EF domain score of 16, the corresponding probabilities of success were 22%, 4%, 20%, 4%, 22%, and 6%, respectively. These results provide stakeholders with a simplified and meaningful interpretation of IIEF EF domain scores based on six key aspects of EF. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Sexual Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A selective screen reveals discrete functional domains in Drosophila Nanos.

    PubMed Central

    Arrizabalaga, G; Lehmann, R

    1999-01-01

    The Drosophila protein Nanos encodes an evolutionarily conserved protein with two zinc finger motifs. In the embryo, Nanos protein function is required for establishment of the anterior-posterior body pattern and for the migration of primordial germ cells. During oogenesis, Nanos protein is involved in the establishment and maintenance of germ-line stem cells and the differentiation of oocyte precursor cells. To establish proper embryonic patterning, Nanos acts as a translational regulator of hunchback RNA. Nanos' targets for germ cell migration and development are not known. Here, we describe a selective genetic screen aimed at isolating new nanos alleles. The molecular and genetic analysis of 68 new alleles has allowed us to identify amino acids critical for nanos function. This analysis shows that the CCHC motifs, which coordinate two metal ions, are essential for all known functions of Nanos protein. Furthermore, a region C-terminal to the zinc fingers seems to constitute a novel functional domain within the Nanos protein. This "tail region" of Nanos is required for abdomen formation and germ cell migration, but not for oogenesis. PMID:10581288

  9. Single TRAM domain RNA-binding proteins in Archaea: functional insight from Ctr3 from the Antarctic methanogen Methanococcoides burtonii.

    PubMed

    Taha; Siddiqui, K S; Campanaro, S; Najnin, T; Deshpande, N; Williams, T J; Aldrich-Wright, J; Wilkins, M; Curmi, P M G; Cavicchioli, R

    2016-09-01

    TRAM domain proteins present in Archaea and Bacteria have a β-barrel shape with anti-parallel β-sheets that form a nucleic acid binding surface; a structure also present in cold shock proteins (Csps). Aside from protein structures, experimental data defining the function of TRAM domains is lacking. Here, we explore the possible functional properties of a single TRAM domain protein, Ctr3 (cold-responsive TRAM domain protein 3) from the Antarctic archaeon Methanococcoides burtonii that has increased abundance during low temperature growth. Ribonucleic acid (RNA) bound by Ctr3 in vitro was determined using RNA-seq. Ctr3-bound M. burtonii RNA with a preference for transfer (t)RNA and 5S ribosomal RNA, and a potential binding motif was identified. In tRNA, the motif represented the C loop; a region that is conserved in tRNA from all domains of life and appears to be solvent exposed, potentially providing access for Ctr3 to bind. Ctr3 and Csps are structurally similar and are both inferred to function in low temperature translation. The broad representation of single TRAM domain proteins within Archaea compared with their apparent absence in Bacteria, and scarcity of Csps in Archaea but prevalence in Bacteria, suggests they represent distinct evolutionary lineages of functionally equivalent RNA-binding proteins.

  10. Structure and functional interactions of the Tsg101 UEV domain.

    PubMed

    Pornillos, Owen; Alam, Steven L; Rich, Rebecca L; Myszka, David G; Davis, Darrell R; Sundquist, Wesley I

    2002-05-15

    Human Tsg101 plays key roles in HIV budding and in cellular vacuolar protein sorting (VPS). In performing these functions, Tsg101 binds both ubiquitin (Ub) and the PTAP tetrapeptide 'late domain' motif located within the viral Gag protein. These interactions are mediated by the N-terminal domain of Tsg101, which belongs to the catalytically inactive ubiquitin E2 variant (UEV) family. We now report the structure of Tsg101 UEV and chemical shift mapping of the Ub and PTAP binding sites. Tsg101 UEV resembles canonical E2 ubiquitin conjugating enzymes, but has an additional N-terminal helix, an extended beta-hairpin that links strands 1 and 2, and lacks the two C-terminal helices normally found in E2 enzymes. PTAP-containing peptides bind in a hydrophobic cleft exposed by the absence of the C-terminal helices, whereas ubiquitin binds in a novel site surrounding the beta-hairpin. These studies provide a structural framework for understanding how Tsg101 mediates the protein-protein interactions required for HIV budding and VPS.

  11. On Determinatives and the Category-Function Distinction: A Reply to Brett Reynolds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenchuk, Iryna; Ahmed, Amer

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the arguments made in the article "Determiners, Feline Marsupials, and the Category-Function Distinction: A Critique of ELT Grammars" by Brett Reynolds recently published in the "TESL Canada Journal" (2013). In our response, we demonstrate that the author's arguments are problematic on both…

  12. Guiding Cell Attachment in 3D Microscaffolds Selectively Functionalized with Two Distinct Adhesion Proteins.

    PubMed

    Richter, Benjamin; Hahn, Vincent; Bertels, Sarah; Claus, Tanja K; Wegener, Martin; Delaittre, Guillaume; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher; Bastmeyer, Martin

    2017-02-01

    The combination of three different photoresists into a single direct laser written 3D microscaffold permits functionalization with two bioactive full-length proteins. The cell-instructive microscaffolds consist of a passivating framework equipped with light activatable constituents featuring distinct protein-binding properties. This allows directed cell attachment of epithelial or fibroblast cells in 3D.

  13. Distinct Patterns of Grey Matter Abnormality in High-Functioning Autism and Asperger's Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAlonan, Grainne M.; Suckling, John; Wong, Naikei; Cheung, Vinci; Lienenkaemper, Nina; Cheung, Charlton; Chua, Siew E.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Autism exists across a wide spectrum and there is considerable debate as to whether children with Asperger's syndrome, who have normal language milestones, should be considered to comprise a subgroup distinct other from high-functioning children with autism (HFA), who have a history of delayed language development. Magnetic resonance…

  14. Distinct Patterns of Grey Matter Abnormality in High-Functioning Autism and Asperger's Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAlonan, Grainne M.; Suckling, John; Wong, Naikei; Cheung, Vinci; Lienenkaemper, Nina; Cheung, Charlton; Chua, Siew E.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Autism exists across a wide spectrum and there is considerable debate as to whether children with Asperger's syndrome, who have normal language milestones, should be considered to comprise a subgroup distinct other from high-functioning children with autism (HFA), who have a history of delayed language development. Magnetic resonance…

  15. Shared and distinctive origins and correlates of adult attachment representations: the developmental organization of romantic functioning.

    PubMed

    Haydon, Katherine C; Collins, W A; Salvatore, Jessica E; Simpson, Jeffry A; Roisman, Glenn I

    2012-01-01

    To test proposals regarding the hierarchical organization of adult attachment, this study examined developmental origins of generalized and romantic attachment representations and their concurrent associations with romantic functioning. Participants (N=112) in a 35-year prospective study completed the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI) and Current Relationship Interview (CRI). Two-way analysis of variance tested interactive associations of AAI and CRI security with infant attachment, early parenting quality, preschool ego resiliency, adolescent friendship quality, and adult romantic functioning. Both representations were associated with earlier parenting and core attachment-related romantic behavior, but romantic representations had distinctive links to ego resiliency and relationship-specific romantic behaviors. Attachment representations were independent and did not interactively predict romantic functioning, suggesting that they confer somewhat distinctive benefits for romantic functioning. © 2012 The Authors. Child Development © 2012 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  16. Shared and Distinctive Origins and Correlates of Adult Attachment Representations: The Developmental Organization of Romantic Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Haydon, Katherine C.; Collins, W. Andrew; Salvatore, Jessica E.; Simpson, Jeffry A.; Roisman, Glenn I.

    2012-01-01

    To test proposals regarding the hierarchical organization of adult attachment, this study examined developmental origins of generalized and romantic attachment representations and their concurrent associations with romantic functioning. Participants (N = 112) in a 35-year prospective study completed the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI) and Current Relationship Interview (CRI). Two-way ANOVAs tested interactive associations of AAI and CRI security with infant attachment, early parenting quality, preschool ego resiliency, adolescent friendship quality, and adult romantic functioning. Both representations were associated with earlier parenting and core attachment-related romantic behavior, but romantic representations had distinctive links to ego resiliency and relationship-specific romantic behaviors. Attachment representations were independent and did not interactively predict romantic functioning, suggesting that they confer somewhat distinctive benefits for romantic functioning. PMID:22694197

  17. Pathway logic modeling of protein functional domains in signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Talcott, C; Eker, S; Knapp, M; Lincoln, P; Laderoute, K

    2004-01-01

    Protein functional domains (PFDs) are consensus sequences within signaling molecules that recognize and assemble other signaling components into complexes. Here we describe the application of an approach called Pathway Logic to the symbolic modeling signal transduction networks at the level of PFDs. These models are developed using Maude, a symbolic language founded on rewriting logic. Models can be queried (analyzed) using the execution, search and model-checking tools of Maude. We show how signal transduction processes can be modeled using Maude at very different levels of abstraction involving either an overall state of a protein or its PFDs and their interactions. The key insight for the latter is our algebraic representation of binding interactions as a graph.

  18. Differential loss of prolyl isomerase or chaperone activity of Ran-binding protein 2 (Ranbp2) unveils distinct physiological roles of its cyclophilin domain in proteostasis.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyoung-in; Patil, Hemangi; Senda, Eugene; Wang, Jessica; Yi, Haiqing; Qiu, Sunny; Yoon, Dosuk; Yu, Minzhong; Orry, Andrew; Peachey, Neal S; Ferreira, Paulo A

    2014-02-21

    The immunophilins, cyclophilins, catalyze peptidyl cis-trans prolyl-isomerization (PPIase), a rate-limiting step in protein folding and a conformational switch in protein function. Cyclophilins are also chaperones. Noncatalytic mutations affecting the only cyclophilins with known but distinct physiological substrates, the Drosophila NinaA and its mammalian homolog, cyclophilin-B, impair opsin biogenesis and cause osteogenesis imperfecta, respectively. However, the physiological roles and substrates of most cyclophilins remain unknown. It is also unclear if PPIase and chaperone activities reflect distinct cyclophilin properties. To elucidate the physiological idiosyncrasy stemming from potential cyclophilin functions, we generated mice lacking endogenous Ran-binding protein-2 (Ranbp2) and expressing bacterial artificial chromosomes of Ranbp2 with impaired C-terminal chaperone and with (Tg-Ranbp2(WT-HA)) or without PPIase activities (Tg-Ranbp2(R2944A-HA)). The transgenic lines exhibit unique effects in proteostasis. Either line presents selective deficits in M-opsin biogenesis with its accumulation and aggregation in cone photoreceptors but without proteostatic impairment of two novel Ranbp2 cyclophilin partners, the cytokine-responsive effectors, STAT3/STAT5. Stress-induced STAT3 activation is also unaffected in Tg-Ranbp2(R2944A-HA)::Ranbp2(-/-). Conversely, proteomic analyses found that the multisystem proteinopathy/amyotrophic lateral sclerosis proteins, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins A2/B1, are down-regulated post-transcriptionally only in Tg-Ranbp2(R2944A-HA)::Ranbp2(-/-). This is accompanied by the age- and tissue-dependent reductions of diubiquitin and ubiquitylated proteins, increased deubiquitylation activity, and accumulation of the 26 S proteasome subunits S1 and S5b. These manifestations are absent in another line, Tg-Ranbp2(CLDm-HA)::Ranbp2(-/-), harboring SUMO-1 and S1-binding mutations in the Ranbp2 cyclophilin-like domain. These results

  19. Differential Loss of Prolyl Isomerase or Chaperone Activity of Ran-binding Protein 2 (Ranbp2) Unveils Distinct Physiological Roles of Its Cyclophilin Domain in Proteostasis*

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kyoung-in; Patil, Hemangi; Senda, Eugene; Wang, Jessica; Yi, Haiqing; Qiu, Sunny; Yoon, Dosuk; Yu, Minzhong; Orry, Andrew; Peachey, Neal S.; Ferreira, Paulo A.

    2014-01-01

    The immunophilins, cyclophilins, catalyze peptidyl cis-trans prolyl-isomerization (PPIase), a rate-limiting step in protein folding and a conformational switch in protein function. Cyclophilins are also chaperones. Noncatalytic mutations affecting the only cyclophilins with known but distinct physiological substrates, the Drosophila NinaA and its mammalian homolog, cyclophilin-B, impair opsin biogenesis and cause osteogenesis imperfecta, respectively. However, the physiological roles and substrates of most cyclophilins remain unknown. It is also unclear if PPIase and chaperone activities reflect distinct cyclophilin properties. To elucidate the physiological idiosyncrasy stemming from potential cyclophilin functions, we generated mice lacking endogenous Ran-binding protein-2 (Ranbp2) and expressing bacterial artificial chromosomes of Ranbp2 with impaired C-terminal chaperone and with (Tg-Ranbp2WT-HA) or without PPIase activities (Tg-Ranbp2R2944A-HA). The transgenic lines exhibit unique effects in proteostasis. Either line presents selective deficits in M-opsin biogenesis with its accumulation and aggregation in cone photoreceptors but without proteostatic impairment of two novel Ranbp2 cyclophilin partners, the cytokine-responsive effectors, STAT3/STAT5. Stress-induced STAT3 activation is also unaffected in Tg-Ranbp2R2944A-HA::Ranbp2−/−. Conversely, proteomic analyses found that the multisystem proteinopathy/amyotrophic lateral sclerosis proteins, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins A2/B1, are down-regulated post-transcriptionally only in Tg-Ranbp2R2944A-HA::Ranbp2−/−. This is accompanied by the age- and tissue-dependent reductions of diubiquitin and ubiquitylated proteins, increased deubiquitylation activity, and accumulation of the 26 S proteasome subunits S1 and S5b. These manifestations are absent in another line, Tg-Ranbp2CLDm-HA::Ranbp2−/−, harboring SUMO-1 and S1-binding mutations in the Ranbp2 cyclophilin-like domain. These results unveil

  20. Identification of Two Functional Domains within the Arenavirus Nucleoprotein▿

    PubMed Central

    Levingston Macleod, Jesica M.; D'Antuono, Alejandra; Loureiro, Maria Eugenia; Casabona, Juan Cruz; Gomez, Guillermo A.; Lopez, Nora

    2011-01-01

    Tacaribe virus (TCRV) belongs to the Arenaviridae family. Its bisegmented negative-stranded RNA genome encodes the nucleoprotein (N), the precursor of the envelope glycoproteins, the polymerase (L), and a RING finger matrix (Z) protein. The 570-amino-acid N protein binds to viral RNA, forming nucleocapsids, which are the template for transcription and replication by the viral polymerase. We have previously shown that the interaction between N and Z is required for assembly of infectious virus-like particles (VLPs) (J. C. Casabona et al., J. Virol. 83:7029-7039, 2009). Here, we examine the functional organization of TCRV N protein. A series of deletions and point mutations were introduced into the N-coding sequence, and the ability of the mutants to sustain heterotypic (N-Z) or homotypic (N-N) interactions was analyzed. We found that N protein displays two functional domains. By using coimmunoprecipitation studies, VLP incorporation assays, and double immunofluorescence staining, the carboxy-terminal region of N was found to be required for N-Z interaction and also necessary for incorporation of N protein into VLPs. Moreover, further analysis of this region showed that the integrity of a putative zinc-finger motif, as well as its amino-flanking sequence (residues 461 to 489), are critical for Z binding and N incorporation into VLPs. In addition, we provide evidence of an essential role of the amino-terminal region of N protein for N-N interaction. In this regard, using reciprocal coimmunoprecipitation analysis, we identified a 28-residue region predicted to form a coiled-coil domain (residues 92 to 119) as a newly recognized molecular determinant of N homotypic interactions. PMID:21159858

  1. Functional expression of Phanerochaete chrysosporium cellobiose dehydrogenase flavin domain in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Desriani; Ferri, Stefano; Sode, Koji

    2010-06-01

    Cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH; EC 1.1.99.18) is an extracellular glycosylated protein composed of two distinct domains, a C-terminal catalytic flavin domain and an N-terminal cytochrome-b-type heme domain, which transfers electrons from the flavin domain to external electron acceptors. The soluble flavin domain of the Phanerochaete chrysosporium CDH was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli. The enzyme showed dye-mediated CDH activity higher than that of the complete CDH, composed of flavin domain and heme domain, prepared using Pichia pastoris as the host microorganism. The ability to conveniently express the recombinant CDH flavin domain in E. coli provides great opportunities for the molecular engineering of the catalytic properties of CDH.

  2. Structural And Functional Studies of ALIX Interactions With YPXnL Late Domains of HIV-1 And EIAV

    SciTech Connect

    Zhai, Q.; Fisher, R.D.; Chung, H.-Y.; Myszka, D.G.; Sundquist, W.I.; Hill, C.P.

    2009-05-28

    Retrovirus budding requires short peptide motifs (late domains) located within the viral Gag protein that function by recruiting cellular factors. The YPX{sub n}L late domains of HIV and other lentiviruses recruit the protein ALIX (also known as AIP1), which also functions in vesicle formation at the multivesicular body and in the abscission stage of cytokinesis. Here, we report the crystal structures of ALIX in complex with the YPX{sub n}L late domains from HIV-1 and EIAV. The two distinct late domains bind at the same site on the ALIX V domain but adopt different conformations that allow them to make equivalent contacts. Binding studies and functional assays verified the importance of key interface residues and revealed that binding affinities are tuned by context-dependent effects. These results reveal how YPX{sub n}L late domains recruit ALIX to facilitate virus budding and how ALIX can bind YPX{sub n}L sequences with both n = 1 and n = 3.

  3. Distinct functional properties of isoamylase-type starch debranching enzymes in monocot and dicot leaves.

    PubMed

    Facon, Maud; Lin, Qiaohui; Azzaz, Abdelhamid M; Hennen-Bierwagen, Tracie A; Myers, Alan M; Putaux, Jean-Luc; Roussel, Xavier; D'Hulst, Christophe; Wattebled, Fabrice

    2013-11-01

    Isoamylase-type starch debranching enzymes (ISA) play important roles in starch biosynthesis in chloroplast-containing organisms, as shown by the strict conservation of both catalytically active ISA1 and the noncatalytic homolog ISA2. Functional distinctions exist between species, although they are not understood yet. Numerous plant tissues require both ISA1 and ISA2 for normal starch biosynthesis, whereas monocot endosperm and leaf exhibit nearly normal starch metabolism without ISA2. This study took in vivo and in vitro approaches to determine whether organism-specific physiology or evolutionary divergence between monocots and dicots is responsible for distinctions in ISA function. Maize (Zea mays) ISA1 was expressed in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) lacking endogenous ISA1 or lacking both native ISA1 and ISA2. The maize protein functioned in Arabidopsis leaves to support nearly normal starch metabolism in the absence of any native ISA1 or ISA2. Analysis of recombinant enzymes showed that Arabidopsis ISA1 requires ISA2 as a partner for enzymatic function, whereas maize ISA1 was active by itself. The electrophoretic mobility of recombinant and native maize ISA differed, suggestive of posttranslational modifications in vivo. Sedimentation equilibrium measurements showed recombinant maize ISA1 to be a dimer, in contrast to previous gel permeation data that estimated the molecular mass as a tetramer. These data demonstrate that evolutionary divergence between monocots and dicots is responsible for the distinctions in ISA1 function.

  4. PAR-3 oligomerization may provide an actin-independent mechanism to maintain distinct par protein domains in the early Caenorhabditis elegans embryo.

    PubMed

    Dawes, Adriana T; Munro, Edwin M

    2011-09-21

    Par proteins establish discrete intracellular spatial domains to polarize many different cell types. In the single-cell embryo of the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans, the segregation of Par proteins is crucial for proper division and cell fate specification. Actomyosin-based cortical flows drive the initial formation of anterior and posterior Par domains, but cortical actin is not required for the maintenance of these domains. Here we develop a model of interactions between the Par proteins that includes both mutual inhibition and PAR-3 oligomerization. We show that this model gives rise to a bistable switch mechanism, allowing the Par proteins to occupy distinct anterior and posterior domains seen in the early C. elegans embryo, independent of dynamics or asymmetries in the actin cortex. The model predicts a sharp loss of cortical Par protein asymmetries during gradual depletion of the Par protein PAR-6, and we confirm this prediction experimentally. Together, these results suggest both mutual inhibition and PAR-3 oligomerization are sufficient to maintain distinct Par protein domains in the early C. elegans embryo.

  5. Diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorders Using Temporally-Distinct Resting-State Functional Connectivity Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wee, Chong-Yaw; Yap, Pew-Thian; Shen, Dinggang

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (R-fMRI) is dynamic in nature since neural activities constantly change over the time and are dominated by repeating brief activations and deactivations involving many brain regions. Each region participates in multiple brain functions and is part of various functionally distinct but spatially overlapping networks. Functional connectivity computed as correlations over the entire time series always overlooks inter-region interactions that often occur repeatedly and dynamically in time, limiting its application to disease diagnosis. Aims We develop a novel framework that uses short-time activation patterns of brain connectivity to better detect subtle disease-induced disruptions of brain connectivity. A clustering algorithm is first used to temporally decompose R-fMRI time series into distinct clusters with similar spatial distribution of neural activity based on the assumption that functionally distinct networks should be largely temporally distinct since brain states do not simultaneously coexist in general. A Pearson correlation-based functional connectivity network is then constructed for each cluster to allow for better exploration of spatiotemporal dynamics of individual neural activity. To reduce significant inter-subject variability and to remove possible spurious connections, we use a group-constrained sparse regression model to construct a backbone sparse network for each cluster and use it to weight the corresponding Pearson correlation network. Results The proposed method outperforms the conventional static, temporally-dependent fully-connected correlation-based networks by at least 7% on a publicly available autism dataset. We were able to reproduce similar results using data from other centers. Conclusions By combining the advantages of temporal independence and group-constrained sparse regression, our method improves autism diagnosis. PMID:26821773

  6. AUX/LAX Genes Encode a Family of Auxin Influx Transporters That Perform Distinct Functions during Arabidopsis Development[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Péret, Benjamin; Swarup, Kamal; Ferguson, Alison; Seth, Malvika; Yang, Yaodong; Dhondt, Stijn; James, Nicholas; Casimiro, Ilda; Perry, Paula; Syed, Adnan; Yang, Haibing; Reemmer, Jesica; Venison, Edward; Howells, Caroline; Perez-Amador, Miguel A.; Yun, Jeonga; Alonso, Jose; Beemster, Gerrit T.S.; Laplaze, Laurent; Murphy, Angus; Bennett, Malcolm J.; Nielsen, Erik; Swarup, Ranjan

    2012-01-01

    Auxin transport, which is mediated by specialized influx and efflux carriers, plays a major role in many aspects of plant growth and development. AUXIN1 (AUX1) has been demonstrated to encode a high-affinity auxin influx carrier. In Arabidopsis thaliana, AUX1 belongs to a small multigene family comprising four highly conserved genes (i.e., AUX1 and LIKE AUX1 [LAX] genes LAX1, LAX2, and LAX3). We report that all four members of this AUX/LAX family display auxin uptake functions. Despite the conservation of their biochemical function, AUX1, LAX1, and LAX3 have been described to regulate distinct auxin-dependent developmental processes. Here, we report that LAX2 regulates vascular patterning in cotyledons. We also describe how regulatory and coding sequences of AUX/LAX genes have undergone subfunctionalization based on their distinct patterns of spatial expression and the inability of LAX sequences to rescue aux1 mutant phenotypes, respectively. Despite their high sequence similarity at the protein level, transgenic studies reveal that LAX proteins are not correctly targeted in the AUX1 expression domain. Domain swapping studies suggest that the N-terminal half of AUX1 is essential for correct LAX localization. We conclude that Arabidopsis AUX/LAX genes encode a family of auxin influx transporters that perform distinct developmental functions and have evolved distinct regulatory mechanisms. PMID:22773749

  7. Relation of neurocardiovascular instability to cognitive, emotional and functional domains.

    PubMed

    Bendini, C; Angelini, A; Salsi, F; Finelli, M E; Martini, E; Neviani, F; Mussi, C; Neri, M

    2007-01-01

    There is bulk of evidence suggesting that blood pressure dysregulation, as low blood pressure (LBP) or hypotension, orthostatic hypotension (OH) and high blood pressure (HPB) or hypertension are associated with alterations in cognitive and emotional domains. Some studies suggest that LBP, neurocardiovascular instability, like the OH, and atherosclerosis resulting from long standing HBP, reduces cerebral blood flow, increasing the risk of cognitive impairment, morbidity and mortality. This study aims to evaluate whether patients with cognitive impairment and cardiovascular disease would show any differences in some anamnestic indicators and/or psychometric measures of cognitive performance and affective symptoms. We recruited 36 patients over 65 years of age admitted to both psycho- and cardio-geriatric ambulatories of our hospital during the last year. The population (mean age of 80.5 years, 72.2% females, 27.8% males) was divided in 2 groups, with OH (25%), and without OH (75%). The first group was subdivided in subgroups: patients with HBP, normal BP and LBP, respectively. Cognitive and depressive domains were assessed with the mini mental state examination (MMSE) and the Italian "scala di valutazione del benessere emotivo nell' anziano" (SVEBA). Information about the present status, comorbidities (cumulative illness rating scale=CIRS), functional ability (activities of daily living=ADL, instrumental ADL=IADL) and drugs were collected during clinical examination. BP was measured 4 times, at the beginning of examination, then with the patient in clinostatic and orthostatic position (1st and 3rd minute). Data were analyzed by MANCOVA, considering age and gender as covariates, MMSE, SVEBA, CIRS, ADL, IADL and drugs as dependent variables, and presence/absence of OH as factor. Covariates were not significant sources of variance, as well as overall factor. Due to the heuristic aim of the study, we considered of interest the results of subsequent ANOVAs showing

  8. Profound regulation of neonatal CA1 rat hippocampal GABAergic transmission by functionally distinct kainate receptor populations

    PubMed Central

    Maingret, François; Lauri, Sari E; Taira, Tomi; Isaac, John TR

    2005-01-01

    Neonatal hippocampus exhibits distinct patterns of network activity that are dependent on the interaction between inhibitory and excitatory transmission. Kainate receptors are ideally positioned to regulate this activity by virtue of their ability to regulate presynaptic function in GABAergic interneurones. Indeed, kainate receptors are highly expressed in neonatal hippocampal interneurones, yet the role and mechanisms by which they might regulate neonatal circuitry are unexplored. To address this we investigated the kainate receptor-dependent regulation of GABAergic transmission onto neonatal CA1 pyramidal neurones. Kainate receptor activation produced two distinct opposing effects, a very large increase in the frequency of spontaneous IPSCs, and a robust depression of evoked GABAergic transmission. The up-regulation of spontaneous transmission was due to activation of somatodendritic and axonal receptors while the depression of evoked transmission could be fully accounted for by a direct regulation of GABA release by kainate receptors located at the terminals. None of the effects of kainate receptor agonists were sensitive to GABAB receptor antagonists, nor was there any postsynaptic kainate receptor-dependent effects observed in CA1 pyramidal cells that could account for our findings. Our data demonstrate that kainate receptors profoundly regulate neonatal CA1 GABAergic circuitry by two distinct opposing mechanisms, and indicate that these two effects are mediated by functionally distinct populations of receptors. Thus kainate receptors are strategically located to play a critical role in shaping early hippocampal network activity and by virtue of this have a key role in hippocampal development. PMID:15946969

  9. An exploration of function analysis and function allocation in the commercial flight domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcguire, James C.; Zich, John A.; Goins, Richard T.; Erickson, Jeffery B.; Dwyer, John P.; Cody, William J.; Rouse, William B.

    1991-01-01

    The applicability is explored of functional analysis methods to support cockpit design. Specifically, alternative techniques are studied for ensuring an effective division of responsibility between the flight crew and automation. A functional decomposition is performed of the commercial flight domain to provide the information necessary to support allocation decisions and demonstrate methodology for allocating functions to flight crew or to automation. The function analysis employed 'bottom up' and 'top down' analyses and demonstrated the comparability of identified functions, using the 'lift off' segment of the 'take off' phase as a test case. The normal flight mission and selected contingencies were addressed. Two alternative methods for using the functional description in the allocation of functions between man and machine were investigated. The two methods were compared in order to ascertain their relative strengths and weaknesses. Finally, conclusions were drawn regarding the practical utility of function analysis methods.

  10. Human germline and pan-cancer variomes and their distinct functional profiles.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yang; Karagiannis, Konstantinos; Zhang, Haichen; Dingerdissen, Hayley; Shamsaddini, Amirhossein; Wan, Quan; Simonyan, Vahan; Mazumder, Raja

    2014-10-01

    Identification of non-synonymous single nucleotide variations (nsSNVs) has exponentially increased due to advances in Next-Generation Sequencing technologies. The functional impacts of these variations have been difficult to ascertain because the corresponding knowledge about sequence functional sites is quite fragmented. It is clear that mapping of variations to sequence functional features can help us better understand the pathophysiological role of variations. In this study, we investigated the effect of nsSNVs on more than 17 common types of post-translational modification (PTM) sites, active sites and binding sites. Out of 1 705 285 distinct nsSNVs on 259 216 functional sites we identified 38 549 variations that significantly affect 10 major functional sites. Furthermore, we found distinct patterns of site disruptions due to germline and somatic nsSNVs. Pan-cancer analysis across 12 different cancer types led to the identification of 51 genes with 106 nsSNV affected functional sites found in 3 or more cancer types. 13 of the 51 genes overlap with previously identified Significantly Mutated Genes (Nature. 2013 Oct 17;502(7471)). 62 mutations in these 13 genes affecting functional sites such as DNA, ATP binding and various PTM sites occur across several cancers and can be prioritized for additional validation and investigations.

  11. On the detection of functionally coherent groups of protein domains with an extension to protein annotation

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, William A; Chen, Ken; Hou, Tingjun; Wang, Wei

    2007-01-01

    Background Protein domains coordinate to perform multifaceted cellular functions, and domain combinations serve as the functional building blocks of the cell. The available methods to identify functional domain combinations are limited in their scope, e.g. to the identification of combinations falling within individual proteins or within specific regions in a translated genome. Further effort is needed to identify groups of domains that span across two or more proteins and are linked by a cooperative function. Such functional domain combinations can be useful for protein annotation. Results Using a new computational method, we have identified 114 groups of domains, referred to as domain assembly units (DASSEM units), in the proteome of budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The units participate in many important cellular processes such as transcription regulation, translation initiation, and mRNA splicing. Within the units the domains were found to function in a cooperative manner; and each domain contributed to a different aspect of the unit's overall function. The member domains of DASSEM units were found to be significantly enriched among proteins contained in transcription modules, defined as genes sharing similar expression profiles and presumably similar functions. The observation further confirmed the functional coherence of DASSEM units. The functional linkages of units were found in both functionally characterized and uncharacterized proteins, which enabled the assessment of protein function based on domain composition. Conclusion A new computational method was developed to identify groups of domains that are linked by a common function in the proteome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These groups can either lie within individual proteins or span across different proteins. We propose that the functional linkages among the domains within the DASSEM units can be used as a non-homology based tool to annotate uncharacterized proteins. PMID:17937820

  12. Organized living: formation mechanisms and functions of plasma membrane domains in yeast.

    PubMed

    Ziółkowska, Natasza E; Christiano, Romain; Walther, Tobias C

    2012-03-01

    Plasma membrane proteins and lipids organize into lateral domains of specific composition. Domain formation is achieved by a combination of lipid-lipid and lipid-protein interactions, membrane-binding protein scaffolds and protein fences. The resulting domains function in membrane protein turnover and homeostasis, as well as in cell signaling. We review the mechanisms generating plasma membrane domains and the functional consequences of this organization, focusing on recent findings from research on the yeast model system.

  13. Functional Interchangeability of Late Domains, Late Domain Cofactors and Ubiquitin in Viral Budding

    PubMed Central

    Zhadina, Maria; Bieniasz, Paul D.

    2010-01-01

    The membrane scission event that separates nascent enveloped virions from host cell membranes often requires the ESCRT pathway, which can be engaged through the action of peptide motifs, termed late (L-) domains, in viral proteins. Viral PTAP and YPDL-like L-domains bind directly to the ESCRT-I and ALIX components of the ESCRT pathway, while PPxY motifs bind Nedd4-like, HECT-domain containing, ubiquitin ligases (e.g. WWP1). It has been unclear precisely how ubiquitin ligase recruitment ultimately leads to particle release. Here, using a lysine-free viral Gag protein derived from the prototypic foamy virus (PFV), where attachment of ubiquitin to Gag can be controlled, we show that several different HECT domains can replace the WWP1 HECT domain in chimeric ubiquitin ligases and drive budding. Moreover, artificial recruitment of isolated HECT domains to Gag is sufficient to stimulate budding. Conversely, the HECT domain becomes dispensable if the other domains of WWP1 are directly fused to an ESCRT-1 protein. In each case where budding is driven by a HECT domain, its catalytic activity is essential, but Gag ubiquitination is dispensable, suggesting that ubiquitin ligation to trans-acting proteins drives budding. Paradoxically, however, we also demonstrate that direct fusion of a ubiquitin moiety to the C-terminus of PFV Gag can also promote budding, suggesting that ubiquitination of Gag can substitute for ubiquitination of trans-acting proteins. Depletion of Tsg101 and ALIX inhibits budding that is dependent on ubiquitin that is fused to Gag, or ligated to trans-acting proteins through the action of a PPxY motif. These studies underscore the flexibility in the ways that the ESCRT pathway can be engaged, and suggest a model in which the identity of the protein to which ubiquitin is attached is not critical for subsequent recruitment of ubiquitin-binding components of the ESCRT pathway and viral budding to proceed. PMID:20975941

  14. Functional interchangeability of late domains, late domain cofactors and ubiquitin in viral budding.

    PubMed

    Zhadina, Maria; Bieniasz, Paul D

    2010-10-21

    The membrane scission event that separates nascent enveloped virions from host cell membranes often requires the ESCRT pathway, which can be engaged through the action of peptide motifs, termed late (L-) domains, in viral proteins. Viral PTAP and YPDL-like L-domains bind directly to the ESCRT-I and ALIX components of the ESCRT pathway, while PPxY motifs bind Nedd4-like, HECT-domain containing, ubiquitin ligases (e.g. WWP1). It has been unclear precisely how ubiquitin ligase recruitment ultimately leads to particle release. Here, using a lysine-free viral Gag protein derived from the prototypic foamy virus (PFV), where attachment of ubiquitin to Gag can be controlled, we show that several different HECT domains can replace the WWP1 HECT domain in chimeric ubiquitin ligases and drive budding. Moreover, artificial recruitment of isolated HECT domains to Gag is sufficient to stimulate budding. Conversely, the HECT domain becomes dispensable if the other domains of WWP1 are directly fused to an ESCRT-1 protein. In each case where budding is driven by a HECT domain, its catalytic activity is essential, but Gag ubiquitination is dispensable, suggesting that ubiquitin ligation to trans-acting proteins drives budding. Paradoxically, however, we also demonstrate that direct fusion of a ubiquitin moiety to the C-terminus of PFV Gag can also promote budding, suggesting that ubiquitination of Gag can substitute for ubiquitination of trans-acting proteins. Depletion of Tsg101 and ALIX inhibits budding that is dependent on ubiquitin that is fused to Gag, or ligated to trans-acting proteins through the action of a PPxY motif. These studies underscore the flexibility in the ways that the ESCRT pathway can be engaged, and suggest a model in which the identity of the protein to which ubiquitin is attached is not critical for subsequent recruitment of ubiquitin-binding components of the ESCRT pathway and viral budding to proceed.

  15. Single-cell analysis reveals functionally distinct classes within the planarian stem cell compartment

    PubMed Central

    van Wolfswinkel, Josien C.; Wagner, Daniel E.; Reddien, Peter W.

    2014-01-01

    Planarians are flatworms capable of regenerating any missing body region. This capacity is mediated by neoblasts, a proliferative cell population that contains pluripotent stem cells. Although population-based studies have revealed many neoblast characteristics, whether functionally distinct classes exist within this population is unclear. Here, we used high-dimensional single-cell transcriptional profiling from over a thousand individual neoblasts to directly compare gene expression fingerprints during homeostasis and regeneration. We identified two prominent neoblast classes that we named ζ (zeta) and σ (sigma). Zeta-neoblasts encompass specified cells that give rise to an abundant postmitotic lineage including epidermal cells, and are not required for regeneration. By contrast, sigma-neoblasts proliferate in response to injury, possess broad lineage capacity, and can give rise to zeta-neoblasts. These findings present a new view of planarian neoblasts, in which the population is comprised of two major and functionally distinct cellular compartments. PMID:25017721

  16. Single-cell analysis reveals functionally distinct classes within the planarian stem cell compartment.

    PubMed

    van Wolfswinkel, Josien C; Wagner, Daniel E; Reddien, Peter W

    2014-09-04

    Planarians are flatworms capable of regenerating any missing body region. This capacity is mediated by neoblasts, a proliferative cell population that contains pluripotent stem cells. Although population-based studies have revealed many neoblast characteristics, whether functionally distinct classes exist within this population is unclear. Here, we used high-dimensional single-cell transcriptional profiling from over a thousand individual neoblasts to directly compare gene expression fingerprints during homeostasis and regeneration. We identified two prominent neoblast classes that we named ζ (zeta) and σ (sigma). Zeta-neoblasts encompass specified cells that give rise to an abundant postmitotic lineage, including epidermal cells, and are not required for regeneration. By contrast, sigma-neoblasts proliferate in response to injury, possess broad lineage capacity, and can give rise to zeta-neoblasts. These findings indicate that planarian neoblasts comprise two major and functionally distinct cellular compartments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Tight Junction–associated MARVEL Proteins MarvelD3, Tricellulin, and Occludin Have Distinct but Overlapping Functions

    PubMed Central

    Raleigh, David R.; Marchiando, Amanda M.; Zhang, Yong; Shen, Le; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Wang, Yingmin; Long, Manyuan

    2010-01-01

    In vitro studies have demonstrated that occludin and tricellulin are important for tight junction barrier function, but in vivo data suggest that loss of these proteins can be overcome. The presence of a heretofore unknown, yet related, protein could explain these observations. Here, we report marvelD3, a novel tight junction protein that, like occludin and tricellulin, contains a conserved four-transmembrane MARVEL (MAL and related proteins for vesicle trafficking and membrane link) domain. Phylogenetic tree reconstruction; analysis of RNA and protein tissue distribution; immunofluorescent and electron microscopic examination of subcellular localization; characterization of intracellular trafficking, protein interactions, dynamic behavior, and siRNA knockdown effects; and description of remodeling after in vivo immune activation show that marvelD3, occludin, and tricellulin have distinct but overlapping functions at the tight junction. Although marvelD3 is able to partially compensate for occludin or tricellulin loss, it cannot fully restore function. We conclude that marvelD3, occludin, and tricellulin define the tight junction–associated MARVEL protein family. The data further suggest that these proteins are best considered as a group with both redundant and unique contributions to epithelial function and tight junction regulation. PMID:20164257

  18. Binding of the cSH3 Domain of Grb2 Adaptor to Two Distinct RXXK Motifs within Gab1 Docker Employs Differential Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Caleb B.; Seldeen, Kenneth L.; Deegan, Brian J.; Bhat, Vikas; Farooq, Amjad

    2010-01-01

    A ubiquitous component of cellular signaling machinery, Gab1 docker plays a pivotal role in routing extracellular information in the form of growth factors and cytokines to downstream targets such as transcription factors within the nucleus. Here, using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) in combination with macromolecular modeling (MM), we show that although Gab1 contains four distinct RXXK motifs, designated G1, G2, G3 and G4, only G1 and G2 motifs bind to the cSH3 domain of Grb2 adaptor and do so with distinct mechanisms. Thus, while the G1 motif strictly requires the PPRPPKP consensus sequence for high-affinity binding to the cSH3 domain, the G2 motif displays preference for the PXVXRXLKPXR consensus. Such sequential differences in the binding of G1 and G2 motifs arise from their ability to adopt distinct polyproline type II (PPII)- and 310-helical conformations upon binding to the cSH3 domain, respectively. Collectively, our study provides detailed biophysical insights into a key protein-protein interaction involved in a diverse array of signaling cascades central to health and disease. PMID:21472810

  19. Binding of the cSH3 domain of Grb2 adaptor to two distinct RXXK motifs within Gab1 docker employs differential mechanisms.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Caleb B; Seldeen, Kenneth L; Deegan, Brian J; Bhat, Vikas; Farooq, Amjad

    2011-01-01

    A ubiquitous component of cellular signaling machinery, Gab1 docker plays a pivotal role in routing extracellular information in the form of growth factors and cytokines to downstream targets such as transcription factors within the nucleus. Here, using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) in combination with macromolecular modeling (MM), we show that although Gab1 contains four distinct RXXK motifs, designated G1, G2, G3, and G4, only G1 and G2 motifs bind to the cSH3 domain of Grb2 adaptor and do so with distinct mechanisms. Thus, while the G1 motif strictly requires the PPRPPKP consensus sequence for high-affinity binding to the cSH3 domain, the G2 motif displays preference for the PXVXRXLKPXR consensus. Such sequential differences in the binding of G1 and G2 motifs arise from their ability to adopt distinct polyproline type II (PPII)- and 3(10) -helical conformations upon binding to the cSH3 domain, respectively. Collectively, our study provides detailed biophysical insights into a key protein-protein interaction involved in a diverse array of signaling cascades central to health and disease.

  20. Expression and Purification of Functional Ligand-binding Domains of T1R3 Taste Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Nie,Y.; Hobbs, J.; Vigues, S.; Olson, W.; Conn, G.; Munger, S.

    2006-01-01

    Chemosensory receptors, including odor, taste, and vomeronasal receptors, comprise the largest group of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in the mammalian genome. However, little is known about the molecular determinants that are critical for the detection and discrimination of ligands by most of these receptors. This dearth of understanding is due in part to difficulties in preparing functional receptors suitable for biochemical and biophysical analyses. Here we describe in detail two strategies for the expression and purification of the ligand-binding domain of T1R taste receptors, which are constituents of the sweet and umami taste receptors. These class C GPCRs contain a large extracellular N-terminal domain (NTD) that is the site of interaction with most ligands and that is amenable to expression as a separate polypeptide in heterologous cells. The NTD of mouse T1R3 was expressed as two distinct fusion proteins in Escherichia coli and purified by column chromatography. Spectroscopic analysis of the purified NTD proteins shows them to be properly folded and capable of binding ligands. This methodology should not only facilitate the characterization of T1R ligand interactions but may also be useful for dissecting the function of other class C GPCRs such as the large family of orphan V2R vomeronasal receptors.

  1. Distinct functions and regulation of epithelial progesterone receptor in the mouse cervix, vagina, and uterus

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Fabiola F.; Son, Jieun; Hewitt, Sylvia C.; Jang, Eunjung; Lydon, John P.; Korach, Kenneth S.; Chung, Sang-Hyuk

    2016-01-01

    While the function of progesterone receptor (PR) has been studied in the mouse vagina and uterus, its regulation and function in the cervix has not been described. We selectively deleted epithelial PR in the female reproductive tracts using the Cre/LoxP recombination system. We found that epithelial PR was required for induction of apoptosis and suppression of cell proliferation by progesterone (P4) in the cervical and vaginal epithelium. We also found that epithelial PR was dispensable for P4 to suppress apoptosis and proliferation in the uterine epithelium. PR is encoded by the Pgr gene, which is regulated by estrogen receptor α (ERα) in the female reproductive tracts. Using knock−in mouse models expressing ERα mutants, we determined that the DNA−binding domain (DBD) and AF2 domain of ERα were required for upregulation of Pgr in the cervix and vagina as well as the uterine stroma. The ERα AF1 domain was required for upregulation of Pgr in the vaginal stroma and epithelium and cervical epithelium, but not in the uterine and cervical stroma. ERα DBD, AF1, and AF2 were required for suppression of Pgr in the uterine epithelium, which was mediated by stromal ERα. Epithelial ERα was responsible for upregulation of epithelial Pgr in the cervix and vagina. Our results indicate that regulation and functions of epithelial PR are different in the cervix, vagina, and uterus. PMID:27007157

  2. Distinct functions and regulation of epithelial progesterone receptor in the mouse cervix, vagina, and uterus.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Fabiola F; Son, Jieun; Hewitt, Sylvia C; Jang, Eunjung; Lydon, John P; Korach, Kenneth S; Chung, Sang-Hyuk

    2016-04-05

    While the function of progesterone receptor (PR) has been studied in the mouse vagina and uterus, its regulation and function in the cervix has not been described. We selectively deleted epithelial PR in the female reproductive tracts using the Cre/LoxP recombination system. We found that epithelial PR was required for induction of apoptosis and suppression of cell proliferation by progesterone (P4) in the cervical and vaginal epithelium. We also found that epithelial PR was dispensable for P4 to suppress apoptosis and proliferation in the uterine epithelium. PR is encoded by the Pgr gene, which is regulated by estrogen receptor α (ERα) in the female reproductive tracts. Using knock-in mouse models expressing ERα mutants, we determined that the DNA-binding domain (DBD) and AF2 domain of ERα were required for upregulation of Pgr in the cervix and vagina as well as the uterine stroma. The ERα AF1 domain was required for upregulation of Pgr in the vaginal stroma and epithelium and cervical epithelium, but not in the uterine and cervical stroma. ERα DBD, AF1, and AF2 were required for suppression of Pgr in the uterine epithelium, which was mediated by stromal ERα. Epithelial ERα was responsible for upregulation of epithelial Pgr in the cervix and vagina. Our results indicate that regulation and functions of epithelial PR are different in the cervix, vagina, and uterus.

  3. Diverse functions of myosin VI elucidated by an isoform-specific α-helix domain

    PubMed Central

    Magistrati, Elisa; Molteni, Erika; Lupia, Michela; Soffientini, Paolo; Rottner, Klemens; Cavallaro, Ugo; Pozzoli, Uberto; Mapelli, Marina; Walters, Kylie J.; Polo, Simona

    2016-01-01

    Myosin VI functions in endocytosis and cell motility. Alternative splicing of myosin VI mRNA generates two distinct isoform types, myosin VIshort and myosin VIlong, which differ in the C-terminal region. Their physiological and pathological role remains unknown. Here we identified an isoform-specific regulatory helix, named α2-linker that defines specific conformations and hence determines the target selectivity of human myosin VI. The presence of the α2-linker structurally defines a novel clathrin-binding domain that is unique to myosin VIlong and masks the known RRL interaction motif. This finding is relevant to ovarian cancer, where alternative myosin VI splicing is aberrantly regulated, and exon skipping dictates cell addiction to myosin VIshort for tumor cell migration. The RRL interactor optineurin contributes to this process by selectively binding myosin VIshort. Thus the α2-linker acts like a molecular switch that assigns myosin VI to distinct endocytic (myosin VIlong) or migratory (myosin VIshort) functional roles. PMID:26950368

  4. The function of words: distinct neural correlates for words denoting differently manipulable objects.

    PubMed

    Rueschemeyer, Shirley-Ann; van Rooij, Daan; Lindemann, Oliver; Willems, Roel M; Bekkering, Harold

    2010-08-01

    Recent research indicates that language processing relies on brain areas dedicated to perception and action. For example, processing words denoting manipulable objects has been shown to activate a fronto-parietal network involved in actual tool use. This is suggested to reflect the knowledge the subject has about how objects are moved and used. However, information about how to use an object may be much more central to the conceptual representation of an object than information about how to move an object. Therefore, there may be much more fine-grained distinctions between objects on the neural level, especially related to the usability of manipulable objects. In the current study, we investigated whether a distinction can be made between words denoting (1) objects that can be picked up to move (e.g., volumetrically manipulable objects: bookend, clock) and (2) objects that must be picked up to use (e.g., functionally manipulable objects: cup, pen). The results show that functionally manipulable words elicit greater levels of activation in the fronto-parietal sensorimotor areas than volumetrically manipulable words. This suggests that indeed a distinction can be made between different types of manipulable objects. Specifically, how an object is used functionally rather than whether an object can be displaced with the hand is reflected in semantic representations in the brain.

  5. Distinct circuit-dependent functions of presynaptic neurexin-3 at GABAergic and glutamatergic synapses

    PubMed Central

    Aoto, Jason; Földy, Csaba; Ilcus, Silviana Maria Ciurea; Tabuchi, Katsuhiko; Südhof, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    α- and β-neurexins are presynaptic cell-adhesion molecules whose general importance for synaptic transmission is well documented. The specific functions of neurexins, however, remain largely unknown because no conditional neurexin knockouts are available, and because targeting all α- and β-neurexins produced by a particular gene is challenging. Using newly-generated constitutive and conditional knockout mice that target all neurexin-3α and -3β isoforms, we here show that neurexin-3 is differentially required for distinct synaptic functions in different brain regions. Specifically, we find that in cultured neurons and acute slices of the hippocampus, presynaptic neurexin-3 mediates trans-synaptic regulation of postsynaptic AMPA-receptors via its extracellular sequences. In cultured neurons and acute slices of the olfactory bulb, however, presynaptic neurexin-3 is selectively required for GABA release by a mechanism involving its intracellular sequences. Thus, our data demonstrate that neurexin-3 performs distinct essential pre- or postsynaptic functions in different brain regions by distinct mechanisms. PMID:26030848

  6. Time domain functional NIRS imaging for human brain mapping.

    PubMed

    Torricelli, Alessandro; Contini, Davide; Pifferi, Antonio; Caffini, Matteo; Re, Rebecca; Zucchelli, Lucia; Spinelli, Lorenzo

    2014-01-15

    This review is aimed at presenting the state-of-the-art of time domain (TD) functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). We first introduce the physical principles, the basics of modeling and data analysis. Basic instrumentation components (light sources, detection techniques, and delivery and collection systems) of a TD fNIRS system are described. A survey of past, existing and next generation TD fNIRS systems used for research and clinical studies is presented. Performance assessment of TD fNIRS systems and standardization issues are also discussed. Main strengths and weakness of TD fNIRS are highlighted, also in comparison with continuous wave (CW) fNIRS. Issues like quantification of the hemodynamic response, penetration depth, depth selectivity, spatial resolution and contrast-to-noise ratio are critically examined, with the help of experimental results performed on phantoms or in vivo. Finally we give an account on the technological developments that would pave the way for a broader use of TD fNIRS in the neuroimaging community.

  7. Structure and functional interactions of the Tsg101 UEV domain

    PubMed Central

    Pornillos, Owen; Alam, Steven L.; Rich, Rebecca L.; Myszka, David G.; Davis, Darrell R.; Sundquist, Wesley I.

    2002-01-01

    Human Tsg101 plays key roles in HIV budding and in cellular vacuolar protein sorting (VPS). In performing these functions, Tsg101 binds both ubiquitin (Ub) and the PTAP tetrapeptide ‘late domain’ motif located within the viral Gag protein. These interactions are mediated by the N-terminal domain of Tsg101, which belongs to the catalytically inactive ubiquitin E2 variant (UEV) family. We now report the struc ture of Tsg101 UEV and chemical shift mapping of the Ub and PTAP binding sites. Tsg101 UEV resembles canonical E2 ubiquitin conjugating enzymes, but has an additional N-terminal helix, an extended β-hairpin that links strands 1 and 2, and lacks the two C-terminal helices normally found in E2 enzymes. PTAP-containing peptides bind in a hydrophobic cleft exposed by the absence of the C-terminal helices, whereas ubiquitin binds in a novel site surrounding the β-hairpin. These studies provide a structural framework for understanding how Tsg101 mediates the protein–protein interactions required for HIV budding and VPS. PMID:12006492

  8. Clarifying the nature of the distinctiveness by domain interaction in conceptual structure: comment on Cree, McNorgan, and McRae (2006).

    PubMed

    Taylor, Kirsten I; Salamoura, Angeliki; Randall, Billi; Moss, Helen; Tyler, Lorraine K

    2008-05-01

    The conceptual structure account of semantic memory (CSA; L. K. Tyler & H. E. Moss, 2001) claims that feature correlation (the degree to which features co-occur) and feature distinctiveness (the number of concepts in which a feature occurs) interact with domains of knowledge (e.g., living vs. nonliving) such that the distinctive features of nonliving things are more highly correlated than the distinctive features of living things. Evidence for (B. Randall, H. E. Moss, J. M. Rodd, M. Greer, & L. K. Tyler, 2004) and against this claim (G. S. Cree, C. McNorgan, & K. McRae, 2006) has been reported. This comment outlines the CSA, discusses Cree et al.'s (2006) critiques of the Randall et al. (2004) experiments and the CSA, and reports new analyses of property norm and behavioral data, which replicate the results reported by Randall et al. (2004).

  9. Transiently populated intermediate functions as a branching point of the FF domain folding pathway.

    PubMed

    Korzhnev, Dmitry M; Religa, Tomasz L; Kay, Lewis E

    2012-10-30

    Studies of protein folding and the intermediates that are formed along the folding pathway provide valuable insights into the process by which an unfolded ensemble forms a functional native conformation. However, because intermediates on folding pathways can serve as initiation points of aggregation (implicated in a number of diseases), their characterization assumes an even greater importance. Establishing the role of such intermediates in folding, misfolding, and aggregation remains a major challenge due to their often low populations and short lifetimes. We recently used NMR relaxation dispersion methods and computational techniques to determine an atomic resolution structure of the folding intermediate of a small protein module--the FF domain--with an equilibrium population of 2-3% and a millisecond lifetime, 25 °C. Based on this structure a variant FF domain has been designed in which the native state is selectively destabilized by removing the carboxyl-terminal helix in the native structure to produce a highly populated structural mimic of the intermediate state. Here, we show via solution NMR studies of the designed mimic that the mimic forms distinct conformers corresponding to monomeric and dimeric (K(d) = 0.2 mM) forms of the protein. The conformers exchange on the seconds timescale with a monomer association rate of 1.1 · 10(4) M(-1) s(-1) and with a region responsible for dimerization localized to the amino-terminal residues of the FF domain. This study establishes the FF domain intermediate as a central player in both folding and misfolding pathways and illustrates how incomplete folding can lead to the formation of higher-order structures.

  10. A functional protein pore with a "retro" transmembrane domain.

    PubMed Central

    Cheley, S.; Braha, O.; Lu, X.; Conlan, S.; Bayley, H.

    1999-01-01

    Extended retro (reversed) peptide sequences have not previously been accommodated within functional proteins. Here, we show that the entire transmembrane portion of the beta-barrel of the pore-forming protein alpha-hemolysin can be formed by retrosequences comprising a total of 175 amino acid residues, 25 contributed by the central sequence of each subunit of the heptameric pore. The properties of wild-type and retro heptamers in planar bilayers are similar. The single-channel conductance of the retro pore is 15% less than that of the wild-type heptamer and its current-voltage relationship denotes close to ohmic behavior, while the wild-type pore is weakly rectifying. Both wild-type and retro pores are very weakly anion selective. These results and the examination of molecular models suggest that beta-barrels may be especially accepting of retro sequences compared to other protein folds. Indeed, the ability to form a retro domain could be diagnostic of a beta-barrel, explaining, for example, the activity of the retro forms of many membrane-permeabilizing peptides. By contrast with the wild-type subunits, monomeric retro subunits undergo premature assembly in the absence of membranes, most likely because the altered central sequence fails to interact with the remainder of the subunit, thereby initiating assembly. Despite this difficulty, a technique was devised for obtaining heteromeric pores containing both wild-type and retro subunits. Most probably as a consequence of unfavorable interstrand side-chain interactions, the heteromeric pores are less stable than either the wild-type or retro homoheptamers, as judged by the presence of subconductance states in single-channel recordings. Knowledge about the extraordinary plasticity of the transmembrane beta-barrel of alpha-hemolysin will be very useful in the de novo design of functional membrane proteins based on the beta-barrel motif. PMID:10386875

  11. LRIG1 extracellular domain: structure and function analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yibin; Soo, Priscilla; Walker, Francesca; Zhang, Hui Hua; Redpath, Nicholas; Tan, Chin Wee; Nicola, Nicos A; Adams, Timothy E; Garrett, Thomas P; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Burgess, Antony W

    2015-05-22

    We have expressed and purified three soluble fragments of the human LRIG1-ECD (extracellular domain): the LRIG1-LRR (leucine-rich repeat) domain, the LRIG1-3Ig (immunoglobulin-like) domain, and the LRIG1-LRR-1Ig fragment using baculovirus vectors in insect cells. The two LRIG1 domains crystallised so that we have been able to determine the three-dimensional structures at 2.3Å resolution. We developed a three-dimensional structure for the LRIG1-ECD using homology modelling based on the LINGO-1 structure. The LRIG1-LRR domain and the LRIG1-LRR-1Ig fragment are monomers in solution, whereas the LRIG1-3Ig domain appears to be dimeric. We could not detect any binding of the LRIG1 domains or the LRIG1-LRR-1Ig fragment to the EGF receptor (EGFR), either in solution using biosensor analysis or when the EGFR was expressed on the cell surface. The FLAG-tagged LRIG1-LRR-1Ig fragment binds weakly to colon cancer cells regardless of the presence of EGFRs. Similarly, neither the soluble LRIG1-LRR nor the LRIG1-3Ig domains nor the full-length LRIG1 co-expressed in HEK293 cells inhibited ligand-stimulated activation of cell-surface EGFR.

  12. Multiple functional self-association interfaces in plant TIR domains

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Bernoux, Maud; Bentham, Adam R.; Newman, Toby E.; Ve, Thomas; Casey, Lachlan W.; Hu, Jian; Croll, Tristan I.; Schreiber, Karl J.; Staskawicz, Brian J.; Anderson, Peter A.; Sohn, Kee Hoon; Williams, Simon J.; Dodds, Peter N.

    2017-01-01

    The self-association of Toll/interleukin-1 receptor/resistance protein (TIR) domains has been implicated in signaling in plant and animal immunity receptors. Structure-based studies identified different TIR-domain dimerization interfaces required for signaling of the plant nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors (NLRs) L6 from flax and disease resistance protein RPS4 from Arabidopsis. Here we show that the crystal structure of the TIR domain from the Arabidopsis NLR suppressor of npr1-1, constitutive 1 (SNC1) contains both an L6-like interface involving helices αD and αE (DE interface) and an RPS4-like interface involving helices αA and αE (AE interface). Mutations in either the AE- or DE-interface region disrupt cell-death signaling activity of SNC1, L6, and RPS4 TIR domains and full-length L6 and RPS4. Self-association of L6 and RPS4 TIR domains is affected by mutations in either region, whereas only AE-interface mutations affect SNC1 TIR-domain self-association. We further show two similar interfaces in the crystal structure of the TIR domain from the Arabidopsis NLR recognition of Peronospora parasitica 1 (RPP1). These data demonstrate that both the AE and DE self-association interfaces are simultaneously required for self-association and cell-death signaling in diverse plant NLRs. PMID:28159890

  13. Multiple functional self-association interfaces in plant TIR domains.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoxiao; Bernoux, Maud; Bentham, Adam R; Newman, Toby E; Ve, Thomas; Casey, Lachlan W; Raaymakers, Tom M; Hu, Jian; Croll, Tristan I; Schreiber, Karl J; Staskawicz, Brian J; Anderson, Peter A; Sohn, Kee Hoon; Williams, Simon J; Dodds, Peter N; Kobe, Bostjan

    2017-03-07

    The self-association of Toll/interleukin-1 receptor/resistance protein (TIR) domains has been implicated in signaling in plant and animal immunity receptors. Structure-based studies identified different TIR-domain dimerization interfaces required for signaling of the plant nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors (NLRs) L6 from flax and disease resistance protein RPS4 from Arabidopsis Here we show that the crystal structure of the TIR domain from the Arabidopsis NLR suppressor of npr1-1, constitutive 1 (SNC1) contains both an L6-like interface involving helices αD and αE (DE interface) and an RPS4-like interface involving helices αA and αE (AE interface). Mutations in either the AE- or DE-interface region disrupt cell-death signaling activity of SNC1, L6, and RPS4 TIR domains and full-length L6 and RPS4. Self-association of L6 and RPS4 TIR domains is affected by mutations in either region, whereas only AE-interface mutations affect SNC1 TIR-domain self-association. We further show two similar interfaces in the crystal structure of the TIR domain from the Arabidopsis NLR recognition of Peronospora parasitica 1 (RPP1). These data demonstrate that both the AE and DE self-association interfaces are simultaneously required for self-association and cell-death signaling in diverse plant NLRs.

  14. How a single residue in individual β-thymosin/WH2 domains controls their functions in actin assembly

    PubMed Central

    Didry, Dominique; Cantrelle, Francois-Xavier; Husson, Clotilde; Roblin, Pierre; Moorthy, Anna M Eswara; Perez, Javier; Le Clainche, Christophe; Hertzog, Maud; Guittet, Eric; Carlier, Marie-France; van Heijenoort, Carine; Renault, Louis

    2012-01-01

    β-Thymosin (βT) and WH2 domains are widespread, intrinsically disordered actin-binding peptides that display significant sequence variability and different regulations of actin self-assembly in motile and morphogenetic processes. Here, we reveal the structural mechanisms by which, in their 1:1 stoichiometric complexes with actin, they either inhibit assembly by sequestering actin monomers like Thymosin-β4, or enhance motility by directing polarized filament assembly like Ciboulot βT. We combined mutational, functional or structural analysis by X-ray crystallography, SAXS (small angle X-ray scattering) and NMR on Thymosin-β4, Ciboulot, TetraThymosinβ and the long WH2 domain of WASP-interacting protein. The latter sequesters G-actin with the same molecular mechanisms as Thymosin-β4. Functionally different βT/WH2 domains differ by distinct dynamics of their C-terminal half interactions with G-actin pointed face. These C-terminal interaction dynamics are controlled by the strength of electrostatic interactions with G-actin. At physiological ionic strength, a single salt bridge with actin located next to their central LKKT/V motif induces G-actin sequestration in both isolated long βT and WH2 domains. The results open perspectives for elucidating the functions of βT/WH2 domains in other modular proteins. PMID:22193718

  15. Lack of Energy: An Important and Distinct Component of HIV-Related Fatigue and Daytime Function

    PubMed Central

    Aouizerat, Bradley E.; Gay, Caryl L.; Lerdal, Anners; Portillo, Carmen J.; Lee, Kathryn A.

    2012-01-01

    Context Fatigue is a prevalent symptom among adults living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). There is increasing evidence that fatigue and energy are related, yet distinct constructs. Although HIV-related fatigue has been well studied, little is known about perceived energy and how it relates to fatigue, individual characteristics, and other symptoms. Objectives To describe the experience of perceived energy in adults with HIV and evaluate its relationship to demographic and clinical characteristics as well as symptoms of fatigue, sleep disturbance, anxiety, depression, and daytime function. Methods The design was descriptive, comparative, and correlational. The sample of 318 adults with HIV completed a demographic questionnaire, the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale, and measures of fatigue, sleep disturbance, anxiety, depressive symptoms, and daytime function. Medical records were reviewed for disease and treatment data. Participants who reported a lack of energy were compared with those who did not on demographic, clinical, and symptom variables. Regression models of perceived energy and its interference with daytime function also were evaluated. Results Perceived lack of energy was highly prevalent (65%) and more strongly related to interference with daytime function than more general measures of fatigue severity, even when controlling for other characteristics and symptoms. Like other aspects of fatigue, lack of energy was associated with sleep disturbance, anxiety, and depressive symptoms. Lack of energy was more strongly related to morning fatigue than to evening fatigue. Conclusion Lack of energy interferes with daytime function and is not just the inverse of fatigue but a distinct perception that differs from fatigue. PMID:22917712

  16. Functional dissection of TFIIB domains required for TFIIB-TFIID-promoter complex formation and basal transcription activity.

    PubMed

    Hisatake, K; Roeder, R G; Horikoshi, M

    1993-06-24

    The protein TFIIB is a general transcription initiation factor that interacts with a promoter complex (D.DNA) containing the TATA-binding subunit (TFIID tau, or TBP) of TFIID to facilitate subsequent interaction with RNA polymerase II (ref. 2) through the associated TFIIF (ref. 3). The potential bridging function of TFIIB raises the possibility of two structural domains and emphasizes the importance of TFIIB structure-function studies for a further understanding of preinitiation complex assembly and function. Here we show that human TFIIB (refs 5,6) is comprised of functionally distinct N- and C-terminal domains. The C-terminal domain, containing the direct repeats and associated basic regions, is necessary and sufficient for interaction with the D.DNA complex. By contrast, the N-terminal domain that is dispensable for formation of the TFIID tau-TFIIB-promoter (D.B.DNA) complex is required for subsequent events leading to basal transcription initiation. On the basis of these results, we discuss structural and functional similarities between TFIIB and TFIID tau, which have similar structural organization and motifs.

  17. Three-dimensional reconstructions of the bacteriophage CUS-3 virion reveal a conserved coat protein I-domain but a distinct tailspike receptor-binding domain

    SciTech Connect

    Parent, Kristin N.; Tang, Jinghua; Cardone, Giovanni; Gilcrease, Eddie B.; Janssen, Mandy E.; Olson, Norman H.; Casjens, Sherwood R.; Baker, Timothy S.

    2014-09-15

    CUS-3 is a short-tailed, dsDNA bacteriophage that infects serotype K1 Escherichia coli. We report icosahedrally averaged and asymmetric, three-dimensional, cryo-electron microscopic reconstructions of the CUS-3 virion. Its coat protein structure adopts the “HK97-fold” shared by other tailed phages and is quite similar to that in phages P22 and Sf6 despite only weak amino acid sequence similarity. In addition, these coat proteins share a unique extra external domain (“I-domain”), suggesting that the group of P22-like phages has evolved over a very long time period without acquiring a new coat protein gene from another phage group. On the other hand, the morphology of the CUS-3 tailspike differs significantly from that of P22 or Sf6, but is similar to the tailspike of phage K1F, a member of the extremely distantly related T7 group of phages. We conclude that CUS-3 obtained its tailspike gene from a distantly related phage quite recently. - Highlights: • Asymmetric and symmetric three-dimensional reconstructions of phage CUS-3 are presented. • CUS-3 major capsid protein has a conserved I-domain, which is found in all three categories of “P22-like phage”. • CUS-3 has very different tailspike receptor binding domain from those of P22 and Sf6. • The CUS-3 tailspike likely was acquired by horizontal gene transfer.

  18. The membrane localization domains of two distinct bacterial toxins form a 4-helix-bundle in solution.

    PubMed

    Hisao, Grant S; Brothers, Michael C; Ho, Mengfei; Wilson, Brenda A; Rienstra, Chad M

    2017-03-01

    Membrane localization domain (MLD) was first proposed for a 4-helix-bundle motif in the crystal structure of the C1 domain of Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT). This structure motif is also found in the crystal structures of several clostridial glycosylating toxins (TcdA, TcdB, TcsL, and TcnA). The Ras/Rap1-specific endopeptidase (RRSP) module of the multifunctional autoprocessing repeats-in-toxins (MARTX) toxin produced by Vibrio vulnificus has sequence homology to the C1-C2 domains of PMT, including a putative MLD. We have determined the solution structure for the MLDs in PMT and in RRSP using solution state NMR. We conclude that the MLDs in these two toxins assume a 4-helix-bundle structure in solution. © 2016 The Protein Society.

  19. Systematic Mapping of WNT-FZD Protein Interactions Reveals Functional Selectivity by Distinct WNT-FZD Pairs*

    PubMed Central

    Dijksterhuis, Jacomijn P.; Baljinnyam, Bolormaa; Stanger, Karen; Sercan, Hakki O.; Ji, Yun; Andres, Osler; Rubin, Jeffrey S.; Hannoush, Rami N.; Schulte, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    The seven-transmembrane-spanning receptors of the FZD1–10 class are bound and activated by the WNT family of lipoglycoproteins, thereby inducing a complex network of signaling pathways. However, the specificity of the interaction between mammalian WNT and FZD proteins and the subsequent signaling cascade downstream of the different WNT-FZD pairs have not been systematically addressed to date. In this study, we determined the binding affinities of various WNTs for different members of the FZD family by using bio-layer interferometry and characterized their functional selectivity in a cell system. Using purified WNTs, we show that different FZD cysteine-rich domains prefer to bind to distinct WNTs with fast on-rates and slow off-rates. In a 32D cell-based system engineered to overexpress FZD2, FZD4, or FZD5, we found that WNT-3A (but not WNT-4, -5A, or -9B) activated the WNT-β-catenin pathway through FZD2/4/5 as measured by phosphorylation of LRP6 and β-catenin stabilization. Surprisingly, different WNT-FZD pairs showed differential effects on phosphorylation of DVL2 and DVL3, revealing a previously unappreciated DVL isoform selectivity by different WNT-FZD pairs in 32D cells. In summary, we present extensive mapping of WNT-FZD cysteine-rich domain interactions complemented by analysis of WNT-FZD pair functionality in a unique cell system expressing individual FZD isoforms. Differential WNT-FZD binding and selective functional readouts suggest that endogenous WNT ligands evolved with an intrinsic natural bias toward different downstream signaling pathways, a phenomenon that could be of great importance in the design of FZD-targeting drugs. PMID:25605717

  20. Processing of different types of social threat in shyness: Preliminary findings of distinct functional neural connectivity.

    PubMed

    Tang, Alva; Beaton, Elliott A; Tatham, Erica; Schulkin, Jay; Hall, Geoffrey B; Schmidt, Louis A

    2016-01-01

    Current theory suggests that the processing of different types of threat is supported by distinct neural networks. Here we tested whether there are distinct neural correlates associated with different types of threat processing in shyness. Using fMRI and multivariate techniques, we compared neural responses and functional connectivity during the processing of imminent (i.e., congruent angry/angry face pairs) and ambiguous (i.e., incongruent angry/neutral face pairs) social threat in young adults selected for high and low shyness. To both types of threat processing, non-shy adults recruited a right medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) network encompassing nodes of the default mode network involved in automatic emotion regulation, whereas shy adults recruited a right dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) network encompassing nodes of the frontoparietal network that instantiate active attentional and cognitive control. Furthermore, in shy adults, the mPFC interacted with the dACC network for ambiguous threat, but with a distinct network encompassing nodes of the salience network for imminent threat. These preliminary results expand our understanding of right mPFC function associated with temperamental shyness. They also provide initial evidence for differential neural networks associated with shy and non-shy profiles in the context of different types of social threat processing.

  1. Phospholamban and Sarcolipin: Are they functionally redundant or distinct regulators of the Sarco(Endo)plasmic Reticulum Calcium ATPase?

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Sana A.; Sahoo, Sanjaya K.; Periasamy, Muthu

    2016-01-01

    In muscle, the Sarco(Endo)plasmic Reticulum Calcium ATPase (SERCA) activity is regulated by two distinct proteins, PLB and SLN, which are highly conserved throughout vertebrate evolution. PLB is predominantly expressed in the cardiac muscle, while SLN is abundant in skeletal muscle. SLN is also found in the cardiac atria and to a lesser extent in the ventricle. PLB regulation of SERCA is central to cardiac function, both at rest and during extreme physiological demand. Compared to PLB, the physiological relevance of SLN remained a mystery until recently and some even thought it was redundant in function. Studies on SLN suggest that it is an uncoupler of the SERCA pump activity and can increase ATP hydrolysis resulting in heat production. Using genetically engineered mouse models for SLN and PLB, we showed that SLN, not PLB, is required for muscle-based thermogenesis. However, the mechanism of how SLN binding to SERCA results in uncoupling SERCA Ca2+ transport from its ATPase activity remains unclear. In this review, we discuss recent advances in understanding how PLB and SLN differ in their interaction with SERCA. We will also explore whether structural differences in the cytosolic domain of PLB and SLN are the basis for their unique function and physiological roles in cardiac and skeletal muscle. PMID:26743715

  2. Distinct features of lamin A-interacting chromatin domains mapped by ChIP-sequencing from sonicated or micrococcal nuclease-digested chromatin.

    PubMed

    Lund, Eivind G; Duband-Goulet, Isabelle; Oldenburg, Anja; Buendia, Brigitte; Collas, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear lamina has been shown to interact with the genome through lamina-associated domains (LADs). LADs have been identified by DamID, a proximity labeling assay, and more recently by chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing (ChIP-seq) of A- and B-type lamins. LADs form megabase-size domains at the nuclear periphery, they are gene-poor and mostly heterochromatic. Here, we show that the mode of chromatin fragmentation for ChIP, namely bath sonication or digestion with micrococcal nuclease (MNase), leads to the discovery of common but also distinct sets of lamin-interacting domains, or LiDs. Using ChIP-seq, we show the existence of lamin A/C (LMNA) LiDs with distinct gene contents, histone composition enrichment and relationships to lamin B1-interacting domains. The extent of genome coverage of lamin A/C (LMNA) LiDs in sonicated or MNase-digested chromatin is similar (∼730 megabases); however over half of these domains are uniquely detected in sonicated or MNase-digested chromatin. Sonication-specific LMNA LiDs are gene-poor and devoid of a broad panel of histone modifications, while MNase-specific LMNA LiDs are of higher gene density and are enriched in H3K9me3, H3K27me3 and in histone variant H2A.Z. LMNB1 LiDs are gene-poor and show no or little enrichment in these marks. Comparison of published LMNB1 DamID LADs with LMNB1 and LMNA LiDs identified here by ChIP-seq further shows that LMNA can associate with 'open' chromatin domains displaying euchromatin characteristics, and which are not associated with LMNB1. The differential genomic and epigenetic properties of lamin-interacting domains reflect the existence of distinct LiD populations identifiable in different chromatin contexts, including nuclease-accessible regions presumably localized in the nuclear interior.

  3. Distinct features of lamin A-interacting chromatin domains mapped by ChIP-sequencing from sonicated or micrococcal nuclease-digested chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Lund, Eivind G; Duband-Goulet, Isabelle; Oldenburg, Anja; Buendia, Brigitte; Collas, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    The nuclear lamina has been shown to interact with the genome through lamina-associated domains (LADs). LADs have been identified by DamID, a proximity labeling assay, and more recently by chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing (ChIP-seq) of A- and B-type lamins. LADs form megabase-size domains at the nuclear periphery, they are gene-poor and mostly heterochromatic. Here, we show that the mode of chromatin fragmentation for ChIP, namely bath sonication or digestion with micrococcal nuclease (MNase), leads to the discovery of common but also distinct sets of lamin-interacting domains, or LiDs. Using ChIP-seq, we show the existence of lamin A/C (LMNA) LiDs with distinct gene contents, histone composition enrichment and relationships to lamin B1-interacting domains. The extent of genome coverage of lamin A/C (LMNA) LiDs in sonicated or MNase-digested chromatin is similar (∼730 megabases); however over half of these domains are uniquely detected in sonicated or MNase-digested chromatin. Sonication-specific LMNA LiDs are gene-poor and devoid of a broad panel of histone modifications, while MNase-specific LMNA LiDs are of higher gene density and are enriched in H3K9me3, H3K27me3 and in histone variant H2A.Z. LMNB1 LiDs are gene-poor and show no or little enrichment in these marks. Comparison of published LMNB1 DamID LADs with LMNB1 and LMNA LiDs identified here by ChIP-seq further shows that LMNA can associate with ‘open’ chromatin domains displaying euchromatin characteristics, and which are not associated with LMNB1. The differential genomic and epigenetic properties of lamin-interacting domains reflect the existence of distinct LiD populations identifiable in different chromatin contexts, including nuclease-accessible regions presumably localized in the nuclear interior. PMID:25602132

  4. Carboxyl-terminal Domain of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 1 Contains Distinct Segments Differentially Involved in Capsaicin- and Heat-induced Desensitization*

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, John; Wang, Sen; Lee, Jongseok; Ro, Jin Y.; Chung, Man-Kyo

    2013-01-01

    Multiple Ca2+-dependent processes are involved in capsaicin-induced desensitization of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), but desensitization of TRPV1 by heat occurs even in the absence of extracellular Ca2+, although the mechanisms are unknown. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that capsaicin and heat desensitize TRPV1 through distinct mechanisms involving distinct structural segments of TRPV1. In HEK293 cells that heterologously express TRPV1, we found that heat-induced desensitization was not affected by the inclusion of intracellular ATP or alanine mutation of Lys155, both of which attenuate capsaicin-induced desensitization, suggesting that heat-induced desensitization occurs through mechanisms distinct from capsaicin-induced desensitization. To determine protein domains involved in heat-induced desensitization, we generated chimeric proteins between TRPV1 and TRPV3, a heat-gated channel lacking heat-induced desensitization. We found that TRPV1 with the carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD) of TRPV3 retained heat activation but was impaired in heat-induced desensitization. Further experiments using chimeric or deletion mutants within TRPV1 CTD indicated that the distal half of CTD regulates the activation and desensitization of TRPV1 in modality-specific manners. Within the distal CTD, we identified two segments that distinctly regulated capsaicin- and heat-induced desensitization. The results suggest that the activation and desensitization of TRPV1 by capsaicin and heat can be modulated differentially and disproportionally through different regions of TRPV1 CTD. Identifying the domains involved in thermal regulation of TRPV1 may facilitate the development of novel anti-hyperalgesic approaches aimed at attenuating activation and enhancing desensitization of TRPV1 by thermal stimuli. PMID:24174527

  5. The Structure of Treponema pallidum Tp0624 Reveals a Modular Assembly of Divergently Functionalized and Previously Uncharacterized Domains

    PubMed Central

    Wetherell, Charmaine; Cameron, Caroline E.

    2016-01-01

    Treponema pallidum subspecies pallidum is the causative agent of syphilis, a chronic, multistage, systemic infection that remains a major global health concern. The molecular mechanisms underlying T. pallidum pathogenesis are incompletely understood, partially due to the phylogenetic divergence of T. pallidum. One aspect of T. pallidum that differentiates it from conventional Gram-negative bacteria, and is believed to play an important role in pathogenesis, is its unusual cell envelope ultrastructure; in particular, the T. pallidum peptidoglycan layer is chemically distinct, thinner and more distal to the outer membrane. Established functional roles for peptidoglycan include contributing to the structural integrity of the cell envelope and stabilization of the flagellar motor complex, which are typically mediated by the OmpA domain-containing family of proteins. To gain insight into the molecular mechanisms that govern peptidoglycan binding and cell envelope biogenesis in T. pallidum we report here the structural characterization of the putative OmpA-like domain-containing protein, Tp0624. Analysis of the 1.70 Å resolution Tp0624 crystal structure reveals a multi-modular architecture comprised of three distinct domains including a C-terminal divergent OmpA-like domain, which we show is unable to bind the conventional peptidoglycan component diaminopimelic acid, and a previously uncharacterized tandem domain unit. Intriguingly, bioinformatic analysis indicates that the three domains together are found in all orthologs from pathogenic treponemes, but are not observed together in genera outside Treponema. These findings provide the first structural insight into a multi-modular treponemal protein containing an OmpA-like domain and its potential role in peptidoglycan coordination and stabilization of the T. pallidum cell envelope. PMID:27832149

  6. Functionally Distinct Tendons From Elastin Haploinsufficient Mice Exhibit Mild Stiffening and Tendon-Specific Structural Alteration.

    PubMed

    Eekhoff, Jeremy D; Fang, Fei; Kahan, Lindsey G; Espinosa, Gabriela; Cocciolone, Austin J; Wagenseil, Jessica E; Mecham, Robert P; Lake, Spencer P

    2017-11-01

    Elastic fibers are present in low quantities in tendon, where they are located both within fascicles near tenocytes and more broadly in the interfascicular matrix (IFM). While elastic fibers have long been known to be significant in the mechanics of elastin-rich tissue (i.e., vasculature, skin, lungs), recent studies have suggested a mechanical role for elastic fibers in tendons that is dependent on specific tendon function. However, the exact contribution of elastin to properties of different types of tendons (e.g., positional, energy-storing) remains unknown. Therefore, this study purposed to evaluate the role of elastin in the mechanical properties and collagen alignment of functionally distinct supraspinatus tendons (SSTs) and Achilles tendons (ATs) from elastin haploinsufficient (HET) and wild type (WT) mice. Despite the significant decrease in elastin in HET tendons, a slight increase in linear stiffness of both tendons was the only significant mechanical effect of elastin haploinsufficiency. Additionally, there were significant changes in collagen nanostructure and subtle alteration to collagen alignment in the AT but not the SST. Hence, elastin may play only a minor role in tendon mechanical properties. Alternatively, larger changes to tendon mechanics may have been mitigated by developmental compensation of HET tendons and/or the role of elastic fibers may be less prominent in smaller mouse tendons compared to the larger bovine and human tendons evaluated in previous studies. Further research will be necessary to fully elucidate the influence of various elastic fiber components on structure-function relationships in functionally distinct tendons.

  7. Simple Separation of Functionally Distinct Populations of Lamin-Binding Proteins.

    PubMed

    Berk, Jason M; Wilson, Katherine L

    2016-01-01

    The inner membrane of the nuclear envelope (NE) is home to hundreds of integral membrane proteins (NE transmembrane proteins, "NETs") with conserved or tissue-specific roles in genome organization and nuclear function. Nearly all characterized NETs bind A- or B-type lamins directly. However, hundreds of NETs remain uncharacterized, collectively posing an enormous gap that must be bridged to understand nuclear function and genome biology. We provide technically simple protocols for the separation and recovery of functionally distinct populations of NETs and A-type lamins. This protocol was developed for emerin, an inner nuclear membrane protein that binds lamins and barrier-to-autointegration factor (BANF1) as a component of nuclear lamina structure, and has diverse roles in nuclear assembly, signaling, and gene regulation. This protocol separates easily solubilized ("easy") populations of nuclear lamina proteins (emerin, lamin A, BAF) from "sonication-dependent" populations. Depending on cell type, the "easy" and "sonication-dependent" fractions each contain up to about half the available emerin, A-type lamins, and BAF, whereas B-type lamins and histone H3 are predominantly sonication dependent. The two populations of emerin have distinct posttranslational modifications, and only one population associates with BAF. This method may be useful for functional screening or analysis of other lamin-associated proteins, including novel NETs emerging from proteomic studies.

  8. Feeding characteristics reveal functional distinctions among browsing herbivorous fishes on coral reefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streit, Robert P.; Hoey, Andrew S.; Bellwood, David R.

    2015-12-01

    The removal of macroalgal biomass by fishes is a key process on coral reefs. Numerous studies have identified the fish species responsible for removing mature macroalgae, and have identified how this varies spatially, temporally, and among different algal types. None, however, have considered the behavioural and morphological traits of the browsing fishes and how this may influence the removal of macroalgal material. Using video observations of fish feeding on the brown macroalga Sargassum polycystum, we quantified the feeding behaviour and morphology of the four dominant browsing species on the Great Barrier Reef ( Kyphosus vaigiensis, Naso unicornis, Siganus canaliculatus, and Siganus doliatus). The greatest distinction between species was the algal material they targeted. K. vaigiensis and N. unicornis bit on the entire macroalgal thallus in approximately 90 % of bites. In contrast, Si. canaliculatus and Si. doliatus avoided biting the stalks, with 80-98 % of bites being on the macroalgal leaves only. This distinctive grouping into `entire thallus-biters' versus `leaf-biters' was not supported by size-standardized measures of biting morphology. Rather, species-specific adult body sizes, tooth shape, and feeding behaviour appear to underpin this functional distinction, with adults of the two larger fish species ( N. unicornis and K. vaigiensis) eating the entire macroalgal thallus, while the two smaller species ( Si. canaliculatus and Si. doliatus) bite only leaves. These findings caution against assumed homogeneity within this, and potentially other, functional groups on coral reefs. As functional redundancy within the macroalgal browsers is limited, the smaller `leaf-biting' species are unlikely to be able to compensate functionally for the loss of larger `entire thallus-biting' species.

  9. Genomic and functional characterization of the diverse immunoglobulin domain-containing protein (DICP) family

    PubMed Central

    Haire, Robert N.; Cannon, John P.; O’Driscoll, Marci L.; Ostrov, David A.; Mueller, M. Gail; Turner, Poem M.; Litman, Ronda T.; Litman, Gary W.; Yoder, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    A heretofore-unrecognized multigene family encoding diverse immunoglobulin (Ig) domain-containing proteins (DICPs) was identified in the zebrafish genome. Twenty-nine distinct loci mapping to three chromosomal regions encode receptor-type structures possessing two classes of Ig ectodomains (D1 and D2). The sequence and number of Ig domains, transmembrane regions and signaling motifs varies between DICPs. Interindividual polymorphism and alternative RNA processing contribute to DICP diversity. Molecular models indicate that most D1 domains are of the variable (V) type; D2 domains are Ig-like. Sequence differences between D1 domains are concentrated in hypervariable regions on the front sheet strands of the Ig fold. Recombinant DICP Ig domains bind lipids, a property shared by mammalian CD300 and TREM family members. These findings suggest that novel multigene families encoding diversified immune receptors have arisen in different vertebrate lineages and effect parallel patterns of ligand recognition that potentially impact species-specific advantages. PMID:22386706

  10. Single-stranded DNA-binding proteins: multiple domains for multiple functions.

    PubMed

    Dickey, Thayne H; Altschuler, Sarah E; Wuttke, Deborah S

    2013-07-02

    The recognition of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) is integral to myriad cellular functions. In eukaryotes, ssDNA is present stably at the ends of chromosomes and at some promoter elements. Furthermore, it is formed transiently by several cellular processes including telomere synthesis, transcription, and DNA replication, recombination, and repair. To coordinate these diverse activities, a variety of proteins have evolved to bind ssDNA in a manner specific to their function. Here, we review the recognition of ssDNA through the analysis of high-resolution structures of proteins in complex with ssDNA. This functionally diverse set of proteins arises from a limited set of structural motifs that can be modified and arranged to achieve distinct activities, including a range of ligand specificities. We also investigate the ways in which these domains interact in the context of large multidomain proteins/complexes. These comparisons reveal the structural features that define the range of functions exhibited by these proteins.

  11. Definition of a "functional R domain" of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator.

    PubMed

    Chen, J M; Scotet, V; Ferec, C

    2000-01-01

    The R domain of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) was originally defined as 241 amino acids, encoded by exon 13. Such exon/intron boundaries provide a convenient way to define the R domain, but do not necessarily reflect the corresponding functional domain within CFTR. A two-domain model was later proposed based on a comparison of the R-domain sequences from 10 species. While RD1, the N-terminal third of the R domain is highly conserved, RD2, the large central region of the R domain has less rigid structural requirements. Although this two-domain model was given strong support by recent functional analysis data, the simple observation that two of the four main phosphorylation sites are excluded from RD2 clearly indicates that RD2 still does not satisfy the requirements of a "functional R domain." Nevertheless, knowledge of the CFTR structure and function accumulated over the past decade and reevaluated in the context of a comprehensive sequence comparison of 15 CFTR homologues made it possible to define such a "functional R domain," i.e., amino acids C647 to D836. This definition is validated primarily because it contains all of the important potential consensus phosphorylation sequences. In addition, it includes the highly charged motif from E822 to D836. Finally, it includes all of the deletions/insertions in this region. This definition also aids in understanding the effects of missense mutations occurring within this domain. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  12. MASTICATORY FUNCTION OF OBESE CANDIDATES TO BARIATRIC SURGERY FROM DISTINCT SOCIOECONOMIC CLASSES

    PubMed Central

    PASSERI, Celso Roberto; ANDRADE, Jacira Alves Caracik de Camargo; TOMAL, Karla Thaíza; PRACUCHO, Eduardo Marcucci; de CAMPOS, Livia Paschoalino; SALES-PERES, Silvia Helena de Carvalho

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Obesity and metabolic syndrome can be labeled as worldwide outbreak; thus, both have led to serious public health problem. Oral health can be worsened by both, obesity and metabolic syndrome. Tooth loss harms masticatory function, essential status to whom will be submitted to bariatric surgery. Aim: Assess masticatory function of obese candidates to bariatric surgery, who belong to distinct socioeconomic class range, in order to recognize hazard factors and the bias of socioeconomic factor in this context. Methods: Observational cross-section study, with samples comprised by two groups of patients, with distinct socioeconomic class range, one of them belonging to public health system (SUSG) and the other to private clinic (CPG), candidates to bariatric surgery. Were assessed anthropometric data, comorbidities and medicines usage, blood tests, habits and the number of dental functional units. Results: The groups SUSG and CPG were homogeneous taking into account gender (p=0,890) and age range (p=0,170). The number of dental functional units was higher in the private group (p<0.001). The impaired masticatory function was rather present among public group (p<0.001) and female gender (p<0,001). Regarded as blood tests, fasting glucose was higher in female in SUSG (p<0,001). The following hazard factors have corroborated to have patients rated as impaired masticatory function: belong to public service (OR: 8.420, p=0.003), higher age (OR: 1.186, p<0.001), female gender (OR: 0.153, p=0.029), diabetes mellitus (OR: 2.545, p=0.045) and smokers (OR: 2.951, p=0.043). Conclusion: The general health and masticatory function of female SUSG were worse, highlighting the socioeconomic condition as hazard factor. PMID:27683777

  13. Functional organization of color domains in V1 and V2 of macaque monkey revealed by optical imaging.

    PubMed

    Lu, Haidong D; Roe, Anna W

    2008-03-01

    Areas V1 and V2 of Macaque monkey visual cortex are characterized by unique cytochrome-oxidase (CO)-staining patterns. Initial electrophysiological studies associated CO blobs in V1 with processing of surface properties such as color and brightness and the interblobs with contour information processing. However, many subsequent studies showed controversial results, some supporting this proposal and others failing to find significant functional differences between blobs and interblobs. In this study, we have used optical imaging to map color-selective responses in V1 and V2. In V1, we find striking "blob-like" patterns of color response. Fine alignment of optical maps and CO-stained tissue revealed that color domains in V1 strongly associate with CO blobs. We also find color domains in V1 align along centers of ocular dominance columns. Furthermore, color blobs in V1 have low orientation selectivity and do not overlap with centers of orientation domains. In V2, color domains coincide with thin stripes; orientation-selective domains coincide with thick and pale stripes. We conclude that color and orientation-selective responses are preferentially located in distinct CO compartments in V1 and V2. We propose that the term "blob" encompasses both the concept of "CO blob" and "color domain" in V1.

  14. Function of the ATR N-terminal domain revealed by an ATM/ATR chimera

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Xinping; Zhao Runxiang; Glick, Gloria G.; Cortez, David . E-mail: david.cortez@vanderbilt.edu

    2007-05-01

    The ATM and ATR kinases function at the apex of checkpoint signaling pathways. These kinases share significant sequence similarity, phosphorylate many of the same substrates, and have overlapping roles in initiating cell cycle checkpoints. However, they sense DNA damage through distinct mechanisms. ATR primarily senses single stranded DNA (ssDNA) through its interaction with ATRIP, and ATM senses double strand breaks through its interaction with Nbs1. We determined that the N-terminus of ATR contains a domain that binds ATRIP. Attaching this domain to ATM allowed the fusion protein (ATM*) to bind ATRIP and associate with RPA-coated ssDNA. ATM* also gained the ability to localize efficiently to stalled replication forks as well as double strand breaks. Despite having normal kinase activity when tested in vitro and being phosphorylated on S1981 in vivo, ATM* is defective in checkpoint signaling and does not complement cellular deficiencies in either ATM or ATR. These data indicate that the N-terminus of ATR is sufficient to bind ATRIP and to promote localization to sites of replication stress.

  15. Tracking the Fate of Genetically Distinct Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Matrix Proteins Highlights the Role for Late Domains in Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Soh, Timothy K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) assembly requires condensation of the viral ribonucleoprotein (RNP) core with the matrix protein (M) during budding from the plasma membrane. The RNP core comprises the negative-sense genomic RNA completely coated by the nucleocapsid protein (N) and associated by a phosphoprotein (P) with the large polymerase protein (L). To study the assembly of single viral particles, we tagged M and P with fluorescent proteins. We selected from a library of viruses with insertions in the M gene a replication-competent virus containing a fluorescent M and combined that with our previously described virus containing fluorescent P. Virus particles containing those fusions maintained the same bullet shape appearance as wild-type VSV but had a modest increase in particle length, reflecting the increased genome size. Imaging of the released particles revealed a variation in the amount of M and P assembled into the virions, consistent with a flexible packaging mechanism. We used the recombinants to further study the importance of the late domains in M, which serve to recruit the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery during budding. Mutations in late domains resulted in the accumulation of virions that failed to pinch off from the plasma membrane. Imaging of single virions released from cells that were coinfected with M tagged with enhanced green fluorescent protein and M tagged with mCherry variants in which the late domains of one virus were inactivated by mutation showed a strong bias against the incorporation of the late-domain mutant into the released virions. In contrast, the intracellular expression and membrane association of the two variants were unaltered. These studies provide new tools for imaging particle assembly and enhance our resolution of existing models for assembly of VSV. IMPORTANCE Assembly of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) particles requires the separate trafficking of the viral replication

  16. Representation, control, or reasoning? Distinct functions for theory of mind within the medial prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Hartwright, Charlotte E; Apperly, Ian A; Hansen, Peter C

    2014-04-01

    The medial pFC (mPFC) is frequently reported to play a central role in Theory of Mind (ToM). However, the contribution of this large cortical region in ToM is not well understood. Combining a novel behavioral task with fMRI, we sought to demonstrate functional divisions between dorsal and rostral mPFC. All conditions of the task required the representation of mental states (beliefs and desires). The level of demands on cognitive control (high vs. low) and the nature of the demands on reasoning (deductive vs. abductive) were varied orthogonally between conditions. Activation in dorsal mPFC was modulated by the need for control, whereas rostral mPFC was modulated by reasoning demands. These findings fit with previously suggested domain-general functions for different parts of mPFC and suggest that these functions are recruited selectively in the service of ToM.

  17. Endocytotic routes of cobra cardiotoxins depend on spatial distribution of positively charged and hydrophobic domains to target distinct types of sulfated glycoconjugates on cell surface.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shao-Chen; Lin, Chien-Chu; Wang, Chia-Hui; Wu, Po-Long; Huang, Hsuan-Wei; Chang, Chung-I; Wu, Wen-guey

    2014-07-18

    Cobra cardiotoxins (CTX) are a family of three-fingered basic polypeptides known to interact with diverse targets such as heparan sulfates, sulfatides, and integrins on cell surfaces. After CTX bind to the membrane surface, they are internalized to intracellular space and exert their cytotoxicity via an unknown mechanism. By the combined in vitro kinetic binding, three-dimensional x-ray structure determination, and cell biology studies on the naturally abundant CTX homologues from the Taiwanese cobra, we showed that slight variations on the spatial distribution of positively charged or hydrophobic domains among CTX A2, A3, and A4 could lead to significant changes in their endocytotic pathways and action mechanisms via distinct sulfated glycoconjugate-mediated processes. The intracellular locations of these structurally similar CTX after internalization are shown to vary between the mitochondria and lysosomes via either dynamin2-dependent or -independent processes with distinct membrane cholesterol sensitivity. Evidence is presented to suggest that the shifting between the sulfated glycoconjugates as distinct targets of CTX A2, A3, and A4 might play roles in the co-evolutionary arms race between venomous snake toxins to cope with different membrane repair mechanisms at the cellular levels. The sensitivity of endocytotic routes to the spatial distribution of positively charged or hydrophobic domains may provide an explanation for the diverse endocytosis pathways of other cell-penetrating basic polypeptides.

  18. AINTEGUMENTA-LIKE genes have partly overlapping functions with AINTEGUMENTA but make distinct contributions to Arabidopsis thaliana flower development

    PubMed Central

    Krizek, Beth A.

    2015-01-01

    AINTEGUMENTA (ANT) is an important regulator of Arabidopsis flower development that has overlapping functions with the related AINTEGUMENTA-LIKE6 (AIL6) gene in floral organ initiation, identity specification, growth, and patterning. Two other AINTEGUMENTA-LIKE (AIL) genes, AIL5 and AIL7, are expressed in developing flowers in spatial domains that partly overlap with those of ANT. Here, it is shown that AIL5 and AIL7 also act in a partially redundant manner with ANT. The results demonstrate that AIL genes exhibit unequal genetic redundancy with roles for AIL5, AIL6, and AIL7 only revealed in the absence of ANT function. ant ail5 and ant ail7 double mutant flowers show alterations in floral organ positioning and growth, sepal fusion, and reductions in petal number. In ant ail5, petals are often replaced by filaments or dramatically reduced in size. ant ail7 double mutants produce increased numbers of carpels, which have defects in valve fusion and a loss of apical tissues. The distinct phenotypes of ant ail5, ant ail7 and the previously characterized ant ail6 indicate that AIL5, AIL6, and AIL7 make unique contributions to flower development. These distinct roles are also supported by genetic analyses of ant ail triple mutants. While ant ail5 ail6 triple mutants closely resemble ant ail6 double mutants, ant ail5 ail7 triple mutants exhibit more severe deviations from the wild type than either ant ail5 or ant ail7 double mutants. Furthermore, it is shown that AIL5, AIL6, and AIL7 act in a dose dependent manners in ant and other mutant backgrounds. PMID:25956884

  19. AINTEGUMENTA-LIKE genes have partly overlapping functions with AINTEGUMENTA but make distinct contributions to Arabidopsis thaliana flower development.

    PubMed

    Krizek, Beth A

    2015-08-01

    AINTEGUMENTA (ANT) is an important regulator of Arabidopsis flower development that has overlapping functions with the related AINTEGUMENTA-LIKE6 (AIL6) gene in floral organ initiation, identity specification, growth, and patterning. Two other AINTEGUMENTA-LIKE (AIL) genes, AIL5 and AIL7, are expressed in developing flowers in spatial domains that partly overlap with those of ANT. Here, it is shown that AIL5 and AIL7 also act in a partially redundant manner with ANT. The results demonstrate that AIL genes exhibit unequal genetic redundancy with roles for AIL5, AIL6, and AIL7 only revealed in the absence of ANT function. ant ail5 and ant ail7 double mutant flowers show alterations in floral organ positioning and growth, sepal fusion, and reductions in petal number. In ant ail5, petals are often replaced by filaments or dramatically reduced in size. ant ail7 double mutants produce increased numbers of carpels, which have defects in valve fusion and a loss of apical tissues. The distinct phenotypes of ant ail5, ant ail7 and the previously characterized ant ail6 indicate that AIL5, AIL6, and AIL7 make unique contributions to flower development. These distinct roles are also supported by genetic analyses of ant ail triple mutants. While ant ail5 ail6 triple mutants closely resemble ant ail6 double mutants, ant ail5 ail7 triple mutants exhibit more severe deviations from the wild type than either ant ail5 or ant ail7 double mutants. Furthermore, it is shown that AIL5, AIL6, and AIL7 act in a dose dependent manners in ant and other mutant backgrounds.

  20. Two critical and functionally distinct stages of face and body perception.

    PubMed

    Pitcher, David; Goldhaber, Tanya; Duchaine, Bradley; Walsh, Vincent; Kanwisher, Nancy

    2012-11-07

    Cortical regions that respond preferentially to particular object categories, such as faces and bodies, are essential for visual perception of these object categories. However, precisely when these regions play a causal role in recognition of their preferred categories is unclear. Here we addressed this question using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Across a series of experiments, TMS was delivered over the functionally localized right occipital face area (rOFA) or right extrastriate body area (rEBA) at different latencies, up to 150 ms, after stimulus onset while adult human participants performed delayed match-to-sample tasks on face and body stimuli. Results showed that TMS disrupted task performance during two temporally distinct time periods after stimulus onset, the first at 40/50 ms and the second at 100/110 ms. These two time periods exhibited functionally distinct patterns of impairment: TMS delivered during the early time period (at 40/50 ms) disrupted task performance for both preferred (faces at rOFA and bodies at rEBA) and nonpreferred (bodies at rOFA and faces at rEBA) categories. In contrast, TMS delivered during the later time period (at 100/110 ms) disrupted task performance for the preferred category only of each area (faces at rOFA and bodies at rEBA). These results indicate that category-selective cortical regions are critical for two functionally distinct stages of visual object recognition: an early, presumably preparatory stage that is not category selective occurring almost immediately after stimulus onset, followed by a later stage of category-specific perceptual processing.

  1. Two Critical and Functionally Distinct Stages of Face and Body Perception

    PubMed Central

    Goldhaber, Tanya; Duchaine, Bradley; Walsh, Vincent; Kanwisher, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Cortical regions that respond preferentially to particular object categories, such as faces and bodies, are essential for visual perception of these object categories. However, precisely when these regions play a causal role in recognition of their preferred categories is unclear. Here we addressed this question using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Across a series of experiments, TMS was delivered over the functionally localized right occipital face area (rOFA) or right extrastriate body area (rEBA) at different latencies, up to 150 ms, after stimulus onset while adult human participants performed delayed match-to-sample tasks on face and body stimuli. Results showed that TMS disrupted task performance during two temporally distinct time periods after stimulus onset, the first at 40/50 ms and the second at 100/110 ms. These two time periods exhibited functionally distinct patterns of impairment: TMS delivered during the early time period (at 40/50 ms) disrupted task performance for both preferred (faces at rOFA and bodies at rEBA) and nonpreferred (bodies at rOFA and faces at rEBA) categories. In contrast, TMS delivered during the later time period (at 100/110 ms) disrupted task performance for the preferred category only of each area (faces at rOFA and bodies at rEBA). These results indicate that category-selective cortical regions are critical for two functionally distinct stages of visual object recognition: an early, presumably preparatory stage that is not category selective occurring almost immediately after stimulus onset, followed by a later stage of category-specific perceptual processing. PMID:23136426

  2. Regulation of synapse structure and function by distinct myosin II motors.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Maria D; Johnson, Richard; Miller, Courtney A; Huganir, Richard L; Rumbaugh, Gavin

    2011-01-26

    Ongoing synaptic function and rapid, bidirectional plasticity are both controlled by regulatory mechanisms within dendritic spines. Spine actin dynamics maintain synapse structure and function, and cytoskeletal rearrangements in these structures trigger structural and functional plasticity. Therefore, proteins that interact with actin filaments are attractive candidates to regulate synaptic actin dynamics and, thus, synapse structure and function. Here, we have cloned the rat isoform of class II myosin heavy chain MyH7B in brain. Unexpectedly, this isoform resembles muscle-type myosin II rather than the ubiquitously expressed nonmuscle myosin II isoforms, suggesting that a rich functional diversity of myosin II motors may exist in neurons. Indeed, reducing the expression of MyH7B in mature neurons caused profound alterations to dendritic spine structure and excitatory synaptic strength. Structurally, dendritic spines had large, irregularly shaped heads that contained many filopodia-like protrusions. Neurons with reduced MyH7B expression also had impaired miniature EPSC amplitudes accompanied by a decrease in synaptic AMPA receptors, which was linked to alterations of the actin cytoskeleton. MyH7B-mediated control over spine morphology and synaptic strength was distinct from that of a nonmuscle myosin, myosin IIb. Interestingly, when myosin IIb expression and MyH7B expression were simultaneously knocked-down in neurons, a third, more pronounced phenotype emerged. Together, our data provide evidence that distinct myosin II isoforms work together to regulate synapse structure and function in cultured hippocampal neurons. Thus, myosin II motor activity is emerging as a broad regulatory mechanism for control over complex actin networks within dendritic spines.

  3. Regulation of Synapse Structure and Function by Distinct Myosin II Motors

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, Maria D.; Johnson, Richard; Miller, Courtney A.; Huganir, Richard L.; Rumbaugh, Gavin

    2011-01-01

    Ongoing synaptic function and rapid, bidirectional plasticity are both controlled by regulatory mechanisms within dendritic spines. Spine actin dynamics maintain synapse structure and function, and cytoskeletal rearrangements in these structures trigger structural and functional plasticity. Therefore, proteins that interact with actin filaments are attractive candidates to regulate synaptic actin dynamics, and thus, synapse structure and function. Here, we have cloned the rat isoform of class II myosin heavy chain MyH7B in brain. Unexpectedly, this isoform resembles muscle-type myosin II, rather than the ubiquitously expressed non-muscle myosin II isoforms, suggesting that a rich functional diversity of myosin II motors may exist in neurons. Indeed, reducing the expression of MyH7B in mature neurons caused profound alterations to dendritic spine structure and excitatory synaptic strength. Structurally, dendritic spines had large, irregular shaped heads that contained many filopodia-like protrusions. Neurons with reduced MyH7B expression also had impaired mEPSC amplitudes, accompanied by a decrease in synaptic AMPA receptors, which was linked to alterations of the actin cytoskeleton. MyH7B-mediated control over spine morphology and synaptic strength was distinct from that of a non-muscle myosin, myosin IIb. Interestingly, when myosin IIb and MyH7B expression were simultaneously knocked-down in neurons, a third, more pronounced phenotype emerged. Taken together, our data provide evidence that distinct myosin II isoforms work together to regulate synapse structure and function in cultured hippocampal neurons. Thus, myosin II motor activity is emerging as a broad regulatory mechanism for control over complex actin networks within dendritic spines. PMID:21273429

  4. Distinctive Feature of Microbial Communities and Bacterial Functional Profiles in Tricholoma matsutake Dominant Soil

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Seung-Yoon; Fong, Jonathan J.; Park, Myung Soo; Lim, Young Woon

    2016-01-01

    Tricholoma matsutake, the pine mushroom, is a valuable forest product with high economic value in Asia, and plays an important ecological role as an ectomycorrhizal fungus. Around the host tree, T. matsutake hyphae generate a distinctive soil aggregating environment called a fairy ring, where fruiting bodies form. Because T. matsutake hyphae dominate the soil near the fairy ring, this species has the potential to influence the microbial community. To explore the influence of T. matsutake on the microbial communities, we compared the microbial community and predicted bacterial function between two different soil types—T. matsutake dominant and T. matsutake minor. DNA sequence analyses showed that fungal and bacterial diversity were lower in the T. matsutake dominant soil compared to T. matsutake minor soil. Some microbial taxa were significantly more common in the T. matsutake dominant soil across geographic locations, many of which were previously identified as mycophillic or mycorrhiza helper bacteria. Between the two soil types, the predicted bacterial functional profiles (using PICRUSt) had significantly distinct KEGG modules. Modules for amino acid uptake, carbohydrate metabolism, and the type III secretion system were higher in the T. matsutake dominant soil than in the T. matsutake minor soil. Overall, similar microbial diversity, community structure, and bacterial functional profiles of the T. matsutake dominant soil across geographic locations suggest that T. matsutake may generate a dominance effect. PMID:27977803

  5. Affinity for self antigen selects regulatory T cells with distinct functional properties

    PubMed Central

    Wyss, Lena; Stadinski, Brian D.; King, Carolyn G.; Schallenberg, Sonja; McCarthy, Nicholas I.; Lee, Jun Young; Kretschmer, Karsten; Terracciano, Luigi M.; Anderson, Graham; Surh, Charles D.; Huseby, Eric S.; Palmer, Ed

    2016-01-01

    How regulatory T cells (Treg cell) control lymphocyte homeostasis is not fully understood. Here we identify two Treg cell populations with differing degrees of self-reactivity and distinct regulatory functions. Triplehi (GITRhiPD-1hiCD25hi) Treg cell are highly self-reactive and control lympho-proliferation in peripheral lymph nodes. Triplelo (GITRloPD-1loCD25lo) Treg cells are less self-reactive and limit development of colitis by promoting conversion of CD4+ Tconv cells into induced Treg cells (iTreg cells). Although Foxp3-deficient (scurfy) mice lack Treg cells, they contain Triplehi-like and Triplelo-like CD4+ T cells with distinct pathological properties. Scurfy TriplehiCD4+T cells infiltrate the skin whereas scurfy TripleloCD4+T cells induce colitis and wasting disease. These findings indicate that T cell receptor affinity for self-antigens drives the differentiation of Tregs into distinct subsets with non-overlapping regulatory activities. PMID:27478940

  6. Three functionally distinct classes of C-fibre nociceptors in primates.

    PubMed

    Wooten, Matthew; Weng, Hao-Jui; Hartke, Timothy V; Borzan, Jasenka; Klein, Amanda H; Turnquist, Brian; Dong, Xinzhong; Meyer, Richard A; Ringkamp, Matthias

    2014-06-20

    In primates, C-fibre polymodal nociceptors are broadly classified into two groups based on mechanosensitivity. Here we demonstrate that mechanically sensitive polymodal nociceptors that respond either quickly (QC) or slowly (SC) to a heat stimulus differ in responses to a mild burn, heat sensitization, conductive properties and chemosensitivity. Superficially applied capsaicin and intradermal injection of β-alanine, an MrgprD agonist, excite vigorously all QCs. Only 40% of SCs respond to β-alanine, and their response is only half that of QCs. Mechanically insensitive C-fibres (C-MIAs) are β-alanine insensitive but vigorously respond to capsaicin and histamine with distinct discharge patterns. Calcium imaging reveals that β-alanine and histamine activate distinct populations of capsaicin-responsive neurons in primate dorsal root ganglion. We suggest that histamine itch and capsaicin pain are peripherally encoded in C-MIAs, and that primate polymodal nociceptive afferents form three functionally distinct subpopulations with β-alanine responsive QC fibres likely corresponding to murine MrgprD-expressing, non-peptidergic nociceptive afferents.

  7. Proteins that bind the Src homology 3 domain of CrkI have distinct roles in Crk transformation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, J; Machida, K; Antoku, S; Ng, K Y; Claffey, K P; Mayer, B J

    2010-12-02

    The v-Crk oncogene product consists of two protein interaction modules, a Src homology 2 (SH2) domain and a Src homology 3 (SH3) domain. Overexpression of CrkI, the cellular homolog of v-Crk, transforms mouse fibroblasts, and elevated CrkI expression is observed in several human cancers. The SH2 and SH3 domains of Crk are required for transformation, but the identity of the critical cellular binding partners is not known. A number of candidate Crk SH3-binding proteins have been identified, including the nonreceptor tyrosine kinases c-Abl and Arg, and the guanine nucleotide exchange proteins C3G, SOS1 and DOCK180. The aim of this study is to determine which of these are required for transformation by CrkI. We found that short hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown of C3G or SOS1 suppressed anchorage-independent growth of NIH-3T3 cells overexpressing CrkI, whereas knockdown of SOS1 alone was sufficient to suppress tumor formation by these cells in nude mice. Knockdown of C3G was sufficient to revert morphological changes induced by CrkI expression. By contrast, knockdown of Abl family kinases or their inhibition with imatinib enhanced anchorage-independent growth and tumorigenesis induced by Crk. These results show that SOS1 is essential for CrkI-induced fibroblast transformation, and also reveal a surprising negative role for Abl kinases in Crk transformation.

  8. Geographically Distinct and Domain-Specific Sequence Variations in the Alleles of Rice Blast Resistance Gene Pib

    PubMed Central

    Vasudevan, Kumar; Vera Cruz, Casiana M.; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Bhullar, Navreet K.

    2016-01-01

    Rice blast is caused by Magnaporthe oryzae, which is the most destructive fungal pathogen affecting rice growing regions worldwide. The rice blast resistance gene Pib confers broad-spectrum resistance against Southeast Asian M. oryzae races. We investigated the allelic diversity of Pib in rice germplasm originating from 12 major rice growing countries. Twenty-five new Pib alleles were identified that have unique single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), insertions and/or deletions, in addition to the polymorphic nucleotides that are shared between the different alleles. These partially or completely shared polymorphic nucleotides indicate frequent sequence exchange events between the Pib alleles. In some of the new Pib alleles, nucleotide diversity is high in the LRR domain, whereas, in others it is distributed among the NB-ARC and LRR domains. Most of the polymorphic amino acids in LRR and NB-ARC2 domains are predicted as solvent-exposed. Several of the alleles and the unique SNPs are country specific, suggesting a diversifying selection of alleles in various geographical locations in response to the locally prevalent M. oryzae population. Together, the new Pib alleles are an important genetic resource for rice blast resistance breeding programs and provide new information on rice-M. oryzae interactions at the molecular level. PMID:27446145

  9. Geographically Distinct and Domain-Specific Sequence Variations in the Alleles of Rice Blast Resistance Gene Pib.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, Kumar; Vera Cruz, Casiana M; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Bhullar, Navreet K

    2016-01-01

    Rice blast is caused by Magnaporthe oryzae, which is the most destructive fungal pathogen affecting rice growing regions worldwide. The rice blast resistance gene Pib confers broad-spectrum resistance against Southeast Asian M. oryzae races. We investigated the allelic diversity of Pib in rice germplasm originating from 12 major rice growing countries. Twenty-five new Pib alleles were identified that have unique single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), insertions and/or deletions, in addition to the polymorphic nucleotides that are shared between the different alleles. These partially or completely shared polymorphic nucleotides indicate frequent sequence exchange events between the Pib alleles. In some of the new Pib alleles, nucleotide diversity is high in the LRR domain, whereas, in others it is distributed among the NB-ARC and LRR domains. Most of the polymorphic amino acids in LRR and NB-ARC2 domains are predicted as solvent-exposed. Several of the alleles and the unique SNPs are country specific, suggesting a diversifying selection of alleles in various geographical locations in response to the locally prevalent M. oryzae population. Together, the new Pib alleles are an important genetic resource for rice blast resistance breeding programs and provide new information on rice-M. oryzae interactions at the molecular level.

  10. Distinct domains of the spinal muscular atrophy protein SMN are required for targeting to Cajal bodies in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Renvoisé, Benoît; Khoobarry, Kevinee; Gendron, Marie-Claude; Cibert, Christian; Viollet, Louis; Lefebvre, Suzie

    2006-02-15

    Mutations of the survival motor neuron gene SMN1 cause the inherited disease spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). The ubiquitous SMN protein facilitates the biogenesis of spliceosomal small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs). The protein is detected in the cytoplasm, nucleoplasm and enriched with snRNPs in nuclear Cajal bodies. It is structurally divided into at least an amino-terminal region rich in basic amino acid residues, a central Tudor domain, a self-association tyrosine-glycine-box and an exon7-encoded C-terminus. To examine the domains required for the intranuclear localization of SMN, we have used fluorescently tagged protein mutants transiently overexpressed in mammalian cells. The basic amino acid residues direct nucleolar localization of SMN mutants. The Tudor domain promotes localization of proteins in the nucleus and it cooperates with the basic amino acid residues and the tyrosine-glycine-box for protein localization in Cajal bodies. Moreover, the most frequent disease-linked mutant SMNDeltaex7 reduces accumulation of snRNPs in Cajal bodies, suggesting that the C-terminus of SMN participates in targeting to Cajal bodies. A reduced number of Cajal bodies in patient fibroblasts associates with the absence of snRNPs in Cajal bodies, revealing that intranuclear snRNA organization is modified in disease. These results indicate that direct and indirect mechanisms regulate localization of SMN in Cajal bodies.

  11. Distinct functions of the RNA polymerase σ subunit region 3.2 in RNA priming and promoter escape

    PubMed Central

    Pupov, Danil; Kuzin, Ivan; Bass, Irina; Kulbachinskiy, Andrey

    2014-01-01

    The σ subunit of bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) has been implicated in all steps of transcription initiation, including promoter recognition and opening, priming of RNA synthesis, abortive initiation and promoter escape. The post-promoter-recognition σ functions were proposed to depend on its conserved region σ3.2 that directly contacts promoter DNA immediately upstream of the RNAP active centre and occupies the RNA exit path. Analysis of the transcription effects of substitutions and deletions in this region in Escherichia coli σ70 subunit, performed in this work, suggests that (i) individual residues in the σ3.2 finger collectively contribute to RNA priming by RNAP, likely by the positioning of the template DNA strand in the active centre, but are not critical to promoter escape; (ii) the physical presence of σ3.2 in the RNA exit channel is important for promoter escape; (iii) σ3.2 promotes σ dissociation during initiation and suppresses σ-dependent promoter-proximal pausing; (iv) σ3.2 contributes to allosteric inhibition of the initiating NTP binding by rifamycins. Thus, region σ3.2 performs distinct functions in transcription initiation and its inhibition by antibiotics. The B-reader element of eukaryotic factor TFIIB likely plays similar roles in RNAPII transcription, revealing common principles in transcription initiation in various domains of life. PMID:24452800

  12. Regularized Laplace-Fourier-Domain Full Waveform Inversion Using a Weighted l 2 Objective Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Hyunggu; Kwon, Jungmin; Shin, Changsoo; Zhou, Hongbo; Cogan, Mike

    2017-03-01

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) can be applied to obtain an accurate velocity model that contains important geophysical and geological information. FWI suffers from the local minimum problem when the starting model is not sufficiently close to the true model. Therefore, an accurate macroscale velocity model is essential for successful FWI, and Laplace-Fourier-domain FWI is appropriate for obtaining such a velocity model. However, conventional Laplace-Fourier-domain FWI remains an ill-posed and ill-conditioned problem, meaning that small errors in the data can result in large differences in the inverted model. This approach also suffers from certain limitations related to the logarithmic objective function. To overcome the limitations of conventional Laplace-Fourier-domain FWI, we introduce a weighted l 2 objective function, instead of the logarithmic objective function, as the data-domain objective function, and we also introduce two different model-domain regularizations: first-order Tikhonov regularization and prior model regularization. The weighting matrix for the data-domain objective function is constructed to suitably enhance the far-offset information. Tikhonov regularization smoothes the gradient, and prior model regularization allows reliable prior information to be taken into account. Two hyperparameters are obtained through trial and error and used to control the trade-off and achieve an appropriate balance between the data-domain and model-domain gradients. The application of the proposed regularizations facilitates finding a unique solution via FWI, and the weighted l 2 objective function ensures a more reasonable residual, thereby improving the stability of the gradient calculation. Numerical tests performed using the Marmousi synthetic dataset show that the use of the weighted l 2 objective function and the model-domain regularizations significantly improves the Laplace-Fourier-domain FWI. Because the Laplace-Fourier-domain FWI is improved, the

  13. Regularized Laplace-Fourier-Domain Full Waveform Inversion Using a Weighted l 2 Objective Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Hyunggu; Kwon, Jungmin; Shin, Changsoo; Zhou, Hongbo; Cogan, Mike

    2016-09-01

    Full waveform inversion (FWI) can be applied to obtain an accurate velocity model that contains important geophysical and geological information. FWI suffers from the local minimum problem when the starting model is not sufficiently close to the true model. Therefore, an accurate macroscale velocity model is essential for successful FWI, and Laplace-Fourier-domain FWI is appropriate for obtaining such a velocity model. However, conventional Laplace-Fourier-domain FWI remains an ill-posed and ill-conditioned problem, meaning that small errors in the data can result in large differences in the inverted model. This approach also suffers from certain limitations related to the logarithmic objective function. To overcome the limitations of conventional Laplace-Fourier-domain FWI, we introduce a weighted l 2 objective function, instead of the logarithmic objective function, as the data-domain objective function, and we also introduce two different model-domain regularizations: first-order Tikhonov regularization and prior model regularization. The weighting matrix for the data-domain objective function is constructed to suitably enhance the far-offset information. Tikhonov regularization smoothes the gradient, and prior model regularization allows reliable prior information to be taken into account. Two hyperparameters are obtained through trial and error and used to control the trade-off and achieve an appropriate balance between the data-domain and model-domain gradients. The application of the proposed regularizations facilitates finding a unique solution via FWI, and the weighted l 2 objective function ensures a more reasonable residual, thereby improving the stability of the gradient calculation. Numerical tests performed using the Marmousi synthetic dataset show that the use of the weighted l 2 objective function and the model-domain regularizations significantly improves the Laplace-Fourier-domain FWI. Because the Laplace-Fourier-domain FWI is improved, the

  14. Compositionally and functionally distinct sinus microbiota in chronic rhinosinusitis patients have immunological and clinically divergent consequences.

    PubMed

    Cope, Emily K; Goldberg, Andrew N; Pletcher, Steven D; Lynch, Susan V

    2017-05-12

    Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is a heterogeneous disease characterized by persistent sinonasal inflammation and sinus microbiome dysbiosis. The basis of this heterogeneity is poorly understood. We sought to address the hypothesis that a limited number of compositionally distinct pathogenic bacterial microbiota exist in CRS patients and invoke discrete immune responses and clinical phenotypes in CRS patients. Sinus brushings from patients with CRS (n = 59) and healthy individuals (n = 10) collected during endoscopic sinus surgery were analyzed using 16S rRNA gene sequencing, predicted metagenomics, and RNA profiling of the mucosal immune response. We show that CRS patients cluster into distinct sub-groups (DSI-III), each defined by specific pattern of bacterial co-colonization (permutational multivariate analysis of variance (PERMANOVA); p = 0.001, r (2) = 0.318). Each sub-group was typically dominated by a pathogenic family: Streptococcaceae (DSI), Pseudomonadaceae (DSII), Corynebacteriaceae [DSIII(a)], or Staphylococcaceae [DSIII(b)]. Each pathogenic microbiota was predicted to be functionally distinct (PERMANOVA; p = 0.005, r (2) = 0.217) and encode uniquely enriched gene pathways including ansamycin biosynthesis (DSI), tryptophan metabolism (DSII), two-component response [DSIII(b)], and the PPAR-γ signaling pathway [DSIII(a)]. Each is also associated with significantly distinct host immune responses; DSI, II, and III(b) invoked a variety of pro-inflammatory, TH1 responses, while DSIII(a), which exhibited significantly increased incidence of nasal polyps (Fisher's exact; p = 0.034, relative risk = 2.16), primarily induced IL-5 expression (Kruskal Wallis; q = 0.045). A large proportion of CRS patient heterogeneity may be explained by the composition of their sinus bacterial microbiota and related host immune response-features which may inform strategies for tailored therapy in this patient population.

  15. Structural and functional analysis of the pro-domain of human cathelicidin, LL-37

    PubMed Central

    Pazgier, Marzena; Ericksen, Bryan; Ling, Minhua; Toth, Eric; Shi, Jishu; Li, Xiangdong; Galliher-Beckley, Amy; Lan, Liqiong; Zou, Guozhang; Zhan, Changyou; Yuan, Weirong; Pozharski, Edwin; Lu, Wuyuan

    2013-01-01

    Cathelicidins form a family of small host defense peptides distinct from another class of cationic antimicrobial peptides, the defensins. They are expressed as large precursor molecules with a highly conserved pro-domain known as the cathelin-like domain (CLD). CLDs have high degrees of sequence homology to cathelin, a protein isolated from pig leukocytes and belonging to the cystatin family of cysteine protease inhibitors. In this report, we describe for the first time the X-ray crystal structure of the human CLD (hCLD) of the sole human cathelicidin, LL-37. The structure of hCLD, determined at 1.93 Å resolution, shows the cystatin-like fold and is highly similar to the structure of the CLD of the pig cathelicidin, protegrin-3. We assayed the in vitro antibacterial activities of hCLD, LL-37 and the precursor form, pro-cathelicidin (also known as hCAP18), and we found that the unprocessed protein inhibited the growth of Gram-negative bacteria with efficiencies comparable to the mature peptide, LL-37. In addition, the antibacterial activity of LL-37 was not inhibited by hCLD intermolecularly, since exogenously added hCLD had no effect on the bactericidal activity of the mature peptide. hCLD itself lacked antimicrobial function and did not inhibit the cysteine protease, cathepsin L. Our results contrast with previous reports of hCLD activity. A comparative structural analysis between hCLD and the cysteine protease inhibitor stefin A showed why hCLD is unable to function as an inhibitor of cysteine proteases. In this respect, the cystatin scaffold represents an ancestral structural platform from which proteins evolved divergently, with some losing inhibitory functions. PMID:23406372

  16. Characterization of a functional domain of human calpastatin.

    PubMed

    Uemori, T; Shimojo, T; Asada, K; Asano, T; Kimizuka, F; Kato, I; Maki, M; Hatanaka, M; Murachi, T; Hanzawa, H

    1990-02-14

    Expression plasmids were constructed from the cDNA of human calpastatin to examine the contribution to the inhibition of calpain of highly conserved sequences in each of four repetitive domains. A series of deletion derivatives of domain 1 proteins, truncated at either the amino or carboxy terminus, were produced in E. coli. Deletion from the amino terminus past the amino terminal conserved sequence decreased the inhibition. When the middle conserved sequence, the M-sequence, was further deleted, no inhibition was detected, but deletion from the carboxy terminus past the carboxy terminal conserved sequence did not decrease the inhibition until the M-sequence was reached. Nuclear magnetic resonance and circular dichroism spectra showed that domain 1 has an unfolded structure. Peptides that contained the M-sequence and some neighboring sequences were synthesized to measure the minimum size of the inhibitory peptide, which was the M-sequence with the next six residues on the amino terminal side.

  17. Lack of energy: an important and distinct component of HIV-related fatigue and daytime function.

    PubMed

    Aouizerat, Bradley E; Gay, Caryl L; Lerdal, Anners; Portillo, Carmen J; Lee, Kathryn A

    2013-02-01

    Fatigue is a prevalent symptom among adults living with HIV. There is increasing evidence that fatigue and energy are related, yet distinct constructs. Although HIV-related fatigue has been well studied, little is known about perceived energy and how it relates to fatigue, individual characteristics, and other symptoms. To describe the experience of perceived energy in adults with HIV and evaluate its relationship to demographic and clinical characteristics as well as symptoms of fatigue, sleep disturbance, anxiety, depression, and daytime function. The design was descriptive, comparative, and correlational. The sample of 318 adults with HIV completed a demographic questionnaire; the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale; and measures of fatigue, sleep disturbance, anxiety, depressive symptoms, and daytime function. Medical records were reviewed for disease and treatment data. Participants who reported a lack of energy were compared with those who did not on demographic, clinical, and symptom variables. Regression models of perceived energy and its interference with daytime function also were evaluated. Perceived lack of energy was highly prevalent (65%) and more strongly related to interference with daytime function than more general measures of fatigue severity, even when controlling for other characteristics and symptoms. Like other aspects of fatigue, lack of energy was associated with sleep disturbance, anxiety, and depressive symptoms. Lack of energy was more strongly related to morning fatigue than to evening fatigue. Lack of energy interferes with daytime function and is not just the inverse of fatigue but a distinct perception that differs from fatigue. Copyright © 2013 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Distinct Molecular Evolutionary Mechanisms Underlie the Functional Diversification of the Wnt and TGFβ Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Konikoff, Charlotte E.; Wisotzkey, Robert G.; Stinchfield, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    The canonical Wnt pathway is one of the oldest and most functionally diverse of animal intercellular signaling pathways. Though much is known about loss-of-function phenotypes for Wnt pathway components in several model organisms, the question of how this pathway achieved its current repertoire of functions has not been addressed. Our phylogenetic analyses of 11 multigene families from five species belonging to distinct phyla, as well as additional analyses employing the 12 Drosophila genomes, suggest frequent gene duplications affecting ligands and receptors as well as co-evolution of new ligand–receptor pairs likely facilitated the expansion of this pathway’s capabilities. Further, several examples of recent gene loss are visible in Drosophila when compared to family members in other phyla. By comparison the TGFβ signaling pathway is characterized by ancient gene duplications of ligands, receptors, and signal transducers with recent duplication events restricted to the vertebrate lineage. Overall, the data suggest that two distinct molecular evolutionary mechanisms can create a functionally diverse developmental signaling pathway. These are the recent dynamic generation of new genes and ligand–receptor interactions as seen in the Wnt pathway and the conservative adaptation of ancient pre-existing genes to new roles as seen in the TGFβ pathway. From a practical perspective, the former mechanism limits the investigator’s ability to transfer knowledge of specific pathway functions across species while the latter facilitates knowledge transfer. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00239-010-9337-z) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20339843

  19. Unique Structural Features of Membrane-Bound C-Terminal Domain Motifs Modulate Complexin Inhibitory Function

    PubMed Central

    Snead, David; Lai, Alex L.; Wragg, Rachel T.; Parisotto, Daniel A.; Ramlall, Trudy F.; Dittman, Jeremy S.; Freed, Jack H.; Eliezer, David

    2017-01-01

    Complexin is a small soluble presynaptic protein that interacts with neuronal SNARE proteins in order to regulate synaptic vesicle exocytosis. While the SNARE-binding central helix of complexin is required for both the inhibition of spontaneous fusion and the facilitation of synchronous fusion, the disordered C-terminal domain (CTD) of complexin is specifically required for its inhibitory function. The CTD of worm complexin binds to membranes via two distinct motifs, one of which undergoes a membrane curvature dependent structural transition that is required for efficient inhibition of neurotransmitter release, but the conformations of the membrane-bound motifs remain poorly characterized. Visualizing these conformations is required to clarify the mechanisms by which complexin membrane interactions regulate its function. Here, we employ optical and magnetic resonance spectroscopy to precisely define the boundaries of the two CTD membrane-binding motifs and to characterize their conformations. We show that the curvature dependent amphipathic helical motif features an irregular element of helical structure, likely a pi-bulge, and that this feature is important for complexin inhibitory function in vivo. PMID:28596722

  20. Distinct Domains within APOBEC3G and APOBEC3F Interact with Separate Regions of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Vif▿

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Rebecca A.; Smith, Jessica; Barr, Rebekah; Bhattacharyya, Darshana; Pathak, Vinay K.

    2009-01-01

    Human APOBEC3G (A3G) and APOBEC3F (A3F) inhibit the replication of Vif-deficient human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). HIV-1 Vif overcomes these host restriction factors by binding to them and inducing their degradation. Thus, the Vif-A3G and Vif-A3F interactions are attractive targets for antiviral drug development, as inhibiting these interactions could allow the host defense mechanism to control HIV-1 replication. Recently, it has been reported that amino acids 105 to 156 of A3G are involved in the interaction with Vif; however, to date, the region of A3F involved in Vif binding has not been identified. Using our previously reported Vif mutants that are capable of binding to only A3G (3G binder) or only A3F (3F binder), in conjunction with a series of A3G-A3F chimeras, we have now mapped the APOBEC3-Vif interaction domains. We found that the A3G domain that interacts with the Vif YRHHY region is located between amino acids 126 and 132 of A3G, which is consistent with the conclusions reported in previous studies. The A3F domain that interacts with the Vif DRMR region did not occur in the homologous domain but instead was located between amino acids 283 and 300 of A3F. These studies are the first to identify the A3F domain that interacts with the Vif DRMR region and show that distinct domains of A3G and A3F interact with different Vif regions. Pharmacological inhibition of either or both of these Vif-A3 interactions should prevent the degradation of the APOBEC3 proteins and could be used as a therapy against HIV-1. PMID:19036809

  1. Molecular basis of the functional distinction between Cln1 and Cln2 cyclins

    PubMed Central

    Quilis, Inma; Igual, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Cln1 and Cln2 are very similar but not identical cyclins. In this work, we tried to describe the molecular basis of the functional distinction between Cln1 and Cln2. We constructed chimeric cyclins containing different fragments of Cln1 and Cln2 and performed several functional analysis that make it possible to distinguish between Cln1 or Cln2. We identified that region between amino acids 225 and 299 of Cln2 is not only necessary but also sufficient to confer Cln2 specific functionality compared with Cln1. We also studied Cln1 and Cln2 subcellular localization identifying additional differences between them. Both cyclins are distributed between the nucleus and the cytoplasm, but Cln1 shows stronger nuclear accumulation. Nuclear import of both cyclins is mediated by the classical nuclear import pathway and by sequences in the N-terminal end of the proteins. For Cln2, but not for Cln1, a nuclear export mechanism mediated by karyopherin Msn5 has been identified. Strikingly, Cln2 export depends on a Msn5-dependent NES between amino acids 225 and 299. In fact, the introduction of this region confers to Cln1 an export mechanism dependent on Msn5; importantly, this causes the gain of Cln2-specific cytosolic functions and the impairment of nuclear function. In short, a region from Cln2 controlling an Msn5-dependent nuclear export mechanism confers a specific functionality to Cln2 compared with Cln1. PMID:22889732

  2. The cysteine-rich domain regulates ADAM protease function in vivo.

    PubMed

    Smith, Katherine M; Gaultier, Alban; Cousin, Helene; Alfandari, Dominique; White, Judith M; DeSimone, Douglas W

    2002-12-09

    ADAMs are membrane-anchored proteases that regulate cell behavior by proteolytically modifying the cell surface and ECM. Like other membrane-anchored proteases, ADAMs contain candidate "adhesive" domains downstream of their metalloprotease domains. The mechanism by which membrane-anchored cell surface proteases utilize these putative adhesive domains to regulate protease function in vivo is not well understood. We address this important question by analyzing the relative contributions of downstream extracellular domains (disintegrin, cysteine rich, and EGF-like repeat) of the ADAM13 metalloprotease during Xenopus laevis development. When expressed in embryos, ADAM13 induces hyperplasia of the cement gland, whereas ADAM10 does not. Using chimeric constructs, we find that the metalloprotease domain of ADAM10 can substitute for that of ADAM13, but that specificity for cement gland expansion requires a downstream extracellular domain of ADAM13. Analysis of finer resolution chimeras indicates an essential role for the cysteine-rich domain and a supporting role for the disintegrin domain. These and other results reveal that the cysteine-rich domain of ADAM13 cooperates intramolecularly with the ADAM13 metalloprotease domain to regulate its function in vivo. Our findings thus provide the first evidence that a downstream extracellular adhesive domain plays an active role in regulating ADAM protease function in vivo. These findings are likely relevant to other membrane-anchored cell surface proteases.

  3. Functional analysis of domain of unknown function (DUF) 1943, DUF1944 and von Willebrand factor type D domain (VWD) in vitellogenin2 in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chen; Hu, Lili; Liu, Shousheng; Gao, Zhan; Zhang, Shicui

    2013-12-01

    Vitellogenin (Vg), the precursor of egg-yolk proteins in all oviparous organisms, shares a similar domain structure combination. In most cases, Vg contains the Vitellogenin_N domain, the domain of unknown function (DUF) 1943, and the von Willebrand factor type D domain (VWD), which are present in different forms of Vg from both vertebrates and invertebrates. Occasionally, a DUF1944 domain is also present in between DUF1943 and VWD in some Vg proteins of vertebrates. Recent studies have shown that Vg participates in immune defense of host with multiple functions. However, whether all Vg proteins encoded by different vg genes play an immune role is unknown. In addition, the correlation of different domains in Vg with the multiple immune functions remains completely unclear. Here we demonstrated clearly that recombinant proteins, rDUF1943, rDUF1944 and rVWD from zebrafish Vg2 interacted with both the Gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis and Micrococcus luteus and the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Vibrio anguillarum, as well as their signature components LTA and LPS. Moreover, both rDUF1943 and rDUF1944 promoted the phagocytosis of E. coli and S. aureus by carp macrophages. These suggest that both DUF1943 and DUF1944 as well as VWD may contribute to the function of Vg as a pattern recognition receptor, and DUF1943 and DUF1944 also contribute to the function of Vg as an opsonin. This study also opens a new angle for identification of function of genes of unknown function, which have the domains DUF1943 and DUF1944. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Two functionally distinct kinetochore pools of BubR1 ensure accurate chromosome segregation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Gang; Mendez, Blanca Lopez; Sedgwick, Garry G.; Nilsson, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    The BubR1/Bub3 complex is an important regulator of chromosome segregation as it facilitates proper kinetochore–microtubule interactions and is also an essential component of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). Whether BubR1/Bub3 localization to kinetochores in human cells stimulates SAC signalling or only contributes to kinetochore–microtubule interactions is debated. Here we show that two distinct pools of BubR1/Bub3 exist at kinetochores and we uncouple these with defined BubR1/Bub3 mutants to address their function. The major kinetochore pool of BubR1/Bub3 is dependent on direct Bub1/Bub3 binding and is required for chromosome alignment but not for the SAC. A distinct pool of BubR1/Bub3 localizes by directly binding to phosphorylated MELT repeats on the outer kinetochore protein KNL1. When we prevent the direct binding of BubR1/Bub3 to KNL1 the checkpoint is weakened because BubR1/Bub3 is not incorporated into checkpoint complexes efficiently. In conclusion, kinetochore localization supports both known functions of BubR1/Bub3. PMID:27457023

  5. Voltage-gated proton currents in microglia of distinct morphology and functional state.

    PubMed

    Klee, R; Heinemann, U; Eder, C

    1999-01-01

    Whole-cell patch-clamp measurements were performed to investigate voltage-gated proton currents (I(PR)) in cultured murine microglia of distinct morphology and functional state. We studied I(PR) in ameboid microglia of untreated cultures, in ameboid microglia which had been activated by lipopolysaccharide, and in ramified microglia which had been exposed to astrocyte-conditioned medium. Proton currents of these three microglia populations did not differ regarding their activation threshold or the voltage dependence of steady-state activation. Moreover, pharmacological properties of I(PR) were similar: proton currents were sensitive to extracellularly applied Zn2+ or La3+, and could be abolished by each of those at a concentration of 100 microM. In the presence of extracellular Na+, I(PR) was decreased to a similar small extent due to activity of the Na+/H+ exchanger in all microglial populations. In contrast, proton currents of microglia differed between the three cell populations with respect to their current density and their time-course of activation: in comparison with untreated microglia, the current density of I(PR) was reduced by about 50% in microglia after their treatment with either lipopolysaccharide or astrocyte-conditioned medium. Moreover, I(PR) activated significantly more slowly in cells exposed to lipopolysaccharide or astrocyte-conditioned medium than in untreated cells. It can be concluded that the distinct H+ current characteristics of the three microglial populations do not correlate with the functional state of the cells.

  6. Hierarchical modularity in ERα transcriptional network is associated with distinct functions and implicates clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Tang, Binhua; Hsu, Hang-Kai; Hsu, Pei-Yin; Bonneville, Russell; Chen, Su-Shing; Huang, Tim H-M; Jin, Victor X

    2012-01-01

    Recent genome-wide profiling reveals highly complex regulation networks among ERα and its targets. We integrated estrogen (E2)-stimulated time-series ERα ChIP-seq and gene expression data to identify the ERα-centered transcription factor (TF) hubs and their target genes, and inferred the time-variant hierarchical network structures using a Bayesian multivariate modeling approach. With its recurrent motif patterns, we determined three embedded regulatory modules from the ERα core transcriptional network. The GO analyses revealed the distinct biological function associated with each of three embedded modules. The survival analysis showed the genes in each module were able to render a significant survival correlation in breast cancer patient cohorts. In summary, our Bayesian statistical modeling and modularity analysis not only reveals the dynamic properties of the ERα-centered regulatory network and associated distinct biological functions, but also provides a reliable and effective genomic analytical approach for the analysis of dynamic regulatory network for any given TF.

  7. Functional domains of the Xenopus replication licensing factor Cdt1

    PubMed Central

    Ferenbach, Andrew; Li, Anatoliy; Brito-Martins, Marta; Blow, J. Julian

    2005-01-01

    During late mitosis and early G1, replication origins are licensed for subsequent replication by loading heterohexamers of the mini-chromosome maintenance proteins (Mcm2-7). To prevent re-replication of DNA, the licensing system is down-regulated at other cell cycle stages. A small protein called geminin plays an important role in this down-regulation by binding and inhibiting the Cdt1 component of the licensing system. We examine here the organization of Xenopus Cdt1, delimiting regions of Cdt1 required for licensing and regions required for geminin interaction. The C-terminal 377 residues of Cdt1 are required for licensing and the extreme C-terminus contains a domain that interacts with an Mcm(2,4,6,7) complex. Two regions of Cdt1 interact with geminin: one at the N-terminus, and one in the centre of the protein. Only the central region binds geminin tightly enough to successfully compete with full-length Cdt1 for geminin binding. This interaction requires a predicted coiled-coil domain that is conserved amongst metazoan Cdt1 homologues. Geminin forms a homodimer, with each dimer binding one molecule of Cdt1. Separation of the domains necessary for licensing activity from domains required for a strong interaction with geminin generated a construct, whose licensing activity was partially insensitive to geminin inhibition. PMID:15653632

  8. Regional functional connectivity predicts distinct cognitive impairments in Alzheimer's disease spectrum.

    PubMed

    Ranasinghe, Kamalini G; Hinkley, Leighton B; Beagle, Alexander J; Mizuiri, Danielle; Dowling, Anne F; Honma, Susanne M; Finucane, Mariel M; Scherling, Carole; Miller, Bruce L; Nagarajan, Srikantan S; Vossel, Keith A

    2014-01-01

    Understanding neural network dysfunction in neurodegenerative disease is imperative to effectively develop network-modulating therapies. In Alzheimer's disease (AD), cognitive decline associates with deficits in resting-state functional connectivity of diffuse brain networks. The goal of the current study was to test whether specific cognitive impairments in AD spectrum correlate with reduced functional connectivity of distinct brain regions. We recorded resting-state functional connectivity of alpha-band activity in 27 patients with AD spectrum--22 patients with probable AD (5 logopenic variant primary progressive aphasia, 7 posterior cortical atrophy, and 10 early-onset amnestic/dysexecutive AD) and 5 patients with mild cognitive impairment due to AD. We used magnetoencephalographic imaging (MEGI) to perform an unbiased search for regions where patterns of functional connectivity correlated with disease severity and cognitive performance. Functional connectivity measured the strength of coherence between a given region and the rest of the brain. Decreased neural connectivity of multiple brain regions including the right posterior perisylvian region and left middle frontal cortex correlated with a higher degree of disease severity. Deficits in executive control and episodic memory correlated with reduced functional connectivity of the left frontal cortex, whereas visuospatial impairments correlated with reduced functional connectivity of the left inferior parietal cortex. Our findings indicate that reductions in region-specific alpha-band resting-state functional connectivity are strongly correlated with, and might contribute to, specific cognitive deficits in AD spectrum. In the future, MEGI functional connectivity could be an important biomarker to map and follow defective networks in the early stages of AD.

  9. Functional chromatography reveals three natural products that target the same protein with distinct mechanisms of action

    PubMed Central

    Kang, MinJin; Wu, Tongde; Wijeratne, E. M. Kithsiri; Lau, Eric C.; Mason, Damian J.; Mesa, Celestina; Tillotson, Joseph; Zhang, Donna D.; Gunatilaka, A. A. Leslie; La Clair, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Access to lead compounds with defined molecular targets continues to be a barrier to the translation of natural product resources. As a solution, we have developed a system that uses discreet, recombinant proteins as the vehicles for natural product isolation. Here, we describe the use of this functional chromatographic method to identify natural products that bind to the AAA+ chaperone, p97, a promising cancer target. Application of this method to a panel of fungal and plant extracts identified rheoemodin, 1-hydroxydehydroherbarin and phomapyrrolidone A as distinct p97 modulators. Excitingly, each of these molecules displayed a unique mechanism of p97 modulation. This discovery provides strong support for the application of functional chromatography to the discovery of protein modulators that would likely escape traditional high-throughput or phenotypic screening platforms. PMID:25125376

  10. Generation of a Functionally Distinct Rhizopus oryzae Lipase through Protein Folding Memory.

    PubMed

    Satomura, Atsushi; Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Rhizopus oryzae lipase (ROL) has a propeptide at its N-terminus that functions as an intramolecular chaperone and facilitates the folding of mature ROL (mROL). In this study, we successfully generated a functionally distinct imprinted mROL (mROLimp) through protein folding memory using a mutated propeptide. The mutated propeptide left its structural memory on mROL and produced mROLimp that exhibited different substrate specificities compared with mROLWT (prepared from the wild type propeptide), although the amino acid sequences of both mROLs were the same. mROLimp showed a preference for substrates with medium chain-length acyl groups and, noticeably, recognized a peptidase-specific substrate. In addition, ROLimp was more stable than mROLWT. These results strongly suggest that proteins with identical amino acid sequences can fold into different conformations and that mutations in intramolecular chaperones can dynamically induce changes in enzymatic activity.

  11. Functional chromatography reveals three natural products that target the same protein with distinct mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min Jin; Wu, Tongde; Wijeratne, E M Kithsiri; Lau, Eric C; Mason, Damian J; Mesa, Celestina; Tillotson, Joseph; Zhang, Donna D; Gunatilaka, A A Leslie; La Clair, James J; Chapman, Eli

    2014-09-22

    Access to lead compounds with defined molecular targets continues to be a barrier to the translation of natural product resources. As a solution, we developed a system that uses discrete, recombinant proteins as the vehicles for natural product isolation. Here, we describe the use of this functional chromatographic method to identify natural products that bind to the AAA+ chaperone, p97, a promising cancer target. Application of this method to a panel of fungal and plant extracts identified rheoemodin, 1-hydroxydehydroherbarin, and phomapyrrolidone A as distinct p97 modulators. Excitingly, each of these molecules displayed a unique mechanism of p97 modulation. This discovery provides strong support for the application of functional chromatography to the discovery of protein modulators that would likely escape traditional high-throughput or phenotypic screening platforms. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Distinct patterns of functional brain connectivity correlate with objective performance and subjective beliefs

    PubMed Central

    Barttfeld, Pablo; Wicker, Bruno; McAleer, Phil; Belin, Pascal; Cojan, Yann; Graziano, Martín; Leiguarda, Ramón; Sigman, Mariano

    2013-01-01

    The degree of correspondence between objective performance and subjective beliefs varies widely across individuals. Here we demonstrate that functional brain network connectivity measured before exposure to a perceptual decision task covaries with individual objective (type-I performance) and subjective (type-II performance) accuracy. Increases in connectivity with type-II performance were observed in networks measured while participants directed attention inward (focus on respiration), but not in networks measured during states of neutral (resting state) or exogenous attention. Measures of type-I performance were less sensitive to the subjects’ specific attentional states from which the networks were derived. These results suggest the existence of functional brain networks indexing objective performance and accuracy of subjective beliefs distinctively expressed in a set of stable mental states. PMID:23801762

  13. Structural And Functional Analysis of the Ligand Specificity of the HtrA2/OmI PDZ Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Appleton, B.A.; Wu, P.; Wiesmann, C.; Sidhu, S.S.

    2009-06-04

    The mitochondrial serine protease HtrA2/Omi helps to maintain mitochondrial function by handling misfolded proteins in the intermembrane space. In addition, HtrA2/Omi has been implicated as a proapoptotic factor upon release into the cytoplasm during the cell death cascade. The protein contains a C-terminal PDZ domain that packs against the protease active site and inhibits proteolytic activity. Engagement of the PDZ domain by peptide ligands has been shown to activate the protease and also has been proposed to mediate substrate recognition. We report a detailed structural and functional analysis of the human HtrA2/Omi PDZ domain using peptide libraries and affinity assays to define specificity, X-ray crystallography to view molecular details of PDZ-ligand interactions, and alanine-scanning mutagenesis to probe the peptide-binding groove. We show that the HtrA2/Omi PDZ domain recognizes both C-terminal and internal stretches of extended, hydrophobic polypeptides. High-affinity ligand recognition requires contacts with up to five hydrophobic side chains by distinct sites on the PDZ domain. However, no particular residue type is absolutely required at any position, and thus, the HtrA2/Omi PDZ domain appears to be a promiscuous module adapted to recognize unstructured, hydrophobic polypeptides. This type of specificity is consistent with the biological role of HtrA2/Omi in mitochondria, which requires the recognition of diverse, exposed stretches of hydrophobic sequences in misfolded proteins. The findings are less consistent with, but do not exclude, a role for the PDZ domain in targeting the protease to specific substrates during apoptosis.

  14. Functional analyses of two cellular binding domains of bovine lactadherin.

    PubMed

    Andersen, M H; Graversen, H; Fedosov, S N; Petersen, T E; Rasmussen, J T

    2000-05-23

    The glycoprotein bovine lactadherin (formerly known as PAS-6/7) comprises two EGF-like domains and two C-like domains found in blood clotting factors V and VIII. Bovine lactadherin binds to alpha(v)beta(5) integrin in an RGD-dependent manner and also to phospholipids, especially phosphatidyl serine. To define and characterize these bindings the interactions between lactadherin and different mammalian cell types were investigated. Using recombinant forms of bovine lactadherin, the human breast carcinomas MCF-7 cells expressing the alpha(v)beta(5) integrin receptor were shown to bind specifically to RGD containing lactadherin but not to a mutated RGE lactadherin. A monoclonal antibody against the alpha(v)beta(5) integrin receptor and a synthetic RGD-containing peptide inhibited the adhesion of MCF-7 cells to lactadherin. Green monkey kidney MA-104 cells, also expressing the alpha(v)beta(3) together with the alpha(v)beta(5) integrin, showed binding to bovine lactadherin via both integrins. To investigate the interaction of lipid with lactadherin two fragments were expressed corresponding to the C1C2 domains and the C2 domain. Both fragments bound to phosphatidyl serine in a concentration-dependent manner with an affinity similar to native lactadherin (K(d) = 1.8 nM). A peptide corresponding to the C-terminal part of the C2 domain inhibited the binding of lactadherin to phospholipid in a concentration-dependent manner, and finally it was shown that lactadherin mediates binding between artificial phosphatidyl serine membranes and MCF-7 cells. Taken together these results show that lactadherin can act as link between two surfaces by binding to integrin receptors through its N-terminus and to phospholipids through its C-terminus.

  15. Understory plant communities and the functional distinction between savanna trees, forest trees, and pines.

    PubMed

    Veldman, Joseph W; Mattingly, W Brett; Brudvig, Lars A

    2013-02-01

    Although savanna trees and forest trees are thought to represent distinct functional groups with different effects on ecosystem processes, few empirical studies have examined these effects. In particular, it remains unclear if savanna and forest trees differ in their ability to coexist with understory plants, which comprise the majority of plant diversity in most savannas. We used structural equation modeling (SEM) and data from 157 sites across three locations in the southeastern United States to understand the effects of broadleaf savanna trees, broadleaf forest trees, and pine trees on savanna understory plant communities. After accounting for underlying gradients in fire frequency and soil moisture, abundances (i.e., basal area and stem density) of forest trees and pines, but not savanna trees, were negatively correlated with the cover and density (i.e., local-scale species richness) of C4 graminoid species, a defining savanna understory functional group that is linked to ecosystem flammability. In analyses of the full understory community, abundances of trees from all functional groups were negatively correlated with species density and cover. For both the C4 and full communities, fire frequency promoted understory plants directly, and indirectly by limiting forest tree abundance. There was little indirect influence of fire on the understory mediated through savanna trees and pines, which are morefire tolerant than forest trees. We conclude that tree functional identity is an important factor that influences overstory tree relationships with savanna understory plant communities. In particular, distinct relationships between trees and C4 graminoids have implications for grass-tree coexistence and vegetation-fire feedbacks that maintain savanna environments and their associated understory plant diversity.

  16. Understory plant communities and the functional distinction between savanna trees, forest trees, and pines

    SciTech Connect

    Veldman, Joseph W.; Mattingly, W. Brett; Brudvig, Lars A.

    2013-02-01

    Although savanna trees and forest trees are thought to represent distinct functional groups with different effects on ecosystem processes, few empirical studies have examined these effects. In particular, it remains unclear if savanna and forest trees differ in their ability to coexist with understory plants, which comprise the majority of plant diversity in most savannas. We used structural equation modeling (SEM) and data from 157 sites across three locations in the southeastern United States to understand the effects of broadleaf savanna trees, broadleaf forest trees, and pine trees on savanna understory plant communities. After accounting for underlying gradients in fire frequency and soil moisture, abundances (i.e., basal area and stem density) of forest trees and pines, but not savanna trees, were negatively correlated with the cover and density (i.e., local-scale species richness) of C4 graminoid species, a defining savanna understory functional group that is linked to ecosystem flammability. In analyses of the full understory community, abundances of trees from all functional groups were negatively correlated with species density and cover. For both the C4 and full communities, fire frequency promoted understory plants directly, and indirectly by limiting forest tree abundance. There was little indirect influence of fire on the understory mediated through savanna trees and pines, which are more fire tolerant than forest trees. We conclude that tree functional identity is an important factor that influences overstory tree relationships with savanna understory plant communities. In particular, distinct relationships between trees and C4 graminoids have implications for grass-tree coexistence and vegetation-fire feedbacks that maintain savanna environments and their associated understory plant diversity.

  17. Common and Distinct Amygdala-Function Perturbations in Depressed vs Anxious Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Beesdo, Katja; Lau, Jennifer Y. F.; Guyer, Amanda E.; McClure-Tone, Erin B.; Monk, Christopher S.; Nelson, Eric E.; Fromm, Stephen J.; Goldwin, Michelle A.; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Leibenluft, El