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Sample records for distinct protease pathways

  1. Distinct protease pathways control cell shape and apoptosis in v-src-transformed quail neuroretina cells

    SciTech Connect

    Neel, Benjamin D.; Gillet, Germain . E-mail: g.gillet@ibcp.fr

    2005-11-15

    Intracellular proteases play key roles in cell differentiation, proliferation and apoptosis. In nerve cells, little is known about their relative contribution to the pathways which control cell physiology, including cell death. Neoplastic transformation of avian neuroretina cells by p60 {sup v-src} tyrosine kinase results in dramatic morphological changes and deregulation of apoptosis. To identify the proteases involved in the cellular response to p60 {sup v-src}, we evaluated the effect of specific inhibitors of caspases, calpains and the proteasome on cell shape changes and apoptosis induced by p60 {sup v-src} inactivation in quail neuroretina cells transformed by tsNY68, a thermosensitive strain of Rous sarcoma virus. We found that the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is recruited early after p60 {sup v-src} inactivation and is critical for morphological changes, whereas caspases are essential for cell death. This study provides evidence that distinct intracellular proteases are involved in the control of the morphology and fate of v-src-transformed cells.

  2. Neuropeptidomics Mass Spectrometry Reveals Signaling Networks Generated by Distinct Protease Pathways in Human Systems.

    PubMed

    Hook, Vivian; Bandeira, Nuno

    2015-12-01

    Neuropeptides regulate intercellular signaling as neurotransmitters of the central and peripheral nervous systems, and as peptide hormones in the endocrine system. Diverse neuropeptides of distinct primary sequences of various lengths, often with post-translational modifications, coordinate and integrate regulation of physiological functions. Mass spectrometry-based analysis of the diverse neuropeptide structures in neuropeptidomics research is necessary to define the full complement of neuropeptide signaling molecules. Human neuropeptidomics has notable importance in defining normal and dysfunctional neuropeptide signaling in human health and disease. Neuropeptidomics has great potential for expansion in translational research opportunities for defining neuropeptide mechanisms of human diseases, providing novel neuropeptide drug targets for drug discovery, and monitoring neuropeptides as biomarkers of drug responses. In consideration of the high impact of human neuropeptidomics for health, an observed gap in this discipline is the few published articles in human neuropeptidomics compared with, for example, human proteomics and related mass spectrometry disciplines. Focus on human neuropeptidomics will advance new knowledge of the complex neuropeptide signaling networks participating in the fine control of neuroendocrine systems. This commentary review article discusses several human neuropeptidomics accomplishments that illustrate the rapidly expanding diversity of neuropeptides generated by protease processing of pro-neuropeptide precursors occurring within the secretory vesicle proteome. Of particular interest is the finding that human-specific cathepsin V participates in producing enkephalin and likely other neuropeptides, indicating unique proteolytic mechanisms for generating human neuropeptides. The field of human neuropeptidomics has great promise to solve new mechanisms in disease conditions, leading to new drug targets and therapeutic agents for human

  3. Neuropeptidomics Mass Spectrometry Reveals Signaling Networks Generated by Distinct Protease Pathways in Human Systems.

    PubMed

    Hook, Vivian; Bandeira, Nuno

    2015-12-01

    Neuropeptides regulate intercellular signaling as neurotransmitters of the central and peripheral nervous systems, and as peptide hormones in the endocrine system. Diverse neuropeptides of distinct primary sequences of various lengths, often with post-translational modifications, coordinate and integrate regulation of physiological functions. Mass spectrometry-based analysis of the diverse neuropeptide structures in neuropeptidomics research is necessary to define the full complement of neuropeptide signaling molecules. Human neuropeptidomics has notable importance in defining normal and dysfunctional neuropeptide signaling in human health and disease. Neuropeptidomics has great potential for expansion in translational research opportunities for defining neuropeptide mechanisms of human diseases, providing novel neuropeptide drug targets for drug discovery, and monitoring neuropeptides as biomarkers of drug responses. In consideration of the high impact of human neuropeptidomics for health, an observed gap in this discipline is the few published articles in human neuropeptidomics compared with, for example, human proteomics and related mass spectrometry disciplines. Focus on human neuropeptidomics will advance new knowledge of the complex neuropeptide signaling networks participating in the fine control of neuroendocrine systems. This commentary review article discusses several human neuropeptidomics accomplishments that illustrate the rapidly expanding diversity of neuropeptides generated by protease processing of pro-neuropeptide precursors occurring within the secretory vesicle proteome. Of particular interest is the finding that human-specific cathepsin V participates in producing enkephalin and likely other neuropeptides, indicating unique proteolytic mechanisms for generating human neuropeptides. The field of human neuropeptidomics has great promise to solve new mechanisms in disease conditions, leading to new drug targets and therapeutic agents for human

  4. Neuropeptidomics Mass Spectrometry Reveals Signaling Networks Generated by Distinct Protease Pathways in Human Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hook, Vivian; Bandeira, Nuno

    2015-12-01

    Neuropeptides regulate intercellular signaling as neurotransmitters of the central and peripheral nervous systems, and as peptide hormones in the endocrine system. Diverse neuropeptides of distinct primary sequences of various lengths, often with post-translational modifications, coordinate and integrate regulation of physiological functions. Mass spectrometry-based analysis of the diverse neuropeptide structures in neuropeptidomics research is necessary to define the full complement of neuropeptide signaling molecules. Human neuropeptidomics has notable importance in defining normal and dysfunctional neuropeptide signaling in human health and disease. Neuropeptidomics has great potential for expansion in translational research opportunities for defining neuropeptide mechanisms of human diseases, providing novel neuropeptide drug targets for drug discovery, and monitoring neuropeptides as biomarkers of drug responses. In consideration of the high impact of human neuropeptidomics for health, an observed gap in this discipline is the few published articles in human neuropeptidomics compared with, for example, human proteomics and related mass spectrometry disciplines. Focus on human neuropeptidomics will advance new knowledge of the complex neuropeptide signaling networks participating in the fine control of neuroendocrine systems. This commentary review article discusses several human neuropeptidomics accomplishments that illustrate the rapidly expanding diversity of neuropeptides generated by protease processing of pro-neuropeptide precursors occurring within the secretory vesicle proteome. Of particular interest is the finding that human-specific cathepsin V participates in producing enkephalin and likely other neuropeptides, indicating unique proteolytic mechanisms for generating human neuropeptides. The field of human neuropeptidomics has great promise to solve new mechanisms in disease conditions, leading to new drug targets and therapeutic agents for human

  5. Pathogen-Secreted Proteases Activate a Novel Plant Immune Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Zhenyu; Li, Jian-Feng; Niu, Yajie; Zhang, Xue-Cheng; Woody, Owen Z.; Xiong, Yan; Djonović, Slavica; Millet, Yves; Bush, Jenifer; McConkey, Brendan J.; Sheen, Jen; Ausubel, Frederick M.

    2015-01-01

    Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) cascades play central roles in innate immune signaling networks in plants and animals1,2. In plants, however, the molecular mechanisms of how signal perception is transduced to MAPK activation remain elusive1. We report that pathogen-secreted proteases activate a previously unknown signaling pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana involving the Gα, Gβ and Gγ subunits of heterotrimeric G-protein complexes, which function upstream of a MAPK cascade. In this pathway, Receptor for Activated C Kinase 1 (RACK1) functions as a novel scaffold that binds to the Gβ subunit as well as to all three tiers of the MAPK cascade, thereby linking upstream G protein signaling to downstream activation of a MAPK cascade. The protease-G protein-RACK1-MAPK cascade modules identified in these studies are distinct from previously described plant immune signaling pathways such as the one elicited by bacterial flagellin, in which G proteins function downstream of or in parallel to a MAPK cascade without the involvement of the RACK1 scaffolding protein. The discovery of the novel protease-mediated immune signaling pathway described here was facilitated by the use of the broad host range, opportunistic bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The ability of P. aeruginosa to infect both plants and animals makes it an excellent model to identify novel types of immunoregulatory strategies that account for its niche adaptation to diverse host tissues and immune systems. PMID:25731164

  6. New soluble ATP-dependent protease, Ti, in Escherichia coli that is distinct from protease La

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, C.H.; Hwang, B.J.; Park, W.J.; Goldberg, A.L.

    1987-05-01

    E. coli must contain other ATP-requiring proteolytic systems in addition to protease La (the lon gene product). A new ATP-dependent protease was purified from lon cells which lack protease La, as shown by immuno-blotting. This enzyme hydrolyzes (TH)casein to acid-soluble products in the presence of ATP (or dATP) and MgS . Nonhydrolyzable ATP analogs, other nucleoside triphosphates and AMP can not replace ATP. Therefore, ATP hydrolysis appears necessary for proteolysis. The enzyme appears to be a serine protease, but also contains essential thiol residues. Unlike protease La, it is not inhibited by vanadate, heparin, or the defective R9 subunit of protease La. On gel filtration, this enzyme has an apparent Mr of 340,000 and is comprised of two components of 190,000D and 130,000D, which can be separated by phosphocellulose chromatography. By themselves, these components do not show ATP-dependent proteolysis, but when mixed, full activity is restored. These finding and similar ones of Maurizi and Gottesman indicate that E. coli contain two soluble ATP-dependent proteases, which function by different mechanisms. This new enzyme may contribute to the rapid breakdown of abnormal polypeptides or of normal proteins during starvation. The authors propose to name it protease Ti.

  7. Escherichia coli contains a soluble ATP-dependent protease (Ti) distinct from protease La

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, B.J.; Park, W.J.; Chung, C.H.; Goldberg, A.L.

    1987-08-01

    The energy requirement for protein breakdown in Escherichia coli has generally been attributed to the ATP-dependence of protease La, the lon gene product. The authors have partially purified another ATP-dependent protease from lon/sup -/ cells that lack protease La (as shown by immunoblotting). This enzyme hydrolyzes (/sup 3/H)methyl-casein to acid-soluble products in the presence of ATP and Mg/sup 2 +/. ATP hydrolysis appears necessary for proteolytic activity. Since this enzyme is inhibited by diisopropyl fluorophosphate, it appears to be a serine protease, but it also contains essential thiol residues. They propose to name this enzyme protease Ti. It differs from protease La in nucleotide specificity, inhibitor sensitivity, and subunit composition. On gel filtration, protease Ti has an apparent molecular weight of 370,000. It can be fractionated by phosphocellulose chromatography or by DEAE chromatography into two components with apparent molecular weights of 260,000 and 140,000. When separated, they do not show preteolytic activity. One of these components, by itself, has ATPase activity and is labile in the absence of ATP. The other contains the diisopropyl fluorophosphate-sensitive proteolytic site. These results and the similar findings of Katayama-Fujimura et al. indicate that E. coli contains two ATP-hydrolyzing proteases, which differ in many biochemical features and probably in their physiological roles.

  8. Signaling pathways activated by a protease allergen in basophils

    PubMed Central

    Rosenstein, Rachel K.; Bezbradica, Jelena S.; Yu, Shuang; Medzhitov, Ruslan

    2014-01-01

    Allergic diseases represent a significant burden in industrialized countries, but why and how the immune system responds to allergens remain largely unknown. Because many clinically significant allergens have proteolytic activity, and many helminths express proteases that are necessary for their life cycles, host mechanisms likely have evolved to detect the proteolytic activity of helminth proteases, which may be incidentally activated by protease allergens. A cysteine protease, papain, is a prototypic protease allergen that can directly activate basophils and mast cells, leading to the production of cytokines, including IL-4, characteristic of the type 2 immune response. The mechanism of papain’s immunogenic activity remains unknown. Here we have characterized the cellular response activated by papain in basophils. We find that papain-induced IL-4 production requires calcium flux and activation of PI3K and nuclear factor of activated T cells. Interestingly, papain-induced IL-4 production was dependent on the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM) adaptor protein Fc receptor γ-chain, even though the canonical ITAM signaling was not activated by papain. Collectively, these data characterize the downstream signaling pathway activated by a protease allergen in basophils. PMID:25369937

  9. Targeting the AKT pathway: Repositioning HIV protease inhibitors as radiosensitizers

    PubMed Central

    Goda, Jayant S.; Pachpor, Tejaswini; Basu, Trinanjan; Chopra, Supriya; Gota, Vikram

    2016-01-01

    Cellular resistance in tumour cells to different therapeutic approaches has been a limiting factor in the curative treatment of cancer. Resistance to therapeutic radiation is a common phenomenon which significantly reduces treatment options and impacts survival. One of the mechanisms of acquiring resistance to ionizing radiation is the overexpression or activation of various oncogenes like the EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor), RAS (rat sarcoma) oncogene or loss of PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue) which in turn activates the phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3-K)/AKT pathway responsible for radiation resistance in various tumours. Blocking the pathway enhances the radiation response both in vitro and in vivo. Due to the differential activation of this pathway (constitutively activated in tumour cells and not in the normal host cells), it is an excellent candidate target for molecular targeted therapy to enhance radiation sensitivity. In this regard, HIV protease inhibitors (HPIs) known to interfere with PI3-K/AKT signaling in tumour cells, have been shown to sensitize various tumour cells to radiation both in vitro and in vivo. As a result, HPIs are now being investigated as possible radiosensitizers along with various chemotherapeutic drugs. This review describes the mechanisms by which PI3-K/AKT pathway causes radioresistance and the role of HIV protease inhibitors especially nelfinavir as a potential candidate drug to target the AKT pathway for overcoming radioresistance and its use in various clinical trials for different malignancies. PMID:27121513

  10. Targeting the AKT pathway: Repositioning HIV protease inhibitors as radiosensitizers.

    PubMed

    Goda, Jayant S; Pachpor, Tejaswini; Basu, Trinanjan; Chopra, Supriya; Gota, Vikram

    2016-02-01

    Cellular resistance in tumour cells to different therapeutic approaches has been a limiting factor in the curative treatment of cancer. Resistance to therapeutic radiation is a common phenomenon which significantly reduces treatment options and impacts survival. One of the mechanisms of acquiring resistance to ionizing radiation is the overexpression or activation of various oncogenes like the EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor), RAS (rat sarcoma) oncogene or loss of PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue) which in turn activates the phosphatidyl inositol 3-kinase/protein kinase B (PI3-K)/AKT pathway responsible for radiation resistance in various tumours. Blocking the pathway enhances the radiation response both in vitro and in vivo. Due to the differential activation of this pathway (constitutively activated in tumour cells and not in the normal host cells), it is an excellent candidate target for molecular targeted therapy to enhance radiation sensitivity. In this regard, HIV protease inhibitors (HPIs) known to interfere with PI3-K/AKT signaling in tumour cells, have been shown to sensitize various tumour cells to radiation both in vitro and in vivo. As a result, HPIs are now being investigated as possible radiosensitizers along with various chemotherapeutic drugs. This review describes the mechanisms by which PI3-K/AKT pathway causes radioresistance and the role of HIV protease inhibitors especially nelfinavir as a potential candidate drug to target the AKT pathway for overcoming radioresistance and its use in various clinical trials for different malignancies.

  11. Axon degeneration: context defines distinct pathways.

    PubMed

    Geden, Matthew J; Deshmukh, Mohanish

    2016-08-01

    Axon degeneration is an essential part of development, plasticity, and injury response and has been primarily studied in mammalian models in three contexts: 1) Axotomy-induced Wallerian degeneration, 2) Apoptosis-induced axon degeneration (axon apoptosis), and 3) Axon pruning. These three contexts dictate engagement of distinct pathways for axon degeneration. Recent advances have identified the importance of SARM1, NMNATs, NAD+ depletion, and MAPK signaling in axotomy-induced Wallerian degeneration. Interestingly, apoptosis-induced axon degeneration and axon pruning have many shared mechanisms both in signaling (e.g. DLK, JNKs, GSK3α/β) and execution (e.g. Puma, Bax, caspase-9, caspase-3). However, the specific mechanisms by which caspases are activated during apoptosis versus pruning appear distinct, with apoptosis requiring Apaf-1 but not caspase-6 while pruning requires caspase-6 but not Apaf-1. PMID:27197022

  12. Distinct properties of proteases and nucleases in the gut, salivary gland and saliva of southern green stink bug, Nezara viridula

    PubMed Central

    Lomate, Purushottam R.; Bonning, Bryony C.

    2016-01-01

    Stink bugs negatively impact numerous plant species of agricultural and horticultural importance. While efforts to develop effective control measures are underway, the unique digestive physiology of these pests presents a significant hurdle for either protein- or nucleotide-based management options. Here we report the comparative biochemical and proteomic characterization of proteases and nucleases from the gut, salivary gland and saliva of the southern green stink bug, Nezara viridula. The pH optimum for protease activity was acidic (5 to 6) in the gut with the primary proteases being cysteine proteases, and alkaline (8 to 9) in the saliva and salivary gland with the primary proteases being serine proteases. The serine proteases in saliva differ biochemically from trypsin and chymotrypsin, and the cathepsins in the gut and saliva showed distinct properties in inhibitor assays. Nuclease activity (DNase, RNase, dsRNase) was concentrated in the salivary gland and saliva with negligible activity in the gut. The most abundant proteins of the gut (530) and salivary gland (631) identified by proteomic analysis included four gut proteases along with eight proteases and one nuclease from the salivary gland. Understanding of N. viridula digestive physiology will facilitate the design of new strategies for management of this significant pest. PMID:27282882

  13. Crystal Structures of the Viral Protease Npro Imply Distinct Roles for the Catalytic Water in Catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Zögg, Thomas; Sponring, Michael; Schindler, Sabrina; Koll, Maria; Schneider, Rainer; Brandstetter, Hans; Auer, Bernhard

    2013-01-01

    Summary Npro is a key effector protein of pestiviruses such as bovine viral diarrhea virus and abolishes host cell antiviral defense mechanisms. Synthesized as the N-terminal part of the viral polyprotein, Npro releases itself via an autoproteolytic cleavage, triggering its immunological functions. However, the mechanisms of its proteolytic action and its immune escape were unclear. Here, we present the crystal structures of Npro to 1.25 Å resolution. Structures of pre- and postcleavage intermediates identify three catalytically relevant elements. The trapping of the putative catalytic water reveals its distinct roles as a base, acid, and nucleophile. The presentation of the substrate further explains the enigmatic latency of the protease, ensuring a single in cis cleavage. Additionally, we identified a zinc-free, disulfide-linked conformation of the TRASH motif, an interaction hub of immune factors. The structure opens additional opportunities in utilizing Npro as an autocleaving fusion protein and as a pharmaceutical target. PMID:23643950

  14. Bacterial serine proteases secreted by the autotransporter pathway: classification, specificity and role in virulence

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Perez, Fernando; Nataro, James P.

    2013-01-01

    Serine proteases exist in eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms and have emerged during evolution as the most abundant and functionally diverse group. In gram-negative bacteria, there is a growing family of high molecular weight serine proteases secreted to the external milieu by a fascinating and widely employed bacterial secretion mechanism, known as the autotransporter pathway. They were initially found in Neisseria, Shigella, and pathogenic Escherichia coli, but have now been also identified in Citrobacter rodentium, Salmonella, and Edwarsiella species. Here, we focus on proteins belonging to the Serine Protease Autotransporter of Enterobacteriaceae (SPATEs) family. Recent findings regarding the predilection of serine proteases to host intracellular or extracellular protein-substrates involved in numerous biological functions, such as those implicated in cytoskeleton stability, autophagy or innate and adaptive immunity, have helped provide a better understanding of SPATEs’ contributions in pathogenesis. Here, we discuss their classification, substrate specificity, and potential roles in pathogenesis. PMID:23689588

  15. AAA+ proteases and their role in distinct stages along the Vibrio cholerae lifecycle.

    PubMed

    Pressler, Katharina; Vorkapic, Dina; Lichtenegger, Sabine; Malli, Gerald; Barilich, Benjamin P; Cakar, Fatih; Zingl, Franz G; Reidl, Joachim; Schild, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    The facultative human pathogen Vibrio cholerae has to adapt to different environmental conditions along its lifecycle by means of transcriptional, translational and post-translational regulation. This study provides a first comprehensive analysis regarding the contribution of the cytoplasmic AAA+ proteases Lon, ClpP and HslV to distinct features of V. cholerae behaviour, including biofilm formation, motility, cholera toxin expression and colonization fitness in the mouse model. While absence of HslV did not yield to any altered phenotype compared to wildtype, absence of Lon or ClpP resulted in significantly reduced colonization in vivo. In addition, a Δlon deletion mutant showed altered biofilm formation and increased motility, which could be correlated with higher expression of V. cholerae flagella gene class IV. Concordantly, we could show by immunoblot analysis, that Lon is the main protease responsible for proteolytic control of FliA, which is required for class IV flagella gene transcription, but also downregulates virulence gene expression. FliA becomes highly sensitive to proteolytic degradation in absence of its anti-sigma factor FlgM, a scenario reported to occur during mucosal penetration due to FlgM secretion through the broken flagellum. Our results confirm that the high stability of FliA in the absence of Lon results in less cholera toxin and toxin corgulated pilus production under virulence gene inducing conditions and in the presence of a damaged flagellum. Thus, the data presented herein provide a molecular explanation on how V. cholerae can achieve full expression of virulence genes during early stages of colonization, despite FliA getting liberated from the anti-sigma factor FlgM. PMID:27345492

  16. Plant vacuolar trafficking occurs through distinctly regulated pathways.

    PubMed

    Ebine, Kazuo; Inoue, Takeshi; Ito, Jun; Ito, Emi; Uemura, Tomohiro; Goh, Tatsuaki; Abe, Hiroshi; Sato, Ken; Nakano, Akihiko; Ueda, Takashi

    2014-06-16

    The multifunctional vacuole is the largest organelle in plant cells, and many proteins are transported to and stored in this organelle; thus, the vacuole has great physiological and agronomical importance. However, the molecular mechanism and regulation of plant vacuolar traffic remain largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that multiple vacuolar trafficking pathways operate in plants. RAB5 and RAB7 are evolutionarily conserved subfamilies of Rab GTPase, whose animal and yeast counterparts regulate vacuolar/endosomal trafficking in a sequential manner. Functional analyses of a putative activating complex for RAB7 indicated that this complex is responsible for maturation from RAB5- to RAB7-positive endosomes in plant cells. Moreover, these machinery components are recruited to a more complex trafficking network. Mutations in RAB5 and RAB7 conferred counteracting effects on the vti11 mutant. Furthermore, impairment of RAB5- and RAB7-dependent pathways differentially affected the transport of distinctive cargos. These results indicate that plants have developed a complex vacuolar transport system distinct from that of nonplant systems by assigning evolutionarily conserved machinery to unique trafficking pathways. These pathways provide a fundamental basis for plant development at the cellular and higher-ordered levels.

  17. The Effect of Clade-Specific Sequence Polymorphisms on HIV-1 Protease Activity and Inhibitor Resistance Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Bandaranayake, Rajintha M.; Kolli, Madhavi; King, Nancy M.; Nalivaika, Ellen A.; Heroux, Annie; Kakizawa, Junko; Sugiura, Wataru; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2010-09-08

    The majority of HIV-1 infections around the world result from non-B clade HIV-1 strains. The CRF01{_}AE (AE) strain is seen principally in Southeast Asia. AE protease differs by {approx}10% in amino acid sequence from clade B protease and carries several naturally occurring polymorphisms that are associated with drug resistance in clade B. AE protease has been observed to develop resistance through a nonactive-site N88S mutation in response to nelfinavir (NFV) therapy, whereas clade B protease develops both the active-site mutation D30N and the nonactive-site mutation N88D. Structural and biochemical studies were carried out with wild-type and NFV-resistant clade B and AE protease variants. The relationship between clade-specific sequence variations and pathways to inhibitor resistance was also assessed. AE protease has a lower catalytic turnover rate than clade B protease, and it also has weaker affinity for both NFV and darunavir (DRV). This weaker affinity may lead to the nonactive-site N88S variant in AE, which exhibits significantly decreased affinity for both NFV and DRV. The D30N/N88D mutations in clade B resulted in a significant loss of affinity for NFV and, to a lesser extent, for DRV. A comparison of crystal structures of AE protease shows significant structural rearrangement in the flap hinge region compared with those of clade B protease and suggests insights into the alternative pathways to NFV resistance. In combination, our studies show that sequence polymorphisms within clades can alter protease activity and inhibitor binding and are capable of altering the pathway to inhibitor resistance.

  18. Distinct quaternary structures of the AAA+ Lon protease control substrate degradation.

    PubMed

    Vieux, Ellen F; Wohlever, Matthew L; Chen, James Z; Sauer, Robert T; Baker, Tania A

    2013-05-28

    Lon is an ATPase associated with cellular activities (AAA+) protease that controls cell division in response to stress and also degrades misfolded and damaged proteins. Subunits of Lon are known to assemble into ring-shaped homohexamers that enclose an internal degradation chamber. Here, we demonstrate that hexamers of Escherichia coli Lon also interact to form a dodecamer at physiological protein concentrations. Electron microscopy of this dodecamer reveals a prolate structure with the protease chambers at the distal ends and a matrix of N domains forming an equatorial hexamer-hexamer interface, with portals of ∼45 Å providing access to the enzyme lumen. Compared with hexamers, Lon dodecamers are much less active in degrading large substrates but equally active in degrading small substrates. Our results support a unique gating mechanism that allows the repertoire of Lon substrates to be tuned by its assembly state.

  19. Scabies mite inactive serine proteases are potent inhibitors of the human complement lectin pathway.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Simone L; Pike, Robert N; Mika, Angela; Blom, Anna M; Hofmann, Andreas; Wijeyewickrema, Lakshmi C; Kemp, Dave; Fischer, Katja

    2014-05-01

    Scabies is an infectious skin disease caused by the mite Sarcoptes scabiei and has been classified as one of the six most prevalent epidermal parasitic skin diseases infecting populations living in poverty by the World Health Organisation. The role of the complement system, a pivotal component of human innate immunity, as an important defence against invading pathogens has been well documented and many parasites have an arsenal of anti-complement defences. We previously reported on a family of scabies mite proteolytically inactive serine protease paralogues (SMIPP-Ss) thought to be implicated in host defence evasion. We have since shown that two family members, SMIPP-S D1 and I1 have the ability to bind the human complement components C1q, mannose binding lectin (MBL) and properdin and are capable of inhibiting all three human complement pathways. This investigation focused on inhibition of the lectin pathway of complement activation as it is likely to be the primary pathway affecting scabies mites. Activation of the lectin pathway relies on the activation of MBL, and as SMIPP-S D1 and I1 have previously been shown to bind MBL, the nature of this interaction was examined using binding and mutagenesis studies. SMIPP-S D1 bound MBL in complex with MBL-associated serine proteases (MASPs) and released the MASP-2 enzyme from the complex. SMIPP-S I1 was also able to bind MBL in complex with MASPs, but MASP-1 and MASP-2 remained in the complex. Despite these differences in mechanism, both molecules inhibited activation of complement components downstream of MBL. Mutagenesis studies revealed that both SMIPP-Ss used an alternative site of the molecule from the residual active site region to inhibit the lectin pathway. We propose that SMIPP-Ss are potent lectin pathway inhibitors and that this mechanism represents an important tool in the immune evasion repertoire of the parasitic mite and a potential target for therapeutics. PMID:24854034

  20. Modulation of tissue factor and tissue factor pathway inhibitor-1 by neutrophil proteases.

    PubMed

    Steppich, Birgit A; Seitz, Isabell; Busch, Gabi; Stein, Andreas; Ott, Ilka

    2008-12-01

    During systemic inflammation, neutrophil activation is accompanied by endothelial cell damage and hypercoagulability. Activated neutrophils release serine proteases that participate in tissue injury. We sought to investigate the effects of neutrophil proteases on proinflammatory and procoagulant changes in endothelial cells. The effects of elastase (HNE), cathepsin G (CG), and proteinase 3 (PR3) on expression of tissue factor (TF) and tissue factor pathway inhibitor-1 (TFPI) were examined in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Flow cytometry demonstrated that these proteases proteolytically degraded endothelial cell-bound TFPI. TFPI mRNA expression was reduced by HNE and CG. PR3, but not HNE or CG, increased surface expression of TF and TF mRNA. Yet, increased TF expression did not enhance TF activity suggesting induction of encrypted TF. Using antibodies and siRNA to inhibit and silence PAR-1 and PAR-2, we observed that PR3 upregulation of TF is at least in part mediated by PAR-1. Although CG and HNE cleaved PAR-1, antibody reactivity to the PAR-1 hirudin-like sequence demonstrated inactivating cleavage, accounting for the selective ability of PR3 to induce PAR-1-mediated procoagulant effects. This was supported by induction of p42/44 MAPK by PR3. In conclusion, PR3 degradation of TFPI increases the procoagulant activity of endothelial cells. Release of PR3 after neutrophil activation may represent an important step in neutrophil-mediated vascular injury. PMID:19132232

  1. Distinct purinergic signaling pathways in prepubescent mouse spermatogonia.

    PubMed

    Fleck, David; Mundt, Nadine; Bruentgens, Felicitas; Geilenkirchen, Petra; Machado, Patricia A; Veitinger, Thomas; Veitinger, Sophie; Lipartowski, Susanne M; Engelhardt, Corinna H; Oldiges, Marco; Spehr, Jennifer; Spehr, Marc

    2016-09-01

    Spermatogenesis ranks among the most complex, yet least understood, developmental processes. The physiological principles that control male germ cell development in mammals are notoriously difficult to unravel, given the intricate anatomy and complex endo- and paracrinology of the testis. Accordingly, we lack a conceptual understanding of the basic signaling mechanisms within the testis, which control the seminiferous epithelial cycle and thus govern spermatogenesis. Here, we address paracrine signal transduction in undifferentiated male germ cells from an electrophysiological perspective. We identify distinct purinergic signaling pathways in prepubescent mouse spermatogonia, both in vitro and in situ. ATP-a dynamic, widespread, and evolutionary conserved mediator of cell to cell communication in various developmental contexts-activates at least two different spermatogonial purinoceptor isoforms. Both receptors operate within nonoverlapping stimulus concentration ranges, display distinct response kinetics and, in the juvenile seminiferous cord, are uniquely expressed in spermatogonia. We further find that spermatogonia express Ca(2+)-activated large-conductance K(+) channels that appear to function as a safeguard against prolonged ATP-dependent depolarization. Quantitative purine measurements additionally suggest testicular ATP-induced ATP release, a mechanism that could increase the paracrine radius of initially localized signaling events. Moreover, we establish a novel seminiferous tubule slice preparation that allows targeted electrophysiological recordings from identified testicular cell types in an intact epithelial environment. This unique approach not only confirms our in vitro findings, but also supports the notion of purinergic signaling during the early stages of spermatogenesis. PMID:27574293

  2. The KLK5 protease suppresses breast cancer by repressing the mevalonate pathway

    PubMed Central

    Pampalakis, Georgios; Obasuyi, Osahon; Papadodima, Olga; Chatziioannou, Aristotelis; Zoumpourlis, Vassileios; Sotiropoulou, Georgia

    2014-01-01

    Kallikrein-related peptidase 5 (KLK5) displays aberrant expression in cancer. However, any functional association is missing. Here, we show that reconstitution of KLK5 expression in non-expressing MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells suppresses malignancy in vitro and in vivo dose-dependently. Reactivation of KLK5 suppressed key EMT genes. Unexpectedly, we identified altered expression of genes encoding enzymes of the mevalonate pathway typical of those observed upon cholesterol starvation. Consistently, we found that SREBF1, the master regulator of the mevalonate pathway was induced. KLK5 re-expression leads to reduced cellular cholesterol and fatty acid synthesis and enhanced uptake of LDL-cholesterol. Suppression of the mevalonate pathway in KLK5 transfectants was further shown by reduced synthesis of isoprenoids. Indeed, we found diminished levels of active RhoA, a signaling oncoprotein that requires prenylation for activation. We propose that reduced RhoA activation plays a dominant role in suppression of malignancy by KLK5, since geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate restored active RhoA in KLK5-reverted cells resulting in increased malignancy. For the first time, we suggest that a protease may suppress breast cancer by modulating the mevalonate pathway. PMID:24158494

  3. Biased Signaling of Protease-Activated Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Peishen; Metcalf, Matthew; Bunnett, Nigel W.

    2014-01-01

    In addition to their role in protein degradation and digestion, proteases can also function as hormone-like signaling molecules that regulate vital patho-physiological processes, including inflammation, hemostasis, pain, and repair mechanisms. Certain proteases can signal to cells by cleaving protease-activated receptors (PARs), a family of four G protein-coupled receptors. PARs are expressed by almost all cell types, control important physiological and disease-relevant processes, and are an emerging therapeutic target for major diseases. Most information about PAR activation and function derives from studies of a few proteases, for example thrombin in the case of PAR1, PAR3, and PAR4, and trypsin in the case of PAR2 and PAR4. These proteases cleave PARs at established sites with the extracellular N-terminal domains, and expose tethered ligands that stabilize conformations of the cleaved receptors that activate the canonical pathways of G protein- and/or β-arrestin-dependent signaling. However, a growing number of proteases have been identified that cleave PARs at divergent sites to activate distinct patterns of receptor signaling and trafficking. The capacity of these proteases to trigger distinct signaling pathways is referred to as biased signaling, and can lead to unique patho-physiological outcomes. Given that a different repertoire of proteases are activated in various patho-physiological conditions that may activate PARs by different mechanisms, signaling bias may account for the divergent actions of proteases and PARs. Moreover, therapies that target disease-relevant biased signaling pathways may be more effective and selective approaches for the treatment of protease- and PAR-driven diseases. Thus, rather than mediating the actions of a few proteases, PARs may integrate the biological actions of a wide spectrum of proteases in different patho-physiological conditions. PMID:24860547

  4. An aspartyl protease defines a novel pathway for export of Toxoplasma proteins into the host cell

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, Michael J; Sleebs, Brad E; Uboldi, Alessandro D; Garnham, Alexandra; Franco, Magdalena; Marino, Nicole D; Panas, Michael W; Ferguson, David JP; Enciso, Marta; O'Neill, Matthew T; Lopaticki, Sash; Stewart, Rebecca J; Dewson, Grant; Smyth, Gordon K; Smith, Brian J; Masters, Seth L; Boothroyd, John C; Boddey, Justin A; Tonkin, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Infection by Toxoplasma gondii leads to massive changes to the host cell. Here, we identify a novel host cell effector export pathway that requires the Golgi-resident aspartyl protease 5 (ASP5). We demonstrate that ASP5 cleaves a highly constrained amino acid motif that has similarity to the PEXEL-motif of Plasmodium parasites. We show that ASP5 matures substrates at both the N- and C-terminal ends of proteins and also controls trafficking of effectors without this motif. Furthermore, ASP5 controls establishment of the nanotubular network and is required for the efficient recruitment of host mitochondria to the vacuole. Assessment of host gene expression reveals that the ASP5-dependent pathway influences thousands of the transcriptional changes that Toxoplasma imparts on its host cell. All these changes result in attenuation of virulence of Δasp5 tachyzoites in vivo. This work characterizes the first identified machinery required for export of Toxoplasma effectors into the infected host cell. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10809.001 PMID:26576949

  5. Two distinct pathways for essential metabolic precursors for isoprenoid biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    KUZUYAMA, Tomohisa; SETO, Haruo

    2012-01-01

    Isoprenoids are a diverse group of molecules found in all organisms, where they perform such important biological functions as hormone signaling (e.g., steroids) in mammals, antioxidation (e.g., carotenoids) in plants, electron transport (e.g., ubiquinone), and cell wall biosynthesis intermediates in bacteria. All isoprenoids are synthesized by the consecutive condensation of the five-carbon monomer isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) to its isomer, dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP). The biosynthetic pathway for the formation of IPP from acetyl-CoA (i.e., the mevalonate pathway) had been established mainly in mice and the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Curiously, most prokaryotic microorganisms lack homologs of the genes in the mevalonate pathway, even though IPP and DMAPP are essential for isoprenoid biosynthesis in bacteria. This observation provided an impetus to search for an alternative pathway to synthesize IPP and DMAPP, ultimately leading to the discovery of the mevalonate-independent 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate pathway. This review article focuses on our significant contributions to a comprehensive understanding of the biosynthesis of IPP and DMAPP. PMID:22450534

  6. Distinct pathways of cell migration and antiapoptotic response to epithelial injury: structure-function analysis of human intestinal trefoil factor.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, K; Taupin, D R; Itoh, H; Podolsky, D K

    2000-07-01

    The trefoil peptide intestinal trefoil factor (ITF) plays a critical role in the protection of colonic mucosa and is essential to restitution after epithelial damage. These functional properties are accomplished through coordinated promotion of cell migration and inhibition of apoptosis. ITF contains a unique three-looped trefoil motif formed by intrachain disulfide bonds among six conserved cysteine residues, which is thought to contribute to its marked protease resistance. ITF also has a seventh cysteine residue, which permits homodimer formation. A series of cysteine-to-serine substitutions and a C-terminally truncated ITF were made by PCR site-directed mutagenesis. Any alteration of the trefoil motif or truncation resulted in loss of protease resistance. However, neither an intact trefoil domain nor dimerization was required to promote cell migration. This pro-restitution activity correlated with the ability of the ITF mutants to activate mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase independent of phosphorylation of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor. In contrast, only intact ITF retained both phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and the EGF receptor-dependent antiapoptotic effect in HCT116 and IEC-6 cells. The inability to block apoptosis correlated with a loss of trefoil peptide-induced transactivation of the EGF receptor or Akt kinase in HT-29 cells. In addition to defining structural requirements for the functional properties of ITF, these findings demonstrate that distinct intracellular signaling pathways mediate the effects of ITF on cell migration and apoptosis.

  7. Distinct Pathways of Cell Migration and Antiapoptotic Response to Epithelial Injury: Structure-Function Analysis of Human Intestinal Trefoil Factor

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, Koichi; Taupin, Douglas R.; Itoh, Hiroshi; Podolsky, Daniel K.

    2000-01-01

    The trefoil peptide intestinal trefoil factor (ITF) plays a critical role in the protection of colonic mucosa and is essential to restitution after epithelial damage. These functional properties are accomplished through coordinated promotion of cell migration and inhibition of apoptosis. ITF contains a unique three-looped trefoil motif formed by intrachain disulfide bonds among six conserved cysteine residues, which is thought to contribute to its marked protease resistance. ITF also has a seventh cysteine residue, which permits homodimer formation. A series of cysteine-to-serine substitutions and a C-terminally truncated ITF were made by PCR site-directed mutagenesis. Any alteration of the trefoil motif or truncation resulted in loss of protease resistance. However, neither an intact trefoil domain nor dimerization was required to promote cell migration. This pro-restitution activity correlated with the ability of the ITF mutants to activate mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase independent of phosphorylation of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor. In contrast, only intact ITF retained both phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and the EGF receptor-dependent antiapoptotic effect in HCT116 and IEC-6 cells. The inability to block apoptosis correlated with a loss of trefoil peptide-induced transactivation of the EGF receptor or Akt kinase in HT-29 cells. In addition to defining structural requirements for the functional properties of ITF, these findings demonstrate that distinct intracellular signaling pathways mediate the effects of ITF on cell migration and apoptosis. PMID:10848594

  8. Structure-based discovery of small molecule hepsin and HGFA protease inhibitors: Evaluation of potency and selectivity derived from distinct binding pockets.

    PubMed

    Franco, Francisco M; Jones, Darin E; Harris, Peter K W; Han, Zhenfu; Wildman, Scott A; Jarvis, Cassie M; Janetka, James W

    2015-05-15

    Hepatocyte growth factor activator (HGFA), matriptase and hepsin are all S1 trypsin-like serine endopeptidases. HGFA is a plasma protease while hepsin and matriptase are type II transmembrane proteases (TTSPs). Upregulated expression and activity of all three proteases is associated with aberrant cancer cell signaling through c-MET and RON tyrosine kinase cell-signaling pathways in cancer. We modeled known benzamidine protease inhibitor scaffolds into the active sites of matriptase, hepsin and HGFA to design new non-peptide inhibitors of hepsin and HGFA. First, we used a docking model of the irreversible inhibitor, Nafamostat, bound to the active site of HGFA in order to explore structure activity relationships (SAR). Compounds were screened for inhibition of HGFA activity in a kinetic enzyme assay using a chromogenic substrate. Next, we designed matched pair compound libraries of 3-amidino and 4-amidino phenylalanine (benzamidine) arginine peptidomimetics based on the structure of matriptase inhibitor, CJ-672. Compounds were screened for inhibition of HGFA, matriptase, and hepsin enzyme activity using fluorogenic substrates. Using this strategy we have discovered the first reported non-peptide small molecule inhibitors of both HGFA and hepsin. These inhibitors have differential potency and selectivity towards all three proteases. A subset of piperazinyl ureas highlighted by 25a, have excellent potency and selectivity for hepsin over matriptase and HGFA.

  9. Structure-based discovery of small molecule hepsin and HGFA protease inhibitors: Evaluation of potency and selectivity derived from distinct binding pockets.

    PubMed

    Franco, Francisco M; Jones, Darin E; Harris, Peter K W; Han, Zhenfu; Wildman, Scott A; Jarvis, Cassie M; Janetka, James W

    2015-05-15

    Hepatocyte growth factor activator (HGFA), matriptase and hepsin are all S1 trypsin-like serine endopeptidases. HGFA is a plasma protease while hepsin and matriptase are type II transmembrane proteases (TTSPs). Upregulated expression and activity of all three proteases is associated with aberrant cancer cell signaling through c-MET and RON tyrosine kinase cell-signaling pathways in cancer. We modeled known benzamidine protease inhibitor scaffolds into the active sites of matriptase, hepsin and HGFA to design new non-peptide inhibitors of hepsin and HGFA. First, we used a docking model of the irreversible inhibitor, Nafamostat, bound to the active site of HGFA in order to explore structure activity relationships (SAR). Compounds were screened for inhibition of HGFA activity in a kinetic enzyme assay using a chromogenic substrate. Next, we designed matched pair compound libraries of 3-amidino and 4-amidino phenylalanine (benzamidine) arginine peptidomimetics based on the structure of matriptase inhibitor, CJ-672. Compounds were screened for inhibition of HGFA, matriptase, and hepsin enzyme activity using fluorogenic substrates. Using this strategy we have discovered the first reported non-peptide small molecule inhibitors of both HGFA and hepsin. These inhibitors have differential potency and selectivity towards all three proteases. A subset of piperazinyl ureas highlighted by 25a, have excellent potency and selectivity for hepsin over matriptase and HGFA. PMID:25882520

  10. Inhibition of M current in sensory neurons by exogenous proteases: a signaling pathway mediating inflammatory nociception.

    PubMed

    Linley, John E; Rose, Kirstin; Patil, Mayur; Robertson, Brian; Akopian, Armen N; Gamper, Nikita

    2008-10-29

    Inflammatory pain is thought to be mediated in part through the action of inflammatory mediators on membrane receptors of peripheral nerve terminals, however, the downstream signaling events which lead to pain are poorly understood. In this study we investigated the nociceptive pathways induced by activation of protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR-2) in damage-sensing (nociceptive) neurons from rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG). We found that activation of PAR-2 in these cells strongly inhibited M-type potassium currents (conducted by Kv7 potassium channels). Such inhibition caused depolarization of the neuronal resting membrane potential leading, ultimately, to nociception. Consistent with this mechanism, injection of the specific M channel blocker XE991 into rat paw induced nociception in a concentration-dependent manner. Injection of a PAR-2 agonist peptide also induced nociception but coinjection of XE991 and the PAR-2 agonist did not result in summation of nociception, suggesting that the action of both agents may share a similar mechanism. We also studied the signaling pathway of M current inhibition by PAR-2 using patch-clamp and fluorescence imaging of DRG neurons. These experiments revealed that the PAR-2 effect was mediated by phospholipase C (PLC). Further experiments demonstrated that M current inhibition required concurrent rises in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration and depletion of membrane phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP(2)). We propose that PLC- and Ca(2+)/PIP(2)-mediated inhibition of M current in sensory neurons may represent one of the general mechanisms underlying pain produced by inflammatory mediators, and may therefore open up a new therapeutic window for treatment of this major clinical problem. PMID:18971466

  11. Evidence for the presence of a protease-activated receptor distinct from the thrombin receptor in human keratinocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Santulli, R J; Derian, C K; Darrow, A L; Tomko, K A; Eckardt, A J; Seiberg, M; Scarborough, R M; Andrade-Gordon, P

    1995-01-01

    Thrombin receptor activation was explored in human epidermal keratinocytes and human dermal fibroblasts, cells that are actively involved in skin tissue repair. The effects of thrombin, trypsin, and the receptor agonist peptides SFLLRN and TFRIFD were assessed in inositolphospholipid hydrolysis and calcium mobilization studies. Thrombin and SFLLRN stimulated fibroblasts in both assays to a similar extent, whereas TFRIFD was less potent. Trypsin demonstrated weak efficacy in these assays in comparison with thrombin. Results in fibroblasts were consistent with human platelet thrombin receptor activation. Keratinocytes, however, exhibited a distinct profile, with trypsin being a far better activator of inositolphospholipid hydrolysis and calcium mobilization than thrombin. Furthermore, SFLLRN was more efficacious than thrombin, whereas no response was observed with TFRIFD. Since our data indicated that keratinocytes possess a trypsin-sensitive receptor, we addressed the possibility that these cells express the human homologue of the newly described murine protease-activated receptor, PAR-2 [Nystedt, S., Emilsson, K., Wahlestedt, C. & Sundelin, J. (1994) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 91, 9208-9212]. PAR-2 is activated by nanomolar concentrations of trypsin and possesses the tethered ligand sequence SLIGRL. SLIGRL was found to be equipotent with SFLLRN in activating keratinocyte inositolphospholipid hydrolysis and calcium mobilization. Desensitization studies indicated that SFLLRN, SLIGRL, and trypsin activate a common receptor, PAR-2. Northern blot analyses detected a transcript of PAR-2 in total RNA from keratinocytes but not fibroblasts. Levels of thrombin receptor message were equivalent in the two cell types. Our results indicate that human keratinocytes possess PAR-2, suggesting a potential role for this receptor in tissue repair and/or skin-related disorders. Images Fig. 6 PMID:7568091

  12. Human papillomaviruses: shared and distinct pathways for pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Galloway, Denise A; Laimins, Laimonis A

    2015-10-01

    Over 200 types of human papillomaviruses (HPV) have been identified that infect epithelial cells at different anatomic locations. HPVs are grouped into five genera with the alpha and beta viruses being the most commonly studied. Members of the alpha HPV genus infect genital epithelia and are the causative agents of many anogenital cancers. Beta HPVs infect cutaneous epithelia and have been suggested as co-factors in the development of non-melanoma skin cancers. Recent studies have shown that activation of DNA damage pathways is important for the productive life cycle of the alpha HPVs while the beta viruses suppress their activation. These differences likely contribute to the varying types of lesions and malignancies that are associated with these viruses.

  13. A distinct pathway for tetrahymanol synthesis in bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banta, Amy B.; Wei, Jeremy H.; Welander, Paula V.

    2015-11-01

    Tetrahymanol is a polycyclic triterpenoid lipid first discovered in the ciliate Tetrahymena pyriformis whose potential diagenetic product, gammacerane, is often used as a biomarker for water column stratification in ancient ecosystems. Bacteria are also a potential source of tetrahymanol, but neither the distribution of this lipid in extant bacteria nor the significance of bacterial tetrahymanol synthesis for interpreting gammacerane biosignatures is known. Here we couple comparative genomics with genetic and lipid analyses to link a protein of unknown function to tetrahymanol synthesis in bacteria. This tetrahymanol synthase (Ths) is found in a variety of bacterial genomes, including aerobic methanotrophs, nitrite-oxidizers, and sulfate-reducers, and in a subset of aquatic and terrestrial metagenomes. Thus, the potential to produce tetrahymanol is more widespread in the bacterial domain than previously thought. However, Ths is not encoded in any eukaryotic genomes, nor is it homologous to eukaryotic squalene-tetrahymanol cyclase, which catalyzes the cyclization of squalene directly to tetrahymanol. Rather, heterologous expression studies suggest that bacteria couple the cyclization of squalene to a hopene molecule by squalene-hopene cyclase with a subsequent Ths-dependent ring expansion to form tetrahymanol. Thus, bacteria and eukaryotes have evolved distinct biochemical mechanisms for producing tetrahymanol.

  14. A distinct pathway for tetrahymanol synthesis in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Banta, Amy B.; Wei, Jeremy H.; Welander, Paula V.

    2015-01-01

    Tetrahymanol is a polycyclic triterpenoid lipid first discovered in the ciliate Tetrahymena pyriformis whose potential diagenetic product, gammacerane, is often used as a biomarker for water column stratification in ancient ecosystems. Bacteria are also a potential source of tetrahymanol, but neither the distribution of this lipid in extant bacteria nor the significance of bacterial tetrahymanol synthesis for interpreting gammacerane biosignatures is known. Here we couple comparative genomics with genetic and lipid analyses to link a protein of unknown function to tetrahymanol synthesis in bacteria. This tetrahymanol synthase (Ths) is found in a variety of bacterial genomes, including aerobic methanotrophs, nitrite-oxidizers, and sulfate-reducers, and in a subset of aquatic and terrestrial metagenomes. Thus, the potential to produce tetrahymanol is more widespread in the bacterial domain than previously thought. However, Ths is not encoded in any eukaryotic genomes, nor is it homologous to eukaryotic squalene-tetrahymanol cyclase, which catalyzes the cyclization of squalene directly to tetrahymanol. Rather, heterologous expression studies suggest that bacteria couple the cyclization of squalene to a hopene molecule by squalene-hopene cyclase with a subsequent Ths-dependent ring expansion to form tetrahymanol. Thus, bacteria and eukaryotes have evolved distinct biochemical mechanisms for producing tetrahymanol. PMID:26483502

  15. A distinct pathway for tetrahymanol synthesis in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Banta, Amy B; Wei, Jeremy H; Welander, Paula V

    2015-11-01

    Tetrahymanol is a polycyclic triterpenoid lipid first discovered in the ciliate Tetrahymena pyriformis whose potential diagenetic product, gammacerane, is often used as a biomarker for water column stratification in ancient ecosystems. Bacteria are also a potential source of tetrahymanol, but neither the distribution of this lipid in extant bacteria nor the significance of bacterial tetrahymanol synthesis for interpreting gammacerane biosignatures is known. Here we couple comparative genomics with genetic and lipid analyses to link a protein of unknown function to tetrahymanol synthesis in bacteria. This tetrahymanol synthase (Ths) is found in a variety of bacterial genomes, including aerobic methanotrophs, nitrite-oxidizers, and sulfate-reducers, and in a subset of aquatic and terrestrial metagenomes. Thus, the potential to produce tetrahymanol is more widespread in the bacterial domain than previously thought. However, Ths is not encoded in any eukaryotic genomes, nor is it homologous to eukaryotic squalene-tetrahymanol cyclase, which catalyzes the cyclization of squalene directly to tetrahymanol. Rather, heterologous expression studies suggest that bacteria couple the cyclization of squalene to a hopene molecule by squalene-hopene cyclase with a subsequent Ths-dependent ring expansion to form tetrahymanol. Thus, bacteria and eukaryotes have evolved distinct biochemical mechanisms for producing tetrahymanol. PMID:26483502

  16. Uniform and Complementary Social Interaction: Distinct Pathways to Solidarity

    PubMed Central

    Koudenburg, Namkje; Postmes, Tom; Gordijn, Ernestine H.; van Mourik Broekman, Aafke

    2015-01-01

    We examine how different forms of co-action give rise to feelings of solidarity. We propose that (a) coordinated action elicits a sense of solidarity, and (b) the process through which such solidarity emerges differs for different forms of co-action. We suggest that whether solidarity within groups emerges from uniform action (e.g. synchronizing, as when people speak in unison) or from more complementary forms of action (e.g. alternating, when speaking in turns) has important consequences for the emergent position of individuals within the group. Uniform action relies on commonality, leaving little scope for individuality. In complementary action each individual makes a distinctive contribution to the group, thereby increasing a sense of personal value to the group, which should contribute to the emergence of solidarity. The predictions receive support from five studies, in which we study groups in laboratory and field settings. Results show that both complementary and uniform co-action increase a sense of solidarity compared to control conditions. However, in the complementary action condition, but not in the uniform action (or synchrony) condition, the effect on feelings of solidarity is mediated by a sense of personal value to the group. PMID:26047131

  17. Uniform and Complementary Social Interaction: Distinct Pathways to Solidarity.

    PubMed

    Koudenburg, Namkje; Postmes, Tom; Gordijn, Ernestine H; van Mourik Broekman, Aafke

    2015-01-01

    We examine how different forms of co-action give rise to feelings of solidarity. We propose that (a) coordinated action elicits a sense of solidarity, and (b) the process through which such solidarity emerges differs for different forms of co-action. We suggest that whether solidarity within groups emerges from uniform action (e.g. synchronizing, as when people speak in unison) or from more complementary forms of action (e.g. alternating, when speaking in turns) has important consequences for the emergent position of individuals within the group. Uniform action relies on commonality, leaving little scope for individuality. In complementary action each individual makes a distinctive contribution to the group, thereby increasing a sense of personal value to the group, which should contribute to the emergence of solidarity. The predictions receive support from five studies, in which we study groups in laboratory and field settings. Results show that both complementary and uniform co-action increase a sense of solidarity compared to control conditions. However, in the complementary action condition, but not in the uniform action (or synchrony) condition, the effect on feelings of solidarity is mediated by a sense of personal value to the group. PMID:26047131

  18. Membrane Proteases in the Bacterial Protein Secretion and Quality Control Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; van Dijl, Jan Maarten

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Proteolytic cleavage of proteins that are permanently or transiently associated with the cytoplasmic membrane is crucially important for a wide range of essential processes in bacteria. This applies in particular to the secretion of proteins and to membrane protein quality control. Major progress has been made in elucidating the structure-function relationships of many of the responsible membrane proteases, including signal peptidases, signal peptide hydrolases, FtsH, the rhomboid protease GlpG, and the site 1 protease DegS. These enzymes employ very different mechanisms to cleave substrates at the cytoplasmic and extracytoplasmic membrane surfaces or within the plane of the membrane. This review highlights the different ways that bacterial membrane proteases degrade their substrates, with special emphasis on catalytic mechanisms and substrate delivery to the respective active sites. PMID:22688815

  19. Maggot excretion products from the blowfly Lucilia sericata contain contact phase/intrinsic pathway-like proteases with procoagulant functions.

    PubMed

    Kahl, M; Gökçen, A; Fischer, S; Bäumer, M; Wiesner, J; Lochnit, G; Wygrecka, M; Vilcinskas, A; Preissner, K T

    2015-08-01

    For centuries, maggots have been used for the treatment of wounds by a variety of ancient cultures, as part of their traditional medicine. With increasing appearance of antimicrobial resistance and in association with diabetic ulcers, maggot therapy was revisited in the 1980s. Three mechanisms by which sterile maggots of the green bottle fly Lucilia sericata may improve healing of chronic wounds have been proposed: Biosurgical debridement, disinfecting properties, and stimulation of the wound healing process. However, the influence of maggot excretion products (MEP) on blood coagulation as part of the wound healing process has not been studied in detail. Here, we demonstrate that specific MEP-derived serine proteases from Lucilia sericata induce clotting of human plasma and whole blood, particularly by activating contact phase proteins factor XII and kininogen as well as factor IX, thereby providing kallikrein-bypassing and factor XIa-like activities, both in plasma and in isolated systems. In plasma samples deficient in contact phase proteins, MEP restored full clotting activity, whereas in plasma deficient in either factor VII, IX, X or II no effect was seen. The observed procoagulant/intrinsic pathway-like activity was mediated by (chymo-) trypsin-like proteases in total MEP, which were significantly blocked by C1-esterase inhibitor or other contact phase-specific protease inhibitors. No significant influence of MEP on platelet activation or fibrinolysis was noted. Together, MEP provides contact phase bypassing procoagulant activity and thereby induces blood clotting in the context of wound healing. Further characterisation of the active serine protease(s) may offer new perspectives for biosurgical treatment of chronic wounds. PMID:25948398

  20. Maggot excretion products from the blowfly Lucilia sericata contain contact phase/intrinsic pathway-like proteases with procoagulant functions.

    PubMed

    Kahl, M; Gökçen, A; Fischer, S; Bäumer, M; Wiesner, J; Lochnit, G; Wygrecka, M; Vilcinskas, A; Preissner, K T

    2015-08-01

    For centuries, maggots have been used for the treatment of wounds by a variety of ancient cultures, as part of their traditional medicine. With increasing appearance of antimicrobial resistance and in association with diabetic ulcers, maggot therapy was revisited in the 1980s. Three mechanisms by which sterile maggots of the green bottle fly Lucilia sericata may improve healing of chronic wounds have been proposed: Biosurgical debridement, disinfecting properties, and stimulation of the wound healing process. However, the influence of maggot excretion products (MEP) on blood coagulation as part of the wound healing process has not been studied in detail. Here, we demonstrate that specific MEP-derived serine proteases from Lucilia sericata induce clotting of human plasma and whole blood, particularly by activating contact phase proteins factor XII and kininogen as well as factor IX, thereby providing kallikrein-bypassing and factor XIa-like activities, both in plasma and in isolated systems. In plasma samples deficient in contact phase proteins, MEP restored full clotting activity, whereas in plasma deficient in either factor VII, IX, X or II no effect was seen. The observed procoagulant/intrinsic pathway-like activity was mediated by (chymo-) trypsin-like proteases in total MEP, which were significantly blocked by C1-esterase inhibitor or other contact phase-specific protease inhibitors. No significant influence of MEP on platelet activation or fibrinolysis was noted. Together, MEP provides contact phase bypassing procoagulant activity and thereby induces blood clotting in the context of wound healing. Further characterisation of the active serine protease(s) may offer new perspectives for biosurgical treatment of chronic wounds.

  1. Bacillus thuringiensis Crystal Protein Cry6Aa Triggers Caenorhabditis elegans Necrosis Pathway Mediated by Aspartic Protease (ASP-1)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fengjuan; Peng, Donghai; Cheng, Chunsheng; Zhou, Wei; Ju, Shouyong; Wan, Danfeng; Yu, Ziquan; Shi, Jianwei; Deng, Yaoyao; Wang, Fenshan; Ye, Xiaobo; Hu, Zhenfei; Lin, Jian; Ruan, Lifang; Sun, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Cell death plays an important role in host-pathogen interactions. Crystal proteins (toxins) are essential components of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) biological pesticides because of their specific toxicity against insects and nematodes. However, the mode of action by which crystal toxins to induce cell death is not completely understood. Here we show that crystal toxin triggers cell death by necrosis signaling pathway using crystal toxin Cry6Aa-Caenorhabditis elegans toxin-host interaction system, which involves an increase in concentrations of cytoplasmic calcium, lysosomal lyses, uptake of propidium iodide, and burst of death fluorescence. We find that a deficiency in the necrosis pathway confers tolerance to Cry6Aa toxin. Intriguingly, the necrosis pathway is specifically triggered by Cry6Aa, not by Cry5Ba, whose amino acid sequence is different from that of Cry6Aa. Furthermore, Cry6Aa-induced necrosis pathway requires aspartic protease (ASP-1). In addition, ASP-1 protects Cry6Aa from over-degradation in C. elegans. This is the first demonstration that deficiency in necrosis pathway confers tolerance to Bt crystal protein, and that Cry6A triggers necrosis represents a newly added necrosis paradigm in the C. elegans. Understanding this model could lead to new strategies for nematode control. PMID:26795495

  2. Two Distinct Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 1a Clades Have Different Geographical Distribution and Association With Natural Resistance to NS3 Protease Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Andrea; Di Giambenedetto, Simona; Lo Presti, Alessandra; Sierra, Saleta; Prosperi, Mattia; Cella, Eleonora; Giovanetti, Marta; Torti, Carlo; Caudai, Cinzia; Vicenti, Ilaria; Saladini, Francesco; Almi, Paolo; Grima, Pierfrancesco; Blanc, Pierluigi; Fabbiani, Massimiliano; Rossetti, Barbara; Gagliardini, Roberta; Kaiser, Rolf; Ciccozzi, Massimo; Zazzi, Maurizio

    2015-04-01

    Background.  Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 is the most prevalent worldwide. Subtype 1a, compared with 1b, shows lower response rates and higher propensity to select for drug resistance to NS3 and selected NS5A and nonnucleoside NS5B inhibitors. Two distinct clades of subtype 1a have been described. Methods.  Using Bayesian methodology, we performed a time-scaled phylogeny reconstruction of clade separation and characterized the geographic distribution, phylodynamics, and association with natural resistance variants of NS3 sequences from 362 patients carrying subtype 1a HCV. Results.  All sequences segregated in 2 clearly distinct clades. Clade I showed an earlier origin from the common ancestor compared with clade II. Clade I virus was more prevalent in non-European countries, represented mostly by United States, compared with European (75.7% vs 49.3%; P < .001). The prevalence of the natural NS3 variant Q80K, associated with resistance to the macrocyclic protease inhibitor simeprevir, was detected in 51.6% of clade I and 0% of clade II (P < .001); clade I showed a lower genetic barrier for Q80K, whereas no sign of selective pressure at any protease inhibitor resistance-associated codon was detected. Conclusions.  Hepatitis C virus subtype 1a clades have a clearly different distribution in Europe and the United States, and the natural resistance mutation Q80K is exclusively associated with clade I. PMID:26213689

  3. Two Distinct Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 1a Clades Have Different Geographical Distribution and Association With Natural Resistance to NS3 Protease Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    De Luca, Andrea; Di Giambenedetto, Simona; Lo Presti, Alessandra; Sierra, Saleta; Prosperi, Mattia; Cella, Eleonora; Giovanetti, Marta; Torti, Carlo; Caudai, Cinzia; Vicenti, Ilaria; Saladini, Francesco; Almi, Paolo; Grima, Pierfrancesco; Blanc, Pierluigi; Fabbiani, Massimiliano; Rossetti, Barbara; Gagliardini, Roberta; Kaiser, Rolf; Ciccozzi, Massimo; Zazzi, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Background. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 1 is the most prevalent worldwide. Subtype 1a, compared with 1b, shows lower response rates and higher propensity to select for drug resistance to NS3 and selected NS5A and nonnucleoside NS5B inhibitors. Two distinct clades of subtype 1a have been described. Methods. Using Bayesian methodology, we performed a time-scaled phylogeny reconstruction of clade separation and characterized the geographic distribution, phylodynamics, and association with natural resistance variants of NS3 sequences from 362 patients carrying subtype 1a HCV. Results. All sequences segregated in 2 clearly distinct clades. Clade I showed an earlier origin from the common ancestor compared with clade II. Clade I virus was more prevalent in non-European countries, represented mostly by United States, compared with European (75.7% vs 49.3%; P < .001). The prevalence of the natural NS3 variant Q80K, associated with resistance to the macrocyclic protease inhibitor simeprevir, was detected in 51.6% of clade I and 0% of clade II (P < .001); clade I showed a lower genetic barrier for Q80K, whereas no sign of selective pressure at any protease inhibitor resistance-associated codon was detected. Conclusions. Hepatitis C virus subtype 1a clades have a clearly different distribution in Europe and the United States, and the natural resistance mutation Q80K is exclusively associated with clade I. PMID:26213689

  4. Identifying Distinct Healthcare Pathways During Episodes of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Exacerbations.

    PubMed

    Kuwornu, John P; Lix, Lisa M; Quail, Jacqueline M; Forget, Evelyn; Muthukumarana, Saman; Wang, Xiaoyun E; Osman, Meric; Teare, Gary F

    2016-03-01

    Healthcare pathways are important to measure because they are expected to affect outcomes. However, they are challenging to define because patients exhibit heterogeneity in their use of healthcare services. The objective of this study was to identify and describe healthcare pathways during episodes of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations. Linked administrative databases from Saskatchewan, Canada were used to identify a cohort of newly diagnosed COPD patients and their episodes of healthcare use for disease exacerbations. Latent class analysis (LCA) was used to classify the cohort into homogeneous pathways using indicators of respiratory-related hospitalizations, emergency department (ED) visits, general and specialist physician visits, and outpatient prescription drug dispensations. Multinomial logistic regression models tested patients' demographic and disease characteristics associated with pathway group membership. The most frequent healthcare contact sequences in each pathway were described. Tests of mean costs across groups were conducted using a model-based approach with χ² statistics. LCA identified 3 distinct pathways for patients with hospital- (n = 963) and ED-initiated (n = 364) episodes. For the former, pathway group 1 members followed complex pathways in which multiple healthcare services were repeatedly used and incurred substantially higher costs than patients in the other pathway groups. For patients with an ED-initiated episode, pathway group 1 members also had higher costs than other groups. Pathway groups differed with respect to patient demographic and disease characteristics. A minority of patients were discharged from ED or hospital, but did not have any follow-up care during the remainder of their episode.Patients who followed complex pathways could benefit from case management interventions to streamline their journeys through the healthcare system. The minority of patients whose pathways were not consistent

  5. Pathways of distinction analysis: a new technique for multi-SNP analysis of GWAS data.

    PubMed

    Braun, Rosemary; Buetow, Kenneth

    2011-06-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have become increasingly common due to advances in technology and have permitted the identification of differences in single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) alleles that are associated with diseases. However, while typical GWAS analysis techniques treat markers individually, complex diseases (cancers, diabetes, and Alzheimers, amongst others) are unlikely to have a single causative gene. Thus, there is a pressing need for multi-SNP analysis methods that can reveal system-level differences in cases and controls. Here, we present a novel multi-SNP GWAS analysis method called Pathways of Distinction Analysis (PoDA). The method uses GWAS data and known pathway-gene and gene-SNP associations to identify pathways that permit, ideally, the distinction of cases from controls. The technique is based upon the hypothesis that, if a pathway is related to disease risk, cases will appear more similar to other cases than to controls (or vice versa) for the SNPs associated with that pathway. By systematically applying the method to all pathways of potential interest, we can identify those for which the hypothesis holds true, i.e., pathways containing SNPs for which the samples exhibit greater within-class similarity than across classes. Importantly, PoDA improves on existing single-SNP and SNP-set enrichment analyses, in that it does not require the SNPs in a pathway to exhibit independent main effects. This permits PoDA to reveal pathways in which epistatic interactions drive risk. In this paper, we detail the PoDA method and apply it to two GWAS: one of breast cancer and the other of liver cancer. The results obtained strongly suggest that there exist pathway-wide genomic differences that contribute to disease susceptibility. PoDA thus provides an analytical tool that is complementary to existing techniques and has the power to enrich our understanding of disease genomics at the systems-level.

  6. Enterokinase, the initiator of intestinal digestion, is a mosaic protease composed of a distinctive assortment of domains.

    PubMed Central

    Kitamoto, Y; Yuan, X; Wu, Q; McCourt, D W; Sadler, J E

    1994-01-01

    Enterokinase is a protease of the intestinal brush border that specifically cleaves the acidic propeptide from trypsinogen to yield active trypsin. This cleavage initiates a cascade of proteolytic reactions leading to the activation of many pancreatic zymogens. The full-length cDNA sequence for bovine enterokinase and partial cDNA sequence for human enterokinase were determined. The deduced amino acid sequences indicate that active two-chain enterokinase is derived from a single-chain precursor. Membrane association may be mediated by a potential signal-anchor sequence near the amino terminus. The amino terminus of bovine enterokinase also meets the known sequence requirements for protein N-myristoylation. The amino-terminal heavy chain contains domains that are homologous to segments of the low density lipoprotein receptor, complement components C1r and C1s, the macrophage scavenger receptor, and a recently described motif shared by the metalloprotease meprin and the Xenopus A5 neuronal recognition protein. The carboxyl-terminal light chain is homologous to the trypsin-like serine proteases. Thus, enterokinase is a mosaic protein with a complex evolutionary history. The amino acid sequence surrounding the amino terminus of the enterokinase light chain is ITPK-IVGG (human) or VSPK-IVGG (bovine), suggesting that single-chain enterokinase is activated by an unidentified trypsin-like protease that cleaves the indicated Lys-Ile bond. Therefore, enterokinase may not be the "first" enzyme of the intestinal digestive hydrolase cascade. The specificity of enterokinase for the DDDDK-I sequence of trypsinogen may be explained by complementary basic-amino acid residues clustered in potential S2-S5 subsites. Images PMID:8052624

  7. Distinct folding pathways of two homologous disulfide proteins: bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor and tick anticoagulant peptide.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jui-Yoa

    2011-01-01

    The folding pathways of disulfide proteins vary substantially (Arolas et al., Trends Biochem Sci 31: 292-301, 2006). The diversity is mainly manifested by (a) the extent of heterogeneity of folding intermediates, (b) the extent of presence of native-like intermediates, and (c) the variation of folding kinetics. Even among structurally similar proteins, the difference can be enormous. This is demonstrated in this concise review with two structurally homologous kunitz-type protease inhibitors, bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor and tick anticoagulant peptide, as well as a group of cystine knot proteins. The diversity of their folding mechanisms is illustrated with two different folding techniques: (a) the conventional method of disulfide oxidation (oxidative folding), and (b) the novel method of disulfide scrambling (Chang, J Biol Chem 277: 120-126, 2002). This review also highlights the convergence of folding models concluded form the conventional conformational folding and those obtained by oxidative folding.

  8. Met-ase: Cloning and distinct chromosomal location of a serine protease preferentially expressed in human natural killer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Smyth, M.J.; Trapani, J.A. ); Sayers, T.J.; Wiltrout, T. ); Powers, J.C. )

    1993-12-01

    A cDNA clone encoding a human NK serine protease was obtained by screening a [lambda]-gt10 library from the Lopez NK leukemia with the rat natural killer Met-ase (RNK-Met-1) cDNA clone. In Northern blot analysis human Met-ase (Hu-Met-1) cDNA hybridized with a 0.9-kb mRNA in two human NK leukemia cell lines, unstimulated human PBMC, and untreated purified CD3[sup [minus

  9. Mycobacteria exploit three genetically distinct DNA double-strand break repair pathways

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Richa; Barkan, Daniel; Redelman-Sidi, Gil; Shuman, Stewart; Glickman, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens rely on their DNA repair pathways to resist genomic damage inflicted by the host. DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are especially threatening to bacterial viability. DSB repair by homologous recombination (HR) requires nucleases that resect DSB ends and a strand exchange protein that facilitates homology search. RecBCD and RecA perform these functions in E. coli and constitute the major pathway of error free DSB repair. Mycobacteria, including the human pathogen M. tuberculosis, elaborate an additional error-prone pathway of DSB repair via nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) catalyzed by Ku and DNA ligase D (LigD). Little is known about the relative contributions of HR and NHEJ to mycobacterial chromosome repair, the factors that dictate pathway choice, or the existence of additional DSB repair pathways. Here we demonstrate that Mycobacterium smegmatis has three DSB repair pathway options: HR, NHEJ, and a novel mechanism of single-strand annealing (SSA). Inactivation of NHEJ or SSA is compensated by elevated HR. We find that mycobacterial RecBCD does not participate in HR or confer resistance to ionizing radiation (IR), but is required for the RecA-independent SSA pathway. In contrast, the mycobacterial helicase-nuclease AdnAB participates in the RecA-dependent HR pathway, and is a major determinant of resistance to IR and oxidative DNA damage. These findings reveal distinctive features of mycobacterial DSB repair, most notably the dedication of the RecBCD and AdnAB helicase-nuclease machines to distinct repair pathways. PMID:21219454

  10. Four distinct secretory pathways serve protein secretion, cell surface growth, and peroxisome biogenesis in the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed Central

    Titorenko, V I; Ogrydziak, D M; Rachubinski, R A

    1997-01-01

    We have identified and characterized mutants of the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica that are deficient in protein secretion, in the ability to undergo dimorphic transition from the yeast to the mycelial form, and in peroxisome biogenesis. Mutations in the SEC238, SRP54, PEX1, PEX2, PEX6, and PEX9 genes affect protein secretion, prevent the exit of the precursor form of alkaline extracellular protease from the endoplasmic reticulum, and compromise peroxisome biogenesis. The mutants sec238A, srp54KO, pex2KO, pex6KO, and pex9KO are also deficient in the dimorphic transition from the yeast to the mycelial form and are affected in the export of only plasma membrane and cell wall-associated proteins specific for the mycelial form. Mutations in the SEC238, SRP54, PEX1, and PEX6 genes prevent or significantly delay the exit of two peroxisomal membrane proteins, Pex2p and Pex16p, from the endoplasmic reticulum en route to the peroxisomal membrane. Mutations in the PEX5, PEX16, and PEX17 genes, which have previously been shown to be essential for peroxisome biogenesis, affect the export of plasma membrane and cell wall-associated proteins specific for the mycelial form but do not impair exit from the endoplasmic reticulum of either Pex2p and Pex16p or of proteins destined for secretion. Biochemical analyses of these mutants provide evidence for the existence of four distinct secretory pathways that serve to deliver proteins for secretion, plasma membrane and cell wall synthesis during yeast and mycelial modes of growth, and peroxisome biogenesis. At least two of these secretory pathways, which are involved in the export of proteins to the external medium and in the delivery of proteins for assembly of the peroxisomal membrane, diverge at the level of the endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:9271399

  11. [Distinct roles of the direct and indirect pathways in the basal ganglia circuit mechanism].

    PubMed

    Morita, Makiko; Hikida, Takatoshi

    2015-11-01

    The basal ganglia are key neural substrates that control not only motor balance but also emotion, motivation, cognition, learning, and decision-making. Dysfunction of the basal ganglia leads to neurodegenerative diseases (e.g. Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease) and psychiatric disorders (e.g. drug addiction, schizophrenia, and depression). In the basal ganglia circuit, there are two important pathways: the direct and indirect striatal pathways. Recently, new molecular techniques that activate or inactive selectively the direct or indirect pathway neurons have revealed the function of each pathway. Here we review the distinct roles of the direct and indirect striatal pathways in brain function and drug addiction. We have developed a reversible neurotransmission blocking technique, in which transmission of each pathway is selectively blocked by specific expression of transmission-blocking tetanus toxin, and revealed that the activation of D1 receptors in the direct pathway is critical for reward learning/cocaine addiction, and that the inactivation of D2 receptors is critical for aversive learning/learning flexibility. We propose a new circuit mechanism by which the dopaminergic input from the ventral tegmental area can switch the direct and indirect pathways in the nucleus accumbens. These basal ganglia circuit mechanisms will give us insights into the pathophysiology of mental diseases. PMID:26785520

  12. Distinct 3D Architecture and Dynamics of the Human HtrA2(Omi) Protease and Its Mutated Variants.

    PubMed

    Gieldon, Artur; Zurawa-Janicka, Dorota; Jarzab, Miroslaw; Wenta, Tomasz; Golik, Przemyslaw; Dubin, Grzegorz; Lipinska, Barbara; Ciarkowski, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    HtrA2(Omi) protease controls protein quality in mitochondria and plays a major role in apoptosis. Its HtrA2S306A mutant (with the catalytic serine routinely disabled for an X-ray study to avoid self-degradation) is a homotrimer whose subunits contain the serine protease domain (PD) and the regulatory PDZ domain. In the inactive state, a tight interdomain interface limits penetration of both PDZ-activating ligands and PD substrates into their respective target sites. We successfully crystalized HtrA2V226K/S306A, whose active counterpart HtrA2V226K has had higher proteolytic activity, suggesting higher propensity to opening the PD-PDZ interface than that of the wild type HtrA2. Yet, the crystal structure revealed the HtrA2V226K/S306A architecture typical of the inactive protein. To get a consistent interpretation of crystallographic data in the light of kinetic results, we employed molecular dynamics (MD). V325D inactivating mutant was used as a reference. Our simulations demonstrated that upon binding of a specific peptide ligand NH2-GWTMFWV-COOH, the PDZ domains open more dynamically in the wild type protease compared to the V226K mutant, whereas the movement is not observed in the V325D mutant. The movement relies on a PDZ vs. PD rotation which opens the PD-PDZ interface in a lid-like (budding flower-like in trimer) fashion. The noncovalent hinges A and B are provided by two clusters of interfacing residues, harboring V325D and V226K in the C- and N-terminal PD barrels, respectively. The opening of the subunit interfaces progresses in a sequential manner during the 50 ns MD simulation. In the systems without the ligand only minor PDZ shifts relative to PD are observed, but the interface does not open. Further activation-associated events, e.g. PDZ-L3 positional swap seen in any active HtrA protein (vs. HtrA2), were not observed. In summary, this study provides hints on the mechanism of activation of wtHtrA2, the dynamics of the inactive HtrA2V325D, but does not

  13. Distinct 3D Architecture and Dynamics of the Human HtrA2(Omi) Protease and Its Mutated Variants.

    PubMed

    Gieldon, Artur; Zurawa-Janicka, Dorota; Jarzab, Miroslaw; Wenta, Tomasz; Golik, Przemyslaw; Dubin, Grzegorz; Lipinska, Barbara; Ciarkowski, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    HtrA2(Omi) protease controls protein quality in mitochondria and plays a major role in apoptosis. Its HtrA2S306A mutant (with the catalytic serine routinely disabled for an X-ray study to avoid self-degradation) is a homotrimer whose subunits contain the serine protease domain (PD) and the regulatory PDZ domain. In the inactive state, a tight interdomain interface limits penetration of both PDZ-activating ligands and PD substrates into their respective target sites. We successfully crystalized HtrA2V226K/S306A, whose active counterpart HtrA2V226K has had higher proteolytic activity, suggesting higher propensity to opening the PD-PDZ interface than that of the wild type HtrA2. Yet, the crystal structure revealed the HtrA2V226K/S306A architecture typical of the inactive protein. To get a consistent interpretation of crystallographic data in the light of kinetic results, we employed molecular dynamics (MD). V325D inactivating mutant was used as a reference. Our simulations demonstrated that upon binding of a specific peptide ligand NH2-GWTMFWV-COOH, the PDZ domains open more dynamically in the wild type protease compared to the V226K mutant, whereas the movement is not observed in the V325D mutant. The movement relies on a PDZ vs. PD rotation which opens the PD-PDZ interface in a lid-like (budding flower-like in trimer) fashion. The noncovalent hinges A and B are provided by two clusters of interfacing residues, harboring V325D and V226K in the C- and N-terminal PD barrels, respectively. The opening of the subunit interfaces progresses in a sequential manner during the 50 ns MD simulation. In the systems without the ligand only minor PDZ shifts relative to PD are observed, but the interface does not open. Further activation-associated events, e.g. PDZ-L3 positional swap seen in any active HtrA protein (vs. HtrA2), were not observed. In summary, this study provides hints on the mechanism of activation of wtHtrA2, the dynamics of the inactive HtrA2V325D, but does not

  14. Distinct 3D Architecture and Dynamics of the Human HtrA2(Omi) Protease and Its Mutated Variants

    PubMed Central

    Gieldon, Artur; Zurawa-Janicka, Dorota; Jarzab, Miroslaw; Wenta, Tomasz; Golik, Przemyslaw; Dubin, Grzegorz; Lipinska, Barbara; Ciarkowski, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    HtrA2(Omi) protease controls protein quality in mitochondria and plays a major role in apoptosis. Its HtrA2S306A mutant (with the catalytic serine routinely disabled for an X-ray study to avoid self-degradation) is a homotrimer whose subunits contain the serine protease domain (PD) and the regulatory PDZ domain. In the inactive state, a tight interdomain interface limits penetration of both PDZ-activating ligands and PD substrates into their respective target sites. We successfully crystalized HtrA2V226K/S306A, whose active counterpart HtrA2V226K has had higher proteolytic activity, suggesting higher propensity to opening the PD-PDZ interface than that of the wild type HtrA2. Yet, the crystal structure revealed the HtrA2V226K/S306A architecture typical of the inactive protein. To get a consistent interpretation of crystallographic data in the light of kinetic results, we employed molecular dynamics (MD). V325D inactivating mutant was used as a reference. Our simulations demonstrated that upon binding of a specific peptide ligand NH2-GWTMFWV-COOH, the PDZ domains open more dynamically in the wild type protease compared to the V226K mutant, whereas the movement is not observed in the V325D mutant. The movement relies on a PDZ vs. PD rotation which opens the PD-PDZ interface in a lid-like (budding flower-like in trimer) fashion. The noncovalent hinges A and B are provided by two clusters of interfacing residues, harboring V325D and V226K in the C- and N-terminal PD barrels, respectively. The opening of the subunit interfaces progresses in a sequential manner during the 50 ns MD simulation. In the systems without the ligand only minor PDZ shifts relative to PD are observed, but the interface does not open. Further activation-associated events, e.g. PDZ-L3 positional swap seen in any active HtrA protein (vs. HtrA2), were not observed. In summary, this study provides hints on the mechanism of activation of wtHtrA2, the dynamics of the inactive HtrA2V325D, but does not

  15. Molecular dynamics studies on HIV-1 protease drug resistance and folding pathways.

    PubMed

    Cecconi, F; Micheletti, C; Carloni, P; Maritan, A

    2001-06-01

    Drug resistance to HIV-1 protease involves the accumulation of multiple mutations in the protein. We investigate the role of these mutations by using molecular dynamics simulations that exploit the influence of the native-state topology in the folding process. Our calculations show that sites contributing to phenotypic resistance of FDA-approved drugs are among the most sensitive positions for the stability of partially folded states and should play a relevant role in the folding process. Furthermore, associations between amino acid sites mutating under drug treatment are shown to be statistically correlated. The striking correlation between clinical data and our calculations suggest a novel approach to the design of drugs tailored to bind regions crucial not only for protein function, but for folding as well.

  16. Toxin-Antitoxin Modules Are Pliable Switches Activated by Multiple Protease Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Muthuramalingam, Meenakumari; White, John C.; Bourne, Christina R.

    2016-01-01

    Toxin-antitoxin (TA) modules are bacterial regulatory switches that facilitate conflicting outcomes for cells by promoting a pro-survival phenotypic adaptation and/or by directly mediating cell death, all through the toxin activity upon degradation of antitoxin. Intensive study has revealed specific details of TA module functions, but significant gaps remain about the molecular details of activation via antitoxin degradation used by different bacteria and in different environments. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge about the interaction of antitoxins with cellular proteases Lon and ClpP to mediate TA module activation. An understanding of these processes can answer long-standing questions regarding stochastic versus specific activation of TA modules and provide insight into the potential for manipulation of TA modules to alter bacterial growth. PMID:27409636

  17. A Distinct Pathway for Polar Exocytosis in Plant Cell Wall Formation1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao; Zhuang, Xiaohong; Wang, Xiangfeng; Law, Angus Ho Yin; Zhao, Teng; Du, Shengwang; Loy, Michael M.T.; Jiang, Liwen

    2016-01-01

    Post-Golgi protein sorting and trafficking to the plasma membrane (PM) is generally believed to occur via the trans-Golgi network (TGN). In this study using Nicotiana tabacum pectin methylesterase (NtPPME1) as a marker, we have identified a TGN-independent polar exocytosis pathway that mediates cell wall formation during cell expansion and cytokinesis. Confocal immunofluorescence and immunogold electron microscopy studies demonstrated that Golgi-derived secretory vesicles (GDSVs) labeled by NtPPME1-GFP are distinct from those organelles belonging to the conventional post-Golgi exocytosis pathway. In addition, pharmaceutical treatments, superresolution imaging, and dynamic studies suggest that NtPPME1 follows a polar exocytic process from Golgi-GDSV-PM/cell plate (CP), which is distinct from the conventional Golgi-TGN-PM/CP secretion pathway. Further studies show that ROP1 regulates this specific polar exocytic pathway. Taken together, we have demonstrated an alternative TGN-independent Golgi-to-PM polar exocytic route, which mediates secretion of NtPPME1 for cell wall formation during cell expansion and cytokinesis and is ROP1-dependent. PMID:27531442

  18. Formation of distinct inclusion bodies by inhibition of ubiquitin-proteasome and autophagy-lysosome pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Junho; Yang, Kyu-Hwan; Joe, Cheol O.; Kang, Seok-Seong

    2011-01-14

    Research highlights: {yields} Distinct inclusion bodies are developed by inhibition of UPP and ALP. {yields} The inclusion bodies differ in morphology, localization and formation process. {yields} The inclusion bodies are distinguishable by the localization of TSC2. {yields} Inhibition of both UPP and ALP simultaneously induces those inclusion bodies. -- Abstract: Accumulation of misfolded proteins is caused by the impairment of protein quality control systems, such as ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) and autophagy-lysosome pathway (ALP). In this study, the formation of inclusion bodies was examined after the blockade of UPP and/or ALP in A549 cells. UPP inhibition induced a single and large inclusion body localized in microtubule-organizing center. Interestingly, however, ALP inhibition generated dispersed small inclusion bodies in the cytoplasm. Tuberous sclerosis complex 2 was selectively accumulated in the inclusion bodies of UPP-inhibited cells, but not those of ALP-inhibited cells. Blockade of transcription and translation entirely inhibited the formation of inclusion body induced by UPP inhibition, but partially by ALP inhibition. Moreover, the simultaneous inhibition of two protein catabolic pathways independently developed two distinct inclusion bodies within a single cell. These findings clearly demonstrated that dysfunction of each catabolic pathway induced formation and accumulation of unique inclusion bodies on the basis of morphology, localization and formation process in A549 cells.

  19. Distinct endocytic pathways identified in tobacco pollen tubes using charged nanogold.

    PubMed

    Moscatelli, Alessandra; Ciampolini, Fabrizio; Rodighiero, Simona; Onelli, Elisabetta; Cresti, Mauro; Santo, Nadia; Idilli, Aurora

    2007-11-01

    In an attempt to dissect endocytosis in Nicotiana tabacum L. pollen tubes, two different probes--positively or negatively charged nanogold--were employed. The destiny of internalized plasma membrane domains, carrying negatively or positively charged residues, was followed at the ultrastructural level and revealed distinct endocytic pathways. Time-course experiments and electron microscopy showed internalization of subapical plasma-membrane domains that were mainly recycled to the secretory pathway through the Golgi apparatus and a second mainly degradative pathway involving plasma membrane retrieval at the tip. In vivo time-lapse experiments using FM4-64 combined with quantitative analysis confirmed the existence of distinct internalization regions. Ikarugamycin, an inhibitor of clathrin-dependent endocytosis, allowed us to further dissect the endocytic process: electron microscopy and time-lapse studies suggested that clathrin-dependent endocytosis occurs in the tip and subapical regions, because recycling of positively charged nanogold to the Golgi bodies and the consignment of negatively charged nanogold to vacuoles were affected. However, intact positively charged-nanogold transport to vacuoles supports the idea that an endocytic pathway that does not require clathrin is also present in pollen tubes.

  20. The apoptotic protease-activating factor 1-mediated pathway of apoptosis is dispensable for negative selection of thymocytes.

    PubMed

    Hara, Hiromitsu; Takeda, Atsunobu; Takeuchi, Michiyo; Wakeham, Andrew C; Itié, Annick; Sasaki, Masafumi; Mak, Tak W; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Nomoto, Kikuo; Yoshida, Hiroki

    2002-03-01

    Negative selection is a process to delete potentially autoreactive clones in developing thymocytes. Programmed cell death or apoptosis is thought to play an important role in this selection process. In this study, we investigated the role of apoptotic protease-activating factor 1 (Apaf1), a mammalian homologue of CED-4, in programmed cell death during the negative selection in thymus. There was no developmental abnormality in thymocytes from newborn Apaf1(-/-) mice in terms of CD4 and CD8 expression pattern and thymocyte number. Clonal deletion by endogenous male H-Y Ag of Apaf1-deficient thymocytes with transgenic expression of H-Y Ag-specific TCRs (H-Y Tg/Apaf1(-/-) thymocytes) was normally observed in lethally irradiated wild-type mice reconstituted with fetal liver-derived hemopoietic stem cells. Clonal deletion induced in vitro by a bacterial superantigen was also normal in fetal thymic organ culture. Thus, Apaf1-mediated pathway of apoptosis is dispensable for the negative selection of thymocytes. However, H-Y Tg/Apaf1(-/-) thymocytes showed partial resistance to H-Y peptide-induced deletion in vitro as compared with H-Y Tg/Apaf1(+/-) thymocytes, implicating the Apaf1-mediated apoptotic pathway in the negative selection in a certain situation. In addition, the peptide-induced deletion was still observed in H-Y Tg/Apaf1(-/-) thymocytes in the presence of a broad spectrum caspase inhibitor, z-VAD-fmk, suggesting the presence of caspase-independent cell death pathway playing roles during the negative selection. We assume that mechanisms for the negative selection are composed of several cell death pathways to avoid failure of elimination of autoreactive clones.

  1. Secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor inhibits expression of polymeric immunoglobulin receptor via the NF-κB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Mikami, Yoshikazu; Iwase, Takashi; Komiyama, Yusuke; Matsumoto, Naoyuki; Oki, Hidero; Komiyama, Kazuo

    2015-10-01

    Polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR) plays an important role in mucosal immune systems. Secretory immunoglobulin A, composed of secretory component of pIgR and a dimeric form of immunoglobulin A, is secreted on mucosal surfaces and serves as a biological defense factor. pIgR gene expression is reportedly induced by activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor (NF)-κB. On the other hand, secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) is a glycoprotein that functions as a serine protease inhibitor. In alveolar epithelial cells, SLPI increases the level of IκBβ, which indicates that it is an inhibitor of NF-κB at the protein level. Taken together, SLPI may regulate pIgR expression; however, the specific mechanism by which this occurs is unclear. Therefore, the aim of this study was to elucidatethe influence of SLPI on pIgR expression.SLPI and pIgR localized in goblet cells and ciliated epithelial cells of the gastrointestinal tract, respectively. No cells were detected in which SLPI and pIgR were co-expressed. In addition, recombinant human SLPI stimulation of an epithelial cell line (HT-29) decreased the pIgR expression. The pIgR expression was also higher in SLPI-deficient Ca9-22 cells than in wild-type Ca9-22 cells. Furthermore, a luciferase assay using a NF-κB reporter plasmid and real-time RT-PCR analysis indicated that when SLPI was present, the transcriptional activity of NF-κB protein was suppressed, which was accompanied by anincrease in the protein, but not the mRNA,expression of IκBβ. These results demonstrate that SLPI down-regulates pIgR expression through the NF-κB signaling pathway by inhibiting degradation of IκBβ protein. PMID:26239418

  2. Distinct G protein-coupled receptor recycling pathways allow spatial control of downstream G protein signaling.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Shanna Lynn; Shiwarski, Daniel John; Puthenveedu, Manojkumar A

    2016-09-26

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are recycled via a sequence-dependent pathway that is spatially and biochemically distinct from bulk recycling. Why there are two distinct recycling pathways from the endosome is a fundamental question in cell biology. In this study, we show that the separation of these two pathways is essential for normal spatial encoding of GPCR signaling. The prototypical β-2 adrenergic receptor (B2AR) activates Gα stimulatory protein (Gαs) on the endosome exclusively in sequence-dependent recycling tubules marked by actin/sorting nexin/retromer tubular (ASRT) microdomains. B2AR was detected in an active conformation in bulk recycling tubules, but was unable to activate Gαs. Protein kinase A phosphorylation of B2AR increases the fraction of receptors localized to ASRT domains and biases the downstream transcriptional effects of B2AR to genes controlled by endosomal signals. Our results identify the physiological relevance of separating GPCR recycling from bulk recycling and suggest a mechanism to tune downstream responses of GPCR signaling by manipulating the spatial origin of G protein signaling. PMID:27646272

  3. Steady and transient fluid shear stress stimulate NO release in osteoblasts through distinct biochemical pathways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAllister, T. N.; Frangos, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    Fluid flow has been shown to be a potent stimulus in osteoblasts and osteocytes and may therefore play an important role in load-induced bone remodeling. The objective of this study was to investigate the characteristics of flow-activated pathways. Previously we reported that fluid flow stimulates rapid and continuous release of nitric oxide (NO) in primary rat calvarial osteoblasts. Here we demonstrate that flow-induced NO release is mediated by shear stress and that this response is distinctly biphasic. Transients in shear stress associated with the onset of flow stimulated a burst in NO production (8.2 nmol/mg of protein/h), while steady flow stimulated sustained NO production (2.2 nmol/mg of protein/h). Both G-protein inhibition and calcium chelation abolished the burst phase but had no effect on sustained production. Activation of G-proteins stimulated dose-dependent NO release in static cultures of both calvarial osteoblasts and UMR-106 osteoblast-like cells. Pertussis toxin had no effect on NO release. Calcium ionophore stimulated low levels of NO production within 15 minutes but had no effect on sustained production. Taken together, these data suggest that fluid shear stress stimulates NO release by two distinct pathways: a G-protein and calcium-dependent phase sensitive to flow transients, and a G-protein and calcium-independent pathway stimulated by sustained flow.

  4. Distinct G protein-coupled receptor recycling pathways allow spatial control of downstream G protein signaling.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Shanna Lynn; Shiwarski, Daniel John; Puthenveedu, Manojkumar A

    2016-09-26

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are recycled via a sequence-dependent pathway that is spatially and biochemically distinct from bulk recycling. Why there are two distinct recycling pathways from the endosome is a fundamental question in cell biology. In this study, we show that the separation of these two pathways is essential for normal spatial encoding of GPCR signaling. The prototypical β-2 adrenergic receptor (B2AR) activates Gα stimulatory protein (Gαs) on the endosome exclusively in sequence-dependent recycling tubules marked by actin/sorting nexin/retromer tubular (ASRT) microdomains. B2AR was detected in an active conformation in bulk recycling tubules, but was unable to activate Gαs. Protein kinase A phosphorylation of B2AR increases the fraction of receptors localized to ASRT domains and biases the downstream transcriptional effects of B2AR to genes controlled by endosomal signals. Our results identify the physiological relevance of separating GPCR recycling from bulk recycling and suggest a mechanism to tune downstream responses of GPCR signaling by manipulating the spatial origin of G protein signaling.

  5. The rice RMR1 associates with a distinct prevacuolar compartment for the protein storage vacuole pathway.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yun; Wang, Junqi; Ding, Yu; Lo, Sze Wan; Gouzerh, Guillaume; Neuhaus, Jean-Marc; Jiang, Liwen

    2011-09-01

    Transport of vacuolar proteins from Golgi apparatus or trans-Golgi network (TGN) to vacuoles is a receptor-mediated process via an intermediate membrane-bound prevacuolar compartment (PVC) in plant cells. Both vacuolar sorting receptor (VSR) and receptor homology region-transmembrane domain-RING-H2 (RMR) proteins have been shown to function in transporting storage proteins to protein storage vacuole (PSV), but little is known about the nature of the PVC for the PSV pathway. Here, we use the rice RMR1 (OsRMR1) as a probe to study the PSV pathway in plants. Immunogold electron microscopy (EM) with specific OsRMR1 antibodies showed that OsRMR1 proteins were found in the Golgi apparatus, TGN, and a distinct organelle with characteristics of PVC in both rice culture cells and developing rice seeds, as well as the protein body type II (PBII) or PSV in developing rice seeds. This organelle, also found in both tobacco BY-2 and Arabidopsis suspension cultured cells, is morphologically distinct from the VSR-positive multivesicular lytic PVC or multivesicular body (MVB) and thus represent a PVC for the PSV pathway that we name storage PVC (sPVC). Further in vivo and in vitro interaction studies using truncated OsRMR1 proteins secreted into the culture media of transgenic BY-2 suspension cells demonstrated that OsRMR1 functions as a sorting receptor in transporting vicilin-like storage proteins.

  6. Leptin differentially regulates NPY secretion in hypothalamic cell lines through distinct intracellular signal transduction pathways.

    PubMed

    Dhillon, Sandeep S; Belsham, Denise D

    2011-04-11

    Leptin acts as a key peripheral hormone in distinct neurons in the hypothalamus to modulate both reproductive function and energy homeostasis. The control of neuropeptide Y (NPY) secretion is an example of a process that can be differentially regulated by leptin. In order to further understand these distinct modulatory effects, we have used immortalized, neuronal hypothalamic cell lines expressing NPY, mHypoE-38 and mHypoE-46. We found that these cell lines express the endogenous leptin receptor, ObRb, and secrete detectable levels of NPY. We exposed the neurons to 100nM leptin for 1h and determined that the basal levels of NPY in the cell lines were differentially regulated: NPY secretion was inhibited in mHypoE-46 neurons, whereas NPY secretion was induced in the mHypoE-38 neurons. In order to determine the mechanisms involved in the divergent regulation of NPY release, we analyzed the activity of a number of signaling components using phospho-specific antibodies directed towards specific proteins in the MAP kinase, PI3K, and AMPK pathways, among others. We found that leptin activated a different combination of second messengers in each cell line. Importantly, we could link the regulation of NPY secretion to different signaling pathways, AMPK in the mHypoE-46 and both MAPK and PI3K in the mHypoE-38 neurons. This is the first demonstration that leptin can specifically regulate individual NPY neuron secretory responses through distinct signaling pathways.

  7. Calpain inhibition induces activation of the distinct signalling pathways and cell migration in human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Noma, Haruyoshi; Kato, Takayuki; Fujita, Hisakazu; Kitagawa, Maki; Yamano, Tsunekazu; Kitagawa, Seiichi

    2009-09-01

    We have recently reported that constitutively active calpain negatively regulates activation of the distinct signalling pathways and cell migration in human neutrophils. Here, we report that a similar regulatory system is also functioning in human monocytes, but not lymphocytes. Calpain was constitutively active in resting human monocytes, but not lymphocytes. Mitogen-activated protein kinases, including extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p38 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt and p21-activated kinase (PAK, an effector molecule of Rac) were rapidly (within 1 min) activated in monocytes, but not lymphocytes, upon exposure to calpain inhibitors (PD150606 and N-acetyl-Leu-Leu-Nle-CHO), but not PD145305 (the inactive analogue of PD150606). Following activation of these signalling pathways, monocytes displayed active migration within 5 min after exposure to calpain inhibitors, and active migration was sustained for more than 45 min. The micropipette method revealed that calpain inhibition-mediated monocyte migration was chemotaxis, not random migration. The studies with pharmacological inhibitors suggest that calpain inhibition-mediated monocyte migration is mediated by activation of ERK, p38, JNK, PI3K/Akt and Rac. NSC23766 (Rac inhibitor) and pertussis toxin (PTX) suppressed calpain inhibitor-induced phosphorylation of distinct signalling molecules (PAK, ERK, p38, JNK and Akt) as well as cell migration, suggesting that the PTX-sensitive G protein and Rac axis may be a possible key target of calpain inhibitors. These findings suggest that constitutively active calpain negatively regulates activation of the distinct signalling pathways and cell migration in resting monocytes, but not lymphocytes.

  8. Distinct Cortical Pathways for Music and Speech Revealed by Hypothesis-Free Voxel Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Norman-Haignere, Sam; Kanwisher, Nancy G; McDermott, Josh H

    2015-12-16

    The organization of human auditory cortex remains unresolved, due in part to the small stimulus sets common to fMRI studies and the overlap of neural populations within voxels. To address these challenges, we measured fMRI responses to 165 natural sounds and inferred canonical response profiles ("components") whose weighted combinations explained voxel responses throughout auditory cortex. This analysis revealed six components, each with interpretable response characteristics despite being unconstrained by prior functional hypotheses. Four components embodied selectivity for particular acoustic features (frequency, spectrotemporal modulation, pitch). Two others exhibited pronounced selectivity for music and speech, respectively, and were not explainable by standard acoustic features. Anatomically, music and speech selectivity concentrated in distinct regions of non-primary auditory cortex. However, music selectivity was weak in raw voxel responses, and its detection required a decomposition method. Voxel decomposition identifies primary dimensions of response variation across natural sounds, revealing distinct cortical pathways for music and speech. PMID:26687225

  9. Distinct Cortical Pathways for Music and Speech Revealed by Hypothesis-Free Voxel Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Norman-Haignere, Sam; Kanwisher, Nancy G; McDermott, Josh H

    2015-12-16

    The organization of human auditory cortex remains unresolved, due in part to the small stimulus sets common to fMRI studies and the overlap of neural populations within voxels. To address these challenges, we measured fMRI responses to 165 natural sounds and inferred canonical response profiles ("components") whose weighted combinations explained voxel responses throughout auditory cortex. This analysis revealed six components, each with interpretable response characteristics despite being unconstrained by prior functional hypotheses. Four components embodied selectivity for particular acoustic features (frequency, spectrotemporal modulation, pitch). Two others exhibited pronounced selectivity for music and speech, respectively, and were not explainable by standard acoustic features. Anatomically, music and speech selectivity concentrated in distinct regions of non-primary auditory cortex. However, music selectivity was weak in raw voxel responses, and its detection required a decomposition method. Voxel decomposition identifies primary dimensions of response variation across natural sounds, revealing distinct cortical pathways for music and speech.

  10. Rac-1 and Raf-1 kinases, components of distinct signaling pathways, activate myotonic dystrophy protein kinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimizu, M.; Wang, W.; Walch, E. T.; Dunne, P. W.; Epstein, H. F.

    2000-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy protein kinase (DMPK) is a serine-threonine protein kinase encoded by the myotonic dystrophy (DM) locus on human chromosome 19q13.3. It is a close relative of other kinases that interact with members of the Rho family of small GTPases. We show here that the actin cytoskeleton-linked GTPase Rac-1 binds to DMPK, and coexpression of Rac-1 and DMPK activates its transphosphorylation activity in a GTP-sensitive manner. DMPK can also bind Raf-1 kinase, the Ras-activated molecule of the MAP kinase pathway. Purified Raf-1 kinase phosphorylates and activates DMPK. The interaction of DMPK with these distinct signals suggests that it may play a role as a nexus for cross-talk between their respective pathways and may partially explain the remarkable pleiotropy of DM.

  11. Three Distinct Blue-Green Color Pathways in a Mammalian Retina

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Lian-Ming; Hoshi, Hideo; Whitaker, Christopher M.; Massey, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    In mammalian retinae, the first steps in the process of discrimination of color are mediated by color-opponent neurons that respond with opposite polarity to signals from short (S, blue) and longer wavelength (M, green or L, red) cones. Primates also contain a second system that is different from M and L cones. Although pathways responding to the onset of S-cone stimulation (S-ON) are well known, the existence of bipolar cells and retinal ganglion cells that respond to the offset of S-cone stimulation (S-OFF) has been controversial. We have recorded from and stained three different types of S/M color-opponent ganglion cells in the rabbit retina that are distinguished by the polarity of their responses to S-cone stimulation, the stratification pattern of their dendrites, and the distinct mechanisms underlying their color-opponent responses. We describe an S-ON and an S-OFF pathway formed by amacrine cells inverting the S-ON signal. Most importantly, we also provide both anatomical and physiological evidence for a direct S-OFF pathway dependent on an S-OFF cone bipolar cell. The results indicate a greater diversity of pathways for processing of signals from S-cones than previously suspected. PMID:24478358

  12. [Cognition-Emotion Interactions and Psychopathic Personality: Distinct Pathways to Antisocial and Violent Behavior].

    PubMed

    Verona, Edelyn

    2016-01-01

    Researchers have long acknowledged heterogeneity among persons who exhibit antisocial and violent behaviours. The study of psychopathic personality or psychopathy can help elucidate this heterogeneity through examination of the different facets that constitute this disorder. In particular, the distinct correlates of the interpersonal-affective traits (Factor 1) and the impulsive-antisocial traits (Factor 2) of psychopathy suggest at least two possible pathways to antisocial behaviours. Building on basic studies in cognitive and affective neuroscience, we provide a focused, non-comprehensive review of work identifying the biopsychological mechanisms involved in these two pathways, with special attention to studies using event-related potential (ERP) methods. In specific, a series of studies are discussed which examined affective and cognitive processes that may distinguish offenders high on psychopathic traits from other offenders, with emphasis on alterations in emotion-cognition interactions related to each factor of psychopathy. The set of findings reviewed highlight a central conclusion: Factor 1 represents a pathway involving reduced emotional responding, exacerbated by attentional abnormalities, that make for a more deliberate and emotionally insensitive offender profile. In contrast, Factor 2 characterizes a pathway marked by emotional and behavioural dysregulation and cognitive control dysfunctions, particularly in emotional contexts. Implications for identifying etiological processes and the further understanding of antisocial and violent behaviours are discussed. PMID:27570952

  13. Major histocompatibility complex class II expression distinguishes two distinct B cell developmental pathways during ontogeny

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    All mature B cells coexpress major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules, I-A and I-E, which are restriction elements required for antigen presentation to CD4+ T cells. However, the expression of class II during the early stages of B cell development has been unclear. We demonstrate here that there is a difference in the expression of class II during murine B cell development in the fetal liver and adult bone marrow (BM). These differences define two distinct B cell developmental pathways. The Fetal-type (FT) pathway is characterized by pre-B and immature IgM+ B cells generated in the fetal liver which initially lack all class II expression. In contrast, the Adult-type (AT) pathway is typified by B cells developing in the adult BM which express class II molecules from the pre-B cell stage. In vitro stromal cell cultures of sorted fetal liver and adult BM pro-B cells indicated that the difference in I-A expression during B cell development is intrinsic to the progenitors. In addition, we show that FT B cell development is not restricted to the fetal liver but occurs in the peritoneal cavities, spleens, liver, and BM of young mice up to at least 1 mo of age. The AT B cell development begins to emerge after birth but is, however, restricted to the BM environment. These findings indicate that there are two distinct B cell developmental pathways during ontogeny, each of which could contribute differentially to the immune repertoire and thus the functions of B cell subsets and lineages. PMID:7913950

  14. Distinct cellular pathways select germline-encoded and somatically mutated antibodies into immunological memory

    PubMed Central

    Kaji, Tomohiro; Ishige, Akiko; Hikida, Masaki; Taka, Junko; Hijikata, Atsushi; Kubo, Masato; Nagashima, Takeshi; Takahashi, Yoshimasa; Kurosaki, Tomohiro; Okada, Mariko; Ohara, Osamu

    2012-01-01

    One component of memory in the antibody system is long-lived memory B cells selected for the expression of somatically mutated, high-affinity antibodies in the T cell–dependent germinal center (GC) reaction. A puzzling observation has been that the memory B cell compartment also contains cells expressing unmutated, low-affinity antibodies. Using conditional Bcl6 ablation, we demonstrate that these cells are generated through proliferative expansion early after immunization in a T cell–dependent but GC-independent manner. They soon become resting and long-lived and display a novel distinct gene expression signature which distinguishes memory B cells from other classes of B cells. GC-independent memory B cells are later joined by somatically mutated GC descendants at roughly equal proportions and these two types of memory cells efficiently generate adoptive secondary antibody responses. Deletion of T follicular helper (Tfh) cells significantly reduces the generation of mutated, but not unmutated, memory cells early on in the response. Thus, B cell memory is generated along two fundamentally distinct cellular differentiation pathways. One pathway is dedicated to the generation of high-affinity somatic antibody mutants, whereas the other preserves germ line antibody specificities and may prepare the organism for rapid responses to antigenic variants of the invading pathogen. PMID:23027924

  15. Two distinct pathways for thymidylate (dTMP) synthesis in (hyper)thermophilic Bacteria and Archaea.

    PubMed

    Leduc, D; Graziani, S; Meslet-Cladiere, L; Sodolescu, A; Liebl, U; Myllykallio, H

    2004-04-01

    The hyperthermophilic anaerobic archaeon Pyrococcus abyssi, which lacks thymidine kinase, incorporates label from extracellular uracil, but not from thymidine, into its DNA. This implies that P. abyssi must synthesize dTMP (thymidylate), an essential precursor for DNA synthesis, de novo. However, iterative similarity searches of the three completed Pyrococcus genomes fail to detect candidate genes for canonical thymidylate synthase ThyA, suggesting the presence of alternative pathways for dTMP synthesis. Indeed, by identifying a novel class of flavin-dependent thymidylate synthases, ThyX, we have recently proven that two distinct pathways for de novo synthesis of dTMP are operational in the microbial world. While both thyX and thyA can be found in hyperthermophilic micro-organisms, the phylogenetic distribution of thyX among hyperthermophiles is wider than that of thyA. In this contribution, we discuss the differences in the distinct mechanisms of dTMP synthesis, with a special emphasis on hyperthermophilic micro-organisms.

  16. Tissue kallikrein mediates pro-inflammatory pathways and activation of protease-activated receptor-4 in proximal tubular epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yiu, Wai Han; Wong, Dickson W L; Chan, Loretta Y Y; Leung, Joseph C K; Chan, Kwok Wah; Lan, Hui Yao; Lai, Kar Neng; Tang, Sydney C W

    2014-01-01

    Tissue kallikrein (KLK1) expression is up-regulated in human diabetic kidney tissue and induced by high glucose (HG) in human proximal tubular epithelial cells (PTEC). Since the kallikrein-kinin system (KKS) has been linked to cellular inflammatory process in many diseases, it is likely that KLK1 expression may mediate the inflammatory process during the development of diabetic nephropathy. In this study, we explored the role of KLK1 in tubular pro-inflammatory responses under the diabetic milieu. Recombinant KLK1 stimulated the production of inflammatory cytokines in PTEC via the activation of p42/44 and p38 MAPK signaling pathways. Molecular knockdown of endogenous KLK1 expression by siRNA transfection in PTEC attenuated advanced glycation end-products (AGE)-induced IL-8 and ICAM-1 productions in vitro. Interestingly, exposure of PTEC to KLK1 induced the expression of protease-activated receptors (PARs). There was a 2.9-fold increase in PAR-4, 1.4-fold increase in PAR-1 and 1.2-fold increase in PAR-2 mRNA levels. Activation of PAR-4 by a selective agonist was found to elicit the pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic phenotypes in PTEC while blockade of the receptor by specific antagonist attenuated high glucose-induced IL-6, CCL-2, CTGF and collagen IV expression. Calcium mobilization by the PAR-4 agonist in PTEC was desensitized by pretreatment with KLK1. Consistent with these in vitro findings, there was a markedly up-regulation of tubular PAR-4 expression in human diabetic renal cortical tissues. Together, these results suggest that up-regulation of KLK1 in tubular epithelial cells may mediate pro-inflammatory pathway and PAR activation during diabetic nephropathy and provide a new therapeutic target for further investigation. PMID:24586431

  17. Tissue Kallikrein Mediates Pro-Inflammatory Pathways and Activation of Protease-Activated Receptor-4 in Proximal Tubular Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yiu, Wai Han; Wong, Dickson W. L.; Chan, Loretta Y. Y.; Leung, Joseph C. K.; Chan, Kwok Wah; Lan, Hui Yao; Lai, Kar Neng; Tang, Sydney C. W.

    2014-01-01

    Tissue kallikrein (KLK1) expression is up-regulated in human diabetic kidney tissue and induced by high glucose (HG) in human proximal tubular epithelial cells (PTEC). Since the kallikrein-kinin system (KKS) has been linked to cellular inflammatory process in many diseases, it is likely that KLK1 expression may mediate the inflammatory process during the development of diabetic nephropathy. In this study, we explored the role of KLK1 in tubular pro-inflammatory responses under the diabetic milieu. Recombinant KLK1 stimulated the production of inflammatory cytokines in PTEC via the activation of p42/44 and p38 MAPK signaling pathways. Molecular knockdown of endogenous KLK1 expression by siRNA transfection in PTEC attenuated advanced glycation end-products (AGE)-induced IL-8 and ICAM-1 productions in vitro. Interestingly, exposure of PTEC to KLK1 induced the expression of protease-activated receptors (PARs). There was a 2.9-fold increase in PAR-4, 1.4-fold increase in PAR-1 and 1.2-fold increase in PAR-2 mRNA levels. Activation of PAR-4 by a selective agonist was found to elicit the pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic phenotypes in PTEC while blockade of the receptor by specific antagonist attenuated high glucose-induced IL-6, CCL-2, CTGF and collagen IV expression. Calcium mobilization by the PAR-4 agonist in PTEC was desensitized by pretreatment with KLK1. Consistent with these in vitro findings, there was a markedly up-regulation of tubular PAR-4 expression in human diabetic renal cortical tissues. Together, these results suggest that up-regulation of KLK1 in tubular epithelial cells may mediate pro-inflammatory pathway and PAR activation during diabetic nephropathy and provide a new therapeutic target for further investigation. PMID:24586431

  18. Distinct microenvironmental cues stimulate divergent TLR4-mediated signaling pathways in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Piccinini, Anna M; Zuliani-Alvarez, Lorena; Lim, Jenny M P; Midwood, Kim S

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages exhibit a phenotypic plasticity that enables them to orchestrate specific immune responses to distinct threats. The microbial product lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and the extracellular matrix glycoprotein tenascin-C are released during bacterial infection and tissue injury, respectively, and both activate Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). We found that these two TLR4 ligands stimulated distinct signaling pathways in macrophages, resulting in cells with divergent phenotypes. Although macrophages activated by LPS or tenascin-C displayed some common features, including activation of nuclear factor κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling and cytokine synthesis, each ligand stimulated the production of different subsets of cytokines and generated different phosphoproteomic signatures. Moreover, tenascin-C promoted the generation of macrophages that exhibited increased synthesis and phosphorylation of extracellular matrix components, whereas LPS stimulated the production of macrophages that exhibited an enhanced capacity to degrade the matrix. These data reveal how the activation of one pattern recognition receptor by different microenvironmental cues generates macrophage with distinct phenotypes. PMID:27577261

  19. Genetic Approach Identifies Distinct Asthma Pathways In Overweight vs. Normal Weight Children

    PubMed Central

    Kovacic, Melinda Butsch; Martin, Lisa J.; Myers, Jocelyn M. Biagini; He, Hua; Lindsey, Mark; Mersha, Tesfaye B.; Ji, Hong; Hershey, Gurjit K. Khurana

    2015-01-01

    Background The pathogenesis of asthma in the context of excess body weight may be distinct from asthma that develops in normal weight children. The study’s objective was to explore the biology of asthma in the context of obesity and normal weight status using genetic methodologies. Methods SNP associations with asthma and interactions between SNPs and overweight status in 49 genes were assessed in child-participants of the Greater Cincinnati Pediatric Clinic Repository. Results Asthma was significantly associated with weight (OR=1.38; p=0.037). The number of genes and the magnitude of their associations with asthma were notably greater when considering overweight children alone versus normal weight and overweight children together. When considering weight, distinct sets of asthma-associated genes were observed, many times with opposing effects. Conclusions We demonstrated that the underlying heterogeneity of asthma is likely due in part to distinct pathogenetic pathways that depend on preceding/co-morbid overweight and/or allergy. It is therefore important to consider both obesity and asthma when conducting studies of asthma. PMID:26009928

  20. Vesicular Monoamine and Glutamate Transporters Select Distinct Synaptic Vesicle Recycling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Onoa, Bibiana; Li, Haiyan; Gagnon-Bartsch, Johann A.; Elias, Laura A. B.; Edwards, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    Previous work has characterized the properties of neurotransmitter release at excitatory and inhibitory synapses, but we know remarkably little about the properties of monoamine release because these neuromodulators do not generally produce a fast ionotropic response. Since dopamine and serotonin neurons can also release glutamate in vitro and in vivo, we have used the vesicular monoamine transporter VMAT2 and the vesicular glutamate transporter VGLUT1 to compare the localization and recycling of synaptic vesicles that store, respectively, monoamines and glutamate. First, VMAT2 segregates partially from VGLUT1 in the boutons of midbrain dopamine neurons, indicating the potential for distinct release sites. Second, endocytosis after stimulation is slower for VMAT2 than VGLUT1. During the stimulus, however, the endocytosis of VMAT2 (but not VGLUT1) accelerates dramatically in midbrain dopamine but not hippocampal neurons, indicating a novel, cell-specific mechanism to sustain high rates of release. On the other hand, we find that in both midbrain dopamine and hippocampal neurons, a substantially smaller proportion of VMAT2 than VGLUT1 is available for evoked release, and VMAT2 shows considerably more dispersion along the axon after exocytosis than VGLUT1. Even when expressed in the same neuron, the two vesicular transporters thus target to distinct populations of synaptic vesicles, presumably due to their selection of distinct recycling pathways. PMID:20534840

  1. Genetic approach identifies distinct asthma pathways in overweight vs normal weight children.

    PubMed

    Butsch Kovacic, M; Martin, L J; Biagini Myers, J M; He, H; Lindsey, M; Mersha, T B; Khurana Hershey, G K

    2015-08-01

    The pathogenesis of asthma in the context of excess body weight may be distinct from asthma that develops in normal weight children. The study's objective was to explore the biology of asthma in the context of obesity and normal weight status using genetic methodologies. Associations between asthma and SNPs in 49 genes were assessed, as well as, interactions between SNPs and overweight status in child participants of the Greater Cincinnati Pediatric Clinic Repository. Asthma was significantly associated with weight (OR = 1.38; P = 0.037). The number of genes and the magnitude of their associations with asthma were notably greater when considering overweight children alone vs normal weight and overweight children together. When considering weight, distinct sets of asthma-associated genes were observed, many times with opposing effects. We demonstrated that the underlying heterogeneity of asthma is likely due in part to distinct pathogenetic pathways that depend on preceding/comorbid overweight and/or allergy. It is therefore important to consider both obesity and asthma when conducting studies of asthma.

  2. Proteases as therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Craik, Charles S.; Page, Michael J.; Madison, Edwin L.

    2015-01-01

    Proteases are an expanding class of drugs that hold great promise. The U.S. FDA (Food and Drug Administration) has approved 12 protease therapies, and a number of next generation or completely new proteases are in clinical development. Although they are a well-recognized class of targets for inhibitors, proteases themselves have not typically been considered as a drug class despite their application in the clinic over the last several decades; initially as plasma fractions and later as purified products. Although the predominant use of proteases has been in treating cardiovascular disease, they are also emerging as useful agents in the treatment of sepsis, digestive disorders, inflammation, cystic fibrosis, retinal disorders, psoriasis and other diseases. In the present review, we outline the history of proteases as therapeutics, provide an overview of their current clinical application, and describe several approaches to improve and expand their clinical application. Undoubtedly, our ability to harness proteolysis for disease treatment will increase with our understanding of protease biology and the molecular mechanisms responsible. New technologies for rationally engineering proteases, as well as improved delivery options, will expand greatly the potential applications of these enzymes. The recognition that proteases are, in fact, an established class of safe and efficacious drugs will stimulate investigation of additional therapeutic applications for these enzymes. Proteases therefore have a bright future as a distinct therapeutic class with diverse clinical applications. PMID:21406063

  3. RecFOR and RecOR as distinct RecA loading pathways.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Akiko; Cox, Michael M

    2009-01-30

    The molecular role of the RecF protein in loading RecA protein onto single-stranded DNA (ssDNA)-binding protein-coated ssDNA has been obscured by the facility with which the RecO and RecR proteins alone perform this function. We now show that RecFOR and RecOR define distinct RecA loading functions that operate optimally in different contexts. RecFOR, but not RecOR, is most effective when RecF(R) is bound near an ssDNA/double-stranded (dsDNA) junction. However, RecF(R) has no enhanced binding affinity for such a junction. RecO and RecR proteins are both required under all conditions in which the RecFOR pathway operates. The RecOR pathway is uniquely distinguished by a required interaction between RecO protein and the ssDNA binding protein C terminus. The RecOR pathway is more efficient for RecA loading onto ssDNA when no proximal dsDNA is available. A merger of new and published results leads to a new model for RecFOR function. PMID:18986990

  4. Lon protease negatively affects GacA protein stability and expression of the Gac/Rsm signal transduction pathway in Pseudomonas protegens.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Kasumi; Tsuchiya, Wataru; Noda, Naomi; Suzuki, Rintaro; Yamazaki, Toshimasa; Haas, Dieter

    2014-08-01

    In Pseudomonas protegens CHA0 and other fluorescent pseudomonads, the Gac/Rsm signal transduction pathway controls secondary metabolism and suppression of fungal root pathogens via the expression of regulatory small RNAs (sRNAs). Because of its high cost, this pathway needs to be protected from overexpression and to be turned off in response to environmental stress such as the lack of nutrients. However, little is known about its underlying molecular mechanisms. In this study, we demonstrated that Lon protease, a member of the ATP-dependent protease family, negatively regulated the Gac/Rsm cascade. In a lon mutant, the steady-state levels and the stability of the GacA protein were significantly elevated at the end of exponential growth. As a consequence, the expression of the sRNAs RsmY and RsmZ and that of dependent physiological functions such as antibiotic production were significantly enhanced. Biocontrol of Pythium ultimum on cucumber roots required fewer lon mutant cells than wild-type cells. In starved cells, the loss of Lon function prolonged the half-life of the GacA protein. Thus, Lon protease is an important negative regulator of the Gac/Rsm signal transduction pathway in P. protegens.

  5. Distinct Pathways of ERK1/2 Activation by Hydroxy-Carboxylic Acid Receptor-1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guo; Wang, Hui-qian; Wang, Li-hui; Chen, Ru-ping; Liu, Jun-ping

    2014-01-01

    Mechanistic investigations have shown that, upon agonist activation, hydroxy-carboxylic acid receptor-1(HCA1) couples to a Gi protein and inhibits adenylate cyclase activity, leading to inhibition of liberation of free fatty acid. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms for HCA1 signaling remain largely unknown. Using CHO-K1 cells stably expressing HCA1, and L6 cells, which endogenously express rat HCA1 receptors, we found that activation of ERK1/2 by HCA1 was rapid, peaking at 5 min, and was significantly blocked by pertussis toxin. Furthermore, time course experiments with different kinase inhibitors demonstrated that HCA1 induced ERK1/2 activation via the extracellular Ca2+, PKC and IGF-I receptor transactivation-dependent pathways. In addition, we observed that pretreated the cells with M119K, an inhibitor of Gβγ subunit-dependent signaling, effectively attenuated the ERK1/2 activation triggered by HCA1, suggesting a critical role for βγ-subunits in HCA1-activated ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Furthermore, the present results also indicated that the arrestin2/3 were not required for ERK1/2 activation. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that upon binding to agonist, HCA1 receptors initially activate Gi, leading to dissociation of the Gβγ subunit from activated Gi, and subsequently induce ERK1/2 activation via two distinct pathways: one PKC-dependent pathway and the other IGF-IR transactivation-dependent pathway. Our results provide the first in-depth evidence that defines the molecular mechanism of HCA1-mediated ERK1/2 activation. PMID:24671202

  6. Distinct Pathways Mediate the Sorting of Tail-Anchored Proteins to the Plastid Outer Envelope

    PubMed Central

    Dhanoa, Preetinder K.; Richardson, Lynn G. L.; Smith, Matthew D.; Gidda, Satinder K.; Henderson, Matthew P. A.; Andrews, David W.; Mullen, Robert T.

    2010-01-01

    Background Tail-anchored (TA) proteins are a distinct class of membrane proteins that are sorted post-translationally to various organelles and function in a number of important cellular processes, including redox reactions, vesicular trafficking and protein translocation. While the molecular targeting signals and pathways responsible for sorting TA proteins to their correct intracellular destinations in yeasts and mammals have begun to be characterized, relatively little is known about TA protein biogenesis in plant cells, especially for those sorted to the plastid outer envelope. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we investigated the biogenesis of three plastid TA proteins, including the 33-kDa and 34-kDa GTPases of the translocon at the outer envelope of chloroplasts (Toc33 and Toc34) and a novel 9-kDa protein of unknown function that we define here as an outer envelope TA protein (OEP9). Using a combination of in vivo and in vitro assays we show that OEP9 utilizes a different sorting pathway than that used by Toc33 and Toc34. For instance, while all three TA proteins interact with the cytosolic OEP chaperone/receptor, AKR2A, the plastid targeting information within OEP9 is distinct from that within Toc33 and Toc34. Toc33 and Toc34 also appear to differ from OEP9 in that their insertion is dependent on themselves and the unique lipid composition of the plastid outer envelope. By contrast, the insertion of OEP9 into the plastid outer envelope occurs in a proteinaceous-dependent, but Toc33/34-independent manner and membrane lipids appear to serve primarily to facilitate normal thermodynamic integration of this TA protein. Conclusions/Significance Collectively, the results provide evidence in support of at least two sorting pathways for plastid TA outer envelope proteins and shed light on not only the complex diversity of pathways involved in the targeting and insertion of proteins into plastids, but also the molecular mechanisms that underlie the delivery of TA

  7. Visualization of Distinct Substrate Recruitment Pathways in the Yeast Exosome by Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Chu-Ya; Ke, Ailong; Wang, Hong-Wei

    2013-01-01

    The eukaryotic exosome is a multi-subunit complex typically composed of a catalytically inactive core and the Rrp44 protein, which contains 3’ to 5’ exo- and endo-ribonuclease activities. RNA substrates have been shown to be recruited through the core to reach Rrp44's exoribonuclease (EXO) site. Using single particle electron microscopy and biochemical analysis, we provide visual evidence that two distinct substrate recruitment pathways exist. In the through-core route, channeling of the single stranded substrates from the core to Rrp44 induces a characteristic conformational change in Rrp44. In the alternative direct-access route, this conformational change does not take place and the RNA substrate is visualized to avoid the core and enter Rrp44's EXO site directly. Our results provide mechanistic explanations for several RNA processing scenarios by the eukaryotic exosome and indicate substrate specific modes of degradation by this complex. PMID:24336220

  8. A distinct small RNA pathway silences selfish genetic elements in the germline.

    PubMed

    Vagin, Vasily V; Sigova, Alla; Li, Chengjian; Seitz, Hervé; Gvozdev, Vladimir; Zamore, Phillip D

    2006-07-21

    In the Drosophila germline, repeat-associated small interfering RNAs (rasiRNAs) ensure genomic stability by silencing endogenous selfish genetic elements such as retrotransposons and repetitive sequences. Whereas small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) derive from both the sense and antisense strands of their double-stranded RNA precursors, rasiRNAs arise mainly from the antisense strand. rasiRNA production appears not to require Dicer-1, which makes microRNAs (miRNAs), or Dicer-2, which makes siRNAs, and rasiRNAs lack the 2',3' hydroxy termini characteristic of animal siRNA and miRNA. Unlike siRNAs and miRNAs, rasiRNAs function through the Piwi, rather than the Ago, Argonaute protein subfamily. Our data suggest that rasiRNAs protect the fly germline through a silencing mechanism distinct from both the miRNA and RNA interference pathways.

  9. Distinct Signaling Mechanisms in Multiple Developmental Pathways by the SCRAMBLED Receptor of Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Su-Hwan; Woo, Sooah; Lee, Myeong Min; Schiefelbein, John

    2014-01-01

    SCRAMBLED (SCM), a leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), is required for positional signaling in the root epidermis and for tissue/organ development in the shoot. To further understand SCM action, we generated a series of kinase domain variants and analyzed their ability to complement scm mutant defects. We found that the SCM kinase domain, but not kinase activity, is required for its role in root epidermal patterning, supporting the view that SCM is an atypical receptor kinase. We also describe a previously uncharacterized role for SCM in fruit dehiscence, because mature siliques from scm mutants fail to open properly. Interestingly, the kinase domain of SCM appears to be dispensable for this developmental process. Furthermore, we found that most of the SCM kinase domain mutations dramatically inhibit inflorescence development. Because this process is not affected in scm null mutants, it is likely that SCM acts redundantly to regulate inflorescence size. The importance of distinct kinase residues for these three developmental processes provides an explanation for the maintenance of the conserved kinase domain in the SCM protein, and it may generally explain its conservation in other atypical kinases. Furthermore, these results indicate that individual leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinases may participate in multiple pathways using distinct signaling mechanisms to mediate diverse cellular communication events. PMID:25136062

  10. A distinct brain pathway links viral RNA exposure to sickness behavior

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xinxia; Levasseur, Pete R.; Michaelis, Katherine A.; Burfeind, Kevin G.; Marks, Daniel L.

    2016-01-01

    Sickness behaviors and metabolic responses to invading pathogens are common to nearly all types of infection. These responses evolved to provide short-term benefit to the host to ward off infection, but impact on quality of life, and when prolonged lead to neurodegeneration, depression, and cachexia. Among the major infectious agents, viruses most frequently enter the brain, resulting in profound neuroinflammation. We sought to define the unique features of the inflammatory response in the brain to these infections. We demonstrate that the molecular pathway defining the central response to dsRNA is distinct from that found in the periphery. The behavioral and physical response to the dsRNA mimetic poly I:C is dependent on signaling via MyD88 when it is delivered centrally, whereas this response is mediated via the TRIF pathway when delivered peripherally. We also define the likely cellular candidates for this MyD88-dependent step. These findings suggest that symptom management is possible without ameliorating protective antiviral immune responses. PMID:27435819

  11. Autism Spectrum Disorders and Drug Addiction: Common Pathways, Common Molecules, Distinct Disorders?

    PubMed Central

    Rothwell, Patrick E.

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and drug addiction do not share substantial comorbidity or obvious similarities in etiology or symptomatology. It is thus surprising that a number of recent studies implicate overlapping neural circuits and molecular signaling pathways in both disorders. The purpose of this review is to highlight this emerging intersection and consider implications for understanding the pathophysiology of these seemingly distinct disorders. One area of overlap involves neural circuits and neuromodulatory systems in the striatum and basal ganglia, which play an established role in addiction and reward but are increasingly implicated in clinical and preclinical studies of ASDs. A second area of overlap relates to molecules like Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) and methyl CpG-binding protein-2 (MECP2), which are best known for their contribution to the pathogenesis of syndromic ASDs, but have recently been shown to regulate behavioral and neurobiological responses to addictive drug exposure. These shared pathways and molecules point to common dimensions of behavioral dysfunction, including the repetition of behavioral patterns and aberrant reward processing. The synthesis of knowledge gained through parallel investigations of ASDs and addiction may inspire the design of new therapeutic interventions to correct common elements of striatal dysfunction. PMID:26903789

  12. Distinct Structural Pathways Coordinate the Activation of AMPA Receptor-Auxiliary Subunit Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Dawe, G. Brent; Musgaard, Maria; Aurousseau, Mark R.P.; Nayeem, Naushaba; Green, Tim; Biggin, Philip C.; Bowie, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Summary Neurotransmitter-gated ion channels adopt different gating modes to fine-tune signaling at central synapses. At glutamatergic synapses, high and low activity of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) is observed when pore-forming subunits coassemble with or without auxiliary subunits, respectively. Whether a common structural pathway accounts for these different gating modes is unclear. Here, we identify two structural motifs that determine the time course of AMPAR channel activation. A network of electrostatic interactions at the apex of the AMPAR ligand-binding domain (LBD) is essential for gating by pore-forming subunits, whereas a conserved motif on the lower, D2 lobe of the LBD prolongs channel activity when auxiliary subunits are present. Accordingly, channel activity is almost entirely abolished by elimination of the electrostatic network but restored via auxiliary protein interactions at the D2 lobe. In summary, we propose that activation of native AMPAR complexes is coordinated by distinct structural pathways, favored by the association/dissociation of auxiliary subunits. PMID:26924438

  13. Distinct Structural Pathways Coordinate the Activation of AMPA Receptor-Auxiliary Subunit Complexes.

    PubMed

    Dawe, G Brent; Musgaard, Maria; Aurousseau, Mark R P; Nayeem, Naushaba; Green, Tim; Biggin, Philip C; Bowie, Derek

    2016-03-16

    Neurotransmitter-gated ion channels adopt different gating modes to fine-tune signaling at central synapses. At glutamatergic synapses, high and low activity of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) is observed when pore-forming subunits coassemble with or without auxiliary subunits, respectively. Whether a common structural pathway accounts for these different gating modes is unclear. Here, we identify two structural motifs that determine the time course of AMPAR channel activation. A network of electrostatic interactions at the apex of the AMPAR ligand-binding domain (LBD) is essential for gating by pore-forming subunits, whereas a conserved motif on the lower, D2 lobe of the LBD prolongs channel activity when auxiliary subunits are present. Accordingly, channel activity is almost entirely abolished by elimination of the electrostatic network but restored via auxiliary protein interactions at the D2 lobe. In summary, we propose that activation of native AMPAR complexes is coordinated by distinct structural pathways, favored by the association/dissociation of auxiliary subunits. PMID:26924438

  14. Pediatric-type nodal follicular lymphoma: a biologically distinct lymphoma with frequent MAPK pathway mutations

    PubMed Central

    Schafernak, Kristian T.; Geyer, Julia T.; Kovach, Alexandra E.; Ghandi, Mahmoud; Gratzinger, Dita; Roth, Christine G.; Paxton, Christian N.; Kim, Sunhee; Namgyal, Chungdak; Morin, Ryan; Morgan, Elizabeth A.; Neuberg, Donna S.; South, Sarah T.; Harris, Marian H.; Hasserjian, Robert P.; Hochberg, Ephraim P.; Garraway, Levi A.; Harris, Nancy Lee; Weinstock, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric-type nodal follicular lymphoma (PTNFL) is a variant of follicular lymphoma (FL) characterized by limited-stage presentation and invariably benign behavior despite often high-grade histological appearance. It is important to distinguish PTNFL from typical FL in order to avoid unnecessary treatment; however, this distinction relies solely on clinical and pathological criteria, which may be variably applied. To define the genetic landscape of PTNFL, we performed copy number analysis and exome and/or targeted sequencing of 26 PTNFLs (16 pediatric and 10 adult). The most commonly mutated gene in PTNFL was MAP2K1, encoding MEK1, with a mutation frequency of 43%. All MAP2K1 mutations were activating missense mutations localized to exons 2 and 3, which encode negative regulatory and catalytic domains, respectively. Missense mutations in MAPK1 (2/22) and RRAS (1/22) were identified in cases that lacked MAP2K1 mutations. The second most commonly mutated gene in PTNFL was TNFRSF14, with a mutation frequency of 29%, similar to that seen in limited-stage typical FL (P = .35). PTNFL was otherwise genomically bland and specifically lacked recurrent mutations in epigenetic modifiers (eg, CREBBP, KMT2D). Copy number aberrations affected a mean of only 0.5% of PTNFL genomes, compared with 10% of limited-stage typical FL genomes (P < .02). Importantly, the mutational profiles of PTNFLs in children and adults were highly similar. Together, these findings define PTNFL as a biologically and clinically distinct indolent lymphoma of children and adults characterized by a high prevalence of MAPK pathway mutations and a near absence of mutations in epigenetic modifiers. PMID:27325104

  15. Molecular subtypes of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma arise by distinct genetic pathways.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Georg; Wright, George W; Emre, N C Tolga; Kohlhammer, Holger; Dave, Sandeep S; Davis, R Eric; Carty, Shannon; Lam, Lloyd T; Shaffer, A L; Xiao, Wenming; Powell, John; Rosenwald, Andreas; Ott, German; Muller-Hermelink, Hans Konrad; Gascoyne, Randy D; Connors, Joseph M; Campo, Elias; Jaffe, Elaine S; Delabie, Jan; Smeland, Erlend B; Rimsza, Lisa M; Fisher, Richard I; Weisenburger, Dennis D; Chan, Wing C; Staudt, Louis M

    2008-09-01

    Gene-expression profiling has been used to define 3 molecular subtypes of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), termed germinal center B-cell-like (GCB) DLBCL, activated B-cell-like (ABC) DLBCL, and primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL). To investigate whether these DLBCL subtypes arise by distinct pathogenetic mechanisms, we analyzed 203 DLBCL biopsy samples by high-resolution, genome-wide copy number analysis coupled with gene-expression profiling. Of 272 recurrent chromosomal aberrations that were associated with gene-expression alterations, 30 were used differentially by the DLBCL subtypes (P < 0.006). An amplicon on chromosome 19 was detected in 26% of ABC DLBCLs but in only 3% of GCB DLBCLs and PMBLs. A highly up-regulated gene in this amplicon was SPIB, which encodes an ETS family transcription factor. Knockdown of SPIB by RNA interference was toxic to ABC DLBCL cell lines but not to GCB DLBCL, PMBL, or myeloma cell lines, strongly implicating SPIB as an oncogene involved in the pathogenesis of ABC DLBCL. Deletion of the INK4a/ARF tumor suppressor locus and trisomy 3 also occurred almost exclusively in ABC DLBCLs and was associated with inferior outcome within this subtype. FOXP1 emerged as a potential oncogene in ABC DLBCL that was up-regulated by trisomy 3 and by more focal high-level amplifications. In GCB DLBCL, amplification of the oncogenic mir-17-92 microRNA cluster and deletion of the tumor suppressor PTEN were recurrent, but these events did not occur in ABC DLBCL. Together, these data provide genetic evidence that the DLBCL subtypes are distinct diseases that use different oncogenic pathways. PMID:18765795

  16. Molecular subtypes of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma arise by distinct genetic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lenz, Georg; Wright, George W.; Emre, N. C. Tolga; Kohlhammer, Holger; Dave, Sandeep S.; Davis, R. Eric; Carty, Shannon; Lam, Lloyd T.; Shaffer, A. L.; Xiao, Wenming; Powell, John; Rosenwald, Andreas; Ott, German; Muller-Hermelink, Hans Konrad; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Connors, Joseph M.; Campo, Elias; Jaffe, Elaine S.; Delabie, Jan; Smeland, Erlend B.; Rimsza, Lisa M.; Fisher, Richard I.; Weisenburger, Dennis D.; Chan, Wing C.; Staudt, Louis M.

    2008-01-01

    Gene-expression profiling has been used to define 3 molecular subtypes of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), termed germinal center B-cell-like (GCB) DLBCL, activated B-cell-like (ABC) DLBCL, and primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma (PMBL). To investigate whether these DLBCL subtypes arise by distinct pathogenetic mechanisms, we analyzed 203 DLBCL biopsy samples by high-resolution, genome-wide copy number analysis coupled with gene-expression profiling. Of 272 recurrent chromosomal aberrations that were associated with gene-expression alterations, 30 were used differentially by the DLBCL subtypes (P < 0.006). An amplicon on chromosome 19 was detected in 26% of ABC DLBCLs but in only 3% of GCB DLBCLs and PMBLs. A highly up-regulated gene in this amplicon was SPIB, which encodes an ETS family transcription factor. Knockdown of SPIB by RNA interference was toxic to ABC DLBCL cell lines but not to GCB DLBCL, PMBL, or myeloma cell lines, strongly implicating SPIB as an oncogene involved in the pathogenesis of ABC DLBCL. Deletion of the INK4a/ARF tumor suppressor locus and trisomy 3 also occurred almost exclusively in ABC DLBCLs and was associated with inferior outcome within this subtype. FOXP1 emerged as a potential oncogene in ABC DLBCL that was up-regulated by trisomy 3 and by more focal high-level amplifications. In GCB DLBCL, amplification of the oncogenic mir-17–92 microRNA cluster and deletion of the tumor suppressor PTEN were recurrent, but these events did not occur in ABC DLBCL. Together, these data provide genetic evidence that the DLBCL subtypes are distinct diseases that use different oncogenic pathways. PMID:18765795

  17. Pediatric-type nodal follicular lymphoma: a biologically distinct lymphoma with frequent MAPK pathway mutations.

    PubMed

    Louissaint, Abner; Schafernak, Kristian T; Geyer, Julia T; Kovach, Alexandra E; Ghandi, Mahmoud; Gratzinger, Dita; Roth, Christine G; Paxton, Christian N; Kim, Sunhee; Namgyal, Chungdak; Morin, Ryan; Morgan, Elizabeth A; Neuberg, Donna S; South, Sarah T; Harris, Marian H; Hasserjian, Robert P; Hochberg, Ephraim P; Garraway, Levi A; Harris, Nancy Lee; Weinstock, David M

    2016-08-25

    Pediatric-type nodal follicular lymphoma (PTNFL) is a variant of follicular lymphoma (FL) characterized by limited-stage presentation and invariably benign behavior despite often high-grade histological appearance. It is important to distinguish PTNFL from typical FL in order to avoid unnecessary treatment; however, this distinction relies solely on clinical and pathological criteria, which may be variably applied. To define the genetic landscape of PTNFL, we performed copy number analysis and exome and/or targeted sequencing of 26 PTNFLs (16 pediatric and 10 adult). The most commonly mutated gene in PTNFL was MAP2K1, encoding MEK1, with a mutation frequency of 43%. All MAP2K1 mutations were activating missense mutations localized to exons 2 and 3, which encode negative regulatory and catalytic domains, respectively. Missense mutations in MAPK1 (2/22) and RRAS (1/22) were identified in cases that lacked MAP2K1 mutations. The second most commonly mutated gene in PTNFL was TNFRSF14, with a mutation frequency of 29%, similar to that seen in limited-stage typical FL (P = .35). PTNFL was otherwise genomically bland and specifically lacked recurrent mutations in epigenetic modifiers (eg, CREBBP, KMT2D). Copy number aberrations affected a mean of only 0.5% of PTNFL genomes, compared with 10% of limited-stage typical FL genomes (P < .02). Importantly, the mutational profiles of PTNFLs in children and adults were highly similar. Together, these findings define PTNFL as a biologically and clinically distinct indolent lymphoma of children and adults characterized by a high prevalence of MAPK pathway mutations and a near absence of mutations in epigenetic modifiers.

  18. Cytochrome P450 3A Conjugation to Ubiquitin in a Process Distinct from Classical Ubiquitination Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Zangar, Richard C. ); Kimzey, Amy L.; Okita, Janice R.; Wunschel, David S. ); Edwards, Robert J.; Kim, Hyesook; Okita, Richard T.

    2001-12-01

    We characterize a novel microsome system that forms high-molecular-mass (HMM) CYP3A, CYP2E1, and ubiquitin conjugates, but does not alter CYP4A or most other microsomal proteins. The formation of the HMM bands was observed in hepatic microsomes isolated from rats treated 1 week or more with high doses (50 mg/kg/day) of nicardipine, clotrimazole, or pregnenolone 16alpha-carbonitrile, but not microsomes from control, dexamethasone-, nifedipine-, or diltiazem-treated rats. Extensive washing of the microsomes to remove loosely attached proteins or cytosolic contaminants did not prevent the conjugation reaction. In contrast to prototypical ubiquitination pathways, this reaction did not require addition of ubiquitin, ATP, Mg(2+), or cytosol. Addition of cytosol did result in the degradation of the HMM CYP3A bands in a process that was not blocked by proteasome inhibitors. Immunoprecipitated CYP3A contained HMM ubiquitin. Even so, mass spectrometric analysis of tryptic peptides indicated that the HMM CYP3A was in molar excess to ubiquitin, suggesting that the formation of the HMM CYP3A may have resulted from conjugation to itself or a diffuse pool of ubiquitinated proteins already present in the microsomes. Addition of CYP3A substrates inhibited the formation of the HMM CYP3A and the cytosol-dependent degradation of HMM CYP3A. These results suggest that after extended periods of elevated CYP3A expression, microsomal factors are induced that catalyze the formation of HMM CYP3A conjugates that contain ubiquitin. This conjugation reaction, however, seems to be distinct from the classical ubiquitination pathway but may be related to the substrate-dependent stabilization of CYP3A observed in vivo.

  19. Phosphorylation and ubiquitination of the IkappaB kinase complex by two distinct signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Shambharkar, Prashant B; Blonska, Marzenna; Pappu, Bhanu P; Li, Hongxiu; You, Yun; Sakurai, Hiroaki; Darnay, Bryant G; Hara, Hiromitsu; Penninger, Josef; Lin, Xin

    2007-04-01

    The IkappaB kinase (IKK) complex serves as the master regulator for the activation of NF-kappaB by various stimuli. It contains two catalytic subunits, IKKalpha and IKKbeta, and a regulatory subunit, IKKgamma/NEMO. The activation of IKK complex is dependent on the phosphorylation of IKKalpha/beta at its activation loop and the K63-linked ubiquitination of NEMO. However, the molecular mechanism by which these inducible modifications occur remains undefined. Here, we demonstrate that CARMA1, a key scaffold molecule, is essential to regulate NEMO ubiquitination upon T-cell receptor (TCR) stimulation. However, the phosphorylation of IKKalpha/beta activation loop is independent of CARMA1 or NEMO ubiquitination. Further, we provide evidence that TAK1 is activated and recruited to the synapses in a CARMA1-independent manner and mediate IKKalpha/beta phosphorylation. Thus, our study provides the biochemical and genetic evidence that phosphorylation of IKKalpha/beta and ubiquitination of NEMO are regulated by two distinct pathways upon TCR stimulation.

  20. Mutations in 2 distinct genetic pathways result in cerebral cavernous malformations in mice

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Aubrey C.; Drakos, Stavros G.; Ruiz, Oscar E.; Smith, Alexandra C.H.; Gibson, Christopher C.; Ling, Jing; Passi, Samuel F.; Stratman, Amber N.; Sacharidou, Anastasia; Revelo, M. Patricia; Grossmann, Allie H.; Diakos, Nikolaos A.; Davis, George E.; Metzstein, Mark M.; Whitehead, Kevin J.; Li, Dean Y.

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are a common type of vascular malformation in the brain that are a major cause of hemorrhagic stroke. This condition has been independently linked to 3 separate genes: Krev1 interaction trapped (KRIT1), Cerebral cavernous malformation 2 (CCM2), and Programmed cell death 10 (PDCD10). Despite the commonality in disease pathology caused by mutations in these 3 genes, we found that the loss of Pdcd10 results in significantly different developmental, cell biological, and signaling phenotypes from those seen in the absence of Ccm2 and Krit1. PDCD10 bound to germinal center kinase III (GCKIII) family members, a subset of serine-threonine kinases, and facilitated lumen formation by endothelial cells both in vivo and in vitro. These findings suggest that CCM may be a common tissue manifestation of distinct mechanistic pathways. Nevertheless, loss of heterozygosity (LOH) for either Pdcd10 or Ccm2 resulted in CCMs in mice. The murine phenotype induced by loss of either protein reproduced all of the key clinical features observed in human patients with CCM, as determined by direct comparison with genotype-specific human surgical specimens. These results suggest that CCM may be more effectively treated by directing therapies based on the underlying genetic mutation rather than treating the condition as a single clinical entity. PMID:21490399

  1. Spermidine and resveratrol induce autophagy by distinct pathways converging on the acetylproteome

    PubMed Central

    Morselli, Eugenia; Mariño, Guillermo; Bennetzen, Martin V.; Eisenberg, Tobias; Megalou, Evgenia; Schroeder, Sabrina; Cabrera, Sandra; Bénit, Paule; Rustin, Pierre; Criollo, Alfredo; Kepp, Oliver; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Shen, Shensi; Malik, Shoaib Ahmad; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Horio, Yoshiyuki; López-Otín, Carlos; Andersen, Jens S.; Tavernarakis, Nektarios

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy protects organelles, cells, and organisms against several stress conditions. Induction of autophagy by resveratrol requires the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide–dependent deacetylase sirtuin 1 (SIRT1). In this paper, we show that the acetylase inhibitor spermidine stimulates autophagy independent of SIRT1 in human and yeast cells as well as in nematodes. Although resveratrol and spermidine ignite autophagy through distinct mechanisms, these compounds stimulate convergent pathways that culminate in concordant modifications of the acetylproteome. Both agents favor convergent deacetylation and acetylation reactions in the cytosol and in the nucleus, respectively. Both resveratrol and spermidine were able to induce autophagy in cytoplasts (enucleated cells). Moreover, a cytoplasm-restricted mutant of SIRT1 could stimulate autophagy, suggesting that cytoplasmic deacetylation reactions dictate the autophagic cascade. At doses at which neither resveratrol nor spermidine stimulated autophagy alone, these agents synergistically induced autophagy. Altogether, these data underscore the importance of an autophagy regulatory network of antagonistic deacetylases and acetylases that can be pharmacologically manipulated. PMID:21339330

  2. Pleiotropic action of CpG-ODN on endothelium and macrophages attenuates angiogenesis through distinct pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jiahui; Su, Wenru; Powner, Michael B.; Liu, Jian; Copland, David A.; Fruttiger, Marcus; Madeddu, Paolo; Dick, Andrew D.; Liu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    There is an integral relationship between vascular cells and leukocytes in supporting healthy tissue homeostasis. Furthermore, activation of these two cellular components is key for tissue repair following injury. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a role in innate immunity defending the organism against infection, but their contribution to angiogenesis remains unclear. Here we used synthetic TLR9 agonists, cytosine-phosphate-guanosine oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG-ODN), to investigate the role of TLR9 in vascular pathophysiology and identify potential therapeutic translation. We demonstrate that CpG-ODN stimulates inflammation yet inhibits angiogenesis. Regulation of angiogenesis by CpG-ODN is pervasive and tissue non-specific. Further, we noted that synthetic CpG-ODN requires backbone phosphorothioate but not TLR9 activation to render and maintain endothelial stalk cells quiescent. CpG-ODN pre-treated endothelial cells enhance macrophage migration but restrain pericyte mobilisation. CpG-ODN attenuation of angiogenesis, however, remains TLR9-dependent, as inhibition is lost in TLR9 deficient mice. Additionally, CpG-ODNs induce an M1 macrophage phenotype that restricts angiogenesis. The effects mediated by CpG-ODNs can therefore modulate both endothelial cells and macrophages through distinct pathways, providing potential therapeutic application in ocular vascular disease. PMID:27558877

  3. DNA Double Strand Break Repair Pathway Choice Is Directed by Distinct MRE11 Nuclease Activities

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Atsushi; Moiani, Davide; Arvai, Andrew S.; Perry, J. Jefferson P.; Harding, Shane M.; Genois, Marie-Michelle; Maity, Ranjan; van Rossum-Fikkert, Sari; Kertokalio, Aryandi; Romoli, Filippo; Ismail, Amani; Ismalaj, Ermal; Petricci, Elena; Matthew, J Neale; Bristow, Robert G; Masson, Jean-Yves; Wyman, Claire; Jeggo, Penny; Tainer, John A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY MRE11 within the MRE11-RAD50-NBS1 (MRN) complex acts in DNA double-strand break repair (DSBR), detection and signaling; yet, how its endo- and exonuclease activities regulate DSB repair by non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) versus homologous recombination (HR) remains enigmatic. Here we employed structure-based design with a focused chemical library to discover specific MRE11 endo- or exonuclease inhibitors. With these inhibitors we examined repair pathway choice at DSBs generated in G2 following radiation exposure. Whilst endo- or exonuclease inhibition impairs radiation-induced RPA chromatin binding, suggesting diminished resection, the inhibitors surprisingly direct different repair outcomes. Endonuclease inhibition promotes NHEJ in lieu of HR, whilst exonuclease inhibition confers a repair defect. Collectively, the results describe nuclease-specific MRE11 inhibitors, define distinct nuclease roles in DSB repair, and support a mechanism whereby MRE11 endonuclease initiates resection, thereby licensing HR followed by MRE11 exo and EXO1/BLM bidirectional resection towards and away from the DNA end, which commits to HR. PMID:24316220

  4. Selective removal of mitochondria via mitophagy: distinct pathways for different mitochondrial stresses.

    PubMed

    Wei, Huifang; Liu, Lei; Chen, Quan

    2015-10-01

    The efficient and selective elimination of damaged or excessive mitochondria in response to bioenergetic and environmental cues is critical for maintaining a healthy and appropriate population of mitochondria. Mitophagy is considered to be the central mechanism of mitochondrial quality and quantity control. Atg32, a mitophagy receptor in yeast, recruits mitochondria targeted for degradation into the isolation membrane via both direct and indirect interactions with Atg8. In mammals, different mitophagy effectors, including the mitophagy receptors NIX, BNIP3 and FUDNC1 and the PINK1/Parkin pathway, have been identified to participate in the selective clearance of mitochondria. One common feature of mitophagy receptors is that they harbor an LC3-interacting region (LIR) that interacts with LC3, thus promoting the sequestration of mitochondria into the isolation membrane. Additionally, both receptor- and Parkin/PINK1-mediated mitophagy have been found to be regulated by reversible phosphorylation. Here, we review the recent progress in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in selective mitophagy at multiple levels. We also discuss different mitophagy receptors from an evolutionary perspective and highlight the specific functions of and possible cooperation between distinct mechanisms of mitophagy.

  5. Two distinctive energy migration pathways of monolayer molecules on metal nanoparticle surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiebo; Qian, Huifeng; Chen, Hailong; Zhao, Zhun; Yuan, Kaijun; Chen, Guangxu; Miranda, Andrea; Guo, Xunmin; Chen, Yajing; Zheng, Nanfeng; Wong, Michael S.; Zheng, Junrong

    2016-01-01

    Energy migrations at metal nanomaterial surfaces are fundamentally important to heterogeneous reactions. Here we report two distinctive energy migration pathways of monolayer adsorbate molecules on differently sized metal nanoparticle surfaces investigated with ultrafast vibrational spectroscopy. On a 5 nm platinum particle, within a few picoseconds the vibrational energy of a carbon monoxide adsorbate rapidly dissipates into the particle through electron/hole pair excitations, generating heat that quickly migrates on surface. In contrast, the lack of vibration-electron coupling on approximately 1 nm particles results in vibrational energy migration among adsorbates that occurs on a twenty times slower timescale. Further investigations reveal that the rapid carbon monoxide energy relaxation is also affected by the adsorption sites and the nature of the metal but to a lesser extent. These findings reflect the dependence of electron/vibration coupling on the metallic nature, size and surface site of nanoparticles and its significance in mediating energy relaxations and migrations on nanoparticle surfaces. PMID:26883665

  6. s-Adenosylmethionine Levels Govern Innate Immunity through Distinct Methylation-Dependent Pathways.

    PubMed

    Ding, Wei; Smulan, Lorissa J; Hou, Nicole S; Taubert, Stefan; Watts, Jennifer L; Walker, Amy K

    2015-10-01

    s-adenosylmethionine (SAM) is the sole methyl donor modifying histones, nucleic acids, and phospholipids. Its fluctuation affects hepatic phosphatidylcholine (PC) synthesis or may be linked to variations in DNA or histone methylation. Physiologically, low SAM is associated with lipid accumulation, tissue injury, and immune responses in fatty liver disease. However, molecular connections among SAM limitation, methyltransferases, and disease-associated phenotypes are unclear. We find that low SAM can activate or attenuate Caenorhabditis elegans immune responses. Immune pathways are stimulated downstream of PC production on a non-pathogenic diet. In contrast, distinct SAM-dependent mechanisms limit survival on pathogenic Pseudomonas aeruginosa. C. elegans undertakes a broad transcriptional response to pathogens and we find that low SAM restricts H3K4me3 at Pseudomonas-responsive promoters, limiting their expression. Furthermore, this response depends on the H3K4 methyltransferase set-16/MLL. Thus, our studies provide molecular links between SAM and innate immune functions and suggest that SAM depletion may limit stress-induced gene expression.

  7. Drosophila Abelson kinase mediates cell invasion and proliferation via two distinct MAPK pathways

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Jaskirat; Aaronson, Stuart A.; Mlodzik, Marek

    2010-01-01

    The Abelson (Abl) family of non-receptor tyrosine kinases plays important role in cell morphogenesis, motility and proliferation. Although the function of Abl has been extensively studied in leukemia, its role in epithelial cell invasion remains obscure. Using the Drosophila wing epithelium as an in-vivo model system, we demonstrate that overexpression (activation) of Drosophila Abl (dAbl) causes loss of epithelial apical/basal cell polarity and secretion of matrix metalloproteinases, resulting in a cellular invasion and apoptosis. Our in vivo data indicate that dAbl acts downstream of the Src kinases, which are known regulators of cell adhesion and invasion. Downstream of dAbl, Rac GTPases activate two distinct MAPK pathways: JNK signaling (required for cell invasion and apoptosis) and ERK signaling (inducing cell proliferation). Activated Abl also increases the activity of Src members through a positive feedback loop leading to signal amplification. Thus targeting Src-Abl, using available dual inhibitors, could be of therapeutic importance in tumor cell metastasis. PMID:20453880

  8. Integrated data analysis reveals uterine leiomyoma subtypes with distinct driver pathways and biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Mehine, Miika; Kaasinen, Eevi; Heinonen, Hanna-Riikka; Mäkinen, Netta; Kämpjärvi, Kati; Sarvilinna, Nanna; Aavikko, Mervi; Vähärautio, Anna; Pasanen, Annukka; Bützow, Ralf; Heikinheimo, Oskari; Sjöberg, Jari; Pitkänen, Esa; Vahteristo, Pia; Aaltonen, Lauri A.

    2016-01-01

    Uterine leiomyomas are common benign smooth muscle tumors that impose a major burden on women’s health. Recent sequencing studies have revealed recurrent and mutually exclusive mutations in leiomyomas, suggesting the involvement of molecularly distinct pathways. In this study, we explored transcriptional differences among leiomyomas harboring different genetic drivers, including high mobility group AT-hook 2 (HMGA2) rearrangements, mediator complex subunit 12 (MED12) mutations, biallelic inactivation of fumarate hydratase (FH), and collagen, type IV, alpha 5 and collagen, type IV, alpha 6 (COL4A5-COL4A6) deletions. We also explored the transcriptional consequences of 7q22, 22q, and 1p deletions, aiming to identify possible target genes. We investigated 94 leiomyomas and 60 corresponding myometrial tissues using exon arrays, whole genome sequencing, and SNP arrays. This integrative approach revealed subtype-specific expression changes in key driver pathways, including Wnt/β-catenin, Prolactin, and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)1 signaling. Leiomyomas with HMGA2 aberrations displayed highly significant up-regulation of the proto-oncogene pleomorphic adenoma gene 1 (PLAG1), suggesting that HMGA2 promotes tumorigenesis through PLAG1 activation. This was supported by the identification of genetic PLAG1 alterations resulting in expression signatures as seen in leiomyomas with HMGA2 aberrations. RAD51 paralog B (RAD51B), the preferential translocation partner of HMGA2, was up-regulated in MED12 mutant lesions, suggesting a role for this gene in the genesis of leiomyomas. FH-deficient leiomyomas were uniquely characterized by activation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) target genes, supporting the hypothesis that accumulation of fumarate leads to activation of the oncogenic transcription factor NRF2. This study emphasizes the need for molecular stratification in leiomyoma research and possibly in clinical practice as well. Further research is

  9. Subcutaneous Allergic Sensitization to Protease Allergen Is Dependent on Mast Cells but Not IL-33: Distinct Mechanisms between Subcutaneous and Intranasal Routes.

    PubMed

    Kamijo, Seiji; Suzuki, Mayu; Hara, Mutsuko; Shimura, Sakiko; Ochi, Hirono; Maruyama, Natsuko; Matsuda, Akira; Saito, Hirohisa; Nakae, Susumu; Suto, Hajime; Ichikawa, Saori; Ikeda, Shigaku; Ogawa, Hideoki; Okumura, Ko; Takai, Toshiro

    2016-05-01

    Protease activity of papain, a plant-derived occupational allergen homologous to mite major allergens, is essential to IgE/IgG1 production and lung eosinophilia induced by intranasal papain administration in mice, and IL-33 contributes to these responses. In this work, we investigate skin and Ab responses induced by s.c. papain administration into ear lobes and responses induced by subsequent airway challenge with papain. Subcutaneous papain injection induced swelling associated with increased epidermal thickness, dermal inflammation, serum IgE/IgG1 responses, and Th2 cytokine production in draining lymph node cells restimulated in vitro. These responses were markedly less upon s.c. administration of protease inhibitor-treated papain. Results obtained by using mast cell-deficient mice and reconstitution of tissue mast cells suggested the contribution of mast cells to papain-specific IgE/IgG1 responses and eosinophil infiltration. The responses were equivalent between wild-type and IL-33(-/-) mice. After the subsequent airway challenge, the s.c. presensitized wild-type mice showed more severe lung eosinophilia than those without the presensitization. The presensitized IL-33(-/-) mice showed modest lung eosinophilia, which was absent without the presensitization, but its severity and IgE boost by the airway challenge were markedly less than the presensitized wild-type mice, in which protease activity of inhaled papain contributed to the responses. The results suggest that mechanisms for the protease-dependent sensitization differ between skin and airway and that cooperation of mast cell-dependent, IL-33-independent initial sensitization via skin and protease-induced, IL-33-mediated mechanism in re-exposure via airway to protease allergens maximizes the magnitude of the transition from skin inflammation to asthma in natural history of progression of allergic diseases. PMID:27001956

  10. Genetically distinct pathways guide effector export through the type VI secretion system

    PubMed Central

    Whitney, John C.; Beck, Christina M.; Goo, Young Ah; Russell, Alistair B.; Harding, Brittany; De Leon, Justin A.; Cunningham, David A.; Tran, Bao Q.; Low, David A.; Goodlett, David R.; Hayes, Christopher S.; Mougous, Joseph D.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Bacterial secretion systems often employ molecular chaperones to recognize and facilitate export of their substrates. Recent work demonstrated that a secreted component of the type VI secretion system (T6SS), hemolysin co-regulated protein (Hcp), binds directly to effectors, enhancing their stability in the bacterial cytoplasm. Herein, we describe a quantitative cellular proteomics screen for T6S substrates that exploits this chaperone-like quality of Hcp. Application of this approach to the Hcp secretion island I-encoded T6SS (H1-T6SS) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa led to the identification of a novel effector protein, termed Tse4 (type VI secretion exported 4), subsequently shown to act as a potent intra-specific H1-T6SS-delivered antibacterial toxin. Interestingly, our screen failed to identify two predicted H1-T6SS effectors, Tse5 and Tse6, which differ from Hcp-stabilized substrates by the presence of toxin-associated PAAR-repeat motifs and genetic linkage to members of the valine-glycine repeat protein G (vgrG) genes. Genetic studies further distinguished these two groups of effectors: Hcp-stabilized effectors were found to display redundancy in interbacterial competition with respect to the requirement for the two H1-T6SS-exported VgrG proteins, whereas Tse5 and Tse6 delivery strictly required a cognate VgrG. Together, we propose that interaction with either VgrG or Hcp defines distinct pathways for T6S effector export. PMID:24589350

  11. Distinct Pathways of Humoral and Cellular Immunity Induced with the Mucosal Administration of a Nanoemulsion Adjuvant

    PubMed Central

    Makidon, Paul E.; Janczak, Katarzyna W.; Blanco, Luz P.; Swanson, Benjamin; Smith, Douglas M.; Pham, Tiffany; Szabo, Zsuzsanna; Kukowska-Latallo, Jolanta F.; Baker, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Nasal administration of an oil-in-water nanoemulsion (NE) adjuvant W805EC produces potent systemic and mucosal, Th-1– and Th-17–balanced cellular responses. However, its molecular mechanism of action has not been fully characterized and is of particular interest because NE does not contain specific ligands for innate immune receptors. In these studies, we demonstrate that W805EC NE adjuvant activates innate immunity, induces specific gene transcription, and modulates NF-κB activity via TLR2 and TLR4 by a mechanism that appears to be distinct from typical TLR agonists. Nasal immunization with NE-based vaccine showed that the TLR2, TLR4, and MyD88 pathways and IL-12 and IL-12Rβ1 expression are not required for an Ab response, but they are essential for the induction of balanced Th-1 polarization and Th-17 cellular immunity. NE adjuvant induces MHC class II, CD80, and CD86 costimulatory molecule expression and dendritic cell maturation. Further, upon immunization with NE, adjuvant mice deficient in the CD86 receptor had normal Ab responses but significantly reduced Th-1 cellular responses, whereas animals deficient in both CD80 and CD86 or lacking CD40 failed to produce either humoral or cellular immunity. Overall, our data show that intranasal administration of Ag with NE induces TLR2 and TLR4 activation along with a MyD88-independent Ab response and a MyD88-dependent Th-1 and Th-17 cell–mediated immune response. These findings suggest that the unique properties of NE adjuvant may offer novel opportunities for understanding previously unrecognized mechanisms of immune activation important for generating effective mucosal and systemic immune responses. PMID:24532579

  12. Regulation of Endothelial Cell Proliferation and Vascular Assembly through Distinct mTORC2 Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shan; Amato, Katherine R.; Song, Wenqiang; Youngblood, Victoria; Lee, Keunwook; Boothby, Mark; Brantley-Sieders, Dana M.

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a serine/threonine kinase that regulates a diverse array of cellular processes, including cell growth, survival, metabolism, and cytoskeleton dynamics. mTOR functions in two distinct complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2, whose activities and substrate specificities are regulated by complex specific cofactors, including Raptor and Rictor, respectively. Little is known regarding the relative contribution of mTORC1 versus mTORC2 in vascular endothelial cells. Using mouse models of Raptor or Rictor gene targeting, we discovered that Rictor ablation inhibited vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced endothelial cell proliferation and assembly in vitro and angiogenesis in vivo, whereas the loss of Raptor had only a modest effect on endothelial cells (ECs). Mechanistically, the loss of Rictor reduced the phosphorylation of AKT, protein kinase Cα (PKCα), and NDRG1 without affecting the mTORC1 pathway. In contrast, the loss of Raptor increased the phosphorylation of AKT despite inhibiting the phosphorylation of S6K1, a direct target of mTORC1. Reconstitution of Rictor-null cells with myristoylated AKT (Myr-AKT) rescued vascular assembly in Rictor-deficient endothelial cells, whereas PKCα rescued proliferation defects. Furthermore, tumor neovascularization in vivo was significantly decreased upon EC-specific Rictor deletion in mice. These data indicate that mTORC2 is a critical signaling node required for VEGF-mediated angiogenesis through the regulation of AKT and PKCα in vascular endothelial cells. PMID:25582201

  13. Subfamily-Specific Fluorescent Probes for Cysteine Proteases Display Dynamic Protease Activities during Seed Germination1

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Haibin; Chandrasekar, Balakumaran; Oeljeklaus, Julian; Misas-Villamil, Johana C.; Wang, Zheming; Shindo, Takayuki; Bogyo, Matthew; Kaiser, Markus; van der Hoorn, Renier A.L.

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine proteases are an important class of enzymes implicated in both developmental and defense-related programmed cell death and other biological processes in plants. Because there are dozens of cysteine proteases that are posttranslationally regulated by processing, environmental conditions, and inhibitors, new methodologies are required to study these pivotal enzymes individually. Here, we introduce fluorescence activity-based probes that specifically target three distinct cysteine protease subfamilies: aleurain-like proteases, cathepsin B-like proteases, and vacuolar processing enzymes. We applied protease activity profiling with these new probes on Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) protease knockout lines and agroinfiltrated leaves to identify the probe targets and on other plant species to demonstrate their broad applicability. These probes revealed that most commercially available protease inhibitors target unexpected proteases in plants. When applied on germinating seeds, these probes reveal dynamic activities of aleurain-like proteases, cathepsin B-like proteases, and vacuolar processing enzymes, coinciding with the remobilization of seed storage proteins. PMID:26048883

  14. Distinct light-mediated pathways regulate the biosynthesis and exchange of isoprenoid precursors during Arabidopsis seedling development.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel; Forés, Oriol; Martinez-García, Jaime F; González, Victor; Phillips, Michael A; Ferrer, Albert; Boronat, Albert

    2004-01-01

    Plants synthesize an astonishing diversity of isoprenoids, some of which play essential roles in photosynthesis, respiration, and the regulation of growth and development. Two independent pathways for the biosynthesis of isoprenoid precursors coexist within the plant cell: the cytosolic mevalonic acid (MVA) pathway and the plastidial methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway. In at least some plants (including Arabidopsis), common precursors are exchanged between the cytosol and the plastid. However, little is known about the signals that coordinate their biosynthesis and exchange. To identify such signals, we arrested seedling development by specifically blocking the MVA pathway with mevinolin (MEV) or the MEP pathway with fosmidomycin (FSM) and searched for MEV-resistant Arabidopsis mutants that also could survive in the presence of FSM. Here, we show that one such mutant, rim1, is a new phyB allele (phyB-m1). Although the MEV-resistant phenotype of mutant seedlings is caused by the upregulation of MVA synthesis, its resistance to FSM most likely is the result of an enhanced intake of MVA-derived isoprenoid precursors by the plastid. The analysis of other light-hyposensitive mutants showed that distinct light perception and signal transduction pathways regulate these two differential mechanisms for resistance, providing evidence for a coordinated regulation of the activity of the MVA pathway and the crosstalk between cell compartments for isoprenoid biosynthesis during the first stages of seedling development.

  15. Cartography of Pathway Signal Perturbations Identifies Distinct Molecular Pathomechanisms in Malignant and Chronic Lung Diseases.

    PubMed

    Arakelyan, Arsen; Nersisyan, Lilit; Petrek, Martin; Löffler-Wirth, Henry; Binder, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Lung diseases are described by a wide variety of developmental mechanisms and clinical manifestations. Accurate classification and diagnosis of lung diseases are the bases for development of effective treatments. While extensive studies are conducted toward characterization of various lung diseases at molecular level, no systematic approach has been developed so far. Here we have applied a methodology for pathway-centered mining of high throughput gene expression data to describe a wide range of lung diseases in the light of shared and specific pathway activity profiles. We have applied an algorithm combining a Pathway Signal Flow (PSF) algorithm for estimation of pathway activity deregulation states in lung diseases and malignancies, and a Self Organizing Maps algorithm for classification and clustering of the pathway activity profiles. The analysis results allowed clearly distinguish between cancer and non-cancer lung diseases. Lung cancers were characterized by pathways implicated in cell proliferation, metabolism, while non-malignant lung diseases were characterized by deregulations in pathways involved in immune/inflammatory response and fibrotic tissue remodeling. In contrast to lung malignancies, chronic lung diseases had relatively heterogeneous pathway deregulation profiles. We identified three groups of interstitial lung diseases and showed that the development of characteristic pathological processes, such as fibrosis, can be initiated by deregulations in different signaling pathways. In conclusion, this paper describes the pathobiology of lung diseases from systems viewpoint using pathway centered high-dimensional data mining approach. Our results contribute largely to current understanding of pathological events in lung cancers and non-malignant lung diseases. Moreover, this paper provides new insight into molecular mechanisms of a number of interstitial lung diseases that have been studied to a lesser extent.

  16. Cartography of Pathway Signal Perturbations Identifies Distinct Molecular Pathomechanisms in Malignant and Chronic Lung Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Arakelyan, Arsen; Nersisyan, Lilit; Petrek, Martin; Löffler-Wirth, Henry; Binder, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Lung diseases are described by a wide variety of developmental mechanisms and clinical manifestations. Accurate classification and diagnosis of lung diseases are the bases for development of effective treatments. While extensive studies are conducted toward characterization of various lung diseases at molecular level, no systematic approach has been developed so far. Here we have applied a methodology for pathway-centered mining of high throughput gene expression data to describe a wide range of lung diseases in the light of shared and specific pathway activity profiles. We have applied an algorithm combining a Pathway Signal Flow (PSF) algorithm for estimation of pathway activity deregulation states in lung diseases and malignancies, and a Self Organizing Maps algorithm for classification and clustering of the pathway activity profiles. The analysis results allowed clearly distinguish between cancer and non-cancer lung diseases. Lung cancers were characterized by pathways implicated in cell proliferation, metabolism, while non-malignant lung diseases were characterized by deregulations in pathways involved in immune/inflammatory response and fibrotic tissue remodeling. In contrast to lung malignancies, chronic lung diseases had relatively heterogeneous pathway deregulation profiles. We identified three groups of interstitial lung diseases and showed that the development of characteristic pathological processes, such as fibrosis, can be initiated by deregulations in different signaling pathways. In conclusion, this paper describes the pathobiology of lung diseases from systems viewpoint using pathway centered high-dimensional data mining approach. Our results contribute largely to current understanding of pathological events in lung cancers and non-malignant lung diseases. Moreover, this paper provides new insight into molecular mechanisms of a number of interstitial lung diseases that have been studied to a lesser extent. PMID:27200087

  17. Gut Symbionts from Distinct Hosts Exhibit Genotoxic Activity via Divergent Colibactin Biosynthesis Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Vizcaino, Maria I.; Crawford, Jason M.

    2014-01-01

    Secondary metabolites produced by nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) or polyketide synthase (PKS) pathways are chemical mediators of microbial interactions in diverse environments. However, little is known about their distribution, evolution, and functional roles in bacterial symbionts associated with animals. A prominent example is colibactin, a largely unknown family of secondary metabolites produced by Escherichia coli via a hybrid NRPS-PKS biosynthetic pathway that inflicts DNA damage upon eukaryotic cells and contributes to colorectal cancer and tumor formation in the mammalian gut. Thus far, homologs of this pathway have only been found in closely related Enterobacteriaceae, while a divergent variant of this gene cluster was recently discovered in a marine alphaproteobacterial Pseudovibrio strain. Herein, we sequenced the genome of Frischella perrara PEB0191, a bacterial gut symbiont of honey bees and identified a homologous colibactin biosynthetic pathway related to those found in Enterobacteriaceae. We show that the colibactin genomic island (GI) has conserved gene synteny and biosynthetic module architecture across F. perrara, Enterobacteriaceae, and the Pseudovibrio strain. Comparative metabolomics analyses of F. perrara and E. coli further reveal that these two bacteria produce related colibactin pathway-dependent metabolites. Finally, we demonstrate that F. perrara, like E. coli, causes DNA damage in eukaryotic cells in vitro in a colibactin pathway-dependent manner. Together, these results support that divergent variants of the colibactin biosynthetic pathway are widely distributed among bacterial symbionts, producing related secondary metabolites and likely endowing its producer with functional capabilities important for diverse symbiotic associations. PMID:25527542

  18. Mutation profiles of synchronous colorectal cancers from a patient with Lynch syndrome suggest distinct oncogenic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Chanjuan; Holt, Jonathan A.; Vnencak-Jones, Cindy L.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with Lynch syndrome often present with multiple synchronous or metachronous colorectal cancers (CRCs). The presence of multiple CRCs with distinct genetic profiles and driver mutations could complicate treatment as each cancer may respond differently to therapy. Studies of sporadic CRCs suggested that synchronous tumors have distinct etiologies, but could not rule out differences in genetic background. The presence of multiple cancers in a patient with a predisposing mutation provides an opportunity to profile synchronous cancers in the same genetic background. Here, we describe the case of a patient with Lynch syndrome that presented with six synchronous CRCs. Microsatellite instability (MSI) and genomic profiling indicated that each lesion had a unique pattern of instability and a distinct profile of affected genes. These findings support the idea that in Lynch syndrome, synchronous CRCs can develop in parallel with distinct mutation profiles and that these differences may inform treatment decisions. PMID:27284491

  19. Specific Hsp100 Chaperones Determine the Fate of the First Enzyme of the Plastidial Isoprenoid Pathway for Either Refolding or Degradation by the Stromal Clp Protease in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Pulido, Pablo; Llamas, Ernesto; Llorente, Briardo; Ventura, Salvador; Wright, Louwrance P.; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    The lifespan and activity of proteins depend on protein quality control systems formed by chaperones and proteases that ensure correct protein folding and prevent the formation of toxic aggregates. We previously found that the Arabidopsis thaliana J-protein J20 delivers inactive (misfolded) forms of the plastidial enzyme deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS) to the Hsp70 chaperone for either proper folding or degradation. Here we show that the fate of Hsp70-bound DXS depends on pathways involving specific Hsp100 chaperones. Analysis of individual mutants for the four Hsp100 chaperones present in Arabidopsis chloroplasts showed increased levels of DXS proteins (but not transcripts) only in those defective in ClpC1 or ClpB3. However, the accumulated enzyme was active in the clpc1 mutant but inactive in clpb3 plants. Genetic evidence indicated that ClpC chaperones might be required for the unfolding of J20-delivered DXS protein coupled to degradation by the Clp protease. By contrast, biochemical and genetic approaches confirmed that Hsp70 and ClpB3 chaperones interact to collaborate in the refolding and activation of DXS. We conclude that specific J-proteins and Hsp100 chaperones act together with Hsp70 to recognize and deliver DXS to either reactivation (via ClpB3) or removal (via ClpC1) depending on the physiological status of the plastid. PMID:26815787

  20. Specific Hsp100 Chaperones Determine the Fate of the First Enzyme of the Plastidial Isoprenoid Pathway for Either Refolding or Degradation by the Stromal Clp Protease in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Pulido, Pablo; Llamas, Ernesto; Llorente, Briardo; Ventura, Salvador; Wright, Louwrance P; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    The lifespan and activity of proteins depend on protein quality control systems formed by chaperones and proteases that ensure correct protein folding and prevent the formation of toxic aggregates. We previously found that the Arabidopsis thaliana J-protein J20 delivers inactive (misfolded) forms of the plastidial enzyme deoxyxylulose 5-phosphate synthase (DXS) to the Hsp70 chaperone for either proper folding or degradation. Here we show that the fate of Hsp70-bound DXS depends on pathways involving specific Hsp100 chaperones. Analysis of individual mutants for the four Hsp100 chaperones present in Arabidopsis chloroplasts showed increased levels of DXS proteins (but not transcripts) only in those defective in ClpC1 or ClpB3. However, the accumulated enzyme was active in the clpc1 mutant but inactive in clpb3 plants. Genetic evidence indicated that ClpC chaperones might be required for the unfolding of J20-delivered DXS protein coupled to degradation by the Clp protease. By contrast, biochemical and genetic approaches confirmed that Hsp70 and ClpB3 chaperones interact to collaborate in the refolding and activation of DXS. We conclude that specific J-proteins and Hsp100 chaperones act together with Hsp70 to recognize and deliver DXS to either reactivation (via ClpB3) or removal (via ClpC1) depending on the physiological status of the plastid. PMID:26815787

  1. Two distinct signaling pathways participate in auxin-induced swelling of pea epidermal protoplasts.

    PubMed

    Yamagami, Mutsumi; Haga, Ken; Napier, Richard M; Iino, Moritoshi

    2004-02-01

    Protoplast swelling was used to investigate auxin signaling in the growth-limiting stem epidermis. The protoplasts of epidermal cells were isolated from elongating internodes of pea (Pisum sativum). These protoplasts swelled in response to auxin, providing the clearest evidence that the epidermis can directly perceive auxin. The swelling response to the natural auxin IAA showed a biphasic dose response curve but that to the synthetic auxin 1-naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) showed a simple bell-shaped dose response curve. The responses to IAA and NAA were further analyzed using antibodies raised against ABP1 (auxin-binding protein 1), and their dependency on extracellular ions was investigated. Two signaling pathways were resolved for IAA, an ABP1-dependent pathway and an ABP1-independent pathway that is much more sensitive to IAA than the former. The response by the ABP1 pathway was eliminated by anti-ABP1 antibodies, had a higher sensitivity to NAA, and did not depend on extracellular Ca(2+). In contrast, the response by the non-ABP1 pathway was not affected by anti-ABP1 antibodies, had no sensitivity to NAA, and depended on extracellular Ca(2+). The swelling by either pathway required extracellular K(+) and Cl(-). The auxin-induced growth of pea internode segments showed similar response patterns, including the occurrence of two peaks in the dose response curve for IAA and the difference in Ca(2+) requirements. It is suggested that two signaling pathways participate in auxin-induced internode growth and that the non-ABP1 pathway is more likely to be involved in the control of growth by constitutive concentrations of endogenous auxin. PMID:14764902

  2. Two Distinct Signaling Pathways Participate in Auxin-Induced Swelling of Pea Epidermal Protoplasts

    PubMed Central

    Yamagami, Mutsumi; Haga, Ken; Napier, Richard M.; Iino, Moritoshi

    2004-01-01

    Protoplast swelling was used to investigate auxin signaling in the growth-limiting stem epidermis. The protoplasts of epidermal cells were isolated from elongating internodes of pea (Pisum sativum). These protoplasts swelled in response to auxin, providing the clearest evidence that the epidermis can directly perceive auxin. The swelling response to the natural auxin IAA showed a biphasic dose response curve but that to the synthetic auxin 1-naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) showed a simple bell-shaped dose response curve. The responses to IAA and NAA were further analyzed using antibodies raised against ABP1 (auxin-binding protein 1), and their dependency on extracellular ions was investigated. Two signaling pathways were resolved for IAA, an ABP1-dependent pathway and an ABP1-independent pathway that is much more sensitive to IAA than the former. The response by the ABP1 pathway was eliminated by anti-ABP1 antibodies, had a higher sensitivity to NAA, and did not depend on extracellular Ca2+. In contrast, the response by the non-ABP1 pathway was not affected by anti-ABP1 antibodies, had no sensitivity to NAA, and depended on extracellular Ca2+. The swelling by either pathway required extracellular K+ and Cl–. The auxin-induced growth of pea internode segments showed similar response patterns, including the occurrence of two peaks in the dose response curve for IAA and the difference in Ca2+ requirements. It is suggested that two signaling pathways participate in auxin-induced internode growth and that the non-ABP1 pathway is more likely to be involved in the control of growth by constitutive concentrations of endogenous auxin. PMID:14764902

  3. Acetylcholinesterase staining differentiates functionally distinct auditory pathways in the barn owl.

    PubMed

    Adolphs, R

    1993-03-15

    The aim of this study was to examine how the functional specialization of the barn owl's auditory brainstem might correlate with histochemical compartmentalization. The barn owl uses interaural intensity and time differences to encode, respectively, the vertical and azimuthal positions of sound sources in space. These two auditory cues are processed in parallel ascending pathways that separate from each other at the level of the cochlear nuclei. Sections through the auditory brainstem were stained for acetylcholinesterase (AChE) to examine whether nuclei that process different auditory cues stain differentially for this enzyme. Of the two cochlear nuclei, angularis showed more intense staining than nucleus magnocellularis. Nucleus angularis projects to all of the nuclei and subdivisions of nuclei that belong to the intensity processing pathway. Acetylcholinesterase stained all regions that contain terminal fields of nucleus angularis and thus provided discrimination between the time and intensity pathways. Moreover, staining patterns with acetylcholinesterase were complementary to those previously reported with an anti-calbindin antibody, which stains terminal fields of nucleus laminaris, and thus stains all the nuclei and subdivisions of nuclei that belong to the time pathway. Some of the gross staining patterns observed with AChE were similar to those reported with antibodies to glutamate decarboxylase. However, AChE is a more convenient and definitive marker in discriminating between these pathways than is calbindin or glutamate decarboxylase. Acetylcholinesterase staining of the intensity pathway in the owl may be related to encoding of sound intensity by spike rate over large dynamic ranges. PMID:7681456

  4. Protease signalling: the cutting edge

    PubMed Central

    Turk, Boris; Turk, Dus̆an; Turk, Vito

    2012-01-01

    Protease research has undergone a major expansion in the last decade, largely due to the extremely rapid development of new technologies, such as quantitative proteomics and in-vivo imaging, as well as an extensive use of in-vivo models. These have led to identification of physiological substrates and resulted in a paradigm shift from the concept of proteases as protein-degrading enzymes to proteases as key signalling molecules. However, we are still at the beginning of an understanding of protease signalling pathways. We have only identified a minor subset of true physiological substrates for a limited number of proteases, and their physiological regulation is still not well understood. Similarly, links with other signalling systems are not well established. Herein, we will highlight current challenges in protease research. PMID:22367392

  5. MALT1 Protease Activity Is Required for Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jong W.; Hoffman, Sandy; Beal, Allison M.; Dykon, Angela; Ringenberg, Michael A.; Hughes, Anna C.; Dare, Lauren; Anderson, Amber D.; Finger, Joshua; Kasparcova, Viera; Rickard, David; Berger, Scott B.; Ramanjulu, Joshi; Emery, John G.; Gough, Peter J.; Bertin, John; Foley, Kevin P.

    2015-01-01

    CARMA-BCL10-MALT1 signalosomes play important roles in antigen receptor signaling and other pathways. Previous studies have suggested that as part of this complex, MALT1 functions as both a scaffolding protein to activate NF-κB through recruitment of ubiquitin ligases, and as a protease to cleave and inactivate downstream inhibitory signaling proteins. However, our understanding of the relative importance of these two distinct MALT1 activities has been hampered by a lack of selective MALT1 protease inhibitors with suitable pharmacologic properties. To fully investigate the role of MALT1 protease activity, we generated mice homozygous for a protease-dead mutation in MALT1. We found that some, but not all, MALT1 functions in immune cells were dependent upon its protease activity. Protease-dead mice had defects in the generation of splenic marginal zone and peritoneal B1 B cells. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells displayed decreased T cell receptor-stimulated proliferation and IL-2 production while B cell receptor-stimulated proliferation was partially dependent on protease activity. In dendritic cells, stimulation of cytokine production through the Dectin-1, Dectin-2, and Mincle C-type lectin receptors was also found to be partially dependent upon protease activity. In vivo, protease-dead mice had reduced basal immunoglobulin levels, and showed defective responses to immunization with T-dependent and T-independent antigens. Surprisingly, despite these decreased responses, MALT1 protease-dead mice, but not MALT1 null mice, developed mixed inflammatory cell infiltrates in multiple organs, suggesting MALT1 protease activity plays a role in immune homeostasis. These findings highlight the importance of MALT1 protease activity in multiple immune cell types, and in integrating immune responses in vivo. PMID:25965667

  6. Overlapping and distinct pRb pathways in the mammalian auditory and vestibular organs.

    PubMed

    Huang, Mingqian; Sage, Cyrille; Tang, Yong; Lee, Sang Goo; Petrillo, Marco; Hinds, Philip W; Chen, Zheng-Yi

    2011-01-15

    Retinoblastoma gene (Rb1) is required for proper cell cycle exit in the developing mouse inner ear and its deletion in the embryo leads to proliferation of sensory progenitor cells that differentiate into hair cells and supporting cells. In a conditional hair cell Rb1 knockout mouse, Pou4f3-Cre-pRb(-/-), pRb(-/-) utricular hair cells differentiate and survive into adulthood whereas differentiation and survival of pRb(-/-) cochlear hair cells are impaired. To comprehensively survey the pRb pathway in the mammalian inner ear, we performed microarray analysis of (pRb(-/-) cochlea and utricle. The comparative analysis shows that the core pathway shared between pRb(-/-) cochlea and utricle is centered on E2F, the key pathway that mediates pRb function. A majority of differentially expressed genes and enriched pathways are not shared but uniquely associated with pRb(-/-) cochlea or utricle. In pRb(-/-) cochlea, pathways involved in early inner ear development such as Wnt/β-catenin and Notch were enriched, whereas pathways involving in proliferation and survival are enriched in pRb(-/-) utricle. Clustering analysis showed that the pRb(-/-) inner ear has characteristics of a younger control inner ear, an indication of delayed differentiation. We created a transgenic mouse model (ER-Cre-pRb(flox/flox)) in which Rb1 can be acutely deleted postnatally. Acute Rb1 deletion in the adult mouse fails to induce proliferation or cell death in inner ear, strongly indicating that Rb1 loss in these postmitotic tissues can be effectively compensated for, or that pRb-mediated changes in the postmitotic compartment result in events that are functionally irreversible once enacted. This study thus supports the concept that pRb-regulated pathways relevant to hair cell development, encompassing proliferation, differentiation and survival, act predominantly during early development.

  7. Parsing the construct of maternal insensitivity: distinct longitudinal pathways associated with early maternal withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Lyons-Ruth, Karlen; Bureau, Jean-Francois; Easterbrooks, M Ann; Obsuth, Ingrid; Hennighausen, Kate; Vulliez-Coady, Lauriane

    2013-01-01

    The current paper expands on Ainsworth's seminal construct of maternal sensitivity by exploring the developmental pathways associated with one particular form of insensitivity: maternal withdrawal. Drawing on longitudinal data from infancy to age 20 in a high-risk cohort, we highlight how maternal withdrawal over the first eight years of life is associated with child caregiving behavior and with maternal role confusion, as well as with features of borderline and antisocial personality disorders. We also present evidence for the specificity of this pathway in relation to other aspects of maternal insensitivity and other aspects of child adaptation. To illuminate these pathways we both review recent published work and report new findings on the middle childhood and adolescent components of these trajectories. Finally, we consider the implications for assessment of maternal behavior in high-risk samples and indicate directions for productive future work. PMID:24299135

  8. Distinct Functions for the Drosophila piRNA Pathway in Genome Maintenance and Telomere Protection

    PubMed Central

    Khurana, Jaspreet S.; Xu, Jia; Weng, Zhiping; Theurkauf, William E.

    2010-01-01

    Transposons and other selfish DNA elements can be found in all phyla, and mobilization of these elements can compromise genome integrity. The piRNA (PIWI-interacting RNA) pathway silences transposons in the germline, but it is unclear if this pathway has additional functions during development. Here we show that mutations in the Drosophila piRNA pathway genes, armi, aub, ago3, and rhi, lead to extensive fragmentation of the zygotic genome during the cleavage stage of embryonic divisions. Additionally, aub and armi show defects in telomere resolution during meiosis and the cleavage divisions; and mutations in lig-IV, which disrupt non-homologous end joining, suppress these fusions. By contrast, lig-IV mutations enhance chromosome fragmentation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation studies show that aub and armi mutations disrupt telomere binding of HOAP, which is a component of the telomere protection complex, and reduce expression of a subpopulation of 19- to 22-nt telomere-specific piRNAs. Mutations in rhi and ago3, by contrast, do not block HOAP binding or production of these piRNAs. These findings uncover genetically separable functions for the Drosophila piRNA pathway. The aub, armi, rhi, and ago3 genes silence transposons and maintain chromosome integrity during cleavage-stage embryonic divisions. However, the aub and armi genes have an additional function in assembly of the telomere protection complex. PMID:21179579

  9. Distinct mechanisms for spiro-carbon formation reveal biosynthetic pathway crosstalk.

    PubMed

    Tsunematsu, Yuta; Ishikawa, Noriyasu; Wakana, Daigo; Goda, Yukihiro; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Moriya, Hisao; Hotta, Kinya; Watanabe, Kenji

    2013-12-01

    Spirotryprostatins, an indole alkaloid class of nonribosomal peptides isolated from Aspergillus fumigatus, are known for their antimitotic activity in tumor cells. Because spirotryprostatins and many other chemically complex spiro-carbon-bearing natural products exhibit useful biological activities, identifying and understanding the mechanism of spiro-carbon biosynthesis is of great interest. Here we report a detailed study of spiro-ring formation in spirotryprostatins from tryprostatins derived from the fumitremorgin biosynthetic pathway, using reactants and products prepared with engineered yeast and fungal strains. Unexpectedly, FqzB, an FAD-dependent monooxygenase from the unrelated fumiquinazoline biosynthetic pathway, catalyzed spiro-carbon formation in spirotryprostatin A via an epoxidation route. Furthermore, FtmG, a cytochrome P450 from the fumitremorgin biosynthetic pathway, was determined to catalyze the spiro-ring formation in spirotryprostatin B. Our results highlight the versatile role of oxygenating enzymes in the biosynthesis of structurally complex natural products and indicate that cross-talk of different biosynthetic pathways allows product diversification in natural product biosynthesis.

  10. PARP-1 and Ku compete for repair of DNA double strand breaks by distinct NHEJ pathways

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Minli; Wu, Weizhong; Wu, Wenqi; Rosidi, Bustanur; Zhang, Lihua; Wang, Huichen; Iliakis, George

    2006-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase 1 (PARP-1) recognizes DNA strand interruptions in vivo and triggers its own modification as well as that of other proteins by the sequential addition of ADP-ribose to form polymers. This modification causes a release of PARP-1 from DNA ends and initiates a variety of responses including DNA repair. While PARP-1 has been firmly implicated in base excision and single strand break repair, its role in the repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) remains unclear. Here, we show that PARP-1, probably together with DNA ligase III, operates in an alternative pathway of non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) that functions as backup to the classical pathway of NHEJ that utilizes DNA-PKcs, Ku, DNA ligase IV, XRCC4, XLF/Cernunnos and Artemis. PARP-1 binds to DNA ends in direct competition with Ku. However, in irradiated cells the higher affinity of Ku for DSBs and an excessive number of other forms of competing DNA lesions limit its contribution to DSB repair. When essential components of the classical pathway of NHEJ are absent, PARP-1 is recruited for DSB repair, particularly in the absence of Ku and non-DSB lesions. This form of DSB repair is sensitive to PARP-1 inhibitors. The results define the function of PARP-1 in DSB repair and characterize a candidate pathway responsible for joining errors causing genomic instability and cancer. PMID:17088286

  11. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Antagonize Distinct Pathways to Suppress Tumorigenesis of Embryonal Rhabdomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Vleeshouwer-Neumann, Terra; Phelps, Michael; Bammler, Theo K.; MacDonald, James W.; Jenkins, Isaac; Chen, Eleanor Y.

    2015-01-01

    Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS) is the most common soft tissue cancer in children. The prognosis of patients with relapsed or metastatic disease remains poor. ERMS genomes show few recurrent mutations, suggesting that other molecular mechanisms such as epigenetic regulation might play a major role in driving ERMS tumor biology. In this study, we have demonstrated the diverse roles of histone deacetylases (HDACs) in the pathogenesis of ERMS by characterizing effects of HDAC inhibitors, trichostatin A (TSA) and suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA; also known as vorinostat) in vitro and in vivo. TSA and SAHA suppress ERMS tumor growth and progression by inducing myogenic differentiation as well as reducing the self-renewal and migratory capacity of ERMS cells. Differential expression profiling and pathway analysis revealed downregulation of key oncogenic pathways upon HDAC inhibitor treatment. By gain-of-function, loss-of-function, and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) studies, we show that Notch1- and EphrinB1-mediated pathways are regulated by HDACs to inhibit differentiation and enhance migratory capacity of ERMS cells, respectively. Our study demonstrates that aberrant HDAC activity plays a major role in ERMS pathogenesis. Druggable targets in the molecular pathways affected by HDAC inhibitors represent novel therapeutic options for ERMS patients. PMID:26636678

  12. Wnt-Fzd signaling sensitizes peripheral sensory neurons via distinct noncanonical pathways.

    PubMed

    Simonetti, Manuela; Agarwal, Nitin; Stösser, Sebastian; Bali, Kiran Kumar; Karaulanov, Emil; Kamble, Rashmi; Pospisilova, Blanka; Kurejova, Martina; Birchmeier, Walter; Niehrs, Christof; Heppenstall, Paul; Kuner, Rohini

    2014-07-01

    Wnt signaling represents a highly versatile signaling system, which plays diverse and critical roles in various aspects of neural development. Sensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglia require Wnt signaling for initial cell-fate determination as well as patterning and synapse formation. Here we report that Wnt signaling pathways persist in adult sensory neurons and play a functional role in their sensitization in a pathophysiological context. We observed that Wnt3a recruits the Wnt-calcium signaling pathway and the Wnt planar cell polarity pathway in peripheral nerves to alter pain sensitivity in a modality-specific manner and we elucidated underlying mechanisms. In contrast, biochemical, pharmacological, and genetic studies revealed lack of functional relevance for the classical canonical β-catenin pathway in peripheral sensory neurons in acute modulation of nociception. Finally, this study provides proof-of-concept for a translational potential for Wnt3a-Frizzled3 signaling in alleviating disease-related pain hypersensitivity in cancer-associated pain in vivo.

  13. Distinct mechanisms for spiro-carbon formation reveal biosynthetic pathway crosstalk.

    PubMed

    Tsunematsu, Yuta; Ishikawa, Noriyasu; Wakana, Daigo; Goda, Yukihiro; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Moriya, Hisao; Hotta, Kinya; Watanabe, Kenji

    2013-12-01

    Spirotryprostatins, an indole alkaloid class of nonribosomal peptides isolated from Aspergillus fumigatus, are known for their antimitotic activity in tumor cells. Because spirotryprostatins and many other chemically complex spiro-carbon-bearing natural products exhibit useful biological activities, identifying and understanding the mechanism of spiro-carbon biosynthesis is of great interest. Here we report a detailed study of spiro-ring formation in spirotryprostatins from tryprostatins derived from the fumitremorgin biosynthetic pathway, using reactants and products prepared with engineered yeast and fungal strains. Unexpectedly, FqzB, an FAD-dependent monooxygenase from the unrelated fumiquinazoline biosynthetic pathway, catalyzed spiro-carbon formation in spirotryprostatin A via an epoxidation route. Furthermore, FtmG, a cytochrome P450 from the fumitremorgin biosynthetic pathway, was determined to catalyze the spiro-ring formation in spirotryprostatin B. Our results highlight the versatile role of oxygenating enzymes in the biosynthesis of structurally complex natural products and indicate that cross-talk of different biosynthetic pathways allows product diversification in natural product biosynthesis. PMID:24121553

  14. Direct neural pathways convey distinct visual information to Drosophila mushroom bodies

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Katrin; Aso, Yoshinori; Hige, Toshihide; Knapek, Stephan; Ichinose, Toshiharu; Friedrich, Anja B; Turner, Glenn C; Rubin, Gerald M; Tanimoto, Hiromu

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that visual and olfactory associative memories of Drosophila share mushroom body (MB) circuits (Vogt et al., 2014). Unlike for odor representation, the MB circuit for visual information has not been characterized. Here, we show that a small subset of MB Kenyon cells (KCs) selectively responds to visual but not olfactory stimulation. The dendrites of these atypical KCs form a ventral accessory calyx (vAC), distinct from the main calyx that receives olfactory input. We identified two types of visual projection neurons (VPNs) directly connecting the optic lobes and the vAC. Strikingly, these VPNs are differentially required for visual memories of color and brightness. The segregation of visual and olfactory domains in the MB allows independent processing of distinct sensory memories and may be a conserved form of sensory representations among insects. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14009.001 PMID:27083044

  15. Direct neural pathways convey distinct visual information to Drosophila mushroom bodies.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Katrin; Aso, Yoshinori; Hige, Toshihide; Knapek, Stephan; Ichinose, Toshiharu; Friedrich, Anja B; Turner, Glenn C; Rubin, Gerald M; Tanimoto, Hiromu

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that visual and olfactory associative memories of Drosophila share mushroom body (MB) circuits (Vogt et al., 2014). Unlike for odor representation, the MB circuit for visual information has not been characterized. Here, we show that a small subset of MB Kenyon cells (KCs) selectively responds to visual but not olfactory stimulation. The dendrites of these atypical KCs form a ventral accessory calyx (vAC), distinct from the main calyx that receives olfactory input. We identified two types of visual projection neurons (VPNs) directly connecting the optic lobes and the vAC. Strikingly, these VPNs are differentially required for visual memories of color and brightness. The segregation of visual and olfactory domains in the MB allows independent processing of distinct sensory memories and may be a conserved form of sensory representations among insects.

  16. Direct neural pathways convey distinct visual information to Drosophila mushroom bodies.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Katrin; Aso, Yoshinori; Hige, Toshihide; Knapek, Stephan; Ichinose, Toshiharu; Friedrich, Anja B; Turner, Glenn C; Rubin, Gerald M; Tanimoto, Hiromu

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that visual and olfactory associative memories of Drosophila share mushroom body (MB) circuits (Vogt et al., 2014). Unlike for odor representation, the MB circuit for visual information has not been characterized. Here, we show that a small subset of MB Kenyon cells (KCs) selectively responds to visual but not olfactory stimulation. The dendrites of these atypical KCs form a ventral accessory calyx (vAC), distinct from the main calyx that receives olfactory input. We identified two types of visual projection neurons (VPNs) directly connecting the optic lobes and the vAC. Strikingly, these VPNs are differentially required for visual memories of color and brightness. The segregation of visual and olfactory domains in the MB allows independent processing of distinct sensory memories and may be a conserved form of sensory representations among insects. PMID:27083044

  17. Distinct visual pathways mediate Drosophila larval light avoidance and circadian clock entrainment.

    PubMed

    Keene, Alex C; Mazzoni, Esteban O; Zhen, Jamie; Younger, Meg A; Yamaguchi, Satoko; Blau, Justin; Desplan, Claude; Sprecher, Simon G

    2011-04-27

    Visual organs perceive environmental stimuli required for rapid initiation of behaviors and can also entrain the circadian clock. The larval eye of Drosophila is capable of both functions. Each eye contains only 12 photoreceptors (PRs), which can be subdivided into two subtypes. Four PRs express blue-sensitive rhodopsin5 (rh5) and eight express green-sensitive rhodopsin6 (rh6). We found that either PR-subtype is sufficient to entrain the molecular clock by light, while only the Rh5-PR subtype is essential for light avoidance. Acetylcholine released from PRs confers both functions. Both subtypes of larval PRs innervate the main circadian pacemaker neurons of the larva, the neuropeptide PDF (pigment-dispersing factor)-expressing lateral neurons (LNs), providing sensory input to control circadian rhythms. However, we show that PDF-expressing LNs are dispensable for light avoidance, and a distinct set of three clock neurons is required. Thus we have identified distinct sensory and central circuitry regulating light avoidance behavior and clock entrainment. Our findings provide insights into the coding of sensory information for distinct behavioral functions and the underlying molecular and neuronal circuitry. PMID:21525293

  18. Distinct amino acid-sensing mTOR pathways regulate skeletal myogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Mee-Sup; Chen, Jie

    2013-12-01

    Signaling through the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in response to amino acid availability controls many cellular and developmental processes. mTOR is a master regulator of myogenic differentiation, but the pathways mediating amino acid signals in this process are not known. Here we examine the Rag GTPases and the class III phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) Vps34, two mediators of amino acid signals upstream of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) in cell growth regulation, for their potential involvement in myogenesis. We find that, although both Rag and Vps34 mediate amino acid activation of mTORC1 in C2C12 myoblasts, they have opposing functions in myogenic differentiation. Knockdown of RagA/B enhances, whereas overexpression of active RagB/C mutants impairs, differentiation, and this inhibitory function of Rag is mediated by mTORC1 suppression of the IRS1-PI3K-Akt pathway. On the other hand, Vps34 is required for myogenic differentiation. Amino acids activate a Vps34-phospholipase D1 (PLD1) pathway that controls the production of insulin-like growth factor II, an autocrine inducer of differentiation, through the Igf2 muscle enhancer. The product of PLD, phosphatidic acid, activates the enhancer in a rapamycin-sensitive but mTOR kinase-independent manner. Our results uncover amino acid-sensing mechanisms controlling the homeostasis of myogenesis and underline the versatility and context dependence of mTOR signaling.

  19. Distinct pathways for rule-based retrieval and spatial mapping of memory representations in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Navawongse, Rapeechai; Eichenbaum, Howard

    2013-01-16

    Hippocampal neurons encode events within the context in which they occurred, a fundamental feature of episodic memory. Here we explored the sources of event and context information represented by hippocampal neurons during the retrieval of object associations in rats. Temporary inactivation of the medial prefrontal cortex differentially reduced the selectivity of rule-based object associations represented by hippocampal neuronal firing patterns but did not affect spatial firing patterns. In contrast, inactivation of the medial entorhinal cortex resulted in a pervasive reorganization of hippocampal mappings of spatial context and events. These results suggest distinct and cooperative prefrontal and medial temporal mechanisms in memory representation.

  20. Distinct amino acid-sensing mTOR pathways regulate skeletal myogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Mee-Sup; Chen, Jie

    2013-12-01

    Signaling through the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in response to amino acid availability controls many cellular and developmental processes. mTOR is a master regulator of myogenic differentiation, but the pathways mediating amino acid signals in this process are not known. Here we examine the Rag GTPases and the class III phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) Vps34, two mediators of amino acid signals upstream of mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) in cell growth regulation, for their potential involvement in myogenesis. We find that, although both Rag and Vps34 mediate amino acid activation of mTORC1 in C2C12 myoblasts, they have opposing functions in myogenic differentiation. Knockdown of RagA/B enhances, whereas overexpression of active RagB/C mutants impairs, differentiation, and this inhibitory function of Rag is mediated by mTORC1 suppression of the IRS1-PI3K-Akt pathway. On the other hand, Vps34 is required for myogenic differentiation. Amino acids activate a Vps34-phospholipase D1 (PLD1) pathway that controls the production of insulin-like growth factor II, an autocrine inducer of differentiation, through the Igf2 muscle enhancer. The product of PLD, phosphatidic acid, activates the enhancer in a rapamycin-sensitive but mTOR kinase-independent manner. Our results uncover amino acid-sensing mechanisms controlling the homeostasis of myogenesis and underline the versatility and context dependence of mTOR signaling. PMID:24068326

  1. Interleukin-13 Activates Distinct Cellular Pathways Leading to Ductular Reaction, Steatosis, and Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Gieseck, Richard L; Ramalingam, Thirumalai R; Hart, Kevin M; Vannella, Kevin M; Cantu, David A; Lu, Wei-Yu; Ferreira-González, Sofía; Forbes, Stuart J; Vallier, Ludovic; Wynn, Thomas A

    2016-07-19

    Fibroproliferative diseases are driven by dysregulated tissue repair responses and are a major cause of morbidity and mortality because they affect nearly every organ system. Type 2 cytokine responses are critically involved in tissue repair; however, the mechanisms that regulate beneficial regeneration versus pathological fibrosis are not well understood. Here, we have shown that the type 2 effector cytokine interleukin-13 simultaneously, yet independently, directed hepatic fibrosis and the compensatory proliferation of hepatocytes and biliary cells in progressive models of liver disease induced by interleukin-13 overexpression or after infection with Schistosoma mansoni. Using transgenic mice with interleukin-13 signaling genetically disrupted in hepatocytes, cholangiocytes, or resident tissue fibroblasts, we have revealed direct and distinct roles for interleukin-13 in fibrosis, steatosis, cholestasis, and ductular reaction. Together, these studies show that these mechanisms are simultaneously controlled but distinctly regulated by interleukin-13 signaling. Thus, it may be possible to promote interleukin-13-dependent hepatobiliary expansion without generating pathological fibrosis. VIDEO ABSTRACT. PMID:27421703

  2. Distinct Effects of p19 RNA Silencing Suppressor on Small RNA Mediated Pathways in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Kontra, Levente; Tavazza, Mario; Lucioli, Alessandra; Tavazza, Raffaela; Moxon, Simon; Medzihradszky, Anna; Burgyán, József

    2016-01-01

    RNA silencing is one of the main defense mechanisms employed by plants to fight viruses. In change, viruses have evolved silencing suppressor proteins to neutralize antiviral silencing. Since the endogenous and antiviral functions of RNA silencing pathway rely on common components, it was suggested that viral suppressors interfere with endogenous silencing pathway contributing to viral symptom development. In this work, we aimed to understand the effects of the tombusviral p19 suppressor on endogenous and antiviral silencing during genuine virus infection. We showed that ectopically expressed p19 sequesters endogenous small RNAs (sRNAs) in the absence, but not in the presence of virus infection. Our presented data question the generalized model in which the sequestration of endogenous sRNAs by the viral suppressor contributes to the viral symptom development. We further showed that p19 preferentially binds the perfectly paired ds-viral small interfering RNAs (vsiRNAs) but does not select based on their sequence or the type of the 5’ nucleotide. Finally, co-immunoprecipitation of sRNAs with AGO1 or AGO2 from virus-infected plants revealed that p19 specifically impairs vsiRNA loading into AGO1 but not AGO2. Our findings, coupled with the fact that p19-expressing wild type Cymbidium ringspot virus (CymRSV) overcomes the Nicotiana benthamiana silencing based defense killing the host, suggest that AGO1 is the main effector of antiviral silencing in this host-virus combination. PMID:27711201

  3. Nonconscious emotional processing involves distinct neural pathways for pictures and videos.

    PubMed

    Faivre, Nathan; Charron, Sylvain; Roux, Paul; Lehéricy, Stéphane; Kouider, Sid

    2012-12-01

    Facial expressions are known to impact observers' behavior, even when they are not consciously identifiable. Relying on visual crowding, a perceptual phenomenon whereby peripheral faces become undiscriminable, we show that participants exposed to happy vs. neutral crowded faces rated the pleasantness of subsequent neutral targets accordingly to the facial expression's valence. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) along with psychophysiological interaction analysis, we investigated the neural determinants of this nonconscious preference bias, either induced by static (i.e., pictures) or dynamic (i.e., videos) facial expressions. We found that while static expressions activated primarily the ventral visual pathway (including task-related functional connectivity between the fusiform face area and the amygdala), dynamic expressions triggered the dorsal visual pathway (i.e., posterior partietal cortex) and the substantia innominata, a structure that is contiguous with the dorsal amygdala. As temporal cues are known to improve the processing of visible facial expressions, the absence of ventral activation we observed with crowded videos questions the capacity to integrate facial features and facial motions without awareness. Nevertheless, both static and dynamic facial expressions activated the hippocampus and the orbitofrontal cortex, suggesting that nonconscious preference judgments may arise from the evaluation of emotional context and the computation of aesthetic evaluation.

  4. Blue Light Induces a Distinct Starch Degradation Pathway in Guard Cells for Stomatal Opening.

    PubMed

    Horrer, Daniel; Flütsch, Sabrina; Pazmino, Diana; Matthews, Jack S A; Thalmann, Matthias; Nigro, Arianna; Leonhardt, Nathalie; Lawson, Tracy; Santelia, Diana

    2016-02-01

    Stomatal pores form a crucial interface between the leaf mesophyll and the atmosphere, controlling water and carbon balance in plants [1]. Major advances have been made in understanding the regulatory networks and ion fluxes in the guard cells surrounding the stomatal pore [2]. However, our knowledge on the role of carbon metabolism in these cells is still fragmentary [3-5]. In particular, the contribution of starch in stomatal opening remains elusive [6]. Here, we used Arabidopsis thaliana as a model plant to provide the first quantitative analysis of starch turnover in guard cells of intact leaves during the diurnal cycle. Starch is present in guard cells at the end of night, unlike in the rest of the leaf, but is rapidly degraded within 30 min of light. This process is critical for the rapidity of stomatal opening and biomass production. We exploited Arabidopsis molecular genetics to define the mechanism and regulation of guard cell starch metabolism, showing it to be mediated by a previously uncharacterized pathway. This involves the synergistic action of β-amylase 1 (BAM1) and α-amylase 3 (AMY3)-enzymes that are normally not required for nighttime starch degradation in other leaf tissues. This pathway is under the control of the phototropin-dependent blue-light signaling cascade and correlated with the activity of the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase. Our results show that guard cell starch degradation has an important role in plant growth by driving stomatal responses to light.

  5. Estrogen induces two distinct cholesterol crystallization pathways by activating ERα and GPR30 in female mice

    PubMed Central

    de Bari, Ornella; Wang, Tony Y.; Liu, Min; Portincasa, Piero; Wang, David Q-H.

    2015-01-01

    To distinguish the lithogenic effect of the classical estrogen receptor α (ERα) from that of the G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30), a new estrogen receptor, on estrogen-induced gallstones, we investigated the entire spectrum of cholesterol crystallization pathways and sequences during the early stage of gallstone formation in gallbladder bile of ovariectomized female wild-type, GPR30(−/−), ERα(−/−), and GPR30(−/−)/ERα(−/−) mice treated with 17β-estradiol (E2) at 6 µg/day and fed a lithogenic diet for 12 days. E2 disrupted biliary cholesterol and bile salt metabolism through ERα and GPR30, leading to supersaturated bile and predisposing to the precipitation of cholesterol monohydrate crystals. In GPR30(−/−) mice, arc-like and tubular crystals formed first, followed by classical parallelogram-shaped cholesterol monohydrate crystals. In ERα(−/−) mice, precipitation of lamellar liquid crystals, typified by birefringent multilamellar vesicles, appeared earlier than cholesterol monohydrate crystals. Both crystallization pathways were accelerated in wild-type mice with the activation of GPR30 and ERα by E2. However, cholesterol crystallization was drastically retarded in GPR30(−/−)/ERα(−/−) mice. We concluded that E2 activates GPR30 and ERα to produce liquid crystalline versus anhydrous crystalline metastable intermediates evolving to cholesterol monohydrate crystals from supersaturated bile. GPR30 produces a synergistic lithogenic action with ERα to enhance E2-induced gallstone formation. PMID:26152119

  6. Estrogen induces two distinct cholesterol crystallization pathways by activating ERα and GPR30 in female mice.

    PubMed

    de Bari, Ornella; Wang, Tony Y; Liu, Min; Portincasa, Piero; Wang, David Q-H

    2015-09-01

    To distinguish the lithogenic effect of the classical estrogen receptor α (ERα) from that of the G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30), a new estrogen receptor, on estrogen-induced gallstones, we investigated the entire spectrum of cholesterol crystallization pathways and sequences during the early stage of gallstone formation in gallbladder bile of ovariectomized female wild-type, GPR30((-/-)), ERα((-/-)), and GPR30((-/-))/ERα((-/-)) mice treated with 17β-estradiol (E2) at 6 µg/day and fed a lithogenic diet for 12 days. E2 disrupted biliary cholesterol and bile salt metabolism through ERα and GPR30, leading to supersaturated bile and predisposing to the precipitation of cholesterol monohydrate crystals. In GPR30((-/-)) mice, arc-like and tubular crystals formed first, followed by classical parallelogram-shaped cholesterol monohydrate crystals. In ERα((-/-)) mice, precipitation of lamellar liquid crystals, typified by birefringent multilamellar vesicles, appeared earlier than cholesterol monohydrate crystals. Both crystallization pathways were accelerated in wild-type mice with the activation of GPR30 and ERα by E2. However, cholesterol crystallization was drastically retarded in GPR30((-/-))/ERα((-/-)) mice. We concluded that E2 activates GPR30 and ERα to produce liquid crystalline versus anhydrous crystalline metastable intermediates evolving to cholesterol monohydrate crystals from supersaturated bile. GPR30 produces a synergistic lithogenic action with ERα to enhance E2-induced gallstone formation.

  7. Supermarket Proteases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagar, William G.; Bullerwell, Lornie D.

    2003-01-01

    Presents a laboratory activity on enzymes. Uses common items found in the supermarket that contain protease enzymes, such as contact lens cleaner and meat tenderizer. Demonstrates the digestion of gelatin proteins as part of enzymatic reactions. (Author/SOE)

  8. Size evolution of highly amphiphilic macromolecular solution assemblies via a distinct bimodal pathway

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Elizabeth G.; Murphy, Ryan P.; Seppala, Jonathan E.; Smart, Thomas P.; Hann, Sarah D.

    2014-01-01

    The solution self-assembly of macromolecular amphiphiles offers an efficient, bottom-up strategy for producing well--defined nanocarriers, with applications ranging from drug delivery to nanoreactors. Typically, the generation of uniform nanocarrier architecturesis controlled by processing methods that rely upon cosolvent mixtures. These preparation strategies hinge on the assumption that macromolecular solution nanostructures are kinetically stable following transfer from an organic/aqueous cosolvent into aqueous solution. Herein we demonstrate that unequivocal step-change shifts in micelle populations occur over several weeks following transfer into a highly selective solvent. The unexpected micelle growth evolves through a distinct bimodal distribution separated by multiple fusion events and critically depends on solution agitation. Notably, these results underscore fundamental similarities between assembly processes in amphiphilic polymer, small molecule, and protein systems. Moreover, the non-equilibrium micelle size increase can have a major impact on the assumed stability of solution assemblies, for which performance is dictated by nanocarrier size and structure. PMID:24710204

  9. Size evolution of highly amphiphilic macromolecular solution assemblies via a distinct bimodal pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, Elizabeth G.; Murphy, Ryan P.; Seppala, Jonathan E.; Smart, Thomas P.; Hann, Sarah D.; Sullivan, Millicent O.; Epps, Thomas H.

    2014-04-01

    The solution self-assembly of macromolecular amphiphiles offers an efficient, bottom-up strategy for producing well-defined nanocarriers, with applications ranging from drug delivery to nanoreactors. Typically, the generation of uniform nanocarrier architectures is controlled by processing methods that rely on cosolvent mixtures. These preparation strategies hinge on the assumption that macromolecular solution nanostructures are kinetically stable following transfer from an organic/aqueous cosolvent into aqueous solution. Herein we demonstrate that unequivocal step-change shifts in micelle populations occur over several weeks following transfer into a highly selective solvent. The unexpected micelle growth evolves through a distinct bimodal distribution separated by multiple fusion events and critically depends on solution agitation. Notably, these results underscore fundamental similarities between assembly processes in amphiphilic polymer, small molecule and protein systems. Moreover, the non-equilibrium micelle size increase can have a major impact on the assumed stability of solution assemblies, for which performance is dictated by nanocarrier size and structure.

  10. Alpha1a-adrenoceptor genetic variant induces cardiomyoblast-to-fibroblast-like cell transition via distinct signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Kleine-Brueggeney, Maren; Gradinaru, Irina; Babaeva, Ekaterina; Schwinn, Debra A; Oganesian, Anush

    2014-09-01

    The role of naturally occurring human α1a-Adrenergic Receptor (α1aAR) genetic variants associated with cardiovascular disorders is poorly understood. Here, we present the novel findings that expression of human α1aAR-247R (247R) genetic variant in cardiomyoblasts leads to transition of cardiomyoblasts into a fibroblast-like phenotype, evidenced by morphology and distinct de novo expression of characteristic genes. These fibroblast-like cells exhibit constitutive, high proliferative capacity and agonist-induced hypertrophy compared with cells prior to transition. We demonstrate that constitutive, synergistic activation of EGFR, Src and ERK kinases is the potential molecular mechanism of this transition. We also demonstrate that 247R triggers two distinct EGFR transactivation-dependent signaling pathways: 1) constitutive Gq-independent β-arrestin-1/Src/MMP/EGFR/ERK-dependent hyperproliferation and 2) agonist-induced Gq- and EGFR/STAT-dependent hypertrophy. Interestingly, in cardiomyoblasts agonist-independent hyperproliferation is MMP-dependent, but in fibroblast-like cells it is MMP-independent, suggesting that expression of α1aAR genetic variant in cardiomyocytes may trigger extracellular matrix remodeling. Thus, these novel findings demonstrate that EGFR transactivation by α1aAR-247R leads to hyperproliferation, hypertrophy and alterations in cardiomyoblasts, suggesting that these unique genetically-mediated alterations in signaling pathways and cellular function may lead to myocardial fibrosis. Such extracellular matrix remodeling may contribute to the genesis of arrhythmias in certain types of heart failure.

  11. Functional genomics identifies five distinct molecular subtypes with clinical relevance and pathways for growth control in epithelial ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Tuan Zea; Miow, Qing Hao; Huang, Ruby Yun-Ju; Wong, Meng Kang; Ye, Jieru; Lau, Jieying Amelia; Wu, Meng Chu; Bin Abdul Hadi, Luqman Hakim; Soong, Richie; Choolani, Mahesh; Davidson, Ben; Nesland, Jahn M; Wang, Ling-Zhi; Matsumura, Noriomi; Mandai, Masaki; Konishi, Ikuo; Goh, Boon-Cher; Chang, Jeffrey T; Thiery, Jean Paul; Mori, Seiichi

    2013-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is hallmarked by a high degree of heterogeneity. To address this heterogeneity, a classification scheme was developed based on gene expression patterns of 1538 tumours. Five, biologically distinct subgroups — Epi-A, Epi-B, Mes, Stem-A and Stem-B — exhibited significantly distinct clinicopathological characteristics, deregulated pathways and patient prognoses, and were validated using independent datasets. To identify subtype-specific molecular targets, ovarian cancer cell lines representing these molecular subtypes were screened against a genome-wide shRNA library. Focusing on the poor-prognosis Stem-A subtype, we found that two genes involved in tubulin processing, TUBGCP4 and NAT10, were essential for cell growth, an observation supported by a pathway analysis that also predicted involvement of microtubule-related processes. Furthermore, we observed that Stem-A cell lines were indeed more sensitive to inhibitors of tubulin polymerization, vincristine and vinorelbine, than the other subtypes. This subtyping offers new insights into the development of novel diagnostic and personalized treatment for EOC patients. PMID:23666744

  12. Transgenic multivitamin corn through biofortification of endosperm with three vitamins representing three distinct metabolic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Naqvi, Shaista; Zhu, Changfu; Farre, Gemma; Ramessar, Koreen; Bassie, Ludovic; Breitenbach, Jürgen; Perez Conesa, Dario; Ros, Gaspar; Sandmann, Gerhard; Capell, Teresa; Christou, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Vitamin deficiency affects up to 50% of the world's population, disproportionately impacting on developing countries where populations endure monotonous, cereal-rich diets. Transgenic plants offer an effective way to increase the vitamin content of staple crops, but thus far it has only been possible to enhance individual vitamins. We created elite inbred South African transgenic corn plants in which the levels of 3 vitamins were increased specifically in the endosperm through the simultaneous modification of 3 separate metabolic pathways. The transgenic kernels contained 169-fold the normal amount of β-carotene, 6-fold the normal amount of ascorbate, and double the normal amount of folate. Levels of engineered vitamins remained stable at least through to the T3 homozygous generation. This achievement, which vastly exceeds any realized thus far by conventional breeding alone, opens the way for the development of nutritionally complete cereals to benefit the world's poorest people. PMID:19416835

  13. Magnetic stimulation of human premotor or motor cortex produces interhemispheric facilitation through distinct pathways.

    PubMed

    Bäumer, Tobias; Bock, Franka; Koch, Giacomo; Lange, Rüdiger; Rothwell, John C; Siebner, Hartwig R; Münchau, Alexander

    2006-05-01

    We explored interhemispheric facilitation (IHF) between (a) left and right primary motor cortex (M1) and (b) left dorsal premotor (dPM) and right M1 in 20 right-handed healthy human subjects using a paired pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) protocol. A conditioning TMS pulse (CP) applied to left M1 or dPM with an intensity of 80% and 60% active motor threshold (CP(80%AMT) and CP(60%AMT), respectively) was followed by a test pulse (TP) over right M1 induced by anterior-posterior- or posterior-anterior- (TP(AP), TP(PA)) directed currents in the brain at interstimulus intervals (ISIs) of 3-8 and 10 ms. EMG was recorded from left first dorsal interosseous muscle. In the main experimental condition IHF was evoked by CP(80%AMT) over left M1 and TPAP at ISIs of 6 and 8 ms. The same CP(80%AMT) produced IHF at an ISI of 8 ms when applied over left dPM but only with TP(PA). In addition, when CP(60%AMT) was given to M1, IHF was present at an ISI of 6 ms (but not 8 ms) when followed by TP(PA), indicating that IHF elicited over dPM was not caused by current spread of the conditioning pulse to M1. We conclude that IHF can be induced differentially by conditioning M1 and dPM using subthreshold CP. These facilitatory interactions depended on the intensity and ISI of the CP as well as the current flow direction of the TP. We suggest that not only do the CPs activate separate anatomical pathways but also that these pathways project to different populations ofinterneurons in the receiving M1. These may correspond to elements involved in the generation of I3 and I1 waves, respectively. PMID:16497712

  14. Distinct silicon and germanium pathways in the soil-plant system: Evidence from banana and horsetail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delvigne, C.; Opfergelt, S.; Cardinal, D.; Delvaux, B.; André, L.

    2009-06-01

    Plants strongly impact the continental silicon cycle by taking up Si and precipitating opal phytoliths which are recycled into the soil. Studying Ge incorporation, a chemical analog of Si, relative to Si may provide a useful tracer of Si pathways. However, Ge uptake and transport through plants and the impact on Ge/Si of phytoliths remain poorly understood. Here, we report Ge uptake and accumulation and Ge/Si fractionation in all plant parts and solutions from: (1) hydroponic banana, (2) in situ sampled banana, and (3) horsetails. We further combine these data with δ29Si from banana plants. Our data reconcile opposite conclusions drawn from previous studies on Ge uptake and pathways. No discrimination of Ge occurred at the root-solution interface. Banana and horsetails were shown to accumulate Ge in roots: a previous study provided evidence of low Ge/Si ratios in root phytoliths which contrasts with high bulk Ge/Si ratios in roots we report here. This suggests that Ge is organically trapped in roots. Consequently, shoots display lower Ge/Si ratios, without fractionation between shoot parts since Ge would follow transpiration stream as silicon, and is not discriminated between shoot parts. This contrasts with the two-step discrimination against heavy Si isotopes, at the root-solution interface, and then within the shoots. The soil composition (clays versus Fe oxides) has a leading role on the Ge/Si signatures of plants which may in turn impact on the Si and Ge fluxes to the global ocean.

  15. Site-directed mutagenesis of aldehyde dehydrogenase-2 suggests three distinct pathways of nitroglycerin biotransformation.

    PubMed

    Wenzl, M Verena; Beretta, Matteo; Griesberger, Martina; Russwurm, Michael; Koesling, Doris; Schmidt, Kurt; Mayer, Bernd; Gorren, Antonius C F

    2011-08-01

    To elucidate the mechanism underlying reduction of nitroglycerin (GTN) to nitric oxide (NO) by mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH2), we generated mutants of the enzyme lacking the cysteines adjacent to reactive Cys302 (C301S and C303S), the glutamate that participates as a general base in aldehyde oxidation (E268Q) or combinations of these residues. The mutants were characterized regarding acetaldehyde dehydrogenation, GTN-triggered enzyme inactivation, GTN denitration, NO formation, and soluble guanylate cyclase activation. Lack of the cysteines did not affect dehydrogenase activity but impeded GTN denitration, aggravated GTN-induced enzyme inactivation, and increased NO formation. A triple mutant lacking the cysteines and Glu268 catalyzed sustained formation of superstoichiometric amounts of NO and exhibited slower rates of inactivation. These results suggest three alternative pathways for the reaction of ALDH2 with GTN, all involving formation of a thionitrate/sulfenyl nitrite intermediate at Cys302 as the initial step. In the first pathway, which predominates in the wild-type enzyme and reflects clearance-based GTN denitration, the thionitrate apparently reacts with one of the adjacent cysteine residues to yield nitrite and a protein disulfide. The predominant reaction catalyzed by the single and double cysteine mutants requires Glu268 and results in irreversible enzyme inactivation. Finally, combined lack of the cysteines and Glu268 shifts the reaction toward formation of the free NO radical, presumably through homolytic cleavage of the sulfenyl nitrite intermediate. Although the latter reaction accounts for less than 10% of total turnover of GTN metabolism catalyzed by wild-type ALDH2, it is most likely essential for vascular GTN bioactivation.

  16. REDOX regulation of IL-13 signaling in intestinal epithelial cells: usage of alternate pathways mediates distinct gene expression patterns

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Debasmita; Fu, Pingfu; Levine, Alan D.

    2010-01-01

    In the classic view interleukin-13 (IL-13) binds to a heterodimer protein complex of the IL-13Rα1 and IL-4Rα chains and signals through a janus kinase 1 (JAK1)-signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6) mechanism. We recently reported that IL-13 also signals through the IL-13Rα2 chain initiating all three mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, and the relative expression of IL-13Rα1 and IL-13Rα2 modulates one another’s transduction pathway. Therefore we investigated whether generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as second messengers may serve as a common nexus between these two pathways emanating from the individual IL-13 receptor chains in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC). IL-13 stimulates intracellular ROS synthesis within 5 min via IL-13Rα1-JAK1-STAT6- and IL-13Rα2-MEK1/2-ERK1/2-dependent activation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase-1 (NOX-1). IL-13-induced ROS generation in turn positively regulates phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and STAT6, yielding a feed forward amplification loop. IL-13 also stimulates the stable, long-term gene expression of two other NADPH oxidases, NOX-4 and DUOX-2, which along with constitutive NOX-1, might facilitate elevated, continuous production of ROS in IL-13-activated IEC. The contribution of each signal transduction pathway initiated by IL-13 engagement to such biological functions as wound healing, inflammation, and apoptosis was mapped for representative, responsive genes. Distinct usage patterns were observed, demonstrating that not only is IL-13 signal transduction through STAT6, MAPK, and ROS regulated in both an antagonistic and cyclic fashion, but each pathway also plays a specific role in modulating the wound healing and anti-apoptotic capabilities of the intestinal epithelium. PMID:20570727

  17. SARS coronavirus papain-like protease inhibits the type I interferon signaling pathway through interaction with the STING-TRAF3-TBK1 complex.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaojuan; Yang, Xingxing; Zheng, Yang; Yang, Yudong; Xing, Yaling; Chen, Zhongbin

    2014-05-01

    SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) develops an antagonistic mechanism by which to evade the antiviral activities of interferon (IFN). Previous studies suggested that SARS-CoV papain-like protease (PLpro) inhibits activation of the IRF3 pathway, which would normally elicit a robust IFN response, but the mechanism(s) used by SARS PLpro to inhibit activation of the IRF3 pathway is not fully known. In this study, we uncovered a novel mechanism that may explain how SARS PLpro efficiently inhibits activation of the IRF3 pathway. We found that expression of the membrane-anchored PLpro domain (PLpro-TM) from SARS-CoV inhibits STING/TBK1/IKKε-mediated activation of type I IFNs and disrupts the phosphorylation and dimerization of IRF3, which are activated by STING and TBK1. Meanwhile, we showed that PLpro-TM physically interacts with TRAF3, TBK1, IKKε, STING, and IRF3, the key components that assemble the STING-TRAF3-TBK1 complex for activation of IFN expression. However, the interaction between the components in STING-TRAF3-TBK1 complex is disrupted by PLpro-TM. Furthermore, SARS PLpro-TM reduces the levels of ubiquitinated forms of RIG-I, STING, TRAF3, TBK1, and IRF3 in the STING-TRAF3-TBK1 complex. These results collectively point to a new mechanism used by SARS-CoV through which PLpro negatively regulates IRF3 activation by interaction with STING-TRAF3-TBK1 complex, yielding a SARS-CoV countermeasure against host innate immunity.

  18. Distinct roles of secreted HtrA proteases from gram-negative pathogens in cleaving the junctional protein and tumor suppressor E-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Hoy, Benjamin; Geppert, Tim; Boehm, Manja; Reisen, Felix; Plattner, Patrick; Gadermaier, Gabriele; Sewald, Norbert; Ferreira, Fatima; Briza, Peter; Schneider, Gisbert; Backert, Steffen; Wessler, Silja

    2012-03-23

    The periplasmic chaperone and serine protease HtrA is important for bacterial stress responses and protein quality control. Recently, we discovered that HtrA from Helicobacter pylori is secreted and cleaves E-cadherin to disrupt the epithelial barrier, but it remained unknown whether this maybe a general virulence mechanism. Here, we show that important other pathogens including enteropathogenic Escherichia coli, Shigella flexneri, and Campylobacter jejuni, but not Neisseria gonorrhoeae, cleaved E-cadherin on host cells. HtrA deletion in C. jejuni led to severe defects in E-cadherin cleavage, loss of cell adherence, paracellular transmigration, and basolateral invasion. Computational modeling of HtrAs revealed a conserved pocket in the active center exhibiting pronounced proteolytic activity. Differential E-cadherin cleavage was determined by an alanine-to-glutamine exchange in the active center of neisserial HtrA. These data suggest that HtrA-mediated E-cadherin cleavage is a prevalent pathogenic mechanism of multiple gram-negative bacteria representing an attractive novel target for therapeutic intervention to combat bacterial infections. PMID:22337879

  19. Two distinct phases of apoptosis in mammary gland involution: proteinase-independent and -dependent pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, Leif R; Romer, John; Thomasset, Nicole; Solberg, Helene; Pyke, Charles; Bissell, Mina J; Dano, Keld; Werb, Zena

    1996-01-01

    Postlactational involution of the mammary gland is characterized by two distinct physiological events: apoptosis of the secretory, epithelial cells undergoing programmed cell death, and proteolytic degradation of the mammary gland basement membrane. We examined the spatial and temporal patterns of apoptotic cells in relation to those of proteinases during involution of the BALB/c mouse mammary gland. Apoptosis was almost absent during lactation but became evident at day 2 of involution, when {beta}-casein gene expression was still high. Apoptotic cells were then seen at least up to day 8 of involution, when {beta}-casein gene expression was being extinguished. Expression of sulfated glycoprotein-2 (SGP-2), interleukin-1{beta} converting enzyme (ICE) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1 was upregulated at day 2, when apoptotic cells were seen initially. Expression of the matrix metalloproteinases gelatinase A and stromelysin-1 and the serine proteinase urokinase-type plasminogen activator, which was low during lactation, was strongly upregulated in parallel starting at day 4 after weaning, coinciding with start of the collapse of the lobulo-alveolar structures and the intensive tissue remodeling in involution. The major sites of mRNA synthesis for these proteinases were fibroblast-like cells in the periductal stroma and stromal cells surrounding the collapsed alveoli, suggesting that the degradative phase of involution is due to a specialized mesenchymal-epithelial interaction. To elucidate the functional role of these proteinases during involution, at the onset of weaning we treated mice systemically with the glucocorticoid hydrocortisone, which is known to inhibit mammary gland involution. Although the initial wave of apoptotic cells appeared in the lumina of the gland, the dramatic regression and tissue remodeling usually evident by day 5 was substantially inhibited by systemic treatment with hydrocortisone. mRNA and protein for gelatinase A, stromelysin

  20. A chimeric prokaryotic pentameric ligand–gated channel reveals distinct pathways of activation

    PubMed Central

    Schmandt, Nicolaus; Velisetty, Phanindra; Chalamalasetti, Sreevatsa V.; Stein, Richard A.; Bonner, Ross; Talley, Lauren; Parker, Mark D.; Mchaourab, Hassane S.; Yee, Vivien C.; Lodowski, David T.

    2015-01-01

    Recent high resolution structures of several pentameric ligand–gated ion channels have provided unprecedented details of their molecular architecture. However, the conformational dynamics and structural rearrangements that underlie gating and allosteric modulation remain poorly understood. We used a combination of electrophysiology, double electron–electron resonance (DEER) spectroscopy, and x-ray crystallography to investigate activation mechanisms in a novel functional chimera with the extracellular domain (ECD) of amine-gated Erwinia chrysanthemi ligand–gated ion channel, which is activated by primary amines, and the transmembrane domain of Gloeobacter violaceus ligand–gated ion channel, which is activated by protons. We found that the chimera was independently gated by primary amines and by protons. The crystal structure of the chimera in its resting state, at pH 7.0 and in the absence of primary amines, revealed a closed-pore conformation and an ECD that is twisted with respect to the transmembrane region. Amine- and pH-induced conformational changes measured by DEER spectroscopy showed that the chimera exhibits a dual mode of gating that preserves the distinct conformational changes of the parent channels. Collectively, our findings shed light on both conserved and divergent features of gating mechanisms in this class of channels, and will facilitate the design of better allosteric modulators. PMID:26415570

  1. Amyloid -protein (A) assembly: A40 and A42 oligomerize through distinct pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bitan, Gal; Kirkitadze, Marina D.; Lomakin, Aleksey; Vollers, Sabrina S.; Benedek, George B.; Teplow, David B.

    2003-01-01

    Amyloid -protein (A) is linked to neuronal injury and death in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Of particular relevance for elucidating the role of A in AD is new evidence that oligomeric forms of A are potent neurotoxins that play a major role in neurodegeneration and the strong association of the 42-residue form of A, A42, with the disease. Detailed knowledge of the structure and assembly dynamics of A thus is important for the development of properly targeted AD therapeutics. Recently, we have shown that A oligomers can be cross-linked efficiently, and their relative abundances quantified, by using the technique of photo-induced cross-linking of unmodified proteins (PICUP). Here, PICUP, size-exclusion chromatography, dynamic light scattering, circular dichroism spectroscopy, and electron microscopy have been combined to elucidate fundamental features of the early assembly of A40 and A42. Carefully prepared aggregate-free A40 existed as monomers, dimers, trimers, and tetramers, in rapid equilibrium. In contrast, A42 preferentially formed pentamer/hexamer units (paranuclei) that assembled further to form beaded superstructures similar to early protofibrils. Addition of Ile-41 to A40 was sufficient to induce formation of paranuclei, but the presence of Ala-42 was required for their further association. These data demonstrate that A42 assembly involves formation of several distinct transient structures that gradually rearrange into protofibrils. The strong etiologic association of A42 with AD may thus be a result of assemblies formed at the earliest stages of peptide oligomerization.

  2. Distinct surveillance pathway for immunopathology during acute infection via autophagy and SR-BI

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiler, Susanne; Khandagale, Avinash B.; Magenau, Astrid; Nichols, Maryana; Heijnen, Harry F. G.; Rinninger, Franz; Ziegler, Tilman; Seveau, Stephanie; Schubert, Sören; Zahler, Stefan; Verschoor, Admar; Latz, Eicke; Massberg, Steffen; Gaus, Katharina; Engelmann, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms protecting from immunopathology during acute bacterial infections are incompletely known. We found that in response to apoptotic immune cells and live or dead Listeria monocytogenes scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI), an anti-atherogenic lipid exchange mediator, activated internalization mechanisms with characteristics of macropinocytosis and, assisted by Golgi fragmentation, initiated autophagic responses. This was supported by scavenger receptor-induced local increases in membrane cholesterol concentrations which generated lipid domains particularly in cell extensions and the Golgi. SR-BI was a key driver of beclin-1-dependent autophagy during acute bacterial infection of the liver and spleen. Autophagy regulated tissue infiltration of neutrophils, suppressed accumulation of Ly6C+ (inflammatory) macrophages, and prevented hepatocyte necrosis in the core of infectious foci. Perifocal levels of Ly6C+ macrophages and Ly6C− macrophages were unaffected, indicating predominant regulation of the focus core. SR-BI-triggered autophagy promoted co-elimination of apoptotic immune cells and dead bacteria but barely influenced bacterial sequestration and survival or inflammasome activation, thus exclusively counteracting damage inflicted by immune responses. Hence, SR-BI- and autophagy promote a surveillance pathway that partially responds to products of antimicrobial defenses and selectively prevents immunity-induced damage during acute infection. Our findings suggest that control of infection-associated immunopathology can be based on a unified defense operation. PMID:27694929

  3. Distinct signal transduction pathways for activation of rabbit alveolar macrophages in vitro by cotton bract tannin.

    PubMed

    Prévost, M C; Soulat, J M; Comminges, C; Maury, E; Aslane, R; Cohen-Jonathan, E; Cariven, C; Lauque, D; Chap, H

    1996-05-01

    These experiments were designed to study signal transduction pathways in alveolar macrophages stimulated by condensed tannin or zymosan. Condensed tannins, present in cotton mill dust, alter the host-defense function of alveolar macrophages and may contribute to the pathogenesis of byssinosis. We tried to determine the early steps in signal transduction mechanisms of cell activation by tannin. With the quantification of 51Cr release, we determined that tannin was cytotoxic for the cells after 30 min activation with 130 micrograms for 2 x 10(6) cells. 51Cr release was similar for control cells and zymosan- or 30 micrograms tannin-activated cells. Using the luciferine luciferase reaction, we showed that tannin markedly depleted ATP cell content. In inositol-labeled cells, tannin increased inositolphosphate release in a dose-dependent manner. In lysoPAF-labeled cells, tannin induced synthesis of phosphatidic acid and diglycerides. In the presence of ethanol, the level of tannin-induced phosphatidic acid was slightly reduced, and phosphatidylethanol was synthesized. No phosphatidylethanol was found in alveolar macrophages stimulated by zymosan in the presence of ethanol. GF 109203X, a specific inhibitor of protein kinase C decreased only tannin-induced phosphatidylethanol synthesis. In conclusion, tannin (at 30 or 130 micrograms/ml) activated an inositol phospholipase C in alveolar membranes. Phosphatidylcholine phospholipases C and D were found only at the higher concentration of tannin.

  4. Distinct splicing signatures affect converged pathways in myelodysplastic syndrome patients carrying mutations in different splicing regulators.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jinsong; Zhou, Bing; Thol, Felicitas; Zhou, Yu; Chen, Liang; Shao, Changwei; DeBoever, Christopher; Hou, Jiayi; Li, Hairi; Chaturvedi, Anuhar; Ganser, Arnold; Bejar, Rafael; Zhang, Dong-Er; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Heuser, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are heterogeneous myeloid disorders with prevalent mutations in several splicing factors, but the splicing programs linked to specific mutations or MDS in general remain to be systematically defined. We applied RASL-seq, a sensitive and cost-effective platform, to interrogate 5502 annotated splicing events in 169 samples from MDS patients or healthy individuals. We found that splicing signatures associated with normal hematopoietic lineages are largely related to cell signaling and differentiation programs, whereas MDS-linked signatures are primarily involved in cell cycle control and DNA damage responses. Despite the shared roles of affected splicing factors in the 3' splice site definition, mutations in U2AF1, SRSF2, and SF3B1 affect divergent splicing programs, and interestingly, the affected genes fall into converging cancer-related pathways. A risk score derived from 11 splicing events appears to be independently associated with an MDS prognosis and AML transformation, suggesting potential clinical relevance of altered splicing patterns in MDS. PMID:27492256

  5. Amyloid β-protein (Aβ) assembly: Aβ40 and Aβ42 oligomerize through distinct pathways

    PubMed Central

    Bitan, Gal; Kirkitadze, Marina D.; Lomakin, Aleksey; Vollers, Sabrina S.; Benedek, George B.; Teplow, David B.

    2003-01-01

    Amyloid β-protein (Aβ) is linked to neuronal injury and death in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Of particular relevance for elucidating the role of Aβ in AD is new evidence that oligomeric forms of Aβ are potent neurotoxins that play a major role in neurodegeneration and the strong association of the 42-residue form of Aβ, Aβ42, with the disease. Detailed knowledge of the structure and assembly dynamics of Aβ thus is important for the development of properly targeted AD therapeutics. Recently, we have shown that Aβ oligomers can be cross-linked efficiently, and their relative abundances quantified, by using the technique of photo-induced cross-linking of unmodified proteins (PICUP). Here, PICUP, size-exclusion chromatography, dynamic light scattering, circular dichroism spectroscopy, and electron microscopy have been combined to elucidate fundamental features of the early assembly of Aβ40 and Aβ42. Carefully prepared aggregate-free Aβ40 existed as monomers, dimers, trimers, and tetramers, in rapid equilibrium. In contrast, Aβ42 preferentially formed pentamer/hexamer units (paranuclei) that assembled further to form beaded superstructures similar to early protofibrils. Addition of Ile-41 to Aβ40 was sufficient to induce formation of paranuclei, but the presence of Ala-42 was required for their further association. These data demonstrate that Aβ42 assembly involves formation of several distinct transient structures that gradually rearrange into protofibrils. The strong etiologic association of Aβ42 with AD may thus be a result of assemblies formed at the earliest stages of peptide oligomerization. PMID:12506200

  6. Distinct pathways regulate proapoptotic Nix and BNip3 in cardiac stress.

    PubMed

    Gálvez, Anita S; Brunskill, Eric W; Marreez, Yehia; Benner, Bonnie J; Regula, Kelly M; Kirschenbaum, Lorrie A; Dorn, Gerald W

    2006-01-20

    Up-regulation of myocardial Nix and BNip3 is associated with apoptosis in cardiac hypertrophy and ischemia, respectively. To identify mechanisms of gene regulation for these critical cardiac apoptosis effectors, the determinants of Nix and BNip3 promoter activation were elucidated by luciferase reporter gene expression in neonatal rat cardiac myocytes. BNip3 transcription was increased by hypoxia but not by phenylephrine (10 microM), angiotensin II (100 nM), or isoproterenol (10 microM). In contrast, Nix transcription was increased by phenylephrine but not by isoproterenol, angiotensin II, or hypoxia. Since phenylephrine stimulates cardiomyocyte hypertrophy via protein kinase C (PKC), the effects of phorbol myristate acetate (PMA, 10 nM for 24 h) and adenoviral PKC expression were assessed. PMA and PKC alpha, but not PKC epsilon or dominant negative PKC alpha, increased Nix transcription. Multiple Nix promoter GC boxes bound transcription factor Sp-1, and basal and PMA- or PKC alpha-stimulated Nix promoter activity was suppressed by mithramycin inhibition of Sp1-DNA interactions. In vivo determinants of Nix expression were evaluated in Nix promoter-luciferase (NixP) transgenic mice that underwent ischemia-reperfusion (1 h/24 h), transverse aortic coarctation (TAC), or cross-breeding with the G(q) overexpression model of hypertrophy. Luciferase activity increased in G alpha(q)-NixP hearts 3.2 +/- 0.4-fold and in TAC hearts 2.8 +/- 0.4-fold but did not increase with infarction-reperfusion. NixP activity was proportional to the extent of TAC hypertrophy and was inhibited by mithramycin. These studies revealed distinct mechanisms of transcriptional regulation for cardiac Nix and BNip3. BNip3 is hypoxia-inducible, whereas Nix expression was induced by G alpha(q)-mediated hypertrophic stimuli. PKC alpha, a G(q) effector, transduced Nix transcriptional induction via Sp1. PMID:16291751

  7. Distinct reaction pathway promoted by non-divalent-metal cations in a tertiary stabilized hammerhead ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Roychowdhury-Saha, Manami; Burke, Donald H.

    2007-01-01

    Divalent ion sensitivity of hammerhead ribozymes is significantly reduced when the RNA structure includes appropriate tertiary stabilization. Therefore, we investigated the activity of the tertiary stabilized “RzB” hammerhead ribozyme in several nondivalent ions. Ribozyme RzB is active in spermidine and Na+ alone, although the cleavage rates are reduced by more than 1,000-fold relative to the rates observed in Mg2+ and in transition metal ions. The trivalent cobalt hexammine (CoHex) ion is often used as an exchange-inert analog of hydrated magnesium ion. Trans-cleavage rates exceeded 8 min−1 in 20 mM CoHex, which promoted cleavage through outersphere interactions. The stimulation of catalysis afforded by the tertiary structural interactions within RzB does not require Mg2+, unlike other extended hammerhead ribozymes. Site-specific interaction with at least one Mg2+ ion is suggested by CoHex competition experiments. In the presence of a constant, low concentration of Mg2+, low concentrations of CoHex decreased the rate by two to three orders of magnitude relative to the rate in Mg2+ alone. Cleavage rates increased as CoHex concentrations were raised further, but the final fraction cleaved was lower than what was observed in CoHex or Mg2+ alone. These observations suggest that Mg2+ and CoHex compete for binding and that they cause misfolded structures when they are together. The results of this study support the existence of an alternate catalytic mechanism used by nondivalent ions (especially CoHex) that is distinct from the one promoted by divalent metal ions, and they imply that divalent metals influence catalysis through a specific nonstructural role. PMID:17456566

  8. Antibody-induced Enhancement of Factor VIIa Activity through Distinct Allosteric Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Lisbeth M.; Andreasen, Peter A.; Svendsen, Ivan; Keemink, Janneke; Østergaard, Henrik; Persson, Egon

    2012-01-01

    In the absence of its cofactor tissue factor (TF), coagulation factor VIIa (FVIIa) predominantly exists in a zymogen-like, catalytically incompetent state. Here we demonstrate that conformation-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) can be used to characterize structural features determining the activity of FVIIa. We isolated two classes of mAbs, which both increased the catalytic efficiency of FVIIa more than 150-fold. The effects of the antibodies were retained with a FVIIa variant, which has been shown to be inert to allosteric activation by the natural activator TF, suggesting that the antibodies and TF employ distinct mechanisms of activation. The antibodies could be classified into two groups based on their patterns of affinities for different conformations of FVIIa. Whereas one class of antibodies affected both the Km and kcat, the other class mainly affected the Km. The antibody-induced activity enhancement could be traced to maturation of the S1 substrate binding pocket and the oxyanion hole, evident by an increased affinity for p-aminobenzamidine, an increased rate of antithrombin inhibition, an increased rate of incorporation of diisopropylfluorophosphate, and an enhanced fraction of molecules with a buried N terminus of the catalytic domain in the presence of antibodies. As demonstrated by site-directed mutagenesis, the two groups of antibodies appear to have overlapping, although clearly different, epitopes in the 170-loop. Our findings suggest that binding of ligands to specific residues in the 170-loop or its spatial vicinity may stabilize the S1 pocket and the oxyanion hole, and they may have general implications for the molecular understanding of FVIIa regulatory mechanisms. PMID:22275370

  9. Antibody-induced enhancement of factor VIIa activity through distinct allosteric pathways.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Lisbeth M; Andreasen, Peter A; Svendsen, Ivan; Keemink, Janneke; Østergaard, Henrik; Persson, Egon

    2012-03-16

    In the absence of its cofactor tissue factor (TF), coagulation factor VIIa (FVIIa) predominantly exists in a zymogen-like, catalytically incompetent state. Here we demonstrate that conformation-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) can be used to characterize structural features determining the activity of FVIIa. We isolated two classes of mAbs, which both increased the catalytic efficiency of FVIIa more than 150-fold. The effects of the antibodies were retained with a FVIIa variant, which has been shown to be inert to allosteric activation by the natural activator TF, suggesting that the antibodies and TF employ distinct mechanisms of activation. The antibodies could be classified into two groups based on their patterns of affinities for different conformations of FVIIa. Whereas one class of antibodies affected both the K(m) and k(cat), the other class mainly affected the K(m). The antibody-induced activity enhancement could be traced to maturation of the S1 substrate binding pocket and the oxyanion hole, evident by an increased affinity for p-aminobenzamidine, an increased rate of antithrombin inhibition, an increased rate of incorporation of diisopropylfluorophosphate, and an enhanced fraction of molecules with a buried N terminus of the catalytic domain in the presence of antibodies. As demonstrated by site-directed mutagenesis, the two groups of antibodies appear to have overlapping, although clearly different, epitopes in the 170-loop. Our findings suggest that binding of ligands to specific residues in the 170-loop or its spatial vicinity may stabilize the S1 pocket and the oxyanion hole, and they may have general implications for the molecular understanding of FVIIa regulatory mechanisms. PMID:22275370

  10. Compartmentalization of Distinct cAMP Signaling Pathways in Mammalian Sperm*♦

    PubMed Central

    Wertheimer, Eva; Krapf, Dario; de la Vega-Beltran, José L.; Sánchez-Cárdenas, Claudia; Navarrete, Felipe; Haddad, Douglas; Escoffier, Jessica; Salicioni, Ana M.; Levin, Lonny R.; Buck, Jochen; Mager, Jesse; Darszon, Alberto; Visconti, Pablo E.

    2013-01-01

    Fertilization competence is acquired in the female tract in a process known as capacitation. Capacitation is needed for the activation of motility (e.g. hyperactivation) and to prepare the sperm for an exocytotic process known as acrosome reaction. Although the HCO3−-dependent soluble adenylyl cyclase Adcy10 plays a role in motility, less is known about the source of cAMP in the sperm head. Transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmACs) are another possible source of cAMP. These enzymes are regulated by stimulatory heterotrimeric Gs proteins; however, the presence of Gs or tmACs in mammalian sperm has been controversial. In this study, we used Western blotting and cholera toxin-dependent ADP-ribosylation to show the Gs presence in the sperm head. Also, we showed that forskolin, a tmAC-specific activator, induces cAMP accumulation in sperm from both WT and Adcy10-null mice. This increase is blocked by the tmAC inhibitor SQ22536 but not by the Adcy10 inhibitor KH7. Although Gs immunoreactivity and tmAC activity are detected in the sperm head, PKA is only found in the tail, where Adcy10 was previously shown to reside. Consistent with an acrosomal localization, Gs reactivity is lost in acrosome-reacted sperm, and forskolin is able to increase intracellular Ca2+ and induce the acrosome reaction. Altogether, these data suggest that cAMP pathways are compartmentalized in sperm, with Gs and tmAC in the head and Adcy10 and PKA in the flagellum. PMID:24129574

  11. Brassinosteroids regulate plant growth through distinct signaling pathways in Selaginella and Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Jinyeong; Fujioka, Shozo; Dilkes, Brian P; Choe, Sunghwa

    2013-01-01

    Brassinosteroids (BRs) are growth-promoting steroid hormones that regulate diverse physiological processes in plants. Most BR biosynthetic enzymes belong to the cytochrome P450 (CYP) family. The gene encoding the ultimate step of BR biosynthesis in Arabidopsis likely evolved by gene duplication followed by functional specialization in a dicotyledonous plant-specific manner. To gain insight into the evolution of BRs, we performed a genomic reconstitution of Arabidopsis BR biosynthetic genes in an ancestral vascular plant, the lycophyte Selaginella moellendorffii. Selaginella contains four members of the CYP90 family that cluster together in the CYP85 clan. Similar to known BR biosynthetic genes, the Selaginella CYP90s exhibit eight or ten exons and Selaginella produces a putative BR biosynthetic intermediate. Therefore, we hypothesized that Selaginella CYP90 genes encode BR biosynthetic enzymes. In contrast to typical CYPs in Arabidopsis, Selaginella CYP90E2 and CYP90F1 do not possess amino-terminal signal peptides, suggesting that they do not localize to the endoplasmic reticulum. In addition, one of the three putative CYP reductases (CPRs) that is required for CYP enzyme function co-localized with CYP90E2 and CYP90F1. Treatments with a BR biosynthetic inhibitor, propiconazole, and epi-brassinolide resulted in greatly retarded and increased growth, respectively. This suggests that BRs promote growth in Selaginella, as they do in Arabidopsis. However, BR signaling occurs through different pathways than in Arabidopsis. A sequence homologous to the Arabidopsis BR receptor BRI1 was absent in Selaginella, but downstream components, including BIN2, BSU1, and BZR1, were present. Thus, the mechanism that initiates BR signaling in Selaginella seems to differ from that in Arabidopsis. Our findings suggest that the basic physiological roles of BRs as growth-promoting hormones are conserved in both lycophytes and Arabidopsis; however, different BR molecules and BRI1-based

  12. Two distinct pathways for the invasion of Streptococcus pyogenes in non-phagocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Molinari, G; Rohde, M; Guzmán, C A; Chhatwal, G S

    2000-04-01

    Adherence to and invasion of epithelial cells represent important pathogenic mechanisms of Streptococcus pyogenes. A fibronectin-binding surface protein of S. pyogenes, Sfbl protein, has been implicated in both adherence and invasion processes. Invasion of Sfbl-containing strains has been suspected to be responsible for the failure of antibiotics treatment to eradicate S. pyogenes. In this study, we tested the adherence and invasion properties of two well-characterized clinical isolates: A40, which expresses Sfbl; and A8, which is Sfbl negative and is unable to bind fibronectin. In strain A40, Sfbl was the main factor required for attachment and invasion by using fibronectin as a bridging molecule and the alpha5beta1 integrin as cellular receptor. The uptake process was characterized by the generation of large membrane invaginations at the bacteria-cell interface without evidence of actin recruitment or cellular injury. A40 cells were located in phagosomes and, only 24 h after infection, a consistent part of the bacterial population reached the cytoplasm. In contrast, uptake of strain A8 required major rearrangements of cytoskeletal proteins underneath attached bacteria. In A8, a proteinaceous moiety was involved, which does not interact with alpha5beta1 or need any known bridging molecule. Bacterial attachment stimulated elongation and massive recruitment of neighbouring microvilli, which fused to surround streptococcal chains. They led to the generation of large pseudopod-like structures, which engulfed bacteria that were rapidly released and replicated in the cytoplasm. The identification of two completely different uptake pathways reported here provided further evidence regarding the diversity of S. pyogenes isolates and might contribute towards understanding the pathogenesis and persistence of S. pyogenes.

  13. Chronic stress and peripheral pain: Evidence for distinct, region-specific changes in visceral and somatosensory pain regulatory pathways.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Gen; Hong, Shuangsong; Hayes, John M; Wiley, John W

    2015-11-01

    Chronic stress alters the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and enhances visceral and somatosensory pain perception. It is unresolved whether chronic stress has distinct effects on visceral and somatosensory pain regulatory pathways. Previous studies reported that stress-induced visceral hyperalgesia is associated with reciprocal alterations of endovanilloid and endocannabinoid pain pathways in DRG neurons innervating the pelvic viscera. In this study, we compared somatosensory and visceral hyperalgesia with respect to differential responses of peripheral pain regulatory pathways in a rat model of chronic, intermittent stress. We found that chronic stress induced reciprocal changes in the endocannabinoid 2-AG (increased) and endocannabinoid degradation enzymes COX-2 and FAAH (decreased), associated with down-regulation of CB1 and up-regulation of TRPV1 receptors in L6-S2 DRG but not L4-L5 DRG neurons. In contrast, sodium channels Nav1.7 and Nav1.8 were up-regulated in L4-L5 but not L6-S2 DRGs in stressed rats, which was reproduced in control DRGs treated with corticosterone in vitro. The reciprocal changes of CB1, TRPV1 and sodium channels were cell-specific and observed in the sub-population of nociceptive neurons. Behavioral assessment showed that visceral hyperalgesia persisted, whereas somatosensory hyperalgesia and enhanced expression of Nav1.7 and Nav1.8 sodium channels in L4-L5 DRGs normalized 3 days after completion of the stress phase. These data indicate that chronic stress induces visceral and somatosensory hyperalgesia that involves differential changes in endovanilloid and endocannabinoid pathways, and sodium channels in DRGs innervating the pelvic viscera and lower extremities. These results suggest that chronic stress-induced visceral and lower extremity somatosensory hyperalgesia can be treated selectively at different levels of the spinal cord. PMID:26408049

  14. Chronic Stress and Peripheral Pain: Evidence for Distinct, Region-specific Changes in Visceral and Somatosensory Pain Regulatory Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Gen; Hong, Shuangsong; Hayes, John M; Wiley, John W

    2015-01-01

    Chronic stress alters the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and enhances visceral and somatosensory pain perception. It is unresolved whether chronic stress has distinct effects on visceral and somatosensory pain regulatory pathways. Previous studies reported that stress-induced visceral hyperalgesia is associated with reciprocal alterations of endovanilloid and endocannabinoid pain pathways in DRG neurons innervating the pelvic viscera. In this study, we compared somatosensory and visceral hyperalgesia with respect to differential responses of peripheral pain regulatory pathways in a rat model of chronic, intermittent stress. We found that chronic stress induced reciprocal changes in the endocannabinoid 2-AG (increased) and endocannabinoid degradation enzymes COX-2 and FAAH (decreased), associated with down-regulation of CB1 and up-regulation of TRPV1 receptors in L6-S2 DRG but not L4-L5 DRG neurons. In contrast, sodium channels Nav1.7 and Nav1.8 were up-regulated in L4-L5 but not L6-S2 DRGs in stressed rats, which was reproduced in control L4-L5 DRGs treated with corticosterone in vitro. The reciprocal changes of CB1, TRPV1 and sodium channels were cell-specific and observed in the sub-population of nociceptive neurons. Behavioral assessment showed that visceral hyperalgesia persisted, whereas somatosensory hyperalgesia and enhanced expression of Nav1.7 and Nav1.8 sodium channels in L4-L5 DRGs normalized 3 days after completion of the stress phase. These data indicate that chronic stress induces visceral and somatosensory hyperalgesia that involves differential changes in endovanilloid and endocannabinoid pathways, and sodium channels in DRGs innervating the pelvic viscera and lower extremities. These results suggest that chronic stress-induced visceral and lower extremity somatosensory hyperalgesia can be treated selectively at different levels of the spinal cord. PMID:26408049

  15. Network Analyses Reveal Pervasive Functional Regulation Between Proteases in the Human Protease Web

    PubMed Central

    Fortelny, Nikolaus; Cox, Jennifer H.; Kappelhoff, Reinhild; Starr, Amanda E.; Lange, Philipp F.; Pavlidis, Paul; Overall, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Proteolytic processing is an irreversible posttranslational modification affecting a large portion of the proteome. Protease-cleaved mediators frequently exhibit altered activity, and biological pathways are often regulated by proteolytic processing. Many of these mechanisms have not been appreciated as being protease-dependent, and the potential in unraveling a complex new dimension of biological control is increasingly recognized. Proteases are currently believed to act individually or in isolated cascades. However, conclusive but scattered biochemical evidence indicates broader regulation of proteases by protease and inhibitor interactions. Therefore, to systematically study such interactions, we assembled curated protease cleavage and inhibition data into a global, computational representation, termed the protease web. This revealed that proteases pervasively influence the activity of other proteases directly or by cleaving intermediate proteases or protease inhibitors. The protease web spans four classes of proteases and inhibitors and so links both recently and classically described protease groups and cascades, which can no longer be viewed as operating in isolation in vivo. We demonstrated that this observation, termed reachability, is robust to alterations in the data and will only increase in the future as additional data are added. We further show how subnetworks of the web are operational in 23 different tissues reflecting different phenotypes. We applied our network to develop novel insights into biologically relevant protease interactions using cell-specific proteases of the polymorphonuclear leukocyte as a system. Predictions from the protease web on the activity of matrix metalloproteinase 8 (MMP8) and neutrophil elastase being linked by an inactivating cleavage of serpinA1 by MMP8 were validated and explain perplexing Mmp8 −/− versus wild-type polymorphonuclear chemokine cleavages in vivo. Our findings supply systematically derived and

  16. Tuning of AKT-pathway by Nef and its blockade by protease inhibitors results in limited recovery in latently HIV infected T-cell line

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Amit; Abbas, Wasim; Colin, Laurence; Khan, Kashif Aziz; Bouchat, Sophie; Varin, Audrey; Larbi, Anis; Gatot, Jean-Stéphane; Kabeya, Kabamba; Vanhulle, Caroline; Delacourt, Nadège; Pasquereau, Sébastien; Coquard, Laurie; Borch, Alexandra; König, Renate; Clumeck, Nathan; De Wit, Stephane; Rohr, Olivier; Rouzioux, Christine; Fulop, Tamas; Van Lint, Carine; Herbein, Georges

    2016-01-01

    Akt signaling plays a central role in many biological processes, which are key players in human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) pathogenesis. We found that Akt interacts with HIV-1 Nef protein. In primary T cells treated with exogenous Nef or acutely infected with Nef-expressing HIV-1 in vitro, Akt became phosphorylated on serine473 and threonine308. In vitro, Akt activation mediated by Nef in T-cells was blocked by HIV protease inhibitors (PI), but not by reverse transcriptase inhibitors (RTI). Ex vivo, we found that the Akt pathway is hyperactivated in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) from cART naïve HIV-1-infected patients. PBLs isolated from PI-treated patients, but not from RTI-treated patients, exhibited decreased Akt activation, T-cell proliferation and IL-2 production. We found that PI but not RTI can block HIV-1 reactivation in latently infected J-Lat lymphoid cells stimulated with various stimuli. Using luciferase measurement, we further confirmed that Nef-mediated reactivation of HIV-1 from latency in 1G5 cells was blocked by PI parallel to decreased Akt activation. Our results indicate that PI-mediated blockade of Akt activation could impact the HIV-1 reservoir and support the need to further assess the therapeutic use of HIV-1 PI in order to curtail latently infected cells in HIV-1-infected patients. PMID:27076174

  17. SARS coronavirus papain-like protease induces Egr-1-dependent up-regulation of TGF-β1 via ROS/p38 MAPK/STAT3 pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Shih-Wein; Wang, Ching-Ying; Jou, Yu-Jen; Yang, Tsuey-Ching; Huang, Su-Hua; Wan, Lei; Lin, Ying-Ju; Lin, Cheng-Wen

    2016-01-01

    SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV) papain-like protease (PLpro) has been identified in TGF-β1 up-regulation in human promonocytes (Proteomics 2012, 12: 3193-205). This study investigates the mechanisms of SARS-CoV PLpro-induced TGF-β1 promoter activation in human lung epithelial cells and mouse models. SARS-CoV PLpro dose- and time-dependently up-regulates TGF-β1 and vimentin in A549 cells. Dual luciferase reporter assays with TGF-β1 promoter plasmids indicated that TGF-β1 promoter region between -175 to -60, the Egr-1 binding site, was responsible for TGF-β1 promoter activation induced by SARS-CoV PLpro. Subcellular localization analysis of transcription factors showed PLpro triggering nuclear translocation of Egr-1, but not NF-κB and Sp-1. Meanwhile, Egr-1 silencing by siRNA significantly reduced PLpro-induced up-regulation of TGF-β1, TSP-1 and pro-fibrotic genes. Furthermore, the inhibitors for ROS (YCG063), p38 MAPK (SB203580), and STAT3 (Stattic) revealed ROS/p38 MAPK/STAT3 pathway involving in Egr-1 dependent activation of TGF-β1 promoter induced by PLpro. In a mouse model with a direct pulmonary injection, PLpro stimulated macrophage infiltration into lung, up-regulating Egr-1, TSP-1, TGF-β1 and vimentin expression in lung tissues. The results revealed that SARS-CoV PLpro significantly triggered Egr-1 dependent activation of TGF-β1 promoter via ROS/p38 MAPK/STAT3 pathway, correlating with up-regulation of pro-fibrotic responses in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27173006

  18. Alpha1a-adrenoceptor genetic variant induces cardiomyoblast-to-fibroblast-like cell transition via distinct signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Kleine-Brueggeney, Maren; Gradinaru, Irina; Babaeva, Ekaterina; Schwinn, Debra A; Oganesian, Anush

    2014-09-01

    The role of naturally occurring human α1a-Adrenergic Receptor (α1aAR) genetic variants associated with cardiovascular disorders is poorly understood. Here, we present the novel findings that expression of human α1aAR-247R (247R) genetic variant in cardiomyoblasts leads to transition of cardiomyoblasts into a fibroblast-like phenotype, evidenced by morphology and distinct de novo expression of characteristic genes. These fibroblast-like cells exhibit constitutive, high proliferative capacity and agonist-induced hypertrophy compared with cells prior to transition. We demonstrate that constitutive, synergistic activation of EGFR, Src and ERK kinases is the potential molecular mechanism of this transition. We also demonstrate that 247R triggers two distinct EGFR transactivation-dependent signaling pathways: 1) constitutive Gq-independent β-arrestin-1/Src/MMP/EGFR/ERK-dependent hyperproliferation and 2) agonist-induced Gq- and EGFR/STAT-dependent hypertrophy. Interestingly, in cardiomyoblasts agonist-independent hyperproliferation is MMP-dependent, but in fibroblast-like cells it is MMP-independent, suggesting that expression of α1aAR genetic variant in cardiomyocytes may trigger extracellular matrix remodeling. Thus, these novel findings demonstrate that EGFR transactivation by α1aAR-247R leads to hyperproliferation, hypertrophy and alterations in cardiomyoblasts, suggesting that these unique genetically-mediated alterations in signaling pathways and cellular function may lead to myocardial fibrosis. Such extracellular matrix remodeling may contribute to the genesis of arrhythmias in certain types of heart failure. PMID:24835978

  19. The ARG1-LIKE2 gene of Arabidopsis functions in a gravity signal transduction pathway that is genetically distinct from the PGM pathway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guan, Changhui; Rosen, Elizabeth S.; Boonsirichai, Kanokporn; Poff, Kenneth L.; Masson, Patrick H.

    2003-01-01

    The arl2 mutants of Arabidopsis display altered root and hypocotyl gravitropism, whereas their inflorescence stems are fully gravitropic. Interestingly, mutant roots respond like the wild type to phytohormones and an inhibitor of polar auxin transport. Also, their cap columella cells accumulate starch similarly to wild-type cells, and mutant hypocotyls display strong phototropic responses to lateral light stimulation. The ARL2 gene encodes a DnaJ-like protein similar to ARG1, another protein previously implicated in gravity signal transduction in Arabidopsis seedlings. ARL2 is expressed at low levels in all organs of seedlings and plants. arl2-1 arg1-2 double mutant roots display kinetics of gravitropism similar to those of single mutants. However, double mutants carrying both arl2-1 and pgm-1 (a mutation in the starch-biosynthetic gene PHOSPHOGLUCOMUTASE) at the homozygous state display a more pronounced root gravitropic defect than the single mutants. On the other hand, seedlings with a null mutation in ARL1, a paralog of ARG1 and ARL2, behave similarly to the wild type in gravitropism and other related assays. Taken together, the results suggest that ARG1 and ARL2 function in the same gravity signal transduction pathway in the hypocotyl and root of Arabidopsis seedlings, distinct from the pathway involving PGM.

  20. The ARG1-LIKE2 Gene of Arabidopsis Functions in a Gravity Signal Transduction Pathway That Is Genetically Distinct from the PGM Pathway1

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Changhui; Rosen, Elizabeth S.; Boonsirichai, Kanokporn; Poff, Kenneth L.; Masson, Patrick H.

    2003-01-01

    The arl2 mutants of Arabidopsis display altered root and hypocotyl gravitropism, whereas their inflorescence stems are fully gravitropic. Interestingly, mutant roots respond like the wild type to phytohormones and an inhibitor of polar auxin transport. Also, their cap columella cells accumulate starch similarly to wild-type cells, and mutant hypocotyls display strong phototropic responses to lateral light stimulation. The ARL2 gene encodes a DnaJ-like protein similar to ARG1, another protein previously implicated in gravity signal transduction in Arabidopsis seedlings. ARL2 is expressed at low levels in all organs of seedlings and plants. arl2-1 arg1-2 double mutant roots display kinetics of gravitropism similar to those of single mutants. However, double mutants carrying both arl2-1 and pgm-1 (a mutation in the starch-biosynthetic gene PHOSPHOGLUCOMUTASE) at the homozygous state display a more pronounced root gravitropic defect than the single mutants. On the other hand, seedlings with a null mutation in ARL1, a paralog of ARG1 and ARL2, behave similarly to the wild type in gravitropism and other related assays. Taken together, the results suggest that ARG1 and ARL2 function in the same gravity signal transduction pathway in the hypocotyl and root of Arabidopsis seedlings, distinct from the pathway involving PGM. PMID:12970478

  1. The Synaptojanin-like Protein Inp53/Sjl3 Functions with Clathrin in a Yeast TGN-to-Endosome Pathway Distinct from the GGA Protein-dependent Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Seon-Ah; Torabinejad, Javad; DeWald, Daryll B.; Wenk, Markus R.; Lucast, Louise; De Camilli, Pietro; Newitt, Richard A.; Aebersold, Ruedi; Nothwehr, Steven F.

    2003-01-01

    Yeast TGN resident proteins that frequently cycle between the TGN and endosomes are much more slowly transported to the prevacuolar/late endosomal compartment (PVC) than other proteins. However, TGN protein transport to the PVC is accelerated in mutants lacking function of Inp53p. Inp53p contains a SacI polyphosphoinositide phosphatase domain, a 5-phosphatase domain, and a proline-rich domain. Here we show that all three domains are required to mediate “slow delivery” of TGN proteins into the PVC. Although deletion of the proline-rich domain did not affect general membrane association, it caused localization to become less specific. The proline-rich domain was shown to bind to two proteins, including clathrin heavy chain, Chc1p. Unlike chc1 mutants, inp53 mutants do not mislocalize TGN proteins to the cell surface, consistent with the idea that Chc1p and Inp53p act at a common vesicular trafficking step but that Chc1p is used at other steps also. Like mutations in the AP-1 adaptor complex, mutations in INP53 exhibit synthetic growth and transport defects when combined with mutations in the GGA proteins. Taken together with other recent studies, our results suggest that Inp53p and AP-1/clathrin act together in a TGN-to-early endosome pathway distinct from the direct TGN-to-PVC pathway mediated by GGA/clathrin. PMID:12686590

  2. The regulation of p53 by phosphorylation: a model for how distinct signals integrate into the p53 pathway.

    PubMed

    Maclaine, Nicola J; Hupp, Ted R

    2009-05-01

    The tumour suppressor p53 is a transcription factor that has evolved the ability to integrate distinct environmental signals including DNA damage, virus infection, and cytokine signaling into a common biological outcome that maintains normal cellular control. Mutations in p53 switch the cellular transcription program resulting in deregulation of the stress responses that normally maintain cell and tissue integrity. Transgenic studies in mice have indicated that changes in the specific activity of p53 can have profound effects not only on cancer development, but also on organism aging. As the specific activity of p53 is regulated at a post-translational level by sets of enzymes that mediate phosphorylation, acetylation, methylation, and ubiquitin-like modifications, it is likely that physiological modifiers of the aging function of p53 would be enzymes that catalyze such covalent modifications. We demonstrate that distinct stress-activated kinases, including ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), casein kinase 1 (CK1) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), mediate phosphorylation of a key phospho-acceptor site in the p53 transactivation domain in response to diverse stresses including ionizing radiation, DNA virus infection, and elevation in the intracellular AMP/ATP ratio. As diseases linked to aging can involve activation of p53-dependent changes in cellular protective pathways, the development of specific physiological models might further shed light on the role of p53 kinases in modifying age-related diseases. PMID:20157532

  3. Cleavage of lamin A by Mch2 alpha but not CPP32: multiple interleukin 1 beta-converting enzyme-related proteases with distinct substrate recognition properties are active in apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, A; Alnemri, E S; Lazebnik, Y A; Fernandes-Alnemri, T; Litwack, G; Moir, R D; Goldman, R D; Poirier, G G; Kaufmann, S H; Earnshaw, W C

    1996-01-01

    Although proteases related to the interleukin 1 beta-converting enzyme (ICE) are known to be essential for apoptotic execution, the number of enzymes involved, their substrate specificities, and their specific roles in the characteristic biochemical and morphological changes of apoptosis are currently unknown. These questions were addressed using cloned recombinant ICE-related proteases (IRPs) and a cell-free model system for apoptosis (S/M extracts). First, we compared the substrate specificities of two recombinant human IRPs, CPP32 and Mch2 alpha. Both enzymes cleaved poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase, albeit with different efficiencies. Mch2 alpha also cleaved recombinant and nuclear lamin A at a conserved VEID decreases NG sequence located in the middle of the coiled-coil rod domain, producing a fragment that was indistinguishable from the lamin A fragment observed in S/M extracts and in apoptotic cells. In contrast, CPP32 did not cleave lamin A. The cleavage of lamin A by Mch2 alpha and by S/M extracts was inhibited by millimolar concentrations of Zn2+, which had a minimal effect on cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase by CPP32 and by S/M extracts. We also found that N-(acetyltyrosinylvalinyl-N epsilon-biotinyllysyl)aspartic acid [(2,6-dimethylbenzoyl)oxy]methyl ketone, which derivatizes the larger subunit of active ICE, can affinity label up to five active IRPs in S/M extracts. Together, these observations indicate that the processing of nuclear proteins in apoptosis involves multiple IRPs having distinct preferences for their apoptosis-associated substrates. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:8710882

  4. Response of mechanosensory hair cells of the zebrafish lateral line to aminoglycosides reveals distinct cell death pathways

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Kelly N.; Coffin, Allison B.; Hong, Lisa S.; Bennett, Keri O’Connell; Rubel, Edwin W; Raible, David W.

    2011-01-01

    We report a series of experiments investigating the kinetics of hair cell loss in lateral line neuromasts of zebrafish larvae following exposure to aminoglycoside antibiotics. Comparisons of the rate of hair cell loss and the differential effects of acute versus chronic exposure to gentamicin and neomycin revealed markedly different results. Neomycin induced rapid and dramatic concentration-dependent hair cell loss that is essentially complete within 90 minutes, regardless of concentration or exposure time. Gentamicin induced loss of half of the hair cells within 90 minutes and substantial additional loss, which was prolonged and cumulative over exposure times up to at least 24 hr. Small molecules and genetic mutations that inhibit neomycin-induced hair cell loss were ineffective against prolonged gentamicin exposure supporting the hypothesis that these two drugs are revealing at least two cellular pathways. The mechanosensory channel blocker amiloride blocked both neomycin and gentamicin-induced hair cell death acutely and chronically indicating that these aminoglycosides share a common entry route. Further tests with additional aminoglycosides revealed a spectrum of differential responses to acute and chronic exposure. The distinctions between the times of action of these aminoglycosides indicate that these drugs induce multiple cell death pathways. PMID:19285126

  5. Functional overlap among distinct G1/S inhibitory pathways allows robust G1 arrest by yeast mating pheromones

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Patricia A.; Pryciak, Peter M.

    2013-01-01

    In budding yeast, mating pheromones arrest the cell cycle in G1 phase via a pheromone-activated Cdk-inhibitor (CKI) protein, Far1. Alternate pathways must also exist, however, because deleting the cyclin CLN2 restores pheromone arrest to far1∆ cells. Here we probe whether these alternate pathways require the G1/S transcriptional repressors Whi5 and Stb1 or the CKI protein Sic1, whose metazoan analogues (Rb or p27) antagonize cell cycle entry. Removing Whi5 and Stb1 allows partial escape from G1 arrest in far1∆ cln2∆ cells, along with partial derepression of G1/S genes, which implies a repressor-independent route for inhibiting G1/S transcription. This route likely involves pheromone-induced degradation of Tec1, a transcriptional activator of the cyclin CLN1, because Tec1 stabilization also causes partial G1 escape in far1∆ cln2∆ cells, and this is additive with Whi5/Stb1 removal. Deleting SIC1 alone strongly disrupts Far1-independent G1 arrest, revealing that inhibition of B-type cyclin-Cdk activity can empower weak arrest pathways. Of interest, although far1∆ cln2∆ sic1∆ cells escaped G1 arrest, they lost viability during pheromone exposure, indicating that G1 exit is deleterious if the arrest signal remains active. Overall our findings illustrate how multiple distinct G1/S-braking mechanisms help to prevent premature cell cycle commitment and ensure a robust signal-induced G1 arrest. PMID:24088572

  6. Cross-talk between non-genomic and genomic signalling pathways - Distinct effect profiles of environmental estrogens

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, Elisabete; Kabil, Alena; Kortenkamp, Andreas

    2010-06-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER) transcriptional cross-talk after activation by 17{beta}-estradiol (E2) has been studied in considerable detail, but comparatively little is known about the ways in which synthetic estrogen-like chemicals, so-called xenoestrogens, interfere with these signalling pathways. E2 can stimulate rapid, non-genomic signalling events, such as activation of the Src/Ras/Erk signalling pathway. We investigated how activation of this pathway by E2, the estrogenic environmental contaminants o,p'-DDT, {beta}-HCH and p,p'-DDE, and epidermal growth factor (EGF) influences the expression of ER target genes, such as TFF1, ER, PR, BRCA1 and CCND1, and the proliferation of breast cancer cells. Despite commonalities in their estrogenicity as judged by cell proliferation assays, the environmental contaminants exhibited striking differences in their non-genomic and genomic signalling. The gene expression profiles of o,p'-DDT and {beta}-HCH resembled the effects observed with E2. In the case of {beta}-HCH this is surprising, considering its reported lack of affinity to the 'classical' ER. The expression profiles seen with p,p'-DDE showed some similarities with E2, but overall, p,p'-DDE was a fairly weak transcriptional inducer of TFF1, ER, PR, BRCA1 and CCND1. We observed distinct differences in the non-genomic signalling of the tested compounds. p,p'-DDE was unable to stimulate Src and Erk1/Erk2 activations. The effects of E2 on Src and Erk1/Erk2 phosphorylation were transient and weak when compared to EGF, but {beta}-HCH induced strong and sustained activation of all tested kinases. Transcription of TFF1, ER, PR and BRCA1 by E2, o,p'-DDT and {beta}-HCH could be suppressed partially by inhibiting the Src/Ras/Erk pathway with PD 98059. However, this was not seen with p,p'-DDE. Our investigations show that the cellular activities of estrogens and xenoestrogens are the result of a combination of extranuclear (non-genomic) and nuclear (genomic) events and highlight the

  7. SARS Coronavirus Papain-Like Protease Inhibits the TLR7 Signaling Pathway through Removing Lys63-Linked Polyubiquitination of TRAF3 and TRAF6

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shih-Wen; Wang, Ching-Ying; Jou, Yu-Jen; Huang, Su-Hua; Hsiao, Li-Hsin; Wan, Lei; Lin, Ying-Ju; Kung, Szu-Hao; Lin, Cheng-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) papain-like protease (PLPro) reportedly inhibits the production of type I interferons (IFNs) and pro-inflammatory cytokines in Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) and retinoic acid-inducible gene 1 (RIG-I) pathways. The study investigated the inhibitory effect and its antagonistic mechanism of SARS-CoV PLPro on TLR7-mediated cytokine production. TLR7 agonist (imiquimod (IMQ)) concentration-dependently induced activation of ISRE-, NF-κB- and AP-1-luciferase reporters, as well as the production of IFN-α, IFN-β, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8 in human promonocyte cells. However, SARS-CoV PLPro significantly inhibited IMQ-induced cytokine production through suppressing the activation of transcription factors IRF-3, NF-κB and AP-1. Western blot analysis with anti-Lys48 and anti-Lys63 ubiquitin antibodies indicated the SARS-CoV PLPro removed Lys63-linked ubiquitin chains of TRAF3 and TRAF6, but not Lys48-linked ubiquitin chains in un-treated and treated cells. The decrease in the activated state of TRAF3 and TRAF6 correlated with the inactivation of TBK1 in response to IMQ by PLPro. The results revealed that the antagonism of SARS-CoV PLPro on TLR7-mediated innate immunity was associated with the negative regulation of TRAF3/6-TBK1-IRF3/NF-κB/AP1 signals. PMID:27164085

  8. SARS Coronavirus Papain-Like Protease Inhibits the TLR7 Signaling Pathway through Removing Lys63-Linked Polyubiquitination of TRAF3 and TRAF6.

    PubMed

    Li, Shih-Wen; Wang, Ching-Ying; Jou, Yu-Jen; Huang, Su-Hua; Hsiao, Li-Hsin; Wan, Lei; Lin, Ying-Ju; Kung, Szu-Hao; Lin, Cheng-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) papain-like protease (PLPro) reportedly inhibits the production of type I interferons (IFNs) and pro-inflammatory cytokines in Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) and retinoic acid-inducible gene 1 (RIG-I) pathways. The study investigated the inhibitory effect and its antagonistic mechanism of SARS-CoV PLPro on TLR7-mediated cytokine production. TLR7 agonist (imiquimod (IMQ)) concentration-dependently induced activation of ISRE-, NF-κB- and AP-1-luciferase reporters, as well as the production of IFN-α, IFN-β, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8 in human promonocyte cells. However, SARS-CoV PLPro significantly inhibited IMQ-induced cytokine production through suppressing the activation of transcription factors IRF-3, NF-κB and AP-1. Western blot analysis with anti-Lys48 and anti-Lys63 ubiquitin antibodies indicated the SARS-CoV PLPro removed Lys63-linked ubiquitin chains of TRAF3 and TRAF6, but not Lys48-linked ubiquitin chains in un-treated and treated cells. The decrease in the activated state of TRAF3 and TRAF6 correlated with the inactivation of TBK1 in response to IMQ by PLPro. The results revealed that the antagonism of SARS-CoV PLPro on TLR7-mediated innate immunity was associated with the negative regulation of TRAF3/6-TBK1-IRF3/NF-κB/AP1 signals. PMID:27164085

  9. Initial innervation of embryonic rat tongue and developing taste papillae: nerves follow distinctive and spatially restricted pathways.

    PubMed

    Mbiene, J P; Mistretta, C M

    1997-01-01

    The rat tongue has an extensive, complex innervation from four cranial nerves. However, the precise developmental time course and spatial routes of these nerves into the embryonic tongue are not known, although this knowledge is crucial for studying mechanisms that regulate development and innervation of the lingual taste organs, gustatory papillae and resident taste buds. We determined the initial spatial course of nerves in the developing tongue and papillae, and tested the hypothesis that sensory nerves first innervate the tongue homogeneously and then retract to more densely innervate papillae and taste buds. Antibodies to GAP-43 and neurofilaments were used to label nerve fibers in rat embryo heads from gestational day 11 through 16 (E11-E16). Serial sagittal sections were traced and reconstructed to follow paths of each nerve. In E11 rat, geniculate, trigeminal and petrosal ganglia were labeled and fibers left the ganglia and extended toward respective branchial arches. At E13 when the developing tongue is still a set of tissue swellings, the combined chorda/lingual, hypoglossal and petrosal nerves approached the lingual swellings from separate positions. Only the chorda/lingual entered the tongue base at this stage. At E14 and E15, the well-developed tongue was innervated by all four cranial nerves. However, the nerves maintained distinctive entry points and relatively restricted mesenchymal territories within the tongue, and did not follow one another in common early pathways. Furthermore, the chorda/lingual and glossopharyngeal nerves did not set up an obvious prepattern for gustatory papilla development, but rather seemed attracted to developing papillae which became very densely innervated compared to surrounding epithelium at E15. To effect this dense papilla innervation, sensory nerves did not first innervate the tongue in a homogeneous manner with subsequent retraction and/or extensive redirection of fibers into the taste organs. Results contribute to

  10. Melatonin Regulates Somatotrope and Lactotrope Function Through Common and Distinct Signaling Pathways in Cultured Primary Pituitary Cells From Female Primates

    PubMed Central

    Ibáñez-Costa, Alejandro; Córdoba-Chacón, José; Gahete, Manuel D.; Kineman, Rhonda D.; Castaño, Justo P.

    2015-01-01

    Melatonin (MT) is secreted by the pineal gland and exhibits a striking circadian rhythm in its release. Depending on the species studied, some pituitary hormones also display marked circadian/seasonal patterns and rhythms of secretion. However, the precise relationship between MT and pituitary function remains controversial, and studies focusing on the direct role of MT in normal pituitary cells are limited to nonprimate species. Here, adult normal primate (baboons) primary pituitary cell cultures were used to determine the direct impact of MT on the functioning of all pituitary cell types from the pars distalis. MT increased GH and prolactin (PRL) expression/release in a dose- and time-dependent fashion, a response that was blocked by somatostatin. However, MT did not significantly affect ACTH, FSH, LH, or TSH expression/release. MT did not alter GHRH- or ghrelin-induced GH and/or PRL secretions, suggesting that MT may activate similar signaling pathways as ghrelin/GHRH. The effects of MT on GH/PRL release, which are likely mediated through MT1 receptor, involve both common (adenylyl cyclase/protein kinase A/extracellular calcium-channels) and distinct (phospholipase C/intracellular calcium-channels) signaling pathways. Actions of MT on pituitary cells also included regulation of the expression of other key components for the control of somatotrope/lactotrope function (GHRH, ghrelin, and somatostatin receptors). These results show, for the first time in a primate model, that MT directly regulates somatotrope/lactotrope function, thereby lending support to the notion that the actions of MT on these cells might substantially contribute to the define daily patterns of GH and PRL observed in primates and perhaps in humans. PMID:25545385

  11. The Candida albicans Histone Acetyltransferase Hat1 Regulates Stress Resistance and Virulence via Distinct Chromatin Assembly Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Tscherner, Michael; Zwolanek, Florian; Jenull, Sabrina; Sedlazeck, Fritz J.; Petryshyn, Andriy; Frohner, Ingrid E.; Mavrianos, John; Chauhan, Neeraj; von Haeseler, Arndt; Kuchler, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Human fungal pathogens like Candida albicans respond to host immune surveillance by rapidly adapting their transcriptional programs. Chromatin assembly factors are involved in the regulation of stress genes by modulating the histone density at these loci. Here, we report a novel role for the chromatin assembly-associated histone acetyltransferase complex NuB4 in regulating oxidative stress resistance, antifungal drug tolerance and virulence in C. albicans. Strikingly, depletion of the NuB4 catalytic subunit, the histone acetyltransferase Hat1, markedly increases resistance to oxidative stress and tolerance to azole antifungals. Hydrogen peroxide resistance in cells lacking Hat1 results from higher induction rates of oxidative stress gene expression, accompanied by reduced histone density as well as subsequent increased RNA polymerase recruitment. Furthermore, hat1Δ/Δ cells, despite showing growth defects in vitro, display reduced susceptibility to reactive oxygen-mediated killing by innate immune cells. Thus, clearance from infected mice is delayed although cells lacking Hat1 are severely compromised in killing the host. Interestingly, increased oxidative stress resistance and azole tolerance are phenocopied by the loss of histone chaperone complexes CAF-1 and HIR, respectively, suggesting a central role for NuB4 in the delivery of histones destined for chromatin assembly via distinct pathways. Remarkably, the oxidative stress phenotype of hat1Δ/Δ cells is a species-specific trait only found in C. albicans and members of the CTG clade. The reduced azole susceptibility appears to be conserved in a wider range of fungi. Thus, our work demonstrates how highly conserved chromatin assembly pathways can acquire new functions in pathogenic fungi during coevolution with the host. PMID:26473952

  12. Distinct Signaling Pathways After Higher or Lower Doses of Radiation in Three Closely Related Human Lymphoblast Cell Lines

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, T.-P.; Lai, L.-C.; Lin, B.-I.; Chen, L.-H.; Hsiao, T.-H.; Liber, Howard L.; Cook, John A.; Mitchell, James B.; Tsai, M.-H.; Chuang, Eric Y.

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: The tumor suppressor p53 plays an essential role in cellular responses to DNA damage caused by ionizing radiation; therefore, this study aims to further explore the role that p53 plays at different doses of radiation. Materials and Methods: The global cellular responses to higher-dose (10 Gy) and lower dose (iso-survival dose, i.e., the respective D0 levels) radiation were analyzed using microarrays in three human lymphoblast cell lines with different p53 status: TK6 (wild-type p53), NH32 (p53-null), and WTK1 (mutant p53). Total RNAs were extracted from cells harvested at 0, 1, 3, 6, 9, and 24 h after higher and lower dose radiation exposures. Template-based clustering, hierarchical clustering, and principle component analysis were applied to examine the transcriptional profiles. Results: Differential expression profiles between 10 Gy and iso-survival radiation in cells with different p53 status were observed. Moreover, distinct gene expression patterns were exhibited among these three cells after 10 Gy radiation treatment, but similar transcriptional responses were observed in TK6 and NH32 cells treated with iso-survival radiation. Conclusions: After 10 Gy radiation exposure, the p53 signaling pathway played an important role in TK6, whereas the NFkB signaling pathway appeared to replace the role of p53 in WTK1. In contrast, after iso-survival radiation treatment, E2F4 seemed to play a dominant role independent of p53 status. This study dissected the impacts of p53, NFkB and E2F4 in response to higher or lower doses of gamma-irradiation.

  13. Immune cell-specific transcriptional profiling highlights distinct molecular pathways controlled by Tob1 upon experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Didonna, Alessandro; Cekanaviciute, Egle; Oksenberg, Jorge R.; Baranzini, Sergio E.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system characterized by focal lymphocytic infiltration, demyelination and neurodegeneration. Despite the recent advances in understanding MS molecular basis, no reliable biomarkers have been identified yet to monitor disease progression. Our group has previously reported that low levels of TOB1 in CD4+ T cells are strongly associated with a higher risk of MS conversion in individuals experiencing an initial demyelinating event. Consistently, Tob1 ablation in mice exacerbates the clinical phenotype of the MS model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). To shed light on Tob1 molecular functions in the immune system, we have conducted the first cell-based transcriptomic analysis in Tob1−/− and wildtype mice upon EAE. Next-generation sequencing was employed to characterize the changes in gene expression in T and B cells at pre- and post-symptomatic EAE stages. Remarkably, we found only modest overlap among the different genetic signatures, suggesting that Tob1 may control distinct genetic programs in the different cytotypes. This hypothesis was corroborated by gene ontology and global interactome analyses, which highlighted specific cellular pathways in each cellular subset before and after EAE induction. In summary, our work pinpoints a multifaceted activity of Tob1 in both homeostasis and disease progression. PMID:27546286

  14. Transformation processes, pathways, and possible sources of distinctive polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin signatures in sink environments.

    PubMed

    Gaus, Caroline; Brunskill, Gregg J; Connell, W; Prange, Joelle; Müller, Jochen F; Päpke, Olaf; Weber, Roland

    2002-08-15

    In recent years, studies on environmental samples with unusual dibenzo-p-dioxin (PCDD) congener profiles were reported from a range of countries. These profiles, characterized by a dominance of octachlorinated dibenzodioxin (OCDD) and relatively low in dibenzofuran (PCDF) concentrations, could not be attributed to known sources or formation processes. In the present study, the processes that result in these unusual profiles were assessed using the concentrations and isomer signatures of PCDDs from dated estuarine sediment cores in Queensland, Australia. Increases in relative concentrations of lower chlorinated PCDDs and a relative decrease of OCDD were correlated with time of sediment deposition. Preferred lateral, anaerobic dechlorination of OCDD represents a likely pathway for these changes. In Queensland sediments, these transformations result in a distinct dominance of isomers fully chlorinated in the 1,4,6,9-positions (1,4-patterns), and similar 1,4-patterns were observed in sediments from elsewhere. Consequently, these environmental samples may not reflect the signatures of the original source, and a reevaluation of source inputs was undertaken. Natural formation of PCDDs, which has previously been suggested, is discussed; however, based on the present results and literature comparisons, we propose an alternative scenario. This scenario hypothesizes that an anthropogenic PCDD precursor input (e.g. pentachlorophenol) results in the contamination. These results and hypothesis imply further investigations are warranted into possible anthropogenic sources in areas where natural PCDD formation has been suggested. PMID:12214647

  15. Regulator of G protein signaling 2 (RGS2) and RGS4 form distinct G protein-dependent complexes with protease activated-receptor 1 (PAR1) in live cells.

    PubMed

    Ghil, Sungho; McCoy, Kelly L; Hepler, John R

    2014-01-01

    Protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) is a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) that is activated by natural proteases to regulate many physiological actions. We previously reported that PAR1 couples to Gi, Gq and G12 to activate linked signaling pathways. Regulators of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins serve as GTPase activating proteins to inhibit GPCR/G protein signaling. Some RGS proteins interact directly with certain GPCRs to modulate their signals, though cellular mechanisms dictating selective RGS/GPCR coupling are poorly understood. Here, using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET), we tested whether RGS2 and RGS4 bind to PAR1 in live COS-7 cells to regulate PAR1/Gα-mediated signaling. We report that PAR1 selectively interacts with either RGS2 or RGS4 in a G protein-dependent manner. Very little BRET activity is observed between PAR1-Venus (PAR1-Ven) and either RGS2-Luciferase (RGS2-Luc) or RGS4-Luc in the absence of Gα. However, in the presence of specific Gα subunits, BRET activity was markedly enhanced between PAR1-RGS2 by Gαq/11, and PAR1-RGS4 by Gαo, but not by other Gα subunits. Gαq/11-YFP/RGS2-Luc BRET activity is promoted by PAR1 and is markedly enhanced by agonist (TFLLR) stimulation. However, PAR1-Ven/RGS-Luc BRET activity was blocked by a PAR1 mutant (R205A) that eliminates PAR1-Gq/11 coupling. The purified intracellular third loop of PAR1 binds directly to purified His-RGS2 or His-RGS4. In cells, RGS2 and RGS4 inhibited PAR1/Gα-mediated calcium and MAPK/ERK signaling, respectively, but not RhoA signaling. Our findings indicate that RGS2 and RGS4 interact directly with PAR1 in Gα-dependent manner to modulate PAR1/Gα-mediated signaling, and highlight a cellular mechanism for selective GPCR/G protein/RGS coupling.

  16. VEGF and thrombin induce MKP-1 through distinct signaling pathways: role for MKP-1 in endothelial cell migration.

    PubMed

    Kinney, Corttrell M; Chandrasekharan, Unni M; Mavrakis, Lori; DiCorleto, Paul E

    2008-01-01

    We have previously reported that MAPK phosphatase-1 (MKP-1/CL100) is a thrombin-responsive gene in endothelial cells (ECs). We now show that VEGF is another efficacious activator of MKP-1 expression in human umbilical vein ECs. VEGF-A and VEGF-E maximally induced MKP-1 expression in ECs; however, the other VEGF subtypes had no effect. Using specific neutralizing antibodies, we determined that VEGF induced MKP-1 specifically through VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR-2), leading to the downstream activation of JNK. The VEGF-A(165) isoform stimulated MKP-1 expression, whereas the VEGF-A(162) isoform induced the gene to a lesser extent, and the VEGF-A(121) isoform had no effect. Furthermore, specific blocking antibodies against neuropilins, VEGFR-2 coreceptors, blocked MKP-1 induction. A Src kinase inhibitor (PP1) completely blocked both VEGF- and thrombin-induced MKP-1 expression. A dominant negative approach revealed that Src kinase was required for VEGF-induced MKP-1 expression, whereas Fyn kinase was critical for thrombin-induced MKP-1 expression. Moreover, VEGF-induced MKP-1 expression required JNK, whereas ERK was critical for thrombin-induced MKP-1 expression. In ECs treated with short interfering (si)RNA targeting MKP-1, JNK, ERK, and p38 phosphorylation were prolonged following VEGF stimulation. An ex vivo aortic angiogenesis assay revealed a reduction in VEGF- and thrombin-induced sprout outgrowth in segments from MKP-1-null mice versus wild-type controls. MKP-1 siRNA also significantly reduced VEGF-induced EC migration using a transwell assay system. Overall, these results demonstrate distinct MAPK signaling pathways for thrombin versus VEGF induction of MKP-1 in ECs and point to the importance of MKP-1 induction in VEGF-stimulated EC migration. PMID:18003751

  17. Interleukin-5 (IL-5) and IL-6 define two molecularly distinct pathways of B-cell differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Randall, T D; Lund, F E; Brewer, J W; Aldridge, C; Wall, R; Corley, R B

    1993-01-01

    Interleukin-5 (IL-5) and IL-6 have both been reported to act as B-cell differentiation factors by stimulating activated B cells to secrete antibody. However, it has not been possible to directly compare the effects of these two lymphokines because of the lack of a suitable B-cell line capable of responding to both. We have identified a clonal, inducible B-cell lymphoma, CH12, that has this property. Both IL-5 and IL-6 can independently stimulate increases in steady-state levels of immunoglobulin and J-chain mRNA and proteins, and they both induce the differentiation of CH12 into high-rate antibody-secreting cells. Nevertheless, there are significant differences in the activities of these two lymphokines. First, while IL-6 acts only as a differentiation factor, IL-5 also augments the proliferation of CH12 cells. Second, the differentiation stimulated by IL-5 but not by IL-6 is partially inhibited by IL-4. Inhibition of IL-5-induced differentiation was not at the level of IL-5 receptor expression, since IL-4 did not inhibit IL-5-induced proliferation. Third, IL-5 but not IL-6 stimulated increased mouse mammary tumor proviral gene expression in CH12 cells. These results demonstrate that while both IL-5 and IL-6 may act as differentiation factors for B cells, they induce differentiation by using at least partially distinct molecular pathways. Our results also establish that B cells characteristic of a single stage of development can independently respond to IL-4, IL-5, and IL-6. Images PMID:8321200

  18. cAMP-mediated and metabolic amplification of insulin secretion are distinct pathways sharing independence of β-cell microfilaments.

    PubMed

    Mourad, Nizar I; Nenquin, Myriam; Henquin, Jean-Claude

    2012-10-01

    Insulin secretion is triggered by an increase in the cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](c)) in β-cells. Ca(2+)-induced exocytosis of insulin granules can be augmented by metabolic amplification (unknown signals generated through glucose metabolism) or neurohormonal amplification (in particular cAMP mediated). Functional actin microfilaments are not required for metabolic amplification, but their possible role in cAMP-mediated amplification is unknown. It is also uncertain whether cAMP (generated in response to glucose) is implicated in metabolic amplification. These questions were addressed using isolated mouse islets. cAMP levels were increased by phosphodiesterase inhibition (with isobutylmethylxanthine) and adenylate-cyclase stimulation (with forskolin or glucagon-like peptide-1, 7-36 amide). Raising cAMP levels had no steady-state impact on actin polymerization in control islets. Neither disruption (depolymerization by latrunculin) nor stabilization (polymerization by jasplakinolide) of actin microfilaments was counteracted by cAMP. Both changes increased both phases of glucose- or tolbutamide-induced insulin secretion but did not prevent further amplification by cAMP. These large changes in secretion were not caused by changes in [Ca(2+)](c), which was only slightly increased by cAMP. Both phases of insulin secretion were larger in response to glucose than tolbutamide, although [Ca(2+)](c) was lower. This difference in secretion, which reflects metabolic amplification, was independent of microfilaments, was not attributable to differences in cAMP, and persisted in presence of dibutyryl-cAMP or when cAMP levels were variably raised by isobutylmethylxanthine + forskolin or glucagon-like peptide-1, 7-36 amide. We conclude that metabolic and cAMP-mediated amplification of insulin secretion are distinct pathways that accelerate acquisition of release competence by insulin granules that can access exocytotic sites without intervention of microfilaments.

  19. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein induces apoptotic insults to mouse cerebral endothelial cells via a Bax-mitochondria-caspase protease pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, T.-G.; Chen, T.-L.; Chang, H.-C.; Tai, Y.-T.; Cherng, Y.-G.; Chang, Y.-T.; Chen, R.-M. . E-mail: rmchen@tmu.edu.tw

    2007-02-15

    LDL can damage the blood-brain barrier through induction of CEC apoptosis via a Bax-mitochondria-caspase protease pathway.

  20. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein induces apoptotic insults to mouse cerebral endothelial cells via a Bax-mitochondria-caspase protease pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tyng-Guey; Chen, Ta-Liang; Chang, Huai-Chia; Tai, Yu-Ting; Cherng, Yih-Giun; Chang, Ya-Ting; Chen, Ruei-Ming

    2007-02-15

    LDL can damage the blood-brain barrier through induction of CEC apoptosis via a Bax-mitochondria-caspase protease pathway. PMID:17239413

  1. Proteases as Insecticidal Agents

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Robert L.; Bonning, Bryony C.

    2010-01-01

    Proteases from a variety of sources (viruses, bacteria, fungi, plants, and insects) have toxicity towards insects. Some of these insecticidal proteases evolved as venom components, herbivore resistance factors, or microbial pathogenicity factors, while other proteases play roles in insect development or digestion, but exert an insecticidal effect when over-expressed from genetically engineered plants or microbial pathogens. Many of these proteases are cysteine proteases, although insect-toxic metalloproteases and serine proteases have also been examined. The sites of protease toxic activity range from the insect midgut to the hemocoel (body cavity) to the cuticle. This review discusses these insecticidal proteases along with their evaluation and use as potential pesticides. PMID:22069618

  2. Insulin, insulin-like growth factor-I, and platelet-derived growth factor activate extracellular signal-regulated kinase by distinct pathways in muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Tsakiridis, T; Tsiani, E; Lekas, P; Bergman, A; Cherepanov, V; Whiteside, C; Downey, G P

    2001-10-19

    We have investigated the signaling pathways initiated by insulin, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-I), and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) leading to activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in L6 myotubes. Insulin but not IGF-I or PDGF-induced ERK activation was abrogated by Ras inhibition, either by treatment with the farnesyl transferase inhibitor FTP III, or by actin disassembly by cytochalasin D, previously shown to inhibit Ras activation. The protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide abolished PDGF but not IGF-I or insulin-induced ERK activation. ERK activation by insulin, IGF-I, or PDGF was unaffected by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor wortmannin but was abolished by the MEK inhibitor PD98059. In contrast, activation of the pathway involving phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3k), protein kinase B, and glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) was mediated similarly by all three receptors, through a PI 3-kinase-dependent but Ras- and actin-independent pathway. We conclude that ERK activation is mediated by distinct pathways including: (i) a cytoskeleton- and Ras-dependent, PKC-independent, pathway utilized by insulin, (ii) a PKC-dependent, cytoskeleton- and Ras-independent pathway used by PDGF, and (iii) a cytoskeleton-, Ras-, and PKC-independent pathway utilized by IGF-I.

  3. Decreasing Electron Flux through the Cytochrome and/or Alternative Respiratory Pathways Triggers Common and Distinct Cellular Responses Dependent on Growth Conditions1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kühn, Kristina; Yin, Guangkun; Duncan, Owen; Law, Simon R.; Kubiszewski-Jakubiak, Szymon; Kaur, Parwinder; Meyer, Etienne; Wang, Yan; Small, Catherine Colas des Francs; Giraud, Estelle; Narsai, Reena; Whelan, James

    2015-01-01

    Diverse signaling pathways are activated by perturbation of mitochondrial function under different growth conditions.Mitochondria have emerged as an important organelle for sensing and coping with stress in addition to being the sites of important metabolic pathways. Here, responses to moderate light and drought stress were examined in different Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutant plants lacking a functional alternative oxidase (alternative oxidase1a [aox1a]), those with reduced cytochrome electron transport chain capacity (T3/T7 bacteriophage-type RNA polymerase, mitochondrial, and plastidial [rpoTmp]), and double mutants impaired in both pathways (aox1a:rpoTmp). Under conditions considered optimal for growth, transcriptomes of aox1a and rpoTmp were distinct. Under adverse growth conditions, however, transcriptome changes in aox1a and rpoTmp displayed a highly significant overlap and were indicative of a common mitochondrial stress response and down-regulation of photosynthesis. This suggests that the role of mitochondria to support photosynthesis is provided through either the alternative pathway or the cytochrome pathway, and when either pathway is inhibited, such as under environmental stress, a common, dramatic, and succinct mitochondrial signal is activated to alter energy metabolism in both organelles. aox1a:rpoTmp double mutants grown under optimal conditions showed dramatic reductions in biomass production compared with aox1a and rpoTmp and a transcriptome that was distinct from aox1a or rpoTmp. Transcript data indicating activation of mitochondrial biogenesis in aox1a:rpoTmp were supported by a proteomic analysis of over 200 proteins. Under optimal conditions, aox1a:rpoTmp plants seemed to switch on many of the typical mitochondrial stress regulators. Under adverse conditions, aox1a:rpoTmp turned off these responses and displayed a biotic stress response. Taken together, these results highlight the diverse signaling pathways activated by the

  4. Serine Protease Autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae (SPATEs): Biogenesis and Function

    PubMed Central

    Dautin, Nathalie

    2010-01-01

    Serine Protease Autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae (SPATEs) constitute a large family of proteases secreted by Escherichia coli and Shigella. SPATEs exhibit two distinct proteolytic activities. First, a C-terminal catalytic site triggers an intra-molecular cleavage that releases the N-terminal portion of these proteins in the extracellular medium. Second, the secreted N-terminal domains of SPATEs are themselves proteases; each contains a canonical serine-protease catalytic site. Some of these secreted proteases are toxins, eliciting various effects on mammalian cells. Here, we discuss the biogenesis of SPATEs and their function as toxins. PMID:22069633

  5. Transport through the yeast endocytic pathway occurs through morphologically distinct compartments and requires an active secretory pathway and Sec18p/N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein.

    PubMed Central

    Hicke, L; Zanolari, B; Pypaert, M; Rohrer, J; Riezman, H

    1997-01-01

    Molecules travel through the yeast endocytic pathway from the cell surface to the lysosome-like vacuole by passing through two sequential intermediates. Immunofluorescent detection of an endocytosed pheromone receptor was used to morphologically identify these intermediates, the early and late endosomes. The early endosome is a peripheral organelle that is heterogeneous in appearance, whereas the late endosome is a large perivacuolar compartment that corresponds to the prevacuolar compartment previously shown to be an endocytic intermediate. We demonstrate that inhibiting transport through the early secretory pathway in sec mutants quickly impedes transport from the early endosome. Treatment of sensitive cells with brefeldin A also blocks transport from this compartment. We provide evidence that Sec18p/N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein, a protein required for membrane fusion, is directly required in vivo for forward transport early in the endocytic pathway. Inhibiting protein synthesis does not affect transport from the early endosome but causes endocytosed proteins to accumulate in the late endosome. As newly synthesized proteins and the late steps of secretion are not required for early to late endosome transport, but endoplasmic reticulum through Golgi traffic is, we propose that efficient forward transport in the early endocytic pathway requires delivery of lipid from secretory organelles to endosomes. Images PMID:9017592

  6. Differential modulation of the glutamate-nitric oxide-cyclic GMP pathway by distinct neurosteroids in cerebellum in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cauli, O; González-Usano, A; Agustí, A; Felipo, V

    2011-09-01

    The glutamate-nitric oxide (NO)-cGMP pathway mediates many responses to activation of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, including modulation of some types of learning and memory. The glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway is modulated by GABAergic neurotransmission. Activation of GABA(A) receptors reduces the function of the pathway. Several neurosteroids modulate the activity of GABA(A) and/or NMDA receptors, suggesting that they could modulate the function of the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway. The aim of this work was to assess, by in vivo microdialysis, the effects of several neurosteroids with different effects on GABA(A) and NMDA receptors on the function of the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway in cerebellum in vivo. To assess the effects of the neurosteroids on the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway, they were administered through the microdialysis probe before administration of NMDA and the effects on NMDA-induced increase in extracellular cGMP were analyzed. We also assessed the effects of the neurosteroids on basal levels of extracellular cGMP. To assess the effects of neurosteroids on nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity and on NMDA-induced activation of NOS, we also measured the effects of the neurosteroids on extracellular citrulline. Pregnanolone and tetrahydrodeoxy-corticosterone (THDOC) behave as agonists of GABA(A) receptors and completely block NMDA-induced increase in cGMP. Pregnanolone but not THDOC also reduced basal levels of extracellular cGMP. Pregnenolone did not affect extracellular cGMP or its increase by NMDA administration. Pregnenolone sulfate increased basal extracellular cGMP and potentiated NMDA-induced increase in cGMP, behaving as an enhancer of NMDA receptors activation. Allopregnanolone and dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate behave as antagonists of NMDA receptors, increasing basal cGMP and blocking completely NMDA-induced increase in cGMP. Dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate seems to do this by activating sigma receptors. These data support the concept that, at

  7. A Minimal Dose of Electrically Induced Muscle Activity Regulates Distinct Gene Signaling Pathways in Humans with Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Petrie, Michael A.; Suneja, Manish; Faidley, Elizabeth; Shields, Richard K.

    2014-01-01

    Paralysis after a spinal cord injury (SCI) induces physiological adaptations that compromise the musculoskeletal and metabolic systems. Unlike non-SCI individuals, people with spinal cord injury experience minimal muscle activity which compromises optimal glucose utilization and metabolic control. Acute or chronic muscle activity, induced through electrical stimulation, may regulate key genes that enhance oxidative metabolism in paralyzed muscle. We investigated the short and long term effects of electrically induced exercise on mRNA expression of human paralyzed muscle. We developed an exercise dose that activated the muscle for only 0.6% of the day. The short term effects were assessed 3 hours after a single dose of exercise, while the long term effects were assessed after training 5 days per week for at least one year (adherence 81%). We found a single dose of exercise regulated 117 biological pathways as compared to 35 pathways after one year of training. A single dose of electrical stimulation increased the mRNA expression of transcriptional, translational, and enzyme regulators of metabolism important to shift muscle toward an oxidative phenotype (PGC-1α, NR4A3, IFRD1, ABRA, PDK4). However, chronic training increased the mRNA expression of specific metabolic pathway genes (BRP44, BRP44L, SDHB, ACADVL), mitochondrial fission and fusion genes (MFF, MFN1, MFN2), and slow muscle fiber genes (MYH6, MYH7, MYL3, MYL2). These findings support that a dose of electrical stimulation (∼10 minutes/day) regulates metabolic gene signaling pathways in human paralyzed muscle. Regulating these pathways early after SCI may contribute to reducing diabetes in people with longstanding paralysis from SCI. PMID:25531450

  8. The distinct interaction between cell cycle regulation and the widely conserved morphogenesis-related (MOR) pathway in the fungus Ustilago maydis determines morphology.

    PubMed

    Sartorel, Elodie; Pérez-Martín, José

    2012-10-01

    The morphogenesis-related NDR kinase (MOR) pathway regulates morphogenesis in fungi. In spite of the high conservation of its components, impairing their functions results in highly divergent cellular responses depending on the fungal species. The reasons for such differences are unclear. Here we propose that the species-specific connections between cell cycle regulation and the MOR pathway could be partly responsible for these divergences. We based our conclusion on the characterization of the MOR pathway in the fungus Ustilago maydis. Each gene that encodes proteins of this pathway in U. maydis was deleted. All mutants exhibited a constitutive hyperpolarized growth, contrasting with the loss of polarity observed in other fungi. Using a conditional allele of the central NDR kinase Ukc1, we found that impairing MOR function resulted in a prolonged G2 phase. This cell cycle delay appears to be the consequence of an increase in Cdk1 inhibitory phosphorylation. Strikingly, prevention of the inhibitory Cdk1 phosphorylation abolished the hyperpolarized growth associated with MOR pathway depletion. We found that the prolonged G2 phase resulted in higher levels of expression of crk1, a conserved kinase that promotes polar growth in U. maydis. Deletion of crk1 also abolished the dramatic activation of polar growth in cells lacking the MOR pathway. Taken together, our results suggest that Cdk1 inhibitory phosphorylation may act as an integrator of signaling cascades regulating fungal morphogenesis and that the distinct morphological response observed in U. maydis upon impairment of the MOR pathway could be due to a cell cycle deregulation.

  9. Steroidal androgens and nonsteroidal, tissue-selective androgen receptor modulator, S-22, regulate androgen receptor function through distinct genomic and nongenomic signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Ramesh; Coss, Christopher C; Yepuru, Muralimohan; Kearbey, Jeffrey D; Miller, Duane D; Dalton, James T

    2008-11-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) ligands are important for the development and function of several tissues and organs. However, the poor oral bioavailability, pharmacokinetic properties, and receptor cross-reactivity of testosterone, coupled with side effects, place limits on its clinical use. Selective AR modulators (SARMs) elicit anabolic effects in muscle and bone, sparing reproductive organs like the prostate. However, molecular mechanisms underlying the tissue selectivity remain ambiguous. We performed a variety of in vitro studies to compare and define the molecular mechanisms of an aryl propionamide SARM, S-22, as compared with dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Studies indicated that S-22 increased levator ani muscle weight but decreased the size of prostate in rats. Analysis of the upstream intracellular signaling events indicated that S-22 and DHT mediated their actions through distinct pathways. Modulation of these pathways altered the recruitment of AR and its cofactors to the PSA enhancer in a ligand-dependent fashion. In addition, S-22 induced Xenopus laevis oocyte maturation and rapid phosphorylation of several kinases, through pathways distinct from steroids. These studies reveal novel differences in the molecular mechanisms by which S-22, a nonsteroidal SARM, and DHT mediate their pharmacological effects.

  10. α-Ketobenzothiazole Serine Protease Inhibitors of Aberrant HGF/c-MET and MSP/RON Kinase Pathway Signaling in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Han, Zhenfu; Harris, Peter K W; Karmakar, Partha; Kim, Tommy; Owusu, Ben Y; Wildman, Scott A; Klampfer, Lidija; Janetka, James W

    2016-03-17

    Upregulation of the HGF and MSP growth-factor processing serine endopeptidases HGFA, matriptase and hepsin is correlated with increased metastasis in multiple tumor types driven by c-MET or RON kinase signaling. We rationally designed P1' α-ketobenzothiazole mechanism-based inhibitors of these proteases. Structure-activity studies are presented, which resulted in the identification of potent inhibitors with differential selectivity. The tetrapeptide inhibitors span the P1-P1' substrate cleavage site via a P1' amide linker off the benzothiazole, occupying the S3' pocket. Optimized inhibitors display sub-nanomolar enzyme inhibition against one, two, or all three of HGFA, matriptase, and hepsin. Several compounds also have good selectivity against the related trypsin-like proteases, thrombin and Factor Xa. Finally, we show that inhibitors block the fibroblast (HGF)-mediated migration of invasive DU145 prostate cancer cells. In addition to prostate cancer, breast, colon, lung, pancreas, gliomas, and multiple myeloma tumors all depend on HGF and MSP for tumor survival and progression. Therefore, these unique inhibitors have potential as new therapeutics for a diverse set of tumor types. PMID:26889658

  11. Protease and protease inhibitory activity in pregnant and postpartum involuting uterus

    SciTech Connect

    Milwidsky, A.; Beller, U.; Palti, Z.; Mayer, M.

    1982-08-15

    The presence of two distinct proteolytic activities in the rat uterus was confirmed with /sup 14/C-labeled globin used as a sensitive protein substrate and following release of label into the trichloroacetic acid-soluble supernatant fraction. Protease I is a cytoplasmic acid protease while protease II is associated with the pellet fraction, can be extracted by 0.6 M sodium chloride, and is active at pH 7.0. Protease I activity is low during pregnancy and markedly increases at term achieving maximal activity at day 3 post partum with a subsequent decline to preterm activity values. Lactation did not affect the uterine protease I activity. Protease II activity is not significantly different during pregnancy, at term, and post partum. The presence of an inhibitor of protease I was suggested by a decrease in enzyme activity with an increased cytosolic protein concentration. The inhibitor also lessened bovine trypsin activity but had no effect on protease II. Although its inhibitory potency on trypsin fluctuated during the various uterine physiologic stages, these changes appeared to be statistically insignificant. Human uterine samples were also found to contain the two protease activities with similar changes in protease I post partum. It is suggested that, both in the rat and in man, uterine involution post partum is associated with a marked increase in activity of acid cytosolic protease, while a particulate neutral protease and a soluble inhibitor of trypsin, which are also present in uterine cells, do not appear to play a significant role in the dissolution of uterine tissues after parturition.

  12. Investigations with Protease.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yip, Din Yan

    1997-01-01

    Presents two simple and reliable ways for measuring protease activity that can be used for a variety of investigations in a range of biology class levels. The investigations use protease from a variety of sources. (DDR)

  13. Distinct development of peripheral trigeminal pathways in the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) and short-beaked echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus).

    PubMed

    Ashwell, Ken W S; Hardman, Craig D; Giere, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The extant monotremes (platypus and echidnas) are believed to all be capable of electroreception in the trigeminal pathways, although they differ significantly in the number and distribution of electroreceptors. It has been argued by some authors that electroreception was first developed in an aquatic environment and that echidnas are descended from a platypus-like ancestor that invaded an available terrestrial habitat. If this were the case, one would expect the developmental trajectories of the trigeminal pathways to be similar in the early stages of platypus and short-beaked echidna development, with structural divergence occurring later. We examined the development of the peripheral trigeminal pathway from snout skin to trigeminal ganglion in sectioned material in the Hill and Hubrecht collections to test for similarities and differences between the two during the development from egg to adulthood. Each monotreme showed a characteristic and different pattern of distribution of developing epidermal sensory gland specializations (electroreceptor primordia) from the time of hatching. The cross-sectional areas of the trigeminal divisions and the volume of the trigeminal ganglion itself were also very different between the two species at embryonic ages, and remained consistently different throughout post-hatching development. Our findings indicate that the trigeminal pathways in the short-beaked echidna and the platypus follow very different developmental trajectories from the earliest ages. These findings are more consistent with the notion that the platypus and echidna have both diverged from an ancestor with rudimentary electroreception and/or trigeminal specialization, rather than the contention that the echidna is derived from a platypus-like ancestor. PMID:22179203

  14. Distinct development of peripheral trigeminal pathways in the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) and short-beaked echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus).

    PubMed

    Ashwell, Ken W S; Hardman, Craig D; Giere, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The extant monotremes (platypus and echidnas) are believed to all be capable of electroreception in the trigeminal pathways, although they differ significantly in the number and distribution of electroreceptors. It has been argued by some authors that electroreception was first developed in an aquatic environment and that echidnas are descended from a platypus-like ancestor that invaded an available terrestrial habitat. If this were the case, one would expect the developmental trajectories of the trigeminal pathways to be similar in the early stages of platypus and short-beaked echidna development, with structural divergence occurring later. We examined the development of the peripheral trigeminal pathway from snout skin to trigeminal ganglion in sectioned material in the Hill and Hubrecht collections to test for similarities and differences between the two during the development from egg to adulthood. Each monotreme showed a characteristic and different pattern of distribution of developing epidermal sensory gland specializations (electroreceptor primordia) from the time of hatching. The cross-sectional areas of the trigeminal divisions and the volume of the trigeminal ganglion itself were also very different between the two species at embryonic ages, and remained consistently different throughout post-hatching development. Our findings indicate that the trigeminal pathways in the short-beaked echidna and the platypus follow very different developmental trajectories from the earliest ages. These findings are more consistent with the notion that the platypus and echidna have both diverged from an ancestor with rudimentary electroreception and/or trigeminal specialization, rather than the contention that the echidna is derived from a platypus-like ancestor.

  15. p53 and ATF4 mediate distinct and additive pathways to skeletal muscle atrophy during limb immobilization.

    PubMed

    Fox, Daniel K; Ebert, Scott M; Bongers, Kale S; Dyle, Michael C; Bullard, Steven A; Dierdorff, Jason M; Kunkel, Steven D; Adams, Christopher M

    2014-08-01

    Immobilization causes skeletal muscle atrophy via complex signaling pathways that are not well understood. To better understand these pathways, we investigated the roles of p53 and ATF4, two transcription factors that mediate adaptations to a variety of cellular stresses. Using mouse models, we demonstrate that 3 days of muscle immobilization induces muscle atrophy and increases expression of p53 and ATF4. Furthermore, muscle fibers lacking p53 or ATF4 are partially resistant to immobilization-induced muscle atrophy, and forced expression of p53 or ATF4 induces muscle fiber atrophy in the absence of immobilization. Importantly, however, p53 and ATF4 do not require each other to promote atrophy, and coexpression of p53 and ATF4 induces more atrophy than either transcription factor alone. Moreover, muscle fibers lacking both p53 and ATF4 are more resistant to immobilization-induced atrophy than fibers lacking only p53 or ATF4. Interestingly, the independent and additive nature of the p53 and ATF4 pathways allows for combinatorial control of at least one downstream effector, p21. Using genome-wide mRNA expression arrays, we identified p21 mRNA as a skeletal muscle transcript that is highly induced in immobilized muscle via the combined actions of p53 and ATF4. Additionally, in mouse muscle, p21 induces atrophy in a manner that does not require immobilization, p53 or ATF4, and p21 is required for atrophy induced by immobilization, p53, and ATF4. Collectively, these results identify p53 and ATF4 as essential and complementary mediators of immobilization-induced muscle atrophy and discover p21 as a critical downstream effector of the p53 and ATF4 pathways.

  16. Fear conditioning and early life vulnerabilities: two distinct pathways of emotional dysregulation and brain dysfunction in PTSD

    PubMed Central

    Lanius, Ruth A.; Frewen, Paul A.; Vermetten, Eric; Yehuda, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    The newly proposed criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-V) include dysregulation of a variety of emotional states including fear, anger, guilt, and shame, in addition to dissociation and numbing. Consistent with these revisions, we postulate two models of emotion dysregulation in PTSD in which fear is not the prevailing emotion but is only one of several components implicated in a dysregulated emotional system that also mediates problems regulating anger, guilt, shame, dissociation, and numbing. We discuss whether there is a relationship between fear and other emotion regulation systems that may help further our understanding of PTSD and its underlying neurocircuitry. Two pathways describing the relationship between fear and other emotion regulation systems in PTSD are proposed. The first pathway describes emotion dysregulation as an outcome of fear conditioning through stress sensitization and kindling. The second pathway views emotion dysregulation as a distal vulnerability factor and hypothesizes a further exacerbation of fear and other emotion regulatory problems, including the development of PTSD after exposure to one or several traumatic event(s) later in life. Future research and treatment implications are discussed. PMID:22893793

  17. Unique and shared signaling pathways cooperate to regulate the differentiation of human CD4+ T cells into distinct effector subsets.

    PubMed

    Ma, Cindy S; Wong, Natalie; Rao, Geetha; Nguyen, Akira; Avery, Danielle T; Payne, Kathryn; Torpy, James; O'Young, Patrick; Deenick, Elissa; Bustamante, Jacinta; Puel, Anne; Okada, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Masao; Martinez-Barricarte, Ruben; Elliott, Michael; Sebnem Kilic, Sara; El Baghdadi, Jamila; Minegishi, Yoshiyuki; Bousfiha, Aziz; Robertson, Nic; Hambleton, Sophie; Arkwright, Peter D; French, Martyn; Blincoe, Annaliesse K; Hsu, Peter; Campbell, Dianne E; Stormon, Michael O; Wong, Melanie; Adelstein, Stephen; Fulcher, David A; Cook, Matthew C; Stepensky, Polina; Boztug, Kaan; Beier, Rita; Ikincioğullari, Aydan; Ziegler, John B; Gray, Paul; Picard, Capucine; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Phan, Tri Giang; Grimbacher, Bodo; Warnatz, Klaus; Holland, Steven M; Uzel, Gulbu; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Tangye, Stuart G

    2016-07-25

    Naive CD4(+) T cells differentiate into specific effector subsets-Th1, Th2, Th17, and T follicular helper (Tfh)-that provide immunity against pathogen infection. The signaling pathways involved in generating these effector cells are partially known. However, the effects of mutations underlying human primary immunodeficiencies on these processes, and how they compromise specific immune responses, remain unresolved. By studying individuals with mutations in key signaling pathways, we identified nonredundant pathways regulating human CD4(+) T cell differentiation in vitro. IL12Rβ1/TYK2 and IFN-γR/STAT1 function in a feed-forward loop to induce Th1 cells, whereas IL-21/IL-21R/STAT3 signaling is required for Th17, Tfh, and IL-10-secreting cells. IL12Rβ1/TYK2 and NEMO are also required for Th17 induction. Strikingly, gain-of-function STAT1 mutations recapitulated the impact of dominant-negative STAT3 mutations on Tfh and Th17 cells, revealing a putative inhibitory effect of hypermorphic STAT1 over STAT3. These findings provide mechanistic insight into the requirements for human T cell effector function, and explain clinical manifestations of these immunodeficient conditions. Furthermore, they identify molecules that could be targeted to modulate CD4(+) T cell effector function in the settings of infection, vaccination, or immune dysregulation. PMID:27401342

  18. Adaptin-like protein TPLATE and clathrin recruitment during plant somatic cytokinesis occurs via two distinct pathways

    PubMed Central

    Van Damme, Daniël; Gadeyne, Astrid; Vanstraelen, Marleen; Inzé, Dirk; Van Montagu, Marc C. E.; De Jaeger, Geert; Russinova, Eugenia; Geelen, Danny

    2011-01-01

    Plant cytokinesis deploys a transport system that centers cell plate-forming vesicles and fuses them to form a cell plate. Here we show that the adaptin-like protein TPLATE and clathrin light chain 2 (CLC2) are targeted to the expanding cell plate and to the equatorial subregion of the plasma membrane referred to as the cortical division zone (CDZ). Bimolecular fluorescence complementation and immunodetection indicates that TPLATE interacts with clathrin. Pharmacological tools as well as analysis of protein targeting in a mutant background affecting cell plate formation allowed to discriminate two recruitment pathways for TPLATE and CLC2. The cell plate recruitment pathway is dependent on phragmoplast microtubule organization and the formation and transport of secretory vesicles. The CDZ recruitment pathway, on the other hand, is activated at the end of cytokinesis and independent of trans-Golgi–derived vesicle trafficking. TPLATE and CLC2 do not accumulate at a narrow zone central of the CDZ. We have dubbed this subdomain the cortical division site and show that it corresponds precisely with the position where the cell plate merges with the parental wall. These data provide evidence that the plasma membrane is subject to localized endocytosis or membrane remodeling processes that are required for the fusion of the cell plate with a predefined region of the plasma membrane. PMID:21187379

  19. Distinct spatial activation of intrinsic and extrinsic apoptosis pathways in natural scrapie: association with prion-related lesions

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, Carmen; Lyahyai, Jaber; Bolea, Rosa; Varona, Luis; Monleón, Eva; Badiola, Juan J.; Zaragoza, Pilar; Martín-Burriel, Inmaculada

    2009-01-01

    Neurodegeneration and gliosis are the main neuropathological features of prion diseases. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in these processes remain unclear. Several studies have demonstrated changes in the expression of apoptotic factors and inflammatory cytokines in animals with experimental infection. Here we present the expression profiles of 15 genes implicated in the intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways in the central nervous systems of sheep naturally infected with scrapie. Expression changes obtained by real-time RT-PCR were also compared with the extent of classical scrapie lesions, such as prion deposition, neuronal vacuolisation, spongiosis, and astrogliosis as well as with the activation of caspase-3, using a stepwise regression. The results suggest that the factors assessed participate in apoptotic or inflammatory functions, depending on the affected area. The mitochondrial apoptosis pathway was associated with prion deposition in the prefrontal cortex (the less affected area), and with activation of caspase-3-mediated cell death via over-expression of BAK. In addition to its known association with astroglial activation, the extrinsic apoptosis pathway was also related to cell death and neuronal vacuolisation. PMID:19401142

  20. Identification of Distinct Conformations of the Angiotensin-II Type 1 Receptor Associated with the Gq/11 Protein Pathway and the β-Arrestin Pathway Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Cabana, Jérôme; Holleran, Brian; Leduc, Richard; Escher, Emanuel; Guillemette, Gaétan; Lavigne, Pierre

    2015-06-19

    Biased signaling represents the ability of G protein-coupled receptors to engage distinct pathways with various efficacies depending on the ligand used or on mutations in the receptor. The angiotensin-II type 1 (AT1) receptor, a prototypical class A G protein-coupled receptor, can activate various effectors upon stimulation with the endogenous ligand angiotensin-II (AngII), including the Gq/11 protein and β-arrestins. It is believed that the activation of those two pathways can be associated with distinct conformations of the AT1 receptor. To verify this hypothesis, microseconds of molecular dynamics simulations were computed to explore the conformational landscape sampled by the WT-AT1 receptor, the N111G-AT1 receptor (constitutively active and biased for the Gq/11 pathway), and the D74N-AT1 receptor (biased for the β-arrestin1 and -2 pathways) in their apo-forms and in complex with AngII. The molecular dynamics simulations of the AngII-WT-AT1, N111G-AT1, and AngII-N111G-AT1 receptors revealed specific structural rearrangements compared with the initial and ground state of the receptor. Simulations of the D74N-AT1 receptor revealed that the mutation stabilizes the receptor in the initial ground state. The presence of AngII further stabilized the ground state of the D74N-AT1 receptor. The biased agonist [Sar(1),Ile(8)]AngII also showed a preference for the ground state of the WT-AT1 receptor compared with AngII. These results suggest that activation of the Gq/11 pathway is associated with a specific conformational transition stabilized by the agonist, whereas the activation of the β-arrestin pathway is linked to the stabilization of the ground state of the receptor.

  1. Identification of Distinct Conformations of the Angiotensin-II Type 1 Receptor Associated with the Gq/11 Protein Pathway and the β-Arrestin Pathway Using Molecular Dynamics Simulations*

    PubMed Central

    Cabana, Jérôme; Holleran, Brian; Leduc, Richard; Escher, Emanuel; Guillemette, Gaétan; Lavigne, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Biased signaling represents the ability of G protein-coupled receptors to engage distinct pathways with various efficacies depending on the ligand used or on mutations in the receptor. The angiotensin-II type 1 (AT1) receptor, a prototypical class A G protein-coupled receptor, can activate various effectors upon stimulation with the endogenous ligand angiotensin-II (AngII), including the Gq/11 protein and β-arrestins. It is believed that the activation of those two pathways can be associated with distinct conformations of the AT1 receptor. To verify this hypothesis, microseconds of molecular dynamics simulations were computed to explore the conformational landscape sampled by the WT-AT1 receptor, the N111G-AT1 receptor (constitutively active and biased for the Gq/11 pathway), and the D74N-AT1 receptor (biased for the β-arrestin1 and -2 pathways) in their apo-forms and in complex with AngII. The molecular dynamics simulations of the AngII-WT-AT1, N111G-AT1, and AngII-N111G-AT1 receptors revealed specific structural rearrangements compared with the initial and ground state of the receptor. Simulations of the D74N-AT1 receptor revealed that the mutation stabilizes the receptor in the initial ground state. The presence of AngII further stabilized the ground state of the D74N-AT1 receptor. The biased agonist [Sar1,Ile8]AngII also showed a preference for the ground state of the WT-AT1 receptor compared with AngII. These results suggest that activation of the Gq/11 pathway is associated with a specific conformational transition stabilized by the agonist, whereas the activation of the β-arrestin pathway is linked to the stabilization of the ground state of the receptor. PMID:25934394

  2. The melanomas: a synthesis of epidemiological, clinical, histopathological, genetic, and biological aspects, supporting distinct subtypes, causal pathways, and cells of origin

    PubMed Central

    Whiteman, David C.; Pavan, William J; Bastian, Boris C.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Converging lines of evidence from varied scientific disciplines suggest that cutaneous melanomas comprise biologically distinct subtypes that arise through multiple causal pathways. Understanding the respective relationships of each subtype with etiologic factors such as UV radiation and constitutional factors is the first necessary step toward developing refined prevention strategies for the specific forms of melanoma. Furthermore, classifying this disease precisely into biologically distinct subtypes is the key to developing mechanism- based treatments, as highlighted by recent discoveries. In this review, we outline the historical developments that underpin our understanding of melanoma heterogeneity, and we do this from the perspectives of clinical presentation, histopathology, epidemiology, molecular genetics, and developmental biology. We integrate the evidence from these separate trajectories to catalog the emerging major categories of melanomas and conclude with important unanswered questions relating to the development of melanoma and its cells of origin. PMID:21707960

  3. The mannan-binding lectin pathway and lung disease in cystic fibrosis--disfunction of mannan-binding lectin-associated serine protease 2 (MASP-2) may be a major modifier.

    PubMed

    Olesen, H V; Jensenius, J C; Steffensen, R; Thiel, S; Schiøtz, P O

    2006-12-01

    The lectin pathway of complement activation is initiated by mannan-binding lectin (MBL) or the ficolins through the common MBL-associated serine protease-2 (MASP-2). Deficiency of MBL has been associated with poorer outcome in cystic fibrosis (CF). We investigated the MBL pathway further by analysis of the MASP-2 deficiency mutation (D105G) as well as MBL-2 genotypes. Concentrations and genotypes of MASP-2 and MBL in 109 CF patients were correlated to lung function and chronic infections. We describe the first CF patient homozygous for the mutation, a girl with extremely severe lung disease with no other precipitating factors. We suspect total MASP-2 dysfunction to be a major modifier of CF lung disease. However, heterozygosity for the D105G mutation of MASP-2 had no correlation to MBL pathway function or poor lung function. Lung function was higher in the MBL deficiency determining genotypes (XA/YO+YO/YO) than in the other genotypes. PMID:17045845

  4. A preliminary neutron diffraction analysis of Achromobacter protease I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, Yuki; Masaki, Takeharu; Yamada, Taro; Kurihara, Kazuo; Tanaka, Ichiro; Niimura, Nobuo

    2010-11-01

    Achromobacter protease I (API, E.C. 3.4.21.50) is one of the serine proteases produced by Achromobacter lyticus M497-1. API is distinct from the other tripsin type protease in its lysine specificity. The neutron structure analysis of catalytic triad with Trp169 and His210 was presented. His57 was double protonated and formed hydrogen bonds to Ser194Oγ and Asp113Oδ1, Oδ2.

  5. Distinct populations within Isl1 lineages contribute to appendicular and facial skeletogenesis through the β-catenin pathway

    PubMed Central

    Akiyama, Ryutaro; Kawakami, Hiroko; Taketo, M. Mark; Evans, Sylvia M.; Wada, Naoyuki; Petryk, Anna; Kawakami, Yasuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Isl1 expression marks progenitor populations in developing embryos. In this study, we investigated the contribution of Isl1-expressing cells that utilize the β-catenin pathway to skeletal development. Inactivation of β-catenin in Isl1-expressing cells caused agenesis of the hindlimb skeleton and absence of the lower jaw (agnathia). In the hindlimb, Isl1-lineages broadly contributed to the mesenchyme, however, deletion of β-catenin in the Isl1-lineage caused cell death only in a discrete posterior domain of nascent hindlimb bud mesenchyme. We found that the loss of posterior mesenchyme, which gives rise to Shh-expressing posterior organizer tissue, caused loss of posterior gene expression and failure to expand chondrogenic precursor cells, leading to severe truncation of the hindlimb. In facial tissues, Isl1-expressing cells broadly contributed to facial epithelium. We found reduced nuclear β-catenin accumulation and loss of Fgf8 expression in mandibular epithelium of Isl1−/− embryos. Inactivating β-catenin in Isl1-expressing epithelium caused both loss of epithelial Fgf8 expression and death of mesenchymal cells in the mandibular arch without affecting epithelial proliferation and survival. These results suggest a Isl1-> β-catenin-> Fgf8 pathway that regulates mesenchymal survival and development of the lower jaw in the mandibular epithelium. By contrast, activating β-catenin signaling in Isl1-lineages caused activation of Fgf8 broadly in facial epithelium. Our results provide evidence that, despite its broad contribution to hindlimb mesenchyme and facial epithelium, the Isl1-β-catenin pathway regulates skeletal development of the hindlimb and lower jaw through discrete populations of cells that give rise to Shh-expressing posterior hindlimb mesenchyme and Fgf8-expressing mandibular epithelium. PMID:24424161

  6. Identification of Biochemically Distinct Properties of the Small Ubiquitin-related Modifier (SUMO) Conjugation Pathway in Plasmodium falciparum*

    PubMed Central

    Reiter, Katherine; Mukhopadhyay, Debaditya; Zhang, Hong; Boucher, Lauren E.; Kumar, Nirbhay; Bosch, Jürgen; Matunis, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Small ubiquitin-related modifiers (SUMOs) are post-translationally conjugated to other proteins and are thereby essential regulators of a wide range of cellular processes. Sumoylation, and enzymes of the sumoylation pathway, are conserved in the malaria causing parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. However, the specific functions of sumoylation in P. falciparum, and the degree of functional conservation between enzymes of the human and P. falciparum sumoylation pathways, have not been characterized. Here, we demonstrate that sumoylation levels peak during midstages of the intra-erythrocyte developmental cycle, concomitant with hemoglobin consumption and elevated oxidative stress. In vitro studies revealed that P. falciparum E1- and E2-conjugating enzymes interact effectively to recognize and modify RanGAP1, a model mammalian SUMO substrate. However, in heterologous reactions, P. falciparum E1 and E2 enzymes failed to interact with cognate human E2 and E1 partners, respectively, to modify RanGAP1. Structural analysis, binding studies, and functional assays revealed divergent amino acid residues within the E1-E2 binding interface that define organism-specific enzyme interactions. Our studies identify sumoylation as a potentially important regulator of oxidative stress response during the P. falciparum intra-erythrocyte developmental cycle, and define E1 and E2 interactions as a promising target for development of parasite-specific inhibitors of sumoylation and parasite replication. PMID:23943616

  7. Distinct Signaling Pathways from the Circadian Clock Participate in Regulation of Rhythmic Conidiospore Development in Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Alejandro; Bell-Pedersen, Deborah

    2002-01-01

    Several different environmental signals can induce asexual spore development (conidiation) and expression of developmentally regulated genes in Neurospora crassa. However, under constant conditions, where no environmental cues for conidiation are present, the endogenous circadian clock in N. crassa promotes daily rhythms in expression of known developmental genes and of conidiation. We anticipated that the same pathway of gene regulation would be followed during clock-controlled conidiation and environmental induction of conidiation and that the circadian clock would need only to control the initial developmental switch. Previous experiments showed that high-level developmental induction of the clock-controlled genes eas (ccg-2) and ccg-1 requires the developmental regulatory proteins FL and ACON-2, respectively, and normal developmental induction of fl mRNA expression requires ACON-2. We demonstrate that the circadian clock regulates rhythmic fl gene expression and that fl rhythmicity requires ACON-2. However, we find that clock regulation of eas (ccg-2) is normal in an fl mutant strain and ccg-1 expression is rhythmic in an acon-2 mutant strain. Together, these data point to the endogenous clock and the environment following separate pathways to regulate conidiation-specific gene expression. PMID:12455961

  8. Phospholipid transfer protein Sec14 is required for trafficking from endosomes and regulates distinct trans-Golgi export pathways.

    PubMed

    Curwin, Amy J; Fairn, Gregory D; McMaster, Christopher R

    2009-03-13

    A protein known to regulate both lipid metabolism and vesicular transport is the phosphatidylcholine/phosphatidylinositol transfer protein Sec14 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Sec14 is thought to globally affect secretion from the trans-Golgi. The results from a synthetic genetic array screen for genes whose inactivation impaired growth of cells with a temperature-sensitive SEC14 allele implied Sec14 regulates transport into and out of the Golgi. This prompted us to examine the role of Sec14 in various vesicular transport pathways. We determined that Sec14 function was required for the route followed by Bgl2, whereas trafficking of other secreted proteins, including Hsp150, Cts1, Scw4, Scw10, Exg1, Cis3, and Ygp1, still occurred, indicating Sec14 regulates specific trans-Golgi export pathways. Upon diminution of Sec14 function, the v-SNARE Snc1 accumulated in endosomes and the trans-Golgi. Its accumulation in endosomes is consistent with Sec14 being required for transport from endosomes to the trans-Golgi. Sec14 was also required for trafficking of Ste3 and the lipophilic dye FM4-64 from the plasma membrane to the vacuole at the level of the endosome. The combined genetic and cell biology data are consistent with regulation of endosome trafficking being a major role for Sec14. We further determined that lipid ligand occupancy differentially regulates Sec14 functions.

  9. Neural activity selects myosin IIB and VI with a specific time window in distinct dynamin isoform-mediated synaptic vesicle reuse pathways.

    PubMed

    Hayashida, Michikata; Tanifuji, Shota; Ma, Huan; Murakami, Noriko; Mochida, Sumiko

    2015-06-10

    Presynaptic nerve terminals must maintain stable neurotransmissions via synaptic vesicle (SV) resupply despite encountering wide fluctuations in the number and frequency of incoming action potentials (APs). However, the molecular mechanism linking variation in neural activity to SV resupply is unknown. Myosins II and VI are actin-based cytoskeletal motors that drive dendritic actin dynamics and membrane transport, respectively, at brain synapses. Here we combined genetic knockdown or molecular dysfunction and direct physiological measurement of fast synaptic transmission from paired rat superior cervical ganglion neurons in culture to show that myosins IIB and VI work individually in SV reuse pathways, having distinct dependency and time constants with physiological AP frequency. Myosin VI resupplied the readily releasable pool (RRP) with slow kinetics independently of firing rates but acted quickly within 50 ms after AP. Under high-frequency AP firing, myosin IIB resupplied the RRP with fast kinetics in a slower time window of 200 ms. Knockdown of both myosin and dynamin isoforms by mixed siRNA microinjection revealed that myosin IIB-mediated SV resupply follows amphiphysin/dynamin-1-mediated endocytosis, while myosin VI-mediated SV resupply follows dynamin-3-mediated endocytosis. Collectively, our findings show how distinct myosin isoforms work as vesicle motors in appropriate SV reuse pathways associated with specific firing patterns. PMID:26063922

  10. Differential regulation of oxidative burst by distinct β-glucan-binding receptors and signaling pathways in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Bose, Nandita; Wurst, Lindsay R; Chan, Anissa S H; Dudney, Christine M; LeRoux, Megan L; Danielson, Michael E; Will, Paul M; Nodland, Sonja E; Patchen, Myra L; Dalle Lucca, Jurandir J; Lebeda, Frank J; Vasilakos, John P

    2014-04-01

    β-Glucans possess broad immunomodulatory properties, including activation of innate immune functions such as oxidative burst activity. The differential roles of complement receptor type 3 (CR3) and Dectin-1, the known β-glucan receptors, and their associated signaling pathways in the generation of oxidative burst induced by different physical forms of Saccharomyces cerevisiae-derived β-glucan were examined in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). In this study whole glucan particle (WGP) or immobilized soluble β-glucan (ISG) was used to represent the phagocytizable or the nonphagocytizable form of a fungus, respectively. Oxidative burst as measured by the formation of superoxide (SO) was detected in PBMC in response to WGP and ISG. SO induction with WGP was concluded to be Dectin-1-mediated and required Src family kinases, phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase and protein kinase B/Akt. In contrast, the SO induction generated by ISG was CR3-mediated and required focal adhesion kinase, spleen tyrosine kinase, phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase, Akt, p38 mitogen activated protein kinase, phospholipase C and protein kinase C. The study results support the hypothesis that human PBMC, specifically monocytes, utilize distinct receptors and overlapping, but distinct, signaling pathways for the oxidative burst in response to challenge by different physical forms of β-glucan.

  11. A new member of the psToc159 family contributes to distinct protein targeting pathways in pea chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Chang, WaiLing; Soll, Jürgen; Bölter, Bettina

    2014-01-01

    Protein import into chloroplasts relies on specific targeting of preproteins from the cytosol to the organelles and coordinated translocation processes across the double envelope membrane. Here, two complex machineries constitute the so called general import pathway, which consists of the TOC and TIC complexes (translocon at the outer envelope of chloroplasts and translocon at the inner envelope of chloroplasts, respectively). The majority of canonical preproteins feature an N-terminal cleavable transit peptide, which is necessary for targeting and recognition at the chloroplast surface by receptors of TOC, where Toc159 acts as the primary contact site. We identified a non-canonical preprotein without the classical transit peptide, the superoxide dismutase (FSD1), which was then used in chemical crosslinking approaches to find new interaction partners at the outer envelope from pea chloroplasts. In this way we could link FSD1 to members of the Toc159 family in pea, namely psToc132 and psToc120. Using deletion mutants as well as a peptide scanning approach we defined regions of the preprotein, which are involved in receptor binding. These are distributed across the entire sequence; however the extreme N-terminus as well as a C-proximal domain turned out to be essential for targeting and import. En route into the plastid FSD1 engages components of the general import pathway, implying that in spite of the non-canonical targeting information and recognition by a specific receptor this preprotein follows a similar way across the envelope as the majority of plastid preproteins.

  12. Erythropoietin activates two distinct signaling pathways required for the initiation and the elongation of c-myc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C.; Sytkowski, A. J.

    2001-01-01

    Erythropoietin (Epo) stimulation of erythroid cells results in the activation of several kinases and a rapid induction of c-myc expression. Protein kinase C is necessary for Epo up-regulation of c-myc by promoting elongation at the 3'-end of exon 1. PKCepsilon mediates this signal. We now show that Epo triggers two signaling pathways to c-myc. Epo rapidly up-regulated Myc protein in BaF3-EpoR cells. The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002 blocked Myc up-regulation in a concentration-dependent manner but had no effect on the Epo-induced phosphorylation of ERK1 and ERK2. LY294002 also had no effect on Epo up-regulation of c-fos. MEK1 inhibitor PD98059 blocked both the c-myc and the c-fos responses to Epo. PD98059 and the PKC inhibitor H7 also blocked the phosphorylation of ERK1 and ERK2. PD98059 but not LY294002 inhibited Epo induction of ERK1 and ERK2 phosphorylation in normal erythroid cells. LY294002 blocked transcription of c-myc at exon 1. PD98059 had no effect on transcription from exon 1 but, rather, blocked Epo-induced c-myc elongation at the 3'-end of exon 1. These results identify two Epo signaling pathways to c-myc, one of which is PI3K-dependent operating on transcriptional initiation, whereas the other is mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent operating on elongation.

  13. The endocannabinoid system in renal cells: regulation of Na+ transport by CB1 receptors through distinct cell signalling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Sampaio, L S; Taveira Da Silva, R; Lima, D; Sampaio, C L C; Iannotti, F A; Mazzarella, E; Di Marzo, V; Vieyra, A; Reis, R A M; Einicker-Lamas, M

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose The function of the endocannabinoid system (ECS) in renal tissue is not completely understood. Kidney function is closely related to ion reabsorption in the proximal tubule, the nephron segment responsible for the re-absorption of 70–80% of the filtrate. We studied the effect of compounds modulating the activity of cannabinoid (CB) receptors on the active re-absorption of Na+ in LLC-PK1 cells. Experimental Approach Changes in Na+/K+-ATPase activity were assessed after treatment with WIN55,212-2 (WIN), a non-selective lipid agonist, and haemopressin (HP), an inverse peptide agonist at CB1 receptors. Pharmacological tools were used to investigate the signalling pathways involved in the modulation of Na+ transport. Key Results In addition to CB1 and CB2 receptors and TRPV1 channels, the mRNAs encoding for enzymes of the ECS were also expressed in LLC-PK1. WIN (10−7 M) and HP (10−6 M) altered Na+ re-absorption in LLC-PK1 in a dual manner. They both acutely (after 1 min) increased Na+/K+-ATPase activity in a TRPV1 antagonist-sensitive way. WIN's stimulating effect persisted for 30 min, and this effect was partially blocked by a CB1 antagonist or a PKC inhibitor. In contrast, HP inhibited Na+/K+-ATPase after 30 min incubation, and this effect was attenuated by a CB1 antagonist or a PKA inhibitor. Conclusion and Implications The ECS is expressed in LLC-PK1 cells. Both CB1 receptors and TRPV1 channels regulate Na+/K+-ATPase activity in these cells, and are modulated by lipid and peptide CB1 receptor ligands, which act via different signalling pathways. PMID:25537261

  14. A new member of the psToc159 family contributes to distinct protein targeting pathways in pea chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Chang, WaiLing; Soll, Jürgen; Bölter, Bettina

    2014-01-01

    Protein import into chloroplasts relies on specific targeting of preproteins from the cytosol to the organelles and coordinated translocation processes across the double envelope membrane. Here, two complex machineries constitute the so called general import pathway, which consists of the TOC and TIC complexes (translocon at the outer envelope of chloroplasts and translocon at the inner envelope of chloroplasts, respectively). The majority of canonical preproteins feature an N-terminal cleavable transit peptide, which is necessary for targeting and recognition at the chloroplast surface by receptors of TOC, where Toc159 acts as the primary contact site. We identified a non-canonical preprotein without the classical transit peptide, the superoxide dismutase (FSD1), which was then used in chemical crosslinking approaches to find new interaction partners at the outer envelope from pea chloroplasts. In this way we could link FSD1 to members of the Toc159 family in pea, namely psToc132 and psToc120. Using deletion mutants as well as a peptide scanning approach we defined regions of the preprotein, which are involved in receptor binding. These are distributed across the entire sequence; however the extreme N-terminus as well as a C-proximal domain turned out to be essential for targeting and import. En route into the plastid FSD1 engages components of the general import pathway, implying that in spite of the non-canonical targeting information and recognition by a specific receptor this preprotein follows a similar way across the envelope as the majority of plastid preproteins. PMID:24904628

  15. Comparison of hepatic transcription profiles of locked ribonucleic acid antisense oligonucleotides: evidence of distinct pathways contributing to non-target mediated toxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Kakiuchi-Kiyota, Satoko; Koza-Taylor, Petra H; Mantena, Srinivasa R; Nelms, Linda F; Enayetallah, Ahmed E; Hollingshead, Brett D; Burdick, Andrew D; Reed, Lori A; Warneke, James A; Whiteley, Lawrence O; Ryan, Anne M; Mathialagan, Nagappan

    2014-03-01

    Development of LNA gapmers, antisense oligonucleotides used for efficient inhibition of target RNA expression, is limited by non-target mediated hepatotoxicity issues. In the present study, we investigated hepatic transcription profiles of mice administered non-toxic and toxic LNA gapmers. After repeated administration, a toxic LNA gapmer (TS-2), but not a non-toxic LNA gapmer (NTS-1), caused hepatocyte necrosis and increased serum alanine aminotransferase levels. Microarray data revealed that, in addition to gene expression patterns consistent with hepatotoxicity, 17 genes in the clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) pathway were altered in the TS-2 group. TS-2 significantly down-regulated myosin 1E (Myo1E), which is involved in release of clathrin-coated pits from plasma membranes. To map the earliest transcription changes associated with LNA gapmer-induced hepatotoxicity, a second microarray analysis was performed using NTS-1, TS-2, and a severely toxic LNA gapmer (HTS-3) at 8, 16, and 72 h following a single administration in mice. The only histopathological change observed was minor hepatic hypertrophy in all LNA groups across time points. NTS-1, but not 2 toxic LNA gapmers, increased immune response genes at 8 and 16 h but not at 72 h. TS-2 significantly perturbed the CME pathway only at 72 h, while Myo1E levels were decreased at all time points. In contrast, HTS-3 modulated DNA damage pathway genes at 8 and 16 h and also modulated the CME pathway genes (but not Myo1E) at 16 h. Our results may suggest that different LNAs modulate distinct transcriptional genes and pathways contributing to non-target mediated hepatotoxicity in mice. PMID:24336348

  16. Comparison of hepatic transcription profiles of locked ribonucleic acid antisense oligonucleotides: evidence of distinct pathways contributing to non-target mediated toxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Kakiuchi-Kiyota, Satoko; Koza-Taylor, Petra H; Mantena, Srinivasa R; Nelms, Linda F; Enayetallah, Ahmed E; Hollingshead, Brett D; Burdick, Andrew D; Reed, Lori A; Warneke, James A; Whiteley, Lawrence O; Ryan, Anne M; Mathialagan, Nagappan

    2014-03-01

    Development of LNA gapmers, antisense oligonucleotides used for efficient inhibition of target RNA expression, is limited by non-target mediated hepatotoxicity issues. In the present study, we investigated hepatic transcription profiles of mice administered non-toxic and toxic LNA gapmers. After repeated administration, a toxic LNA gapmer (TS-2), but not a non-toxic LNA gapmer (NTS-1), caused hepatocyte necrosis and increased serum alanine aminotransferase levels. Microarray data revealed that, in addition to gene expression patterns consistent with hepatotoxicity, 17 genes in the clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) pathway were altered in the TS-2 group. TS-2 significantly down-regulated myosin 1E (Myo1E), which is involved in release of clathrin-coated pits from plasma membranes. To map the earliest transcription changes associated with LNA gapmer-induced hepatotoxicity, a second microarray analysis was performed using NTS-1, TS-2, and a severely toxic LNA gapmer (HTS-3) at 8, 16, and 72 h following a single administration in mice. The only histopathological change observed was minor hepatic hypertrophy in all LNA groups across time points. NTS-1, but not 2 toxic LNA gapmers, increased immune response genes at 8 and 16 h but not at 72 h. TS-2 significantly perturbed the CME pathway only at 72 h, while Myo1E levels were decreased at all time points. In contrast, HTS-3 modulated DNA damage pathway genes at 8 and 16 h and also modulated the CME pathway genes (but not Myo1E) at 16 h. Our results may suggest that different LNAs modulate distinct transcriptional genes and pathways contributing to non-target mediated hepatotoxicity in mice.

  17. Mutant Allele-Specific Uncoupling of PENETRATION3 Functions Reveals Engagement of the ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter in Distinct Tryptophan Metabolic Pathways1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xunli; Dittgen, Jan; Piślewska-Bednarek, Mariola; Molina, Antonio; Schneider, Bernd; Doubský, Jan; Schneeberger, Korbinian; Schulze-Lefert, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) PENETRATION (PEN) genes quantitatively contribute to the execution of different forms of plant immunity upon challenge with diverse leaf pathogens. PEN3 encodes a plasma membrane-resident pleiotropic drug resistance-type ATP-binding cassette transporter and is thought to act in a pathogen-inducible and PEN2 myrosinase-dependent metabolic pathway in extracellular defense. This metabolic pathway directs the intracellular biosynthesis and activation of tryptophan-derived indole glucosinolates for subsequent PEN3-mediated efflux across the plasma membrane at pathogen contact sites. However, PEN3 also functions in abiotic stress responses to cadmium and indole-3-butyric acid (IBA)-mediated auxin homeostasis in roots, raising the possibility that PEN3 exports multiple functionally unrelated substrates. Here, we describe the isolation of a pen3 allele, designated pen3-5, that encodes a dysfunctional protein that accumulates in planta like wild-type PEN3. The specific mutation in pen3-5 uncouples PEN3 functions in IBA-stimulated root growth modulation, callose deposition induced with a conserved peptide epitope of bacterial flagellin (flg22), and pathogen-inducible salicylic acid accumulation from PEN3 activity in extracellular defense, indicating the engagement of multiple PEN3 substrates in different PEN3-dependent biological processes. We identified 4-O-β-d-glucosyl-indol-3-yl formamide (4OGlcI3F) as a pathogen-inducible, tryptophan-derived compound that overaccumulates in pen3 leaf tissue and has biosynthesis that is dependent on an intact PEN2 metabolic pathway. We propose that a precursor of 4OGlcI3F is the PEN3 substrate in extracellular pathogen defense. These precursors, the shared indole core present in IBA and 4OGlcI3F, and allele-specific uncoupling of a subset of PEN3 functions suggest that PEN3 transports distinct indole-type metabolites in distinct biological processes. PMID:26023163

  18. Mutant Allele-Specific Uncoupling of PENETRATION3 Functions Reveals Engagement of the ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter in Distinct Tryptophan Metabolic Pathways.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xunli; Dittgen, Jan; Piślewska-Bednarek, Mariola; Molina, Antonio; Schneider, Bernd; Svatoš, Aleš; Doubský, Jan; Schneeberger, Korbinian; Weigel, Detlef; Bednarek, Paweł; Schulze-Lefert, Paul

    2015-07-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) penetration (PEN) genes quantitatively contribute to the execution of different forms of plant immunity upon challenge with diverse leaf pathogens. PEN3 encodes a plasma membrane-resident pleiotropic drug resistance-type ATP-binding cassette transporter and is thought to act in a pathogen-inducible and PEN2 myrosinase-dependent metabolic pathway in extracellular defense. This metabolic pathway directs the intracellular biosynthesis and activation of tryptophan-derived indole glucosinolates for subsequent PEN3-mediated efflux across the plasma membrane at pathogen contact sites. However, PEN3 also functions in abiotic stress responses to cadmium and indole-3-butyric acid (IBA)-mediated auxin homeostasis in roots, raising the possibility that PEN3 exports multiple functionally unrelated substrates. Here, we describe the isolation of a pen3 allele, designated pen3-5, that encodes a dysfunctional protein that accumulates in planta like wild-type PEN3. The specific mutation in pen3-5 uncouples PEN3 functions in IBA-stimulated root growth modulation, callose deposition induced with a conserved peptide epitope of bacterial flagellin (flg22), and pathogen-inducible salicylic acid accumulation from PEN3 activity in extracellular defense, indicating the engagement of multiple PEN3 substrates in different PEN3-dependent biological processes. We identified 4-O-β-D-glucosyl-indol-3-yl formamide (4OGlcI3F) as a pathogen-inducible, tryptophan-derived compound that overaccumulates in pen3 leaf tissue and has biosynthesis that is dependent on an intact PEN2 metabolic pathway. We propose that a precursor of 4OGlcI3F is the PEN3 substrate in extracellular pathogen defense. These precursors, the shared indole core present in IBA and 4OGlcI3F, and allele-specific uncoupling of a subset of PEN3 functions suggest that PEN3 transports distinct indole-type metabolites in distinct biological processes.

  19. AP-1 and AP-3 mediate sorting of melanosomal and lysosomal membrane proteins into distinct post-Golgi trafficking pathways.

    PubMed

    Chapuy, Björn; Tikkanen, Ritva; Mühlhausen, Chris; Wenzel, Dirk; von Figura, Kurt; Höning, Stefan

    2008-07-01

    The adaptor complexes AP-1 and AP-3 are localized to endosomes and/or the trans Golgi network (TGN). Because of limitations in analysing intracellular adaptor function directly, their site of function is a matter of ongoing uncertainty. To overcome this problem and to analyse adaptor sorting at the TGN, we reconstituted vesicle formation from Golgi/TGN-enriched membranes in a novel in vitro budding assay. Melanocytes were metabolically labelled followed by a 19 degrees C temperature block to accumulate newly synthesized proteins in Golgi membranes, which were then enriched by subcellular fractionation and used as donor membranes for vesicle formation in vitro. The incorporation of the melanosomal proteins tyrosinase and tyrosinase-related protein 1 (TRP-1) as well as Lamp-1 and 46 kDa mannose-6-phosphate receptor (MPR46) into Golgi/TGN-derived vesicles was temperature, nucleotide, cytosol, ADP ribosylation factor 1 and adaptor dependent. We show that sorting of TRP-1 and MPR46 was AP-1 dependent, while budding of tyrosinase and Lamp-1 required AP-3. Depletion of clathrin inhibited sorting of all four cargo proteins, suggesting that AP-1 and AP-3 are involved in the formation of distinct types of clathrin-coated vesicles, each of which is characterized by the incorporation of specific cargo membrane proteins.

  20. Distinct abscisic acid signaling pathways for modulation of guard cell versus mesophyll cell potassium channels revealed by expression studies in Xenopus laevis oocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutton, F.; Paul, S. S.; Wang, X. Q.; Assmann, S. M.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Regulation of guard cell ion transport by abscisic acid (ABA) and in particular ABA inhibition of a guard cell inward K(+) current (I(Kin)) is well documented. However, little is known concerning ABA effects on ion transport in other plant cell types. Here we applied patch clamp techniques to mesophyll cell protoplasts of fava bean (Vicia faba cv Long Pod) plants and demonstrated ABA inhibition of an outward K(+) current (I(Kout)). When mesophyll cell protoplast mRNA (mesophyll mRNA) was expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, I(Kout) was generated that displayed similar properties to I(Kout) observed from direct analysis of mesophyll cell protoplasts. I(Kout) expressed by mesophyll mRNA-injected oocytes was inhibited by ABA, indicating that the ABA signal transduction pathway observed in mesophyll cells was preserved in the frog oocytes. Co-injection of oocytes with guard cell protoplast mRNA and cRNA for KAT1, an inward K(+) channel expressed in guard cells, resulted in I(Kin) that was similarly inhibited by ABA. However, oocytes co-injected with mesophyll mRNA and KAT1 cRNA produced I(Kin) that was not inhibited by ABA. These results demonstrate that the mesophyll-encoded signaling mechanism could not substitute for the guard cell pathway. These findings indicate that mesophyll cells and guard cells use distinct and different receptor types and/or signal transduction pathways in ABA regulation of K(+) channels.

  1. Different modulation of the outputs of yeast MAPK-mediated pathways by distinct stimuli and isoforms of the dual-specificity phosphatase Msg5.

    PubMed

    Marín, María José; Flández, Marta; Bermejo, Clara; Arroyo, Javier; Martín, Humberto; Molina, María

    2009-03-01

    The activity of protein phosphatases on mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKS) is essential in the modulation of the final outcome of MAPK-signalling pathways. The yeast dual-specificity phosphatase (DSP) Msg5, expressed as two isoforms of different length, dephosphorylates the MAPKs of mating and cell integrity pathways, Fus3 and Slt2, respectively, but its action on the MAPK Kss1 is unclear. Here we analyse the global impact of Msg5 on the yeast transcriptome. Both Fus3- and Slt2- but not Kss1-mediated gene expression is induced in cells lacking Msg5. However, although these cells show high Slt2 phosphorylation, the Rlm1-dependent Slt2-regulated transcriptional response is weak. Therefore, mechanisms concomitant with Slt2 phosphorylation are required for a strong Rlm1 activation. The limited Slt2 activity on Rlm1 is not a specific effect on this substrate but a consequence of its low kinase activity in msg5Delta cells. Lack of Msg5 does not increase Kss1 phosphorylation although both proteins physically interact. Both Msg5 isoforms interact similarly with Slt2, whereas the long form binds Fus3 with higher affinity and consequently down-regulates it more efficiently than the short one. We propose that specific binding of DSP isoforms to distinct MAPKs provides a novel mechanism for fine tuning different pathways by the same phosphatase. PMID:19123063

  2. Distinct abscisic acid signaling pathways for modulation of guard cell versus mesophyll cell potassium channels revealed by expression studies in Xenopus laevis oocytes.

    PubMed

    Sutton, F; Paul, S S; Wang, X Q; Assmann, S M

    2000-09-01

    Regulation of guard cell ion transport by abscisic acid (ABA) and in particular ABA inhibition of a guard cell inward K(+) current (I(Kin)) is well documented. However, little is known concerning ABA effects on ion transport in other plant cell types. Here we applied patch clamp techniques to mesophyll cell protoplasts of fava bean (Vicia faba cv Long Pod) plants and demonstrated ABA inhibition of an outward K(+) current (I(Kout)). When mesophyll cell protoplast mRNA (mesophyll mRNA) was expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, I(Kout) was generated that displayed similar properties to I(Kout) observed from direct analysis of mesophyll cell protoplasts. I(Kout) expressed by mesophyll mRNA-injected oocytes was inhibited by ABA, indicating that the ABA signal transduction pathway observed in mesophyll cells was preserved in the frog oocytes. Co-injection of oocytes with guard cell protoplast mRNA and cRNA for KAT1, an inward K(+) channel expressed in guard cells, resulted in I(Kin) that was similarly inhibited by ABA. However, oocytes co-injected with mesophyll mRNA and KAT1 cRNA produced I(Kin) that was not inhibited by ABA. These results demonstrate that the mesophyll-encoded signaling mechanism could not substitute for the guard cell pathway. These findings indicate that mesophyll cells and guard cells use distinct and different receptor types and/or signal transduction pathways in ABA regulation of K(+) channels. PMID:10982437

  3. Cytokeratin and protein expression patterns in squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity provide evidence for two distinct pathogenetic pathways

    PubMed Central

    FROHWITTER, GESCHE; BUERGER, HORST; VAN DIEST, PAUL J.; KORSCHING, EBERHARD; KLEINHEINZ, JOHANNES; FILLIES, THOMAS

    2016-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oral cavity is a morphological heterogeneous disease. Various cytokeratin (CK) expression patterns with different prognostic values have been described, but little is known concerning the underlying biological cell mechanisms. Therefore, the present study investigated 193 cases of oral SCCs using immunohistochemistry for α/β/γ-catenin, glucose transporter 1, caspase-3, X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein, hypoxia inducible factor-1α, carbonic anhydrase 9, heat shock protein (hsp) 70, mast/stem cell growth factor receptor, p21, p27, p16, p53, B-cell lymphoma 6, epidermal growth factor receptor, cyclin D1 and CK1, 5/6, 8/18, 10, 14 and 19. Expression patterns were analyzed with biomathematical permutation analysis. The present results revealed a significant association between the expression of low-molecular weight CK8/18 and 19 and a high-tumor grade, β and γ-catenin expression, deregulated cell cycle proteins and a predominant localization of the tumor on the floor of the mouth. By contrast, expression of high-molecular weight CK1, 5/6, 10 and 14 was significantly associated with the expression of p21 and hsp70. In conclusion, the current study presents evidence for the existence of two parallel pathogenetic pathways in oral SCCs, characterized by the expression of low- and high-molecular weight CKs. Additional studies are required to demonstrate the extent that these results may be used to improve therapeutic regimens. PMID:27347109

  4. The ethanol metabolite acetaldehyde induces water and salt intake via two distinct pathways in the central nervous system of rats.

    PubMed

    Ujihara, Izumi; Hitomi, Suzuro; Ono, Kentaro; Kakinoki, Yasuaki; Hashimoto, Hirofumi; Ueta, Yoichi; Inenaga, Kiyotoshi

    2015-12-01

    The sensation of thirst experienced after heavy alcohol drinking is widely regarded as a consequence of ethanol (EtOH)-induced diuresis, but EtOH in high doses actually induces anti-diuresis. The present study was designed to investigate the introduction mechanism of water and salt intake after heavy alcohol drinking, focusing on action of acetaldehyde, a metabolite of EtOH and a toxic substance, using rats. The aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) inhibitor cyanamide was used to mimic the effect of prolonged acetaldehyde exposure because acetaldehyde is quickly degraded by ALDH. Systemic administration of a high-dose of EtOH at 2.5 g/kg induced water and salt intake with anti-diuresis. Cyanamide enhanced the fluid intake following EtOH and acetaldehyde administration. Systemic administration of acetaldehyde with cyanamide suppressed blood pressure and increased plasma renin activity. Blockade of central angiotensin receptor AT1R suppressed the acetaldehyde-induced fluid intake and c-Fos expression in the circumventricular organs (CVOs), which form part of dipsogenic mechanism in the brain. In addition, central administration of acetaldehyde together with cyanamide selectively induced water but not salt intake without changes in blood pressure. In electrophysiological recordings from slice preparations, acetaldehyde specifically excited angiotensin-sensitive neurons in the CVO. These results suggest that acetaldehyde evokes the thirst sensation following heavy alcohol drinking, by two distinct and previously unsuspected mechanisms, independent of diuresis. First acetaldehyde indirectly activates AT1R in the dipsogenic centers via the peripheral renin-angiotensin system following the depressor response and induces both water and salt intake. Secondly acetaldehyde directly activates neurons in the dipsogenic centers and induces only water intake.

  5. Endothelial and Neuronal Nitric Oxide Activate Distinct Pathways on Sympathetic Neurotransmission in Rat Tail and Mesenteric Arteries.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Joana Beatriz; Vieira-Rocha, Maria Sofia; Arribas, Silvia M; González, Maria Carmen; Fresco, Paula; Diniz, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) seems to contribute to vascular homeostasis regulating neurotransmission. This work aimed at assessing the influence of NO from different sources and respective intracellular pathways on sympathetic neurotransmission, in two vascular beds. Electrically-evoked [3H]-noradrenaline release was assessed in rat mesenteric and tail arteries in the presence of NO donors or endothelial/neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors. The influence of NO on adenosine-mediated effects was also studied using selective antagonists for adenosine receptors subtypes. Location of neuronal NOS (nNOS) was investigated by immunohistochemistry (with specific antibodies for nNOS and for Schwann cells) and Confocal Microscopy. Results indicated that: 1) in mesenteric arteries, noradrenaline release was reduced by NO donors and it was increased by nNOS inhibitors; the effect of NO donors was only abolished by the adenosine A1 receptors antagonist; 2) in tail arteries, noradrenaline release was increased by NO donors and it was reduced by eNOS inhibitors; adenosine receptors antagonists were devoid of effect; 3) confocal microscopy showed nNOS staining in adventitial cells, some co-localized with Schwann cells. nNOS staining and its co-localization with Schwann cells were significantly lower in tail compared to mesenteric arteries. In conclusion, in mesenteric arteries, nNOS, mainly located in Schwann cells, seems to be the main source of NO influencing perivascular sympathetic neurotransmission with an inhibitory effect, mediated by adenosine A1 receptors activation. Instead, in tail arteries endothelial NO seems to play a more relevant role and has a facilitatory effect, independent of adenosine receptors activation.

  6. Distinct muscle apoptotic pathways are activated in muscles with different fiber types in a rat model of critical illness myopathy.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Benjamin T; Confides, Amy L; Rich, Mark M; Dupont-Versteegden, Esther E

    2015-06-01

    Critical illness myopathy (CIM) is associated with severe muscle atrophy and fatigue in affected patients. Apoptotic signaling is involved in atrophy and is elevated in muscles from patients with CIM. In this study we investigated underlying mechanisms of apoptosis-related pathways in muscles with different fiber type composition in a rat model of CIM using denervation and glucocorticoid administration (denervation and steroid-induced myopathy, DSIM). Soleus and tibialis anterior (TA) muscles showed severe muscle atrophy (40-60% of control muscle weight) and significant apoptosis in interstitial as well as myofiber nuclei that was similar between the two muscles with DSIM. Caspase-3 and -8 activities, but not caspase-9 and -12, were elevated in TA and not in soleus muscle, while the caspase-independent proteins endonuclease G (EndoG) and apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) were not changed in abundance nor differentially localized in either muscle. Anti-apoptotic proteins HSP70, -27, and apoptosis repressor with a caspase recruitment domain (ARC) were elevated in soleus compared to TA muscle and ARC was significantly decreased with induction of DSIM in soleus. Results indicate that apoptosis is a significant process associated with DSIM in both soleus and TA muscles, and that apoptosis-associated processes are differentially regulated in muscles of different function and fiber type undergoing atrophy due to DSIM. We conclude that interventions combating apoptosis with CIM may need to be directed towards inhibiting caspase-dependent as well as -independent mechanisms to be able to affect muscles of all fiber types.

  7. Endothelial and Neuronal Nitric Oxide Activate Distinct Pathways on Sympathetic Neurotransmission in Rat Tail and Mesenteric Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Joana Beatriz; Vieira-Rocha, Maria Sofia; Arribas, Silvia M.; González, Maria Carmen; Fresco, Paula; Diniz, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) seems to contribute to vascular homeostasis regulating neurotransmission. This work aimed at assessing the influence of NO from different sources and respective intracellular pathways on sympathetic neurotransmission, in two vascular beds. Electrically-evoked [3H]-noradrenaline release was assessed in rat mesenteric and tail arteries in the presence of NO donors or endothelial/neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors. The influence of NO on adenosine-mediated effects was also studied using selective antagonists for adenosine receptors subtypes. Location of neuronal NOS (nNOS) was investigated by immunohistochemistry (with specific antibodies for nNOS and for Schwann cells) and Confocal Microscopy. Results indicated that: 1) in mesenteric arteries, noradrenaline release was reduced by NO donors and it was increased by nNOS inhibitors; the effect of NO donors was only abolished by the adenosine A1 receptors antagonist; 2) in tail arteries, noradrenaline release was increased by NO donors and it was reduced by eNOS inhibitors; adenosine receptors antagonists were devoid of effect; 3) confocal microscopy showed nNOS staining in adventitial cells, some co-localized with Schwann cells. nNOS staining and its co-localization with Schwann cells were significantly lower in tail compared to mesenteric arteries. In conclusion, in mesenteric arteries, nNOS, mainly located in Schwann cells, seems to be the main source of NO influencing perivascular sympathetic neurotransmission with an inhibitory effect, mediated by adenosine A1 receptors activation. Instead, in tail arteries endothelial NO seems to play a more relevant role and has a facilitatory effect, independent of adenosine receptors activation. PMID:26075386

  8. Endothelial and Neuronal Nitric Oxide Activate Distinct Pathways on Sympathetic Neurotransmission in Rat Tail and Mesenteric Arteries.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Joana Beatriz; Vieira-Rocha, Maria Sofia; Arribas, Silvia M; González, Maria Carmen; Fresco, Paula; Diniz, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) seems to contribute to vascular homeostasis regulating neurotransmission. This work aimed at assessing the influence of NO from different sources and respective intracellular pathways on sympathetic neurotransmission, in two vascular beds. Electrically-evoked [3H]-noradrenaline release was assessed in rat mesenteric and tail arteries in the presence of NO donors or endothelial/neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors. The influence of NO on adenosine-mediated effects was also studied using selective antagonists for adenosine receptors subtypes. Location of neuronal NOS (nNOS) was investigated by immunohistochemistry (with specific antibodies for nNOS and for Schwann cells) and Confocal Microscopy. Results indicated that: 1) in mesenteric arteries, noradrenaline release was reduced by NO donors and it was increased by nNOS inhibitors; the effect of NO donors was only abolished by the adenosine A1 receptors antagonist; 2) in tail arteries, noradrenaline release was increased by NO donors and it was reduced by eNOS inhibitors; adenosine receptors antagonists were devoid of effect; 3) confocal microscopy showed nNOS staining in adventitial cells, some co-localized with Schwann cells. nNOS staining and its co-localization with Schwann cells were significantly lower in tail compared to mesenteric arteries. In conclusion, in mesenteric arteries, nNOS, mainly located in Schwann cells, seems to be the main source of NO influencing perivascular sympathetic neurotransmission with an inhibitory effect, mediated by adenosine A1 receptors activation. Instead, in tail arteries endothelial NO seems to play a more relevant role and has a facilitatory effect, independent of adenosine receptors activation. PMID:26075386

  9. Distinct effects of folate pathway genes MTHFR and MTHFD1L on ruminative response style: a potential risk mechanism for depression.

    PubMed

    Eszlari, N; Kovacs, D; Petschner, P; Pap, D; Gonda, X; Elliott, R; Anderson, I M; Deakin, J F W; Bagdy, G; Juhasz, G

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in the folate pathway have been related to both major depression and cognitive inflexibility; however, they have not been investigated in the genetic background of ruminative response style, which is a form of perseverative cognition and a risk factor for depression. In the present study, we explored the association of rumination (measured by the Ruminative Responses Scale) with polymorphisms of two distinct folate pathway genes, MTHFR rs1801133 (C677T) and MTHFD1L rs11754661, in a combined European white sample from Budapest, Hungary (n=895) and Manchester, United Kingdom (n=1309). Post hoc analysis investigated whether the association could be replicated in each of the two samples, and the relationship between folate pathway genes, rumination, lifetime depression and Brief Symptom Inventory depression score. Despite its functional effect on folate metabolism, the MTHFR rs1801133 showed no effect on rumination. However, the A allele of MTHFD1L rs11754661 was significantly associated with greater rumination, and this effect was replicated in both the Budapest and Manchester samples. In addition, rumination completely mediated the effects of MTHFD1L rs11754661 on depression phenotypes. These findings suggest that the MTHFD1L gene, and thus the C1-THF synthase enzyme of the folate pathway localized in mitochondria, has an important effect on the pathophysiology of depression through rumination, and maybe via this cognitive intermediate phenotype on other mental and physical disorders. Further research should unravel whether the reversible metabolic effect of MTHFD1L is responsible for increased rumination or other long-term effects on brain development. PMID:26926881

  10. Distinct effects of folate pathway genes MTHFR and MTHFD1L on ruminative response style: a potential risk mechanism for depression

    PubMed Central

    Eszlari, N; Kovacs, D; Petschner, P; Pap, D; Gonda, X; Elliott, R; Anderson, I M; Deakin, J F W; Bagdy, G; Juhasz, G

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in the folate pathway have been related to both major depression and cognitive inflexibility; however, they have not been investigated in the genetic background of ruminative response style, which is a form of perseverative cognition and a risk factor for depression. In the present study, we explored the association of rumination (measured by the Ruminative Responses Scale) with polymorphisms of two distinct folate pathway genes, MTHFR rs1801133 (C677T) and MTHFD1L rs11754661, in a combined European white sample from Budapest, Hungary (n=895) and Manchester, United Kingdom (n=1309). Post hoc analysis investigated whether the association could be replicated in each of the two samples, and the relationship between folate pathway genes, rumination, lifetime depression and Brief Symptom Inventory depression score. Despite its functional effect on folate metabolism, the MTHFR rs1801133 showed no effect on rumination. However, the A allele of MTHFD1L rs11754661 was significantly associated with greater rumination, and this effect was replicated in both the Budapest and Manchester samples. In addition, rumination completely mediated the effects of MTHFD1L rs11754661 on depression phenotypes. These findings suggest that the MTHFD1L gene, and thus the C1-THF synthase enzyme of the folate pathway localized in mitochondria, has an important effect on the pathophysiology of depression through rumination, and maybe via this cognitive intermediate phenotype on other mental and physical disorders. Further research should unravel whether the reversible metabolic effect of MTHFD1L is responsible for increased rumination or other long-term effects on brain development. PMID:26926881

  11. Proteinase-activated receptors 1 and 2 and the regulation of porcine coronary artery contractility: a role for distinct tyrosine kinase pathways

    PubMed Central

    El-Daly, Mahmoud; Saifeddine, Mahmoud; Mihara, Koichiro; Ramachandran, Rithwik; Triggle, Christopher R; Hollenberg, Morley D

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Because angiotensin-II-mediated porcine coronary artery (PCA) vasoconstriction is blocked by protein tyrosine kinase (PYK) inhibitors, we hypothesized that proteinase-activated receptors (PARs), known to regulate vascular tension, like angiotensin-II, would also cause PCA contractions via PYK-dependent signalling pathways. Experimental Approach Contractions of intact and endothelium-free isolated PCA rings, stimulated by PAR1/PAR2-activating peptides, angiotensin-II, PGF2α, EGF, PDGF and KCl, were monitored with/without multiple signalling pathway inhibitors, including AG-tyrphostins AG18 (non-specific PYKs), AG1478 (EGF-receptor kinase), AG1296 (PDGF receptor kinase), PP1 (Src kinase), U0126 and PD98059 (MEK/MAPKinase kinase), indomethacin/SC-560/NS-398 (COX-1/2) and L-NAME (NOS). Key Results AG18 inhibited the contractions induced by all the agonists except KCl, whereas U0126 attenuated contractions induced by PAR1/PAR2 agonists, EGF and angiotensin-II, but not by PGF2α, the COX-produced metabolites of arachidonate and KCl. PP1 only affected the responses to PAR1/PAR2-activating peptides and angiotensin-II. The EGF-kinase inhibitor, AG1478, attenuated contractions initiated by the PARs (PAR2 >> PAR1) and EGF itself, but not by angiotensin-II, PGF2α or KCl. COX-1/2 inhibitors blocked the contractions induced by all the agonists, except KCl and PGF2α. Conclusion and Implications PAR1/2-mediated contractions of the PCA are dependent on Src and MAPKinase and, in part, involve EGF-receptor-kinase transactivation and the generation of a COX-derived contractile agonist. However, the PYK signalling pathways used by PARs are distinct from each other and from those triggered by angiotensin-II and EGF. These signalling pathways may be therapeutic targets for managing coagulation-proteinase-induced coronary vasospasm. PMID:24506284

  12. The Hippo pathway controls border cell migration through distinct mechanisms in outer border cells and polar cells of the Drosophila ovary.

    PubMed

    Lin, Tzu-Huai; Yeh, Tsung-Han; Wang, Tsu-Wei; Yu, Jenn-Yah

    2014-11-01

    The Hippo pathway is a key signaling cascade in controlling organ size. The core components of this pathway are two kinases, Hippo (Hpo) and Warts (Wts), and a transcriptional coactivator, Yorkie (Yki). Yes-associated protein (YAP, a Yki homolog in mammals) promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition and cell migration in vitro. Here, we use border cells in the Drosophila ovary as a model to study Hippo pathway functions in cell migration in vivo. During oogenesis, polar cells secrete Unpaired (Upd), which activates JAK/STAT signaling of neighboring cells and specifies them into outer border cells. The outer border cells form a cluster with polar cells and undergo migration. We find that hpo and wts are required for migration of the border cell cluster. In outer border cells, overexpression of hpo disrupts polarization of the actin cytoskeleton and attenuates migration. In polar cells, knockdown of hpo and wts or overexpression of yki impairs border cell induction and disrupts migration. These manipulations in polar cells reduce JAK/STAT activity in outer border cells. Expression of upd-lacZ is increased and decreased in yki and hpo mutant polar cells, respectively. Furthermore, forced expression of upd in polar cells rescues defects of border cell induction and migration caused by wts knockdown. These results suggest that Yki negatively regulates border cell induction by inhibiting JAK/STAT signaling. Together, our data elucidate two distinct mechanisms of the Hippo pathway in controlling border cell migration: (1) in outer border cells, it regulates polarized distribution of the actin cytoskeleton; (2) in polar cells, it regulates upd expression to control border cell induction and migration.

  13. CtpB assembles a gated protease tunnel regulating cell-cell signaling during spore formation in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Mastny, Markus; Heuck, Alexander; Kurzbauer, Robert; Heiduk, Anja; Boisguerin, Prisca; Volkmer, Rudolf; Ehrmann, Michael; Rodrigues, Christopher D A; Rudner, David Z; Clausen, Tim

    2013-10-24

    Spore formation in Bacillus subtilis relies on a regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) pathway that synchronizes mother-cell and forespore development. To address the molecular basis of this SpoIV transmembrane signaling, we carried out a structure-function analysis of the activating protease CtpB. Crystal structures reflecting distinct functional states show that CtpB constitutes a ring-like protein scaffold penetrated by two narrow tunnels. Access to the proteolytic sites sequestered within these tunnels is controlled by PDZ domains that rearrange upon substrate binding. Accordingly, CtpB resembles a minimal version of a self-compartmentalizing protease regulated by a unique allosteric mechanism. Moreover, biochemical analysis of the PDZ-gated channel combined with sporulation assays reveal that activation of the SpoIV RIP pathway is induced by the concerted activity of CtpB and a second signaling protease, SpoIVB. This proteolytic mechanism is of broad relevance for cell-cell communication, illustrating how distinct signaling pathways can be integrated into a single RIP module.

  14. CtpB assembles a gated protease tunnel regulating cell-cell signaling during spore formation in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Mastny, Markus; Heuck, Alexander; Kurzbauer, Robert; Heiduk, Anja; Boisguerin, Prisca; Volkmer, Rudolf; Ehrmann, Michael; Rodrigues, Christopher D A; Rudner, David Z; Clausen, Tim

    2013-10-24

    Spore formation in Bacillus subtilis relies on a regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) pathway that synchronizes mother-cell and forespore development. To address the molecular basis of this SpoIV transmembrane signaling, we carried out a structure-function analysis of the activating protease CtpB. Crystal structures reflecting distinct functional states show that CtpB constitutes a ring-like protein scaffold penetrated by two narrow tunnels. Access to the proteolytic sites sequestered within these tunnels is controlled by PDZ domains that rearrange upon substrate binding. Accordingly, CtpB resembles a minimal version of a self-compartmentalizing protease regulated by a unique allosteric mechanism. Moreover, biochemical analysis of the PDZ-gated channel combined with sporulation assays reveal that activation of the SpoIV RIP pathway is induced by the concerted activity of CtpB and a second signaling protease, SpoIVB. This proteolytic mechanism is of broad relevance for cell-cell communication, illustrating how distinct signaling pathways can be integrated into a single RIP module. PMID:24243021

  15. Two distinct pathways account for EDHF-dependent dilatation in the gracilis artery of dyslipidaemic hApoB+/+ mice

    PubMed Central

    Krummen, Stéphane; Falck, John R; Thorin, Eric

    2005-01-01

    A universal endothelium-derived hyperpolarising factor (EDHF – non-NO/non-PGI2) has not been identified. EDHF, however, is essential for the physiological control of resistance artery tone. The impact of dyslipidaemia (DL), a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, on the nature and the efficacy of EDHF has not been evaluated yet. Pressurised (80 mmHg) gracilis arterial segments isolated from mice expressing the human apoB-100 and C57Bl/6 wild-type (WT) mice were used. EDHF-dependent dilatations to acetylcholine (ACh) were measured in the presence of L-NNA (100 μM, NOS inhibitor) and indomethacin (10 μM, COX inhibitor). Maximal EDHF-induced dilatations were increased in DL when compared to WT (95±2 versus 86±4% in WT; P<0.05). Combination of apamin and charybdotoxin strongly reduced (P<0.05) ACh-induced dilatation in WT (22±4%) and DL (25±5%). Combined addition of barium (Ba2+) and ouabain abolished EDHF-induced dilatations in WT arteries (13±3%; P<0.05). In vessels isolated from DL mice, however, only the addition of 14,15-EEZE (a 14,15-EET antagonist) to Ba2+ and ouabain prevented EDHF-induced dilatations (5±3% compared to 54±11% in the presence of combined Ba2+ and ouabain; P<0.05). Our data suggest that EDHF-mediated dilatation depends on the opening of endothelial SKCa and IKCa channels. This is associated with the opening of Kir channels and activation of the Na+/K+-ATPase pump on smooth muscle cells leading to dilatation. In arteries from DL mice, a cytochrome P450 metabolite likely to be 14,15-EET equally contributes to the dilatory action of ACh. The early increased efficacy of EDHF in arteries isolated from DL mice may originate from the duplication of the EDHF pathways. PMID:15765099

  16. Mechanistically Distinct Pathways of Divergent Regulatory DNA Creation Contribute to Evolution of Human-Specific Genomic Regulatory Networks Driving Phenotypic Divergence of Homo sapiens.

    PubMed

    Glinsky, Gennadi V

    2016-01-01

    Thousands of candidate human-specific regulatory sequences (HSRS) have been identified, supporting the hypothesis that unique to human phenotypes result from human-specific alterations of genomic regulatory networks. Collectively, a compendium of multiple diverse families of HSRS that are functionally and structurally divergent from Great Apes could be defined as the backbone of human-specific genomic regulatory networks. Here, the conservation patterns analysis of 18,364 candidate HSRS was carried out requiring that 100% of bases must remap during the alignments of human, chimpanzee, and bonobo sequences. A total of 5,535 candidate HSRS were identified that are: (i) highly conserved in Great Apes; (ii) evolved by the exaptation of highly conserved ancestral DNA; (iii) defined by either the acceleration of mutation rates on the human lineage or the functional divergence from non-human primates. The exaptation of highly conserved ancestral DNA pathway seems mechanistically distinct from the evolution of regulatory DNA segments driven by the species-specific expansion of transposable elements. Genome-wide proximity placement analysis of HSRS revealed that a small fraction of topologically associating domains (TADs) contain more than half of HSRS from four distinct families. TADs that are enriched for HSRS and termed rapidly evolving in humans TADs (revTADs) comprise 0.8-10.3% of 3,127 TADs in the hESC genome. RevTADs manifest distinct correlation patterns between placements of human accelerated regions, human-specific transcription factor-binding sites, and recombination rates. There is a significant enrichment within revTAD boundaries of hESC-enhancers, primate-specific CTCF-binding sites, human-specific RNAPII-binding sites, hCONDELs, and H3K4me3 peaks with human-specific enrichment at TSS in prefrontal cortex neurons (P < 0.0001 in all instances). Present analysis supports the idea that phenotypic divergence of Homo sapiens is driven by the evolution of human

  17. Mechanistically Distinct Pathways of Divergent Regulatory DNA Creation Contribute to Evolution of Human-Specific Genomic Regulatory Networks Driving Phenotypic Divergence of Homo sapiens.

    PubMed

    Glinsky, Gennadi V

    2016-09-19

    Thousands of candidate human-specific regulatory sequences (HSRS) have been identified, supporting the hypothesis that unique to human phenotypes result from human-specific alterations of genomic regulatory networks. Collectively, a compendium of multiple diverse families of HSRS that are functionally and structurally divergent from Great Apes could be defined as the backbone of human-specific genomic regulatory networks. Here, the conservation patterns analysis of 18,364 candidate HSRS was carried out requiring that 100% of bases must remap during the alignments of human, chimpanzee, and bonobo sequences. A total of 5,535 candidate HSRS were identified that are: (i) highly conserved in Great Apes; (ii) evolved by the exaptation of highly conserved ancestral DNA; (iii) defined by either the acceleration of mutation rates on the human lineage or the functional divergence from non-human primates. The exaptation of highly conserved ancestral DNA pathway seems mechanistically distinct from the evolution of regulatory DNA segments driven by the species-specific expansion of transposable elements. Genome-wide proximity placement analysis of HSRS revealed that a small fraction of topologically associating domains (TADs) contain more than half of HSRS from four distinct families. TADs that are enriched for HSRS and termed rapidly evolving in humans TADs (revTADs) comprise 0.8-10.3% of 3,127 TADs in the hESC genome. RevTADs manifest distinct correlation patterns between placements of human accelerated regions, human-specific transcription factor-binding sites, and recombination rates. There is a significant enrichment within revTAD boundaries of hESC-enhancers, primate-specific CTCF-binding sites, human-specific RNAPII-binding sites, hCONDELs, and H3K4me3 peaks with human-specific enrichment at TSS in prefrontal cortex neurons (P < 0.0001 in all instances). Present analysis supports the idea that phenotypic divergence of Homo sapiens is driven by the evolution of human

  18. Rotavirus Controls Activation of the 2′-5′-Oligoadenylate Synthetase/RNase L Pathway Using at Least Two Distinct Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Tacuba, Liliana; Rojas, Margarito; Arias, Carlos F.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The innate immune response is the first line of defense of the host cell against a viral infection. In turn, viruses have evolved a wide variety of strategies to hide from, and to directly antagonize, the host innate immune pathways. One of these pathways is the 2′-5′-oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS)/RNase L pathway. OAS is activated by double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) to produce 2′-5′ oligoadenylates, which are the activators of RNase L; this enzyme degrades viral and cellular RNAs, restricting viral infection. It has been recently found that the carboxy-terminal domain (CTD) of rotavirus VP3 has a 2′-5′-phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity that is able to functionally substitute for the PDE activity of the mouse hepatitis virus ns2 protein. This particular phosphodiesterase cleaves the 2′-5′-phosphodiester bond of the oligoadenylates, antagonizing the OAS/RNase L pathway. However, whether this activity of VP3 is relevant during the replication cycle of rotavirus is not known. Here, we demonstrate that after rotavirus infection the OAS/RNase L complex becomes activated; however, the virus is able to control its activity using at least two distinct mechanisms. A virus-cell interaction that occurs during or before rotavirus endocytosis triggers a signal that prevents the early activation of RNase L, while later on the control is taken by the newly synthesized VP3. Cosilencing the expression of VP3 and RNase L in infected cells yields viral infectious particles at levels similar to those obtained in control infected cells, where no genes were silenced, suggesting that the capping activity of VP3 is not essential for the formation of infectious viral particles. IMPORTANCE Rotaviruses represent an important cause of severe gastroenteritis in the young of many animal species, including humans. In this work, we have found that the OAS/RNase L pathway is activated during rotavirus infection, but the virus uses two different strategies to prevent the

  19. The outer membrane protease PgtE of Salmonella enterica interferes with the alternative complement pathway by cleaving factors B and H

    PubMed Central

    Riva, Rauna; Korhonen, Timo K.; Meri, Seppo

    2015-01-01

    The virulence factor PgtE is an outer membrane protease (omptin) of the zoonotic pathogen Salmonella enterica that causes diseases ranging from gastroenteritis to severe enteric fever. It is surface exposed in bacteria that have a short-chain, i.e., rough LPS, as observed e.g., in bacteria residing inside macrophages or just emerging from them. We investigated whether PgtE cleaves the complement factors B (B) and H (H), key proteins controlling formation and inactivation of the complement protein C3b and thereby the activity of the complement system. S. enterica serovar Typhimurium or omptin-expressing recombinant E. coli bacteria were incubated with purified human complement proteins or recombinant H fragments. PgtE cleaved both B and H, whereas its close homolog Pla of Yersinia pestis cleaved only H. H was cleaved at both N- and C-termini, while the central region resisted proteolysis. Because of multiple effects of PgtE on complement components (cleavage of C3, C3b, B, and H) we assessed its effect on the opsonophagocytosis of Salmonella. In human serum, C3 cleavage was dependent on proteolytically active PgtE. Human neutrophils interacted less with serum-opsonized FITC-stained S. enterica 14028R than with the isogenic ΔpgtE strain, as analyzed by flow cytometry. In conclusion, cleavage of B and H by PgtE, together with C3 cleavage, affects the C3-mediated recognition of S. enterica by human neutrophils, thus thwarting the immune protection against Salmonella. PMID:25705210

  20. Dual origin of gut proteases in Formosan subterranean termites (Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki) (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae).

    PubMed

    Sethi, Amit; Xue, Qing-Gang; La Peyre, Jerome F; Delatte, Jennifer; Husseneder, Claudia

    2011-07-01

    Cellulose digestion in lower termites, mediated by carbohydrases originating from both termite and endosymbionts, is well characterized. In contrast, limited information exists on gut proteases of lower termites, their origins and roles in termite nutrition. The objective of this study was to characterize gut proteases of the Formosan subterranean termite (Coptotermes formosanus Shiraki) (Isoptera: Rhinotermitidae). The protease activity of extracts from gut tissues (fore-, mid- and hindgut) and protozoa isolated from hindguts of termite workers was quantified using hide powder azure as a substrate and further characterized by zymography with gelatin SDS-PAGE. Midgut extracts showed the highest protease activity followed by the protozoa extracts. High level of protease activity was also detected in protozoa culture supernatants after 24 h incubation. Incubation of gut and protozoa extracts with class-specific protease inhibitors revealed that most of the proteases were serine proteases. All proteolytic bands identified after gelatin SDS-PAGE were also inhibited by serine protease inhibitors. Finally, incubation with chromogenic substrates indicated that extracts from fore- and hindgut tissues possessed proteases with almost exclusively trypsin-like activity while both midgut and protozoa extracts possessed proteases with trypsin-like and subtilisin/chymotrypsin-like activities. However, protozoa proteases were distinct from midgut proteases (with different molecular mass). Our results suggest that the Formosan subterranean termite not only produces endogenous proteases in its gut tissues, but also possesses proteases originating from its protozoan symbionts.

  1. Intracellular alkaline proteases produced by thermoacidophiles: detection of protease heterogeneity by gelatin zymography and polymerase chain reaction (PCR).

    PubMed

    Kocabiyik, Semra; Erdem, Bilge

    2002-08-01

    In this study 24 thermoacidophilic archeal and bacterial strains isolated from hot-springs and hot-soils were screened for their ability to produce intracellular alkaline proteases. The protease activities of the strains, based on azocasein hydrolysis, showed a variation from 0.6 to 5.1 U. The cell extracts of three most potent producers were further examined and it was found that their proteases exhibited maximum activity at 60-70 degrees C and showed a pH optimum over a range of pH 7.0-8.5. Gelatin zymography revealed that two of the selected archeal strains produced multiple active SDS-resistant proteases. On the other hand, PCR amplification of alkaline serine protease gene sequences of total DNA from all isolates yielded four distinct amplification fragments of 650, 450, 400 and 300 bp, which might have been derived from different serine protease genes.

  2. Finding novel distinctions between the sAPPα-mediated anabolic biochemical pathways in Autism Spectrum Disorder and Fragile X Syndrome plasma and brain tissue

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Balmiki; Sokol, Deborah K.; Maloney, Bryan; Lahiri, Debomoy K.

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and Fragile X syndrome (FXS) are developmental disorders. No validated blood-based biomarkers exist for either, which impedes bench-to-bedside approaches. Amyloid-β (Aβ) precursor protein (APP) and metabolites are usually associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). APP cleavage by α-secretase produces potentially neurotrophic secreted APPα (sAPPα) and the P3 peptide fragment. β-site APP cleaving enzyme (BACE1) cleavage produces secreted APPβ (sAPPβ) and intact Aβ. Excess Aβ is potentially neurotoxic and can lead to atrophy of brain regions such as amygdala in AD. By contrast, amygdala is enlarged in ASD but not FXS. We previously reported elevated levels of sAPPα in ASD and FXS vs. controls. We now report elevated plasma Aβ and total APP levels in FXS compared to both ASD and typically developing controls, and elevated levels of sAPPα in ASD and FXS vs. controls. By contrast, plasma and brain sAPPβ and Aβ were lower in ASD vs. controls but elevated in FXS plasma vs. controls. We also detected age-dependent increase in an α-secretase in ASD brains. We report a novel mechanistic difference in APP pathways between ASD (processing) and FXS (expression) leading to distinct APP metabolite profiles in these two disorders. These novel, distinctive biochemical differences between ASD and FXS pave the way for blood-based biomarkers for ASD and FXS. PMID:27212113

  3. Neurodevelopmental alcohol exposure elicits long-term changes to gene expression that alter distinct molecular pathways dependent on timing of exposure

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Maternal alcohol consumption is known to adversely affect fetal neurodevelopment. While it is known that alcohol dose and timing play a role in the cognitive and behavioral changes associated with prenatal alcohol exposure, it is unclear what developmental processes are disrupted that may lead to these phenotypes. Methods Mice (n=6 per treatment per developmental time) were exposed to two acute doses of alcohol (5 g/kg) at neurodevelopmental times representing the human first, second, or third trimester equivalent. Mice were reared to adulthood and changes to their adult brain transcriptome were assessed using expression arrays. These were then categorized based on Gene Ontology annotations, canonical pathway associations, and relationships to interacting molecules. Results The results suggest that ethanol disrupts biological processes that are actively occurring at the time of exposure. These include cell proliferation during trimester one, cell migration and differentiation during trimester two, and cellular communication and neurotransmission during trimester three. Further, although ethanol altered a distinct set of genes depending on developmental timing, many of these show interrelatedness and can be associated with one another via ‘hub’ molecules and pathways such as those related to huntingtin and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Conclusions These changes to brain gene expression represent a ‘molecular footprint’ of neurodevelopmental alcohol exposure that is long-lasting and correlates with active processes disrupted at the time of exposure. This study provides further support that there is no neurodevelopmental time when alcohol cannot adversely affect the developing brain. PMID:23497526

  4. Human atherosclerotic plaque alternative macrophages display low cholesterol handling but high phagocytosis because of distinct activities of the PPARɣ and LXRα pathways

    PubMed Central

    Chinetti-Gbaguidi, Giulia; Baron, Morgane; Bouhlel, Mohamed Amine; Vanhoutte, Jonathan; Copin, Corinne; Sebti, Yasmine; Derudas, Bruno; Mayi, Thérèse; Bories, Gael; Tailleux, Anne; Haulon, Stéphane; Zawadzki, Christophe; Jude, Brigitte; Staels, Bart

    2011-01-01

    Rationale A crucial step in atherogenesis is the infiltration of the sub-endothelial space of large arteries by monocytes where they differentiate into macrophages and transform into lipid-loaded foam cells. Macrophages are heterogeneous cells which adapt their response to environmental cytokines. Th1 cytokines promote monocyte differentiation into M1 macrophages, while Th2 cytokines trigger an “alternative” M2 phenotype. Objective We previously reported the presence of CD68+MR+ M2 macrophages in human atherosclerotic plaques. However, the function of these plaque CD68+MR+ macrophages is still unknown. Methods and Results Histological analysis revealed that CD68+MR+ locate far from the lipid core of the plaque and contain smaller lipid droplets compared to CD68+MR− macrophages. IL-4 polarized CD68+MR+ display a reduced capacity to handle and efflux cellular cholesterol due to low expression levels of the nuclear receptor Liver X Receptor (LXR)α and its target genes, ABCA1 and ApoE, caused by the high 15-lipoxygenase activity in CD68+MR+ macrophages. By contrast, CD68+MR+ highly express opsonins and receptors involved in phagocytosis resulting in high phagocytic activity. In M2 macrophages, Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated receptor (PPAR)γ activation enhances the phagocytic, but not the cholesterol trafficking pathways. Conclusions These data identify a distinct macrophage sub-population with a low susceptibility to become foam cells, but high phagocytic activity due to different regulatory activities of the PPARγ-LXRα pathways. PMID:21350215

  5. Confocal Microscopy Studies of Cationic Lipid/dna Complexes Reveal Distinct Pathways of Gene Delivery in Cells as a Function of Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Alison J.; Slack, Nelle L.; Ahmad, Ayesha; Evans, Heather M.; George, Cyril X.; Samuel, Charles E.; Safinya, Cyrus R.

    2000-03-01

    We have identified multiple pathways of gene delivery in mouse L cells using cationic lipids as carriers of DNA. Transfection, the process of delivering foreign DNA into cells, using cationic lipid/DNA (CL-DNA) complexes was monitored by laser confocal microscopy. By following the progress of fluorescently labelled lipid and DNA, we have determined distinct pathways of entry of complexes into cells and the subsequent DNA release from the complexes. We have correlated the microscopy results with the x-ray diffraction data on complex structures and the corresponding transfection efficiencies. X-ray diffraction results elucidated the structures of CL-DNA complexes as a function of the membrane charge density of the system. Luciferase protein assays disclosed novel trends of transfection efficiencies along the structural phase diagram. Similar results were obtained with GFP plasmids. Funded by NIH R01-GM59288-01, R37-AI12520-24, NSF-DMR 9972246, UC-Biotechnology Research and Education Program (97-02).

  6. Calcium and SOL Protease Mediate Temperature Resetting of Circadian Clocks

    PubMed Central

    Tataroglu, Ozgur; Zhao, Xiaohu; Busza, Ania; Ling, Jinli; O’Neill, John S.; Emery, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Summary Circadian clocks integrate light and temperature input to remain synchronized with the day/night cycle. Although light input to the clock is well studied, the molecular mechanisms by which circadian clocks respond to temperature remain poorly understood. We found that temperature phase shifts Drosophila circadian clocks through degradation of the pacemaker protein TIM. This degradation is mechanistically distinct from photic CRY-dependent TIM degradation. Thermal TIM degradation is triggered by cytosolic calcium increase and CALMODULIN binding to TIM and is mediated by the atypical calpain protease SOL. This thermal input pathway and CRY-dependent light input thus converge on TIM, providing a molecular mechanism for the integration of circadian light and temperature inputs. Mammals use body temperature cycles to keep peripheral clocks synchronized with their brain pacemaker. Interestingly, downregulating the mammalian SOL homolog SOLH blocks thermal mPER2 degradation and phase shifts. Thus, we propose that circadian thermosensation in insects and mammals share common principles. PMID:26590423

  7. Structural determinants of tobacco vein mottling virus protease substrate specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Ping; Austin, Brian P.; Tozer, Jozsef; Waugh, David

    2010-10-28

    Tobacco vein mottling virus (TVMV) is a member of the Potyviridae, one of the largest families of plant viruses. The TVMV genome is translated into a single large polyprotein that is subsequently processed by three virally encoded proteases. Seven of the nine cleavage events are carried out by the NIa protease. Its homolog from the tobacco etch virus (TEV) is a widely used reagent for the removal of affinity tags from recombinant proteins. Although TVMV protease is a close relative of TEV protease, they exhibit distinct sequence specificities. We report here the crystal structure of a catalytically inactive mutant TVMV protease (K65A/K67A/C151A) in complex with a canonical peptide substrate (Ac-RETVRFQSD) at 1.7-{angstrom} resolution. As observed in several crystal structures of TEV protease, the C-terminus ({approx}20 residues) of TVMV protease is disordered. Unexpectedly, although deleting the disordered residues from TEV protease reduces its catalytic activity by {approx}10-fold, an analogous truncation mutant of TVMV protease is significantly more active. Comparison of the structures of TEV and TVMV protease in complex with their respective canonical substrate peptides reveals that the S3 and S4 pockets are mainly responsible for the differing substrate specificities. The structure of TVMV protease suggests that it is less tolerant of variation at the P1{prime} position than TEV protease. This conjecture was confirmed experimentally by determining kinetic parameters k{sub cat} and K{sub m} for a series of oligopeptide substrates. Also, as predicted by the cocrystal structure, we confirm that substitutions in the P6 position are more readily tolerated by TVMV than TEV protease.

  8. Nidovirus papain-like proteases: multifunctional enzymes with protease, deubiquitinating and deISGylating activities

    PubMed Central

    Mielech, Anna M.; Chen, Yafang; Mesecar, Andrew D.; Baker, Susan C.

    2014-01-01

    Coronaviruses and arteriviruses, members of the order Nidovirales, are positive strand RNA viruses that encode large replicase polyproteins that are processed by viral proteases to generate the nonstructural proteins which mediate viral RNA synthesis. The viral papain-like proteases (PLPs) are critical for processing the amino-terminal end of the replicase and are attractive targets for antiviral therapies. With the analysis of the papain-like protease of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), came the realization of the multifunctional nature of these enzymes. Structural and enzymatic studies revealed that SARS-CoV PLpro can act as both a protease to cleave peptide bonds and also as a deubiquitinating (DUB) enzyme to cleave the isopeptide bonds found in polyubiquitin chains. Furthermore, viral DUBs can also remove the protective effect of conjugated ubiquitin-like molecules such as interferon stimulated gene 15 (ISG15). Extension of these studies to other coronaviruses and arteriviruses led to the realization that viral protease/DUB activity is conserved in many family members. Overexpression studies revealed that viral protease/DUB activity can modulate or block activation of the innate immune response pathway. Importantly, mutations that alter DUB activity but not viral protease activity have been identified and arteriviruses expressing DUB mutants stimulated higher levels of acute inflammatory cytokines after infection. Further understanding of the multifunctional nature of the Nidovirus PLP/DUBs may facilitate vaccine development. Here, we review studies describing the PLPs’ enzymatic activity and their role in virus pathogenesis. PMID:24512893

  9. Extracellular Bacterial Proteases in Chronic Wounds: A Potential Therapeutic Target?

    PubMed Central

    Suleman, Louise

    2016-01-01

    Significance: Bacterial biofilms are considered to be responsible for over 80% of persistent infections, including chronic lung infections, osteomyelitis, periodontitis, endocarditis, and chronic wounds. Over 60% of chronic wounds are colonized with bacteria that reside within a biofilm. The exaggerated proteolytic environment of chronic wounds, more specifically elevated matrix metalloproteinases, is thought to be one of the possible reasons as to why chronic wounds fail to heal. However, the role of bacterial proteases within chronic wounds is not fully understood. Recent Advances: Recent research has shown that bacterial proteases can enable colonization and facilitate bacterial immune evasion. The inhibition of bacterial proteases such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase B (LasB) has resulted in the disruption of the bacterial biofilm in vitro. P. aeruginosa is thought to be a key pathogen in chronic wound infection, and therefore, the disruption of these biofilms, potentially through the targeting of P. aeruginosa bacterial proteases, is an attractive therapeutic endeavor. Critical Issues: Disrupting biofilm formation through the inhibition of bacterial proteases may lead to the dissemination of bacteria from the biofilm, allowing planktonic cells to colonize new sites within the wound. Future Directions: Despite a plethora of evidence supporting the role of bacterial proteases as virulence factors in infection, there remains a distinct lack of research into the effect of bacterial proteases in chronic wounds. To assess the viability of targeting bacterial proteases, future research should aim to understand the role of these proteases in a variety of chronic wound subtypes. PMID:27785379

  10. Subunits of the Heterotrimeric Transcription Factor NF-Y Are Imported into the Nucleus by Distinct Pathways Involving Importin β and Importin 13

    PubMed Central

    Kahle, Joerg; Baake, Matthias; Doenecke, Detlef; Albig, Werner

    2005-01-01

    The transcriptional activator NF-Y is a heterotrimeric complex composed of NF-YA, NF-YB, and NF-YC, which specifically binds the CCAAT consensus present in about 30% of eukaryotic promoters. All three subunits contain evolutionarily conserved core regions, which comprise a histone fold motif (HFM) in the case of NF-YB and NF-YC. Our results of in vitro binding studies and nuclear import assays reveal two different transport mechanisms for NF-Y subunits. While NF-YA is imported by an importin β-mediated pathway, the NF-YB/NF-YC heterodimer is translocated into the nucleus in an importin 13-dependent manner. We define a nonclassical nuclear localization signal (ncNLS) in NF-YA, and mutational analysis indicates that positively charged amino acid residues in the ncNLS are required for nuclear targeting of NF-YA. Importin β binding is restricted to the monomeric, uncomplexed NF-YA subunit. In contrast, the nuclear import of NF-YB and NF-YC requires dimer formation. Only the NF-YB/NF-YC dimer, but not the monomeric components, are recognized by importin 13 and are imported into the nucleus. Importin 13 competes with NF-YA for binding to the NF-YB/NF-YC dimer. Our data suggest that a distinct binding platform derived from the HFM of both subunits, NF-YB/NF-YC, mediates those interactions. PMID:15964792

  11. Global gene expression profiling reveals widespread yet distinctive translational responses to different eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2B-targeting stress pathways.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, Julia B; Selley, Julian N; Sanchez-Cabo, Fatima; Carroll, Kathleen; Eddy, A Alan; McCarthy, John E G; Hubbard, Simon J; Pavitt, Graham D; Grant, Chris M; Ashe, Mark P

    2005-11-01

    Global inhibition of protein synthesis is a hallmark of many cellular stress conditions. Even though specific mRNAs defy this (e.g., yeast GCN4 and mammalian ATF4), the extent and variation of such resistance remain uncertain. In this study, we have identified yeast mRNAs that are translationally maintained following either amino acid depletion or fusel alcohol addition. Both stresses inhibit eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2B, but via different mechanisms. Using microarray analysis of polysome and monosome mRNA pools, we demonstrate that these stress conditions elicit widespread yet distinct translational reprogramming, identifying a fundamental role for translational control in the adaptation to environmental stress. These studies also highlight the complex interplay that exists between different stages in the gene expression pathway to allow specific preordained programs of proteome remodeling. For example, many ribosome biogenesis genes are coregulated at the transcriptional and translational levels following amino acid starvation. The transcriptional regulation of these genes has recently been connected to the regulation of cellular proliferation, and on the basis of our results, the translational control of these mRNAs should be factored into this equation.

  12. Cu(I)-catalyzed diamination of conjugated dienes. Complementary regioselectivity from two distinct mechanistic pathways involving Cu(II) and Cu(III) species.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Baoguo; Peng, Xingao; Zhu, Yingguang; Ramirez, Thomas A; Cornwall, Richard G; Shi, Yian

    2011-12-28

    Conjugated dienes can be diaminated at the internal and/or terminal double bonds using Cu(I) as catalyst and N,N-di-t-butyldiaziridinone (1) as nitrogen source. The regioselectivity is highly dependent upon the choice of Cu(I) catalyst and the substituents on diene substrates. The diamination likely proceeds via two mechanistically distinct pathways. The N-N bond of N,N-di-t-butyldiaziridinone (1) is first homolytically cleaved by the Cu(I) catalyst to form four-membered Cu(III) species A and Cu(II) radical species B, which are in rapid equilibrium. The internal diamination likely proceeds in a concerted manner via Cu(III) species A, and the terminal diamination likely involves Cu(II) radical species B. Kinetic studies have shown that the diamination is first-order in N,N-di-t-butyldiaziridinone (1), zero-order in olefin, and first-order in total Cu(I) catalyst, and the cleavage of the N-N bond of 1 by the Cu(I) catalyst is the rate-determining step. The internal diamination is favored by use of CuBr without ligand and electron-rich dienes. The terminal diamination is favored when using CuCl-L and dienes with radical-stabilizing groups. PMID:22081888

  13. Cu(I)-Catalyzed Diamination of Conjugated Dienes. Complementary Regioselectivity from Two Distinct Mechanistic Pathways Involving Cu(II) and Cu(III) Species

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Baoguo; Peng, Xingao; Zhu, Yingguang; Ramirez, Thomas A.; Cornwall, Richard G.

    2011-01-01

    Conjugated dienes can be diaminated at the internal and/or terminal double bonds using Cu(I) as catalyst and N,N-di-t-butyldiaziridinone (1) as nitrogen source. The regioselectivity is highly dependent upon the choice of Cu(I) catalyst and the substituents on diene substrates. The diamination likely proceeds via two mechanistically distinct pathways. The N-N bond of N,N-di-t-butyldiaziridinone (1) is first homolytically cleaved by the Cu(I) catalyst to form four-membered Cu(III) species A and Cu(II) radical species B, which are in rapid equilibrium. The internal diamination likely proceeds in a concerted manner via Cu(III) species A and the terminal diamination likely involves Cu(II) radical species B. Kinetic studies have shown that the diamination is first-order in N,N-di-t-butyldiaziridinone (1), zero-order in olefin, first-order in total Cu(I) catalyst, and the cleavage of the N-N bond of 1 by the Cu(I) catalyst is the rate-determining step. The internal diamination is favored by use of CuBr without ligand and electron-rich dienes. The terminal diamination is favored when using CuCl-L and dienes with radical-stabilizing groups. PMID:22081888

  14. Proteases and Protease Inhibitors of Urinary Extracellular Vesicles in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Tataruch, Dorota; Gu, Dongfeng; Liu, Xinyu; Forsblom, Carol; Groop, Per-Henrik; Holthofer, Harry

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is one of the major complications of diabetes mellitus (DM), leads to chronic kidney disease (CKD), and, ultimately, is the main cause for end-stage kidney disease (ESKD). Beyond urinary albumin, no reliable biomarkers are available for accurate early diagnostics. Urinary extracellular vesicles (UEVs) have recently emerged as an interesting source of diagnostic and prognostic disease biomarkers. Here we used a protease and respective protease inhibitor array to profile urines of type 1 diabetes patients at different stages of kidney involvement. Urine samples were divided into groups based on the level of albuminuria and UEVs isolated by hydrostatic dialysis and screened for relative changes of 34 different proteases and 32 protease inhibitors, respectively. Interestingly, myeloblastin and its natural inhibitor elafin showed an increase in the normo- and microalbuminuric groups. Similarly, a characteristic pattern was observed in the array of protease inhibitors, with a marked increase of cystatin B, natural inhibitor of cathepsins L, H, and B as well as of neutrophil gelatinase-associated Lipocalin (NGAL) in the normoalbuminuric group. This study shows for the first time the distinctive alterations in comprehensive protease profiles of UEVs in diabetic nephropathy and uncovers intriguing mechanistic, prognostic, and diagnostic features of kidney damage in diabetes. PMID:25874235

  15. Protease IV, a quorum sensing-dependent protease of Pseudomonas aeruginosa modulates insect innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Park, Su-Jin; Kim, Soo-Kyoung; So, Yong-In; Park, Ha-Young; Li, Xi-Hui; Yeom, Doo Hwan; Lee, Mi-Nan; Lee, Bok-Luel; Lee, Joon-Hee

    2014-12-01

    In Pseudomonas aeruginosa, quorum sensing (QS) plays an essential role in pathogenesis and the QS response controls many virulence factors. Using a mealworm, Tenebrio molitor as a host model, we found that Protease IV, a QS-regulated exoprotease of P. aeruginosa functions as a key virulence effector causing the melanization and death of T. molitor larvae. Protease IV was able to degrade zymogens of spätzle processing enzyme (SPE) and SPE-activating enzyme (SAE) without the activation of the antimicrobial peptide (AMP) production. Since SPE and SAE function to activate spätzle, a ligand of Toll receptor in the innate immune system of T. molitor, we suggest that Protease IV may interfere with the activation of the Toll signaling. Independently of the Toll pathway, the melanization response, another innate immunity was still generated, since Protease IV directly converted Tenebrio prophenoloxidase into active phenoloxidase. Protease IV also worked as an important factor in the virulence to brine shrimp and nematode. These results suggest that Protease IV provides P. aeruginosa with a sophisticated way to escape the immune attack of host by interfering with the production of AMPs. PMID:25315216

  16. Epstein-Barr virus LMP1 induction of the epidermal growth factor receptor is mediated through a TRAF signaling pathway distinct from NF-kappaB activation.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, W E; Mosialos, G; Kieff, E; Raab-Traub, N

    1997-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded LMP1 protein induces several cellular changes including induction of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression and activation of the NF-kappaB transcription factor. Two domains within the carboxy terminus have been identified that activate NF-kappaB. In this study, mutational analysis of the LMP1 protein indicated that the proximal NF-kappaB activation domain, which is identical to the TRAF interaction domain (amino acids 187 to 231), is essential for induction of the EGFR. The distal NF-kappaB activation domain (amino acids 352 to 386) did not induce expression of the EGFR. In contrast, the two domains both independently activated a kappaB-CAT reporter gene and induced expression of the NF-kappaB-regulated A20 gene in C33A epithelial cells. These results indicate that induction of the EGFR by LMP1 involves the TRAF interaction domain and that activation of NF-kappaB alone is not sufficient. Northern blot analysis revealed that induction of EGFR and A20 expression is likely to be at the transcriptional level. Interestingly expression of CD40 in the C33A cells also induced expression of the EGFR. Overexpression of either TRAF3 or an amino-terminal-truncated form of TRAF3 (TRAF3-C) inhibited signaling from the LMP1 TRAF interaction domain but did not affect signaling from the distal NF-kappaB activation domain. These data further define the mechanism by which LMP1 induces expression of the EGFR and indicate that TRAF signaling from LMP1 and CD40 activates a downstream transcription pathway distinct from NF-kappaB that induces expression of the EGFR. PMID:8985387

  17. Cold-adapted proteases as an emerging class of therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Fornbacke, Marcus; Clarsund, Mats

    2013-06-01

    Proteases have been used in medicine for several decades and are an established and well tolerated class of therapeutic agent. These proteases were sourced from mammals or bacteria that exist or have adapted to moderate temperatures (mesophilic organisms); however, proteases derived from organisms from cold environments-cold-adapted or psychrophilic proteases-generally have high specific activity, low substrate affinity, and high catalytic rates at low and moderate temperatures. Made possible by greater flexibility, psychrophilic enzymes interact with and transform the substrate at lower energy costs. Cold-adapted proteases have been used in a wide range of applications, including industrial functions, textiles, cleaning/hygiene products, molecular biology, environmental bioremediations, consumer food products, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical production. In addition to these applications, they have also shown promise as therapeutic modalities for cosmeceutical applications (by reducing glabellar [frown] lines) and a number of disease conditions, including bacterial infections (by disrupting biofilms to prevent bacterial infection), topical wound management (when used as a debridement agent to remove necrotic tissue and fibrin clots), oral/dental health management (by removing plaque and preventing periodontal disease), and in viral infections (by reducing the infectivity of viruses, such as human rhinovirus 16 and herpes simplex virus). Psychrophilic proteases with greater activity and stability (than the original organism-derived variant) have been developed; this coupled with available manufacturing recombinant production techniques suggests that cold-adapted proteases have a promising future as a distinct therapeutic class with diverse clinical applications.

  18. Cold-adapted proteases as an emerging class of therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Fornbacke, Marcus; Clarsund, Mats

    2013-06-01

    Proteases have been used in medicine for several decades and are an established and well tolerated class of therapeutic agent. These proteases were sourced from mammals or bacteria that exist or have adapted to moderate temperatures (mesophilic organisms); however, proteases derived from organisms from cold environments-cold-adapted or psychrophilic proteases-generally have high specific activity, low substrate affinity, and high catalytic rates at low and moderate temperatures. Made possible by greater flexibility, psychrophilic enzymes interact with and transform the substrate at lower energy costs. Cold-adapted proteases have been used in a wide range of applications, including industrial functions, textiles, cleaning/hygiene products, molecular biology, environmental bioremediations, consumer food products, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical production. In addition to these applications, they have also shown promise as therapeutic modalities for cosmeceutical applications (by reducing glabellar [frown] lines) and a number of disease conditions, including bacterial infections (by disrupting biofilms to prevent bacterial infection), topical wound management (when used as a debridement agent to remove necrotic tissue and fibrin clots), oral/dental health management (by removing plaque and preventing periodontal disease), and in viral infections (by reducing the infectivity of viruses, such as human rhinovirus 16 and herpes simplex virus). Psychrophilic proteases with greater activity and stability (than the original organism-derived variant) have been developed; this coupled with available manufacturing recombinant production techniques suggests that cold-adapted proteases have a promising future as a distinct therapeutic class with diverse clinical applications. PMID:25135820

  19. The Lon AAA+ protease.

    PubMed

    Gur, Eyal

    2013-01-01

    As the first ATP-dependent protease to be identified, Lon holds a special place in the history of cellular biology. In fact, the concept of ATP-dependent protein degradation was established through the findings that led to the discovery of Lon. Therefore, this chapter begins with a historical perspective, describing the milestones that led to the discovery of Lon and ATP-dependent proteolysis, starting from the early findings in the 1960s until the demonstration of Lon's ATP-dependent proteolytic activity in vitro, in 1981. Most of our knowledge on Lon derives from studies of the Escherichia coli Lon ortholog, and, therefore, most of this chapter relates to this particular enzyme. Nonetheless, Lon is not only found in most bacterial species, it is also found in Archaea and in the mitochondrion and chloroplast of eukaryotic cells. Therefore many of the conclusions gained from studies on the E. coli enzyme are relevant to Lon proteases in other organisms. Lon, more than any other bacterial or organellar protease, is associated with the degradation of misfolded proteins and protein quality control. In addition, Lon also degrades many regulatory proteins that are natively folded, thus it also plays a prominent role in regulation of physiological processes. Throughout the years, many Lon substrates have been identified, confirming its role in the regulation of diverse cellular processes, including cell division, DNA replication, differentiation, and adaptation to stress conditions. Some examples of these functions are described and discussed here, as is the role of Lon in the degradation of misfolded proteins and in protein quality control. Finally, this chapter deals with the exquisite sensitivity of protein degradation inside a cell. How can a protease distinguish so many substrates from cellular proteins that should not be degraded? Can the specificity of a protease be regulated according to the physiological needs of a cell? This chapter thus broadly discusses the

  20. Laundry performance of subtilisin proteases.

    PubMed

    Wolff, A M; Showell, M S; Venegas, M G; Barnett, B L; Wertz, W C

    1996-01-01

    Effective laundry protease performance against susceptible stains depends upon both the enzyme itself and the environment in which it must work. In order to technically design superior laundry proteases, a model for protease's mechanism of action in detergents was developed which has been substantiated through-the-wash. While evaluation of this model and/or a given protease's effectiveness could be judged by a variety of methods, the utility of using visual wash performance comparisons, analytical, and stain characterization studies is described. Finally, data comparing the performance of wild type Subtilisin proteases with mutants designed via the projected model are given, demonstrating possible utility of the system.

  1. Cysteine Protease Inhibitors as Chemotherapy: Lessons from a Parasite Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selzer, Paul M.; Pingel, Sabine; Hsieh, Ivy; Ugele, Bernhard; Chan, Victor J.; Engel, Juan C.; Bogyo, Matthew; Russell, David G.; Sakanari, Judy A.; McKerrow, James H.

    1999-09-01

    Papain family cysteine proteases are key factors in the pathogenesis of cancer invasion, arthritis, osteoporosis, and microbial infections. Targeting this enzyme family is therefore one strategy in the development of new chemotherapy for a number of diseases. Little is known, however, about the efficacy, selectivity, and safety of cysteine protease inhibitors in cell culture or in vivo. We now report that specific cysteine protease inhibitors kill Leishmania parasites in vitro, at concentrations that do not overtly affect mammalian host cells. Inhibition of Leishmania cysteine protease activity was accompanied by defects in the parasite's lysosome/endosome compartment resembling those seen in lysosomal storage diseases. Colocalization of anti-protease antibodies with biotinylated surface proteins and accumulation of undigested debris and protease in the flagellar pocket of treated parasites were consistent with a pathway of protease trafficking from flagellar pocket to the lysosome/endosome compartment. The inhibitors were sufficiently absorbed and stable in vivo to ameliorate the pathology associated with a mouse model of Leishmania infection.

  2. Staphylococcal proteases aid in evasion of the human complement system.

    PubMed

    Jusko, Monika; Potempa, Jan; Kantyka, Tomasz; Bielecka, Ewa; Miller, Halie K; Kalinska, Magdalena; Dubin, Grzegorz; Garred, Peter; Shaw, Lindsey N; Blom, Anna M

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen that presents severe health care concerns due to the prevalence of multiple antibiotic-resistant strains. New treatment strategies are urgently needed, which requires an understanding of disease causation mechanisms. Complement is one of the first lines of defense against bacterial pathogens, and S. aureus expresses several specific complement inhibitors. The effect of extracellular proteases from this bacterium on complement, however, has been the subject of limited investigation, except for a recent report regarding cleavage of the C3 component by aureolysin (Aur). We demonstrate here that four major extracellular proteases of S. aureus are potent complement inhibitors. Incubation of human serum with the cysteine proteases staphopain A and staphopain B, the serine protease V8 and the metalloproteinase Aur resulted in a drastic decrease in the hemolytic activity of serum, whereas two staphylococcal serine proteases D and E, had no effect. These four proteases were found to inhibit all pathways of complement due to the efficient degradation of several crucial components. Furthermore, S. aureus mutants lacking proteolytic enzymes were found to be more efficiently killed in human blood. Taken together, the major proteases of S. aureus appear to be important for pathogen-mediated evasion of the human complement system.

  3. Toxoplasma gondii aspartic protease 1 is not essential in tachyzoites.

    PubMed

    Polonais, Valerie; Shea, Michael; Soldati-Favre, Dominique

    2011-08-01

    Aspartic proteases are important virulence factors for pathogens and are recognized as attractive drug targets. Seven aspartic proteases (ASPs) have been identified in Toxoplasma gondii genome. Bioinformatics and phylogenetic analyses regroup them into five monophyletic groups. Among them, TgASP1, a coccidian specific aspartic protease related to the food vacuole plasmepsins, is associated with the secretory pathway in non-dividing cells and relocalizes in close proximity to the nascent inner membrane complex (IMC) of daughter cells during replication. Despite a potential role for TgASP1 in IMC formation, the generation of a conventional knockout of the TgASP1 gene revealed that this protease is not required for T. gondii tachyzoite survival or for proper IMC biogenesis.

  4. ADAM Proteases and Gastrointestinal Function.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jennifer C; Rustagi, Shelly; Dempsey, Peter J

    2016-01-01

    A disintegrin and metalloproteinases (ADAMs) are a family of cell surface proteases that regulate diverse cellular functions, including cell adhesion, migration, cellular signaling, and proteolysis. Proteolytically active ADAMs are responsible for ectodomain shedding of membrane-associated proteins. ADAMs rapidly modulate key cell signaling pathways in response to changes in the extracellular environment (e.g., inflammation) and play a central role in coordinating intercellular communication within the local microenvironment. ADAM10 and ADAM17 are the most studied members of the ADAM family in the gastrointestinal tract. ADAMs regulate many cellular processes associated with intestinal development, cell fate specification, and the maintenance of intestinal stem cell/progenitor populations. Several signaling pathway molecules that undergo ectodomain shedding by ADAMs [e.g., ligands and receptors from epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/ErbB and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) receptor (TNFR) families] help drive and control intestinal inflammation and injury/repair responses. Dysregulation of these processes through aberrant ADAM expression or sustained ADAM activity is linked to chronic inflammation, inflammation-associated cancer, and tumorigenesis.

  5. ADAM Proteases and Gastrointestinal Function

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jennifer C.; Rustagi, Shelly; Dempsey, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    A disintegrin and metalloproteinases (ADAMs) are a family of cell surface proteases that regulate diverse cellular functions, including cell adhesion, migration, cellular signaling, and proteolysis. Proteolytically active ADAMs are responsible for ectodomain shedding of membrane-associated proteins. ADAMs rapidly modulate key cell signaling pathways in response to changes in the extracellular environment (e.g., inflammation) and play a central role in coordinating intercellular communication within the local microenvironment. ADAM10 and ADAM17 are the most studied members of the ADAM family in the gastrointestinal tract. ADAMs regulate many cellular processes associated with intestinal development, cell fate specification, and the maintenance of intestinal stem cell/progenitor populations. Several signaling pathway molecules that undergo ectodomain shedding by ADAMs [e.g., ligands and receptors from epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/ErbB and tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) receptor (TNFR) families] help drive and control intestinal inflammation and injury/repair responses. Dysregulation of these processes through aberrant ADAM expression or sustained ADAM activity is linked to chronic inflammation, inflammation-associated cancer, and tumorigenesis. PMID:26667078

  6. SK-N-MC cell death occurs by distinct molecular mechanisms in response to hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anions: involvements of JAK2-STAT3, JNK, and p38 MAP kinases pathways.

    PubMed

    Moslehi, Maryam; Yazdanparast, Razieh

    2013-07-01

    Oxidative stress plays a vital role in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. Nerve cells are incessantly exposed to environmental stresses leading to overproduction of some harmful species like reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS including hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion are potent inducers of various signaling pathways encompassing MAPKs and JAK-STAT pathways. In the current study, we scrutinized the effects of hydrogen peroxide and/or menadione (superoxide anion generator) on JNK/p38-MAPKs and JAK2-STAT3 pathways to elucidate the mechanism(s) by which each oxidant modulated the above-mentioned pathways leading to SK-N-MC cell death. Our results delineated that hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion radical induced distinct responses as we showed that STAT3 and p38 were activated in response to hydrogen peroxide, but not superoxide anion radicals indicating the specificity in ROS-induced signaling pathways activations and behaviors. We also observed that menadione induced JNK-dependent p53 expression and apoptotic death in SK-N-MC cells while H2O2-induced JNK activation was p53 independent. Thus, we declare that ROS type has a key role in selective instigation of JNK/p38-MAPKs and JAK2-STAT3 pathways in SK-N-MC cells. Identifying these differential behaviors and mechanisms of hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion functions illuminates the possible therapeutic targets in the prevention or treatment of ROS-induced neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease.

  7. From proteases to proteomics.

    PubMed

    Neurath, H

    2001-04-01

    This personal and professional autobiography covers the 50-yr period of 1950-2000 and includes the following topics: History of the University of Washington School of Medicine and its Department of Biochemistry (Mount Rainier and the University of Washington, recruiting faculty, biology, research programs); scientific editing (publication, Biochemistry, Protein Science, electronic publication); Europe revisited (Heidelberg, approaching retirement, the German Research Center, reunion in Vienna); and 50 yr of research on proteolytic enzymes (trypsin, carboxypeptidases, mast cell proteases, future developments).

  8. From proteases to proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Neurath, Hans

    2001-01-01

    This personal and professional autobiography covers the 50-yr period of 1950–2000 and includes the following topics: History of the University of Washington School of Medicine and its Department of Biochemistry (Mount Rainier and the University of Washington, recruiting faculty, biology, research programs); scientific editing (publication, Biochemistry, Protein Science, electronic publication); Europe revisited (Heidelberg, approaching retirement, the German Research Center, reunion in Vienna); and 50 yr of research on proteolytic enzymes (trypsin, carboxypeptidases, mast cell proteases, future developments). PMID:11274481

  9. 17Beta-estradiol differentially protects cortical pericontusional zone from programmed cell death after traumatic cerebral contusion at distinct stages via non-genomic and genomic pathways.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yi-Jun; Li, Li-Zhuo; Li, Xin-Guo; Wang, Yun-Jie

    2011-11-01

    Pericontusional zone (PCZ) of traumatic cerebral contusion is a target of pharmacological intervention. Our previous study indicated that 17beta-estradiol has a protective role in PCZ after traumatic cerebral contusion via the upregulation of estrogen receptor (ER) alpha mRNA induction and protein expression as well as inhibition of caspase-3 activation, suggesting that genomic signaling pathway is implicated in the protective effect of 17beta-estrodiol. Recent findings demonstrated that 17beta-estradiol also acts on the extranuclear/membrane ER to activate non-genomic signaling pathway to regulate cellular functions and exert the protective effect in the brain. It is still unclear how and whether genomic and non-genomic pathways of 17beta-estradiol are involved in the neuroprotection in PCZ. Our current study demonstrates that 17beta-estradiol activates ERK1/2 and Akt at the early stage and induces ERalpha and survivin mRNA at the late stage to modulate its protection via the suppression of caspase-3 activation in PCZ. These findings suggest that 17beta-estrodiol differentially plays its protective roles via genomic and non-genomic signaling pathways in PCZ after traumatic cerebral contusion.

  10. Protease-mediated drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, Eva F.; Goyan, Rebecca L.; Kennedy, James C.; Mackay, M.; Mendes, M. A. K.; Pottier, Roy H.

    2003-12-01

    Drugs used in disease treatment can cause damage to both malignant and normal tissue. This toxicity limits the maximum therapeutic dose. Drug targeting is of high interest to increase the therapeutic efficacy of the drug without increasing systemic toxicity. Certain tissue abnormalities, disease processes, cancers, and infections are characterized by high levels of activity of specific extracellular and/or intracellular proteases. Abnormally high activity levels of specific proteases are present at sites of physical or chemical trauma, blood clots, malignant tumors, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, gingival disease, glomerulonerphritis, and acute pancreatitis. Abnormal protease activity is suspected in development of liver thrombosis, pulmonary emphysema, atherosclerosis, and muscular dystrophy. Inactiviating disease-associated proteases by the administration of appropriate protease inhibitors has had limited success. Instead, one could use such proteases to target drugs to treat the condition. Protease mediated drug delivery offers such a possibility. Solubilizing groups are attached to insoluble drugs via a polypeptide chain which is specifically cleavable by certian proteases. When the solubilized drug enounters the protease, the solubilizing moieties are cleaved, and the drug precipitates at the disease location. Thus, a smaller systemic dosage could result in a therapeutic drug concentration at the treatment site with less systemic toxicity.

  11. Proteases of human rhinovirus: role in infection.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Lora M; Walker, Erin J; Jans, David A; Ghildyal, Reena

    2015-01-01

    Human rhinoviruses (HRV) are the major etiological agents of the common cold and asthma exacerbations, with significant worldwide health and economic impact. Although large-scale population vaccination has proved successful in limiting or even eradicating many viruses, the more than 100 distinct serotypes mean that conventional vaccination is not a feasible strategy to combat HRV. An alternative strategy is to target conserved viral proteins such as the HRV proteases, 2A(pro) and 3C(pro), the focus of this review. Necessary for host cell shutoff, virus replication, and pathogenesis, 2A(pro) and 3C(pro) are clearly viable drug targets, and indeed, 3C(pro) has been successfully targeted for treating the common cold in experimental infection. 2A(pro) and 3C(pro) are crucial for virus replication due to their role in polyprotein processing as well as cleavage of key cellular proteins to inhibit cellular transcription and translation. Intriguingly, the action of the HRV proteases also disrupts nucleocytoplasmic trafficking, contributing to HRV cytopathic effects. Improved understanding of the protease-cell interactions should enable new therapeutic approaches to be identified for drug development. PMID:25261311

  12. Proteases of human rhinovirus: role in infection.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Lora M; Walker, Erin J; Jans, David A; Ghildyal, Reena

    2015-01-01

    Human rhinoviruses (HRV) are the major etiological agents of the common cold and asthma exacerbations, with significant worldwide health and economic impact. Although large-scale population vaccination has proved successful in limiting or even eradicating many viruses, the more than 100 distinct serotypes mean that conventional vaccination is not a feasible strategy to combat HRV. An alternative strategy is to target conserved viral proteins such as the HRV proteases, 2A(pro) and 3C(pro), the focus of this review. Necessary for host cell shutoff, virus replication, and pathogenesis, 2A(pro) and 3C(pro) are clearly viable drug targets, and indeed, 3C(pro) has been successfully targeted for treating the common cold in experimental infection. 2A(pro) and 3C(pro) are crucial for virus replication due to their role in polyprotein processing as well as cleavage of key cellular proteins to inhibit cellular transcription and translation. Intriguingly, the action of the HRV proteases also disrupts nucleocytoplasmic trafficking, contributing to HRV cytopathic effects. Improved understanding of the protease-cell interactions should enable new therapeutic approaches to be identified for drug development.

  13. Increasing maternal body mass index is associated with systemic inflammation in the mother and the activation of distinct placental inflammatory pathways.

    PubMed

    Aye, Irving L M H; Lager, Susanne; Ramirez, Vanessa I; Gaccioli, Francesca; Dudley, Donald J; Jansson, Thomas; Powell, Theresa L

    2014-06-01

    Obese pregnant women have increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines in maternal circulation and placental tissues. However, the pathways contributing to placental inflammation in obesity are largely unknown. We tested the hypothesis that maternal body mass index (BMI) was associated with elevated proinflammatory cytokines in maternal and fetal circulations and increased activation of placental inflammatory pathways. A total of 60 women of varying pre-/early pregnancy BMI, undergoing delivery by Cesarean section at term, were studied. Maternal and fetal (cord) plasma were collected for analysis of insulin, leptin, IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-8, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP) 1, and TNFalpha by multiplex ELISA. Activation of the inflammatory pathways in the placenta was investigated by measuring the phosphorylated and total protein expression of p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK)-MAPK, signal transducer-activated transcription factor (STAT) 3, caspase-1, IL-1beta, IkappaB-alpha protein, and p65 DNA-binding activity. To determine the link between activated placental inflammatory pathways and elevated maternal cytokines, cultured primary human trophoblast (PHT) cells were treated with physiological concentrations of insulin, MCP-1, and TNFalpha, and inflammatory signaling analyzed by Western blot. Maternal BMI was positively correlated with maternal insulin, leptin, MCP-1, and TNFalpha, whereas only fetal leptin was increased with BMI. Placental phosphorylation of p38-MAPK and STAT3, and the expression of IL-1beta protein, were increased with maternal BMI; phosphorylation of p38-MAPK was also correlated with birth weight. In contrast, placental NFkappaB, JNK and caspase-1 signaling, and fetal cytokine levels were unaffected by maternal BMI. In PHT cells, p38-MAPK was activated by MCP-1 and TNFalpha, whereas STAT3 phosphorylation was increased following TNFalpha treatment. Maternal BMI is associated with elevated maternal

  14. Genome-wide survey of prokaryotic serine proteases: Analysis of distribution and domain architectures of five serine protease families in prokaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Lokesh P; Sowdhamini, R

    2008-01-01

    Background Serine proteases are one of the most abundant groups of proteolytic enzymes found in all the kingdoms of life. While studies have established significant roles for many prokaryotic serine proteases in several physiological processes, such as those associated with metabolism, cell signalling, defense response and development, functional associations for a large number of prokaryotic serine proteases are relatively unknown. Current analysis is aimed at understanding the distribution and probable biological functions of the select serine proteases encoded in representative prokaryotic organisms. Results A total of 966 putative serine proteases, belonging to five families, were identified in the 91 prokaryotic genomes using various sensitive sequence search techniques. Phylogenetic analysis reveals several species-specific clusters of serine proteases suggesting their possible involvement in organism-specific functions. Atypical phylogenetic associations suggest an important role for lateral gene transfer events in facilitating the widespread distribution of the serine proteases in the prokaryotes. Domain organisations of the gene products were analysed, employing sensitive sequence search methods, to infer their probable biological functions. Trypsin, subtilisin and Lon protease families account for a significant proportion of the multi-domain representatives, while the D-Ala-D-Ala carboxypeptidase and the Clp protease families are mostly single-domain polypeptides in prokaryotes. Regulatory domains for protein interaction, signalling, pathogenesis, cell adhesion etc. were found tethered to the serine protease domains. Some domain combinations (such as S1-PDZ; LON-AAA-S16 etc.) were found to be widespread in the prokaryotic lineages suggesting a critical role in prokaryotes. Conclusion Domain architectures of many serine proteases and their homologues identified in prokaryotes are very different from those observed in eukaryotes, suggesting distinct roles

  15. Activation of Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells in Colon-Draining Lymph Nodes during Citrobacter rodentium Infection Involves Pathogen-Sensing and Inflammatory Pathways Distinct from Conventional Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Toivonen, Raine; Kong, Lingjia; Rasool, Omid; Lund, Riikka J; Lahesmaa, Riitta; Hänninen, Arno

    2016-06-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) bear the main responsibility for initiation of adaptive immune responses necessary for antimicrobial immunity. In the small intestine, afferent lymphatics convey Ags and microbial signals to mesenteric lymph nodes (LNs) to induce adaptive immune responses against microbes and food Ags derived from the small intestine. Whether the large intestine is covered by the same lymphatic system or represents its own lymphoid compartment has not been studied until very recently. We identified three small mesenteric LNs, distinct from small intestinal LNs, which drain lymph specifically from the colon, and studied DC responses to the attaching and effacing pathogen Citrobacter rodentium in these. Transcriptional profiling of conventional (CD11c(high)CD103(high)) DC and plasmacytoid (plasmacytoid DC Ag-1(high)B220(+)CD11c(int)) DC (pDC) populations during steady-state conditions revealed activity of distinct sets of genes in these two DC subsets, both in small intestinal and colon-draining LNs. C. rodentium activated DC especially in colon-draining LNs, and gene expression changed in pDC more profoundly than in conventional DC. Among the genes most upregulated in pDC were C-type lectin receptor CLEC4E, IL-1Rs (IL-1R1 and -2), proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1a and IL-6), and TLR6. Our results indicate that colon immune surveillance is distinct from that of the small intestine in terms of draining LNs, and identify pDC as active sentinels of colonic inflammation and/or microbial dysbiosis. PMID:27183629

  16. Distinct MAPK signaling pathways, p21 up-regulation and caspase-mediated p21 cleavage establishes the fate of U937 cells exposed to 3-hydrogenkwadaphnin: Differentiation versus apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Moosavi, Mohammad Amin; Yazdanparast, Razieh

    2008-07-01

    Despite the depth of knowledge concerning the pathogenesis of acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML), long-term survival remains unresolved. Therefore, new agents that act more selectively and more potently are required. In that line, we have recently characterized a novel diterpene ester, called 3-hydrogenkwadaphnin (3-HK), with capability to induce both differentiation and apoptosis in various leukemia cell lines. These effects of 3-HK were mediated through inhibition of inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase, a selective up-regulated enzyme in cancerous cells, especially leukemia. However, it remains elusive to understand how cells display different fates in response to 3-HK. Here, we report the distinct molecular signaling pathways involved in forcing of 3-HK-treated U937 cells to undergo differentiation and apoptosis. After 3-HK (15 nM) treatment, a portion of U937 cells adhered to the culture plates and showed macrophage criteria while others remained in suspension and underwent apoptosis. The differentiated cells arrested in G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase of cell cycle and showed early activation of ERK1/2 pathway (3 h) along with ERK-dependent p21{sup Cip/WAF1} (p21) up-regulation and expression of p27{sup Kip1} and Bcl-2. In contrast, the suspension cells underwent apoptosis through Fas/FasL and mitochondrial pathways. The occurrence of apoptosis in these cells were accompanied with caspase-8-mediated p21 cleavage and delayed activation (24 h) of JNK1/2 and p38 MAPK. Taken together, these results suggest that distinct signaling pathways play a pivotal role in fates of drug-treated leukemia cells, thus this may pave some novel therapeutical utilities.

  17. Proteolytic Activation of the Protease-activated Receptor (PAR)-2 by the Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored Serine Protease Testisin*

    PubMed Central

    Driesbaugh, Kathryn H.; Buzza, Marguerite S.; Martin, Erik W.; Conway, Gregory D.; Kao, Joseph P. Y.; Antalis, Toni M.

    2015-01-01

    Protease-activated receptors (PARs) are a family of seven-transmembrane, G-protein-coupled receptors that are activated by multiple serine proteases through specific N-terminal proteolytic cleavage and the unmasking of a tethered ligand. The majority of PAR-activating proteases described to date are soluble proteases that are active during injury, coagulation, and inflammation. Less investigation, however, has focused on the potential for membrane-anchored serine proteases to regulate PAR activation. Testisin is a unique trypsin-like serine protease that is tethered to the extracellular membrane of cells through a glycophosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor. Here, we show that the N-terminal domain of PAR-2 is a substrate for testisin and that proteolytic cleavage of PAR-2 by recombinant testisin activates downstream signaling pathways, including intracellular Ca2+ mobilization and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. When testisin and PAR-2 are co-expressed in HeLa cells, GPI-anchored testisin specifically releases the PAR-2 tethered ligand. Conversely, knockdown of endogenous testisin in NCI/ADR-Res ovarian tumor cells reduces PAR-2 N-terminal proteolytic cleavage. The cleavage of PAR-2 by testisin induces activation of the intracellular serum-response element and NFκB signaling pathways and the induction of IL-8 and IL-6 cytokine gene expression. Furthermore, the activation of PAR-2 by testisin results in the loss and internalization of PAR-2 from the cell surface. This study reveals a new biological substrate for testisin and is the first demonstration of the activation of a PAR by a serine protease GPI-linked to the cell surface. PMID:25519908

  18. Rhomboid proteases in mitochondria and plastids: keeping organelles in shape.

    PubMed

    Jeyaraju, Danny V; Sood, Aditi; Laforce-Lavoie, Audrey; Pellegrini, Luca

    2013-02-01

    Rhomboids constitute the most widespread and conserved family of intramembrane cleaving proteases. They are key regulators of critical cellular processes in bacteria and animals, and are poised to play an equally important role also in plants. Among eukaryotes, a distinct subfamily of rhomboids, prototyped by the mammalian mitochondrial protein Parl, ensures the maintenance of the structural and functional integrity of mitochondria and plastids. Here, we discuss the studies that in the past decade have unveiled the role, regulation, and structure of this unique group of rhomboid proteases. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Protein Import and Quality Control in Mitochondria and Plastids.

  19. Protease degradable electrospun fibrous hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Wade, Ryan J.; Bassin, Ethan J.; Rodell, Christopher B.; Burdick, Jason A.

    2015-01-01

    Electrospun nanofibers are promising in biomedical applications to replicate features of the natural extracellular matrix (ECM). However, nearly all electrospun scaffolds are either non-degradable or degrade hydrolytically, whereas natural ECM degrades proteolytically, often through matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Here, we synthesize reactive macromers that contain protease-cleavable and fluorescent peptides and are able to form both isotropic hydrogels and electrospun fibrous hydrogels through a photoinitiated polymerization. These biomimetic scaffolds are susceptible to protease-mediated cleavage in vitro in a protease dose dependent manner and in vivo in a subcutaneous mouse model using transdermal fluorescent imaging to monitor degradation. Importantly, materials containing an alternate and non-protease-cleavable peptide sequence are stable in both in vitro and in vivo settings. To illustrate the specificity in degradation, scaffolds with mixed fiber populations support selective fiber degradation based on individual fiber degradability. Overall, this represents a novel biomimetic approach to generate protease-sensitive fibrous scaffolds for biomedical applications. PMID:25799370

  20. Regulation of endothelial cell cycle by laminar versus oscillatory flow: distinct modes of interactions of AMP-activated protein kinase and Akt pathways.

    PubMed

    Guo, Deliang; Chien, Shu; Shyy, John Y-J

    2007-03-01

    Steady laminar flow in the straight parts of the arterial tree is atheroprotective, whereas disturbed flow with oscillation in branch points and the aortic root are athero-prone, in part, because of the distinct roles of the flow patterns in regulating the cell cycle of vascular endothelial cells (ECs). To elucidate the molecular basis underlying the endothelial cell cycle regulated by distinct flow patterns, we conducted flow-channel experiments to investigate the effects of laminar versus oscillatory flows on activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and Akt in ECs. Laminar flow caused a transient activation of both AMPK and Akt, but oscillatory flow activated only Akt, with AMPK being maintained at its basal level. Constitutively active and dominant-negative mutants of AMPK and Akt were used to elucidate further the positive effect of Akt and negative role of AMPK in mediating mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin) and its target p70S6 kinase (S6K) in response to laminar and oscillatory flows. Measurements of phosphorylation of mTOR Ser2448 and S6K Thr389 showed that AMPK, by counteracting Akt under laminar flow, resulted in a transient activation of S6K. Under oscillatory flow, because of the lack of AMPK activation to effect negative regulation, S6K was activated in a sustained manner. As a functional consequence, AMPK activation attenuated cell cycle progression in response to both laminar and oscillatory flows. In contrast, AMPK inhibition promoted EC cycle progression by decreasing the cell population in the G(0)/G(1) phase and increasing it in the S+G(2)/M phase. In vivo, phosphorylation of the promitotic S6K in mouse thoracic aorta was much less than that in mouse aortic root. In contrast, AMPK phosphorylation was higher in the thoracic aorta. These results provide a molecular mechanism by which laminar versus oscillatory flow regulates the endothelial cell cycle.

  1. Metabolomic profiles indicate distinct physiological pathways affected by two loci with major divergent effect on Bos taurus growth and lipid deposition.

    PubMed

    Weikard, Rosemarie; Altmaier, Elisabeth; Suhre, Karsten; Weinberger, Klaus M; Hammon, Harald M; Albrecht, Elke; Setoguchi, Kouji; Takasuga, Akiko; Kühn, Christa

    2010-10-01

    Identifying trait-associated genetic variation offers new prospects to reveal novel physiological pathways modulating complex traits. Taking advantage of a unique animal model, we identified the I442M mutation in the non-SMC condensin I complex, subunit G (NCAPG) gene and the Q204X mutation in the growth differentiation factor 8 (GDF8) gene as substantial modulators of pre- and/or postnatal growth in cattle. In a combined metabolomic and genotype association approach, which is the first respective study in livestock, we surveyed the specific physiological background of the effects of both loci on body-mass gain and lipid deposition. Our data provided confirming evidence from two historically and geographically distant cattle populations that the onset of puberty is the key interval of divergent growth. The locus-specific metabolic patterns obtained from monitoring 201 plasma metabolites at puberty mirror the particular NCAPG I442M and GDF8 Q204X effects and represent biosignatures of divergent physiological pathways potentially modulating effects on proportional and disproportional growth, respectively. While the NCAPG I442M mutation affected the arginine metabolism, the 204X allele in the GDF8 gene predominantly raised the carnitine level and had concordant effects on glycerophosphatidylcholines and sphingomyelins. Our study provides a conclusive link between the well-described growth-regulating functions of arginine metabolism and the previously unknown specific physiological role of the NCAPG protein in mammalian metabolism. Owing to the confirmed effect of the NCAPG/LCORL locus on human height in genome-wide association studies, the results obtained for bovine NCAPG might add valuable, comparative information on the physiological background of genetically determined divergent mammalian growth.

  2. Community structure analysis of transcriptional networks reveals distinct molecular pathways for early- and late-onset temporal lobe epilepsy with childhood febrile seizures.

    PubMed

    Moreira-Filho, Carlos Alberto; Bando, Silvia Yumi; Bertonha, Fernanda Bernardi; Iamashita, Priscila; Silva, Filipi Nascimento; Costa, Luciano da Fontoura; Silva, Alexandre Valotta; Castro, Luiz Henrique Martins; Wen, Hung-Tzu

    2015-01-01

    Age at epilepsy onset has a broad impact on brain plasticity and epilepsy pathomechanisms. Prolonged febrile seizures in early childhood (FS) constitute an initial precipitating insult (IPI) commonly associated with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). FS-MTLE patients may have early disease onset, i.e. just after the IPI, in early childhood, or late-onset, ranging from mid-adolescence to early adult life. The mechanisms governing early (E) or late (L) disease onset are largely unknown. In order to unveil the molecular pathways underlying E and L subtypes of FS-MTLE we investigated global gene expression in hippocampal CA3 explants of FS-MTLE patients submitted to hippocampectomy. Gene coexpression networks (GCNs) were obtained for the E and L patient groups. A network-based approach for GCN analysis was employed allowing: i) the visualization and analysis of differentially expressed (DE) and complete (CO) - all valid GO annotated transcripts - GCNs for the E and L groups; ii) the study of interactions between all the system's constituents based on community detection and coarse-grained community structure methods. We found that the E-DE communities with strongest connection weights harbor highly connected genes mainly related to neural excitability and febrile seizures, whereas in L-DE communities these genes are not only involved in network excitability but also playing roles in other epilepsy-related processes. Inversely, in E-CO the strongly connected communities are related to compensatory pathways (seizure inhibition, neuronal survival and responses to stress conditions) while in L-CO these communities harbor several genes related to pro-epileptic effects, seizure-related mechanisms and vulnerability to epilepsy. These results fit the concept, based on fMRI and behavioral studies, that early onset epilepsies, although impacting more severely the hippocampus, are associated to compensatory mechanisms, while in late MTLE development the brain is less able to

  3. Community Structure Analysis of Transcriptional Networks Reveals Distinct Molecular Pathways for Early- and Late-Onset Temporal Lobe Epilepsy with Childhood Febrile Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Moreira-Filho, Carlos Alberto; Bando, Silvia Yumi; Bertonha, Fernanda Bernardi; Iamashita, Priscila; Silva, Filipi Nascimento; Costa, Luciano da Fontoura; Silva, Alexandre Valotta; Castro, Luiz Henrique Martins; Wen, Hung-Tzu

    2015-01-01

    Age at epilepsy onset has a broad impact on brain plasticity and epilepsy pathomechanisms. Prolonged febrile seizures in early childhood (FS) constitute an initial precipitating insult (IPI) commonly associated with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). FS-MTLE patients may have early disease onset, i.e. just after the IPI, in early childhood, or late-onset, ranging from mid-adolescence to early adult life. The mechanisms governing early (E) or late (L) disease onset are largely unknown. In order to unveil the molecular pathways underlying E and L subtypes of FS-MTLE we investigated global gene expression in hippocampal CA3 explants of FS-MTLE patients submitted to hippocampectomy. Gene coexpression networks (GCNs) were obtained for the E and L patient groups. A network-based approach for GCN analysis was employed allowing: i) the visualization and analysis of differentially expressed (DE) and complete (CO) - all valid GO annotated transcripts - GCNs for the E and L groups; ii) the study of interactions between all the system’s constituents based on community detection and coarse-grained community structure methods. We found that the E-DE communities with strongest connection weights harbor highly connected genes mainly related to neural excitability and febrile seizures, whereas in L-DE communities these genes are not only involved in network excitability but also playing roles in other epilepsy-related processes. Inversely, in E-CO the strongly connected communities are related to compensatory pathways (seizure inhibition, neuronal survival and responses to stress conditions) while in L-CO these communities harbor several genes related to pro-epileptic effects, seizure-related mechanisms and vulnerability to epilepsy. These results fit the concept, based on fMRI and behavioral studies, that early onset epilepsies, although impacting more severely the hippocampus, are associated to compensatory mechanisms, while in late MTLE development the brain is less able to

  4. NFAT activation by membrane potential follows a calcium pathway distinct from other activity-related transcription factors in skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Valdés, Juan Antonio; Gaggero, Eduardo; Hidalgo, Jorge; Leal, Nancy; Jaimovich, Enrique; Carrasco, M Angélica

    2008-03-01

    Depolarization of skeletal muscle cells triggers intracellular Ca2+ signals mediated by ryanodine and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptors. Previously, we have reported that K+-induced depolarization activates transcriptional regulators ERK, cAMP response element-binding protein, c-fos, c-jun, and egr-1 through IP3-dependent Ca2+ release, whereas NF-kappa B activation is elicited by both ryanodine and IP3 receptor-mediated Ca2+ signals. We have further shown that field stimulation with electrical pulses results in an NF-kappa B activation increase dependent of the amount of pulses and independent of their frequency. In this work, we report the results obtained for nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT)-mediated transcription and translocation generated by both K+ and electrical stimulation protocols in primary skeletal muscle cells and C2C12 cells. The Ca2+ source for NFAT activation is through release by ryanodine receptors and extracellular Ca2+ entry. We found this activation to be independent of the number of pulses within a physiological range of stimulus frequency and enhanced by long-lasting low-frequency stimulation. Therefore, activation of the NFAT signaling pathway differs from that of NF-kappa B and other transcription factors. Calcineurin enzyme activity correlated well with the relative activation of NFAT translocation and transcription using different stimulation protocols. Furthermore, both K+-induced depolarization and electrical stimulation increased mRNA levels of the type 1 IP3 receptor mediated by calcineurin activity, which suggests that depolarization may regulate IP3 receptor transcription. These results confirm the presence of at least two independent pathways for excitation-transcription coupling in skeletal muscle cells, both dependent on Ca2+ release and triggered by the same voltage sensor but activating different intracellular release channels. PMID:18184878

  5. Evolution under Drug Pressure Remodels the Folding Free-Energy Landscape of Mature HIV-1 Protease.

    PubMed

    Louis, John M; Roche, Julien

    2016-07-01

    Using high-pressure NMR spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry, we investigate the folding landscape of the mature HIV-1 protease homodimer. The cooperativity of unfolding was measured in the absence or presence of a symmetric active site inhibitor for the optimized wild type protease (PR), its inactive variant PRD25N, and an extremely multidrug-resistant mutant, PR20. The individual fit of the pressure denaturation profiles gives rise to first order, ∆GNMR, and second order, ∆VNMR (the derivative of ∆GNMR with pressure); apparent thermodynamic parameters for each amide proton considered. Heterogeneity in the apparent ∆VNMR values reflects departure from an ideal cooperative unfolding transition. The narrow to broad distribution of ∆VNMR spanning the extremes from inhibitor-free PR20D25N to PR-DMP323 complex, and distinctively for PRD25N-DMP323 complex, indicated large variations in folding cooperativity. Consistent with this data, the shape of thermal unfolding transitions varies from asymmetric for PR to nearly symmetric for PR20, as dimer-inhibitor ternary complexes. Lack of structural cooperativity was observed between regions located close to the active site, including the hinge and tip of the glycine-rich flaps, and the rest of the protein. These results strongly suggest that inhibitor binding drastically decreases the cooperativity of unfolding by trapping the closed flap conformation in a deep energy minimum. To evade this conformational trap, PR20 evolves exhibiting a smoother folding landscape with nearly an ideal two-state (cooperative) unfolding transition. This study highlights the malleability of retroviral protease folding pathways by illustrating how the selection of mutations under drug pressure remodels the free-energy landscape as a primary mechanism. PMID:27170547

  6. Evolution under Drug Pressure Remodels the Folding Free-Energy Landscape of Mature HIV-1 Protease.

    PubMed

    Louis, John M; Roche, Julien

    2016-07-01

    Using high-pressure NMR spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry, we investigate the folding landscape of the mature HIV-1 protease homodimer. The cooperativity of unfolding was measured in the absence or presence of a symmetric active site inhibitor for the optimized wild type protease (PR), its inactive variant PRD25N, and an extremely multidrug-resistant mutant, PR20. The individual fit of the pressure denaturation profiles gives rise to first order, ∆GNMR, and second order, ∆VNMR (the derivative of ∆GNMR with pressure); apparent thermodynamic parameters for each amide proton considered. Heterogeneity in the apparent ∆VNMR values reflects departure from an ideal cooperative unfolding transition. The narrow to broad distribution of ∆VNMR spanning the extremes from inhibitor-free PR20D25N to PR-DMP323 complex, and distinctively for PRD25N-DMP323 complex, indicated large variations in folding cooperativity. Consistent with this data, the shape of thermal unfolding transitions varies from asymmetric for PR to nearly symmetric for PR20, as dimer-inhibitor ternary complexes. Lack of structural cooperativity was observed between regions located close to the active site, including the hinge and tip of the glycine-rich flaps, and the rest of the protein. These results strongly suggest that inhibitor binding drastically decreases the cooperativity of unfolding by trapping the closed flap conformation in a deep energy minimum. To evade this conformational trap, PR20 evolves exhibiting a smoother folding landscape with nearly an ideal two-state (cooperative) unfolding transition. This study highlights the malleability of retroviral protease folding pathways by illustrating how the selection of mutations under drug pressure remodels the free-energy landscape as a primary mechanism.

  7. A New Pepstatin-Insensitive Thermopsin-Like Protease Overproduced in Peptide-Rich Cultures of Sulfolobus solfataricus

    PubMed Central

    Gogliettino, Marta; Riccio, Alessia; Cocca, Ennio; Rossi, Mosè; Palmieri, Gianna; Balestrieri, Marco

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we gain insight into the extracellular proteolytic system of Sulfolobus solfataricus grown on proteinaceous substrates, providing further evidence that acidic proteases were specifically produced in response to peptide-rich media. The main proteolytic component was the previously isolated SsMTP (Sulfolobus solfataricus multi-domain thermopsin-like protease), while the less abundant (named SsMTP-1) one was purified, characterized and identified as the sso1175 gene-product. The protein revealed a multi-domain organization shared with the cognate SsMTP with a catalytic domain followed by several tandemly-repeated motifs. Moreover, both enzymes were found spread across the Crenarchaeota phylum and belonging to the thermopsin family, although segregated into diverse phylogenetic clusters. SsMTP-1 showed a 75-kDa molecular mass and was stable in the temperature range 50–90 °C, with optimal activity at 70 °C and pH 2.0. Serine, metallo and aspartic protease inhibitors did not affect the enzyme activity, designating SsMTP-1 as a new member of the pepstatin-insensitive aspartic protease family. The peptide-bond-specificity of SsMTP-1 in the cleavage of the oxidized insulin B chain was uncommon amongst thermopsins, suggesting that it could play a distinct, but cooperative role in the protein degradation machinery. Interestingly, predictions of the transmembrane protein topology of SsMTP and SsMTP-1 strongly suggest a possible contribution in signal-transduction pathways. PMID:24566144

  8. Allostery in trypsin-like proteases suggests new therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Gohara, David W; Di Cera, Enrico

    2011-11-01

    Trypsin-like proteases (TLPs) are a large family of enzymes responsible for digestion, blood coagulation, fibrinolysis, development, fertilization, apoptosis and immunity. A current paradigm posits that the irreversible transition from an inactive zymogen to the active protease form enables productive interaction with substrate and catalysis. Analysis of the entire structural database reveals two distinct conformations of the active site: one fully accessible to substrate (E) and the other occluded by the collapse of a specific segment (E*). The allosteric E*-E equilibrium provides a reversible mechanism for activity and regulation in addition to the irreversible zymogen to protease conversion and points to new therapeutic strategies aimed at inhibiting or activating the enzyme. In this review, we discuss relevant examples, with emphasis on the rational engineering of anticoagulant thrombin mutants.

  9. Atg8 Transfer from Atg7 to Atg3: A Distinctive E1-E2 Architecture and Mechanism in the Autophagy Pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Taherbhoy, Asad M.; Tait, Stephen W.; Kaiser, Stephen E.; Williams, Allison H.; Deng, Alan; Nourse, Amanda; Hammel, Michal; Kurinov, Igor; Rock, Charles O.; Green, Douglas R.; Schulman, Brenda A.

    2012-07-11

    Atg7 is a noncanonical, homodimeric E1 enzyme that interacts with the noncanonical E2 enzyme, Atg3, to mediate conjugation of the ubiquitin-like protein (UBL) Atg8 during autophagy. Here we report that the unique N-terminal domain of Atg7 (Atg7{sup NTD}) recruits a unique 'flexible region' from Atg3 (Atg3{sup FR}). The structure of an Atg7{sup NTD}-Atg3{sup FR} complex reveals hydrophobic residues from Atg3 engaging a conserved groove in Atg7, important for Atg8 conjugation. We also report the structure of the homodimeric Atg7 C-terminal domain, which is homologous to canonical E1s and bacterial antecedents. The structures, SAXS, and crosslinking data allow modeling of a full-length, dimeric (Atg7 {approx} Atg8-Atg3){sub 2} complex. The model and biochemical data provide a rationale for Atg7 dimerization: Atg8 is transferred in trans from the catalytic cysteine of one Atg7 protomer to Atg3 bound to the N-terminal domain of the opposite Atg7 protomer within the homodimer. The studies reveal a distinctive E1 {approx} UBL-E2 architecture for enzymes mediating autophagy.

  10. Distinctive profiles of small RNA couple inverted repeat-induced post-transcriptional gene silencing with endogenous RNA silencing pathways in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Matvienko, Marta; Piskurewicz, Urszula; Xu, Huaqin; Martineau, Belinda; Wong, Joan; Govindarajulu, Manjula; Kozik, Alexander; Michelmore, Richard W.

    2014-01-01

    The experimental induction of RNA silencing in plants often involves expression of transgenes encoding inverted repeat (IR) sequences to produce abundant dsRNAs that are processed into small RNAs (sRNAs). These sRNAs are key mediators of post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) and determine its specificity. Despite its application in agriculture and broad utility in plant research, the mechanism of IR-PTGS is incompletely understood. We generated four sets of 60 Arabidopsis plants, each containing IR transgenes expressing different configurations of uidA and CHALCONE SYNTHASE (At-CHS) gene fragments. Levels of PTGS were found to depend on the orientation and position of the fragment in the IR construct. Deep sequencing and mapping of sRNAs to corresponding transgene-derived and endogenous transcripts identified distinctive patterns of differential sRNA accumulation that revealed similarities among sRNAs associated with IR-PTGS and endogenous sRNAs linked to uncapped mRNA decay. Detailed analyses of poly-A cleavage products from At-CHS mRNA confirmed this hypothesis. We also found unexpected associations between sRNA accumulation and the presence of predicted open reading frames in the trigger sequence. In addition, strong IR-PTGS affected the prevalence of endogenous sRNAs, which has implications for the use of PTGS for experimental or applied purposes. PMID:25344399

  11. The MAPKERK-1,2 pathway integrates distinct and antagonistic signals from TGF alpha and FGF7 in morphogenesis of mouse mammary epithelium

    SciTech Connect

    Fata, Jimmie E; Mori, Hidetoshi; Ewald, Andrew J; Zhang, Hui; Yao, Evelyn; Werb, Zena; Bissell, Mina J

    2006-10-03

    Transforming growth factor-{alpha} (TGF{alpha}) and fibroblast growth factor-7 (FGF7) exhibit distinct expression patterns in the mammary gland. Both factors signal through mitogen-activated kinase/extracellular regulated kinase-1,2 (MAPK{sup ERK1,2}); however, their unique and/or combined contributions to mammary morphogenesis have not been examined. In ex vivo mammary explants, we show that a sustained activation of MAPK{sup ERK1,2} for 1 h, induced by TGF{alpha}, was necessary and sufficient to initiate branching morphogenesis, whereas a transient activation (15 min) of MAPK{sup ERK1,2}, induced by FGF7, led to growth without branching. Unlike TGF{alpha}, FGF7 promoted sustained proliferation as well as ectopic localization of, and increase in, keratin-6 expressing cells. The response of the explants to FGF10 was similar to that to FGF7. Simultaneous stimulation by FGF7 and TGF{alpha} indicated that the FGF7-induced MAPK{sup ERK1,2} signaling and associated phenotypes were dominant: FGF7 may prevent branching by suppression of two necessary TGF{alpha}-induced morphogenetic effectors, matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3/stromelysin-1), and fibronectin. Our findings indicate that expression of morphogenetic effectors, proliferation, and cell-type decisions during mammary organoid morphogenesis are intimately dependent on the duration of activation of MAPK{sup ERK1,2} activation.

  12. PAR-2, LGL-1 and the CDC-42 GAP CHIN-1 act in distinct pathways to maintain polarity in the C. elegans embryo.

    PubMed

    Beatty, Alexander; Morton, Diane G; Kemphues, Kenneth

    2013-05-01

    In the one-cell C. elegans embryo, polarity is maintained by mutual antagonism between the anterior cortical proteins PAR-3, PKC-3, PAR-6 and CDC-42, and the posterior cortical proteins PAR-2 and LGL-1 on the posterior cortex. The mechanisms by which these proteins interact to maintain polarity are incompletely understood. In this study, we investigate the interplay among PAR-2, LGL-1, myosin, the anterior PAR proteins and CDC-42. We find that PAR-2 and LGL-1 affect cortical myosin accumulation by different mechanisms. LGL-1 does not directly antagonize the accumulation of cortical myosin and instead plays a role in regulating PAR-6 levels. By contrast, PAR-2 likely has separate roles in regulating cortical myosin accumulation and preventing the expansion of the anterior cortical domain. We also provide evidence that asymmetry of active CDC-42 can be maintained independently of LGL-1 and PAR-2 by a redundant pathway that includes the CDC-42 GAP CHIN-1. Finally, we show that, in addition to its primary role in regulating the size of the anterior cortical domain via its binding to PAR-6, CDC-42 has a secondary role in regulating cortical myosin that is not dependent on PAR-6.

  13. Nutritional Omega-3 Deficiency Alters Glucocorticoid Receptor-Signaling Pathway and Neuronal Morphology in Regionally Distinct Brain Structures Associated with Emotional Deficits

    PubMed Central

    Larrieu, Thomas; Hilal, Muna L.; De Smedt-Peyrusse, Véronique; Sans, Nathalie; Layé, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Extensive evidence suggests that long term dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) deficiency results in altered emotional behaviour. We have recently demonstrated that n-3 PUFAs deficiency induces emotional alterations through abnormal corticosterone secretion which leads to altered dendritic arborisation in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). Here we show that hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis feedback inhibition was not compromised in n-3 deficient mice. Rather, glucocorticoid receptor (GR) signaling pathway was inactivated in the PFC but not in the hippocampus of n-3 deficient mice. Consequently, only dendritic arborisation in PFC was affected by dietary n-3 PUFAs deficiency. In addition, occlusion experiment with GR blockade altered GR signaling in the PFC of control mice, with no further alterations in n-3 deficient mice. In conclusion, n-3 PUFAs deficiency compromised PFC, leading to dendritic atrophy, but did not change hippocampal GR function and dendritic arborisation. We argue that this GR sensitivity contributes to n-3 PUFAs deficiency-related emotional behaviour deficits. PMID:27057368

  14. Deoxycholic acid and selenium metabolite methylselenol exert common and distinct effects on cell cycle, apoptosis, and MAP kinase pathway in HCT116 human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Huawei; Botnen, James H; Briske-Anderson, Mary

    2010-01-01

    The cell growth inhibition induced by bile acid deoxycholic acid (DCA) may cause compensatory hyperproliferation of colonic epithelial cells and consequently increase colon cancer risk. On the other hand, there is increasing evidence for the efficacy of certain forms of selenium (Se) as anticancer nutrients. Methylselenol has been hypothesized to be a critical Se metabolite for anticancer activity in vivo. In this study, we demonstrated that both DCA (75-300 micromol/l) and submicromolar methylselenol inhibited colon cancer cell proliferation by up to 64% and 63%, respectively. In addition, DCA and methylselenol each increased colon cancer cell apoptosis rate by up to twofold. Cell cycle analyses revealed that DCA induced an increase in only the G1 fraction with a concomitant drop in G2 and S-phase; in contrast, methylselenol led to an increase in the G1 and G2 fractions with a concomitant drop only in the S-phase. Although both DCA and methylselenol significantly promoted apoptosis and inhibited cell growth, examination of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway activation showed that DCA, but not methylselenol, induced SAPK/JNK1/2, p38 MAPK, ERK1/2 activation. Thus, our data provide, for the first time, the molecular basis for opposite effects of methylselenol and DCA on colon tumorigenesis.

  15. Extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway play distinct role in acetochlor-mediated toxicity and intrinsic apoptosis in A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Zerin, Tamanna; Song, Ho-Yeon; Kim, Yong-Sik

    2015-02-01

    Acetochlor (ACETO), a member of the chloroacetanilide family of herbicides, is widely used globally and is very frequently detected in watersheds of agricultural lands and fresh water streams. The human health consequences of environmental exposure to ACETO are unknown. This study was designed to elucidate the effect and molecular mechanisms of ACETO on human alveolar A549 cells. Established assays of cell viability and cytotoxicity were performed to detect the potential effects of ACETO on A549 cells. ACETO generated reactive oxygen species, which may have been crucial to apoptosis-mediated cytotoxicity. ACETO-treatment showed a concentration dependent up-regulation of pro-apoptotic proteins including Bax, Bak, BID and Bad, but a differential level of expression of anti-apoptotic proteins were observed, leading to the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria to the cytoplasm as well as activation of caspase-3, and cleavage of caspase-9 and PARP. ACETO also induced activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Inhibition of the expression of ERK by PD98059 partially reversed ACETO-induced cytotoxicity, apoptosis and the expression of caspase-3, -9 and PARP in A549 cells. Comparative evaluation of the results indicates that the principal mechanism underlying ACETO-mediated cytotoxicity is likely to be through ERK-mediated intrinsic pathway of apoptosis. PMID:25291404

  16. Two distinct alpha-interferon-dependent signal transduction pathways may contribute to activation of transcription of the guanylate-binding protein gene

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, T.; Lew, D.J.; Darnell, J.E. Jr. )

    1991-10-01

    The promoter of the gene encoding a cytoplasmic guanylate-binding (GBP) contains two overlapping elements: the interferon stimulation response element (ISRE), which mediates alpha interferon (IFN-{alpha})-dependent transcription, and the IFN-{gamma} activation site (GAS), which is required for INF-{gamma}-mediated stimulation. The ISRE binds a factor called ISGF-3 that is activated by IFN-{alpha} but not by IFN-{gamma}. The GAS binds a protein that is activated by IFN-{gamma}, which the authors have termed GAF. The authors now find that the GAS is also an IFN-{alpha}-responsive element in vivo and that IFN-{alpha} (in addition to activating ISGF-3) rapidly activates a GAS-binding factor, the IFN-{alpha} activation factor (AAF). The AAF has characteristics very similar to those of the previously described GAF. Through the use of inhibitors of protein synthesis and inhibitors of protein kinases, the activation conditions of AAF, GAF, and ISGF-3 could be distinguished. Therefore, not only do IFN-{alpha} and IFN-{gamma} stimulate transcription of GBP through different receptors linked to different signaling molecules, but occupation of the IFN-{alpha} receptor apparently leads to the rapid activation of two different DNA-binding proteins through the use of different intracellular pathways.

  17. RNA sequencing supports distinct reactive oxygen species-mediated pathways of apoptosis by high and low size mass fractions of Bay leaf (Lauris nobilis) in HT-29 cells.

    PubMed

    Rodd, Annabelle L; Ververis, Katherine; Sayakkarage, Dheeshana; Khan, Abdul W; Rafehi, Haloom; Ziemann, Mark; Loveridge, Shanon J; Lazarus, Ross; Kerr, Caroline; Lockett, Trevor; El-Osta, Assam; Karagiannis, Tom C; Bennett, Louise E

    2015-08-01

    Anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects of Bay leaf (Laurus nobilis) in mammalian cancer and HT-29 adenocarcinoma cells have been previously attributed to effects of polyphenolic and essential oil chemical species. Recently, we demonstrated differentiated growth-regulating effects of high (HFBL) versus low molecular mass (LFBL) aqueous fractions of bay leaf and now confirm by comparative effects on gene expression, that HFBL and LFBL suppress HT-29 growth by distinct mechanisms. Induction of intra-cellular lesions including DNA strand breakage by extra-cellular HFBL, invoked the hypothesis that iron-mediated reactive oxygen species with capacity to penetrate cell membrane, were responsible for HFBL-mediated effects, supported by equivalent effects of HFBL in combination with γ radiation. Activities of HFBL and LFBL were interpreted to reflect differentiated responses to iron-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS), occurring either outside or inside cells. In the presence of LFBL, apoptotic death was relatively delayed compared with HFBL. ROS production by LFBL mediated p53-dependent apoptosis and recovery was suppressed by promoting G1/S phase arrest and failure of cellular tight junctions. In comparison, intra-cellular anti-oxidant protection exerted by LFBL was absent for extra-cellular HFBL (likely polysaccharide-rich), which potentiated more rapid apoptosis by producing DNA double strand breaks. Differentiated effects on expression of genes regulating ROS defense and chromatic condensation by LFBL versus HFBL, were observed. The results support ferrous iron in cell culture systems and potentially in vivo, can invoke different extra-cellular versus intra-cellular ROS-mediated chemistries, that may be regulated by exogenous, including dietary species. PMID:26114728

  18. Distinct Cellular Pathways for Induction of CD4+ T Cell-Dependent Antibody Responses to Antigen Expressed by Intact Bacteria Versus Isolated Soluble Antigen.

    PubMed

    Kar, Swagata; Colino, Jesus; Snapper, Clifford M

    2016-05-15

    Uptake of intact bacteria and soluble Ags by APCs is mediated by phagocytosis and endocytosis or pinocytosis, respectively. Thus, we predicted that injection of clodronate-containing liposomes (CLs), which selectively deplete cells efficient in phagocytosis, would inhibit murine CD4(+) T cell-dependent IgG responses to Ags expressed by intact bacteria but not isolated soluble Ags. Surprisingly, injection of CLs markedly inhibited protein-specific IgG responses to intact, heat-killed Streptococcus pneumoniae, as well as a soluble OVA-polysaccharide conjugate or OVA alone. IgG anti-polysaccharide responses to bacteria and conjugate were also reduced, but more modestly. In both instances, CL-mediated inhibition was associated with a significant reduction in induced germinal centers and CD4(+) germinal center T follicular helper cells. However, CL injection, which largely abrogated the proliferative response of adoptively transferred OVA peptide-specific-transgenic CD4(+) T cells in response to immunization with S. pneumoniae expressing OVA peptide, did not inhibit T cell proliferation in response to OVA-polysaccharide conjugate or OVA. In this regard, monocyte-derived cells, depleted by CLs, internalized S. pneumoniae in vivo, whereas CD11c(low) dendritic cells, unaffected by CL injection, internalized soluble OVA. Ex vivo isolation and coculture of these respective APCs from S. pneumoniae- or OVA-immunized mice with OVA-specific T cells, in the absence of exogenous Ag, demonstrated their selective ability to induce T cell activation. These data suggest that, although distinct APCs initiate CD4(+) T cell activation in response to Ag expressed by intact bacteria versus Ag in soluble form, CL-sensitive cells appear to be necessary for the subsequent IgG responses to both forms of Ag.

  19. RNA sequencing supports distinct reactive oxygen species-mediated pathways of apoptosis by high and low size mass fractions of Bay leaf (Lauris nobilis) in HT-29 cells.

    PubMed

    Rodd, Annabelle L; Ververis, Katherine; Sayakkarage, Dheeshana; Khan, Abdul W; Rafehi, Haloom; Ziemann, Mark; Loveridge, Shanon J; Lazarus, Ross; Kerr, Caroline; Lockett, Trevor; El-Osta, Assam; Karagiannis, Tom C; Bennett, Louise E

    2015-08-01

    Anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects of Bay leaf (Laurus nobilis) in mammalian cancer and HT-29 adenocarcinoma cells have been previously attributed to effects of polyphenolic and essential oil chemical species. Recently, we demonstrated differentiated growth-regulating effects of high (HFBL) versus low molecular mass (LFBL) aqueous fractions of bay leaf and now confirm by comparative effects on gene expression, that HFBL and LFBL suppress HT-29 growth by distinct mechanisms. Induction of intra-cellular lesions including DNA strand breakage by extra-cellular HFBL, invoked the hypothesis that iron-mediated reactive oxygen species with capacity to penetrate cell membrane, were responsible for HFBL-mediated effects, supported by equivalent effects of HFBL in combination with γ radiation. Activities of HFBL and LFBL were interpreted to reflect differentiated responses to iron-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS), occurring either outside or inside cells. In the presence of LFBL, apoptotic death was relatively delayed compared with HFBL. ROS production by LFBL mediated p53-dependent apoptosis and recovery was suppressed by promoting G1/S phase arrest and failure of cellular tight junctions. In comparison, intra-cellular anti-oxidant protection exerted by LFBL was absent for extra-cellular HFBL (likely polysaccharide-rich), which potentiated more rapid apoptosis by producing DNA double strand breaks. Differentiated effects on expression of genes regulating ROS defense and chromatic condensation by LFBL versus HFBL, were observed. The results support ferrous iron in cell culture systems and potentially in vivo, can invoke different extra-cellular versus intra-cellular ROS-mediated chemistries, that may be regulated by exogenous, including dietary species.

  20. Distinctive expression patterns of Hedgehog pathway genes in the Ciona intestinalis larva: implications for a role of Hedgehog signaling in postembryonic development and chordate evolution.

    PubMed

    Islam, A F M Tariqul; Moly, Pricila Khan; Miyamoto, Yuki; Kusakabe, Takehiro G

    2010-02-01

    Members of the Hedgehog (Hh) family are soluble ligands that orchestrate a wide spectrum of developmental processes ranging from left-right axis determination of the embryo to tissue patterning and organogenesis. Tunicates, including ascidians, are the closest relatives of vertebrates, and elucidation of Hh signaling in ascidians should provide an important clue towards better understanding the role of this pathway in development. In previous studies, expression patterns of genes encoding Hh and its downstream factor Gli have been examined up to the tailbud stage in the ascidian embryo, but their expression in the larva has not been reported. Here we show the spatial expression patterns of hedgehog (Ci-hh1, Ci-hh2), patched (Ci-ptc), smoothened (Ci-smo), and Gli (Ci-Gli) orthologs in larvae of the ascidian Ciona intestinalis. The expression patterns of Ci-hh2 and Ci-Gli dramatically change during the period between the late tailbud embryo and the swimming larva. At the larval stage, expression of Ci-Gli was found in a central part of the endoderm and in the visceral ganglion, while Ci-hh2 was expressed in two discrete endodermal regions, anteriorly and posteriorly adjacent to the cells expressing Gli. The expression patterns of these genes suggest that the Hh ligand controls postembryonic development of the endoderm and the central nervous system. Expression of a gene encoding Hh in the anterior and/or pharyngeal endoderm is probably an ancient chordate character; diversification of regulation and targets of the Hh signaling in this region may have played a major role in the evolution of chordate body structures.

  1. Galloflavin, a new lactate dehydrogenase inhibitor, induces the death of human breast cancer cells with different glycolytic attitude by affecting distinct signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Farabegoli, F; Vettraino, M; Manerba, M; Fiume, L; Roberti, M; Di Stefano, G

    2012-11-20

    Galloflavin (GF), a recently identified lactate dehydrogenase inhibitor, hinders the proliferation of cancer cells by blocking glycolysis and ATP production. The aim of the present experiments was to study the effect of this compound on breast cancer cell lines reproducing different pathological subtypes of this tumor: MCF-7 (the well differentiated form), MDA-MB-231 (the aggressive triple negative tumor) and MCF-Tam (a sub-line of MCF-7 with acquired tamoxifen resistance). We observed marked differences in the energetic metabolism of these cell lines. Compared to MCF-7 cells, both MDA-MB-231 and MCF-Tam cells exhibited higher LDH levels and glucose uptake and showed lower capacity of oxygen consumption. In spite of these differences, GF exerted similar growth inhibitory effects. This result was explained by the finding of a constitutively activated stress response in MDA-MB-231 and MCF-Tam cells, which reproduce the poor prognosis tumor forms. As a further proof, different signaling pathways were found to be involved in the antiproliferative action of GF. In MCF-7 cells we observed a down regulation of the ERα-mediated signaling needed for cell survival. On the contrary, in MCF-Tam and MDA-MB-231 cells growth inhibition appeared to be contributed by an oxidative stress condition. The prevalent mechanism of cell death was found to be apoptosis induction. Because of the clinical relevance of breast cancer forms having the triple negative and/or chemoresistant phenotype, our results showing comparable effects of GF even on aggressively growing cells encourage further studies to verify the potential of this compound in improving the chemotherapy of breast cancer.

  2. Regulation of Extracellular Protease Production in Bacillus cereus T: Characterization of Mutants Producing Altered Amounts of Protease

    PubMed Central

    Aronson, A. I.; Angelo, N.; Holt, S. C.

    1971-01-01

    Twenty-nine mutants of Bacillus cereus T were selected on casein agar for their inability to produce large amounts of extracellular protease. They all formed spores, and 27 were also auxotrophs for purines or pyrimidines. Upon reversion to prototrophy, a large fraction regained the capacity to produce protease. Conversely, reversion to normal protease production resulted in loss of the purine or pyrimidine requirement in a large fraction of the revertants. One spontaneous low-protease-producing pyrimidine auxotroph studied in detail grew as well as the wild type and produced spores which were identical to those produced by the wild type on the basis of heat resistance, dipicolinic acid content, density, and appearance in the electron microscope. The rate of protein turnover in the mutant was the same as the wild type. The mutant did grow poorly, however, when casein was the principal carbon source. A mutant excreting 5 to 10 times as much protease as the wild type was isolated as a secondary mutation from the hypoproducer discussed above. Loss of the pyrimidine requirement in this case did not alter the regulation of protease production. Although the secondary mutant grew somewhat faster in most media than the wild type, the final cell yield was lower. The spores of this mutant appeared to have excess coat on the basis of both electron microscopic and chemical studies. There appear to be closely related but distinct catabolic controls for both extracellular protease and spore formation. These controls can be dissociated as for the hypoproducers but can also appear integrated as for the hyperprotease producer. Images PMID:4104235

  3. Poly(I:C) reduces expression of JAM-A and induces secretion of IL-8 and TNF-{alpha} via distinct NF-{kappa}B pathways in human nasal epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkuni, Tsuyoshi; Kojima, Takashi; Ogasawara, Noriko; Masaki, Tomoyuki; Fuchimoto, Jun; Kamekura, Ryuta; Koizumi, Jun-ichi; Ichimiya, Shingo; Murata, Masaki; Tanaka, Satoshi; Himi, Tetsuo; Sawada, Norimasa

    2011-01-01

    Human nasal epithelium is an important physical barrier and innate immune defense protecting against inhaled substances and pathogens. Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling, which plays a key role in the innate immune response, has not been well characterized in human nasal epithelial cells (HNECs), including the epithelial tight junctional barrier. In the present study, mRNAs of TLR1-10 were detected in hTERT-transfected HNECs, which can be used as an indispensable and stable model of normal HNECs, similar to primary cultured HNECs. To investigate the changes of tight junction proteins and the signal transduction pathways via TLRs in HNECs in vitro, hTERT-transfected HNECs were treated with TLR2 ligand P{sub 3}CSK{sub 4}, TLR3 ligand poly(I:C), TLR4 ligand LPS, TLR7/8 ligand CL097, TLR8 ligand ssRNA40/LyoVec, and TLR9 ligand ODN2006. In hTERT-transfected HNECs, treatment with poly(I:C) significantly reduced expression of the tight junction protein JAM-A and induced secretion of proinflammatory cytokines IL-8 and TNF-{alpha}. Both the reduction of JAM-A expression and the induction of secretion of IL-8 and TNF-{alpha} after treatment with poly(I:C) were modulated by distinct signal transduction pathways via EGFR, PI3K, and p38 MAPK and finally regulated by a TLR3-mediated NF-{kappa}B pathway. The control of TLR3-mediated signaling pathways in HNECs may be important not only in infection by viral dsRNA but also in autoimmune diseases caused by endogenous dsRNA released from necrotic cells.

  4. Serine proteases of parasitic helminths.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yong; Wen, Yun jun; Cai, Ya Nan; Vallée, Isabelle; Boireau, Pascal; Liu, Ming Yuan; Cheng, Shi Peng

    2015-02-01

    Serine proteases form one of the most important families of enzymes and perform significant functions in a broad range of biological processes, such as intra- and extracellular protein metabolism, digestion, blood coagulation, regulation of development, and fertilization. A number of serine proteases have been identified in parasitic helminths that have putative roles in parasite development and nutrition, host tissues and cell invasion, anticoagulation, and immune evasion. In this review, we described the serine proteases that have been identified in parasitic helminths, including nematodes (Trichinella spiralis, T. pseudospiralis, Trichuris muris, Anisakis simplex, Ascaris suum, Onchocerca volvulus, O. lienalis, Brugia malayi, Ancylostoma caninum, and Steinernema carpocapsae), cestodes (Spirometra mansoni, Echinococcus granulosus, and Schistocephalus solidus), and trematodes (Fasciola hepatica, F. gigantica, and Schistosoma mansoni). Moreover, the possible biological functions of these serine proteases in the endogenous biological phenomena of these parasites and in the host-parasite interaction were also discussed. PMID:25748703

  5. Serine Proteases of Parasitic Helminths

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yong; Wen, Yun jun; Cai, Ya Nan; Vallée, Isabelle; Boireau, Pascal; Liu, Ming Yuan; Cheng, Shi Peng

    2015-01-01

    Serine proteases form one of the most important families of enzymes and perform significant functions in a broad range of biological processes, such as intra- and extracellular protein metabolism, digestion, blood coagulation, regulation of development, and fertilization. A number of serine proteases have been identified in parasitic helminths that have putative roles in parasite development and nutrition, host tissues and cell invasion, anticoagulation, and immune evasion. In this review, we described the serine proteases that have been identified in parasitic helminths, including nematodes (Trichinella spiralis, T. pseudospiralis, Trichuris muris, Anisakis simplex, Ascaris suum, Onchocerca volvulus, O. lienalis, Brugia malayi, Ancylostoma caninum, and Steinernema carpocapsae), cestodes (Spirometra mansoni, Echinococcus granulosus, and Schistocephalus solidus), and trematodes (Fasciola hepatica, F. gigantica, and Schistosoma mansoni). Moreover, the possible biological functions of these serine proteases in the endogenous biological phenomena of these parasites and in the host-parasite interaction were also discussed. PMID:25748703

  6. Photosynthesis of Grass Species Differing in Carbon Dioxide Fixation Pathways : VII. CHROMOSOME NUMBERS, METAPHASE I CHROMOSOME BEHAVIOR, AND MODE OF REPRODUCTION OF PHOTOSYNTHETICALLY DISTINCT PANICUM SPECIES.

    PubMed

    Bouton, J H; Brown, R H; Bolton, J K; Campagnoli, R P

    1981-03-01

    plants. Possession of the same basic chromosome number, regular meiotic pairing, a high degree of stainable pollen, and good seed set in most of the plants studied indicate possible success in making hybrids for a genetic study of photosynthetic pathways in Panicum.

  7. Comparative genomics of mycobacterial proteases.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro-Guimarães, Michelle Lopes; Pessolani, Maria Cristina Vidal

    2007-01-01

    Although proteases are recognized as important virulent factors in pathogenic microorganisms, little information is available so far regarding the potential role of these enzymes in diseases caused by mycobacteria. Here we use bioinformatic tools to compare the protease-coding genes present in the genome of Mycobacterium leprae, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis. This analysis allowed a review of the nomenclature of the protease family present in mycobacteria. A special attention was devoted to the 'decaying genome' of M. leprae where a relatively high level of conservation of protease-coding genes was observed when compared to other genes families. A total of 39 genes out of the 49 found in M. bovis were identified in M. leprae. Of relevance, a core of well-conserved 38 protease genes shared by the four species was defined. This set of proteases is probably essential for survival in the host and disease outcome and may constitute novel targets for drug development leading to a more effective control of mycobacterial diseases.

  8. Genetic Changes in HIV-1 Gag-Protease Associated with Protease Inhibitor-Based Therapy Failure in Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Giandhari, Jennifer; Basson, Adriaan E.; Coovadia, Ashraf; Kuhn, Louise; Abrams, Elaine J.; Strehlau, Renate; Morris, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Studies have shown a low frequency of HIV-1 protease drug resistance mutations in patients failing protease inhibitor (PI)-based therapy. Recent studies have identified mutations in Gag as an alternate pathway for PI drug resistance in subtype B viruses. We therefore genotyped the Gag and protease genes from 20 HIV-1 subtype C-infected pediatric patients failing a PI-based regimen. Major protease resistance mutations (M46I, I54V, and V82A) were identified in eight (40%) patients, as well as Gag cleavage site (CS) mutations (at codons 373, 374, 378, 428, 431, 449, 451, and 453) in nine (45%) patients. Four of these Gag CS mutations occurred in the absence of major protease mutations at PI failure. In addition, amino acid changes were noted at Gag non-CS with some predicted to be under HLA/KIR immune-mediated pressure and/or drug selection pressure. Changes in Gag during PI failure therefore warrant further investigation of the Gag gene and its role in PI failure in HIV-1 subtype C infection. PMID:25919760

  9. Human B lymphoblastoid cells contain distinct patterns of cathepsin activity in endocytic compartments and regulate MHC class II transport in a cathepsin S-independent manner.

    PubMed

    Lautwein, Alfred; Kraus, Marianne; Reich, Michael; Burster, Timo; Brandenburg, J; Overkleeft, Herman S; Schwarz, Gerold; Kammer, Winfried; Weber, Ekkehard; Kalbacher, Hubert; Nordheim, Alfred; Driessen, Christoph

    2004-05-01

    Endocytic proteolysis represents a major functional component of the major histocompatibility complex class II antigen-presentation machinery. Although transport and assembly of class II molecules in the endocytic compartment are well characterized, we lack information about the pattern of endocytic protease activity along this pathway. Here, we used chemical tools that visualize endocytic proteases in an activity-dependent manner in combination with subcellular fractionation to dissect the subcellular distribution of the major cathepsins (Cat) CatS, CatB, CatH, CatD, CatC, and CatZ as well as the asparagine-specific endoprotease (AEP) in human B-lymphoblastoid cells (BLC). Endocytic proteases were distributed in two distinct patterns: CatB and CatZ were most prominent in early and late endosomes but absent from lysosomes, and CatH, CatS, CatD, CatC, and AEP distributed between late endosomes and lysosomes, suggesting that CatB and CatZ might be involved in the initial proteolytic attack on a given antigen. The entire spectrum of protease activity colocalized with human leukocyte antigen-DM and the C-terminal and N-terminal processing of invariant chain (Ii) in late endosomes. CatS was active in all endocytic compartments. Surprisingly and in contrast with results from dendritic cells, inhibition of CatS activity by leucine-homophenylalanine-vinylsulfone-phenol prevented N-terminal processing of Ii but did not alter the subcellular trafficking or surface delivery of class II complexes, as deferred from pulse-chase analysis in combination with subcellular fractionation and biotinylation of cell-surface protein. Thus, BLC contain distinct activity patterns of proteases in endocytic compartments and regulate the intracellular transport and surface-delivery of class II in a CatS-independent manner. PMID:14966190

  10. Kinetic Intermediates en Route to the Final Serpin-Protease Complex

    PubMed Central

    Maddur, Ashoka A.; Swanson, Richard; Izaguirre, Gonzalo; Gettins, Peter G. W.; Olson, Steven T.

    2013-01-01

    Serpin protein protease inhibitors inactivate their target proteases through a unique mechanism in which a major serpin conformational change, resulting in a 70-Å translocation of the protease from its initial reactive center loop docking site to the opposite pole of the serpin, kinetically traps the acyl-intermediate complex. Although the initial Michaelis and final trapped acyl-intermediate complexes have been well characterized structurally, the intermediate stages involved in this remarkable transformation are not well understood. To better characterize such intermediate steps, we undertook rapid kinetic studies of the FRET and fluorescence perturbation changes of site-specific fluorophore-labeled derivatives of the serpin, α1-protease inhibitor (α1PI), which report the serpin and protease conformational changes involved in transforming the Michaelis complex to the trapped acyl-intermediate complex in reactions with trypsin. Two kinetically resolvable conformational changes were observed in the reactions, ascribable to (i) serpin reactive center loop insertion into sheet A with full protease translocation but incomplete protease distortion followed by, (ii) full conformational distortion and movement of the protease and coupled serpin conformational changes involving the F helix-sheet A interface. Kinetic studies of calcium effects on the labeled α1PI-trypsin reactions demonstrated both inactive and low activity states of the distorted protease in the final complex that were distinct from the intermediate distorted state. These studies provide new insights into the nature of the serpin and protease conformational changes involved in trapping the acyl-intermediate complex in serpin-protease reactions and support a previously proposed role for helix F in the trapping mechanism. PMID:24047901

  11. Subclassification and Biochemical Analysis of Plant Papain-Like Cysteine Proteases Displays Subfamily-Specific Characteristics1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Richau, Kerstin H.; Kaschani, Farnusch; Verdoes, Martijn; Pansuriya, Twinkal C.; Niessen, Sherry; Stüber, Kurt; Colby, Tom; Overkleeft, Hermen S.; Bogyo, Matthew; Van der Hoorn, Renier A.L.

    2012-01-01

    Papain-like cysteine proteases (PLCPs) are a large class of proteolytic enzymes associated with development, immunity, and senescence. Although many properties have been described for individual proteases, the distribution of these characteristics has not been studied collectively. Here, we analyzed 723 plant PLCPs and classify them into nine subfamilies that are present throughout the plant kingdom. Analysis of these subfamilies revealed previously unreported distinct subfamily-specific functional and structural characteristics. For example, the NPIR and KDEL localization signals are distinctive for subfamilies, and the carboxyl-terminal granulin domain occurs in two PLCP subfamilies, in which some individual members probably evolved by deletion of the granulin domains. We also discovered a conserved double cysteine in the catalytic site of SAG12-like proteases and two subfamily-specific disulfides in RD19A-like proteases. Protease activity profiling of representatives of the PLCP subfamilies using novel fluorescent probes revealed striking polymorphic labeling profiles and remarkably distinct pH dependency. Competition assays with peptide-epoxide scanning libraries revealed common and unique inhibitory fingerprints. Finally, we expand the detection of PLCPs by identifying common and organ-specific protease activities and identify previously undetected proteases upon labeling with cell-penetrating probes in vivo. This study provides the plant protease research community with tools for further functional annotation of plant PLCPs. PMID:22371507

  12. Protease- and Acid-catalyzed Labeling Workflows Employing 18O-enriched Water

    PubMed Central

    Klingler, Diana; Hardt, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Stable isotopes are essential tools in biological mass spectrometry. Historically, 18O-stable isotopes have been extensively used to study the catalytic mechanisms of proteolytic enzymes1-3. With the advent of mass spectrometry-based proteomics, the enzymatically-catalyzed incorporation of 18O-atoms from stable isotopically enriched water has become a popular method to quantitatively compare protein expression levels (reviewed by Fenselau and Yao4, Miyagi and Rao5 and Ye et al.6). 18O-labeling constitutes a simple and low-cost alternative to chemical (e.g. iTRAQ, ICAT) and metabolic (e.g. SILAC) labeling techniques7. Depending on the protease utilized, 18O-labeling can result in the incorporation of up to two 18O-atoms in the C-terminal carboxyl group of the cleavage product3. The labeling reaction can be subdivided into two independent processes, the peptide bond cleavage and the carboxyl oxygen exchange reaction8. In our PALeO (protease-assisted labeling employing 18O-enriched water) adaptation of enzymatic 18O-labeling, we utilized 50% 18O-enriched water to yield distinctive isotope signatures. In combination with high-resolution matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS/MS), the characteristic isotope envelopes can be used to identify cleavage products with a high level of specificity. We previously have used the PALeO-methodology to detect and characterize endogenous proteases9 and monitor proteolytic reactions10-11. Since PALeO encodes the very essence of the proteolytic cleavage reaction, the experimental setup is simple and biochemical enrichment steps of cleavage products can be circumvented. The PALeO-method can easily be extended to (i) time course experiments that monitor the dynamics of proteolytic cleavage reactions and (ii) the analysis of proteolysis in complex biological samples that represent physiological conditions. PALeO-TimeCourse experiments help identifying rate-limiting processing

  13. Evidence for Reduced Drug Susceptibility without Emergence of Major Protease Mutations following Protease Inhibitor Monotherapy Failure in the SARA Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, Katherine A.; Parry, Chris M.; McCormick, Adele; Kapaata, Anne; Lyagoba, Fred; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Gilks, Charles F.; Goodall, Ruth; Spyer, Moira; Kityo, Cissy; Pillay, Deenan; Gupta, Ravindra K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Major protease mutations are rarely observed following failure with protease inhibitors (PI), and other viral determinants of failure to PI are poorly understood. We therefore characterized Gag-Protease phenotypic susceptibility in subtype A and D viruses circulating in East Africa following viral rebound on PIs. Methods Samples from baseline and treatment failure in patients enrolled in the second line LPV/r trial SARA underwent phenotypic susceptibility testing. Data were expressed as fold-change in susceptibility relative to a LPV-susceptible reference strain. Results We cloned 48 Gag-Protease containing sequences from seven individuals and performed drug resistance phenotyping from pre-PI and treatment failure timepoints in seven patients. For the six patients where major protease inhibitor resistance mutations did not emerge, mean fold-change EC50 to LPV was 4.07 fold (95% CI, 2.08–6.07) at the pre-PI timepoint. Following viral failure the mean fold-change in EC50 to LPV was 4.25 fold (95% CI, 1.39–7.11, p = 0.91). All viruses remained susceptible to DRV. In our assay system, the major PI resistance mutation I84V, which emerged in one individual, conferred a 10.5-fold reduction in LPV susceptibility. One of the six patients exhibited a significant reduction in susceptibility between pre-PI and failure timepoints (from 4.7 fold to 9.6 fold) in the absence of known major mutations in protease, but associated with changes in Gag: V7I, G49D, R69Q, A120D, Q127K, N375S and I462S. Phylogenetic analysis provided evidence of the emergence of genetically distinct viruses at the time of treatment failure, indicating ongoing viral evolution in Gag-protease under PI pressure. Conclusions Here we observe in one patient the development of significantly reduced susceptibility conferred by changes in Gag which may have contributed to treatment failure on a protease inhibitor containing regimen. Further phenotype-genotype studies are required to elucidate genetic

  14. Conditional Proteolysis of the Membrane Protein YfgM by the FtsH Protease Depends on a Novel N-terminal Degron*

    PubMed Central

    Bittner, Lisa-Marie; Westphal, Kai; Narberhaus, Franz

    2015-01-01

    Regulated proteolysis efficiently and rapidly adapts the bacterial proteome to changing environmental conditions. Many protease substrates contain recognition motifs, so-called degrons, that direct them to the appropriate protease. Here we describe an entirely new degron identified in the cytoplasmic N-terminal end of the membrane-anchored protein YfgM of Escherichia coli. YfgM is stable during exponential growth and degraded in stationary phase by the essential FtsH protease. The alarmone (p)ppGpp, but not the previously described YfgM interactors RcsB and PpiD, influence YfgM degradation. By scanning mutagenesis, we define individual amino acids responsible for turnover of YfgM and find that the degron does not at all comply with the known N-end rule pathway. The YfgM degron is a distinct module that facilitates FtsH-mediated degradation when fused to the N terminus of another monotopic membrane protein but not to that of a cytoplasmic protein. Several lines of evidence suggest that stress-induced degradation of YfgM relieves the response regulator RcsB and thereby permits cellular protection by the Rcs phosphorelay system. On the basis of these and other results in the literature, we propose a model for how the membrane-spanning YfgM protein serves as connector between the stress responses in the periplasm and cytoplasm. PMID:26092727

  15. Peptidomimetic inhibitors of HIV protease.

    PubMed

    Randolph, John T; DeGoey, David A

    2004-01-01

    There are currently (July, 2002) six protease inhibitors approved for the treatment of HIV infection, each of which can be classified as peptidomimetic in structure. These agents, when used in combination with other antiretroviral agents, produce a sustained decrease in viral load, often to levels below the limits of quantifiable detection, and a significant reconstitution of the immune system. Therapeutic regimens containing one or more HIV protease inhibitors thus provide a highly effective method for disease management. The important role of protease inhibitors in HIV therapy, combined with numerous challenges remaining in HIV treatment, have resulted in a continued effort both to optimize regimens using the existing agents and to identify new protease inhibitors that may provide unique properties. This review will provide an overview of the discovery and clinical trials of the currently approved HIV protease inhibitors, followed by an examination of important aspects of therapy, such as pharmacokinetic enhancement, resistance and side effects. A description of new peptidomimetic compounds currently being investigated in the clinic and in preclinical discovery will follow. PMID:15193140

  16. Microbial inhibitors of cysteine proteases.

    PubMed

    Kędzior, Mateusz; Seredyński, Rafał; Gutowicz, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Cysteine proteases are one of the major classes of proteolytic enzymes involved in a number of physiological and pathological processes in plants, animals and microorganisms. When their synthesis, activity and localization in mammalian cells are altered, they may contribute to the development of many diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis and cancer. Therefore, cysteine proteases have become promising drug targets for the medical treatment of these disorders. Inhibitors of cysteine proteases are also produced by almost every group of living organisms, being responsible for the control of intracellular proteolytic activity. Microorganisms synthesize cysteine protease inhibitors not only to regulate the activity of endogenous, often virulent enzymes, but also to hinder the host's proteolytic defense system and evade its immune responses against infections. Present work describes known to date microbial inhibitors of cysteine proteases in terms of their structure, enzyme binding mechanism, specificity and pathophysiological roles. The overview of both proteinaceous and small-molecule inhibitors produced by all groups of microorganisms (bacteria, archaea, fungi, protists) and viruses is provided. Subsequently, possible applications of microbial inhibitors in science, medicine and biotechnology are also highlighted. PMID:27048482

  17. Microbial inhibitors of cysteine proteases.

    PubMed

    Kędzior, Mateusz; Seredyński, Rafał; Gutowicz, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Cysteine proteases are one of the major classes of proteolytic enzymes involved in a number of physiological and pathological processes in plants, animals and microorganisms. When their synthesis, activity and localization in mammalian cells are altered, they may contribute to the development of many diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis and cancer. Therefore, cysteine proteases have become promising drug targets for the medical treatment of these disorders. Inhibitors of cysteine proteases are also produced by almost every group of living organisms, being responsible for the control of intracellular proteolytic activity. Microorganisms synthesize cysteine protease inhibitors not only to regulate the activity of endogenous, often virulent enzymes, but also to hinder the host's proteolytic defense system and evade its immune responses against infections. Present work describes known to date microbial inhibitors of cysteine proteases in terms of their structure, enzyme binding mechanism, specificity and pathophysiological roles. The overview of both proteinaceous and small-molecule inhibitors produced by all groups of microorganisms (bacteria, archaea, fungi, protists) and viruses is provided. Subsequently, possible applications of microbial inhibitors in science, medicine and biotechnology are also highlighted.

  18. The macromolecular assembly of pathogen-recognition receptors is impelled by serine proteases, via their complement control protein modules.

    PubMed

    Le Saux, Agnès; Ng, Patricia Miang Lon; Koh, Joanne Jing Yun; Low, Diana Hooi Ping; Leong, Geraldine E-Ling; Ho, Bow; Ding, Jeak Ling

    2008-03-28

    Although the innate immune response is triggered by the formation of a stable assembly of pathogen-recognition receptors (PRRs) onto the pathogens, the driving force that enables this PRR-PRR interaction is unknown. Here, we show that serine proteases, which are activated during infection, participate in associating with the PRRs. Inhibition of serine proteases gravely impairs the PRR assembly. Using yeast two-hybrid and pull-down methods, we found that two serine proteases in the horseshoe crab Carcinoscorpius rotundicauda are able to bind to the following three core members of PRRs: galactose-binding protein, Carcinolectin-5 and C-reactive protein. These two serine proteases are (1) Factor C, which activates the coagulation pathway, and (2) C2/Bf, a protein from the complement pathway. By systematic molecular dissection, we show that these serine proteases interact with the core "pathogen-recognition complex" via their complement control protein modules. PMID:18279891

  19. Differential protease activity augments polyphagy in Helicoverpa armigera.

    PubMed

    Chikate, Y R; Tamhane, V A; Joshi, R S; Gupta, V S; Giri, A P

    2013-06-01

    Helicoverpa armigera (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) and other polyphagous agricultural pests are extending their plant host range and emerging as serious agents in restraining crop productivity. Dynamic regulation, coupled with a diversity of digestive and detoxifying enzymes, play a crucial role in the adaptation of polyphagous insects. To investigate the functional intricacy of serine proteases in the development and polyphagy of H. armigera, we profiled the expression of eight trypsin-like and four chymotrypsin-like phylogenetically diverse mRNAs from different life stages of H. armigera reared on nutritionally distinct host plants. These analyses revealed diet- and stage-specific protease expression patterns. The trypsins expressed showed structural variations, which might result in differential substrate specificity and interaction with inhibitors. Protease profiles in the presence of inhibitors and their mass spectrometric analyses revealed insight into their differential activity. These findings emphasize the differential expression of serine proteases and their consequences for digestive physiology in promoting polyphagy in H. armigera. PMID:23432026

  20. Curcumin derivatives as HIV-1 protease inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Sui, Z.; Li, J.; Craik, C.S.; Ortiz de Montellano, P.R.

    1993-12-31

    Curcumin, a non-toxic natural compound from Curcuma longa, has been found to be an HIV-1 protease inhibitor. Some of its derivatives were synthesized and their inhibitory activity against the HIV-1 protease was tested. Curcumin analogues containing boron enhanced the inhibitory activity. At least of the the synthesized compounds irreversibly inhibits the HIV-1 protease.

  1. Proteases in Fas-mediated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhivotovsky, B; Burgess, D H; Schlegel, J; Pörn, M I; Vanags, D; Orrenius, S

    1997-01-01

    Involvement of a unique family of cysteine proteases in the multistep apoptotic process has been documented. Cloning of several mammalian genes identifies some components of this cellular response. However, it is currently unclear which protease plays a role as a signal and/or effector of apoptosis. We summarize contributions to the data concerning proteases in Fas-mediated apoptosis.

  2. Exogenous proteases for meat tenderization.

    PubMed

    Bekhit, Alaa A; Hopkins, David L; Geesink, Geert; Bekhit, Adnan A; Franks, Philip

    2014-01-01

    The use of exogenous proteases to improve meat tenderness has attracted much interest recently, with a view to consistent production of tender meat and added value to lower grade meat cuts. This review discusses the sources, characteristics, and use of exogenous proteases in meat tenderization to highlight the specificity of the proteases toward meat proteins and their impact on meat quality. Plant enzymes (such as papain, bromelain, and ficin) have been extensively investigated as meat tenderizers. New plant proteases (actinidin and zingibain) and microbial enzyme preparations have been of recent interest due to controlled meat tenderization and other advantages. Successful use of these enzymes in fresh meat requires their enzymatic kinetics and characteristics to be determined, together with an understanding of the impact of the surrounding environmental conditions of the meat (pH, temperature) on enzyme function. This enables the optimal conditions for tenderizing fresh meat to be established, and the elimination or reduction of any negative impacts on other quality attributes. PMID:24499119

  3. Mutational Tail Loss Is an Evolutionary Mechanism for Liberating Marapsins and Other Type I Serine Proteases from Transmembrane Anchors*

    PubMed Central

    Raman, Kavita; Trivedi, Neil N.; Raymond, Wilfred W.; Ganesan, Rajkumar; Kirchhofer, Daniel; Verghese, George M.; Craik, Charles S.; Schneider, Eric L.; Nimishakavi, Shilpa; Caughey, George H.

    2013-01-01

    Human and mouse marapsins (Prss27) are serine proteases preferentially expressed by stratified squamous epithelia. However, mouse marapsin contains a transmembrane anchor absent from the human enzyme. To gain insights into physical forms, activities, inhibition, and roles in epithelial differentiation, we traced tail loss in human marapsin to a nonsense mutation in an ancestral ape, compared substrate preferences of mouse and human marapsins with those of the epithelial peptidase prostasin, designed a selective substrate and inhibitor, and generated Prss27-null mice. Phylogenetic analysis predicts that most marapsins are transmembrane proteins. However, nonsense mutations caused membrane anchor loss in three clades: human/bonobo/chimpanzee, guinea pig/degu/tuco-tuco/mole rat, and cattle/yak. Most marapsin-related proteases, including prostasins, are type I transmembrane proteins, but the closest relatives (prosemins) are not. Soluble mouse and human marapsins are tryptic with subsite preferences distinct from those of prostasin, lack general proteinase activity, and unlike prostasins resist antiproteases, including leupeptin, aprotinin, serpins, and α2-macroglobulin, suggesting the presence of non-canonical active sites. Prss27-null mice develop normally in barrier conditions and are fertile without overt epithelial defects, indicating that marapsin does not play critical, non-redundant roles in development, reproduction, or epithelial differentiation. In conclusion, marapsins are conserved, inhibitor-resistant, tryptic peptidases. Although marapsins are type I transmembrane proteins in their typical form, they mutated independently into anchorless forms in several mammalian clades, including one involving humans. Similar pathways appear to have been traversed by prosemins and tryptases, suggesting that mutational tail loss is an important means of evolving new functions of tryptic serine proteases from transmembrane ancestors. PMID:23447538

  4. Serine proteases SP1 and SP13 mediate the melanization response of Asian corn borer, Ostrinia furnacalis, against entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana.

    PubMed

    Chu, Yuan; Liu, Yang; Shen, Dongxu; Hong, Fang; Wang, Guirong; An, Chunju

    2015-06-01

    Exposure to entomopathogenic fungi is one approach for insect pest control. Little is known about the immune interactions between fungus and its insect host. Melanization is a prominent immune response in insects in defending against pathogens such as bacteria and fungi. Clip domain serine proteases in insect plasma have been implicated in the activation of prophenoloxidase, a key enzyme in the melanization. The relationship between host melanization and the infection by a fungus needs to be established. We report here that the injection of entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana induced both melanin synthesis and phenoloxidase activity in its host insect, the Asian corn borer, Ostrinia furnacalis (Guenée). qRT-PCR analysis showed several distinct patterns of expression of 13 clip-domain serine proteases in response to the challenge of fungi, with seven increased, two decreased, and four unchanged. Of special interest among these clip-domain serine protease genes are SP1 and SP13, the orthologs of Manduca sexta HP6 and PAP1 which are involved in the prophenoloxidase activation pathway. Recombinant O. furnacalis SP1 was found to activate proSP13 and induce the phenoloxidase activity in corn borer plasma. Additionally, SP13 was determined to directly cleave prophenoloxidase and therefore act as the prophenoloxidase activating protease. Our work thus reveals a biochemical mechanism in the melanization in corn borer associated with the challenge by B. bassiana injection. These insights could provide valuable information for better understanding the immune responses of Asian corn borer against B. bassiana. PMID:25900291

  5. Discrimination of differentially inhibited cysteine proteases by activity-based profiling using cystatin variants with tailored specificities.

    PubMed

    Sainsbury, Frank; Rhéaume, Ann-Julie; Goulet, Marie-Claire; Vorster, Juan; Michaud, Dominique

    2012-12-01

    Recent research has shown the possibility of tailoring the inhibitory specificity of plant cystatins toward cysteine (Cys) proteases by single mutations at positively selected amino acid sites. Here we devised a cystatin activity-based profiling approach to assess the impact of such mutations at the proteome scale using single variants of tomato cystatin SlCYS8 and digestive Cys proteases of the herbivorous insect, Colorado potato beetle, as a model. Biotinylated forms of SlCYS8 and SlCYS8 variants were used to capture susceptible Cys proteases in insect midgut protein extracts by biotin immobilization on avidin-embedded beads. A quantitative LC-MS/MS analysis of the captured proteins was performed to compare the inhibitory profile of different SlCYS8 variants. The approach confirmed the relevance of phylogenetic inferences categorizing the insect digestive Cys proteases into six functionally distinct families. It also revealed significant variation in protease family profiles captured with N-terminal variants of SlCYS8, in line with in silico structural models for Cys protease-SlCYS8 interactions suggesting a functional role for the N-terminal region. Our data confirm overall the usefulness of cystatin activity-based protease profiling for the monitoring of Cys protease-inhibitor interactions in complex biological systems. They also illustrate the potential of biotinylated cystatins to identify recombinant cystatin candidates for the inactivation of specific Cys protease targets. PMID:23082957

  6. Structure-based design and functional studies of novel noroviral 3C protease chimaeras offer insights into substrate specificity

    PubMed Central

    Herod, Morgan R.; Prince, Cynthia A.; Skilton, Rachel J.; Ward, Vernon K.; Cooper, Jonathan B.; Clarke, Ian N.

    2014-01-01

    The norovirus NS6 protease is a key target for anti-viral drug development. Noroviruses encode a 2200 amino acid polyprotein which is cleaved by this critical protease at five defined boundary substrates into six mature non-structural (NS) proteins. Studies of the human norovirus (HNV) NS6 protease, in the context of a full ORF1 polyprotein, have been severely hampered because HNVs are not culturable. Thus, investigations into the HNV NS6 protease have been largely restricted to in vitro assays using Escherichia coli-expressed, purified enzyme. The NS6 protease is formed of two distinct domains joined by a linking loop. Structural data suggest that domain 2 of the protease possesses substantial substrate binding pockets which form the bulk of the interactions with the NS boundaries and largely dictate boundary specificity and cleavage. We have constructed chimaeric murine norovirus (MNV) genomes carrying individual domains from the HNV protease and demonstrated by cell transfection that chimaeric HNV proteases have functional activity in the context of the full-length ORF1 polyprotein. Although domain 2 primarily confers boundary specificity, our data suggest that an inter-domain interaction exists within HNV NS6 protease which influences cleavage of specific substrates. The present study also shows that chimaeric MNVs provide improved models for studying HNV protein function in the context of a full ORF1 polyprotein. PMID:25275273

  7. Discrimination of differentially inhibited cysteine proteases by activity-based profiling using cystatin variants with tailored specificities.

    PubMed

    Sainsbury, Frank; Rhéaume, Ann-Julie; Goulet, Marie-Claire; Vorster, Juan; Michaud, Dominique

    2012-12-01

    Recent research has shown the possibility of tailoring the inhibitory specificity of plant cystatins toward cysteine (Cys) proteases by single mutations at positively selected amino acid sites. Here we devised a cystatin activity-based profiling approach to assess the impact of such mutations at the proteome scale using single variants of tomato cystatin SlCYS8 and digestive Cys proteases of the herbivorous insect, Colorado potato beetle, as a model. Biotinylated forms of SlCYS8 and SlCYS8 variants were used to capture susceptible Cys proteases in insect midgut protein extracts by biotin immobilization on avidin-embedded beads. A quantitative LC-MS/MS analysis of the captured proteins was performed to compare the inhibitory profile of different SlCYS8 variants. The approach confirmed the relevance of phylogenetic inferences categorizing the insect digestive Cys proteases into six functionally distinct families. It also revealed significant variation in protease family profiles captured with N-terminal variants of SlCYS8, in line with in silico structural models for Cys protease-SlCYS8 interactions suggesting a functional role for the N-terminal region. Our data confirm overall the usefulness of cystatin activity-based protease profiling for the monitoring of Cys protease-inhibitor interactions in complex biological systems. They also illustrate the potential of biotinylated cystatins to identify recombinant cystatin candidates for the inactivation of specific Cys protease targets.

  8. Structure-based design and functional studies of novel noroviral 3C protease chimaeras offer insights into substrate specificity.

    PubMed

    Herod, Morgan R; Prince, Cynthia A; Skilton, Rachel J; Ward, Vernon K; Cooper, Jonathan B; Clarke, Ian N

    2014-12-15

    The norovirus NS6 protease is a key target for anti-viral drug development. Noroviruses encode a 2200 amino acid polyprotein which is cleaved by this critical protease at five defined boundary substrates into six mature non-structural (NS) proteins. Studies of the human norovirus (HNV) NS6 protease, in the context of a full ORF1 polyprotein, have been severely hampered because HNVs are not culturable. Thus, investigations into the HNV NS6 protease have been largely restricted to in vitro assays using Escherichia coli-expressed, purified enzyme. The NS6 protease is formed of two distinct domains joined by a linking loop. Structural data suggest that domain 2 of the protease possesses substantial substrate binding pockets which form the bulk of the interactions with the NS boundaries and largely dictate boundary specificity and cleavage. We have constructed chimaeric murine norovirus (MNV) genomes carrying individual domains from the HNV protease and demonstrated by cell transfection that chimaeric HNV proteases have functional activity in the context of the full-length ORF1 polyprotein. Although domain 2 primarily confers boundary specificity, our data suggest that an inter-domain interaction exists within HNV NS6 protease which influences cleavage of specific substrates. The present study also shows that chimaeric MNVs provide improved models for studying HNV protein function in the context of a full ORF1 polyprotein. PMID:25275273

  9. Dengue Virus Infection Causes the Activation of Distinct NF-κB Pathways for Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase and TNF-α Expression in RAW264.7 Cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yi-Lin; Lin, Yee-Shin; Chen, Chia-Ling; Wan, Shu-Wen; Ou, Yi-Dan; Yu, Chia-Yi; Tsai, Tsung-Ting; Tseng, Po-Chun; Lin, Chiou-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Infection with dengue virus (DENV) causes an increase in proinflammatory responses, such as nitric oxide (NO) generation and TNF-α expression; however, the molecular mechanism underlying this inflammatory activation remains undefined, although the activation of the transcription factor NF-κB is generally involved. In addition to TNF-α production in DENV-infected murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells, inducible NO synthase was transcriptionally and posttranslationally elevated and accompanied by NO generation. NF-κB is known to be activated by DENV infection. Pharmacologically inhibiting NF-κB activation abolishes iNOS/NO biosynthesis and TNF-α production. With inhibition, the potential role of NF-κB in oxidative signaling regulation was prevented during DENV infection. Heat-inactivated DENV failed to cause the identified inflammatory responses. Pharmacological inhibition of TLR3 partly decreased NF-κB activation; however, it effectively abolished inducible iNOS/NO biosynthesis but did not inhibit TNF-α production. In contrast to TLR3, viral protein NS2B3 also independently contributed to NF-κB activation to regulate TNF-α production. These results show the distinct pathways for NF-κB activation caused by DENV infection individually for the regulation of iNOS/NO and TNF-α expression. PMID:26199460

  10. A Lys49 Phospholipase A2, Isolated from Bothrops asper Snake Venom, Induces Lipid Droplet Formation in Macrophages Which Depends on Distinct Signaling Pathways and the C-Terminal Region

    PubMed Central

    Cristina Giannotti, Karina; Leiguez, Elbio; Moreira, Vanessa; Nascimento, Neide Galvão; Lomonte, Bruno; Gutiérrez, José Maria; Lopes de Melo, Robson; Teixeira, Catarina

    2013-01-01

    MT-II, a Lys49PLA2 homologue devoid of catalytic activity from B. asper venom, stimulates inflammatory events in macrophages. We investigated the ability of MT-II to induce formation of lipid droplets (LDs), key elements of inflammatory responses, in isolated macrophages and participation of protein kinases and intracellular PLA2s in this effect. Influence of MT-II on PLIN2 recruitment and expression was assessed, and the effects of some synthetic peptides on LD formation were further evaluated. At noncytotoxic concentrations, MT-II directly activated macrophages to form LDs. This effect was reproduced by a synthetic peptide corresponding to the C-terminal sequence 115–129 of MT-II, evidencing the critical role of C-terminus for MT-II-induced effect. Moreover, MT-II induced expression and recruitment of PLIN2. Pharmacological interventions with specific inhibitors showed that PKC, PI3K, ERK1/2, and iPLA2, but not P38MAPK or cPLA2, signaling pathways are involved in LD formation induced by MT-II. This sPLA2 homologue also induced synthesis of PGE2 that colocalized to LDs. In conclusion, MT-II is able to induce formation of LDs committed to PGE2 formation in a process dependent on C-terminal loop engagement and regulated by distinct protein kinases and iPLA2. LDs may constitute an important inflammatory mechanism triggered by MT-II in macrophages. PMID:23509782

  11. Propeptides of eukaryotic proteases encode histidines to exploit organelle pH for regulation

    PubMed Central

    Elferich, Johannes; Williamson, Danielle M.; Krishnamoorthy, Bala; Shinde, Ujwal

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells maintain strict control over protein secretion, in part by using the pH gradient maintained within their secretory pathway. How eukaryotic proteins evolved from prokaryotic orthologs to exploit the pH gradient for biological functions remains a fundamental question in cell biology. Our laboratory previously demonstrated that protein domains located within precursor proteins, propeptides, encode histidine-driven pH sensors to regulate organelle-specific activation of the eukaryotic proteases furin and proprotein convertase-1/3. Similar findings have been reported in other unrelated protease families. By analyzing >10,000 unique proteases within evolutionarily unrelated families, we show that eukaryotic propeptides are enriched in histidines compared with prokaryotic orthologs. On this basis, we hypothesize that eukaryotic proteins evolved to enrich histidines within their propeptides to exploit the tightly controlled pH gradient of the secretory pathway, thereby regulating activation within specific organelles. Enrichment of histidines in propeptides may therefore be used to predict the presence of pH sensors in other proteases or even protease substrates.—Elferich, J., Williamson, D. M., Krishnamoorthy, B., Shinde, U. Propeptides of eukaryotic proteases encode histidines to exploit organelle pH for regulation. PMID:23585398

  12. Serine protease activation of near-silent epithelial Na+ channels.

    PubMed

    Caldwell, Ray A; Boucher, Richard C; Stutts, M Jackson

    2004-01-01

    The regulation of epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) function is critical for normal salt and water balance. This regulation is achieved through cell surface insertion/retrieval of channels, by changes in channel open probability (Po), or through a combination of these processes. Epithelium-derived serine proteases, including channel activating protease (CAP) and prostasin, regulate epithelial Na+ transport, but the molecular mechanism is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that extracellular serine proteases activate a near-silent ENaC population resident in the plasma membrane. Single-channel events were recorded in outside-out patches from fibroblasts (NIH/3T3) stably expressing rat alpha-, beta-, and gamma-subunits (rENaC), before and during exposure to trypsin, a serine protease homologous to CAP and prostasin. Under baseline conditions, near-silent patches were defined as having rENaC activity (NPo) < 0.03, where N is the number of channels. Within 1-5 min of 3 microg/ml bath trypsin superfusion, NPo increased approximately 66-fold (n = 7). In patches observed to contain a single functional channel, trypsin increased Po from 0.02 +/- 0.01 to 0.57 +/- 0.03 (n = 3, mean +/- SE), resulting from the combination of an increased channel open time and decreased channel closed time. Catalytic activity was required for activation of near-silent ENaC. Channel conductance and the Na+/Li+ current ratio with trypsin were similar to control values. Modulation of ENaC Po by endogenous epithelial serine proteases is a potentially important regulator of epithelial Na+ transport, distinct from the regulation achieved by hormone-induced plasma membrane insertion of channels. PMID:12967915

  13. Biotechnology of Cold-Active Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Swati; Satyanarayana, Tulasi

    2013-01-01

    The bulk of Earth’s biosphere is cold (<5 °C) and inhabited by psychrophiles. Biocatalysts from psychrophilic organisms (psychrozymes) have attracted attention because of their application in the ongoing efforts to decrease energy consumption. Proteinases as a class represent the largest category of industrial enzymes. There has been an emphasis on employing cold-active proteases in detergents because this allows laundry operations at ambient temperatures. Proteases have been used in environmental bioremediation, food industry and molecular biology. In view of the present limited understanding and availability of cold-active proteases with diverse characteristics, it is essential to explore Earth’s surface more in search of an ideal cold-active protease. The understanding of molecular and mechanistic details of these proteases will open up new avenues to tailor proteases with the desired properties. A detailed account of the developments in the production and applications of cold-active proteases is presented in this review. PMID:24832807

  14. Intestinal proteases of free-living and parasitic astigmatid mites.

    PubMed

    Holt, Deborah C; Burgess, Stewart T G; Reynolds, Simone L; Mahmood, Wajahat; Fischer, Katja

    2013-02-01

    Among arthropod pests, mites are responsible for considerable damage to crops, humans and other animals. However, detailed physiological data on these organisms remain sparse, mainly because of their small size but possibly also because of their extreme diversity. Focusing on intestinal proteases, we draw together information from three distinct mite species that all feed on skin but have separately adapted to a free-living, a strictly ecto-parasitic and a parasitic lifestyle. A wide range of studies involving immunohistology, molecular biology, X-ray crystallography and enzyme biochemistry of mite gut proteases suggests that these creatures have diverged considerably as house dust mites, sheep scab mites and scabies mites. Each species has evolved a particular variation of a presumably ancestral repertoire of digestive enzymes that have become specifically adapted to their individual environmental requirements.

  15. A computational module assembled from different protease family motifs identifies PI PLC from Bacillus cereus as a putative prolyl peptidase with a serine protease scaffold.

    PubMed

    Rendón-Ramírez, Adela; Shukla, Manish; Oda, Masataka; Chakraborty, Sandeep; Minda, Renu; Dandekar, Abhaya M; Ásgeirsson, Bjarni; Goñi, Félix M; Rao, Basuthkar J

    2013-01-01

    Proteolytic enzymes have evolved several mechanisms to cleave peptide bonds. These distinct types have been systematically categorized in the MEROPS database. While a BLAST search on these proteases identifies homologous proteins, sequence alignment methods often fail to identify relationships arising from convergent evolution, exon shuffling, and modular reuse of catalytic units. We have previously established a computational method to detect functions in proteins based on the spatial and electrostatic properties of the catalytic residues (CLASP). CLASP identified a promiscuous serine protease scaffold in alkaline phosphatases (AP) and a scaffold recognizing a β-lactam (imipenem) in a cold-active Vibrio AP. Subsequently, we defined a methodology to quantify promiscuous activities in a wide range of proteins. Here, we assemble a module which encapsulates the multifarious motifs used by protease families listed in the MEROPS database. Since APs and proteases are an integral component of outer membrane vesicles (OMV), we sought to query other OMV proteins, like phospholipase C (PLC), using this search module. Our analysis indicated that phosphoinositide-specific PLC from Bacillus cereus is a serine protease. This was validated by protease assays, mass spectrometry and by inhibition of the native phospholipase activity of PI-PLC by the well-known serine protease inhibitor AEBSF (IC50 = 0.018 mM). Edman degradation analysis linked the specificity of the protease activity to a proline in the amino terminal, suggesting that the PI-PLC is a prolyl peptidase. Thus, we propose a computational method of extending protein families based on the spatial and electrostatic congruence of active site residues.

  16. Rubus idaeus L. reverses epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and suppresses cell invasion and protease activities by targeting ERK1/2 and FAK pathways in human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yih-Shou; Chu, Shu-Chen; Hsu, Li-Sung; Chen, Kuo-Shuen; Lai, Ming-Tsung; Yeh, Chia-Heng; Chen, Pei-Ni

    2013-12-01

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) has been considered essential for cancer metastasis, a multistep complicated process including local invasion, intravasation, extravasation, and proliferation at distant sites. Herein we provided molecular evidence associated with the antimetastatic effect of Rubus idaeus L. extracts (RIE) by showing a nearly complete inhibition on the invasion (p<0.001) of highly metastatic A549 cells via reduced activities of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and urokinasetype plasminogen activator (u-PA). We performed Western blot to find that RIE could induce up-regulation of epithelial marker such as E-cadherin and α-catenin and inhibit the mesenchymal markers such as N-cadherin, fibronectin, snail-1, and vimentin. Selective snail-1 inhibition by snail-1-specific-siRNA also showed increased E-cadherin expression in A549 cells suggesting a possible involvement of snail-1 inhibition in RIE-caused increase in E-cadherin level. RIE also inhibited p-FAK, p-paxillin and AP-1 by Western blot analysis, indicating the anti-EMT effect of RIE in human lung carcinoma. Importantly, an in vivo BALB/c nude mice xenograft model showed that RIE treatment reduced tumor growth by oral gavage, and RIE represent promising candidates for future phytochemical-based mechanistic pathway-targeted cancer prevention strategies.

  17. Rubus idaeus L. reverses epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and suppresses cell invasion and protease activities by targeting ERK1/2 and FAK pathways in human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Yih-Shou; Chu, Shu-Chen; Hsu, Li-Sung; Chen, Kuo-Shuen; Lai, Ming-Tsung; Yeh, Chia-Heng; Chen, Pei-Ni

    2013-12-01

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) has been considered essential for cancer metastasis, a multistep complicated process including local invasion, intravasation, extravasation, and proliferation at distant sites. Herein we provided molecular evidence associated with the antimetastatic effect of Rubus idaeus L. extracts (RIE) by showing a nearly complete inhibition on the invasion (p<0.001) of highly metastatic A549 cells via reduced activities of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and urokinasetype plasminogen activator (u-PA). We performed Western blot to find that RIE could induce up-regulation of epithelial marker such as E-cadherin and α-catenin and inhibit the mesenchymal markers such as N-cadherin, fibronectin, snail-1, and vimentin. Selective snail-1 inhibition by snail-1-specific-siRNA also showed increased E-cadherin expression in A549 cells suggesting a possible involvement of snail-1 inhibition in RIE-caused increase in E-cadherin level. RIE also inhibited p-FAK, p-paxillin and AP-1 by Western blot analysis, indicating the anti-EMT effect of RIE in human lung carcinoma. Importantly, an in vivo BALB/c nude mice xenograft model showed that RIE treatment reduced tumor growth by oral gavage, and RIE represent promising candidates for future phytochemical-based mechanistic pathway-targeted cancer prevention strategies. PMID:24161487

  18. Type II Transmembrane Serine Proteases*

    PubMed Central

    Bugge, Thomas H.; Antalis, Toni M.; Wu, Qingyu

    2009-01-01

    Analysis of genome and expressed sequence tag data bases at the turn of the millennium unveiled a new protease family named the type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSPs) in a Journal of Biological Chemistry minireview (Hooper, J. D., Clements, J. A., Quigley, J. P., and Antalis, T. M. (2001) J. Biol. Chem. 276, 857–860). Since then, the number of known TTSPs has more than doubled, and more importantly, our understanding of the physiological functions of individual TTSPs and their contribution to human disease has greatly increased. Progress has also been made in identifying molecular substrates and endogenous inhibitors. This minireview summarizes the current knowledge of the rapidly advancing TTSP field. PMID:19487698

  19. Proteases in agricultural dust induce lung inflammation through PAR-1 and PAR-2 activation.

    PubMed

    Romberger, Debra J; Heires, Art J; Nordgren, Tara M; Souder, Chelsea P; West, William; Liu, Xiang-de; Poole, Jill A; Toews, Myron L; Wyatt, Todd A

    2015-08-15

    Workers exposed to aerosolized dust present in concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) are susceptible to inflammatory lung diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Extracts of dust collected from hog CAFOs [hog dust extract (HDE)] are potent stimulators of lung inflammatory responses in several model systems. The observation that HDE contains active proteases prompted the present study, which evaluated the role of CAFO dust proteases in lung inflammatory processes and tested whether protease-activated receptors (PARs) are involved in the signaling pathway for these events. We hypothesized that the damaging proinflammatory effect of HDE is due, in part, to the proteolytic activation of PARs, and inhibiting the proteases in HDE or disrupting PAR activation would attenuate HDE-mediated inflammatory indexes in bronchial epithelial cells (BECs), in mouse lung slices in vitro, and in a murine in vivo exposure model. Human BECs and mouse lung slice cultures stimulated with 5% HDE released significantly more of each of the cytokines measured (IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, keratinocyte-derived chemokine/CXC chemokine ligand 1, and macrophage inflammatory protein-2/CXC chemokine ligand 2) than controls, and these effects were markedly diminished by protease inhibition. Inhibition of PARs also blunted the HDE-induced cytokine release from BECs. In addition, protease depletion inhibited HDE-induced BEC intracellular PKCα and PKCε activation. C57BL/6J mice administered 12.5% HDE intranasally, either once or daily for 3 wk, exhibited increased total cellular and neutrophil influx, bronchial alveolar fluid inflammatory cytokines, lung histopathology, and inflammatory scores compared with mice receiving protease-depleted HDE. These data suggest that proteases in dust from CAFOs are important mediators of lung inflammation, and these proteases and their receptors may provide novel targets for therapeutic intervention in CAFO dust-induced airways disease.

  20. Proteases in agricultural dust induce lung inflammation through PAR-1 and PAR-2 activation.

    PubMed

    Romberger, Debra J; Heires, Art J; Nordgren, Tara M; Souder, Chelsea P; West, William; Liu, Xiang-de; Poole, Jill A; Toews, Myron L; Wyatt, Todd A

    2015-08-15

    Workers exposed to aerosolized dust present in concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) are susceptible to inflammatory lung diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Extracts of dust collected from hog CAFOs [hog dust extract (HDE)] are potent stimulators of lung inflammatory responses in several model systems. The observation that HDE contains active proteases prompted the present study, which evaluated the role of CAFO dust proteases in lung inflammatory processes and tested whether protease-activated receptors (PARs) are involved in the signaling pathway for these events. We hypothesized that the damaging proinflammatory effect of HDE is due, in part, to the proteolytic activation of PARs, and inhibiting the proteases in HDE or disrupting PAR activation would attenuate HDE-mediated inflammatory indexes in bronchial epithelial cells (BECs), in mouse lung slices in vitro, and in a murine in vivo exposure model. Human BECs and mouse lung slice cultures stimulated with 5% HDE released significantly more of each of the cytokines measured (IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, keratinocyte-derived chemokine/CXC chemokine ligand 1, and macrophage inflammatory protein-2/CXC chemokine ligand 2) than controls, and these effects were markedly diminished by protease inhibition. Inhibition of PARs also blunted the HDE-induced cytokine release from BECs. In addition, protease depletion inhibited HDE-induced BEC intracellular PKCα and PKCε activation. C57BL/6J mice administered 12.5% HDE intranasally, either once or daily for 3 wk, exhibited increased total cellular and neutrophil influx, bronchial alveolar fluid inflammatory cytokines, lung histopathology, and inflammatory scores compared with mice receiving protease-depleted HDE. These data suggest that proteases in dust from CAFOs are important mediators of lung inflammation, and these proteases and their receptors may provide novel targets for therapeutic intervention in CAFO dust-induced airways disease. PMID

  1. Proteases in agricultural dust induce lung inflammation through PAR-1 and PAR-2 activation

    PubMed Central

    Heires, Art J.; Nordgren, Tara M.; Souder, Chelsea P.; West, William; Liu, Xiang-de; Poole, Jill A.; Toews, Myron L.; Wyatt, Todd A.

    2015-01-01

    Workers exposed to aerosolized dust present in concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) are susceptible to inflammatory lung diseases, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Extracts of dust collected from hog CAFOs [hog dust extract (HDE)] are potent stimulators of lung inflammatory responses in several model systems. The observation that HDE contains active proteases prompted the present study, which evaluated the role of CAFO dust proteases in lung inflammatory processes and tested whether protease-activated receptors (PARs) are involved in the signaling pathway for these events. We hypothesized that the damaging proinflammatory effect of HDE is due, in part, to the proteolytic activation of PARs, and inhibiting the proteases in HDE or disrupting PAR activation would attenuate HDE-mediated inflammatory indexes in bronchial epithelial cells (BECs), in mouse lung slices in vitro, and in a murine in vivo exposure model. Human BECs and mouse lung slice cultures stimulated with 5% HDE released significantly more of each of the cytokines measured (IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, keratinocyte-derived chemokine/CXC chemokine ligand 1, and macrophage inflammatory protein-2/CXC chemokine ligand 2) than controls, and these effects were markedly diminished by protease inhibition. Inhibition of PARs also blunted the HDE-induced cytokine release from BECs. In addition, protease depletion inhibited HDE-induced BEC intracellular PKCα and PKCε activation. C57BL/6J mice administered 12.5% HDE intranasally, either once or daily for 3 wk, exhibited increased total cellular and neutrophil influx, bronchial alveolar fluid inflammatory cytokines, lung histopathology, and inflammatory scores compared with mice receiving protease-depleted HDE. These data suggest that proteases in dust from CAFOs are important mediators of lung inflammation, and these proteases and their receptors may provide novel targets for therapeutic intervention in CAFO dust-induced airways disease. PMID

  2. Cleavage of Dicer protein by I7 protease during vaccinia virus infection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jhih-Si; Li, Hui-Chun; Lin, Shu-I; Yang, Chee-Hing; Chien, Wan-Yu; Syu, Ciao-Ling; Lo, Shih-Yen

    2015-01-01

    Dicer is the key component in the miRNA pathway. Degradation of Dicer protein is facilitated during vaccinia virus (VV) infection. A C-terminal cleaved product of Dicer protein was detected in the presence of MG132 during VV infection. Thus, it is possible that Dicer protein is cleaved by a viral protease followed by proteasome degradation of the cleaved product. There is a potential I7 protease cleavage site in the C-terminus of Dicer protein. Indeed, reduction of Dicer protein was detected when Dicer was co-expressed with I7 protease but not with an I7 protease mutant protein lack of the protease activity. Mutation of the potential I7 cleavage site in the C-terminus of Dicer protein resisted its degradation during VV infection. Furthermore, Dicer protein was reduced dramatically by recombinant VV vI7Li after the induction of I7 protease. If VV could facilitate the degradation of Dicer protein, the process of miRNA should be affected by VV infection. Indeed, accumulation of precursor miR122 was detected after VV infection or I7 protease expression. Reduction of miR122 would result in the suppression of HCV sub-genomic RNA replication, and, in turn, the amount of viral proteins. As expected, significant reduction of HCVNS5A protein was detected after VV infection and I7 protease expression. Therefore, our results suggest that VV could cleave Dicer protein through I7 protease to facilitate Dicer degradation, and in turn, suppress the processing of miRNAs. Effect of Dicer protein on VV replication was also studied. Exogenous expression of Dicer protein suppresses VV replication slightly while knockdown of Dicer protein does not affect VV replication significantly.

  3. Molecular Imaging of Proteases in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yunan; Hong, Hao; Zhang, Yin; Cai, Weibo

    2010-01-01

    Proteases play important roles during tumor angiogenesis, invasion, and metastasis. Various molecular imaging techniques have been employed for protease imaging: optical (both fluorescence and bioluminescence), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and positron emission tomography (PET). In this review, we will summarize the current status of imaging proteases in cancer with these techniques. Optical imaging of proteases, in particular with fluorescence, is the most intensively validated and many of the imaging probes are already commercially available. It is generally agreed that the use of activatable probes is the most accurate and appropriate means for measuring protease activity. Molecular imaging of proteases with other techniques (i.e. MRI, SPECT, and PET) has not been well-documented in the literature which certainly deserves much future effort. Optical imaging and molecular MRI of protease activity has very limited potential for clinical investigation. PET/SPECT imaging is suitable for clinical investigation; however the optimal probes for PET/SPECT imaging of proteases in cancer have yet to be developed. Successful development of protease imaging probes with optimal in vivo stability, tumor targeting efficacy, and desirable pharmacokinetics for clinical translation will eventually improve cancer patient management. Not limited to cancer, these protease-targeted imaging probes will also have broad applications in other diseases such as arthritis, atherosclerosis, and myocardial infarction. PMID:20234801

  4. ATP-dependent incorporation of 20S protease into the 26S complex that degrades proteins conjugated to ubiquitin.

    PubMed Central

    Eytan, E; Ganoth, D; Armon, T; Hershko, A

    1989-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that the ATP-dependent 26S protease complex that degrades proteins conjugated to ubiquitin is formed by the assembly of three factors in an ATP-requiring process. We now identify one of the factors as the 20S "multicatalytic" protease, a complex of low molecular weight subunits widely distributed in eukaryotic cells. Comparison of the subunit compositions of purified 20S and 26S complexes indicates that the former is an integral part of the latter. By the use of detergent treatment to activate latent protease activity, we show that the 20S protease becomes incorporated into the 26S complex in the ATP-dependent assembly process. It thus seems that the 20S protease is the "catalytic core" of the 26S complex of the ubiquitin proteolytic pathway. Images PMID:2554287

  5. Serum proteases alter the antigenicity of peptides presented by class I major histocompatibility complex molecules.

    PubMed Central

    Falo, L D; Colarusso, L J; Benacerraf, B; Rock, K L

    1992-01-01

    Any effect of serum on the antigenicity of peptides is potentially relevant to their use as immunogens in vivo. Here we demonstrate that serum contains distinct proteases that can increase or decrease the antigenicity of peptides. By using a functional assay, we show that a serum component other than beta 2-microglobulin enhances the presentation of ovalbumin peptides produced by cyanogen bromide cleavage. Three features of this serum activity implicate proteolysis: it is temperature dependent, it results in increased antigenicity in a low molecular weight peptide fraction, and it is inhibited by the protease inhibitor leupeptin. Conversely, presentation of the synthetic peptide OVA-(257-264) is inhibited by serum. This inhibition is unaffected by leupeptin but is blocked by bestatin, a protease inhibitor with distinct substrate specificities. Implications for peptide-based vaccine design and immunotherapy are discussed. PMID:1518868

  6. A sensitive fluorescence reporter for monitoring quorum sensing regulated protease production in Vibrio harveyi.

    PubMed

    Rajamani, Sathish; Sayre, Richard T

    2011-02-01

    Many bacteria produce and secrete proteases during host invasion and pathogenesis. Vibrio harveyi, an opportunistic pathogen of shrimp, is known to use a two-component quorum sensing (QS) mechanism for coordination of gene expression including protease secretion at high population densities. We examined the role of V. harveyi's QS signaling molecules, N-(3-hydroxybutanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (AI-1) and the boron derivative of autoinducer-2 (BAI-2) in extracellular protease production. A fusion protein, M3CLPY (Rajamani et al., 2007), consisting of a large protease sensitive BAI-2 mutant receptor LuxP (~38kDa) flanked by two protease insensitive cyan and yellow variants of GFP (~28kDa each) was utilized as a substrate to detect secreted protease activity. The M3CLPY fusion, with the addition of wild-type V. harveyi (BB120) cell-free culture filtrate showed a time-dependent loss in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) associated with the cleavage of the LuxP linker protein and hence separation of the two fluorophores. This cleavage of LuxP linker protein leading to decreased FRET efficiency was further confirmed by immunoblotting using anti-GFP antibody. The addition of cell-free filtrates from strains defective in one or both of the two-component QS pathways: luxN(-) (defective in AI-1), luxS(-) (defective in BAI-2), and luxN(-)/luxS(-) (defective in both AI-1/BAI-2) showed differential levels of protease production. The observed protease activities were most pronounced in wild-type, followed by the AI-1 defective mutant (BB170) and the least for luxS(-) mutant (MM30) and luxN(-)/luxS(-) double mutant (MM32) strains. Incidentally, the lowest protease producing strains MM30 and MM32 were both defective in BAI-2 production. This observation was validated by addition of synthetic BAI-2 to MM30 and MM32 strains to restore protease production. Our results indicate that BAI-2 signaling in the two-component QS pathway plays the key role in regulating

  7. Advances in protease engineering for laundry detergents.

    PubMed

    Vojcic, Ljubica; Pitzler, Christian; Körfer, Georgette; Jakob, Felix; Ronny Martinez; Maurer, Karl-Heinz; Schwaneberg, Ulrich

    2015-12-25

    Proteases are essential ingredients in modern laundry detergents. Over the past 30 years, subtilisin proteases employed in the laundry detergent industry have been engineered by directed evolution and rational design to tailor their properties towards industrial demands. This comprehensive review discusses recent success stories in subtilisin protease engineering. Advances in protease engineering for laundry detergents comprise simultaneous improvement of thermal resistance and activity at low temperatures, a rational strategy to modulate pH profiles, and a general hypothesis for how to increase promiscuous activity towards the production of peroxycarboxylic acids as mild bleaching agents. The three protease engineering campaigns presented provide in-depth analysis of protease properties and have identified principles that can be applied to improve or generate enzyme variants for industrial applications beyond laundry detergents.

  8. Nucleotide sequences encoding a thermostable alkaline protease

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, David B.; Lao, Guifang

    1998-01-01

    Nucleotide sequences, derived from a thermophilic actinomycete microorganism, which encode a thermostable alkaline protease are disclosed. Also disclosed are variants of the nucleotide sequences which encode a polypeptide having thermostable alkaline proteolytic activity. Recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide may be obtained by culturing in a medium a host cell genetically engineered to contain and express a nucleotide sequence according to the present invention, and recovering the recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide from the culture medium.

  9. Nucleotide sequences encoding a thermostable alkaline protease

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, D.B.; Lao, G.

    1998-01-06

    Nucleotide sequences, derived from a thermophilic actinomycete microorganism, which encode a thermostable alkaline protease are disclosed. Also disclosed are variants of the nucleotide sequences which encode a polypeptide having thermostable alkaline proteolytic activity. Recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide may be obtained by culturing in a medium a host cell genetically engineered to contain and express a nucleotide sequence according to the present invention, and recovering the recombinant thermostable alkaline protease or recombinant polypeptide from the culture medium. 3 figs.

  10. Crystal structures of Bacillus subtilis Lon protease.

    PubMed

    Duman, Ramona E; Löwe, Jan

    2010-08-27

    Lon ATP-dependent proteases are key components of the protein quality control systems of bacterial cells and eukaryotic organelles. Eubacterial Lon proteases contain an N-terminal domain, an ATPase domain, and a protease domain, all in one polypeptide chain. The N-terminal domain is thought to be involved in substrate recognition, the ATPase domain in substrate unfolding and translocation into the protease chamber, and the protease domain in the hydrolysis of polypeptides into small peptide fragments. Like other AAA+ ATPases and self-compartmentalising proteases, Lon functions as an oligomeric complex, although the subunit stoichiometry is currently unclear. Here, we present crystal structures of truncated versions of Lon protease from Bacillus subtilis (BsLon), which reveal previously unknown architectural features of Lon complexes. Our analytical ultracentrifugation and electron microscopy show different oligomerisation of Lon proteases from two different bacterial species, Aquifex aeolicus and B. subtilis. The structure of BsLon-AP shows a hexameric complex consisting of a small part of the N-terminal domain, the ATPase, and protease domains. The structure shows the approximate arrangement of the three functional domains of Lon. It also reveals a resemblance between the architecture of Lon proteases and the bacterial proteasome-like protease HslUV. Our second structure, BsLon-N, represents the first 209 amino acids of the N-terminal domain of BsLon and consists of a globular domain, similar in structure to the E. coli Lon N-terminal domain, and an additional four-helix bundle, which is part of a predicted coiled-coil region. An unexpected dimeric interaction between BsLon-N monomers reveals the possibility that Lon complexes may be stabilised by coiled-coil interactions between neighbouring N-terminal domains. Together, BsLon-N and BsLon-AP are 36 amino acids short of offering a complete picture of a full-length Lon protease.

  11. Proteolytic crosstalk in multi-protease networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogle, Curtis T.; Mather, William H.

    2016-04-01

    Processive proteases, such as ClpXP in E. coli, are conserved enzyme assemblies that can recognize and rapidly degrade proteins. These proteases are used for a number of purposes, including degrading mistranslated proteins and controlling cellular stress response. However, proteolytic machinery within the cell is limited in capacity and can lead to a bottleneck in protein degradation, whereby many proteins compete (‘queue’) for proteolytic resources. Previous work has demonstrated that such queueing can lead to pronounced statistical relationships between different protein counts when proteins compete for a single common protease. However, real cells contain many different proteases, e.g. ClpXP, ClpAP, and Lon in E. coli, and it is not clear how competition between proteins for multiple classes of protease would influence the dynamics of cellular networks. In the present work, we theoretically demonstrate that a multi-protease proteolytic bottleneck can substantially couple the dynamics for both simple and complex (oscillatory) networks, even between substrates with substantially different affinities for protease. For these networks, queueing often leads to strong positive correlations between protein counts, and these correlations are strongest near the queueing theoretic point of balance. Furthermore, we find that the qualitative behavior of these networks depends on the relative size of the absolute affinity of substrate to protease compared to the cross affinity of substrate to protease, leading in certain regimes to priority queue statistics.

  12. Vacuolar cysteine proteases of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) are common to leaf senescence induced by different factors.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Dana E; Bartoli, Carlos G; Grbic, Vojislava; Guiamet, Juan J

    2007-01-01

    Cellular proteins are extensively degraded during leaf senescence, and this correlates with an up-regulation of protease gene expression, particularly cysteine proteases. The objectives of this work were (i) to detect cysteine proteases associated with senescence of wheat leaves under different conditions and (ii) to find out their subcellular location. Activity labelling of cysteine proteases with the biotinylated inhibitor DCG-04 detected five bands at 27, 36, 39, 42, and 46 kDa in leaves of wheat senescing under continuous darkness. In-gel activity assays showed that these proteases are only active in an acid milieu (pH 4), and their activity increased several-fold in senescing leaves. Fractionation experiments showed that the senescence-associated cysteine proteases of 36, 39, 42, and 46 kDa localize to a vacuolar-enriched fraction. The vacuolar cysteine proteases of 36, 39, and 42 kDa increased in activity in attached flag leaves senescing naturally during post-anthesis, and in attached leaves of plants subjected to a period of water deficit. Thus, the activity of these vacuolar cysteine proteases is associated with developmental (post-anthesis) senescence and with senescence induced by stress factors (i.e. protracted darkness or drought). This suggests that vacuoles are involved in senescence-associated cellular degradation, and that different senescence-inducing factors may converge on a single degradation pathway.

  13. Type-I Prenyl Protease Function Is Required in the Male Germline of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Adolphsen, Katie; Amell, Amanda; Havko, Nathan; Kevorkian, Sara; Mears, Kyle; Neher, Hayley; Schwarz, Dietmar; Schulze, Sandra R.

    2012-01-01

    Many proteins require the addition of a hydrophobic prenyl anchor (prenylation) for proper trafficking and localization in the cell. Prenyl proteases play critical roles in modifying proteins for membrane anchorage. The type I prenyl protease has a defined function in yeast (Ste24p/Afc1p) where it modifies a mating pheromone, and in humans (Zmpste24) where it has been implicated in a disease of premature aging. Despite these apparently very different biological processes, the type I prenyl protease gene is highly conserved, encoded by a single gene in a wide range of animal and plant groups. A notable exception is Drosophila melanogaster, where the gene encoding the type I prenyl protease has undergone an unprecedented series of duplications in the genome, resulting in five distinct paralogs, three of which are organized in a tandem array, and demonstrate high conservation, particularly in the vicinity of the active site of the enzyme. We have undertaken targeted deletion to remove the three tandem paralogs from the genome. The result is a male fertility defect, manifesting late in spermatogenesis. Our results also show that the ancestral type I prenyl protease gene in Drosophila is under strong purifying selection, while the more recent replicates are evolving rapidly. Our rescue data support a role for the rapidly evolving tandem paralogs in the male germline. We propose that potential targets for the male-specific type I prenyl proteases include proteins involved in the very dramatic cytoskeletal remodeling events required for spermatid maturation. PMID:22690372

  14. Cloning, nucleotide sequence, and expression of Achromobacter protease I gene.

    PubMed

    Ohara, T; Makino, K; Shinagawa, H; Nakata, A; Norioka, S; Sakiyama, F

    1989-12-01

    Achromobacter protease I (API) is a lysine-specific serine protease which hydrolyzes specifically the lysyl peptide bond. A gene coding for API was cloned from Achromobacter lyticus M497-1. Nucleotide sequence of the cloned DNA fragment revealed that the gene coded for a single polypeptide chain of 653 amino acids. The N-terminal 205 amino acids, including signal peptide and the threonine/serine-rich C-terminal 180 amino acids are flanking the 268 amino acid-mature protein which was identified by protein sequencing. Escherichia coli carrying a plasmid containing the cloned API gene overproduced and secreted a protein of Mr 50,000 (API') into the periplasm. This protein exhibited a distinct endopeptidase activity specific for lysyl bonds as well. The N-terminal amino acid sequence of API' was the same as mature API, suggesting that the enzyme retained the C-terminal extended peptide chain. The present experiments indicate that API, an extracellular protease produced by gram-negative bacteria, is synthesized in vivo as a precursor protein bearing long extended peptide chains at both N and C termini. PMID:2684982

  15. Proteases from Canavalia ensiformis: Active and Thermostable Enzymes with Potential of Application in Biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Rayane Natshe; Gozzini Barbosa, Suellen Duarte

    2016-01-01

    Extracts of leaves, seeds, roots, and stem from a tropical legume, C. ensiformis, were prepared employing buffers and detergent in aqueous solution. Leaf extracts had the highest protein content and the most pronounced peptidase activity with optimal pH in the neutral to alkaline range. All extracts exhibited peaks of activity at various pH values, suggesting the presence of distinctive classes of proteases. N-α-Tosyl-L-arginine methyl ester hydrolysis was maximal at 30°C to 60°C and peptidase activity from all extracts presented very good thermal stability after 24 h incubation at 70°C. C. ensiformis proteases exhibited molecular masses of about 200–57, 40–37, and 20–15 kDa by SDS-PAGE analysis. These enzymes cleaved hemoglobin, bovine serum albumin, casein, and gelatin at different levels. Serine and metalloproteases are the major proteases in C. ensiformis extracts, modulated by divalent cations, stable at 1% of surfactant Triton X-100 and at different concentrations of the reducing agent β-mercaptoethanol. Thus, C. ensiformis expresses a particular set of proteases in distinctive organs with high activity and stability, making this legume an important source of proteases with biotechnological potential.

  16. Proteases from Canavalia ensiformis: Active and Thermostable Enzymes with Potential of Application in Biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Rayane Natshe; Gozzini Barbosa, Suellen Duarte

    2016-01-01

    Extracts of leaves, seeds, roots, and stem from a tropical legume, C. ensiformis, were prepared employing buffers and detergent in aqueous solution. Leaf extracts had the highest protein content and the most pronounced peptidase activity with optimal pH in the neutral to alkaline range. All extracts exhibited peaks of activity at various pH values, suggesting the presence of distinctive classes of proteases. N-α-Tosyl-L-arginine methyl ester hydrolysis was maximal at 30°C to 60°C and peptidase activity from all extracts presented very good thermal stability after 24 h incubation at 70°C. C. ensiformis proteases exhibited molecular masses of about 200–57, 40–37, and 20–15 kDa by SDS-PAGE analysis. These enzymes cleaved hemoglobin, bovine serum albumin, casein, and gelatin at different levels. Serine and metalloproteases are the major proteases in C. ensiformis extracts, modulated by divalent cations, stable at 1% of surfactant Triton X-100 and at different concentrations of the reducing agent β-mercaptoethanol. Thus, C. ensiformis expresses a particular set of proteases in distinctive organs with high activity and stability, making this legume an important source of proteases with biotechnological potential. PMID:27630776

  17. Structural Evidence for Regulation and Specificity of Flaviviral Proteases and Evolution of the Flaviviridae Fold

    SciTech Connect

    Aleshin,A.; Shiryaev, S.; Strongin, A.; Liddington, R.

    2007-01-01

    Pathogenic members of the flavivirus family, including West Nile Virus (WNV) and Dengue Virus (DV), are growing global threats for which there are no specific treatments. The two-component flaviviral enzyme NS2B-NS3 cleaves the viral polyprotein precursor within the host cell, a process that is required for viral replication. Here, we report the crystal structure of WNV NS2B-NS3pro both in a substrate-free form and in complex with the trypsin inhibitor aprotinin/BPTI. We show that aprotinin binds in a substrate-mimetic fashion in which the productive conformation of the protease is fully formed, providing evidence for an 'induced fit' mechanism of catalysis and allowing us to rationalize the distinct substrate specificities of WNV and DV proteases. We also show that the NS2B cofactor of WNV can adopt two very distinct conformations and that this is likely to be a general feature of flaviviral proteases, providing further opportunities for regulation. Finally, by comparing the flaviviral proteases with the more distantly related Hepatitis C virus, we provide insights into the evolution of the Flaviviridae fold. Our work should expedite the design of protease inhibitors to treat a range of flaviviral infections.

  18. Proteases from Canavalia ensiformis: Active and Thermostable Enzymes with Potential of Application in Biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Rayane Natshe; Gozzini Barbosa, Suellen Duarte; da Silva-López, Raquel Elisa

    2016-01-01

    Extracts of leaves, seeds, roots, and stem from a tropical legume, C. ensiformis, were prepared employing buffers and detergent in aqueous solution. Leaf extracts had the highest protein content and the most pronounced peptidase activity with optimal pH in the neutral to alkaline range. All extracts exhibited peaks of activity at various pH values, suggesting the presence of distinctive classes of proteases. N-α-Tosyl-L-arginine methyl ester hydrolysis was maximal at 30°C to 60°C and peptidase activity from all extracts presented very good thermal stability after 24 h incubation at 70°C. C. ensiformis proteases exhibited molecular masses of about 200-57, 40-37, and 20-15 kDa by SDS-PAGE analysis. These enzymes cleaved hemoglobin, bovine serum albumin, casein, and gelatin at different levels. Serine and metalloproteases are the major proteases in C. ensiformis extracts, modulated by divalent cations, stable at 1% of surfactant Triton X-100 and at different concentrations of the reducing agent β-mercaptoethanol. Thus, C. ensiformis expresses a particular set of proteases in distinctive organs with high activity and stability, making this legume an important source of proteases with biotechnological potential. PMID:27630776

  19. Fragment-Based Screen against HIV Protease

    PubMed Central

    Perryman, A. L.; Zhang, Q.; Soutter, H. H.; Rosenfeld, R.; McRee, D. E.; Olson, A. J.; Elder, J. E.; Stout, C. D.

    2009-01-01

    We have employed a fragment-based screen against wild-type (NL4-3) HIV protease (PR) using the Active Sight fragment library and X-ray crystallography. The experiments reveal two new binding sites for small molecules. PR was co-crystallized with fragments, or crystals were soaked in fragment solutions, using five crystal forms, and 378 data sets were collected to 2.3-1.3 Å resolution. Fragment binding induces a distinct conformation and specific crystal form of TL-3 inhibited PR during co-crystallization. One fragment, 2-methylcyclohexanol, binds in the ‘exo site’ adjacent to the Gly16Gly17Gln18 loop where the amide of Gly17 is a specific hydrogen bond donor, and hydrophobic contacts occur with the side chains of Lys14 and Leu63. Another fragment, indole-6-carboxylic acid, binds on the ‘outside/top of the flap’ via hydrophobic contacts with Trp42, Pro44, Met46, and Lys55, a hydrogen bond with Val56, and a salt-bridge with Arg57. 2-acetyl-benzothiophene also binds at this site. This study is the first fragment-based crystallographic screen against HIV PR, and the first time that fragments were screened against an inhibitor-bound drug target to search for compounds that both bind to novel sites and stabilize the inhibited conformation of the target. PMID:20659109

  20. Fragment-based screen against HIV protease.

    PubMed

    Perryman, Alexander L; Zhang, Qing; Soutter, Holly H; Rosenfeld, Robin; McRee, Duncan E; Olson, Arthur J; Elder, John E; Stout, C David

    2010-03-01

    We have employed a fragment-based screen against wild-type (NL4-3) HIV protease (PR) using the Active Sight fragment library and X-ray crystallography. The experiments reveal two new binding sites for small molecules. PR was co-crystallized with fragments, or crystals were soaked in fragment solutions, using five crystal forms, and 378 data sets were collected to 2.3-1.3 A resolution. Fragment binding induces a distinct conformation and specific crystal form of TL-3 inhibited PR during co-crystallization. One fragment, 2-methylcyclohexanol, binds in the 'exo site' adjacent to the Gly(16)Gly(17)Gln(18)loop where the amide of Gly(17)is a specific hydrogen bond donor, and hydrophobic contacts occur with the side chains of Lys(14)and Leu(63). Another fragment, indole-6-carboxylic acid, binds on the 'outside/top of the flap' via hydrophobic contacts with Trp(42), Pro(44), Met(46), and Lys(55), a hydrogen bond with Val(56), and a salt-bridge with Arg(57). 2-acetyl-benzothiophene also binds at this site. This study is the first fragment-based crystallographic screen against HIV PR, and the first time that fragments were screened against an inhibitor-bound drug target to search for compounds that both bind to novel sites and stabilize the inhibited conformation of the target.

  1. The functional and pathologic relevance of autophagy proteases

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Álvaro F.; López-Otín, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a well-conserved catabolic process essential for cellular homeostasis. First described in yeast as an adaptive response to starvation, this pathway is also present in higher eukaryotes, where it is triggered by stress signals such as damaged organelles or pathogen infection. Autophagy is characterized at the cellular level by the engulfment of portions of the cytoplasm in double-membrane structures called autophagosomes. Autophagosomes fuse with lysosomes, resulting in degradation of the inner autophagosomal membrane and luminal content. This process is coordinated by complex molecular systems, including the ATG8 ubiquitin–like conjugation system and the ATG4 cysteine proteases, which are implicated in the formation, elongation, and fusion of these autophagic vesicles. In this Review, we focus on the diverse functional roles of the autophagins, a protease family formed by the four mammalian orthologs of yeast Atg4. We also address the dysfunctional expression of these proteases in several pathologic conditions such as cancer and inflammation and discuss potential therapies based on their modulation. PMID:25654548

  2. PARP9-DTX3L ubiquitin ligase targets host histone H2BJ and viral 3C protease to enhance interferon signaling and control viral infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Mao, Dailing; Roswit, William T.; Jin, Xiaohua; Patel, Anand C.; Patel, Dhara A.; Agapov, Eugene; Wang, Zhepeng; Tidwell, Rose M.; Atkinson, Jeffrey J.; Huang, Guangming; McCarthy, Ronald; Yu, Jinsheng; Yun, Nadezhda E.; Paessler, Slobodan; Lawson, T. Glen; Omattage, Natalie S.; Brett, Tom J.; Holtzman, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Enhancing the response to interferon could offer an immunological advantage to the host. In support of this concept, we used a modified form of the transcription factor STAT1 to achieve interferon hyperresponsiveness without toxicity and markedly improve antiviral function in transgenic mice and transduced human cells. We found that the improvement depends on expression of a PARP9-DTX3L complex with distinct domains for interaction with STAT1 and for activity as an E3 ubiquitin ligase that acts on host histone H2BJ to promote interferon-stimulated gene expression and on viral 3C proteases to initiate their degradation via the immunoproteasome. Together, PARP9-DTX3L acts on host and pathogen to achieve a double layer of immunity within a safe reserve in the interferon signaling pathway. PMID:26479788

  3. Organ Length Control by an ADAMTS Extracellular Protease in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Yukimasa; Kawakado, Yuri; Hori, Noriyoshi; Tanaka, Kota; Inoue, Ryo; Takano, Tomomi; Kubota, Yukihiko; Nishiwaki, Kiyoji

    2016-01-01

    MIG-17, a secreted protease of the ADAMTS family, acts in the directed migration of gonadal distal tip cells (DTCs) through regulation of the gonadal basement membrane in Caenorhabditis elegans. Here, we show that MIG-17 is also required for the control of pharynx elongation during animal growth. We found that the pharynx was elongated in mig-17 mutants compared with wild type. MIG-17 localized to the pharyngeal basement membrane as well as to the gonadal basement membrane. The number of nuclei in the pharynx, and the pumping rate of the pharynx, were not affected in mig-17 mutants, suggesting that cells constituting the pharynx are elongated, although the pharynx functions normally in these mutants. In contrast to the control of DTC migration, MIG-18, a secreted cofactor of MIG-17, was not essential for pharynx length regulation. In addition, the downstream pathways of MIG-17 involving LET-2/type IV collagen, FBL-1/fibulin-1, and NID-1/nidogen, partly diverged from those in gonad development. These results indicate that basement membrane remodeling is important for organ length regulation, and suggest that MIG-17/ADAMTS functions in similar but distinct molecular machineries in pharyngeal and gonadal basement membranes. PMID:26994289

  4. Propeptides of eukaryotic proteases encode histidines to exploit organelle pH for regulation.

    PubMed

    Elferich, Johannes; Williamson, Danielle M; Krishnamoorthy, Bala; Shinde, Ujwal

    2013-08-01

    Eukaryotic cells maintain strict control over protein secretion, in part by using the pH gradient maintained within their secretory pathway. How eukaryotic proteins evolved from prokaryotic orthologs to exploit the pH gradient for biological functions remains a fundamental question in cell biology. Our laboratory previously demonstrated that protein domains located within precursor proteins, propeptides, encode histidine-driven pH sensors to regulate organelle-specific activation of the eukaryotic proteases furin and proprotein convertase-1/3. Similar findings have been reported in other unrelated protease families. By analyzing >10,000 unique proteases within evolutionarily unrelated families, we show that eukaryotic propeptides are enriched in histidines compared with prokaryotic orthologs. On this basis, we hypothesize that eukaryotic proteins evolved to enrich histidines within their propeptides to exploit the tightly controlled pH gradient of the secretory pathway, thereby regulating activation within specific organelles. Enrichment of histidines in propeptides may therefore be used to predict the presence of pH sensors in other proteases or even protease substrates.

  5. Anatomical localization of protease-activated receptor-1 and protease-mediated neuroglial crosstalk on peri-synaptic astrocytic endfeet.

    PubMed

    Shavit, Efrat; Michaelson, Daniel M; Chapman, Joab

    2011-11-01

    We studied the localization, activation and function of protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR-1) at the CNS synapse utilizing rat brain synaptosomes and slices. Confocal immunofluoresence and transmission electron microscopy in brain slices with pre-embedding diaminobenzidine (DAB) immunostaining found PAR-1 predominantly localized to the peri-synaptic astrocytic endfeet. Structural confocal immunofluorescence microscopy studies of isolated synaptosomes revealed spherical structures stained with anti-PAR-1 antibody which co-stained mainly for glial-filament acidic protein compared with the neuronal markers synaptophysin and PSD-95. Immunoblot studies of synaptosomes demonstrated an appropriate major band corresponding to PAR-1 and activation of the receptor by a specific agonist peptide (SFLLRN) significantly modulated phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase. A significant membrane potential depolarization was produced by thrombin (1 U/mL) and the PAR-1 agonist (100 μM) and depolarization by high K(+) elevated extracellular thrombin-like activity in the synaptosomes preparation. The results indicate PAR-1 localized to the peri-synaptic astrocytic endfeet is most likely activated by synaptic proteases and induces cellular signaling and modulation of synaptic electrophysiology. A protease mediated neuron-glia pathway may be important in both physiological and pathological regulation of the synapse. PMID:21854391

  6. Distinct cathepsins control necrotic cell death mediated by pyroptosis inducers and lysosome-destabilizing agents.

    PubMed

    Brojatsch, Jürgen; Lima, Heriberto; Palliser, Deborah; Jacobson, Lee S; Muehlbauer, Stefan M; Furtado, Raquel; Goldman, David L; Lisanti, Michael P; Chandran, Kartik

    2015-01-01

    Necrotic cell death triggers a range of biological responses including a strong adaptive immune response, yet we know little about the cellular pathways that control necrotic cell death. Inhibitor studies suggest that proteases, and in particular cathepsins, drive necrotic cell death. The cathepsin B-selective inhibitor CA-074-Me blocks all forms of programmed necrosis by an unknown mechanism. We found that cathepsin B deficiency does not prevent induction of pyroptosis and lysosome-mediated necrosis suggesting that CA-074-Me blocks necrotic cell death by targeting cathepsins other than cathepsin B. A single cathepsin, cathepsin C, drives necrotic cell death mediated by the lysosome-destabilizing agent Leu-Leu-OMe (LLOMe). Here we present evidence that cathepsin C-deficiency and CA-074-Me block LLOMe killing in a distinct and cell type-specific fashion. Cathepsin C-deficiency and CA-074-Me block LLOMe killing of all myeloid cells, except for neutrophils. Cathepsin C-deficiency, but not CA-074-Me, blocks LLOMe killing of neutrophils suggesting that CA-074-Me does not target cathepsin C directly, consistent with inhibitor studies using recombinant cathepsin C. Unlike other cathepsins, cathepsin C lacks endoproteolytic activity, and requires activation by other lysosomal proteases, such as cathepsin D. Consistent with this theory, we found that lysosomotropic agents and cathepsin D downregulation by siRNA block LLOMe-mediated necrosis. Our findings indicate that a proteolytic cascade, involving cathepsins C and D, controls LLOMe-mediated necrosis. In contrast, cathepsins C and D were not required for pyroptotic cell death suggesting that distinct cathepsins control pyroptosis and lysosome-mediated necrosis. PMID:25830414

  7. Protease-resistant peptide design-empowering nature's fragile warriors against HIV.

    PubMed

    Weinstock, Matthew T; Francis, J Nicholas; Redman, Joseph S; Kay, Michael S

    2012-01-01

    Peptides have great potential as therapeutic agents, but their use is often limited by susceptibility to proteolysis and their resulting in vivo fragility. In this review, we focus on peptidomimetic approaches to produce protease-resistant peptides with the potential for greatly improved clinical utility. We focus on the use of mirror-image (D-peptide) and ß-peptides as two leading approaches with distinct design principles and challenges. Application to the important and difficult problem of inhibiting HIV entry illustrates the current state-of-the-art in peptidomimetic technologies. We also summarize future directions for this field and highlight remaining obstacles to widespread use of protease-resistant peptides.

  8. Protease-degradable electrospun fibrous hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, Ryan J.; Bassin, Ethan J.; Rodell, Christopher B.; Burdick, Jason A.

    2015-03-01

    Electrospun nanofibres are promising in biomedical applications to replicate features of the natural extracellular matrix (ECM). However, nearly all electrospun scaffolds are either non-degradable or degrade hydrolytically, whereas natural ECM degrades proteolytically, often through matrix metalloproteinases. Here we synthesize reactive macromers that contain protease-cleavable and fluorescent peptides and are able to form both isotropic hydrogels and electrospun fibrous hydrogels through a photoinitiated polymerization. These biomimetic scaffolds are susceptible to protease-mediated cleavage in vitro in a protease dose-dependent manner and in vivo in a subcutaneous mouse model using transdermal fluorescent imaging to monitor degradation. Importantly, materials containing an alternate and non-protease-cleavable peptide sequence are stable in both in vitro and in vivo settings. To illustrate the specificity in degradation, scaffolds with mixed fibre populations support selective fibre degradation based on individual fibre degradability. Overall, this represents a novel biomimetic approach to generate protease-sensitive fibrous scaffolds for biomedical applications.

  9. Differential effects of serine proteases on the migration of normal and tumor cells: implications for tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Elzer, Kirsten L; Heitzman, Deborah A; Chernin, Mitchell I; Novak, Josef F

    2008-12-01

    The supporting role of proteases in tumor progression and invasion is well known; however, the use of proteases as therapeutic agents has also been demonstrated. In this article, the authors report on the differential effects of exogenous serine proteases on the motility of tumor and normal cells. The treatment of normal and tumor cells with a single dose of pancreatic serine proteases, trypsin (TR) and chymotrypsin (CH), leads to a concentration-dependent response by cells, first accelerating and then slowing mobility. Tumor cells are 10 to 20 times more sensitive to exogenous TR/CH, suggesting that a single dose of proteases may cause discordant movements of normal and tumor cells within the tumor environment. The inhibitory effects of TR on cell motility are contradicted by thrombin (TH), particularly in the regulation of normal cells' migration. The purpose of this investigation was to ascertain the role of protease-activated receptors (PARs) in terms of normal and tumor cell motility. Duplicate treatments with proteases resulted in diminished mobility of both normal and tumor cells. Repeated application of TR and TH in 1-hour treatment intervals initially desensitizes cell surface PARs. However, cell surface PARs reappear regardless of subsequent protease treatments in both normal and tumor cells. The resensitization process is retarded in tumor cells when compared with normal cells. This is evidenced by lower expression of PARs as well as by their relocalization at the tumor cell surfaces. Under these conditions, normal cells remain responsive to exogenous proteases in terms of cell motility. Exogenous proteases do not modulate motility of repeatedly stimulated tumor cells, and consequently, the migration of tumor cells appears disconnected from the PAR signaling pathways. The use of activating peptides in lieu of the cognate proteases for a given PAR system indicated that proteases may act through additional targets not regulated by PAR signaling. We

  10. Mast cell proteases as pharmacological targets.

    PubMed

    Caughey, George H

    2016-05-01

    Mast cells are rich in proteases, which are the major proteins of intracellular granules and are released with histamine and heparin by activated cells. Most of these proteases are active in the granule as well as outside of the mast cell when secreted, and can cleave targets near degranulating mast cells and in adjoining tissue compartments. Some proteases released from mast cells reach the bloodstream and may have far-reaching actions. In terms of relative amounts, the major mast cell proteases include the tryptases, chymases, cathepsin G, carboxypeptidase A3, dipeptidylpeptidase I/cathepsin C, and cathepsins L and S. Some mast cells also produce granzyme B, plasminogen activators, and matrix metalloproteinases. Tryptases and chymases are almost entirely mast cell-specific, whereas other proteases, such as cathepsins G, C, and L are expressed by a variety of inflammatory cells. Carboxypeptidase A3 expression is a property shared by basophils and mast cells. Other proteases, such as mastins, are largely basophil-specific, although human basophils are protease-deficient compared with their murine counterparts. The major classes of mast cell proteases have been targeted for development of therapeutic inhibitors. Also, a human β-tryptase has been proposed as a potential drug itself, to inactivate of snake venins. Diseases linked to mast cell proteases include allergic diseases, such as asthma, eczema, and anaphylaxis, but also include non-allergic diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease, autoimmune arthritis, atherosclerosis, aortic aneurysms, hypertension, myocardial infarction, heart failure, pulmonary hypertension and scarring diseases of lungs and other organs. In some cases, studies performed in mouse models suggest protective or homeostatic roles for specific proteases (or groups of proteases) in infections by bacteria, worms and other parasites, and even in allergic inflammation. At the same time, a clearer picture has emerged of differences in the

  11. Gene expression and activity of digestive proteases in Daphnia: effects of cyanobacterial protease inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The frequency of cyanobacterial blooms has increased worldwide, and these blooms have been claimed to be a major factor leading to the decline of the most important freshwater herbivores, i.e. representatives of the genus Daphnia. This suppression of Daphnia is partly attributed to the presence of biologically active secondary metabolites in cyanobacteria. Among these metabolites, protease inhibitors are found in almost every natural cyanobacterial bloom and have been shown to specifically inhibit Daphnia's digestive proteases in vitro, but to date no physiological responses of these serine proteases to cyanobacterial protease inhibitors in Daphnia have been reported in situ at the protein and genetic levels. Results Nine digestive proteases were detected in D. magna using activity-stained SDS-PAGE. Subsequent analyses by LC-MS/MS and database search led to the identification of respective protease genes. D. magna responded to dietary protease inhibitors by up-regulation of the expression of these respective proteases at the RNA-level and by the induction of new and less sensitive protease isoforms at the protein level. The up-regulation in response to dietary trypsin- and chymotrypsin-inhibitors ranged from 1.4-fold to 25.6-fold. These physiological responses of Daphnia, i.e. up-regulation of protease expression and the induction of isoforms, took place even after feeding on 20% cyanobacterial food for only 24 h. These physiological responses proved to be independent from microcystin effects. Conclusion Here for the first time it was shown in situ that a D. magna clone responds physiologically to dietary cyanobacterial protease inhibitors by phenotypic plasticity of the targets of these specific inhibitors, i.e. Daphnia gut proteases. These regulatory responses are adaptive for D. magna, as they increase the capacity for protein digestion in the presence of dietary protease inhibitors. The type and extent of these responses in protease expression might

  12. Neutralizing monoclonal antibodies to an extracellular Pseudomonas cepacia protease.

    PubMed Central

    Kooi, C; Cox, A; Darling, P; Sokol, P A

    1994-01-01

    Pseudomonas cepacia produces at least two extracellular proteases with apparent molecular masses of 36,000 and 40,000 Da. The 36-kDa protease has high proteolytic activity and the 40-kDa protease has low proteolytic activity with hide powder azure as a substrate. Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were raised against the purified 36- and 40-kDa proteases. Several MAbs directed against the 36-kDa protease were found to recognize the 40-kDa protease by Western immunoblot analysis. Similarly, a MAb directed against the 40-kDa protease recognized the 36-kDa protease, suggesting that these two proteases may be immunologically related. A MAb directed against the 36-kDa protease, designated 36-6-8, and a MAb directed against the 40-kDa protease (MAb G-11) cross-reacted with other extracellular proteases, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase and alkaline protease, Pseudomonas pseudomallei protease, and the Vibrio cholerae hemagglutinin/protease. MAb 36-6-8 neutralized the P. cepacia 36-kDa protease, P. aeruginosa elastase, P. pseudomallei protease, and V. cholerae hemagglutinin/protease but did not affect P. aeruginosa alkaline protease activity. In contrast, MAb G-11 to the 40-kDa protease neutralized only the P. cepacia 36-kDa protease. This evidence suggests that the neutralizing MAb, 36-6-8, recognizes an epitope conserved among some metalloproteases. This epitope may lie at or near the active site of the P. cepacia 36-kDa protease and P. aeruginosa elastase. Images PMID:7516312

  13. Factor V activation and inactivation by venom proteases.

    PubMed

    Rosing, J; Govers-Riemslag, J W; Yukelson, L; Tans, G

    2001-01-01

    Blood coagulation factor V is a single-chain glycoprotein with M(r) = 330,000 which plays an important role in the procoagulant and anticoagulant pathways. Thrombin activates factor V into factor Va, a two-chain molecule which is composed of a heavy (M(r) = 105,000) and a light chain (M(r) = 71,000/74,000). Factor Va accelerates factor Xa-catalysed prothrombin activation more than 1,000-fold and under physiological conditions the cofactor activity of factor Va in prothrombin activation is down-regulated by activated protein C. Factor V can also be activated by a wide variety of snake venoms (e.g. from Vipera species, Naja naja oxiana, Bothrops atrox) and by proteases present in the bristles of a South American caterpillar (Lonomia achelous). Some venoms, notably of Vipera lebetina turanica and Lonomia achelous, contain proteases that are able to inactivate factor V or factor Va. Venom factor V activators are excellent tools in studying the structure-function relationship of factor V(a) and they are also used in diagnostic tests for quantification of plasma factor V levels and for the screening of defects in the protein C pathway. In this review, the structural and functional properties of animal venom factor V activators and inactivators is described. PMID:11910191

  14. Regulation of protease production in Clostridium sporogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Allison, C; Macfarlane, G T

    1990-01-01

    The physiological and nutritional factors that regulate protease synthesis in Clostridium sporogenes C25 were studied in batch and continuous cultures. Formation of extracellular proteases occurred at the end of active growth and during the stationary phase in batch cultures. Protease production was inversely related to growth rate in glucose-excess and glucose-limited chemostats over the range D = 0.05 to 0.70 h-1. In pulse experiments, glucose, ammonia, phosphate, and some amino acids (tryptophan, proline, tyrosine, and isoleucine) strongly repressed protease synthesis. This repression was not relieved by addition of 4 mM cyclic AMP, cyclic GMP, or dibutyryl cyclic AMP. Protease formation was markedly inhibited by 4 mM ATP and ADP, but GTP and GDP had little effect on the process. It is concluded that protease production by C. sporogenes is strongly influenced by the amount of energy available to the cells, with the highest levels of protease synthesis occurring under energy-limiting conditions. PMID:2268158

  15. A biotechnology perspective of fungal proteases

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Paula Monteiro; Bittencourt, Mona Lisa de Assis; Caprara, Carolina Canielles; de Freitas, Marcela; de Almeida, Renata Paula Coppini; Silveira, Dâmaris; Fonseca, Yris Maria; Ferreira, Edivaldo Ximenes; Pessoa, Adalberto; Magalhães, Pérola Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    Proteases hydrolyze the peptide bonds of proteins into peptides and amino acids, being found in all living organisms, and are essential for cell growth and differentiation. Proteolytic enzymes have potential application in a wide number of industrial processes such as food, laundry detergent and pharmaceutical. Proteases from microbial sources have dominated applications in industrial sectors. Fungal proteases are used for hydrolyzing protein and other components of soy beans and wheat in soy sauce production. Proteases can be produced in large quantities in a short time by established methods of fermentation. The parameters such as variation in C/N ratio, presence of some sugars, besides several other physical factors are important in the development of fermentation process. Proteases of fungal origin can be produced cost effectively, have an advantage faster production, the ease with which the enzymes can be modified and mycelium can be easily removed by filtration. The production of proteases has been carried out using submerged fermentation, but conditions in solid state fermentation lead to several potential advantages for the production of fungal enzymes. This review focuses on the production of fungal proteases, their distribution, structural-functional aspects, physical and chemical parameters, and the use of these enzymes in industrial applications. PMID:26273247

  16. Extracellular proteases of Trichoderma species. A review.

    PubMed

    Kredics, L; Antal, Zsuzsanna; Szekeres, A; Hatvani, L; Manczinger, L; Vágvölgyi, Cs; Nagy, Erzsébet

    2005-01-01

    Cellulolytic, xylanolytic, chitinolytic and beta-1,3-glucanolytic enzyme systems of species belonging to the filamentous fungal genus Trichoderma have been investigated in details and are well characterised. The ability of Trichoderma strains to produce extracellular proteases has also been known for a long time, however, the proteolytic enzyme system is relatively unknown in this genus. Fortunately, in the recent years more and more attention is focused on the research in this field. The role of Trichoderma proteases in the biological control of plant pathogenic fungi and nematodes has been demonstrated, and it is also suspected that they may be important for the competitive saprophytic ability of green mould isolates and may represent potential virulence factors of Trichoderma strains as emerging fungal pathogens of clinical importance. The aim of this review is to summarize the information available about the extracellular proteases of Trichoderma. Numerous studies are available about the extracellular proteolytic enzyme profiles of Trichoderma strains and about the effect of abiotic environmental factors on protease activities. A number of protease enzymes have been purified to homogeneity and some protease encoding genes have been cloned and characterized. These results will be reviewed and the role of Trichoderma proteases in biological control as well as their advantages and disadvantages in biotechnology will be discussed. PMID:16003937

  17. A biotechnology perspective of fungal proteases.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Paula Monteiro; Bittencourt, Mona Lisa de Assis; Caprara, Carolina Canielles; de Freitas, Marcela; de Almeida, Renata Paula Coppini; Silveira, Dâmaris; Fonseca, Yris Maria; Ferreira Filho, Edivaldo Ximenes; Pessoa Junior, Adalberto; Magalhães, Pérola Oliveira

    2015-06-01

    Proteases hydrolyze the peptide bonds of proteins into peptides and amino acids, being found in all living organisms, and are essential for cell growth and differentiation. Proteolytic enzymes have potential application in a wide number of industrial processes such as food, laundry detergent and pharmaceutical. Proteases from microbial sources have dominated applications in industrial sectors. Fungal proteases are used for hydrolyzing protein and other components of soy beans and wheat in soy sauce production. Proteases can be produced in large quantities in a short time by established methods of fermentation. The parameters such as variation in C/N ratio, presence of some sugars, besides several other physical factors are important in the development of fermentation process. Proteases of fungal origin can be produced cost effectively, have an advantage faster production, the ease with which the enzymes can be modified and mycelium can be easily removed by filtration. The production of proteases has been carried out using submerged fermentation, but conditions in solid state fermentation lead to several potential advantages for the production of fungal enzymes. This review focuses on the production of fungal proteases, their distribution, structural-functional aspects, physical and chemical parameters, and the use of these enzymes in industrial applications. PMID:26273247

  18. Activation of specific apoptotic caspases with an engineered small-molecule-activated protease.

    PubMed

    Gray, Daniel C; Mahrus, Sami; Wells, James A

    2010-08-20

    Apoptosis is a conserved cellular pathway that results in the activation of cysteine-aspartyl proteases, or caspases. To dissect the nonredundant roles of the executioner caspase-3, -6, and -7 in orchestrating apoptosis, we have developed an orthogonal protease to selectively activate each isoform in human cells. Our approach uses a split-tobacco etch virus (TEV) protease under small-molecule control, which we call the SNIPer, with caspase alleles containing genetically encoded TEV cleavage sites. These studies reveal that all three caspases are transiently activated but only activation of caspase-3 or -7 is sufficient to induce apoptosis. Proteomic analysis shown here and from others reveals that 20 of the 33 subunits of the 26S proteasome can be cut by caspases, and we demonstrate synergy between proteasome inhibition and dose-dependent caspase activation. We propose a model of proteolytic reciprocal negative regulation with mechanistic implications for the combined clinical use of proteasome inhibitors and proapoptotic drugs.

  19. Cysteine Proteases from Bloodfeeding Arthropod Ectoparasites

    PubMed Central

    Sojka, Daniel; Francischetti, Ivo M. B.; Calvo, Eric; Kotsyfakis, Michalis

    2012-01-01

    Cysteine proteases have been discovered in various bloodfeeding ectoparasites. Here, we assemble the available information about the function of these peptidases and reveal their role in hematophagy and parasite development. While most of the data shed light on key proteolytic events that play a role in arthropod physiology, we also report on the association of cysteine proteases with arthropod vectorial capacity. With emphasis on ticks, specifically Ixodes ricinus, we finally propose a model about the contribution of cysteine peptidases to blood digestion, and how their concerted action with other tick midgut proteases leads to the absorbance of nutrients by the midgut epithelial cells. PMID:21660665

  20. HIV-1 Protease: Structure, Dynamics and Inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Louis, John M.; Ishima, R.; Torchia, D.A.; Weber, Irene T.

    2008-06-03

    The HIV-1 protease is synthesized as part of a large Gag-Pol precursor protein. It is responsible for its own release from the precursor and the processing of the Gag and Gag-Pol polyproteins into the mature structural and functional proteins required for virus maturation. Because of its indispensable role, the mature HIV-1 protease dimer has proven to be a successful target for the development of antiviral agents. In the last 5 years, a major emphasis in protease research has been to improve inhibitor design and treatment regimens.

  1. Quantitative Correlation of Conformational Binding Enthalpy with Substrate Specificity of Serine Proteases.

    PubMed

    Waldner, Birgit J; Fuchs, Julian E; Huber, Roland G; von Grafenstein, Susanne; Schauperl, Michael; Kramer, Christian; Liedl, Klaus R

    2016-01-21

    Members of the same protease family show different substrate specificity, even if they share identical folds, depending on the physiological processes they are part of. Here, we investigate the key factors for subpocket and global specificity of factor Xa, elastase, and granzyme B which despite all being serine proteases and sharing the chymotrypsin-fold show distinct substrate specificity profiles. We determined subpocket interaction potentials with GRID for static X-ray structures and an in silico generated ensemble of conformations. Subpocket interaction potentials determined for static X-ray structures turned out to be insufficient to explain serine protease specificity for all subpockets. Therefore, we generated conformational ensembles using molecular dynamics simulations. We identified representative binding site conformations using distance-based hierarchical agglomerative clustering and determined subpocket interaction potentials for each representative conformation of the binding site. Considering the differences in subpocket interaction potentials for these representative conformations as well as their abundance allowed us to quantitatively explain subpocket specificity for the nonprime side for all three example proteases on a molecular level. The methods to identify key regions determining subpocket specificity introduced in this study are directly applicable to other serine proteases, and the results provide starting points for new strategies in rational drug design.

  2. A Lon-like protease with no ATP-powered unfolding activity.

    PubMed

    Liao, Jiahn-Haur; Kuo, Chiao-I; Huang, Ya-Yi; Lin, Yu-Ching; Lin, Yen-Chen; Yang, Chen-Yui; Wu, Wan-Ling; Chang, Wei-Hau; Liaw, Yen-Chywan; Lin, Li-Hua; Chang, Chung-I; Wu, Shih-Hsiung

    2012-01-01

    Lon proteases are a family of ATP-dependent proteases involved in protein quality control, with a unique proteolytic domain and an AAA(+) (ATPases associated with various cellular activities) module accommodated within a single polypeptide chain. They were classified into two types as either the ubiquitous soluble LonA or membrane-inserted archaeal LonB. In addition to the energy-dependent forms, a number of medically and ecologically important groups of bacteria encode a third type of Lon-like proteins in which the conserved proteolytic domain is fused to a large N-terminal fragment lacking canonical AAA(+) motifs. Here we showed that these Lon-like proteases formed a clade distinct from LonA and LonB. Characterization of one such Lon-like protease from Meiothermus taiwanensis indicated that it formed a hexameric assembly with a hollow chamber similar to LonA/B. The enzyme was devoid of ATPase activity but retained an ability to bind symmetrically six nucleotides per hexamer; accordingly, structure-based alignment suggested possible existence of a non-functional AAA-like domain. The enzyme degraded unstructured or unfolded protein and peptide substrates, but not well-folded proteins, in ATP-independent manner. These results highlight a new type of Lon proteases that may be involved in breakdown of excessive damage or unfolded proteins during stress conditions without consumption of energy.

  3. Quantitative Correlation of Conformational Binding Enthalpy with Substrate Specificity of Serine Proteases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Members of the same protease family show different substrate specificity, even if they share identical folds, depending on the physiological processes they are part of. Here, we investigate the key factors for subpocket and global specificity of factor Xa, elastase, and granzyme B which despite all being serine proteases and sharing the chymotrypsin-fold show distinct substrate specificity profiles. We determined subpocket interaction potentials with GRID for static X-ray structures and an in silico generated ensemble of conformations. Subpocket interaction potentials determined for static X-ray structures turned out to be insufficient to explain serine protease specificity for all subpockets. Therefore, we generated conformational ensembles using molecular dynamics simulations. We identified representative binding site conformations using distance-based hierarchical agglomerative clustering and determined subpocket interaction potentials for each representative conformation of the binding site. Considering the differences in subpocket interaction potentials for these representative conformations as well as their abundance allowed us to quantitatively explain subpocket specificity for the nonprime side for all three example proteases on a molecular level. The methods to identify key regions determining subpocket specificity introduced in this study are directly applicable to other serine proteases, and the results provide starting points for new strategies in rational drug design. PMID:26709959

  4. Ovarian Tumor (OTU)-domain Containing Viral Proteases Evade Ubiquitin- and ISG15-dependent Innate Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Frias-Staheli, Natalia; Giannakopoulos, Nadia V.; Kikkert, Marjolein; Taylor, Shannon L.; Bridgen, Anne; Paragas, Jason J.; Richt, Juergen A.; Rowland, Raymond R.; Schmaljohn, Connie S.; Lenschow, Deborah J.; Snijder, Eric J.; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Virgin, Herbert Whiting

    2007-01-01

    Summary Ubiquitin (Ub) and interferon stimulated gene product 15 (ISG15) reversibly conjugate to proteins via a conserved LRLRGG C-terminal motif, mediating important innate antiviral responses. The ovarian tumor (OTU) domain represents a superfamily of predicted proteases found in eukaryotic, bacterial and viral proteins, some of which have Ub-deconjugating activity. We show that the OTU domain-containing proteases of nairoviruses and arteriviruses hydrolyze Ub and ISG15 from cellular target proteins. This broad activity contrasts with the target specificity of known mammalian OTU domain-containing proteins. The biological significance of this activity of viral OTU domain-containing proteases was evidenced by their capacity to inhibit NF-κB dependent signaling and to antagonize the antiviral effects of ISG15 during Sindbis virus infection in vivo. The deconjugating activity of viral OTU proteases represents a novel viral immune evasion mechanism that inhibits Ub-and ISG15-dependent antiviral pathways. PMID:18078692

  5. Protease nexin-1 regulates retinal vascular development.

    PubMed

    Selbonne, Sonia; Francois, Deborah; Raoul, William; Boulaftali, Yacine; Sennlaub, Florian; Jandrot-Perrus, Martine; Bouton, Marie-Christine; Arocas, Véronique

    2015-10-01

    We recently identified protease nexin-1 (PN-1) or serpinE2, as a possibly underestimated player in maintaining angiogenic balance. Here, we used the well-characterized postnatal vascular development of newborn mouse retina to further investigate the role and the mechanism of action of PN-1 in physiological angiogenesis. The development of retinal vasculature was analysed by endothelial cell staining with isolectin B4. PN-1-deficient (PN-1(-/-)) retina displayed increased vascularization in the postnatal period, with elevated capillary thickness and density, compared to their wild-type littermate (WT). Moreover, PN-1(-/-) retina presented more veins/arteries than WT retina. The kinetics of retinal vasculature development, retinal VEGF expression and overall retinal structure were similar in WT and PN-1(-/-) mice, but we observed a hyperproliferation of vascular cells in PN-1(-/-) retina. Expression of PN-1 was analysed by immunoblotting and X-Gal staining of retinas from mice expressing beta-galactosidase under a PN-1 promoter. PN-1 was highly expressed in the first week following birth and then progressively decreased to a low level in adult retina where it localized on the retinal arteries. PCR arrays performed on mouse retinal RNA identified two angiogenesis-related factors, midkine and Smad5, that were overexpressed in PN-1(-/-) newborn mice and this was confirmed by RT-PCR. Both the higher vascularization and the overexpression of midkine and Smad5 mRNA were also observed in gastrocnemius muscle of PN-1(-/-) mice, suggesting that PN-1 interferes with these pathways. Together, our results demonstrate that PN-1 strongly limits physiological angiogenesis and suggest that modulation of PN-1 expression could represent a new way to regulate angiogenesis.

  6. Human immunodeficiency virus 1 protease expressed in Escherichia coli behaves as a dimeric aspartic protease.

    PubMed Central

    Meek, T D; Dayton, B D; Metcalf, B W; Dreyer, G B; Strickler, J E; Gorniak, J G; Rosenberg, M; Moore, M L; Magaard, V W; Debouck, C

    1989-01-01

    Recombinant human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) protease, purified from a bacterial expression system, processed a recombinant form of its natural substrate, Pr55gag, into protein fragments that possess molecular weights commensurate with those of the virion gag proteins. Molecular weights of the protease obtained under denaturing and nondenaturing conditions (11,000 and 22,000, respectively) and chemical crosslinking studies were consistent with a dimeric structure for the active enzyme. The protease appropriately cleaved the nonapeptide Ac-Arg-Ala-Ser-Gln-Asn-Tyr-Pro-Val-Val-NH2 between the tyrosine and proline residues. HIV-1 protease was sensitive to inactivators of the aspartic proteases. The aspartic protease inactivator 1,2-epoxy-3-(4-nitrophenoxy)propane produced irreversible, time-dependent inactivation of the protease. The pH-dependent kinetics of this inactivator were consistent with the requirement of an unprotonated carboxyl group in the active site of the enzyme, suggesting that HIV-1 protease is also an aspartic protease. Images PMID:2648384

  7. Molecular basis for increased susceptibility of isolates with atazanavir resistance-conferring substitution I50L to other protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Yanchunas, Joseph; Langley, David R; Tao, Li; Rose, Ronald E; Friborg, Jacques; Colonno, Richard J; Doyle, Michael L

    2005-09-01

    Protease inhibitors (PIs) are highly effective drugs against the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), yet long-term therapeutic use is limited by emergence of HIV type 1 (HIV-1) protease substitutions that confer cross-resistance to multiple protease inhibitor drugs. Atazanavir is a highly potent HIV protease inhibitor with a distinct resistance profile that includes effectiveness against most HIV-1 isolates resistant to one or two PIs. The signature resistance substitution for atazanavir is I50L, and it is frequently (53%) accompanied by a compensatory A71V substitution that helps restore viability and increases atazanavir resistance levels. We measured the binding affinities of wild-type (WT) and I50L/A71V HIV-1 proteases to atazanavir and other currently approved PIs (ritonavir, lopinavir, saquinavir, nelfinavir, indinavir, and amprenavir) by isothermal titration calorimetry. Remarkably, we find that all of the PIs have 2- to 10-fold increased affinities for I50L/A71V protease, except for atazanavir. The results are also manifested by thermal stability measures of affinity for WT and I50L/A71V proteases. Additional biophysical and enzyme kinetics experiments show I50L/A71V protease is a stable enzyme with catalytic activity that is slightly reduced (34%) relative to the WT. Computational modeling reveals that the unique resistance phenotype of I50L/A71V protease likely originates from bulky tert-butyl groups at P2 and P2' (specific to atazanavir) that sterically clash with methyl groups on residue L50. The results of this study provide a molecular understanding of the novel hypersusceptibility of atazanavir-resistant I50L/A71V-containing clinical isolates to other currently approved PIs.

  8. Secreted fungal aspartic proteases: A review.

    PubMed

    Mandujano-González, Virginia; Villa-Tanaca, Lourdes; Anducho-Reyes, Miguel Angel; Mercado-Flores, Yuridia

    2016-01-01

    The aspartic proteases, also called aspartyl and aspartate proteases or acid proteases (E.C.3.4.23), belong to the endopeptidase family and are characterized by the conserved sequence Asp-Gly-Thr at the active site. These enzymes are found in a wide variety of microorganisms in which they perform important functions related to nutrition and pathogenesis. In addition, their high activity and stability at acid pH make them attractive for industrial application in the food industry; specifically, they are used as milk-coagulating agents in cheese production or serve to improve the taste of some foods. This review presents an analysis of the characteristics and properties of secreted microbial aspartic proteases and their potential for commercial application. PMID:27137097

  9. Secreted fungal aspartic proteases: A review.

    PubMed

    Mandujano-González, Virginia; Villa-Tanaca, Lourdes; Anducho-Reyes, Miguel Angel; Mercado-Flores, Yuridia

    2016-01-01

    The aspartic proteases, also called aspartyl and aspartate proteases or acid proteases (E.C.3.4.23), belong to the endopeptidase family and are characterized by the conserved sequence Asp-Gly-Thr at the active site. These enzymes are found in a wide variety of microorganisms in which they perform important functions related to nutrition and pathogenesis. In addition, their high activity and stability at acid pH make them attractive for industrial application in the food industry; specifically, they are used as milk-coagulating agents in cheese production or serve to improve the taste of some foods. This review presents an analysis of the characteristics and properties of secreted microbial aspartic proteases and their potential for commercial application.

  10. Vanadium inhibition of serine and cysteine proteases.

    PubMed

    Guerrieri, N; Cerletti, P; De Vincentiis, M; Salvati, A; Scippa, S

    1999-03-01

    A study was made on the effect of vanadium, in both the tetravalent state in vanadyl sulphate and in the pentavalent state in sodium meta-vanadate, and ortho-vanadate, on the proteolysis of azocasein by two serine proteases, trypsin and subtilisin and two cysteine proteases bromelain and papain. Also the proteolysis of bovine azoalbumin by serine proteases was considered. An inhibitory effect was present in all cases, except meta-vanadate with subtilisin. The oxidation level of vanadium by itself did not determine the inhibition kinetics, which also depended on the type and composition of the vanadium containing molecule and on the enzyme assayed. The pattern of inhibition was similar for proteases belonging to the same class. The highest inhibition was obtained with meta-vanadate on papain and with vanadyl sulphate on bromelain.

  11. Bioinformatics of proteases in the MEROPS database.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Alan J

    2004-05-01

    Proteolytic enzymes represent approximately approximately 2% of the total number of proteins present in all types of organisms. Many of these enzymes are of medical importance, and those that are of potential interest as drug targets can be divided into the endogenous enzymes encoded in the human genome, and the exogenous proteases encoded in the genomes of disease-causing organisms. There are also naturally occurring inhibitors of proteases, some of which have pharmaceutical relevance. The MEROPS database provides a rich source of information on proteases and their inhibitors. Storage and retrieval of this information is facilitated by the use of a hierarchical classification system (which was pioneered by the compilers of the database) in which homologous proteases and their inhibitors are divided into clans and families. PMID:15216937

  12. Drought and flooding have distinct effects on herbivore-induced responses and resistance in Solanum dulcamara.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Duy; D'Agostino, Nunzio; Tytgat, Tom O G; Sun, Pulu; Lortzing, Tobias; Visser, Eric J W; Cristescu, Simona M; Steppuhn, Anke; Mariani, Celestina; van Dam, Nicole M; Rieu, Ivo

    2016-07-01

    In the field, biotic and abiotic stresses frequently co-occur. As a consequence, common molecular signalling pathways governing adaptive responses to individual stresses can interact, resulting in compromised phenotypes. How plant signalling pathways interact under combined stresses is poorly understood. To assess this, we studied the consequence of drought and soil flooding on resistance of Solanum dulcamara to Spodoptera exigua and their effects on hormonal and transcriptomic profiles. The results showed that S. exigua larvae performed less well on drought-stressed plants than on well-watered and flooded plants. Both drought and insect feeding increased abscisic acid and jasmonic acid (JA) levels, whereas flooding did not induce JA accumulation. RNA sequencing analyses corroborated this pattern: drought and herbivory induced many biological processes that were repressed by flooding. When applied in combination, drought and herbivory had an additive effect on specific processes involved in secondary metabolism and defence responses, including protease inhibitor activity. In conclusion, drought and flooding have distinct effects on herbivore-induced responses and resistance. Especially, the interaction between abscisic acid and JA signalling may be important to optimize plant responses to combined drought and insect herbivory, making drought-stressed plants more resistant to insects than well-watered and flooded plants.

  13. Targeting the extrinsic apoptotic pathway in cancer: lessons learned and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Ashkenazi, Avi

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is a metazoan process of controlled cell elimination that plays critical roles in embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis. Apoptosis dysregulation contributes to several important diseases, including cancer. Two distinct yet interconnected signaling pathways control apoptosis by activating a core intracellular machinery of death proteases called caspases. The intrinsic apoptotic pathway engages caspases via members of the BCL-2 protein family and the mitochondria in reaction to severe cellular damage or stress. The extrinsic pathway activates caspases via cell-surface death receptors, which respond to cognate death ligands expressed on immune-effector cells. Tumor cells can acquire various apoptosis-evasion mechanisms; nevertheless, the transformed state of these cells makes them uniquely susceptible to apoptosis reactivation if resistance is circumvented. Molecular approaches to reengage the apoptotic pathways in cancer have been underway for over two decades. Gratifyingly, BCL-2 antagonists — which drive the intrinsic pathway — are beginning to bear clinical fruit. In contrast, clinical attempts to stimulate the extrinsic pathway with proapoptotic receptor agonists (PARAs) have been disappointing, despite compelling preclinical efficacy with this class of agents. Here, I discuss some of the possible reasons for this translational discrepancy and suggest strategies to overcome it with the next generation of PARAs. PMID:25642709

  14. Electrically sensing protease activity with nanopores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukwikila, Mikiembo; Howorka, Stefan

    2010-11-01

    The enzymatic activity of a protease was electrically detected using nanopore recordings. A peptide substrate was tethered to microscale beads, and cleavage by the enzyme trypsin released a soluble fragment that was electrophoretically driven through the α-hemolysin protein pore, leading to detectable blockades in the ionic current. Owing to its simplicity, this approach to sense enzymatic activity may be applied to other proteases.

  15. A novel Ca2+-activated protease from germinating Vigna radiata seeds and its role in storage protein mobilization.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sadaf; Verma, Giti; Sharma, Samir

    2010-07-15

    Calcium (Ca(2+))-dependent/activated proteases make decisive cleavages in proteins, affecting their further degradation/activation. Few such Ca(2+)-dependent proteases have been reported from plants, and none during germination-related events. Seeds are woken up from their quiescent state upon imbibition of water. The subsequent process of germination is strongly influenced by hormones (mainly gibberellins) and light, with both resulting in change in intracellular Ca(2+). We have investigated the effect of Ca(2+) on protease activity in extracts prepared from dry Vigna radiata (L.) Wilczec seeds and cotyledons 4, 24, 48 and 72h post-imbibition. Ca(2+)-activated protease activity is present at a very low level in dry seeds, rises with imbibition and peaks 24h post-imbibition. Subsequently, the activity rapidly declines, even as total protease activity continues to rise. Calcium activation of proteolysis was reversed by ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA), ethylene glycol-bis (2-aminoethylether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA), 1,10, phenanthroline, chlorpromazine and by beta-mercaptoethanol in a concentration-dependent manner. Protease activity was also inhibited by para chloro mercuribenzoate (pCMB) and l-trans-epoxysuccinyl-leucylamido(4-guanidino) butane (E 64), while phenyl methyl sulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) and pepstatin did not effect Ca(2+) activation. The protease could be separated from the calmodulin fraction by size-exclusion chromatography, while retaining its ability for Ca(2+) activation, excluding the possibility of activation through calmodulin-based pathways. The presence of a Ca(2+)-activated protease in the cotyledons suggests its role in a predetermined program of germination involving elevation of cytosolic Ca(2+) levels during germination. This protease could be an important enzyme interfacing cytoplasmic signaling events and initiation of storage protein mobilization during seed germination.

  16. HIV Protease Inhibitors and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Anuurad, Erdembileg; Bremer, Andrew; Berglund, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of review To review the current scientific literature and recent clinical trials on HIV protease inhibitors (PIs) and their potential role in the pathogenesis of lipodystrophy and metabolic disorders. Recent findings HIV PI treatment may affect the normal stimulatory effect of insulin on glucose and fat storage. Further, chronic inflammation from HIV infection and PI treatment trigger cellular homeostatic stress responses with adverse effects on intermediary metabolism. The physiologic outcome is such that total adipocyte storage capacity is decreased, and the remaining adipocytes resist further fat storage. This process leads to a pathologic cycle of lipodystrophy and lipotoxicity, a pro-atherogenic lipid profile, and a clinical phenotype of increased central body fat distribution similar to the metabolic syndrome. Summary PIs are a key component of antiretroviral therapy and have dramatically improved the life expectancy of HIV-infected individuals. However, they are also associated with abnormalities in glucose/lipid metabolism and body fat distribution. Further studies are needed to better define the pathogenesis of PI-associated metabolic and body fat changes and their potential treatment. PMID:20717021

  17. Neutral serine proteases of neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Kettritz, Ralph

    2016-09-01

    Neutrophil serine proteases (NSPs) exercise tissue-degrading and microbial-killing effects. The spectrum of NSP-mediated functions grows continuously, not least because of methodological progress. Sensitive and specific FRET substrates were developed to study the proteolytic activity of each NSP member. Advanced biochemical methods are beginning to characterize common and specific NSP substrates. The resulting novel information indicates that NSPs contribute not only to genuine inflammatory neutrophil functions but also to autoimmunity, metabolic conditions, and cancer. Tight regulatory mechanisms control the proteolytic potential of NSPs. However, not all NSP functions depend on their enzymatic activity. Proteinase-3 (PR3) is somewhat unique among the NSPs for PR3 functions as an autoantigen. Patients with small-vessel vasculitis develop autoantibodies to PR3 that bind their target antigens on the neutrophil surface and trigger neutrophil activation. These activated cells subsequently contribute to vascular necrosis with life-threatening multiorgan failure. This article discusses various aspects of NSP biology and highlights translational aspects with strong clinical implications. PMID:27558338

  18. Carbohydrate protease conjugates: Stabilized proteases for peptide synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Wartchow, C.A.; Wang, Peng; Bednarski, M.D.; Callstrom, M.R. |

    1995-12-31

    The synthesis of oligopeptides using stable carbohydrate protease conjugates (CPCs) was examined in acetonitrile solvent systems. CPC[{alpha}-chymotrypsin] was used for the preparation of peptides containing histidine, phenylalanine, tryptophan in the P{sub 1} position in 60-93% yield. The CPC[{alpha}-chymotrypsin]-catalyzed synthesis of octamer Z-Gly-Gly-Phe-Gly-Gly-Phe-Gly-Gly-OEt from Z-Gly-Gly-Phe-Gly-Gly-Phe-OMe was achieved in 71% yield demonstrating that synthesis peptides containing both hydrophylic and hydrophobic amino acids. The P{sub 2} specificity of papain for aromatic residues was utilized for the 2 + 3 coupling of Z-Tyr-Gly-OMe to H{sub 2}N-Gly-Phe-Leu-OH to generate the leucine enkephalin derivative in 79% yield. Although papain is nonspecific for the hydrolysis of N-benzyloxycarbonyl amino acid methyl esters in aqueous solution, the rates of synthesis for these derivitives with nucleophile leucine tert-butyl ester differed by nearly 2 orders of magnitude. CPC[thermolysin] was used to prepare the aspartame precursor Z-Asp-Phe-OMe in 90% yield. The increased stability of CPCs prepared from periodate-modified poly(2-methacryl- amido-2-deoxy-D-glucose), poly(2-methacrylamido-2-deoxy-D-galactose), and poly(5-methacryl-amido-5-deoxy-D-ribose), carbohydrate materials designed to increase the aldehyde concentration in aqueous solution, suggests that the stability of CPCs is directly related to the aldehyde concentration of the carbohydrate material. Periodate oxidation of poly(2-methacrylamido-2-deoxy-D-glucose) followed by covalent attachment to {alpha}-chymotrypsin gave a CPC with catalytic activity in potassium phosphate buffer at 90{degrees}C for 2 h. 1 fig., 1 tab., 40 refs.

  19. Protease Inhibitors Targeting Coronavirus and Filovirus Entry

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yanchen; Vedantham, Punitha; Lu, Kai; Agudelo, Juliet; Carrion, Ricardo; Nunneley, Jerritt W.; Barnard, Dale; Pöhlmann, Stefan; McKerrow, James H.; Renslo, Adam R.; Simmons, Graham

    2016-01-01

    In order to gain entry into cells, diverse viruses, including Ebola virus, SARS-coronavirus and the emerging MERS-coronavirus, depend on activation of their envelope glycoproteins by host cell proteases. The respective enzymes are thus excellent targets for antiviral intervention. In cell culture, activation of Ebola virus, as well as SARS- and MERS-coronavirus can be accomplished by the endosomal cysteine proteases, cathepsin L (CTSL) and cathepsin B (CTSB). In addition, SARS- and MERS-coronavirus can use serine proteases localized at the cell surface, for their activation. However, it is currently unclear which protease(s) facilitate viral spread in the infected host. We report here that the cysteine protease inhibitor K11777, ((2S)-N-[(1E,3S)-1-(benzenesulfonyl)-5-phenylpent-1-en-3-yl]-2-{[(E)-4-methylpiperazine-1-carbonyl]amino}-3-phenylpropanamide) and closely-related vinylsulfones act as broad-spectrum antivirals by targeting cathepsin-mediated cell entry. K11777 is already in advanced stages of development for a number of parasitic diseases, such as Chagas disease, and has proven to be safe and effective in a range of animal models. K11777 inhibition of SARS-CoV and Ebola virus entry was observed in the sub-nanomolar range. In order to assess, whether cysteine or serine proteases promote viral spread in the host, we compared the antiviral activity of an optimized K11777-derivative with that of camostat, an inhibitor of TMPRSS2 and related serine proteases. Employing a pathogenic animal model of SARS-CoV infection, we demonstrated that viral spread and pathogenesis of SARS-CoV is driven by serine rather than cysteine proteases and can be effectively prevented by camostat. Camostat has been clinically used to treat chronic pancreatitis, and thus represents an exciting potential therapeutic for respiratory coronavirus infections. Our results indicate that camostat, or similar serine protease inhibitors, might be an effective option for treatment of SARS and

  20. β-Lactam Resistance in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus USA300 Is Increased by Inactivation of the ClpXP Protease

    PubMed Central

    Bæk, Kristoffer T.; Gründling, Angelika; Mogensen, René G.; Thøgersen, Louise; Petersen, Andreas; Paulander, Wilhelm

    2014-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has acquired the mecA gene encoding a peptidoglycan transpeptidase, penicillin binding protein 2a (PBP2a), which has decreased affinity for β-lactams. Quickly spreading and highly virulent community-acquired (CA) MRSA strains recently emerged as a frequent cause of infection in individuals without exposure to the health care system. In this study, we found that the inactivation of the components of the ClpXP protease substantially increased the β-lactam resistance level of a CA-MRSA USA300 strain, suggesting that the proteolytic activity of ClpXP controls one or more pathways modulating β-lactam resistance. These pathways do not involve the control of mecA expression, as the cellular levels of PBP2a were unaltered in the clp mutants. An analysis of the cell envelope properties of the clpX and clpP mutants revealed a number of distinct phenotypes that may contribute to the enhanced β-lactam tolerance. Both mutants displayed significantly thicker cell walls, increased peptidoglycan cross-linking, and altered composition of monomeric muropeptide species compared to those of the wild types. Moreover, changes in Sle1-mediated peptidoglycan hydrolysis and altered processing of the major autolysin Atl were observed in the clp mutants. In conclusion, the results presented here point to an important role for the ClpXP protease in controlling cell wall metabolism and add novel insights into the molecular factors that determine strain-dependent β-lactam resistance. PMID:24867990

  1. β-Lactam resistance in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus USA300 is increased by inactivation of the ClpXP protease.

    PubMed

    Bæk, Kristoffer T; Gründling, Angelika; Mogensen, René G; Thøgersen, Louise; Petersen, Andreas; Paulander, Wilhelm; Frees, Dorte

    2014-08-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has acquired the mecA gene encoding a peptidoglycan transpeptidase, penicillin binding protein 2a (PBP2a), which has decreased affinity for β-lactams. Quickly spreading and highly virulent community-acquired (CA) MRSA strains recently emerged as a frequent cause of infection in individuals without exposure to the health care system. In this study, we found that the inactivation of the components of the ClpXP protease substantially increased the β-lactam resistance level of a CA-MRSA USA300 strain, suggesting that the proteolytic activity of ClpXP controls one or more pathways modulating β-lactam resistance. These pathways do not involve the control of mecA expression, as the cellular levels of PBP2a were unaltered in the clp mutants. An analysis of the cell envelope properties of the clpX and clpP mutants revealed a number of distinct phenotypes that may contribute to the enhanced β-lactam tolerance. Both mutants displayed significantly thicker cell walls, increased peptidoglycan cross-linking, and altered composition of monomeric muropeptide species compared to those of the wild types. Moreover, changes in Sle1-mediated peptidoglycan hydrolysis and altered processing of the major autolysin Atl were observed in the clp mutants. In conclusion, the results presented here point to an important role for the ClpXP protease in controlling cell wall metabolism and add novel insights into the molecular factors that determine strain-dependent β-lactam resistance.

  2. In Vivo Studies in Rhodospirillum rubrum Indicate That Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase (Rubisco) Catalyzes Two Obligatorily Required and Physiologically Significant Reactions for Distinct Carbon and Sulfur Metabolic Pathways.

    PubMed

    Dey, Swati; North, Justin A; Sriram, Jaya; Evans, Bradley S; Tabita, F Robert

    2015-12-25

    All organisms possess fundamental metabolic pathways to ensure that needed carbon and sulfur compounds are provided to the cell in the proper chemical form and oxidation state. For most organisms capable of using CO2 as sole source of carbon, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) catalyzes primary carbon dioxide assimilation. In addition, sulfur salvage pathways are necessary to ensure that key sulfur-containing compounds are both available and, where necessary, detoxified in the cell. Using knock-out mutations and metabolomics in the bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum, we show here that Rubisco concurrently catalyzes key and essential reactions for seemingly unrelated but physiologically essential central carbon and sulfur salvage metabolic pathways of the cell. In this study, complementation and mutagenesis studies indicated that representatives of all known extant functional Rubisco forms found in nature are capable of simultaneously catalyzing reactions required for both CO2-dependent growth as well as growth using 5-methylthioadenosine as sole sulfur source under anaerobic photosynthetic conditions. Moreover, specific inactivation of the CO2 fixation reaction did not affect the ability of Rubisco to support anaerobic 5-methylthioadenosine metabolism, suggesting that the active site of Rubisco has evolved to ensure that this enzyme maintains both key functions. Thus, despite the coevolution of both functions, the active site of this protein may be differentially modified to affect only one of its key functions.

  3. Intramolecular Interactions between the Protease and Structural Domains Are Important for the Functions of Serine Protease Autotransporters▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Casey; Malik, Huma; Nassman, Deana; Huang, Antony; Tariq, Fayha; Oelschlaeger, Peter; Stathopoulos, Christos

    2010-01-01

    Autotransporter (AT) is a protein secretion pathway found in Gram-negative bacteria featuring a multidomain polypeptide with a signal sequence, a passenger domain, and a translocator domain. An AT subfamily named serine protease ATs of the family Enterobacteriaceae (SPATEs) is characterized by the presence of a conserved serine protease motif in the passenger domain which contributes to bacterial pathogenesis. The goal of the current study is to determine the importance of the passenger domain conserved residues in the SPATE proteolytic and adhesive functions using the temperature-sensitive hemagglutinin (Tsh) protein as our model. To begin, mutations of 21 fully conserved residues in the four passenger domain conserved motifs were constructed by PCR-based site-directed mutagenesis. Seventeen mutants exhibited a wild-type secretion level; among these mutants, eight displayed reduced proteolytic activities in Tsh-specific oligopeptide and mucin cleavage assays. These eight mutants also demonstrated lower affinities to extracellular matrix proteins, collagen IV, and fibronectin. These eight conserved residues were analyzed by molecular graphics modeling to demonstrate their intramolecular interactions with the catalytic triad and other key residues. Additional mutations were made to confirm the above interactions in order to demonstrate their significance to the SPATE functions. Altogether our data suggest that certain conserved residues in the SPATE passenger domain are important for both the proteolytic and adhesive activities of SPATE by maintaining the proper protein structure via intramolecular interactions between the protease and β-helical domains. Here, we provide new insight into the structure-function relationship of the SPATEs and the functional roles of their conserved residues. PMID:20479079

  4. Function of site-2 proteases in bacteria and bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Jessica S.; Glickman, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Site-2 Proteases (S2Ps) are a class of intramembrane metalloproteases named after the founding member of this protein family, human S2P, which cleaves Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Proteins which control cholesterol and fatty acid biosynthesis. S2Ps are widely distributed in bacteria and participate in diverse pathways that control such diverse functions as membrane integrity, sporulation, lipid biosynthesis, pheromone production, virulence, and others. The most common signaling mechanism mediated by S2Ps is the coupled degradation of transmembrane anti-Sigma factors to activate ECF Sigma factor regulons. However, additional signaling mechanisms continue to emerge as more prokaryotic S2Ps are characterized, including direct proteolysis of membrane embedded transcription factors and proteolysis of non-transcriptional membrane proteins or membrane protein remnants. In this review we seek to comprehensively review the functions of S2Ps in bacteria and bacterial pathogens and attempt to organize these proteases into conceptual groups that will spur further study. PMID:24099002

  5. A caspase-independent cell clearance program. The LEI/L-DNase II pathway.

    PubMed

    Torriglia, A; Perani, P; Brossas, J Y; Altairac, S; Zeggai, S; Martin, E; Tréton, J; Courtois, Y; Counis, M F

    2000-01-01

    The discovery of caspase-mitochondrial pathway counts as one of the most important discovery in apoptosis biochemistry. Today, however, we begin to recognize its limits. Inhibition of caspase does not prevent cell death in many mammalian models. Targeted disruption of caspases does not impair every type of apoptosis. Other pathways, caspase independent, are now described. Here we present one of these pathways. It is a serine-protease dependent pathway and its key event is the transformation of LEI (a serine protease inhibitor) into L-DNase II (an endonuclease). When using this apoptotic pathway the cell activates, at the same time, its endonuclease activity (L-DNase II appears) and its protease activity (there is a release of inhibition of proteases).

  6. Isolation of the human PC6 gene encoding the putative host protease for HIV-1 gp160 processing in CD4+ T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, L; Wolf, J; Pichuantes, S; Duke, R; Franzusoff, A

    1996-01-01

    Production of infectious HIV-1 virions is dependent on the processing of envelope glycoprotein gp160 by a host cell protease. The protease in human CD4+ T lymphocytes has not been unequivocally identified, yet members of the family of mammalian subtilisin-like protein convertases (SPCs), which are soluble or membrane-bound proteases of the secretory pathway, best fulfill the criteria. These proteases are required for proprotein maturation and cleave at paired basic amino acid motifs in numerous cellular and viral glycoprotein precursors, both in vivo and in vitro. To identify the gp160 processing protease, we have used reverse transcription-PCR and Northern blot analyses to ascertain the spectrum of SPC proteases in human CD4+ T cells. We have cloned novel members of the SPC family, known as the human PC6 genes. Two isoforms of the hPC6 protease are expressed in human T cells, hPC6A and the larger hPC6B. The patterns of SPC gene expression in human T cells has been compared with the furin-defective LoVo cell line, both of which are competent in the production of infectious HIV virions. This comparison led to the conclusion that the hPC6 gene products are the most likely candidates for the host cell protease responsible for HIV-1 gp160 processing in human CD4+ T cells. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:8755538

  7. Purification, characterization, and gene cloning of a cold-adapted thermolysin-like protease from Halobacillus sp. SCSIO 20089.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jian; Li, Jie; Mai, Zhimao; Tian, Xinpeng; Zhang, Si

    2013-06-01

    Marine sediment is a distinctive habitat of cold enzyme producing bacteria. A protease producing strain Halobacillus sp. SCSIO 20089 was isolated from a marine sediment of South China Sea. Using chromatographic techniques, the extracellular protease was purified to homogeneity from the culture supernatant. The purified protease exhibited maximal activity at 30°C, pH 8.0, and remained more than 20% of its activity at 0°C. Its activation energy was calculated to be 34.4 kJ/mol, suggesting it is a cold-adapted protease. Based on the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the purified enzyme, full gene encoding the enzyme was obtained by combination of degenerate primer PCR and hiTAIL-PCR. The deduced amino acid sequence showed 57% and 52% identity with mesothermal and thermophilic protease in thermolysin family respectively. All these indicate the enzyme is a unique cold-active thermolysin-like protease with potential in both basic research and industrial application areas.

  8. An acidic amino acid-specific protease from germinating soybeans.

    PubMed

    Tan-Wilson, A L; Liu, X; Chen, R; Qi, X; Wilson, K A

    1996-05-01

    The degradation of the beta-conglycinin protein reserves in soybean seeds during germination and early growth begins with the proteolysis of its alpha and alpha' subunits by an enzyme called Protease C1. In the pathway, a number of proteolytic intermediates are produced and subsequently degraded. Determination of the N-terminal sequences of these intermediates provides insight regarding the requirements of the cleavage sites. The N-terminal sequence of three such proteolytic intermediates has been determined. The sequence has been located in the published sequences of the beta-conglycinin subunits. Comparing these cleavage sites, plus those of two others previously delineated, shows that the P1' and P4' positions always bear either a Glu or an Asp residue while the P1 position always bears either a Glu or a Gln residue. In addition, other sites from P3 to P7' are also rich in either Glu or Asp, and the whole region is predicted to be in a alpha-helix. Consistent with the observation, synthetic poly-L-Glu inhibits the Protease C1-catalysed degradation of the alpha and alpha' subunits of beta-conglycinin. Poly-L-Glu (av. M(r) = 1000) at 12.5 mM was more effective at inhibiting the reaction than poly-L-Glu (av. M(r) = 600) or poly-L-Glu (av. M(r) = 14,300) at the same concentration. Comparing large synthetic polypeptides at 12.5mM, inhibition by poly-L-Asp (av. M(r) = 15,000) is as effective as poly-L-Glu (av. M(r) = 14,300), while poly-L-Ser (av. M(r) = 15,000) had no effect at all. Poly-D-Glu (av. M(r) = 15,000) is a better inhibitor than poly-L-Glu of the same size. A serine protease of similar molecular weight as Protease C1 and also capable of catalysing the proteolysis of the alpha and alpha' subunits of beta-conglycinin to generate proteolytic intermediates of the same size has been found in mung bean.

  9. Development of potent inhibitors of the coxsackievirus 3C protease

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Eui Seung; Lee, Won Gil; Yun, Soo-Hyeon; Rho, Seong Hwan; Im, Isak; Yang, Sung Tae; Sellamuthu, Saravanan; Lee, Yong Jae; Kwon, Sun Jae; Park, Ohkmae K.; Jeon, Eun-Seok; Park, Woo Jin . E-mail: wjpark@gist.ac.kr; Kim, Yong-Chul . E-mail: yongchul@gist.ac.kr

    2007-06-22

    Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) 3C protease (3CP) plays essential roles in the viral replication cycle, and therefore, provides an attractive therapeutic target for treatment of human diseases caused by CVB3 infection. CVB3 3CP and human rhinovirus (HRV) 3CP have a high degree of amino acid sequence similarity. Comparative modeling of these two 3CPs revealed one prominent distinction; an Asn residue delineating the S2' pocket in HRV 3CP is replaced by a Tyr residue in CVB3 3CP. AG7088, a potent inhibitor of HRV 3CP, was modified by substitution of the ethyl group at the P2' position with various hydrophobic aromatic rings that are predicted to interact preferentially with the Tyr residue in the S2' pocket of CVB3 3CP. The resulting derivatives showed dramatically increased inhibitory activities against CVB3 3CP. In addition, one of the derivatives effectively inhibited the CVB3 proliferation in vitro.

  10. Production of alkaline protease from Cellulosimicrobium cellulans

    PubMed Central

    Ferracini-Santos, Luciana; Sato, Hélia H

    2009-01-01

    Cellulosimicrobium cellulans is one of the microorganisms that produces a wide variety of yeast cell wall-degrading enzymes, β-1,3-glucanase, protease and chitinase. Dried cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were used as carbon and nitrogen source for cell growth and protease production. The medium components KH2PO4, KOH and dried yeast cells showed a significant effect (p<0.05) on the factorial fractional design. A second design was prepared using two factors: pH and percentage of dried yeast cells. The results showed that the culture medium for the maximum production of protease was 0.2 g/l of MgSO4.7H2O, 2.0 g/l of (NH4)2SO4 and 8% of dried yeast cells in 0.15M phosphate buffer at pH 8.0. The maximum alkaline protease production was 7.0 ± 0.27 U/ml over the center point. Crude protease showed best activity at 50ºC and pH 7.0-8.0, and was stable at 50ºC. PMID:24031317

  11. Protease Inhibitors from Plants with Antimicrobial Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin-Young; Park, Seong-Cheol; Hwang, Indeok; Cheong, Hyeonsook; Nah, Jae-Woon; Hahm, Kyung-Soo; Park, Yoonkyung

    2009-01-01

    Antimicrobial proteins (peptides) are known to play important roles in the innate host defense mechanisms of most living organisms, including plants, insects, amphibians and mammals. They are also known to possess potent antibiotic activity against bacteria, fungi, and even certain viruses. Recently, the rapid emergence of microbial pathogens that are resistant to currently available antibiotics has triggered considerable interest in the isolation and investigation of the mode of action of antimicrobial proteins (peptides). Plants produce a variety of proteins (peptides) that are involved in the defense against pathogens and invading organisms, including ribosome-inactivating proteins, lectins, protease inhibitors and antifungal peptides (proteins). Specially, the protease inhibitors can inhibit aspartic, serine and cysteine proteinases. Increased levels of trypsin and chymotrypsin inhibitors correlated with the plants resistance to the pathogen. Usually, the purification of antimicrobial proteins (peptides) with protease inhibitor activity was accomplished by salt-extraction, ultrafiltration and C18 reverse phase chromatography, successfully. We discuss the relation between antimicrobial and anti-protease activity in this review. Protease inhibitors from plants potently inhibited the growth of a variety of pathogenic bacterial and fungal strains and are therefore excellent candidates for use as the lead compounds for the development of novel antimicrobial agents. PMID:19582234

  12. The Spn4 gene from Drosophila melanogaster is a multipurpose defence tool directed against proteases from three different peptidase families

    PubMed Central

    Brüning, Mareke; Lummer, Martina; Bentele, Caterina; Smolenaars, Marcel M. W.; Rodenburg, Kees W.; Ragg, Hermann

    2006-01-01

    By alternative use of four RSL (reactive site loop) coding exon cassettes, the serpin (serine protease inhibitor) gene Spn4 from Drosophila melanogaster was proposed to enable the synthesis of multiple protease inhibitor isoforms, one of which has been shown to be a potent inhibitor of human furin. Here, we have investigated the inhibitory spectrum of all Spn4 RSL variants. The analyses indicate that the Spn4 gene encodes inhibitors that may inhibit serine proteases of the subtilase family (S8), the chymotrypsin family (S1), and the papain-like cysteine protease family (C1), most of them at high rates. Thus a cohort of different protease inhibitors is generated simply by grafting enzyme-adapted RSL sequences on to a single serpin scaffold, even though the target proteases contain different types and/or a varying order of catalytic residues and are descendents of different phylogenetic lineages. Since all of the Spn4 RSL isoforms are produced as intracellular residents and additionally as variants destined for export or associated with the secretory pathway, the Spn4 gene represents a versatile defence tool kit that may provide multiple antiproteolytic functions. PMID:16989645

  13. Structurally Similar Triphenylphosphine-Stabilized Undecagolds, Au11(PPh3)7Cl3 and [Au11(PPh3)8Cl2]Cl, Exhibit Distinct Ligand Exchange Pathways with Glutathione

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ligand exchange is frequently used to introduce new functional groups on the surface of inorganic nanoparticles or clusters while preserving the core size. For one of the smallest clusters, triphenylphosphine (TPP)-stabilized undecagold, there are conflicting reports in the literature regarding whether core size is retained or significant growth occurs during exchange with thiol ligands. During an investigation of these differences in reactivity, two distinct forms of undecagold were isolated. The X-ray structures of the two forms, Au11(PPh3)7Cl3 and [Au11(PPh3)8Cl2]Cl, differ only in the number of TPP ligands bound to the core. Syntheses were developed to produce each of the two forms, and their spectroscopic features correlated with the structures. Ligand exchange on [Au11(PPh3)8Cl2]Cl yields only small clusters, whereas exchange on Au11(PPh3)7Cl3 (or mixtures of the two forms) yields the larger Au25 cluster. The distinctive features in the optical spectra of the two forms made it possible to evaluate which of the cluster forms were used in the previously published papers and clarify the origin of the differences in reactivity that had been reported. The results confirm that reactions of clusters and nanoparticles may be influenced by small variations in the arrangement of ligands and suggest that the role of the ligand shell in stabilizing intermediates during ligand exchange may be essential to preventing particle growth or coalescence. PMID:25171178

  14. Retroviral proteases and their roles in virion maturation.

    PubMed

    Konvalinka, Jan; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Müller, Barbara

    2015-05-01

    Proteolytic processing of viral polyproteins is essential for retrovirus infectivity. Retroviral proteases (PR) become activated during or after assembly of the immature, non-infectious virion. They cleave viral polyproteins at specific sites, inducing major structural rearrangements termed maturation. Maturation converts retroviral enzymes into their functional form, transforms the immature shell into a metastable state primed for early replication events, and enhances viral entry competence. Not only cleavage at all PR recognition sites, but also an ordered sequence of cleavages is crucial. Proteolysis is tightly regulated, but the triggering mechanisms and kinetics and pathway of morphological transitions remain enigmatic. Here, we outline PR structures and substrate specificities focusing on HIV PR as a therapeutic target. We discuss design and clinical success of HIV PR inhibitors, as well as resistance development towards these drugs. Finally, we summarize data elucidating the role of proteolysis in maturation and highlight unsolved questions regarding retroviral maturation.

  15. Proteome analysis of peroxisomes from etiolated Arabidopsis seedlings identifies a peroxisomal protease involved in β-oxidation and development.

    PubMed

    Quan, Sheng; Yang, Pingfang; Cassin-Ross, Gaëlle; Kaur, Navneet; Switzenberg, Robert; Aung, Kyaw; Li, Jiying; Hu, Jianping

    2013-12-01

    Plant peroxisomes are highly dynamic organelles that mediate a suite of metabolic processes crucial to development. Peroxisomes in seeds/dark-grown seedlings and in photosynthetic tissues constitute two major subtypes of plant peroxisomes, which had been postulated to contain distinct primary biochemical properties. Multiple in-depth proteomic analyses had been performed on leaf peroxisomes, yet the major makeup of peroxisomes in seeds or dark-grown seedlings remained unclear. To compare the metabolic pathways of the two dominant plant peroxisomal subtypes and discover new peroxisomal proteins that function specifically during seed germination, we performed proteomic analysis of peroxisomes from etiolated Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings. The detection of 77 peroxisomal proteins allowed us to perform comparative analysis with the peroxisomal proteome of green leaves, which revealed a large overlap between these two primary peroxisomal variants. Subcellular targeting analysis by fluorescence microscopy validated around 10 new peroxisomal proteins in Arabidopsis. Mutant analysis suggested the role of the cysteine protease RESPONSE TO DROUGHT21A-LIKE1 in β-oxidation, seed germination, and growth. This work provides a much-needed road map of a major type of plant peroxisome and has established a basis for future investigations of peroxisomal proteolytic processes to understand their roles in development and in plant interaction with the environment.

  16. Serine protease inhibitors of parasitic helminths.

    PubMed

    Molehin, Adebayo J; Gobert, Geoffrey N; McManus, Donald P

    2012-05-01

    Serine protease inhibitors (serpins) are a superfamily of structurally conserved proteins that inhibit serine proteases and play key physiological roles in numerous biological systems such as blood coagulation, complement activation and inflammation. A number of serpins have now been identified in parasitic helminths with putative involvement in immune regulation and in parasite survival through interference with the host immune response. This review describes the serpins and smapins (small serine protease inhibitors) that have been identified in Ascaris spp., Brugia malayi, Ancylostoma caninum Onchocerca volvulus, Haemonchus contortus, Trichinella spiralis, Trichostrongylus vitrinus, Anisakis simplex, Trichuris suis, Schistosoma spp., Clonorchis sinensis, Paragonimus westermani and Echinococcus spp. and discusses their possible biological functions, including roles in host-parasite interplay and their evolutionary relationships. PMID:22310379

  17. Coagulation, Protease Activated Receptors and Viral Myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Antoniak, Silvio; Mackman, Nigel

    2013-01-01

    The coagulation protease cascade plays an essential role in hemostasis. In addition, a clot contributes to host defense by limiting the spread of pathogens. Coagulation proteases induce intracellular signaling by cleavage of cell surface receptors called protease-activated receptors (PARs). These receptors allow cells to sense changes in the extracellular environment, such as infection. Viruses activate the coagulation cascade by inducing tissue factor expression and by disrupting the endothelium. Virus infection of the heart can cause myocarditis, cardiac remodeling and heart failure. Recent studies using a mouse model have shown that tissue factor, thrombin and PAR-1 signaling all positively regulate the innate immune during viral myocarditis. In contrast, PAR-2 signaling was found to inhibit interferon-β expression and the innate immune response. These observations suggest that anticoagulants may impair the innate immune response to viral infection and that inhibition of PAR-2 may be a new target to reduce viral myocarditis.. PMID:24203054

  18. Subtilisin-like proteases in nematodes.

    PubMed

    Poole, Catherine B; Jin, Jingmin; McReynolds, Larry A

    2007-09-01

    Cleavage by subtilisin-like proteases (subtilases) is an essential step in post-translational processing of proteins found in organisms ranging from yeast to mammals. Our knowledge of the diversity of this protease family in nematodes is aided by the rapid increase in sequence information, especially from the Brugia malayi genome project. Genetic studies of the subtilases in Caenorhabitis elegans give valuable insight into the biological function of these proteases in other nematode species. In this review, we focus on the subtilases in filarial nematodes as well as other parasitic and free-living nematodes in comparison to what is known in C. elegans. Topics to be addressed include expansion and diversity of the subtilase gene family during evolution, enhanced complexity created by alternative RNA splicing, molecular and biochemical characterization of the different subtilases and the challenges of designing subtilase-specific inhibitors for parasitic nematodes. PMID:17570539

  19. Conformational selection in trypsin-like proteases

    PubMed Central

    Pozzi, Nicola; Vogt, Austin D.; Gohara, David W.; Di Cera, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    For over four decades, two competing mechanisms of ligand recognition – conformational selection and induced-fit - have dominated our interpretation of protein allostery. Defining the mechanism broadens our understanding of the system and impacts our ability to design effective drugs and new therapeutics. Recent kinetics studies demonstrate that trypsin-like proteases exist in equilibrium between two forms: one fully accessible to substrate (E) and the other with the active site occluded (E*). Analysis of the structural database confirms existence of the E* and E forms and vouches for the allosteric nature of the trypsin fold. Allostery in terms of conformational selection establishes an important paradigm in the protease field and enables protein engineers to expand the repertoire of proteases as therapeutics. PMID:22664096

  20. Dataset of cocoa aspartic protease cleavage sites.

    PubMed

    Janek, Katharina; Niewienda, Agathe; Wöstemeyer, Johannes; Voigt, Jürgen

    2016-09-01

    The data provide information in support of the research article, "The cleavage specificity of the aspartic protease of cocoa beans involved in the generation of the cocoa-specific aroma precursors" (Janek et al., 2016) [1]. Three different protein substrates were partially digested with the aspartic protease isolated from cocoa beans and commercial pepsin, respectively. The obtained peptide fragments were analyzed by matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS/MS) and identified using the MASCOT server. The N- and C-terminal ends of the peptide fragments were used to identify the corresponding in-vitro cleavage sites by comparison with the amino acid sequences of the substrate proteins. The same procedure was applied to identify the cleavage sites used by the cocoa aspartic protease during cocoa fermentation starting from the published amino acid sequences of oligopeptides isolated from fermented cocoa beans. PMID:27508221

  1. Trypsin causes platelet activation independently of known protease-activated receptors

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yingying; Kunapuli, Satya P.

    2014-01-01

    To identify a physiological agonist of PAR3, we used PAR4 null murine platelets, which were known to express only PAR3. In this study, we tested several proteases and found that trypsin, but not heat-inactivated trypsin, activated PAR4 null murine platelets. Even at high concentrations, trypsin caused shape change without increasing intracellular calcium levels in PAR4 null murine platelets. Consistent with this result, the Gq inhibitor YM-254890 had no effect on trypsin-induced shape change. However, trypsin-induced platelet shape change was abolished by either p160ROCK inhibitor, Y27632 or H1152. Furthermore, trypsin caused phosphorylation of myosin light chain (Thr18), but not Akt or Erk. Surprisingly, trypsin caused a similar shape change in PAR4-desensitized PAR3 null murine platelets as in PAR4 null murine platelets, indicating that trypsin did not activate PAR3 to cause shape change. More interestingly, the Src family kinase (SFK) inhibitor PP2 abolished trypsin-induced, but not AYPGKF-induced, shape change. Hence, trypsin activated a novel signaling pathway through RhoA/p160ROCK and was regulated by SFKs. In conclusion, our study demonstrates a novel protease signaling pathway in platelets that is independent of PARs. This protease-induced novel signaling pathway regulates platelet shape change through SFKs and p160ROCK. PMID:24030758

  2. Serine Protease(s) Secreted by the Nematode Trichuris muris Degrade the Mucus Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Hasnain, Sumaira Z.; McGuckin, Michael A.; Grencis, Richard K.; Thornton, David J.

    2012-01-01

    The polymeric mucin component of the intestinal mucus barrier changes during nematode infection to provide not only physical protection but also to directly affect pathogenic nematodes and aid expulsion. Despite this, the direct interaction of the nematodes with the mucins and the mucus barrier has not previously been addressed. We used the well-established Trichuris muris nematode model to investigate the effect on mucins of the complex mixture of immunogenic proteins secreted by the nematode called excretory/secretory products (ESPs). Different regimes of T. muris infection were used to simulate chronic (low dose) or acute (high dose) infection. Mucus/mucins isolated from mice and from the human intestinal cell line, LS174T, were treated with ESPs. We demonstrate that serine protease(s) secreted by the nematode have the ability to change the properties of the mucus barrier, making it more porous by degrading the mucin component of the mucus gel. Specifically, the serine protease(s) acted on the N-terminal polymerising domain of the major intestinal mucin Muc2, resulting in depolymerisation of Muc2 polymers. Importantly, the respiratory/gastric mucin Muc5ac, which is induced in the intestine and is critical for worm expulsion, was protected from the depolymerising effect exerted by ESPs. Furthermore, serine protease inhibitors (Serpins) which may protect the mucins, in particular Muc2, from depolymerisation, were highly expressed in mice resistant to chronic infection. Thus, we demonstrate that nematodes secrete serine protease(s) to degrade mucins within the mucus barrier, which may modify the niche of the parasite to prevent clearance from the host or facilitate efficient mating and egg laying from the posterior end of the parasite that is in intimate contact with the mucus barrier. However, during a TH2-mediated worm expulsion response, serpins, Muc5ac and increased levels of Muc2 protect the barrier from degradation by the nematode secreted protease(s). PMID

  3. Current and Novel Inhibitors of HIV Protease

    PubMed Central

    Pokorná, Jana; Machala, Ladislav; Řezáčová, Pavlína; Konvalinka, Jan

    2009-01-01

    The design, development and clinical success of HIV protease inhibitors represent one of the most remarkable achievements of molecular medicine. This review describes all nine currently available FDA-approved protease inhibitors, discusses their pharmacokinetic properties, off-target activities, side-effects, and resistance profiles. The compounds in the various stages of clinical development are also introduced, as well as alternative approaches, aiming at other functional domains of HIV PR. The potential of these novel compounds to open new way to the rational drug design of human viruses is critically assessed. PMID:21994591

  4. Using specificity to strategically target proteases

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Mark D.; Craik, Charles S.

    2009-01-01

    Proteases are a family of naturally occurring enzymes in the body whose dysregulation has been implicated in numerous diseases and cancers. Their ability to selectively and catalytically turnover substrate adds both signal amplification and functionality as parameters for the detection of disease. This review will focus on the development of activity-based methodologies to characterize proteases, and in particular, the use of positional scanning, synthetic combinatorial libraries (PS-SCL’s), and substrate activity screening (SAS) assays. The use of these approaches to better understand a protease’s natural substrate will be discussed as well as the technologies that emerged. PMID:18434168

  5. Detection of protease and protease activity using a single nanoscrescent SERS probe

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Gang L.; Ellman, Jonathan A.; Lee, Luke P.; Chen, Fanqing Frank

    2013-01-29

    This invention pertains to the in vitro detection of proteases using a single peptide-conjugate nanocrescent surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) probes with at least nanomolar sensitivity. The probe enables detection of proteolytic activity in extremely small volume and at low concentration. In certain embodiments the probes comprise an indicator for the detection of an active protease, where the indicator comprises a nanocrescent attached to a peptide, where said peptide comprises a recognition site for the protease and a Raman tag attached to the peptide.

  6. Tocopherol isoforms (α-, γ-, and δ-) show distinct capacities to control Nrf-2 and NfκB signaling pathways that modulate inflammatory response in Caco-2 intestinal cells.

    PubMed

    Elisia, Ingrid; Kitts, David D

    2015-06-01

    We recently showed that α-, γ-, and δ-tocopherols (Toc) were isoform dependent in modulating an inflammatory response in differentiated human Caco-2 intestinal cells. Here, we aim to investigate the relative capacity of Toc isoforms to modify the stress-activated NfκB and Nrf-2 signaling pathways that regulate the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and antioxidant enzymes, respectively, in this well-established in vitro model of the small intestine The modulation of IFNγ/phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-induced inflammatory responses, determined by the expression of IL8 mRNA and protein, corresponded to the extent by which different Toc isoforms altered intracellular oxidative status in Caco-2 cells. α Toc was more effective at suppressing IFNγ/PMA-induced NfκB activation than γ-Toc, while δ-Toc was ineffective. On the other hand, only δ-Toc and to a lesser extent γ-Toc promoted IFNγ/PMA-induced Nrf-2 activation. Up-regulation of Nrf-2 by δ-Toc coincided with a decrease in GSH/GSSG ratio, thus pointing to pro-oxidant activity of δ-Toc isoform in IFNγ/PMA-stimulated Caco-2 cells. The induction of oxidative stress in IFNγ/PMA-treated cells by δ-Toc was lowered (P < 0.05) in the presence of ascorbic acid. Ascorbic acid also enabled a greater suppression of IL8 secretion than when cells were treated with δ-Toc isoform alone. Our findings show that δ-Toc uniquely promoted oxidative stress which translated to Toc isoform-specific modulation of the stress-activated Nrf-2 and NfκB signaling pathway and an influence on IL8 expression.

  7. Divergent expression of MUC5AC, MUC6, MUC2, CD10, and CDX-2 in dysplasia and intramucosal adenocarcinomas with intestinal and foveolar morphology: is this evidence of distinct gastric and intestinal pathways to carcinogenesis in Barrett Esophagus?

    PubMed

    Khor, Tze Sheng; Alfaro, Eduardo E; Ooi, Esther M M; Li, Yuan; Srivastava, Amitabh; Fujita, Hiroshi; Park, Youn; Kumarasinghe, Marian Priyanthi; Lauwers, Gregory Yves

    2012-03-01

    Dysplasia in Barrett esophagus has been recognized to be morphologically heterogenous, featuring adenomatous, foveolar, and hybrid phenotypes. Recent studies have suggested a tumor suppressor role for CDX-2 in the metaplasia-dysplasia-carcinoma sequence. The phenotypic stability and role of CDX-2 in the neoplastic progression of different types of dysplasias have not been evaluated. Thirty-eight endoscopic mucosal resections with dysplasia and/or intramucosal carcinoma (IMC) arising in Barrett esophagus were evaluated for the expression of MUC5AC, MUC6, MUC2, CD10, and CDX-2. The background mucosa was also evaluated. The results were correlated with morphologic classification and clinicopathologic parameters. Of 38 endoscopic mucosal resections, 23 had IMC and dysplasia, 8 had IMC only, and 7 had dysplasia only. Among dysplastic lesions, 73% were foveolar, 17% were adenomatous, and 10% were hybrid. Twenty of 23 cases with dysplasia and adjacent IMC showed an identical immunophenotype of dysplasia and IMC comprising 16 gastric, 3 intestinal, and 1 mixed immunophenotype. Three cases showed discordance of dysplasia and IMC immunophenotype. These findings suggest that most Barrett-related IMC cases are either gastric or intestinal, with phenotypic stability during progression supporting separate gastric and intestinal pathways of carcinogenesis. CDX-2 showed gradual downregulation of expression during progression in adenomatous dysplasia but not in foveolar or hybrid dysplasia, supporting a tumor suppressor role, at least in the intestinal pathway. CDX-2 was also found to be expressed to a greater degree in intestinal metaplasia compared with nonintestinalized columnar metaplasia. Consistent with CDX-2 as a tumor suppressor, this suggests that nonintestinalized columnar metaplasia may be an unstable intermediate state at risk for neoplastic progression.

  8. Broad Spectrum Activity of a Lectin-Like Bacterial Serine Protease Family on Human Leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ayala-Lujan, Jorge Luis; Vijayakumar, Vidhya; Gong, Mei; Smith, Rachel; Santiago, Araceli E.; Ruiz-Perez, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The serine protease autotransporter from Enterobacteriaceae (SPATE) family, which number more than 25 proteases with apparent diverse functions, have been phylogenetically divided into two distinct classes, designated 1 and 2. We recently demonstrated that Pic and Tsh, two members of the class-2 SPATE family produced by intestinal and extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli, were able to cleave a number of O-glycosylated proteins on neutrophils and lymphocytes resulting in impaired leukocyte functions. Here we show that most members of the class-2 SPATE family have lectin-like properties and exhibit differential protease activity reliant on glycoprotein type and cell lineage. Protease activity was seen in virtually all tested O-glycosylated proteins including CD34, CD55, CD164, TIM1, TIM3, TIM4 and C1-INH. We also show that although SPATE proteins bound and cleaved glycoproteins more efficiently on granulocytes and monocytes, they also targeted glycoproteins on B, T and natural killer lymphocytes. Finally, we found that the characteristic domain-2 of class-2 SPATEs is not required for glycoprotease activity, but single amino acid mutations in Pic domain-1 to those residues naturally occurring in domain-1 of SepA, were sufficient to hamper Pic glycoprotease activity. This study shows that most class-2 SPATEs have redundant activities and suggest that they may function as immunomodulators at several levels of the immune system. PMID:25251283

  9. A modified method for the detection of microbial proteases on agar plates using tannic acid.

    PubMed

    Saran, Saurabh; Isar, Jasmine; Saxena, Rajendra Kumar

    2007-06-10

    In routine assay for the screening of microbes producing proteases, 10% trichloroaceticacid (TCA) is flooded on the milk agar plates after inoculation and required incubation to precipitate the protein. However, the clarity of the hydrolyzed zone is not very sharp and distinct. We herein present an improved assay for detecting the presence of extracellular protease from microorganisms on agar plates. In this method 10% tannic acid is flooded on the milk agar plate (in place of, TCA) to observe the zone of hydrolysis. Tannic acid sharply increases the colour intensity of the plate, as it favours the precipitation of the unhydrolyzed protein in the plate, thereby improving the contrast between the intact zones and the enzymatic lyses zones of the substrate. Our results indicate that this method is useful to detect extracellular proteases produced by both fungi as well as bacteria. The method used in the present study is sensitive, and can be easily performed for screening of large number of microbial cultures. This is the first report on the use of tannic acid for the detection of microbial proteases.

  10. Mutational analysis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease suggests functional homology with aspartic proteinases.

    PubMed Central

    Loeb, D D; Hutchison, C A; Edgell, M H; Farmerie, W G; Swanstrom, R

    1989-01-01

    Processing of the retroviral gag and pol gene products is mediated by a viral protease. Bacterial expression systems have been developed which permit genetic analysis of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease as measured by cleavage of the pol protein precursor. Deletion analysis of the pol reading frame locates the sequences required to encode a protein with appropriate proteolytic activity near the left end of the pol reading frame but largely outside the gag-pol overlap region, which is at the extreme left end of pol. Most missense mutations within an 11-amino-acid domain highly conserved among retroviral proteases and with sequence similarity to the active site of aspartic proteinases abolish appropriate processing, suggesting that the retrovirus proteases share a catalytic mechanism with aspartic proteinases. Substitution of the amino acids flanking the scissile bond at three of the processing sites encoded by pol demonstrates distinct sequence requirements for cleavage at these different sites. The inclusion of a charged amino acid at the processing site blocks cleavage. A subset of these substitutions also inhibits processing at the nonmutated sites. Images PMID:2642305

  11. Crystal structure of a novel cysteinless plant Kunitz-type protease inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Daiane; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra; Verissimo, Paula; Yoo Im, Sonia; Sampaio, Misako Uemura; Oliva, Maria Luiza Vilela . E-mail: olivaml.bioq@epm.br

    2007-09-07

    Bauhinia bauhinioides Cruzipain Inhibitor (BbCI) is a cysteine protease inhibitor highly homologous to plant Kunitz-type inhibitors. However, in contrast to classical Kunitz family inhibitors it lacks cysteine residues and therefore disulfide bridges. BbCI is also distinct in the ability to inactivate enzymes belonging to two different classes, cysteine and serine proteases. Besides inhibiting the cysteine protease cruzipain, BbCI also inhibits cathepsin L and the serine proteases HNE (human neutrophil elastase) and PPE (porcine pancreatic elastase). Monoclinic crystals of the recombinant inhibitor that diffract to 1.7 A resolution were obtained using hanging drop method by vapor diffusion at 18 {sup o}C. The refined structure shows the conservative {beta}-trefoil fold features of the Kunitz inhibitors. In BbCI, one of the two characteristic S-S bonds is replaced by the water-mediated interaction between Tyr125 and Gly132. In this work we explore the structural differences between Kunitz-type inhibitors and analyze the essential interactions that maintain the protein structural stability preserving its biological function.

  12. In Vitro Characterization of Chain Depolymerization Activities of SUMO-Specific Proteases.

    PubMed

    Eckhoff, Julia; Dohmen, R Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    SUMO-specific proteases, known as Ulps in baker's yeast and SENPs in humans, have important roles in controlling the dynamics of SUMO-modified proteins. They display distinct modes of action and specificity, in that they may act on the SUMO precursor, mono-sumoylated, and/or polysumoylated proteins, and they might be specific for substrates with certain SUMO paralogs. SUMO chains may be dismantled either by endo or exo mechanisms. Biochemical characterization of a protease usually requires purification of the protein of interest. Developing a purification protocol, however, can be very difficult, and in some cases, isolation of a protease in its pure form may go along with a substantial loss of activity. To characterize the reaction mechanism of Ulps, we have developed an in vitro assay, which makes use of substrates endowed with artificial poly-SUMO chains of defined lengths, and S. cerevisiae Ulp enzymes in crude extract from E. coli. This fast and economic approach should be applicable to SUMO-specific proteases from other species as well. PMID:27631802

  13. The Structure of the Cell-Wall Protease from Streptococci that Inactivates the Human Complement Factor 5A

    SciTech Connect

    Brown,C.; Gu, Z.; Matsuka, Y.; Olmsted, S.; Cleary, P.; Ohlendorf, D.; Earhart, C.

    2006-01-01

    The structure of a 949-residue fragment of complement factor 5a peptidase (SCP) was determined to 1.9 Angstroms resolution. The molecule is made of five distinct domains in an elongated head-stalk structure. The structure suggests that activity of SCP can be modulated through binding of integrins to 2 RGD sequences. This structure is the first of an enzyme that is covalently attached to the cell wall of a Gram-positive bacteria. SCP is also the first functional protease containing a protease-associated domain to have its structure elucidated.

  14. Monocytes can be induced by lipopolysaccharide-triggered T lymphocytes to express functional factor VII/VIIa protease activity

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    In the present study we demonstrate that human monocytes can be induced by the model stimulus, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), to produce and assemble on their surface functional Factor VII/VIIa. This protease was not induced in relatively purified monocytes alone following exposure to LPS; but was induced in the presence of Leu-3a positive helper/inducer T cells. The Factor VII/VIIa protease activity represented 35-40% of the potential initiating activity for the extrinsic coagulation pathway and was demonstrated using functional coagulation assays, as well as in amidolytic assays for the activation of Factor X. This activity of cell-bound Factor VII/VIIa appeared to involve a tight adduct of calcium. The identity of the Factor X- activating protease as Factor VII/VIIa was confirmed by the capacity of antibody specific for Factor VII/VIIa to neutralize the cell-bound protease. Further propagation of the extrinsic pathway following generation of Factor Xa required addition of exogenous Factor Va. These results expand the repertoire of proteases that have been identified with appropriately triggered cells of the monocyte/macrophage series, and suggest that initiation and propagation of the extrinsic coagulation protease network on induced monocytes involves not only expression of the initiating cofactor molecule, tissue factor, but also production of Factor VII and its organization into the molecular assembly. Thus, in the absence of exogenous Factor VII/VIIa a directly proteolytic effector cell can be generated. Further molecular assembly of the extrinsic pathway on the monocyte surface sequentially expands the proteolytic capacity of this response. The synthesis and assembly of the extrinsic activation complex by the monocyte and its derived progeny, the macrophage, provides a mechanism by which coagulation is initiated under T cell instruction at sites of immunologic responses. PMID:6368733

  15. The Clp Chaperones and Proteases of the Human Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    SciTech Connect

    Bakkouri, Majida El; Pow, Andre; Mulichak, Anne; Cheung, Kevin L.Y.; Artz, Jennifer D.; Amani, Mehrnaz; Fell, Stuart; de Koning-Ward, Tania F.; Goodman, C. Dean; McFadden, Geoffrey I.; Ortega, Joaquin; Hui, Raymond; Houry, Walid A.

    2015-02-09

    The Clp chaperones and proteases play an important role in protein homeostasis in the cell. They are highly conserved across prokaryotes and found also in the mitochondria of eukaryotes and the chloroplasts of plants. They function mainly in the disaggregation, unfolding and degradation of native as well as misfolded proteins. Here, we provide a comprehensive analysis of the Clp chaperones and proteases in the human malaria parasite Plasmodium