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Sample records for distinct structural domains

  1. Apo raver1 structure reveals distinct RRM domain orientations

    SciTech Connect

    Rangarajan, Erumbi S.; Lee, Jun Hyuck; Izard, Tina

    2012-09-17

    Raver1 is a multifunctional protein that modulates both alternative splicing and focal adhesion assembly by binding to the nucleoplasmic splicing repressor polypyrimidine tract protein (PTB) or to the cytoskeletal proteins vinculin and {alpha}-actinin. The amino-terminal region of raver1 has three RNA recognition motif (RRM1, RRM2, and RRM3) domains, and RRM1 interacts with the vinculin tail (Vt) domain and vinculin mRNA. We previously determined the crystal structure of the raver1 RRM1-3 domains in complex with Vt at 2.75 {angstrom} resolution. Here, we report crystal structure of the unbound raver1 RRM1-3 domains at 2 {angstrom} resolution. The apo structure reveals that a bound sulfate ion disrupts an electrostatic interaction between the RRM1 and RRM2 domains, triggering a large relative domain movement of over 30{sup o}. Superposition with other RNA-bound RRM structures places the sulfate ion near the superposed RNA phosphate group suggesting that this is the raver1 RNA binding site. While several single and some tandem RRM domain structures have been described, to the best of our knowledge, this is the second report of a three-tandem RRM domain structure.

  2. The structure of a conserved piezo channel domain reveals a topologically distinct β sandwich fold.

    PubMed

    Kamajaya, Aron; Kaiser, Jens T; Lee, Jonas; Reid, Michelle; Rees, Douglas C

    2014-10-07

    Piezo has recently been identified as a family of eukaryotic mechanosensitive channels composed of subunits containing over 2,000 amino acids, without recognizable sequence similarity to other channels. Here, we present the crystal structure of a large, conserved extramembrane domain located just before the last predicted transmembrane helix of C. elegans PIEZO, which adopts a topologically distinct β sandwich fold. The structure was also determined of a point mutation located on a conserved surface at the position equivalent to the human PIEZO1 mutation found in dehydrated hereditary stomatocytosis patients (M2225R). While the point mutation does not change the overall domain structure, it does alter the surface electrostatic potential that may perturb interactions with a yet-to-be-identified ligand or protein. The lack of structural similarity between this domain and any previously characterized fold, including those of eukaryotic and bacterial channels, highlights the distinctive nature of the Piezo family of eukaryotic mechanosensitive channels.

  3. Plasmodium alveolins possess distinct but structurally and functionally related multi-repeat domains.

    PubMed

    Al-Khattaf, Fatimah S; Tremp, Annie Z; Dessens, Johannes T

    2015-02-01

    The invasive and motile life stages of malaria parasites (merozoite, ookinete and sporozoite) possess a distinctive cortical structure termed the pellicle. The pellicle is characterised by a double-layered 'inner membrane complex' (IMC) located underneath the plasma membrane, which is supported by a cytoskeletal structure termed the subpellicular network (SPN). The SPN consists of intermediate filaments, whose major constituents include a family of proteins called alveolins. Here, we re-appraise the alveolins in the genus Plasmodium with respect to their repertoire, structure and interrelatedness. Amongst 13 family members identified, we distinguish two domain types that, albeit distinct at the primary structure level, are structurally related and contain tandem repeats with a consensus 12-amino acid periodicity. Analysis in Plasmodium berghei of the most divergent alveolin, PbIMC1d, reveals a zoite-specific expression in ookinetes and a subcellular localisation in the pellicle, consistent with its predicted role as a SPN component. Knockout of PbIMC1d gives rise to a wild-type phenotype with respect to ookinete morphogenesis, tensile strength, gliding motility and infectivity, presenting the first example of apparent functional redundancy amongst alveolin family members.

  4. Paget disease of bone-associated UBA domain mutations of SQSTM1 exert distinct effects on protein structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Goode, Alice; Long, Jed E.; Shaw, Barry; Ralston, Stuart H.; Visconti, Micaela Rios; Gianfrancesco, Fernando; Esposito, Teresa; Gennari, Luigi; Merlotti, Daniela; Rendina, Domenico; Rea, Sarah L.; Sultana, Melanie; Searle, Mark S.; Layfield, Robert

    2014-01-01

    SQSTM1 mutations are common in patients with Paget disease of bone (PDB), with most affecting the C-terminal ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domain of the SQSTM1 protein. We performed structural and functional analyses of two UBA domain mutations, an I424S mutation relatively common in UK PDB patients, and an A427D mutation associated with a severe phenotype in Southern Italian patients. Both impaired SQSTM1's ubiquitin-binding function in pull-down assays and resulted in activation of basal NF-κB signalling, compared to wild-type, in reporter assays. We found evidence for a relationship between the ability of different UBA domain mutants to activate NF-κB signalling in vitro and number of affected sites in vivo in 1152 PDB patients from the UK and Italy, with A427D-SQSTM1 producing the greatest level of activation (relative to wild-type) of all PDB mutants tested to date. NMR and isothermal titration calorimetry studies were able to demonstrate that I424S is associated with global structural changes in the UBA domain, resulting in 10-fold weaker UBA dimer stability than wild-type and reduced ubiquitin-binding affinity of the UBA monomer. Our observations provide insights into the role of SQSTM1-mediated NF-κB signalling in PDB aetiology, and demonstrate that different mutations in close proximity within loop 2/helix 3 of the SQSTM1 UBA domain exert distinct effects on protein structure and stability, including indirect effects at the UBA/ubiquitin-binding interface. PMID:24642144

  5. Clarifying the Nature of the Distinctiveness by Domain Interaction in Conceptual Structure: Comment on Cree, McNorgan, and McRae (2006)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Kirsten I.; Salamoura, Angeliki; Randall, Billi; Moss, Helen; Tyler, Lorraine K.

    2008-01-01

    The conceptual structure account of semantic memory (CSA; L. K. Tyler & H. E. Moss, 2001) claims that feature correlation (the degree to which features co-occur) and feature distinctiveness (the number of concepts in which a feature occurs) interact with domains of knowledge (e.g., living vs. nonliving) such that the distinctive features of…

  6. Structure of N-Terminal Domain of NPC1 Reveals Distinct Subdomains for Binding and Transfer of Cholesterol

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Hyock Joo; Abi-Mosleh, Lina; Wang, Michael L.; Deisenhofer, Johann; Goldstein, Joseph L.; Brown, Michael S.; Infante, Rodney E.

    2010-09-21

    LDL delivers cholesterol to lysosomes by receptor-mediated endocytosis. Exit of cholesterol from lysosomes requires two proteins, membrane-bound Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1) and soluble NPC2. NPC2 binds cholesterol with its isooctyl side chain buried and its 3{beta}-hydroxyl exposed. Here, we describe high-resolution structures of the N-terminal domain (NTD) of NPC1 and complexes with cholesterol and 25-hydroxycholesterol. NPC1(NTD) binds cholesterol in an orientation opposite to NPC2: 3{beta}-hydroxyl buried and isooctyl side chain exposed. Cholesterol transfer from NPC2 to NPC1(NTD) requires reorientation of a helical subdomain in NPC1(NTD), enlarging the opening for cholesterol entry. NPC1 with point mutations in this subdomain (distinct from the binding subdomain) cannot accept cholesterol from NPC2 and cannot restore cholesterol exit from lysosomes in NPC1-deficient cells. We propose a working model wherein after lysosomal hydrolysis of LDL-cholesteryl esters, cholesterol binds NPC2, which transfers it to NPC1(NTD), reversing its orientation and allowing insertion of its isooctyl side chain into the outer lysosomal membranes.

  7. Acetylation mimics within individual core histone tail domains indicate distinct roles in regulating the stability of higher-order chromatin structure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaodong; Hayes, Jeffrey J

    2008-01-01

    Nucleosome arrays undergo salt-dependent self-association into large oligomers in a process thought to recapitulate essential aspects of higher-order tertiary chromatin structure formation. Lysine acetylation within the core histone tail domains inhibits self-association, an effect likely related to its role in facilitating transcription. As acetylation of specific tail domains may encode distinct functions, we investigated biochemical and self-association properties of model nucleosome arrays containing combinations of native and mutant core histones with lysine-to-glutamine substitutions to mimic acetylation. Acetylation mimics within the tail domains of H2B and H4 caused the largest inhibition of array self-association, while modification of the H3 tail uniquely affected the stability of DNA wrapping within individual nucleosomes. In addition, the effect of acetylation mimics on array self-association is inconsistent with a simple charge neutralization mechanism. For example, acetylation mimics within the H2A tail can have either a positive or negative effect on self-association, dependent upon the acetylation state of the other tails and nucleosomal repeat length. Finally, we demonstrate that glutamine substitutions and lysine acetylation within the H4 tail domain have identical effects on nucleosome array self-association. Our results indicate that acetylation of specific tail domains plays distinct roles in the regulation of chromatin structure.

  8. Structural and Functional Modularity of the Orange Carotenoid Protein: Distinct Roles for the N- and C-Terminal Domains in Cyanobacterial Photoprotection[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Leverenz, Ryan L.; Jallet, Denis; Li, Ming-De; Mathies, Richard A.; Kirilovsky, Diana; Kerfeld, Cheryl A.

    2014-01-01

    The orange carotenoid protein (OCP) serves as a sensor of light intensity and an effector of phycobilisome (PB)–associated photoprotection in cyanobacteria. Structurally, the OCP is composed of two distinct domains spanned by a single carotenoid chromophore. Functionally, in response to high light, the OCP converts from a dark-stable orange form, OCPO, to an active red form, OCPR. The C-terminal domain of the OCP has been implicated in the dynamic response to light intensity and plays a role in switching off the OCP’s photoprotective response through its interaction with the fluorescence recovery protein. The function of the N-terminal domain, which is uniquely found in cyanobacteria, is unclear. To investigate its function, we isolated the N-terminal domain in vitro using limited proteolysis of native OCP. The N-terminal domain retains the carotenoid chromophore; this red carotenoid protein (RCP) has constitutive PB fluorescence quenching activity comparable in magnitude to that of active, full-length OCPR. A comparison of the spectroscopic properties of the RCP with OCPR indicates that critical protein–chromophore interactions within the C-terminal domain are weakened in the OCPR form. These results suggest that the C-terminal domain dynamically regulates the photoprotective activity of an otherwise constitutively active carotenoid binding N-terminal domain. PMID:24399299

  9. Modular structure of chromosomal proteins HMG-14 and HMG-17: Definition of a transcriptional enhancement domain distinct from the nucleosomal binding domain

    SciTech Connect

    Trieschmann, L.; Postnikov, Y.V.; Rickers, A.; Bustin, M.

    1995-12-01

    This report describes how deletion mutants and peptides were used to identify the transcriptional enhancement domain and the nucleosome binding domain of two chromosomal proteins, HMG-14 and HMG-17. The research indicates that mutations involving C-terminal amino acids significantly reduces the ability of the nucleoproteins to enhance transcription from chromatin templates. 42 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Human GATA-3 trans-activation, DNA-binding, and nuclear localization activities are organized into distinct structural domains.

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Z; Gu, L; Romeo, P H; Bories, D; Motohashi, H; Yamamoto, M; Engel, J D

    1994-01-01

    GATA-3 is a zinc finger transcription factor which is expressed in a highly restricted and strongly conserved tissue distribution pattern in vertebrate organisms, specifically, in a subset of hematopoietic cells, in cells within the central and peripheral nervous systems, in the kidney, and in placental trophoblasts. Tissue-specific cellular genes regulated by GATA-3 have been identified in T lymphocytes and the placenta, while GATA-3-regulated genes in the nervous system and kidney have not yet been defined. We prepared monoclonal antibodies with which we could dissect the biochemical and functional properties of human GATA-3. The results of these experiments show some anticipated phenotypes, for example, the definition of discrete domains required for specific DNA-binding site recognition (amino acids 303 to 348) and trans activation (amino acids 30 to 74). The signaling sequence for nuclear localization of human GATA-3 is a property conferred by sequences within and surrounding the amino finger (amino acids 249 to 311) of the protein, thereby assigning a function to this domain and thus explaining the curious observation that this zinc finger is dispensable for DNA binding by the GATA family of transcription factors. Images PMID:8114750

  11. Two distinct variants of erythrocyte spectrin beta IV domain.

    PubMed

    Pothier, B; Alloisio, N; Morlé, L; Maréchal, J; Barthélemy, H; Ducluzeau, M T; Dorier, A; Delaunay, J

    1989-11-01

    We report two distinct variants affecting the beta IV domain of erythrocyte spectrin, designated spectrin Saint-Chamond and spectrin Tlemcen. They were discovered in a French family and an Algerian individual, respectively. They appeared clinically and morphologically asymptomatic in the heterozygous state. In two-dimensional maps of spectrin partial digests, both mutants were manifested by cathodic shifts (with no change of the molecular weights) of the peptides that cover the N-terminal region of spectrin beta IV domain. The relevance of the abnormal peptides to the beta IV domain was established by quantitative analysis and by Western blotting using anti-beta IV domain-specific antibodies. These two variants are thus far the most distal variants of spectrin to be defined on an unequivocal structural basis.

  12. Flavin-binding and protein structural integrity studies on NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase are consistent with the presence of distinct domains.

    PubMed

    Narayanasami, R; Horowitz, P M; Masters, B S

    1995-01-10

    NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (reductase) contains FMN and FAD in 1:1 stoichiometry as tightly bound cofactors. Electrons from NADPH are transferred to cytochrome P450 through the intermediacy of reductase. A knowledge of the interactions which must occur to allow the intermolecular and intramolecular transfer of electrons is not only of intrinsic interest but is necessary to understand the regulation of the overall oxidation-reduction processes in which cytochromes P450 participate in the endoplasmic reticulum of many organs. In the present study, urea has been employed as a chaotropic agent to study the dissociation of flavins from NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase. The results show that dissociation of FMN occurs at concentrations of urea between 0 and 1 M and that, as the concentrations of urea approach 1 M, the intrinsic protein fluorescence increases, indicating a change in protein conformation. Above 2 M urea protein fluorescence increases, reaching a plateau at 3 M urea, and FAD begins to dissociate from the enzyme. In the range of 0-1 M urea, a completely reversible dissociation of FMN occurs and, at 3 M urea, the fluorescence values representing flavin dissociation and protein conformation changes have reached a maximum. Thus, the definition of various states of the flavoprotein with both, one, or no flavins bound and the ability to remove the flavins reversibly under specific conditions have permitted the construction of a simple model to explain the various unfolding intermediates of this enzyme. Our experiments suggest that reductase is composed of distinct domains which can be examined independently by the application of chaotropic agents.

  13. Structure of the Mtb CarD/RNAP β-lobes complex reveals the molecular basis of interaction and presents a distinct DNA-binding domain for Mtb CarD.

    PubMed

    Gulten, Gulcin; Sacchettini, James C

    2013-10-08

    CarD from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is an essential protein shown to be involved in stringent response through downregulation of rRNA and ribosomal protein genes. CarD interacts with the β-subunit of RNAP and this interaction is vital for Mtb's survival during the persistent infection state. We have determined the crystal structure of CarD in complex with the RNAP β-subunit β1 and β2 domains at 2.1 Å resolution. The structure reveals the molecular basis of CarD/RNAP interaction, providing a basis to further our understanding of RNAP regulation by CarD. The structural fold of the CarD N-terminal domain is conserved in RNAP interacting proteins such as TRCF-RID and CdnL, and displays similar interactions to the predicted homology model based on the TRCF/RNAP β1 structure. Interestingly, the structure of the C-terminal domain, which is required for complete CarD function in vivo, represents a distinct DNA-binding fold.

  14. Evolution of distinct EGF domains with specific functions

    PubMed Central

    Wouters, Merridee A.; Rigoutsos, Isidore; Chu, Carmen K.; Feng, Lina L.; Sparrow, Duncan B.; Dunwoodie, Sally L.

    2005-01-01

    EGF domains are extracellular protein modules cross-linked by three intradomain disulfides. Past studies suggest the existence of two types of EGF domain with three-disulfides, human EGF-like (hEGF) domains and complement C1r-like (cEGF) domains, but to date no functional information has been related to the two different types, and they are not differentiated in sequence or structure databases. We have developed new sequence patterns based on the different C-termini to search specifically for the two types of EGF domains in sequence databases. The exhibited sensitivity and specificity of the new pattern-based method represents a significant advancement over the currently available sequence detection techniques. We re-annotated EGF sequences in the latest release of Swiss-Prot looking for functional relationships that might correlate with EGF type. We show that important post-translational modifications of three-disulfide EGFs, including unusual forms of glycosylation and post-translational proteolytic processing, are dependent on EGF subtype. For example, EGF domains that are shed from the cell surface and mediate intercellular signaling are all hEGFs, as are all human EGF receptor family ligands. Additional experimental data suggest that functional specialization has accompanied subtype divergence. Based on our structural analysis of EGF domains with three-disulfide bonds and comparison to laminin and integrin-like EGF domains with an additional inter-domain disulfide, we propose that these hEGF and cEGF domains may have arisen from a four-disulfide ancestor by selective loss of different cysteine residues. PMID:15772310

  15. SH3 Domains Differentially Stimulate Distinct Dynamin I Assembly Modes and G Domain Activity

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Sai; Collett, Michael; Robinson, Phillip J.

    2015-01-01

    Dynamin I is a highly regulated GTPase enzyme enriched in nerve terminals which mediates vesicle fission during synaptic vesicle endocytosis. One regulatory mechanism involves its interactions with proteins containing Src homology 3 (SH3) domains. At least 30 SH3 domain-containing proteins bind dynamin at its proline-rich domain (PRD). Those that stimulate dynamin activity act by promoting its oligomerisation. We undertook a systematic parallel screening of 13 glutathione-S-transferase (GST)-tagged endocytosis-related SH3 domains on dynamin binding, GTPase activity and oligomerisation. No correlation was found between dynamin binding and their potency to stimulate GTPase activity. There was limited correlation between the extent of their ability to stimulate dynamin activity and the level of oligomerisation, indicating an as yet uncharacterised allosteric coupling of the PRD and G domain. We examined the two variants, dynamin Iab and Ibb, which differ in the alternately splice middle domain α2 helix. They responded differently to the panel of SH3s, with the extent of stimulation between the splice variants varying greatly between the SH3s. This study reveals that SH3 binding can act as a heterotropic allosteric regulator of the G domain via the middle domain α2 helix, suggesting an involvement of this helix in communicating the PRD-mediated allostery. This indicates that SH3 binding both stabilises multiple conformations of the tetrameric building block of dynamin, and promotes assembly of dynamin-SH3 complexes with distinct rates of GTP hydrolysis. PMID:26659814

  16. The C2 Domains of Human Synaptotagmin 1 Have Distinct Mechanical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Fuson, Kerry L.; Ma, Liang; Sutton, R. Bryan; Oberhauser, Andres F.

    2009-01-01

    Synaptotagmin 1 (Syt1) is the Ca+2 receptor for fast, synchronous vesicle fusion in neurons. Because membrane fusion is an inherently mechanical, force-driven event, Syt1 must be able to adapt to the energetics of the fusion apparatus. Syt1 contains two C2 domains (C2A and C2B) that are homologous in sequence and three-dimensional in structure; yet, a number of observations have suggested that they have distinct biochemical and biological properties. In this study, we analyzed the mechanical stability of the C2A and C2B domains of human Syt1 using single-molecule atomic force microscopy. We found that stretching the C2AB domains of Syt1 resulted in two distinct unfolding force peaks. The larger force peak of ∼100 pN was identified as C2B and the second peak of ∼50 pN as C2A. Furthermore, a significant fraction of C2A domains unfolded through a low force intermediate that was not observed in C2B. We conclude that these domains have different mechanical properties. We hypothesize that a relatively small stretching force may be sufficient to deform the effector-binding regions of the C2A domain and modulate the affinity for soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF) attachment protein receptors (SNAREs), phospholipids, and Ca+2. PMID:19186144

  17. Structure of axionic domain walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, M. C.; Sikivie, P.

    1985-09-01

    The structure of axionic domain walls is investigated using the low-energy effective theory of axions and pions. We derive the spatial dependence of the phases of the Peccei-Quinn scalar field and the QCD quark-antiquark condensates inside an axionic domain wall. Thence an accurate estimate of the wall surface energy density is obtained. The equations of motion for axions, photons, leptons, and baryons in the neighborhood of axionic domain walls are written down and estimates are given for the wall reflection and transmission coefficients of these particles. Finally, we discuss the energy dissipation by axionic domain walls oscillating in the early universe due to the reflection of particles in the primordial soup.

  18. Functional diversity of Robo receptor immunoglobulin domains promotes distinct axon guidance decisions.

    PubMed

    Evans, Timothy A; Bashaw, Greg J

    2010-03-23

    Recognition molecules of the immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily control axon guidance in the developing nervous system. Ig-like domains are among the most widely represented protein domains in the human genome, and the number of Ig superfamily proteins is strongly correlated with cellular complexity. In Drosophila, three Roundabout (Robo) Ig superfamily receptors respond to their common Slit ligand to regulate axon guidance at the midline: Robo and Robo2 mediate midline repulsion, Robo2 and Robo3 control longitudinal pathway selection, and Robo2 can promote midline crossing. How these closely related receptors mediate distinct guidance functions is not understood. We report that the differential functions of Robo2 and Robo3 are specified by their ectodomains and do not reflect differences in cytoplasmic signaling. Functional modularity of Robo2's ectodomain facilitates multiple guidance decisions: Ig1 and Ig3 of Robo2 confer lateral positioning activity, whereas Ig2 confers promidline crossing activity. Robo2's distinct functions are not dependent on greater Slit affinity but are instead due in part to differences in multimerization and receptor-ligand stoichiometry conferred by Robo2's Ig domains. Together, our findings suggest that diverse responses to the Slit guidance cue are imparted by intrinsic structural differences encoded in the extracellular Ig domains of the Robo receptors.

  19. Cooperative unfolding of distinctive mechanoreceptor domains transduces force into signals

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Lining; Chen, Yunfeng; Xue, Lingzhou; Du, Xiaoping; Zhu, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    How cells sense their mechanical environment and transduce forces into biochemical signals is a crucial yet unresolved question in mechanobiology. Platelets use receptor glycoprotein Ib (GPIb), specifically its α subunit (GPIbα), to signal as they tether and translocate on von Willebrand factor (VWF) of injured arterial surfaces against blood flow. Force elicits catch bonds to slow VWF–GPIbα dissociation and unfolds the GPIbα leucine-rich repeat domain (LRRD) and juxtamembrane mechanosensitive domain (MSD). How these mechanical processes trigger biochemical signals remains unknown. Here we analyze these extracellular events and the resulting intracellular Ca2+ on a single platelet in real time, revealing that LRRD unfolding intensifies Ca2+ signal whereas MSD unfolding affects the type of Ca2+ signal. Therefore, LRRD and MSD are analog and digital force transducers, respectively. The >30 nm macroglycopeptide separating the two domains transmits force on the VWF–GPIbα bond (whose lifetime is prolonged by LRRD unfolding) to the MSD to enhance its unfolding, resulting in unfolding cooperativity at an optimal force. These elements may provide design principles for a generic mechanosensory protein machine. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15447.001 PMID:27434669

  20. A Method to Examine Content Domain Structures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Agostino, Jerome; Karpinski, Aryn; Welsh, Megan

    2011-01-01

    After a test is developed, most content validation analyses shift from ascertaining domain definition to studying domain representation and relevance because the domain is assumed to be set once a test exists. We present an approach that allows for the examination of alternative domain structures based on extant test items. In our example based on…

  1. The Proteomic Investigation of Chromatin Functional Domains Reveals Novel Synergisms among Distinct Heterochromatin Components*

    PubMed Central

    Soldi, Monica; Bonaldi, Tiziana

    2013-01-01

    Chromatin is a highly dynamic, well-structured nucleoprotein complex of DNA and proteins that controls virtually all DNA transactions. Chromatin dynamicity is regulated at specific loci by the presence of various associated proteins, histones, post-translational modifications, histone variants, and DNA methylation. Until now the characterization of the proteomic component of chromatin domains has been held back by the challenge of enriching distinguishable, homogeneous regions for subsequent mass spectrometry analysis. Here we describe a modified protocol for chromatin immunoprecipitation combined with quantitative proteomics based on stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture to identify known and novel histone modifications, variants, and complexes that specifically associate with silent and active chromatin domains. Our chromatin proteomics strategy revealed unique functional interactions among various chromatin modifiers, suggesting new regulatory pathways, such as a heterochromatin-specific modulation of DNA damage response involving H2A.X and WICH, both enriched in silent domains. Chromatin proteomics expands the arsenal of tools for deciphering how all the distinct protein components act together to enforce a given region-specific chromatin status. PMID:23319141

  2. Distinct domains of the limbic system-associated membrane protein (LAMP) mediate discrete effects on neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Eagleson, Kathie L; Pimenta, Aurea F; Burns, Mary M; Fairfull, Liane D; Cornuet, Pamela K; Zhang, Li; Levitt, Pat

    2003-11-01

    The limbic system-associated membrane protein (LAMP) is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored glycoprotein with three immunoglobulin (Ig) domains that can either enhance or inhibit neurite outgrowth depending upon the neuronal population examined. In the present study, we investigate the domains responsible for these activities. Domain deletion revealed that the N-terminal IgI domain is necessary and sufficient for the neurite-promoting activity observed in hippocampal neurons. In contrast, inhibition of neurite outgrowth in SCG neurons, which is mediated by heterophilic interactions, requires full-length LAMP, although selective inhibition of the second Ig domain, but not the first or third domains, prevented the inhibitory effect. This indicates that the IgII domain of LAMP harbors the neurite-inhibiting activity, but only in the context of the full-length configuration. Covasphere-binding analyses demonstrate IgI/IgI interactions, but no interaction between IgII and any other domain, consistent with the biological activities that each domain mediates. The data suggest that LAMP may serve as a bifunctional guidance molecule, with distinct structural domains contributing to the promotion and inhibition of neurite outgrowth.

  3. Structural and Functional Analysis of Multi-Interface Domains

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Liang; Hoi, Steven C. H.; Wong, Limsoon; Hamp, Tobias; Li, Jinyan

    2012-01-01

    A multi-interface domain is a domain that can shape multiple and distinctive binding sites to contact with many other domains, forming a hub in domain-domain interaction networks. The functions played by the multiple interfaces are usually different, but there is no strict bijection between the functions and interfaces as some subsets of the interfaces play the same function. This work applies graph theory and algorithms to discover fingerprints for the multiple interfaces of a domain and to establish associations between the interfaces and functions, based on a huge set of multi-interface proteins from PDB. We found that about 40% of proteins have the multi-interface property, however the involved multi-interface domains account for only a tiny fraction (1.8%) of the total number of domains. The interfaces of these domains are distinguishable in terms of their fingerprints, indicating the functional specificity of the multiple interfaces in a domain. Furthermore, we observed that both cooperative and distinctive structural patterns, which will be useful for protein engineering, exist in the multiple interfaces of a domain. PMID:23272073

  4. Dystrophin colocalizes with beta-spectrin in distinct subsarcolemmal domains in mammalian skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Duchenne's muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by the absence or drastic decrease of the structural protein, dystrophin, and is characterized by sarcolemmal lesions in skeletal muscle due to the stress of contraction. Dystrophin has been localized to the sarcolemma, but its organization there is not known. We report immunofluorescence studies which show that dystrophin is concentrated, along with the major muscle isoform of beta-spectrin, in three distinct domains at the sarcolemma: in elements overlying both I bands and M lines, and in occasional strands running along the longitudinal axis of the myofiber. Vinculin, which has previously been found at the sarcolemma overlying the I bands and in longitudinal strands, was present in the same three structures as spectrin and dystrophin. Controls demonstrated that the labeling was intracellular. Comparison to labeling of the lipid bilayer and of the extracellular matrix showed that the labeling for spectrin and dystrophin is associated with the intact sarcolemma and is not a result of processing artifacts. Dystrophin is not required for this lattice- like organization, as similar domains containing spectrin but not dystrophin are present in muscle from the mdx mouse and from humans with Duchenne's muscular dystrophy. We discuss the possibility that dystrophin and spectrin, along with vinculin, may function to link the contractile apparatus to the sarcolemma of normal skeletal muscle. PMID:1577872

  5. The structure of the XPF-ssDNA complex underscores the distinct roles of the XPF and ERCC1 helix- hairpin-helix domains in ss/ds DNA recognition.

    PubMed

    Das, Devashish; Folkers, Gert E; van Dijk, Marc; Jaspers, Nicolaas G J; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Kaptein, Robert; Boelens, Rolf

    2012-04-04

    Human XPF/ERCC1 is a structure-specific DNA endonuclease that nicks the damaged DNA strand at the 5' end during nucleotide excision repair. We determined the structure of the complex of the C-terminal domain of XPF with 10 nt ssDNA. A positively charged region within the second helix of the first HhH motif contacts the ssDNA phosphate backbone. One guanine base is flipped out of register and positioned in a pocket contacting residues from both HhH motifs of XPF. Comparison to other HhH-containing proteins indicates a one-residue deletion in the second HhH motif of XPF that has altered the hairpin conformation, thereby permitting ssDNA interactions. Previous nuclear magnetic resonance studies showed that ERCC1 in the XPF-ERCC1 heterodimer can bind dsDNA. Combining the two observations gives a model that underscores the asymmetry of the human XPF/ERCC1 heterodimer in binding at an ss/ds DNA junction.

  6. Discrete structure of van der Waals domains in globular proteins.

    PubMed

    Berezovsky, Igor N

    2003-03-01

    Most globular proteins are divisible by domains, distinct substructures of the globule. The notion of hierarchy of the domains was introduced earlier via van der Waals energy profiles that allow one to subdivide the proteins into domains (subdomains). The question remains open as to what is the possible structural connection of the energy profiles. The recent discovery of the loop-n-lock elements in the globular proteins suggests such a structural connection. A direct comparison of the segmentation by van der Waals energy criteria with the maps of the locked loops of nearly standard size reveals a striking correlation: domains in general appear to consist of one to several such loops. In addition, it was demonstrated that a variety of subdivisions of the same protein into domains is just a regrouping of the loop-n-lock elements.

  7. DEP domains: structurally similar but functionally different.

    PubMed

    Consonni, Sarah V; Maurice, Madelon M; Bos, Johannes L

    2014-05-01

    The Dishevelled, EGL-10 and pleckstrin (DEP) domain is a globular protein domain that is present in about ten human protein families with well-defined structural features. A picture is emerging that DEP domains mainly function in the spatial and temporal control of diverse signal transduction events by recruiting proteins to the plasma membrane. DEP domains can interact with various partners at the membrane, including phospholipids and membrane receptors, and their binding is subject to regulation.

  8. Structural and evolutionary division of phosphotyrosine binding (PTB) domains.

    PubMed

    Uhlik, Mark T; Temple, Brenda; Bencharit, Sompop; Kimple, Adam J; Siderovski, David P; Johnson, Gary L

    2005-01-07

    Proteins encoding phosphotyrosine binding (PTB) domains function as adaptors or scaffolds to organize the signaling complexes involved in wide-ranging physiological processes including neural development, immunity, tissue homeostasis and cell growth. There are more than 200 proteins in eukaryotes and nearly 60 human proteins having PTB domains. Six PTB domain encoded proteins have been found to have mutations that contribute to inherited human diseases including familial stroke, hypercholesteremia, coronary artery disease, Alzheimer's disease and diabetes, demonstrating the importance of PTB scaffold proteins in organizing critical signaling complexes. PTB domains bind both peptides and headgroups of phosphatidylinositides, utilizing two distinct binding motifs to mediate spatial organization and localization within cells. The structure of PTB domains confers specificity for binding peptides having a NPXY motif with differing requirements for phosphorylation of the tyrosine within this recognition sequence. In this review, we use structural, evolutionary and functional analysis to divide PTB domains into three groups represented by phosphotyrosine-dependent Shc-like, phosphotyrosine-dependent IRS-like and phosphotyrosine-independent Dab-like PTBs, with the Dab-like PTB domains representing nearly 75% of proteins encoding PTB domains. In addition, we further define the binding characteristics of the cognate ligands for each group of PTB domains. The signaling complexes organized by PTB domain encoded proteins are largely unknown and represents an important challenge in systems biology for the future.

  9. An ambiguity principle for assigning protein structural domains.

    PubMed

    Postic, Guillaume; Ghouzam, Yassine; Chebrek, Romain; Gelly, Jean-Christophe

    2017-01-01

    Ambiguity is the quality of being open to several interpretations. For an image, it arises when the contained elements can be delimited in two or more distinct ways, which may cause confusion. We postulate that it also applies to the analysis of protein three-dimensional structure, which consists in dividing the molecule into subunits called domains. Because different definitions of what constitutes a domain can be used to partition a given structure, the same protein may have different but equally valid domain annotations. However, knowledge and experience generally displace our ability to accept more than one way to decompose the structure of an object-in this case, a protein. This human bias in structure analysis is particularly harmful because it leads to ignoring potential avenues of research. We present an automated method capable of producing multiple alternative decompositions of protein structure (web server and source code available at www.dsimb.inserm.fr/sword/). Our innovative algorithm assigns structural domains through the hierarchical merging of protein units, which are evolutionarily preserved substructures that describe protein architecture at an intermediate level, between domain and secondary structure. To validate the use of these protein units for decomposing protein structures into domains, we set up an extensive benchmark made of expert annotations of structural domains and including state-of-the-art domain parsing algorithms. The relevance of our "multipartitioning" approach is shown through numerous examples of applications covering protein function, evolution, folding, and structure prediction. Finally, we introduce a measure for the structural ambiguity of protein molecules.

  10. An ambiguity principle for assigning protein structural domains

    PubMed Central

    Postic, Guillaume; Ghouzam, Yassine; Chebrek, Romain; Gelly, Jean-Christophe

    2017-01-01

    Ambiguity is the quality of being open to several interpretations. For an image, it arises when the contained elements can be delimited in two or more distinct ways, which may cause confusion. We postulate that it also applies to the analysis of protein three-dimensional structure, which consists in dividing the molecule into subunits called domains. Because different definitions of what constitutes a domain can be used to partition a given structure, the same protein may have different but equally valid domain annotations. However, knowledge and experience generally displace our ability to accept more than one way to decompose the structure of an object—in this case, a protein. This human bias in structure analysis is particularly harmful because it leads to ignoring potential avenues of research. We present an automated method capable of producing multiple alternative decompositions of protein structure (web server and source code available at www.dsimb.inserm.fr/sword/). Our innovative algorithm assigns structural domains through the hierarchical merging of protein units, which are evolutionarily preserved substructures that describe protein architecture at an intermediate level, between domain and secondary structure. To validate the use of these protein units for decomposing protein structures into domains, we set up an extensive benchmark made of expert annotations of structural domains and including state-of-the-art domain parsing algorithms. The relevance of our “multipartitioning” approach is shown through numerous examples of applications covering protein function, evolution, folding, and structure prediction. Finally, we introduce a measure for the structural ambiguity of protein molecules. PMID:28097215

  11. Structure and function of KH domains.

    PubMed

    Valverde, Roberto; Edwards, Laura; Regan, Lynne

    2008-06-01

    The hnRNP K homology (KH) domain was first identified in the protein human heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) 14 years ago. Since then, KH domains have been identified as nucleic acid recognition motifs in proteins that perform a wide range of cellular functions. KH domains bind RNA or ssDNA, and are found in proteins associated with transcriptional and translational regulation, along with other cellular processes. Several diseases, e.g. fragile X mental retardation syndrome and paraneoplastic disease, are associated with the loss of function of a particular KH domain. Here we discuss the progress made towards understanding both general and specific features of the molecular recognition of nucleic acids by KH domains. The typical binding surface of KH domains is a cleft that is versatile but that can typically accommodate only four unpaired bases. Van der Waals forces and hydrophobic interactions and, to a lesser extent, electrostatic interactions, contribute to the nucleic acid binding affinity. 'Augmented' KH domains or multiple copies of KH domains within a protein are two strategies that are used to achieve greater affinity and specificity of nucleic acid binding. Isolated KH domains have been seen to crystallize as monomers, dimers and tetramers, but no published data support the formation of noncovalent higher-order oligomers by KH domains in solution. Much attention has been given in the literature to a conserved hydrophobic residue (typically Ile or Leu) that is present in most KH domains. The interest derives from the observation that an individual with this Ile mutated to Asn, in the KH2 domain of fragile X mental retardation protein, exhibits a particularly severe form of the syndrome. The structural effects of this mutation in the fragile X mental retardation protein KH2 domain have recently been reported. We discuss the use of analogous point mutations at this position in other KH domains to dissect both structure and function.

  12. Structure and Function of KH Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Valverde, R.; Regan, E

    2008-01-01

    The hnRNP K homology (KH) domain was first identified in the protein human heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) 14 years ago. Since then, KH domains have been identified as nucleic acid recognition motifs in proteins that perform a wide range of cellular functions. KH domains bind RNA or ssDNA, and are found in proteins associated with transcriptional and translational regulation, along with other cellular processes. Several diseases, e.g. fragile X mental retardation syndrome and paraneoplastic disease, are associated with the loss of function of a particular KH domain. Here we discuss the progress made towards understanding both general and specific features of the molecular recognition of nucleic acids by KH domains. The typical binding surface of KH domains is a cleft that is versatile but that can typically accommodate only four unpaired bases. Van der Waals forces and hydrophobic interactions and, to a lesser extent, electrostatic interactions, contribute to the nucleic acid binding affinity. 'Augmented' KH domains or multiple copies of KH domains within a protein are two strategies that are used to achieve greater affinity and specificity of nucleic acid binding. Isolated KH domains have been seen to crystallize as monomers, dimers and tetramers, but no published data support the formation of noncovalent higher-order oligomers by KH domains in solution. Much attention has been given in the literature to a conserved hydrophobic residue (typically Ile or Leu) that is present in most KH domains. The interest derives from the observation that an individual with this Ile mutated to Asn, in the KH2 domain of fragile X mental retardation protein, exhibits a particularly severe form of the syndrome. The structural effects of this mutation in the fragile X mental retardation protein KH2 domain have recently been reported. We discuss the use of analogous point mutations at this position in other KH domains to dissect both structure and function.

  13. Structural basis of Smoothened regulation by its extracellular domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, Eamon F. X.; Sircar, Ria; Miller, Paul S.; Hedger, George; Luchetti, Giovanni; Nachtergaele, Sigrid; Tully, Mark D.; Mydock-McGrane, Laurel; Covey, Douglas F.; Rambo, Robert P.; Sansom, Mark S. P.; Newstead, Simon; Rohatgi, Rajat; Siebold, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Developmental signals of the Hedgehog (Hh) and Wnt families are transduced across the membrane by Frizzled-class G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) composed of both a heptahelical transmembrane domain (TMD) and an extracellular cysteine-rich domain (CRD). How the large extracellular domains of GPCRs regulate signalling by the TMD is unknown. We present crystal structures of the Hh signal transducer and oncoprotein Smoothened, a GPCR that contains two distinct ligand-binding sites: one in its TMD and one in the CRD. The CRD is stacked atop the TMD, separated by an intervening wedge-like linker domain. Structure-guided mutations show that the interface between the CRD, linker domain and TMD stabilizes the inactive state of Smoothened. Unexpectedly, we find a cholesterol molecule bound to Smoothened in the CRD binding site. Mutations predicted to prevent cholesterol binding impair the ability of Smoothened to transmit native Hh signals. Binding of a clinically used antagonist, vismodegib, to the TMD induces a conformational change that is propagated to the CRD, resulting in loss of cholesterol from the CRD-linker domain-TMD interface. Our results clarify the structural mechanism by which the activity of a GPCR is controlled by ligand-regulated interactions between its extracellular and transmembrane domains.

  14. ABCA1, ABCG1, and ABCG4 are distributed to distinct membrane meso-domains and disturb detergent-resistant domains on the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Sano, Osamu; Ito, Shiho; Kato, Reiko; Shimizu, Yuji; Kobayashi, Aya; Kimura, Yasuhisa; Kioka, Noriyuki; Hanada, Kentaro; Ueda, Kazumitsu; Matsuo, Michinori

    2014-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette A1 (ABCA1), ABCG1, and ABCG4 are lipid transporters that mediate the efflux of cholesterol from cells. To analyze the characteristics of these lipid transporters, we examined and compared their distributions and lipid efflux activity on the plasma membrane. The efflux of cholesterol mediated by ABCA1 and ABCG1, but not ABCG4, was affected by a reduction of cellular sphingomyelin levels. Detergent solubility and gradient density ultracentrifugation assays indicated that ABCA1, ABCG1, and ABCG4 were distributed to domains that were solubilized by Triton X-100 and Brij 96, resistant to Triton X-100 and Brij 96, and solubilized by Triton X-100 but resistant to Brij 96, respectively. Furthermore, ABCG1, but not ABCG4, was colocalized with flotillin-1 on the plasma membrane. The amounts of cholesterol extracted by methyl-β-cyclodextrin were increased by ABCA1, ABCG1, or ABCG4, suggesting that cholesterol in non-raft domains was increased. Furthermore, ABCG1 and ABCG4 disturbed the localization of caveolin-1 to the detergent-resistant domains and the binding of cholera toxin subunit B to the plasma membrane. These results suggest that ABCA1, ABCG1, and ABCG4 are localized to distinct membrane meso-domains and disturb the meso-domain structures by reorganizing lipids on the plasma membrane; collectively, these observations may explain the different substrate profiles and lipid efflux roles of these transporters.

  15. Structural domain walls in polar hexagonal manganites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, Yu

    2014-03-01

    The domain structure in the multiferroic hexagonal manganites is currently intensely investigated, motivated by the observation of intriguing sixfold topological defects at their meeting points [Choi, T. et al,. Nature Mater. 9, 253 (2010).] and nanoscale electrical conductivity at the domain walls [Wu, W. et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 077203 (2012).; Meier, D. et al., Nature Mater. 11, 284 (2012).], as well as reports of coupling between ferroelectricity, magnetism and structural antiphase domains [Geng, Y. et al., Nano Lett. 12, 6055 (2012).]. The detailed structure of the domain walls, as well as the origin of such couplings, however, was previously not fully understood. In the present study, we have used first-principles density functional theory to calculate the structure and properties of the low-energy structural domain walls in the hexagonal manganites [Kumagai, Y. and Spaldin, N. A., Nature Commun. 4, 1540 (2013).]. We find that the lowest energy domain walls are atomically sharp, with {210}orientation, explaining the orientation of recently observed stripe domains and suggesting their topological protection [Chae, S. C. et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 167603 (2012).]. We also explain why ferroelectric domain walls are always simultaneously antiphase walls, propose a mechanism for ferroelectric switching through domain-wall motion, and suggest an atomistic structure for the cores of the sixfold topological defects. This work was supported by ETH Zurich, the European Research Council FP7 Advanced Grants program me (grant number 291151), the JSPS Postdoctoral Fellowships for Research Abroad, and the MEXT Elements Strategy Initiative to Form Core Research Center TIES.

  16. Three Distinct Domains Contribute to Nuclear Transport of Murine Foxp3

    PubMed Central

    Hancock, Wayne W.; Özkaynak, Engin

    2009-01-01

    Foxp3, a 47-kDa transcription factor, is necessary for the function of CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs), with an essential role in the control of self-reactive T cells and in preventing autoimmunity. Activation of Tregs by TCR engagement results in upregulation of Foxp3 expression, followed by its rapid nuclear transport and binding to chromatin. Here, we identify three distinct Foxp3 domains that contribute to nuclear transport. The first domain (Domain 1) comprises the C-terminal 12 amino acids. The second domain (Domain 2) is located immediately N-terminal to the forkhead domain (FHD), recently reported to be a binding site for the runt-related transcription factor 1/acute myeloid leukemia 1 (Runx1/AML1). The third domain (Domain 3) is located within the N-terminal first 51 amino acids. Unlike the known nuclear localization signals (NLSs), none of these three regions are rich in basic residues and do not bear any similarity to known monopartite or bipartite NLSs that have one or more clusters of basic amino acids. The basic arginine-lysine-lysine-arginine (RKKR) sequence, located 12-aa from the C-terminal end of Foxp3 was previously reported to be a nuclear localization signal (NLS) for several proteins, including for a GFP-Foxp3 hybrid. Evidence is provided here that in the full-length native Foxp3 RKKR does not function as an NLS. The data reported in this study indicates that Foxp3 achieves nuclear transport by binding to other nuclear factors and co-transporting with them to the nucleus. PMID:19924293

  17. Identification and characterization of structural domains of human ERp57: association with calreticulin requires several domains.

    PubMed

    Silvennoinen, Laura; Myllyharju, Johanna; Ruoppolo, Margherita; Orrù, Stefania; Caterino, Marianna; Kivirikko, Kari I; Koivunen, Peppi

    2004-04-02

    The amino acid sequence of ERp57, which functions in the endoplasmic reticulum together with the lectins calreticulin and calnexin to achieve folding of newly synthesized glycoproteins, is highly similar to that of protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), but they have their own distinct roles in protein folding. We have characterized the domain structure of ERp57 by limited proteolysis and N-terminal sequencing and have found it to be similar but not identical to that of PDI. ERp57 had three major protease-sensitive regions, the first of which was located between residues 120 and 150, the second between 201 and 215, and the third between 313 and 341, the data thus being consistent with a four-domain structure abb'a'. Recombinant expression in Escherichia coli was used to verify the domain boundaries. Each single domain and a b'a' double domain could be produced in the form of soluble, folded polypeptides, as verified by circular dichroism spectra and urea gradient gel electrophoresis. When the ability of ERp57 and its a and a' domains to fold denatured RNase A was studied by electrospray mass analyses, ERp57 markedly enhanced the folding rate at early time points, although less effectively than PDI, but was an ineffective catalyst of the overall process. The a and a' domains produced only minor, if any, increases in the folding rate at the early stages and no increase at the late stages. Interaction of the soluble ERp57 domains with the P domain of calreticulin was studied by chemical cross-linking in vitro. None of the single ERp57 domains nor the b'a' double domain could be cross-linked to the P domain, whereas cross-linking was obtained with a hybrid ERpabb'PDIa'c polypeptide but not with ERpabPDIb'a'c, indicating that multiple domains are involved in this protein-protein interaction and that the b' domain of ERp57 cannot be replaced by that of PDI.

  18. Crystal Structure of the Marburg Virus VP35 Oligomerization Domain.

    PubMed

    Bruhn, Jessica F; Kirchdoerfer, Robert N; Urata, Sarah M; Li, Sheng; Tickle, Ian J; Bricogne, Gérard; Saphire, Erica Ollmann

    2017-01-15

    Marburg virus (MARV) is a highly pathogenic filovirus that is classified in a genus distinct from that of Ebola virus (EBOV) (genera Marburgvirus and Ebolavirus, respectively). Both viruses produce a multifunctional protein termed VP35, which acts as a polymerase cofactor, a viral protein chaperone, and an antagonist of the innate immune response. VP35 contains a central oligomerization domain with a predicted coiled-coil motif. This domain has been shown to be essential for RNA polymerase function. Here we present crystal structures of the MARV VP35 oligomerization domain. These structures and accompanying biophysical characterization suggest that MARV VP35 is a trimer. In contrast, EBOV VP35 is likely a tetramer in solution. Differences in the oligomeric state of this protein may explain mechanistic differences in replication and immune evasion observed for MARV and EBOV.

  19. Structural insights into the assembly and regulation of distinct viral capsid complexes

    PubMed Central

    Sarker, Subir; Terrón, María C.; Khandokar, Yogesh; Aragão, David; Hardy, Joshua M.; Radjainia, Mazdak; Jiménez-Zaragoza, Manuel; de Pablo, Pedro J.; Coulibaly, Fasséli; Luque, Daniel; Raidal, Shane R.; Forwood, Jade K.

    2016-01-01

    The assembly and regulation of viral capsid proteins into highly ordered macromolecular complexes is essential for viral replication. Here, we utilize crystal structures of the capsid protein from the smallest and simplest known viruses capable of autonomously replicating in animal cells, circoviruses, to establish structural and mechanistic insights into capsid morphogenesis and regulation. The beak and feather disease virus, like many circoviruses, encode only two genes: a capsid protein and a replication initiation protein. The capsid protein forms distinct macromolecular assemblies during replication and here we elucidate these structures at high resolution, showing that these complexes reverse the exposure of the N-terminal arginine rich domain responsible for DNA binding and nuclear localization. We show that assembly of these complexes is regulated by single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), and provide a structural basis of capsid assembly around single-stranded DNA, highlighting novel binding interfaces distinct from the highly positively charged N-terminal ARM domain. PMID:27698405

  20. Isolation and characterization of distinct domains of sarcolemma and T-tubules from rat skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, P; Rosemblatt, M; Testar, X; Palacín, M; Zorzano, A

    1995-01-01

    1. Several cell-surface domains of sarcolemma and T-tubule from skeletal-muscle fibre were isolated and characterized. 2. A protocol of subcellular fractionation was set up that involved the sequential low- and high-speed homogenization of rat skeletal muscle followed by KCl washing, Ca2+ loading and sucrose-density-gradient centrifugation. This protocol led to the separation of cell-surface membranes from membranes enriched in sarcoplasmic reticulum and intracellular GLUT4-containing vesicles. 3. Agglutination of cell-surface membranes using wheat-germ agglutinin allowed the isolation of three distinct cell-surface membrane domains: sarcolemmal fraction 1 (SM1), sarcolemmal fraction 2 (SM2) and a T-tubule fraction enriched in protein tt28 and the alpha 2-component of dihydropyridine receptor. 4. Fractions SM1 and SM2 represented distinct sarcolemmal subcompartments based on different compositions of biochemical markers: SM2 was characterized by high levels of beta 1-integrin and dystrophin, and SM1 was enriched in beta 1-integrin but lacked dystrophin. 5. The caveolae-associated molecule caveolin was very abundant in SM1, SM2 and T-tubules, suggesting the presence of caveolae or caveolin-rich domains in these cell-surface membrane domains. In contrast, clathrin heavy chain was abundant in SM1 and T-tubules, but only trace levels were detected in SM2. 6. Immunoadsorption of T-tubule vesicles with antibodies against protein tt28 and against GLUT4 revealed the presence of GLUT4 in T-tubules under basal conditions and it also allowed the identification of two distinct pools of T-tubules showing different contents of tt28 and dihydropyridine receptors. 7. Our data on distribution of clathrin and dystrophin reveal the existence of subcompartments in sarcolemma from muscle fibre, featuring selective mutually exclusive components. T-tubules contain caveolin and clathrin suggesting that they contain caveolin- and clathrin-rich domains. Furthermore, evidence for the

  1. Domain structure of Lassa virus L protein.

    PubMed

    Brunotte, Linda; Lelke, Michaela; Hass, Meike; Kleinsteuber, Katja; Becker-Ziaja, Beate; Günther, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    The 200-kDa L protein of arenaviruses plays a central role in viral genome replication and transcription. This study aimed at providing evidence for the domain structure of L protein by combining bioinformatics with a stepwise mutagenesis approach using the Lassa virus minireplicon system. Potential interdomain linkers were predicted using various algorithms. The prediction was challenged by insertion of flexible sequences into the predicted linkers. Insertion of 5 or 10 amino acid residues was tolerated at seven sites (S407, G446, G467, G774, G939, S1952, and V2074 in Lassa virus AV). At two of these sites, G467 and G939, L protein could be split into an N-terminal and a C-terminal part, which were able to trans-complement each other and reconstitute a functional complex upon coexpression. Coimmunoprecipitation studies revealed physical interaction between the N- and C-terminal domains, irrespective of whether L protein was split at G467 or G939. In confocal immunofluorescence microscopy, the N-terminal domains showed a dot-like, sometimes perinuclear, cytoplasmic distribution similar to that of full-length L protein, while the C-terminal domains were homogenously distributed in cytoplasm. The latter were redistributed into the dot-like structures upon coexpression with the corresponding N-terminal domain. In conclusion, this study demonstrates two interdomain linkers in Lassa virus L protein, at G467 and G939, suggesting that L protein is composed of at least three structural domains spanning residues 1 to 467, 467 to 939, and 939 to 2220. The first domain seems to mediate accumulation of L protein into cytoplasmic dot-like structures.

  2. Structural organization of human replication timing domains.

    PubMed

    Boulos, Rasha E; Drillon, Guénola; Argoul, Françoise; Arneodo, Alain; Audit, Benjamin

    2015-10-07

    Recent analysis of genome-wide epigenetic modification data, mean replication timing (MRT) profiles and chromosome conformation data in mammals have provided increasing evidence that flexibility in replication origin usage is regulated locally by the epigenetic landscape and over larger genomic distances by the 3D chromatin architecture. Here, we review the recent results establishing some link between replication domains and chromatin structural domains in pluripotent and various differentiated cell types in human. We reconcile the originally proposed dichotomic picture of early and late constant timing regions that replicate by multiple rather synchronous origins in separated nuclear compartments of open and closed chromatins, with the U-shaped MRT domains bordered by "master" replication origins specified by a localized (∼200-300 kb) zone of open and transcriptionally active chromatin from which a replication wave likely initiates and propagates toward the domain center via a cascade of origin firing. We discuss the relationships between these MRT domains, topologically associated domains and lamina-associated domains. This review sheds a new light on the epigenetically regulated global chromatin reorganization that underlies the loss of pluripotency and the determination of differentiation properties.

  3. Structural basis for Smoothened regulation by its extracellular domains

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Paul S.; Hedger, George; Luchetti, Giovanni; Nachtergaele, Sigrid; Tully, Mark D.; Mydock-McGrane, Laurel; Covey, Douglas F.; Rambo, Robert P.; Sansom, Mark S. P.; Rohatgi, Rajat; Siebold, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Developmental signals of the Hedgehog (Hh) and Wnt families are transduced across the membrane by Frizzled-class G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) composed of both a heptahelical transmembrane domain (TMD) and an extracellular cysteine-rich domain (CRD). How such large extracellular domains of GPCRs regulate signalling by the TMD is unknown. We present crystal structures of the Hh signal transducer and oncoprotein Smoothened (SMO), which contains two distinct ligand-binding sites in its TMD and CRD. The CRD is stacked atop the TMD, separated by an intervening wedge-like linker domain (LD). Structure-guided mutations show that the interface between the CRD, LD and TMD stabilises the inactive state of SMO. Unexpectedly, we find a cholesterol molecule bound to SMO in the CRD-binding site. Mutations predicted to prevent cholesterol binding impair the ability of SMO to transmit native Hh signals. Binding of a clinically used antagonist, vismodegib, to the TMD induces a conformational change that is propagated to the CRD, resulting in loss of cholesterol from the CRD-LD-TMD interface. Our work elucidates the structural mechanism by which the activity of a GPCR is controlled by ligand-regulated interactions between its extracellular and transmembrane domains. PMID:27437577

  4. Structured hints : extracting and abstracting domain expertise.

    SciTech Connect

    Hereld, M.; Stevens, R.; Sterling, T.; Gao, G. R.; Mathematics and Computer Science; California Inst. of Tech.; Louisiana State Univ.; Univ. of Delaware

    2009-03-16

    We propose a new framework for providing information to help optimize domain-specific application codes. Its design addresses problems that derive from the widening gap between the domain problem statement by domain experts and the architectural details of new and future high-end computing systems. The design is particularly well suited to program execution models that incorporate dynamic adaptive methodologies for live tuning of program performance and resource utilization. This new framework, which we call 'structured hints', couples a vocabulary of annotations to a suite of performance metrics. The immediate target is development of a process by which a domain expert describes characteristics of objects and methods in the application code that would not be readily apparent to the compiler; the domain expert provides further information about what quantities might provide the best indications of desirable effect; and the interactive preprocessor identifies potential opportunities for the domain expert to evaluate. Our development of these ideas is progressing in stages from case study, through manual implementation, to automatic or semi-automatic implementation. In this paper we discuss results from our case study, an examination of a large simulation of a neural network modeled after the neocortex.

  5. Epigenetic and genetic deregulation in cancer target distinct signaling pathway domains

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yang; Teschendorff, Andrew E.

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is characterized by both genetic and epigenetic alterations. While cancer driver mutations and copy-number alterations have been studied at a systems-level, relatively little is known about the systems-level patterns exhibited by their epigenetic counterparts. Here we perform a pan-cancer wide systems-level analysis, mapping candidate cancer-driver DNA methylation (DNAm) alterations onto a human interactome. We demonstrate that functional DNAm alterations in cancer tend to map to nodes of lower connectivity and inter-connectivity, compared to the corresponding alterations at the genomic level. We find that epigenetic alterations are relatively over-represented in extracellular and transmembrane signaling domains, whereas cancer genes undergoing amplification or deletion tend to be enriched within the intracellular domain. A pan-cancer wide meta-analysis identifies WNT and chemokine signaling, as two key pathways where epigenetic deregulation preferentially targets extracellular components. We further pinpoint specific chemokine ligands/receptors whose epigenetic deregulation associates with key epigenetic enzymes, representing potential targets for epigenetic therapy. Our results suggest that epigenetic deregulation in cancer not only targets tissue-specific transcription factors, but also modulates signaling within the extra-cellular domain, providing novel system-level insight into the potential distinctive role of genetic and epigenetic alterations in cancer. PMID:27899617

  6. Distinct protein domains and expression patterns confer divergent axon guidance functions for Drosophila Robo receptors.

    PubMed

    Spitzweck, Bettina; Brankatschk, Marko; Dickson, Barry J

    2010-02-05

    The orthogonal array of axon pathways in the Drosophila CNS is constructed in part under the control of three Robo family axon guidance receptors: Robo1, Robo2 and Robo3. Each of these receptors is responsible for a distinct set of guidance decisions. To determine the molecular basis for these functional specializations, we used homologous recombination to create a series of 9 "robo swap" alleles: expressing each of the three Robo receptors from each of the three robo loci. We demonstrate that the lateral positioning of longitudinal axon pathways relies primarily on differences in gene regulation, not distinct combinations of Robo proteins as previously thought. In contrast, specific features of the Robo1 and Robo2 proteins contribute to their distinct functions in commissure formation. These specializations allow Robo1 to prevent crossing and Robo2 to promote crossing. These data demonstrate how diversification of expression and structure within a single family of guidance receptors can shape complex patterns of neuronal wiring.

  7. Human fibronectin contains distinct adhesion- and motility-promoting domains for metastatic melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    The active migration of tumor cells through extracellular matrices has been proposed to play a role in certain aspects of metastasis. Metastatic tumor cells migrate in vitro in response to substratum-bound adhesive glycoproteins such as fibronectin. The present studies use affinity-purified proteolytic fragments of fibronectin to determine the nature of adhesion- and/or motility-promoting domains within the protein. Two distinct fragments were identified with cell adhesion- promoting activities. By a number of criteria, the adhesive activity promoted by these two fragments was distinct. One fragment, a 75-kD tryptic fragment purified by monoclonal antibody chromatography, promoted the adhesion, spreading, and haptotactic motility of melanoma cells. Experiments using a synthetic cell attachment peptide in solution indicated that at least part of the attachment activity exhibited by the 75-kD fragment is mediated by the sequence arg-gly-asp- ser. It was not possible to demonstrate migration-stimulating activity using a small (11.5 kD) peptic fragment containing this sequence (Pierschbacher, M.D., E. G. Hayman, and E. Ruoslahti, 1981, Cell, 26:259-267) suggesting that another cell-binding activity within the 75 kD fragment distinct from arg-gly-asp-ser might be required for motility. The second fragment that stimulated melanoma adhesion was a 33-kD tryptic/catheptic carboxyl-terminal heparin-binding fragment, which is localized to the A chain of fibronectin. This fragment promotes adhesion and spreading but not the motility of these cells. Melanoma adhesion to this heparin-binding fragment was sensitive to the effects of cycloheximide, which contrasted adhesion to the haptotaxis- promoting fragment. Importantly, these studies illustrate that haptotaxis in response to fibronectin is not due to simple adhesion gradients of this protein. The results are discussed in light of a model for multiple distinct cell surface constituents mediating cell adhesion and motility on

  8. MAGDM linear-programming models with distinct uncertain preference structures.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zeshui S; Chen, Jian

    2008-10-01

    Group decision making with preference information on alternatives is an interesting and important research topic which has been receiving more and more attention in recent years. The purpose of this paper is to investigate multiple-attribute group decision-making (MAGDM) problems with distinct uncertain preference structures. We develop some linear-programming models for dealing with the MAGDM problems, where the information about attribute weights is incomplete, and the decision makers have their preferences on alternatives. The provided preference information can be represented in the following three distinct uncertain preference structures: 1) interval utility values; 2) interval fuzzy preference relations; and 3) interval multiplicative preference relations. We first establish some linear-programming models based on decision matrix and each of the distinct uncertain preference structures and, then, develop some linear-programming models to integrate all three structures of subjective uncertain preference information provided by the decision makers and the objective information depicted in the decision matrix. Furthermore, we propose a simple and straightforward approach in ranking and selecting the given alternatives. It is worth pointing out that the developed models can also be used to deal with the situations where the three distinct uncertain preference structures are reduced to the traditional ones, i.e., utility values, fuzzy preference relations, and multiplicative preference relations. Finally, we use a practical example to illustrate in detail the calculation process of the developed approach.

  9. Multilevel domain decomposition for electronic structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Barrault, M. . E-mail: maxime.barrault@edf.fr; Cances, E. . E-mail: cances@cermics.enpc.fr; Hager, W.W. . E-mail: hager@math.ufl.edu; Le Bris, C. . E-mail: lebris@cermics.enpc.fr

    2007-03-01

    We introduce a new multilevel domain decomposition method (MDD) for electronic structure calculations within semi-empirical and density functional theory (DFT) frameworks. This method iterates between local fine solvers and global coarse solvers, in the spirit of domain decomposition methods. Using this approach, calculations have been successfully performed on several linear polymer chains containing up to 40,000 atoms and 200,000 atomic orbitals. Both the computational cost and the memory requirement scale linearly with the number of atoms. Additional speed-up can easily be obtained by parallelization. We show that this domain decomposition method outperforms the density matrix minimization (DMM) method for poor initial guesses. Our method provides an efficient preconditioner for DMM and other linear scaling methods, variational in nature, such as the orbital minimization (OM) procedure.

  10. A distinct switch in interactions of the histone H4 tail domain upon salt-dependent folding of nucleosome arrays.

    PubMed

    Pepenella, Sharon; Murphy, Kevin J; Hayes, Jeffrey J

    2014-09-26

    The core histone tail domains mediate inter-nucleosomal interactions that direct folding and condensation of nucleosome arrays into higher-order chromatin structures. The histone H4 tail domain facilitates inter-array interactions by contacting both the H2A/H2B acidic patch and DNA of neighboring nucleosomes. Likewise, H4 tail-H2A contacts stabilize array folding. However, whether the H4 tail domains stabilize array folding via inter-nucleosomal interactions with the DNA of neighboring nucleosomes remains unclear. We utilized defined oligonucleosome arrays containing a single specialized nucleosome with a photo-inducible cross-linker in the N terminus of the H4 tail to characterize these interactions. We observed that the H4 tail participates exclusively in intra-array interactions with DNA in unfolded arrays. These interactions are diminished during array folding, yet no inter-nucleosome, intra-array H4 tail-DNA contacts are observed in condensed chromatin. However, we document contacts between the N terminus of the H4 tail and H2A. Installation of acetylation mimics known to disrupt H4-H2A surface interactions did not increase observance of H4-DNA inter-nucleosomal interactions. These results suggest the multiple functions of the H4 tail require targeted distinct interactions within condensed chromatin.

  11. Distinct Domains of Yeast Cortical Tag Proteins Bud8p and Bud9p Confer Polar Localization and Functionality

    PubMed Central

    Krappmann, Anne-Brit; Taheri, Naimeh; Heinrich, Melanie

    2007-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, diploid yeast cells follow a bipolar budding program, which depends on the two transmembrane glycoproteins Bud8p and Bud9p that potentially act as cortical tags to mark the cell poles. Here, we have performed systematic structure-function analyses of Bud8p and Bud9p to identify functional domains. We find that polar transport of Bud8p and Bud9p does not depend on N-terminal sequences but instead on sequences in the median part of the proteins and on the C-terminal parts that contain the transmembrane domains. We show that the guanosine diphosphate (GDP)/guanosine triphosphate (GTP) exchange factor Bud5p, which is essential for bud site selection and physically interacts with Bud8p, also interacts with Bud9p. Regions of Bud8p and Bud9p predicted to reside in the extracellular space are likely to confer interaction with the N-terminal region of Bud5p, implicating indirect interactions between the cortical tags and the GDP/GTP exchange factor. Finally, we have identified regions of Bud8p and Bud9p that are required for interaction with the cortical tag protein Rax1p. In summary, our study suggests that Bud8p and Bud9p carry distinct domains for delivery of the proteins to the cell poles, for interaction with the general budding machinery and for association with other cortical tag proteins. PMID:17581861

  12. Replication-coupled chromatin assembly of newly synthesized histones: distinct functions for the histone tail domains.

    PubMed

    Ejlassi-Lassallette, Aïda; Thiriet, Christophe

    2012-02-01

    The maintenance of the genome during replication requires the assembly of nucleosomes with newly synthesized histones. Achieving the deposition of newly synthesized histones in chromatin implies their transport from the cytoplasm to the nucleus at the replication sites. Several lines of evidence have revealed critical functions of the histone tail domains in these conserved cellular processes. In this review, we discuss the role of the amino termini of the nucleosome building blocks, H2A/H2B and H3/H4, in different model systems. The experimental data showed that H2A/H2B tails and H3/H4 tails display distinct functions in nuclear import and chromatin assembly. Furthermore, we describe recent studies exploiting the unique properties of the slime mold, Physarum polycephalum , that have advanced understanding of the function of the highly conserved replication-dependent diacetylation of H4.

  13. The two distinctive metal ion binding domains of the wheat metallothionein Ec-1.

    PubMed

    Peroza, Estevão A; Kaabi, Ali Al; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Wellenreuther, Gerd; Freisinger, Eva

    2009-03-01

    Metallothioneins are small cysteine-rich proteins believed to play a role, among others, in the homeostasis of essential metal ions such as Zn(II) and Cu(I). Recently, we could show that wheat E(c)-1 is coordinating its six Zn(II) ions in form of metal-thiolate clusters analogously to the vertebrate metallothioneins. Specifically, two Zn(II) ions are bound in the N-terminal and four in the C-terminal domain. In the following, we will present evidence for the relative independence of the two domains from each other with respect to their metal ion binding abilities, and uncover three intriguing peculiarities of the protein. Firstly, one Zn(II) ion of the N-terminal domain is relative resistant to complete replacement with Cd(II) indicating the presence of a Zn(II)-binding site with increased stability. Secondly, the C-terminal domain is able to coordinate an additional fifth metal ion, though with reduced affinity, which went undetected so far. Finally, reconstitution of apoE(c)-1 with an excess of Zn(II) shows a certain amount of sub-stoichiometrically metal-loaded species. The possible relevance of these finding for the proposed biological functions of wheat E(c)-1 will be discussed. In addition, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements on both, the full-length and the truncated protein, provide final evidence for His participation in metal ion binding.

  14. Domain-specific knowledge systems in the brain the animate-inanimate distinction.

    PubMed

    Caramazza, A; Shelton, J R

    1998-01-01

    We claim that the animate and inanimate conceptual categories represent evolutionarily adapted domain-specific knowledge systems that are subserved by distinct neural mechanisms, thereby allowing for their selective impairment in conditions of brain damage. On this view, (some of) the category-specific deficits that have recently been reported in the cognitive neuropsychological literature - for example, the selective damage or sparing of knowledge about animals - are truly categorical effects. Here, we articulate and defend this thesis against the dominant, reductionist theory of category-specific deficits, which holds that the categorical nature of the deficits is the result of selective damage to noncategorically organized visual or functional semantic subsystems. On the latter view, the sensory/functional dimension provides the fundamental organizing principle of the semantic system. Since, according to the latter theory, sensory and functional properties are differentially important in determining the meaning of the members of different semantic categories, selective damage to the visual or the functional semantic subsystem will result in a category-like deficit. A review of the literature and the results of a new case of category-specific deficit will show that the domain-specific knowledge framework provides a better account of category-specific deficits than the sensory/functional dichotomy theory.

  15. Hox genes define distinct progenitor sub-domains within the second heart field

    PubMed Central

    Bertrand, Nicolas; Roux, Marine; Ryckebüsch, Lucile; Niederreither, Karen; Dollé, Pascal; Moon, Anne; Capecchi, Mario; Zaffran, Stéphane

    2011-01-01

    Much of the heart, including the atria, right ventricle and outflow tract (OFT) is derived from a progenitor cell population termed the second heart field (SHF) that contributes progressively to the embryonic heart during cardiac looping. Several studies have revealed anterior-posterior patterning of the SHF, since the anterior region (anterior heart field) contributes to right ventricular and OFT myocardium whereas the posterior region gives rise to the atria. We have previously shown that Retinoic Acid (RA) signal participates to this patterning. We now show that Hoxb1, Hoxa1, and Hoxa3, as downstream RA targets, are expressed in distinct sub-domains within the SHF. Our genetic lineage tracing analysis revealed that Hoxb1, Hoxa1 and Hoxa3-expressing cardiac progenitor cells contribute to both atria and the inferior wall of the OFT, which subsequently gives rise to myocardium at the base of pulmonary trunk. By contrast to Hoxb1Cre, the contribution of Hoxa1-enhIII-Cre and Hoxa3Cre-labeled cells is restricted to the distal regions of the OFT suggesting that proximo-distal patterning of the OFT is related to SHF sub-domains characterized by combinatorial Hox genes expression. Manipulation of RA signaling pathways showed that RA is required for the correct deployment of Hox-expressing SHF cells. This report provides new insights into the regulatory gene network in SHF cells contributing to the atria and sub-pulmonary myocardium. PMID:21385575

  16. Domain theoretic structures in quantum information theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Johnny

    2011-12-01

    In this thesis, we continue the study of domain theoretic structures in quantum information theory initiated by Keye Martin and Bob Coecke in 2002. The first part of the thesis is focused on exploring the domain theoretic properties of qubit channels. We discover that the Scott continuous qubit channels are exactly those that are unital or constant. We then prove that the unital qubit channels form a continuous dcpo, and identify various measurements on them. We show that Holevo capacity is a measurement on unital qubit channels, and discover the natural measurement in this setting. We find that qubit channels also form a continuous dcpo, but capacity fails to be a measurement. In the second part we focus on the study of exact dcpos, a domain theoretic structure, closely related to continuous dcpos, possessed by quantum states. Exact dcpos admit a topology, called the exact topology, and we show that the exact topology has an order theoretic characterization similar to the characterization of the Scott topology on continuous dcpos. We then explore the connection between exact and continuous dcpos; first, by identifying an important set of points, called the split points, that distinguishes between exact and continuous structures; second, by exploring a continuous completion of exact dcpos, and showing that we can recover the exact topology from the Scott topology of the completion.

  17. Synthetic mimetics of protein secondary structure domains

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Nathan T.; Katt, William P.; Hamilton, Andrew D.

    2010-01-01

    Proteins modulate the majority of all biological functions and are primarily composed of highly organized secondary structural elements such as helices, turns and sheets. Many of these functions are affected by a small number of key protein–protein contacts, often involving one or more of these well-defined structural elements. Given the ubiquitous nature of these protein recognition domains, their mimicry by peptidic and non-peptidic scaffolds has become a major focus of contemporary research. This review examines several key advances in secondary structure mimicry over the past several years, particularly focusing upon scaffolds that show not only promising projection of functional groups, but also a proven effect in biological systems. PMID:20123744

  18. Structural studies of several distinct metastable forms of amorphous ice.

    PubMed

    Tulk, C A; Benmore, C J; Urquidi, J; Klug, D D; Neuefeind, J; Tomberli, B; Egelstaff, P A

    2002-08-23

    Structural changes during annealing of high-density amorphous ice were studied with both neutron and x-ray diffraction. The first diffraction peak was followed from the high- to the low-density amorphous form. Changes were observed to occur through a series of intermediate forms that appear to be metastable at each anneal temperature. Five distinct amorphous forms were studied with neutron scattering, and many more forms may be possible. Radial distribution functions indicate that the structure evolves systematically between 4 and 8 angstroms. The phase transformations in low-temperature liquid water may be much more complex than currently understood.

  19. Measles virus recognizes its receptor, CD46, via two distinct binding domains within SCR1-2.

    PubMed

    Manchester, M; Gairin, J E; Patterson, J B; Alvarez, J; Liszewski, M K; Eto, D S; Atkinson, J P; Oldstone, M B

    1997-06-23

    Measles virus (MV) enters cells by attachment of the viral hemagglutinin to the major cell surface receptor CD46 (membrane cofactor protein). CD46 is a transmembrane glycoprotein whose ectodomain is largely composed of four conserved modules called short consensus repeats (SCRs). We have previously shown that MV interacts with SCR1 and SCR2 of CD46. (M. Manchester et al. (1995) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 92, 2303-2307) Here we report mapping the MV interaction with SCR1 and SCR2 of CD46 using a combination of peptide inhibition and mutagenesis studies. By testing a series of overlapping peptides corresponding to the 126 amino acid SCR1-2 region for inhibition of MV infection, two domains were identified that interacted with MV. One domain was found within SCR1 (amino acids 37-56) and another within SCR2 (amino acids 85-104). These results were confirmed by constructing chimeras with complementary regions from structurally similar, but non-MV-binding, SCRs of decay accelerating factor (DAF; CD55). These results indicate that MV contacts at least two distinct sites within SCR1-2.

  20. Automated retinal fovea type distinction in spectral-domain optical coherence tomography of retinal vein occlusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jing; Waldstein, Sebastian M.; Gerendas, Bianca S.; Langs, Georg; Simader, Christian; Schmidt-Erfurth, Ursula

    2015-03-01

    Spectral-domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT) is a non-invasive modality for acquiring high- resolution, three-dimensional (3D) cross-sectional volumetric images of the retina and the subretinal layers. SD-OCT also allows the detailed imaging of retinal pathology, aiding clinicians in the diagnosis of sight degrading diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), glaucoma and retinal vein occlusion (RVO). Disease diagnosis, assessment, and treatment will require a patient to undergo multiple OCT scans, possibly using multiple scanners, to accurately and precisely gauge disease activity, progression and treatment success. However, cross-vendor imaging and patient movement may result in poor scan spatial correlation potentially leading to incorrect diagnosis or treatment analysis. The retinal fovea is the location of the highest visual acuity and is present in all patients, thus it is critical to vision and highly suitable for use as a primary landmark for cross-vendor/cross-patient registration for precise comparison of disease states. However, the location of the fovea in diseased eyes is extremely challenging to locate due to varying appearance and the presence of retinal layer destroying pathology. Thus categorising and detecting the fovea type is an important prior stage to automatically computing the fovea position. Presented here is an automated cross-vendor method for fovea distinction in 3D SD-OCT scans of patients suffering from RVO, categorising scans into three distinct types. OCT scans are preprocessed by motion correction and noise filing followed by segmentation using a kernel graph-cut approach. A statistically derived mask is applied to the resulting scan creating an ROI around the probable fovea location from which the uppermost retinal surface is delineated. For a normal appearance retina, minimisation to zero thickness is computed using the top two retinal surfaces. 3D local minima detection and layer thickness analysis are used

  1. Domain structure of black hole space-times

    SciTech Connect

    Harmark, Troels

    2009-07-15

    We introduce the domain structure for stationary black hole space-times. The domain structure lives on the submanifold of fixed points of the Killing vector fields. Depending on which Killing vector field has fixed points the submanifold is naturally divided into domains. The domain structure provides invariants of the space-time, both topological and continuous. It is defined for any space-time dimension and any number of Killing vector fields. We examine the domain structure for asymptotically flat space-times and find a canonical form for the metric of such space-times. The domain structure generalizes the rod structure introduced for space-times with D-2 commuting Killing vector fields. We analyze in detail the domain structure for Minkowski space, the Schwarzschild-Tangherlini black hole and the Myers-Perry black hole in six and seven dimensions. Finally, we consider the possible domain structures for asymptotically flat black holes in six and seven dimensio0008.

  2. Crystal Structure of the BARD1 BRCT Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Birrane,G.; Varma, A.; Soni, A.; Ladias, J.

    2007-01-01

    The interaction of the breast tumor suppressor BRCA1 with the protein BARD1 results in the formation of a heterodimeric complex that has ubiquitin ligase activity and plays central roles in cell cycle checkpoint control and DNA repair. Both BRCA1 and BARD1 possess a pair of tandem BRCT domains that interact in a phosphorylation-dependent manner with target proteins. We determined the crystal structure of the human BARD1 BRCT repeats (residues 568-777) at 1.9 {angstrom} resolution. The composition and structure of the BARD1 phosphoserine-binding pocket P{sub 1} are strikingly similar to those of the BRCA1 and MDC1 BRCT domains, suggesting a similar mode of interaction with the phosphate group of the ligand. By contrast, the BARD1 BRCT selectivity pocket P{sub 2} exhibits distinct structural features, including two prominent histidine residues, His685 and His686, which may be important for ligand binding. The protonation state of these histidines has a marked effect on the calculated electrostatic potential in the vicinity of P{sub 2}, raising the possibility that ligand recognition may be regulated by changes in pH. Importantly, the BARD1 BRCT structure provides insights into the mechanisms by which the cancer-associated missense mutations C645R, V695L, and S761N may adversely affect the structure and function of BARD1.

  3. Independent Structural Domains in Paramyxovirus Polymerase Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Dochow, Melanie; Krumm, Stefanie A.; Crowe, James E.; Moore, Martin L.; Plemper, Richard K.

    2012-01-01

    All enzymatic activities required for genomic replication and transcription of nonsegmented negative strand RNA viruses (or Mononegavirales) are believed to be concentrated in the viral polymerase (L) protein. However, our insight into the organization of these different enzymatic activities into a bioactive tertiary structure remains rudimentary. Fragments of Mononegavirales polymerases analyzed to date cannot restore bioactivity through trans-complementation, unlike the related L proteins of segmented NSVs. We investigated the domain organization of phylogenetically diverse Paramyxovirus L proteins derived from measles virus (MeV), Nipah virus (NiV), and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). Through a comprehensive in silico and experimental analysis of domain intersections, we defined MeV L position 615 as an interdomain candidate in addition to the previously reported residue 1708. Only position 1708 of MeV and the homologous positions in NiV and RSV L also tolerated the insertion of epitope tags. Splitting of MeV L at residue 1708 created fragments that were unable to physically interact and trans-complement, but strikingly, these activities were reconstituted by the addition of dimerization tags to the fragments. Equivalently split fragments of NiV, RSV, and MeV L oligomerized with comparable efficiency in all homo- and heterotypic combinations, but only the homotypic pairs were able to trans-complement. These results demonstrate that synthesis as a single polypeptide is not required for the Mononegavirales polymerases to adopt a proper tertiary conformation. Paramyxovirus polymerases are composed of at least two truly independent folding domains that lack a traditional interface but require molecular compatibility for bioactivity. The functional probing of the L domain architecture through trans-complementation is anticipated to be applicable to all Mononegavirales polymerases. PMID:22215662

  4. Association of astrocytes with neurons and astrocytes derived from distinct progenitor domains in the subpallium

    PubMed Central

    Torigoe, Makio; Yamauchi, Kenta; Zhu, Yan; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Murakami, Fujio

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes play pivotal roles in metabolism and homeostasis as well as in neural development and function in a manner thought to depend on their region-specific diversity. In the mouse spinal cord, astrocytes and neurons, which are derived from a common progenitor domain (PD) and controlled by common PD-specific transcription factors, migrate radially and share their final positions. However, whether astrocytes can only interact with neurons from common PDs in the brain remains unknown. Here, we focused on subpallium-derived cells, because the subpallium generates neurons that show a diverse mode of migration. We tracked their fate by in utero electroporation of plasmids that allow for chromosomal integration of transgenes or of a Cre recombinase expression vector to reporter mice. We also used an Nkx2.1Cre mouse line to fate map the cells originating from the medial ganglionic eminence and preoptic area. We find that although neurons and astrocytes are labeled in various regions, only neurons are labeled in the neocortex, hippocampus and olfactory bulb. Furthermore, we find astrocytes derived from an Nkx 2.1-negative PD are associated with neurons from the Nkx2.1+ PD. Thus, forebrain astrocytes can associate with neurons as well as astrocytes derived from a distinct PD. PMID:26193445

  5. Crystal Structure of the Marburg Virus VP35 Oligomerization Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Bruhn, Jessica F.; Kirchdoerfer, Robert N.; Urata, Sarah M.; Li, Sheng; Tickle, Ian J.; Bricogne, Gérard; Saphire, Erica Ollmann; Sundquist, W. I.

    2016-11-09

    ABSTRACT

    Marburg virus (MARV) is a highly pathogenic filovirus that is classified in a genus distinct from that of Ebola virus (EBOV) (generaMarburgvirusandEbolavirus, respectively). Both viruses produce a multifunctional protein termed VP35, which acts as a polymerase cofactor, a viral protein chaperone, and an antagonist of the innate immune response. VP35 contains a central oligomerization domain with a predicted coiled-coil motif. This domain has been shown to be essential for RNA polymerase function. Here we present crystal structures of the MARV VP35 oligomerization domain. These structures and accompanying biophysical characterization suggest that MARV VP35 is a trimer. In contrast, EBOV VP35 is likely a tetramer in solution. Differences in the oligomeric state of this protein may explain mechanistic differences in replication and immune evasion observed for MARV and EBOV.

    IMPORTANCEMarburg virus can cause severe disease, with up to 90% human lethality. Its genome is concise, only producing seven proteins. One of the proteins, VP35, is essential for replication of the viral genome and for evasion of host immune responses. VP35 oligomerizes (self-assembles) in order to function, yet the structure by which it assembles has not been visualized. Here we present two crystal structures of this oligomerization domain. In both structures, three copies of VP35 twist about each other to form a coiled coil. This trimeric assembly is in contrast to tetrameric predictions for VP35 of Ebola virus and to known structures of homologous proteins in the measles, mumps, and Nipah viruses. Distinct oligomeric states of the Marburg and Ebola virus VP35 proteins may explain differences between them in polymerase function and immune evasion. These findings may provide a more accurate understanding of the mechanisms governing

  6. Minicollagen cysteine-rich domains encode distinct modes of polymerization to form stable nematocyst capsules

    PubMed Central

    Tursch, Anja; Mercadante, Davide; Tennigkeit, Jutta; Gräter, Frauke; Özbek, Suat

    2016-01-01

    The stinging capsules of cnidarians, nematocysts, function as harpoon-like organelles with unusual biomechanical properties. The nanosecond discharge of the nematocyst requires a dense protein network of the capsule structure withstanding an internal pressure of up to 150 bar. Main components of the capsule are short collagens, so-called minicollagens, that form extended polymers by disulfide reshuffling of their cysteine-rich domains (CRDs). Although CRDs have identical cysteine patterns, they exhibit different structures and disulfide connectivity at minicollagen N and C-termini. We show that the structurally divergent CRDs have different cross-linking potentials in vitro and in vivo. While the C-CRD can participate in several simultaneous intermolecular disulfides and functions as a cystine knot after minicollagen synthesis, the N-CRD is monovalent. Our combined experimental and computational analyses reveal the cysteines in the C-CRD fold to exhibit a higher structural propensity for disulfide bonding and a faster kinetics of polymerization. During nematocyst maturation, the highly reactive C-CRD is instrumental in efficient cross-linking of minicollagens to form pressure resistant capsules. The higher ratio of C-CRD folding types evidenced in the medusozoan lineage might have fostered the evolution of novel, predatory nematocyst types in cnidarians with a free-swimming medusa stage. PMID:27166560

  7. Distinct and redundant roles of the non-muscle myosin II isoforms and functional domains.

    PubMed

    Wang, Aibing; Ma, Xuefei; Conti, Mary Anne; Adelstein, Robert S

    2011-10-01

    We propose that the in vivo functions of NM II (non-muscle myosin II) can be divided between those that depend on the N-terminal globular motor domain and those less dependent on motor activity but more dependent on the C-terminal domain. The former, being more dependent on the kinetic properties of NM II to translocate actin filaments, are less amenable to substitution by different NM II isoforms, whereas the in vivo functions of the latter, which involve the structural properties of NM II to cross-link actin filaments, are more amenable to substitution. In light of this hypothesis, we examine the ability of NM II-A, as well as a motor-compromised form of NM II-B, to replace NM II-B and rescue neuroepithelial cell-cell adhesion defects and hydrocephalus in the brain of NM II-B-depleted mice. We also examine the ability of NM II-B as well as chimaeric forms of NM II (II-A head and II-B tail and vice versa) to substitute for NM II-A in cell-cell adhesions in II-A-ablated mice. However, we also show that certain functions, such as neuronal cell migration in the developing brain and vascularization of the mouse embryo and placenta, specifically require NM II-B and II-A respectively.

  8. The functional requirement of two structural domains within telomerase RNA emerged early in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Podlevsky, Joshua D; Li, Yang; Chen, Julian J-L

    2016-11-16

    Telomerase emerged during evolution as a prominent solution to the eukaryotic linear chromosome end-replication problem. Telomerase minimally comprises the catalytic telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) and telomerase RNA (TR) that provides the template for telomeric DNA synthesis. While the TERT protein is well-conserved across taxa, TR is highly divergent amongst distinct groups of species. Herein, we have identified the essential functional domains of TR from the basal eukaryotic species Trypanosoma brucei, revealing the ancestry of TR comprising two distinct structural core domains that can assemble in trans with TERT and reconstitute active telomerase enzyme in vitro The upstream essential domain of T. brucei TR, termed the template core, constitutes three short helices in addition to the 11-nt template. Interestingly, the trypanosome template core domain lacks the ubiquitous pseudoknot found in all known TRs, suggesting later evolution of this critical structural element. The template-distal domain is a short stem-loop, termed equivalent CR4/5 (eCR4/5). While functionally similar to vertebrate and fungal CR4/5, trypanosome eCR4/5 is structurally distinctive, lacking the essential P6.1 stem-loop. Our functional study of trypanosome TR core domains suggests that the functional requirement of two discrete structural domains is a common feature of TRs and emerged early in telomerase evolution.

  9. Transcriptional activation by the acidic domain of Vmw65 requires the integrity of the domain and involves additional determinants distinct from those necessary for TFIIB binding.

    PubMed

    Walker, S; Greaves, R; O'Hare, P

    1993-09-01

    In this work we have examined the requirements for activity of the acidic domain of Vmw65 (VP16) by deletion and site-directed mutagenesis of the region in the context of GAL4 fusion proteins. The results indicate that the present interpretation of what actually constitutes the activation domain is not correct. We demonstrate, using a promoter with one target site which is efficiently activated by the wild-type (wt) fusion protein, that amino acids distal to residue 453 are critical for activity. Truncation of the domain or substitution of residues in the distal region almost completely abrogate activity. However, inactivating mutations within the distal region are complemented by using a promoter containing multiple target sites. Moreover, duplication of the proximal region, but not the distal region, restores the ability to activate a promoter with a single target site. These results indicate some distinct qualitative difference between the proximal and distal regions. We have also examined the binding of nuclear proteins to the wt domain and to a variant with the distal region inactivated by mutation. The lack of activity of this variant is not explained by a lack of binding of TFIIB, a protein previously reported to be the likely target of the acidic domain. Therefore some additional function is involved in transcriptional activation by the acid domain, and determinants distinct from those involved in TFIIB binding are required for this function. Analysis of the total protein profiles binding to the wt and mutant domains has demonstrated the selective binding to the wt domain of a 135-kDa polypeptide, which is therefore a candidate component involved in this additional function. This is the first report to provide evidence for the proposal of a multiplicity of interactions within the acidic domain, by uncoupling requirements for one function from those for another.

  10. Two distinct domains of Bicoid mediate its transcriptional downregulation by the Torso pathway.

    PubMed

    Janody, F; Sturny, R; Schaeffer, V; Azou, Y; Dostatni, N

    2001-06-01

    The transcriptional activity of the Bicoid morphogen is directly downregulated by the Torso signal transduction cascade at the anterior pole of the Drosophila embryo. This regulation does not involve the homeodomain or direct phosphorylation of Bicoid. We analyse the transcriptional regulation of Bicoid in response to the Torso pathway, using Bicoid variants and fusion proteins between the Bicoid domains and the Gal4 DNA-binding domain. We show that Bicoid possesses three autonomous activation domains. Two of these domains, the serine/threonine-rich and the acidic domains, are downregulated by Torso, whereas the third activation domain, which is rich in glutamine, is not. The alanine-rich domain, previously described as an activation domain in vitro, has a repressive activity that is independent of Torso. Thus, Bicoid downregulation by Torso results from a competition between the glutamine-rich domain that is insensitive to Torso and the serine/threonine-rich and acidic activation domains downregulated by Torso. The alanine-rich domain contributes to this process indirectly by reducing the global activity of the protein and in particular the activity of the glutamine-rich domain that might otherwise prevent downregulation by Torso.

  11. The Distinct Element Method - Application to Structures in Jointed Rock

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J.P.; Glen, L.; Blair, S.; Heuze, F.

    2001-11-30

    The Distinct Element Method (DEM) is a meshfree method with applications to rock mechanics, mining sciences, simulations of nuclear repositories, and the stability of underground structures. Continuum mesh-based methods have been applied successfully to many problems in geophysics. Even if the geology includes fractures and faults, when sufficiently large length scales are considered a continuum approximation may be sufficient. However, a large class of problems exist where individual rock joints must be taken into account. This includes problems where the structures of interest have sizes comparable with the block size. In addition, it is possible that while the structure may experience loads which do no measurable damage to individual blocks, some joints may fail. This may launch smaller blocks as dangerous projectiles or even cause total failure of a tunnel. Traditional grid-based continuum approaches are wholly unsuited to this class of problem. It is possible to introduce discontinuities or slide lines into existing grid-based methods, however, such limited approaches can break down when new contacts form between blocks. The distinct element method (DEM) is an alternative, meshfree approach. The DEM can directly approximate the block structure of the jointed rock using arbitrary polyhedra. Using this approach, preexisting joints are readily incorporated into the DEM model. In addition, the method detects all new contacts between blocks resulting from relative block motion. We will describe the background of the DEM and review previous application of the DEM to geophysical problems. Finally we present preliminary results from a investigation into the stability of underground structures subjected to dynamic loading.

  12. Purification and Structural Analysis of LEM-Domain Proteins.

    PubMed

    Herrada, Isaline; Bourgeois, Benjamin; Samson, Camille; Buendia, Brigitte; Worman, Howard J; Zinn-Justin, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    LAP2-emerin-MAN1 (LEM)-domain proteins are modular proteins characterized by the presence of a conserved motif of about 50 residues. Most LEM-domain proteins localize at the inner nuclear membrane, but some are also found in the endoplasmic reticulum or nuclear interior. Their architecture has been analyzed by predicting the limits of their globular domains, determining the 3D structure of these domains and in a few cases calculating the 3D structure of specific domains bound to biological targets. The LEM domain adopts an α-helical fold also found in SAP and HeH domains of prokaryotes and unicellular eukaryotes. The LEM domain binds to BAF (barrier-to-autointegration factor; BANF1), which interacts with DNA and tethers chromatin to the nuclear envelope. LAP2 isoforms also share an N-terminal LEM-like domain, which binds DNA. The structure and function of other globular domains that distinguish LEM-domain proteins from each other have been characterized, including the C-terminal dimerization domain of LAP2α and C-terminal WH and UHM domains of MAN1. LEM-domain proteins also have large intrinsically disordered regions that are involved in intra- and intermolecular interactions and are highly regulated by posttranslational modifications in vivo.

  13. Correlation between spin structure oscillations and domain wall velocities

    PubMed Central

    Bisig, André; Stärk, Martin; Mawass, Mohamad-Assaad; Moutafis, Christoforos; Rhensius, Jan; Heidler, Jakoba; Büttner, Felix; Noske, Matthias; Weigand, Markus; Eisebitt, Stefan; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Van Waeyenberge, Bartel; Stoll, Hermann; Schütz, Gisela; Kläui, Mathias

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic sensing and logic devices based on the motion of magnetic domain walls rely on the precise and deterministic control of the position and the velocity of individual magnetic domain walls in curved nanowires. Varying domain wall velocities have been predicted to result from intrinsic effects such as oscillating domain wall spin structure transformations and extrinsic pinning due to imperfections. Here we use direct dynamic imaging of the nanoscale spin structure that allows us for the first time to directly check these predictions. We find a new regime of oscillating domain wall motion even below the Walker breakdown correlated with periodic spin structure changes. We show that the extrinsic pinning from imperfections in the nanowire only affects slow domain walls and we identify the magnetostatic energy, which scales with the domain wall velocity, as the energy reservoir for the domain wall to overcome the local pinning potential landscape. PMID:23978905

  14. Correlation between spin structure oscillations and domain wall velocities.

    PubMed

    Bisig, André; Stärk, Martin; Mawass, Mohamad-Assaad; Moutafis, Christoforos; Rhensius, Jan; Heidler, Jakoba; Büttner, Felix; Noske, Matthias; Weigand, Markus; Eisebitt, Stefan; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Van Waeyenberge, Bartel; Stoll, Hermann; Schütz, Gisela; Kläui, Mathias

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic sensing and logic devices based on the motion of magnetic domain walls rely on the precise and deterministic control of the position and the velocity of individual magnetic domain walls in curved nanowires. Varying domain wall velocities have been predicted to result from intrinsic effects such as oscillating domain wall spin structure transformations and extrinsic pinning due to imperfections. Here we use direct dynamic imaging of the nanoscale spin structure that allows us for the first time to directly check these predictions. We find a new regime of oscillating domain wall motion even below the Walker breakdown correlated with periodic spin structure changes. We show that the extrinsic pinning from imperfections in the nanowire only affects slow domain walls and we identify the magnetostatic energy, which scales with the domain wall velocity, as the energy reservoir for the domain wall to overcome the local pinning potential landscape.

  15. Structural and Histone Binding Ability Characterizations of Human PWWP Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Hong; Zeng, Hong; Lam, Robert; Tempel, Wolfram; Amaya, Maria F.; Xu, Chao; Dombrovski, Ludmila; Qiu, Wei; Wang, Yanming; Min, Jinrong

    2013-09-25

    The PWWP domain was first identified as a structural motif of 100-130 amino acids in the WHSC1 protein and predicted to be a protein-protein interaction domain. It belongs to the Tudor domain 'Royal Family', which consists of Tudor, chromodomain, MBT and PWWP domains. While Tudor, chromodomain and MBT domains have long been known to bind methylated histones, PWWP was shown to exhibit histone binding ability only until recently. The PWWP domain has been shown to be a DNA binding domain, but sequence analysis and previous structural studies show that the PWWP domain exhibits significant similarity to other 'Royal Family' members, implying that the PWWP domain has the potential to bind histones. In order to further explore the function of the PWWP domain, we used the protein family approach to determine the crystal structures of the PWWP domains from seven different human proteins. Our fluorescence polarization binding studies show that PWWP domains have weak histone binding ability, which is also confirmed by our NMR titration experiments. Furthermore, we determined the crystal structures of the BRPF1 PWWP domain in complex with H3K36me3, and HDGF2 PWWP domain in complex with H3K79me3 and H4K20me3. PWWP proteins constitute a new family of methyl lysine histone binders. The PWWP domain consists of three motifs: a canonical {beta}-barrel core, an insertion motif between the second and third {beta}-strands and a C-terminal {alpha}-helix bundle. Both the canonical {beta}-barrel core and the insertion motif are directly involved in histone binding. The PWWP domain has been previously shown to be a DNA binding domain. Therefore, the PWWP domain exhibits dual functions: binding both DNA and methyllysine histones.

  16. The activation domain of a basic helix-loop-helix protein is masked by repressor interaction with domains distinct from that required for transcription regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Jayaraman, P S; Hirst, K; Goding, C R

    1994-01-01

    While there are many examples of protein-protein interactions modulating the DNA-binding activity of transcription factors, little is known of the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of the transcription activation function. Using a two-hybrid system we show here that transcription repression of the basic domain/helix-loop-helix factor PHO4 is mediated by complex formation with the PHO80 repressor. In contrast to other systems, such as inhibition of GAL4 by GAL80 or of p53 by MDM2, where repression is mediated by direct interaction at regions overlapping the transcription activation domain, interaction with PHO80 involves two regions of PHO4 distinct from those involved in transcription activation or DNA-binding and dimerization. The possibility that repression of PHO4 by PHO80 may represent a general mechanism of transcription control, including regulation of the cell-type-specific transcription activation domain of c-Jun, is discussed. Images PMID:8187772

  17. Individual domains of Tensin2 exhibit distinct subcellular localisations and migratory effects.

    PubMed

    Hafizi, Sassan; Sernstad, Emma; Swinny, Jerome D; Gomez, Maria F; Dahlbäck, Björn

    2010-01-01

    Tensins are large intracellular proteins believed to link the extracellular matrix to the cytoskeleton via integrins. Tensins are multidomain proteins consisting of homologous C1, PTPase, C2, SH2 and PTB domains. Full-length Tensin proteins can undergo cleavage inside cells, thus yielding domains in isolation that may have discrete subcellular localisations and downstream effects. We expressed different isoforms of Tensin2 and their individual domains as recombinant green fluorescent protein (GFP)-fusion constructs in DU145 human prostate cancer cells. Under fluorescence confocal microscopy, the isolated domains of Tensin2 all displayed discrete distributions throughout the cytoplasm and the nucleus. In particular, partial constructs containing the C1 domain localised preferentially to the nucleus, including the isolated C1 domain and the PTPase domain. In contrast, all three full-length isoforms of Tensin2 were present exclusively in discrete punctate bodies throughout the cytoplasm. This punctate staining showed colocalisation with the tumour suppressor protein DLC-1 as well as with actin (phalloidin). Furthermore, DU145 cells transiently expressing partial Tensin2 constructs containing the PTB domain showed an increased haptotactic migration. In addition, stimulation of renal carcinoma cells stably expressing Tensin2 by the survival factor Gas6 caused phosphorylation of its receptor Axl, but no effect on Tensin2, which was already maximally phosphorylated at time 0. In conclusion, our results indicate that differential proteolytic cleavage of Tensin2 can liberate domains with discrete localisations and functions, which has implications for the role of Tensins in cancer cell survival and motility.

  18. Tunable conductance of magnetic nanowires with structured domain walls.

    PubMed

    Dugaev, V K; Berakdar, J; Barnaś, J

    2006-02-03

    We show that in a magnetic nanowire with double magnetic domain walls, quantum interference results in spin-split quasistationary states localized mainly between the domain walls. Spin-flip-assisted transmission through the domain structure increases strongly when these size-quantized states are tuned on resonance with the Fermi energy, e.g., upon varying the distance between the domain walls which results in resonance-type peaks of the wire conductance. This novel phenomenon is shown to be utilizable to manipulate the spin density in the domain vicinity. The domain wall parameters are readily controllable, and the predicted effect is hence exploitable in spintronic devices.

  19. Distinct self-interaction domains promote Multi Sex Combs accumulation in and formation of the Drosophila histone locus body.

    PubMed

    Terzo, Esteban A; Lyons, Shawn M; Poulton, John S; Temple, Brenda R S; Marzluff, William F; Duronio, Robert J

    2015-04-15

    Nuclear bodies (NBs) are structures that concentrate proteins, RNAs, and ribonucleoproteins that perform functions essential to gene expression. How NBs assemble is not well understood. We studied the Drosophila histone locus body (HLB), a NB that concentrates factors required for histone mRNA biosynthesis at the replication-dependent histone gene locus. We coupled biochemical analysis with confocal imaging of both fixed and live tissues to demonstrate that the Drosophila Multi Sex Combs (Mxc) protein contains multiple domains necessary for HLB assembly. An important feature of this assembly process is the self-interaction of Mxc via two conserved N-terminal domains: a LisH domain and a novel self-interaction facilitator (SIF) domain immediately downstream of the LisH domain. Molecular modeling suggests that the LisH and SIF domains directly interact, and mutation of either the LisH or the SIF domain severely impairs Mxc function in vivo, resulting in reduced histone mRNA accumulation. A region of Mxc between amino acids 721 and 1481 is also necessary for HLB assembly independent of the LisH and SIF domains. Finally, the C-terminal 195 amino acids of Mxc are required for recruiting FLASH, an essential histone mRNA-processing factor, to the HLB. We conclude that multiple domains of the Mxc protein promote HLB assembly in order to concentrate factors required for histone mRNA biosynthesis.

  20. Structural and functional diversity of Topologically Associating Domains.

    PubMed

    Dekker, Job; Heard, Edith

    2015-10-07

    Recent studies have shown that chromosomes in a range of organisms are compartmentalized in different types of chromatin domains. In mammals, chromosomes form compartments that are composed of smaller Topologically Associating Domains (TADs). TADs are thought to represent functional domains of gene regulation but much is still unknown about the mechanisms of their formation and how they exert their regulatory effect on embedded genes. Further, similar domains have been detected in other organisms, including flies, worms, fungi and bacteria. Although in all these cases these domains appear similar as detected by 3C-based methods, their biology appears to be quite distinct with differences in the protein complexes involved in their formation and differences in their internal organization. Here we outline our current understanding of such domains in different organisms and their roles in gene regulation.

  1. Capturing distinct KCNQ2 channel resting states by metal ion bridges in the voltage-sensor domain.

    PubMed

    Gourgy-Hacohen, Orit; Kornilov, Polina; Pittel, Ilya; Peretz, Asher; Attali, Bernard; Paas, Yoav

    2014-12-01

    Although crystal structures of various voltage-gated K(+) (Kv) and Na(+) channels have provided substantial information on the activated conformation of the voltage-sensing domain (VSD), the topology of the VSD in its resting conformation remains highly debated. Numerous studies have investigated the VSD resting state in the Kv Shaker channel; however, few studies have explored this issue in other Kv channels. Here, we investigated the VSD resting state of KCNQ2, a K(+) channel subunit belonging to the KCNQ (Kv7) subfamily of Kv channels. KCNQ2 can coassemble with the KCNQ3 subunit to mediate the IM current that regulates neuronal excitability. In humans, mutations in KCNQ2 are associated with benign neonatal forms of epilepsy or with severe epileptic encephalopathy. We introduced cysteine mutations into the S4 transmembrane segment of the KCNQ2 VSD and determined that external application of Cd(2+) profoundly reduced the current amplitude of S4 cysteine mutants S195C, R198C, and R201C. Based on reactivity with the externally accessible endogenous cysteine C106 in S1, we infer that each of the above S4 cysteine mutants forms Cd(2+) bridges to stabilize a channel closed state. Disulfide bonds and metal bridges constrain the S4 residues S195, R198, and R201 near C106 in S1 in the resting state, and experiments using concatenated tetrameric constructs indicate that this occurs within the same VSD. KCNQ2 structural models suggest that three distinct resting channel states have been captured by the formation of different S4-S1 Cd(2+) bridges. Collectively, this work reveals that residue C106 in S1 can be very close to several N-terminal S4 residues for stabilizing different KCNQ2 resting conformations.

  2. Capturing distinct KCNQ2 channel resting states by metal ion bridges in the voltage-sensor domain

    PubMed Central

    Gourgy-Hacohen, Orit; Kornilov, Polina; Pittel, Ilya; Peretz, Asher

    2014-01-01

    Although crystal structures of various voltage-gated K+ (Kv) and Na+ channels have provided substantial information on the activated conformation of the voltage-sensing domain (VSD), the topology of the VSD in its resting conformation remains highly debated. Numerous studies have investigated the VSD resting state in the Kv Shaker channel; however, few studies have explored this issue in other Kv channels. Here, we investigated the VSD resting state of KCNQ2, a K+ channel subunit belonging to the KCNQ (Kv7) subfamily of Kv channels. KCNQ2 can coassemble with the KCNQ3 subunit to mediate the IM current that regulates neuronal excitability. In humans, mutations in KCNQ2 are associated with benign neonatal forms of epilepsy or with severe epileptic encephalopathy. We introduced cysteine mutations into the S4 transmembrane segment of the KCNQ2 VSD and determined that external application of Cd2+ profoundly reduced the current amplitude of S4 cysteine mutants S195C, R198C, and R201C. Based on reactivity with the externally accessible endogenous cysteine C106 in S1, we infer that each of the above S4 cysteine mutants forms Cd2+ bridges to stabilize a channel closed state. Disulfide bonds and metal bridges constrain the S4 residues S195, R198, and R201 near C106 in S1 in the resting state, and experiments using concatenated tetrameric constructs indicate that this occurs within the same VSD. KCNQ2 structural models suggest that three distinct resting channel states have been captured by the formation of different S4–S1 Cd2+ bridges. Collectively, this work reveals that residue C106 in S1 can be very close to several N-terminal S4 residues for stabilizing different KCNQ2 resting conformations. PMID:25385787

  3. The structure of a PKD domain from polycystin-1: implications for polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed Central

    Bycroft, M; Bateman, A; Clarke, J; Hamill, S J; Sandford, R; Thomas, R L; Chothia, C

    1999-01-01

    Most cases of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) are the result of mutations in the PKD1 gene. The PKD1 gene codes for a large cell-surface glycoprotein, polycystin-1, of unknown function, which, based on its predicted domain structure, may be involved in protein-protein and protein-carbohydrate interactions. Approximately 30% of polycystin-1 consists of 16 copies of a novel protein module called the PKD domain. Here we show that this domain has a beta-sandwich fold. Although this fold is common to a number of cell-surface modules, the PKD domain represents a distinct protein family. The tenth PKD domain of human and Fugu polycystin-1 show extensive conservation of surface residues suggesting that this region could be a ligand-binding site. This structure will allow the likely effects of missense mutations in a large part of the PKD1 gene to be determined. PMID:9889186

  4. Structural rearrangement of the intracellular domains during AMPA receptor activation

    PubMed Central

    Zachariassen, Linda G.; Katchan, Ljudmila; Jensen, Anna G.; Pickering, Darryl S.; Plested, Andrew J. R.

    2016-01-01

    α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs) are ligand-gated ion channels that mediate the majority of fast excitatory neurotransmission in the central nervous system. Despite recent advances in structural studies of AMPARs, information about the specific conformational changes that underlie receptor function is lacking. Here, we used single and dual insertion of GFP variants at various positions in AMPAR subunits to enable measurements of conformational changes using fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) in live cells. We produced dual CFP/YFP-tagged GluA2 subunit constructs that had normal activity and displayed intrareceptor FRET. We used fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) in live HEK293 cells to determine distinct steady-state FRET efficiencies in the presence of different ligands, suggesting a dynamic picture of the resting state. Patch-clamp fluorometry of the double- and single-insert constructs showed that both the intracellular C-terminal domain (CTD) and the loop region between the M1 and M2 helices move during activation and the CTD is detached from the membrane. Our time-resolved measurements revealed unexpectedly complex fluorescence changes within these intracellular domains, providing clues as to how posttranslational modifications and receptor function interact. PMID:27313205

  5. Endocytotic routes of cobra cardiotoxins depend on spatial distribution of positively charged and hydrophobic domains to target distinct types of sulfated glycoconjugates on cell surface.

    PubMed

    Lee, Shao-Chen; Lin, Chien-Chu; Wang, Chia-Hui; Wu, Po-Long; Huang, Hsuan-Wei; Chang, Chung-I; Wu, Wen-guey

    2014-07-18

    Cobra cardiotoxins (CTX) are a family of three-fingered basic polypeptides known to interact with diverse targets such as heparan sulfates, sulfatides, and integrins on cell surfaces. After CTX bind to the membrane surface, they are internalized to intracellular space and exert their cytotoxicity via an unknown mechanism. By the combined in vitro kinetic binding, three-dimensional x-ray structure determination, and cell biology studies on the naturally abundant CTX homologues from the Taiwanese cobra, we showed that slight variations on the spatial distribution of positively charged or hydrophobic domains among CTX A2, A3, and A4 could lead to significant changes in their endocytotic pathways and action mechanisms via distinct sulfated glycoconjugate-mediated processes. The intracellular locations of these structurally similar CTX after internalization are shown to vary between the mitochondria and lysosomes via either dynamin2-dependent or -independent processes with distinct membrane cholesterol sensitivity. Evidence is presented to suggest that the shifting between the sulfated glycoconjugates as distinct targets of CTX A2, A3, and A4 might play roles in the co-evolutionary arms race between venomous snake toxins to cope with different membrane repair mechanisms at the cellular levels. The sensitivity of endocytotic routes to the spatial distribution of positively charged or hydrophobic domains may provide an explanation for the diverse endocytosis pathways of other cell-penetrating basic polypeptides.

  6. A hybrid method for identification of structural domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Yongpan; Zhu, Min; Wang, Yuelong; Xie, Zhaoyang; Li, Menglong

    2014-12-01

    Structural domains in proteins are the basic units to form various proteins. In the protein's evolution and functioning, domains play important roles. But the definition of domain is not yet precisely given, and the update cycle of structural domain databases is long. The automatic algorithms identify domains slowly, while protein entities with great structural complexity are on the rise. Here, we present a method which recognizes the compact and modular segments of polypeptide chains to identify structural domains, and contrast some data sets to illuminate their effect. The method combines support vector machine (SVM) with K-means algorithm. It is faster and more stable than most current algorithms and performs better. It also indicates that when proteins are presented as some Alpha-carbon atoms in 3D space, it is feasible to identify structural domains by the spatially structural properties. We have developed a web-server, which would be helpful in identification of structural domains (http://vis.sculab.org/~huayongpan/cgi-bin/domainAssignment.cgi).

  7. Evolution of magnetic domain structures from Pseudo-Single-Domain to Multidomain.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Wyn; Nagy, Lesleis; Fabian, Karl; Muxworthy, Adrian

    2016-04-01

    Palaeomagnetic observations over the last 60 years have made a significant contribution to our understanding of the geological structure of the Earth. The interpretation of these recordings is almost entirely based on the assumption that the remanence is held in uniformly magnetised (single-domain) particles. However it has long been recognised that the upper limit for SD magnetite is at about 80nm (for equidimensional grains of magnetite) and it is likely that many palaeomagnetic samples will contain a much broader range of grain sizes, which may be dominated by non-uniformly magnetised pseudo-single-domain (PSD) grains. Recent progress in determining energy barriers between the different possible domain states in a grain (to be discussed in this session by Nagy et al.) shows that the thermal stability of PSD grains are dominated by energy barriers and domain transitions whose characteristics are SD-like. The magnetic structures in PSD grains undergo a form of domain rotation rather than the domain wall motions observed in multidomain (MD) grains. Thus transition in stability and fidelity of palaeomagentic recorders from the more reliable PSD to less reliable MD structures can be mapped to the evolution of domain walls from the vortex cores of PSD grains. In this talk we will discuss our preliminary results for very large scale micromagnetic models using a new parallel numerical model called DUNLOP. We will outline the magnetic properties and structures of what we classify as PSD grains and how these types of domains evolve from vortex-dominated to MD structures for easy-axis aligned domains. Such domains are separated by narrow Bloch and Néel - type walls and we discuss the likely impact on the classification of reliable palaeomagentic domain structures.

  8. Structural genomics reveals EVE as a new ASCH/PUA-related domain.

    PubMed

    Bertonati, Claudia; Punta, Marco; Fischer, Markus; Yachdav, Guy; Forouhar, Farhad; Zhou, Weihong; Kuzin, Alexander P; Seetharaman, Jayaraman; Abashidze, Mariam; Ramelot, Theresa A; Kennedy, Michael A; Cort, John R; Belachew, Adam; Hunt, John F; Tong, Liang; Montelione, Gaetano T; Rost, Burkhard

    2009-05-15

    We report on several proteins recently solved by structural genomics consortia, in particular by the Northeast Structural Genomics consortium (NESG). The proteins considered in this study differ substantially in their sequences but they share a similar structural core, characterized by a pseudobarrel five-stranded beta sheet. This core corresponds to the PUA domain-like architecture in the SCOP database. By connecting sequence information with structural knowledge, we characterize a new subgroup of these proteins that we propose to be distinctly different from previously described PUA domain-like domains such as PUA proper or ASCH. We refer to these newly defined domains as EVE. Although EVE may have retained the ability of PUA domains to bind RNA, the available experimental and computational data suggests that both the details of its molecular function and its cellular function differ from those of other PUA domain-like domains. This study of EVE and its relatives illustrates how the combination of structure and genomics creates new insights by connecting a cornucopia of structures that map to the same evolutionary potential. Primary sequence information alone would have not been sufficient to reveal these evolutionary links.

  9. Cross-talk among structural domains of human DBP upon binding 25-hydroxyvitamin D

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Arjun; Swamy, Narasimha; Ray, Rahul

    2007-01-01

    Serum vitamin D-binding protein (DBP) is structurally very similar to serum albumin (ALB); both have three distinct structural domains and high cysteine-content. Yet, functionally they are very different. DBP possesses high affinity for vitamin D metabolites and G-actin, but ALB does not. It has been suggested that there may be cross-talk among the domains so that binding of one ligand may influence the binding of others. In this study we have employed 2-p-toluidinyl-6-sulphonate (TNS), a reporter molecule that fluoresces upon binding to hydrophobic pockets of DBP. We observed that recombinant domain III possesses strong binding for TNS, which is not influenced by 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25-OH-D3), yet TNS-fluorescence of the whole protein is quenched by 25-OH-D3. These results provide a direct evidence of cross-talk among the structural domains of DBP. PMID:18035050

  10. A structural portrait of the PDZ domain family.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Andreas; Appleton, Brent A; Ivarsson, Ylva; Zhang, Yingnan; Gfeller, David; Wiesmann, Christian; Sidhu, Sachdev S

    2014-10-23

    PDZ (PSD-95/Discs-large/ZO1) domains are interaction modules that typically bind to specific C-terminal sequences of partner proteins and assemble signaling complexes in multicellular organisms. We have analyzed the existing database of PDZ domain structures in the context of a specificity tree based on binding specificities defined by peptide-phage binding selections. We have identified 16 structures of PDZ domains in complex with high-affinity ligands and have elucidated four additional structures to assemble a structural database that covers most of the branches of the PDZ specificity tree. A detailed comparison of the structures reveals features that are responsible for the diverse specificities across the PDZ domain family. Specificity differences can be explained by differences in PDZ residues that are in contact with the peptide ligands, but these contacts involve both side-chain and main-chain interactions. Most PDZ domains bind peptides in a canonical conformation in which the ligand main chain adopts an extended β-strand conformation by interacting in an antiparallel fashion with a PDZ β-strand. However, a subset of PDZ domains bind peptides with a bent main-chain conformation and the specificities of these non-canonical domains could not be explained based on canonical structures. Our analysis provides a structural portrait of the PDZ domain family, which serves as a guide in understanding the structural basis for the diverse specificities across the family.

  11. Distinct cytoplasmic domains in Plexin-A4 mediate diverse responses to semaphorin 3A in developing mammalian neurons.

    PubMed

    Mlechkovich, Guy; Peng, Sheng-Shiang; Shacham, Vered; Martinez, Edward; Gokhman, Irena; Minis, Adi; Tran, Tracy S; Yaron, Avraham

    2014-03-11

    Guidance receptor signaling is crucial for neural circuit formation and elicits diverse cellular events in specific neurons. We found that signaling from the guidance cue semaphorin 3A diverged through distinct cytoplasmic domains in its receptor Plexin-A4 to promote disparate cellular behavior in different neuronal cell types. Plexin-A4 has three main cytoplasmic domains--C1, Hinge/RBD, and C2--and interacts with family members of the Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor FARP proteins. We show that growth cone collapse occurred in Plexin-A4-deficient dorsal root ganglion sensory neurons reconstituted with Plexin-A4 containing either the Hinge/RBD or C2 domain, whereas both of the Hinge/RBD and C1 domains were required for dendritic arborization in cortical neurons. Although knockdown studies indicated that both the collapse and arborization responses involved FARP2, mutations in the cytoplasmic region of Plexin-A4 that reduced its interaction with FARP2 strongly inhibited semaphorin 3A-induced dendritic branching but not growth cone collapse, suggesting that different degrees of interaction are required for the two responses or that developing axons have an indirect path to FARP2 activation. Thus, our study provided insights into the multifunctionality of guidance receptors, in particular showing that the semaphorin 3A signal diverges through specific functions of the modular domains of Plexin-A4.

  12. Two functionally distinct domains generated by in vivo cleavage of Nup145p: a novel biogenesis pathway for nucleoporins.

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, M T; Siniossoglou, S; Podtelejnikov, S; Bénichou, J C; Mann, M; Dujon, B; Hurt, E; Fabre, E

    1997-01-01

    Nup145p is an essential yeast nucleoporin involved in nuclear export of polyadenylated RNAs. We demonstrate here that Nup145p is cleaved in vivo to yield two functionally distinct domains: a carboxy-terminal domain (C-Nup145p) which is located at the nuclear pore complex (NPC) and assembles into the Nup84p complex, and a GLFG-containing amino-terminal domain (N-Nup145p) which is not part of this complex. Whereas the essential C-Nup145p accomplishes the functions required for efficient mRNA export and normal NPC distribution, N-Nup145p, which is homologous to the GLFG-containing nucleoporins Nup100p and Nup116p, is not necessary for cell growth. However, the N-Nup145p becomes essential in a nup188 mutant background. Strikingly, generation of a free N-domain is a prerequisite for complementation of this peculiar synthetic lethal mutant. These data suggest that N- and C-domains of Nup145p perform independent functions, and that the in vivo cleavage observed is of functional importance. PMID:9305650

  13. Chlamydia trachomatis Tarp harbors distinct G and F actin binding domains that bundle actin filaments.

    PubMed

    Jiwani, Shahanawaz; Alvarado, Stephenie; Ohr, Ryan J; Romero, Adriana; Nguyen, Brenda; Jewett, Travis J

    2013-02-01

    All species of Chlamydia undergo a unique developmental cycle that transitions between extracellular and intracellular environments and requires the capacity to invade new cells for dissemination. A chlamydial protein called Tarp has been shown to nucleate actin in vitro and is implicated in bacterial entry into human cells. Colocalization studies of ectopically expressed enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-Tarp indicate that actin filament recruitment is restricted to the C-terminal half of the effector protein. Actin filaments are presumably associated with Tarp via an actin binding alpha helix that is also required for actin nucleation in vitro, but this has not been investigated. Tarp orthologs from C. pneumoniae, C. muridarum, and C. caviae harbor between 1 and 4 actin binding domains located in the C-terminal half of the protein, but C. trachomatis serovar L2 has only one characterized domain. In this work, we examined the effects of domain-specific mutations on actin filament colocalization with EGFP-Tarp. We now demonstrate that actin filament colocalization with Tarp is dependent on two novel F-actin binding domains that endow the Tarp effector with actin-bundling activity. Furthermore, Tarp-mediated actin bundling did not require actin nucleation, as the ability to bundle actin filaments was observed in mutant Tarp proteins deficient in actin nucleation. These data shed molecular insight on the complex cytoskeletal rearrangements required for C. trachomatis entry into host cells.

  14. Structural organization and interactions of transmembrane domains in tetraspanin proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kovalenko, Oleg V; Metcalf, Douglas G; DeGrado, William F; Hemler, Martin E

    2005-01-01

    Background Proteins of the tetraspanin family contain four transmembrane domains (TM1-4) linked by two extracellular loops and a short intracellular loop, and have short intracellular N- and C-termini. While structure and function analysis of the larger extracellular loop has been performed, the organization and role of transmembrane domains have not been systematically assessed. Results Among 28 human tetraspanin proteins, the TM1-3 sequences display a distinct heptad repeat motif (abcdefg)n. In TM1, position a is occupied by structurally conserved bulky residues and position d contains highly conserved Asn and Gly residues. In TM2, position a is occupied by conserved small residues (Gly/Ala/Thr), and position d has a conserved Gly and two bulky aliphatic residues. In TM3, three a positions of the heptad repeat are filled by two leucines and a glutamate/glutamine residue, and two d positions are occupied by either Phe/Tyr or Val/Ile/Leu residues. No heptad motif is apparent in TM4 sequences. Mutations of conserved glycines in human CD9 (Gly25 and Gly32 in TM1; Gly67 and Gly74 in TM2) caused aggregation of mutant proteins inside the cell. Modeling of the TM1-TM2 interface in CD9, using a novel algorithm, predicts tight packing of conserved bulky residues against conserved Gly residues along the two helices. The homodimeric interface of CD9 was mapped, by disulfide cross-linking of single-cysteine mutants, to the vicinity of residues Leu14 and Phe17 in TM1 (positions g and c) and Gly77, Gly80 and Ala81 in TM2 (positions d, g and a, respectively). Mutations of a and d residues in both TM1 and TM2 (Gly25, Gly32, Gly67 and Gly74), involved in intramolecular TM1-TM2 interaction, also strongly diminished intermolecular interaction, as assessed by cross-linking of Cys80. Conclusion Our results suggest that tetraspanin intra- and intermolecular interactions are mediated by conserved residues in adjacent, but distinct regions of TM1 and TM2. A key structural element that

  15. Quantum Oscillations of Interacting Nanoscale Structural Inhomogeneities in a Domain Wall of Magnetic Stripe Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevchenko, Andriy; Barabash, Maksym

    2016-10-01

    It was established that at low temperatures, quantum oscillations of a pair of interacting nanoscale structural inhomogeneities (vertical Bloch lines) occur in a domain wall of stripe domain in uniaxial ferromagnetic film. The effective mass of vertical Bloch line and conditions for this effect were determined. The effect can be used in the hybrid storage devices bit + q-bit.

  16. Some Lower Valence Vanadium Fluorides: Their Crystal Distortions, Domain Structures, Modulated Structures, Ferrimagnetism, and Composition Dependence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Y. S.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Describes some contemporary concepts unique to the structure of advanced solids, i.e., their crystal distortions, domain structures, modulated structures, ferrimagnetism, and composition dependence. (Author/CS)

  17. Solution structure of the RecQ C-terminal domain of human Bloom syndrome protein.

    PubMed

    Park, Chin-Ju; Ko, Junsang; Ryu, Kyoung-Seok; Choi, Byong-Seok

    2014-02-01

    RecQ C-terminal (RQC) domain is known as the main DNA binding module of RecQ helicases such as Bloom syndrome protein (BLM) and Werner syndrome protein (WRN) that recognizes various DNA structures. Even though BLM is able to resolve various DNA structures similarly to WRN, BLM has different binding preferences for DNA substrates from WRN. In this study, we determined the solution structure of the RQC domain of human BLM. The structure shares the common winged-helix motif with other RQC domains. However, half of the N-terminal has unstructured regions (α1-α2 loop and α3 region), and the aromatic side chain on the top of the β-hairpin, which is important for DNA duplex strand separation in other RQC domains, is substituted with a negatively charged residue (D1165) followed by the polar residue (Q1166). The structurally distinctive features of the RQC domain of human BLM suggest that the DNA binding modes of the BLM RQC domain may be different from those of other RQC domains.

  18. Crystal structure of the Toll/interleukin-1 receptor domain of human IL-1RAPL.

    PubMed

    Khan, Javed A; Brint, Elizabeth K; O'Neill, Luke A J; Tong, Liang

    2004-07-23

    The Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR) domain is conserved in the intracellular regions of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and interleukin-1 receptors (IL-1Rs) as well as in several cytoplasmic adapter molecules. This domain has crucial roles in signal transduction by these receptors for host immune response. Here we report the crystal structure at 2.3-A resolution of the TIR domain of human IL-1RAPL, the first structure of a TIR domain of the IL-1R superfamily. There are large structural differences between this TIR domain and that of TLR1 and TLR2. Helix alphaD in IL-1RAPL is almost perpendicular to its equivalent in TLR1 or TLR2. The BB loop contains a hydrogen bond unique to IL-1RAPL between Thr residues at the 8th and 10th positions. The structural and sequence diversity among these domains may be important for specificity in the signal transduction by these receptors. A dimer of the TIR domain of IL-1RAPL is observed in the crystal, although this domain is monomeric in solution. Residues in the dimer interface are mostly unique to IL-1RAPL, which is consistent with the distinct functional roles of this receptor. Our functional studies show IL-1RAPL can activate JNK but not the ERK or the p38 MAP kinases, whereas its close homolog, TIGIRR, cannot activate JNK. Deletion mutagenesis studies show that the activation of JNK by IL-1RAPL does not depend on the integrity of its TIR domain, suggesting a distinct mechanism of signaling through this receptor.

  19. Extensions of PDZ domains as important structural and functional elements.

    PubMed

    Wang, Conan K; Pan, Lifeng; Chen, Jia; Zhang, Mingjie

    2010-08-01

    'Divide and conquer' has been the guiding strategy for the study of protein structure and function. Proteins are divided into domains with each domain having a canonical structural definition depending on its type. In this review, we push forward with the interesting observation that many domains have regions outside of their canonical definition that affect their structure and function; we call these regions 'extensions'. We focus on the highly abundant PDZ (PSD-95, DLG1 and ZO-1) domain. Using bioinformatics, we find that many PDZ domains have potential extensions and we developed an openly-accessible website to display our results ( http://bcz102.ust.hk/pdzex/ ). We propose, using well-studied PDZ domains as illustrative examples, that the roles of PDZ extensions can be classified into at least four categories: 1) protein dynamics-based modulation of target binding affinity, 2) provision of binding sites for macro-molecular assembly, 3) structural integration of multi-domain modules, and 4) expansion of the target ligand-binding pocket. Our review highlights the potential structural and functional importance of domain extensions, highlighting the significance of looking beyond the canonical boundaries of protein domains in general.

  20. Structural properties of PAS domains from the KCNH potassium channels.

    PubMed

    Adaixo, Ricardo; Harley, Carol A; Castro-Rodrigues, Artur F; Morais-Cabral, João H

    2013-01-01

    KCNH channels form an important family of voltage gated potassium channels. These channels include a N-terminal Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) domain with unknown function. In other proteins PAS domains are implicated in cellular responses to environmental queues through small molecule binding or involvement in signaling cascades. To better understand their role we characterized the structural properties of several channel PAS domains. We determined high resolution structures of PAS domains from the mouse EAG (mEAG), drosophila ELK (dELK) and human ERG (hERG) channels and also of the hERG domain without the first nine amino acids. We analyzed these structures for features connected to ligand binding and signaling in other PAS domains. In particular, we have found cavities in the hERG and mEAG structures that share similarities with the ligand binding sites from other PAS domains. These cavities are lined by polar and apolar chemical groups and display potential flexibility in their volume. We have also found that the hydrophobic patch on the domain β-sheet is a conserved feature and appears to drive the formation of protein-protein contacts. In addition, the structures of the dELK domain and of the truncated hERG domain revealed the presence of N-terminal helices. These helices are equivalent to the helix described in the hERG NMR structures and are known to be important for channel function. Overall, these channel domains retain many of the PAS domain characteristics known to be important for cell signaling.

  1. MLLT1 YEATS domain mutations in clinically distinctive Favourable Histology Wilms tumours | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Wilms tumour is an embryonal tumour of childhood that closely resembles the developing kidney. Genomic changes responsible for the development of the majority of Wilms tumours remain largely unknown. Here we identify recurrent mutations within Wilms tumours that involve the highly conserved YEATS domain of MLLT1 (ENL), a gene known to be involved in transcriptional elongation during early development. The mutant MLLT1 protein shows altered binding to acetylated histone tails.

  2. Comparative Analysis of RNA Families Reveals Distinct Repertoires for Each Domain of Life

    PubMed Central

    Hoeppner, Marc P.; Gardner, Paul P.; Poole, Anthony M.

    2012-01-01

    The RNA world hypothesis, that RNA genomes and catalysts preceded DNA genomes and genetically-encoded protein catalysts, has been central to models for the early evolution of life on Earth. A key part of such models is continuity between the earliest stages in the evolution of life and the RNA repertoires of extant lineages. Some assessments seem consistent with a diverse RNA world, yet direct continuity between modern RNAs and an RNA world has not been demonstrated for the majority of RNA families, and, anecdotally, many RNA functions appear restricted in their distribution. Despite much discussion of the possible antiquity of RNA families, no systematic analyses of RNA family distribution have been performed. To chart the broad evolutionary history of known RNA families, we performed comparative genomic analysis of over 3 million RNA annotations spanning 1446 families from the Rfam 10 database. We report that 99% of known RNA families are restricted to a single domain of life, revealing discrete repertoires for each domain. For the 1% of RNA families/clans present in more than one domain, over half show evidence of horizontal gene transfer (HGT), and the rest show a vertical trace, indicating the presence of a complex protein synthesis machinery in the Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA) and consistent with the evolutionary history of the most ancient protein-coding genes. However, with limited interdomain transfer and few RNA families exhibiting demonstrable antiquity as predicted under RNA world continuity, our results indicate that the majority of modern cellular RNA repertoires have primarily evolved in a domain-specific manner. PMID:23133357

  3. FENS-1 and DFCP1 are FYVE domain-containing proteins with distinct functions in the endosomal and Golgi compartments.

    PubMed

    Ridley, S H; Ktistakis, N; Davidson, K; Anderson, K E; Manifava, M; Ellson, C D; Lipp, P; Bootman, M; Coadwell, J; Nazarian, A; Erdjument-Bromage, H; Tempst, P; Cooper, M A; Thuring, J W; Lim, Z Y; Holmes, A B; Stephens, L R; Hawkins, P T

    2001-11-01

    FENS-1 and DFCP1 are recently discovered proteins containing one or two FYVE-domains respectively. We show that the FYVE domains in these proteins can bind PtdIns3P in vitro with high specificity over other phosphoinositides. Exogenously expressed FENS-1 localises to early endosomes: this localisation requires an intact FYVE domain and is sensitive to wortmannin inhibition. The isolated FYVE domain of FENS-1 also localises to endosomes. These results are consistent with current models of FYVE-domain function in this cellular compartment. By contrast, exogenously expressed DFCP1 displays a predominantly Golgi, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and vesicular distribution with little or no overlap with FENS-1 or other endosomal markers. Overexpression of DFCP1 was found to cause dispersal of the Golgi compartment defined by giantin and gpp130-staining. Disruption of the FYVE domains of DFCP1 causes a shift to more condensed and compact Golgi structures and overexpression of this mutant was found to confer significant protection to the Golgi against brefeldin-induced dispersal. These properties of DFCP1 are surprising, and suggest FYVE domain-localisation and function may not be exclusively endosomal. Movies available on-line

  4. Distinct roles for extracellular and intracellular domains in neuroligin function at inhibitory synapses

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Quynh-Anh; Horn, Meryl E; Nicoll, Roger A

    2016-01-01

    Neuroligins (NLGNs) are postsynaptic cell adhesion molecules that interact trans-synaptically with neurexins to mediate synapse development and function. NLGN2 is only at inhibitory synapses while NLGN3 is at both excitatory and inhibitory synapses. We found that NLGN3 function at inhibitory synapses in rat CA1 depends on the presence of NLGN2 and identified a domain in the extracellular region that accounted for this functional difference between NLGN2 and 3 specifically at inhibitory synapses. We further show that the presence of a cytoplasmic tail (c-tail) is indispensible, and identified two domains in the c-tail that are necessary for NLGN function at inhibitory synapses. These domains point to a gephyrin-dependent mechanism that is disrupted by an autism-associated mutation at R705 and a gephyrin-independent mechanism reliant on a putative phosphorylation site at S714. Our work highlights unique and separate roles for the extracellular and intracellular regions in specifying and carrying out NLGN function respectively. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19236.001 PMID:27805570

  5. Distinct roles for extracellular and intracellular domains in neuroligin function at inhibitory synapses.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Quynh-Anh; Horn, Meryl E; Nicoll, Roger A

    2016-11-02

    Neuroligins (NLGNs) are postsynaptic cell adhesion molecules that interact trans-synaptically with neurexins to mediate synapse development and function. NLGN2 is only at inhibitory synapses while NLGN3 is at both excitatory and inhibitory synapses. We found that NLGN3 function at inhibitory synapses in rat CA1 depends on the presence of NLGN2 and identified a domain in the extracellular region that accounted for this functional difference between NLGN2 and 3 specifically at inhibitory synapses. We further show that the presence of a cytoplasmic tail (c-tail) is indispensible, and identified two domains in the c-tail that are necessary for NLGN function at inhibitory synapses. These domains point to a gephyrin-dependent mechanism that is disrupted by an autism-associated mutation at R705 and a gephyrin-independent mechanism reliant on a putative phosphorylation site at S714. Our work highlights unique and separate roles for the extracellular and intracellular regions in specifying and carrying out NLGN function respectively.

  6. Structure of a double-domain phosphagen kinase reveals an asymmetric arrangement of the tandem domains.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiming; Qiao, Zhu; Ye, Sheng; Zhang, Rongguang

    2015-04-01

    Tandem duplications and fusions of single genes have led to magnificent expansions in the divergence of protein structures and functions over evolutionary timescales. One of the possible results is polydomain enzymes with interdomain cooperativities, few examples of which have been structurally characterized at the full-length level to explore their innate synergistic mechanisms. This work reports the crystal structures of a double-domain phosphagen kinase in both apo and ligand-bound states, revealing a novel asymmetric L-shaped arrangement of the two domains. Unexpectedly, the interdomain connections are not based on a flexible hinge linker but on a rigid secondary-structure element: a long α-helix that tethers the tandem domains in relatively fixed positions. Besides the connective helix, the two domains also contact each other directly and form an interdomain interface in which hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions further stabilize the L-shaped domain arrangement. Molecular-dynamics simulations show that the interface is generally stable, suggesting that the asymmetric domain arrangement crystallographically observed in the present study is not a conformational state simply restrained by crystal-packing forces. It is possible that the asymmetrically arranged tandem domains could provide a structural basis for further studies of the interdomain synergy.

  7. Polarized spatial frequency domain imaging of heart valve fiber structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goth, Will; Yang, Bin; Lesicko, John; Allen, Alicia; Sacks, Michael S.; Tunnell, James W.

    2016-03-01

    Our group previously introduced Polarized Spatial Frequency Domain Imaging (PSFDI), a wide-field, reflectance imaging technique which we used to empirically map fiber direction in porcine pulmonary heart valve leaflets (PHVL) without optical clearing or physical sectioning of the sample. Presented is an extended analysis of our PSFDI results using an inverse Mueller matrix model of polarized light scattering that allows additional maps of fiber orientation distribution, along with instrumentation permitting increased imaging speed for dynamic PHVL fiber measurements. We imaged electrospun fiber phantoms with PSFDI, and then compared these measurements to SEM data collected for the same phantoms. PHVL was then imaged and compared to results of the same leaflets optically cleared and imaged with small angle light scattering (SALS). The static PHVL images showed distinct regional variance of fiber orientation distribution, matching our SALS results. We used our improved imaging speed to observe bovine tendon subjected to dynamic loading using a biaxial stretching device. Our dynamic imaging experiment showed trackable changes in the fiber microstructure of biological tissue under loading. Our new PSFDI analysis model and instrumentation allows characterization of fiber structure within heart valve tissues (as validated with SALS measurements), along with imaging of dynamic fiber remodeling. The experimental data will be used as inputs to our constitutive models of PHVL tissue to fully characterize these tissues' elastic behavior, and has immediate application in determining the mechanisms of structural and functional failure in PHVLs used as bio-prosthetic implants.

  8. Phase field modeling of domain structures in ferroelectric thin films.

    PubMed

    Artemev, A; Slutsker, J; Roytburd, A L

    2008-05-01

    Phase-field simulations were used to explore the effect of the characteristics of the Landau-Devonshire free energy and values of electrostatic and elastic interactions on the formation of different types of domain structures in ferroelectric thin films. Simulations were performed at different constant-applied electric fields and by using a cyclic continuously changing field. It is shown that the 180 degrees or 90 degrees domain structures can be produced depending on the relative strength of elastic interactions and the ratio of barrier heights that determine the energy of the 180 degrees and 90 degrees domain boundaries. It is shown that the applied field strength and the thickness of the dead layer can play a minor role in the transition between the 90 degrees and 180 degrees domain structures. It is also demonstrated that the poling history can affect the type of the domain structure.

  9. The putative LEF-1 proteins from two distinct Choristoneura fumiferana multiple nucleopolyhedroviruses share domain homology to eukaryotic primases.

    PubMed

    Barrett, J W; Lauzon, H A; Mercuri, P S; Krell, P J; Sohi, S S; Arif, B M

    1996-01-01

    We have identified the lef-1 genes from two multiple nucleopolyhedroviruses that infect natural populations of Choristoneura fumiferana. The lef-1 genes in both viruses are directly upstream and in the opposite orientation of their respective ecdysteroid UDP-glucosyltransferase (egt) genes. This gene organization pattern is similar to that found in the genomes of AcMNPV and of OpMNPV. As well, the coding regions and putative protein sequences share a high degree of similarity. Alignment of the predicted amino acid sequences of all known baculovirus lef-1 genes suggests that the LEF-1 proteins have a relatively high degree of conservation, particularly at four identified and distinct domains. Moreover, LEF-1 proteins bear clear similarity to some eukaryotic primases, predominately at three of the four domains where certain amino acids are absolutely conserved.

  10. Structure and Function of the TIR Domain from the Grape NLR Protein RPV1

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Simon J.; Yin, Ling; Foley, Gabriel; Casey, Lachlan W.; Outram, Megan A.; Ericsson, Daniel J.; Lu, Jiang; Boden, Mikael; Dry, Ian B.; Kobe, Bostjan

    2016-01-01

    The N-terminal Toll/interleukin-1 receptor/resistance protein (TIR) domain has been shown to be both necessary and sufficient for defense signaling in the model plants flax and Arabidopsis. In examples from these organisms, TIR domain self-association is required for signaling function, albeit through distinct interfaces. Here, we investigate these properties in the TIR domain containing resistance protein RPV1 from the wild grapevine Muscadinia rotundifolia. The RPV1 TIR domain, without additional flanking sequence present, is autoactive when transiently expressed in tobacco, demonstrating that the TIR domain alone is capable of cell-death signaling. We determined the crystal structure of the RPV1 TIR domain at 2.3 Å resolution. In the crystals, the RPV1 TIR domain forms a dimer, mediated predominantly through residues in the αA and αE helices (“AE” interface). This interface is shared with the interface discovered in the dimeric complex of the TIR domains from the Arabidopsis RPS4/RRS1 resistance protein pair. We show that surface-exposed residues in the AE interface that mediate the dimer interaction in the crystals are highly conserved among plant TIR domain-containing proteins. While we were unable to demonstrate self-association of the RPV1 TIR domain in solution or using yeast 2-hybrid, mutations of surface-exposed residues in the AE interface prevent the cell-death autoactive phenotype. In addition, mutation of residues known to be important in the cell-death signaling function of the flax L6 TIR domain were also shown to be required for RPV1 TIR domain mediated cell-death. Our data demonstrate that multiple TIR domain surfaces control the cell-death function of the RPV1 TIR domain and we suggest that the conserved AE interface may have a general function in TIR-NLR signaling. PMID:28008335

  11. Membrane-bound mucin modular domains: from structure to function.

    PubMed

    Jonckheere, Nicolas; Skrypek, Nicolas; Frénois, Frédéric; Van Seuningen, Isabelle

    2013-06-01

    Mucins belong to a heterogeneous family of large O-glycoproteins composed of a long peptidic chain called apomucin on which are linked hundreds of oligosaccharidic chains. Among mucins, membrane-bound mucins are modular proteins and have a structural organization usually containing Pro/Thr/Ser-rich O-glycosylated domains (PTS), EGF-like and SEA domains. Via these modular domains, the membrane-bound mucins participate in cell signalling and cell interaction with their environment in normal and pathological conditions. Moreover, the recent knowledge of these domains and their biological activities led to the development of new therapeutic approaches involving mucins. In this review, we show 3D structures of EGF and SEA domains. We also describe the functional features of the evolutionary conserved domains of membrane-bound mucins and discuss consequences of splice events.

  12. Regulated magnetic domains and high-frequency property in magnetic materials with columnar structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Cai; Wei, Wenwen; Jiang, Changjun

    2015-10-01

    The regulation of magnetic domains and high-frequency property in Fe20Ni80 thin films sputtered on anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) substrates with different apertures and a Si substrate were investigated. The obvious stripe domain structure was observed in FeNi thin film sputtered on AAO (pore in diameter d ~ 20 nm) substrate. The distinct cross-sectional columnar structures prepared on three different substrates and measured by scanning electron microscope were shown, which arose from different growth mechanisms on various kinds of substrates. The structure of AAO substrate could modulate the growth mechanism of thin films and the appearance of stripe domains structure. In addition, the resonant frequency was enhanced in FeNi thin film prepared on AAO ( d ~ 20 nm) substrate.

  13. CBS domains: structure, function, and pathology in human proteins.

    PubMed

    Ignoul, Sofie; Eggermont, Jan

    2005-12-01

    The cystathionine-beta-synthase (CBS) domain is an evolutionarily conserved protein domain that is present in the proteome of archaebacteria, prokaryotes, and eukaryotes. CBS domains usually come in tandem repeats and are found in cytosolic and membrane proteins performing different functions (metabolic enzymes, kinases, and channels). Crystallographic studies of bacterial CBS domains have shown that two CBS domains form an intramolecular dimeric structure (CBS pair). Several human hereditary diseases (homocystinuria, retinitis pigmentosa, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, myotonia congenital, etc.) can be caused by mutations in CBS domains of, respectively, cystathionine-beta-synthase, inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase, AMP kinase, and chloride channels. Despite their clinical relevance, it remains to be established what the precise function of CBS domains is and how they affect the structural and/or functional properties of an enzyme, kinase, or channel. Depending on the protein in which they occur, CBS domains have been proposed to affect multimerization and sorting of proteins, channel gating, and ligand binding. However, recent experiments revealing that CBS domains can bind adenosine-containing ligands such ATP, AMP, or S-adenosylmethionine have led to the hypothesis that CBS domains function as sensors of intracellular metabolites.

  14. Saccharomyces SRP RNA secondary structures: a conserved S-domain and extended Alu-domain.

    PubMed

    Van Nues, Rob W; Brown, Jeremy D

    2004-01-01

    The contribution made by the RNA component of signal recognition particle (SRP) to its function in protein targeting is poorly understood. We have generated a complete secondary structure for Saccharomyces cerevisiae SRP RNA, scR1. The structure conforms to that of other eukaryotic SRP RNAs. It is rod-shaped with, at opposite ends, binding sites for proteins required for the SRP functions of signal sequence recognition (S-domain) and translational elongation arrest (Alu-domain). Micrococcal nuclease digestion of purified S. cerevisiae SRP separated the S-domain of the RNA from the Alu-domain as a discrete fragment. The Alu-domain resolved into several stable fragments indicating a compact structure. Comparison of scR1 with SRP RNAs of five yeast species related to S. cerevisiae revealed the S-domain to be the most conserved region of the RNA. Extending data from nuclease digestion with phylogenetic comparison, we built the secondary structure model for scR1. The Alu-domain contains large extensions, including a sequence with hallmarks of an expansion segment. Evolutionarily conserved bases are placed in the Alu- and S-domains as in other SRP RNAs, the exception being an unusual GU(4)A loop closing the helix onto which the signal sequence binding Srp54p assembles (domain IV). Surprisingly, several mutations within the predicted Srp54p binding site failed to disrupt SRP function in vivo. However, the strength of the Srp54p-scR1 and, to a lesser extent, Sec65p-scR1 interaction was decreased in these mutant particles. The availability of a secondary structure for scR1 will facilitate interpretation of data from genetic analysis of the RNA.

  15. Differential antibiosis against Helicoverpa armigera exerted by distinct inhibitory repeat domains of Capsicum annuum proteinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Rakesh S; Gupta, Vidya S; Giri, Ashok P

    2014-05-01

    Plant defensive serine proteinase inhibitors (PIs) are known to have negative impact on digestive physiology of herbivore insects and thus have a crucial role in plant protection. Here, we have assessed the efficacy and specificity of three previously characterized inhibitory repeat domain (IRD) variants from Capsicum annuum PIs viz., IRD-7, -9 and -12 against gut proteinases from Helicoverpa armigera. Comparative study of in silico binding energy revealed that IRD-9 possesses higher affinity towards H. armigera serine proteinases as compared to IRD-7 and -12. H. armigera fed on artificial diet containing 5 TIU/g of recombinant IRD proteins exhibited differential effects on larval growth, survival rate and other nutritional parameters. Major digestive gut trypsin and chymotrypsin genes were down regulated in the IRD fed larvae, while few of them were up-regulated, this indicate alterations in insect digestive physiology. The results corroborated with proteinase activity assays and zymography. These findings suggest that the sequence variations among PIs reflect in their efficacy against proteinases in vitro and in vivo, which also could be used for developing tailor-made multi-domain inhibitor gene(s).

  16. Interaction of the amyloid precursor protein-like protein 1 (APLP1) E2 domain with heparan sulfate involves two distinct binding modes

    SciTech Connect

    Dahms, Sven O.; Mayer, Magnus C.; Roeser, Dirk; Multhaup, Gerd; Than, Manuel E.

    2015-03-01

    Two X-ray structures of APLP1 E2 with and without a heparin dodecasaccharide are presented, revealing two distinct binding modes of the protein to heparan sulfate. The data provide a mechanistic explanation of how APP-like proteins bind to heparan sulfates and how they specifically recognize nonreducing structures of heparan sulfates. Beyond the pathology of Alzheimer’s disease, the members of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) family are essential for neuronal development and cell homeostasis in mammals. APP and its paralogues APP-like protein 1 (APLP1) and APP-like protein 2 (APLP2) contain the highly conserved heparan sulfate (HS) binding domain E2, which effects various (patho)physiological functions. Here, two crystal structures of the E2 domain of APLP1 are presented in the apo form and in complex with a heparin dodecasaccharide at 2.5 Å resolution. The apo structure of APLP1 E2 revealed an unfolded and hence flexible N-terminal helix αA. The (APLP1 E2){sub 2}–(heparin){sub 2} complex structure revealed two distinct binding modes, with APLP1 E2 explicitly recognizing the heparin terminus but also interacting with a continuous heparin chain. The latter only requires a certain register of the sugar moieties that fits to a positively charged surface patch and contributes to the general heparin-binding capability of APP-family proteins. Terminal binding of APLP1 E2 to heparin specifically involves a structure of the nonreducing end that is very similar to heparanase-processed HS chains. These data reveal a conserved mechanism for the binding of APP-family proteins to HS and imply a specific regulatory role of HS modifications in the biology of APP and APP-like proteins.

  17. The history of the CATH structural classification of protein domains.

    PubMed

    Sillitoe, Ian; Dawson, Natalie; Thornton, Janet; Orengo, Christine

    2015-12-01

    This article presents a historical review of the protein structure classification database CATH. Together with the SCOP database, CATH remains comprehensive and reasonably up-to-date with the now more than 100,000 protein structures in the PDB. We review the expansion of the CATH and SCOP resources to capture predicted domain structures in the genome sequence data and to provide information on the likely functions of proteins mediated by their constituent domains. The establishment of comprehensive function annotation resources has also meant that domain families can be functionally annotated allowing insights into functional divergence and evolution within protein families.

  18. Structural Dynamics of the Cereblon Ligand Binding Domain

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Marcus D.; Boichenko, Iuliia; Coles, Murray; Lupas, Andrei N.; Hernandez Alvarez, Birte

    2015-01-01

    Cereblon, a primary target of thalidomide and its derivatives, has been characterized structurally from both bacteria and animals. Especially well studied is the thalidomide binding domain, CULT, which shows an invariable structure across different organisms and in complex with different ligands. Here, based on a series of crystal structures of a bacterial representative, we reveal the conformational flexibility and structural dynamics of this domain. In particular, we follow the unfolding of large fractions of the domain upon release of thalidomide in the crystalline state. Our results imply that a third of the domain, including the thalidomide binding pocket, only folds upon ligand binding. We further characterize the structural effect of the C-terminal truncation resulting from the mental-retardation linked R419X nonsense mutation in vitro and offer a mechanistic hypothesis for its irresponsiveness to thalidomide. At 1.2Å resolution, our data provide a view of thalidomide binding at atomic resolution. PMID:26024445

  19. Structural Studies of the SET Domain from RIZ1 Tumor Suppressor

    SciTech Connect

    Briknarova, Klara; Zhou, Xinliang; Satterthwait, Arnold C.; Hoyt, David W.; Ely, Kathryn R.; Huang, Shi

    2008-02-15

    Histone lysine methyltransferases (HKMTs) are involved in regulation of chromatin structure, and, as such, are important for longterm gene activation and repression that is associated with cell memory and establishment of cell-type specific transcriptional programs. Most HKMTs contain a SET domain, which is responsible for their catalytic activity. RIZ1 is a transcription regulator and tumor suppressor that catalyzes methylation of lysine 9 of histone H3 and contains a rather distinct SET domain. Similar SET domains, sometimes refererred to as PR (PRDI-BF1 and RIZ1 homology) domains, are also found in other proteins including Blimp-1/PRDI-BF1, MDS1-EVI1 and Meisetz. We determined the solution structure of the PR domain from RIZ1 and characterized its interaction with S-adenosyl homocysteine (SAH) and a peptide from histone H3. Despite low sequence identity with canonical SET domains, the PR domain displays a typical SET fold including a pseudo-knot at the C-terminus. The N-flanking sequence of RIZ1 PR domain adopts a novel conformation and interacts closely with the SET fold. The C-flanking sequence contains an α-helix that exhibits higher mobility than the SET fold and points away from the protein face that harbors active site in other SET domains. Residues that interact with the methylation cofactor in SET domains are not conserved in RIZ1 or other PR domains, and the SET fold of RIZ1 does not bind SAH. However, the PR domain of RIZ1 interacts specifically with a synthetic peptide comprising residues 1-20 of histone H3.

  20. Quantifying information transfer by protein domains: Analysis of the Fyn SH2 domain structure

    PubMed Central

    Lenaerts, Tom; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper; Stricher, Francois; Serrano, Luis; Schymkowitz, Joost WH; Rousseau, Frederic

    2008-01-01

    Background Efficient communication between distant sites within a protein is essential for cooperative biological response. Although often associated with large allosteric movements, more subtle changes in protein dynamics can also induce long-range correlations. However, an appropriate formalism that directly relates protein structural dynamics to information exchange between functional sites is still lacking. Results Here we introduce a method to analyze protein dynamics within the framework of information theory and show that signal transduction within proteins can be considered as a particular instance of communication over a noisy channel. In particular, we analyze the conformational correlations between protein residues and apply the concept of mutual information to quantify information exchange. Mapping out changes of mutual information on the protein structure then allows visualizing how distal communication is achieved. We illustrate the approach by analyzing information transfer by the SH2 domain of Fyn tyrosine kinase, obtained from Monte Carlo dynamics simulations. Our analysis reveals that the Fyn SH2 domain forms a noisy communication channel that couples residues located in the phosphopeptide and specificity binding sites and a number of residues at the other side of the domain near the linkers that connect the SH2 domain to the SH3 and kinase domains. We find that for this particular domain, communication is affected by a series of contiguous residues that connect distal sites by crossing the core of the SH2 domain. Conclusion As a result, our method provides a means to directly map the exchange of biological information on the structure of protein domains, making it clear how binding triggers conformational changes in the protein structure. As such it provides a structural road, next to the existing attempts at sequence level, to predict long-range interactions within protein structures. PMID:18842137

  1. Revised domain structure of ulvan lyase and characterization of the first ulvan binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Melcher, Rebecca L. J.; Neumann, Marten; Fuenzalida Werner, Juan Pablo; Gröhn, Franziska; Moerschbacher, Bruno M.

    2017-01-01

    Biomass waste products from green algae have recently been given new life, as these polysaccharides have potential applications in industry, agriculture, and medicine. One such polysaccharide group called ulvans displays many different, potentially useful properties that arise from their structural versatility. Hence, performing structural analyses on ulvan is crucial for future applications. However, chemical reaction–based analysis methods cannot fully characterize ulvan and tend to alter its structure. Thus, better methods require well-characterized ulvan-degrading enzymes. Therefore, we analysed a previously sequenced ulvan lyase (GenebankTM reference number JN104480) and characterized its domains. We suggest that the enzyme consists of a shorter than previously described catalytic domain, a newly identified substrate binding domain, and a C-terminal type 9 secretion system signal peptide. By separately expressing the two domains in E. coli, we confirmed that the binding domain is ulvan specific, having higher affinity for ulvan than most lectins for their ligands (affinity constant: 105 M−1). To our knowledge, this is the first description of an ulvan-binding domain. Overall, identifying this new binding domain is one step towards engineering ulvan enzymes that can be used to characterize ulvan, e.g. through enzymatic/mass spectrometric fingerprinting analyses, and help unlock its full potential. PMID:28327560

  2. MLLT1 YEATS domain mutations in clinically distinctive Favourable Histology Wilms tumours

    PubMed Central

    Perlman, Elizabeth J.; Gadd, Samantha; Arold, Stefan T.; Radhakrishnan, Anand; Gerhard, Daniela S.; Jennings, Lawrence; Huff, Vicki; Guidry Auvil, Jaime M.; Davidsen, Tanja M.; Dome, Jeffrey S.; Meerzaman, Daoud; Hsu, Chih Hao; Nguyen, Cu; Anderson, James; Ma, Yussanne; Mungall, Andrew J.; Moore, Richard A.; Marra, Marco A.; Mullighan, Charles G.; Ma, Jing; Wheeler, David A.; Hampton, Oliver A.; Gastier-Foster, Julie M.; Ross, Nicole; Smith, Malcolm A.

    2015-01-01

    Wilms tumour is an embryonal tumour of childhood that closely resembles the developing kidney. Genomic changes responsible for the development of the majority of Wilms tumours remain largely unknown. Here we identify recurrent mutations within Wilms tumours that involve the highly conserved YEATS domain of MLLT1 (ENL), a gene known to be involved in transcriptional elongation during early development. The mutant MLLT1 protein shows altered binding to acetylated histone tails. Moreover, MLLT1-mutant tumours show an increase in MYC gene expression and HOX dysregulation. Patients with MLLT1-mutant tumours present at a younger age and have a high prevalence of precursor intralobar nephrogenic rests. These data support a model whereby activating MLLT1 mutations early in renal development result in the development of Wilms tumour. PMID:26635203

  3. Correlation between magnetic interactions and domain structure in A1 FePt ferromagnetic thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez, N.; Sallica Leva, E.; Valente, R. C.; Vásquez Mansilla, M.; Gómez, J.; Milano, J.; Butera, A.

    2014-02-01

    We have investigated the relationship between the domain structure and the magnetic interactions in a series of FePt ferromagnetic thin films of varying thickness. As-made films grow in the magnetically soft and chemically disordered A1 phase that may have two distinct domain structures. Above a critical thickness dcr ˜ 30 nm the presence of an out of plane anisotropy induces the formation of stripes, while for d < dcr planar domains occur. Magnetic interactions have been characterized using the well known DC demagnetization - isothermal remanent magnetization remanence protocols, δM plots, and magnetic viscosity measurements. We have observed a strong correlation between the domain configuration and the sign of the magnetic interactions. Planar domains are associated with positive exchange-like interactions, while stripe domains have a strong negative dipolar-like contribution. In this last case we have found a close correlation between the interaction parameter and the surface dipolar energy of the stripe domain structure. Using time dependent magnetic viscosity measurements, we have also estimated an average activation volume for magnetic reversal, ⟨Vac⟩˜1.37×104 nm3, which is approximately independent of the film thickness or the stripe period.

  4. Evolution of structure and mechanistic divergence in di-domain methyltransferases from nematode phosphocholine biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soon Goo; Jez, Joseph M

    2013-10-08

    The phosphobase methylation pathway is the major route for supplying phosphocholine to phospholipid biosynthesis in plants, nematodes, and Plasmodium. In this pathway, phosphoethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PMT) catalyzes the sequential methylation of phosphoethanolamine to phosphocholine. In the PMT, one domain (MT1) catalyzes methylation of phosphoethanolamine to phosphomonomethylethanolamine and a second domain (MT2) completes the synthesis of phosphocholine. The X-ray crystal structures of the di-domain PMT from the parasitic nematode Haemonchus contortus (HcPMT1 and HcPMT2) reveal that the catalytic domains of these proteins are structurally distinct and allow for selective methylation of phosphobase substrates using different active site architectures. These structures also reveal changes leading to loss of function in the vestigial domains of the nematode PMT. Divergence of function in the two nematode PMTs provides two distinct antiparasitic inhibitor targets within the same essential metabolic pathway. The PMTs from nematodes, plants, and Plasmodium also highlight adaptable metabolic modularity in evolutionarily diverse organisms.

  5. Transforming the domain structure of botulinum neurotoxins into novel therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Chaddock, John

    2013-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins are comprised of multiple identifiable protein domains. Recent advances in understanding the relationships between domain structure and neurotoxin function have provided a number of opportunities to engineer innovative therapeutic proteins that utilise the neurotoxins and neurotoxin domains. For example, recent insights into the properties of the catalytic, translocation and binding domains open up opportunities to develop botulinum neurotoxins with enhanced properties of selectivity, potency and duration of action. In parallel, the broad scope for utilisation of the individual domains is becoming clearer as significant advancements are made to exploit the unique biology of the catalytic and translocation domains. These opportunities and the status of their development will be reviewed in this chapter.

  6. LRIG1 extracellular domain: structure and function analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yibin; Soo, Priscilla; Walker, Francesca; Zhang, Hui Hua; Redpath, Nicholas; Tan, Chin Wee; Nicola, Nicos A; Adams, Timothy E; Garrett, Thomas P; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Burgess, Antony W

    2015-05-22

    We have expressed and purified three soluble fragments of the human LRIG1-ECD (extracellular domain): the LRIG1-LRR (leucine-rich repeat) domain, the LRIG1-3Ig (immunoglobulin-like) domain, and the LRIG1-LRR-1Ig fragment using baculovirus vectors in insect cells. The two LRIG1 domains crystallised so that we have been able to determine the three-dimensional structures at 2.3Å resolution. We developed a three-dimensional structure for the LRIG1-ECD using homology modelling based on the LINGO-1 structure. The LRIG1-LRR domain and the LRIG1-LRR-1Ig fragment are monomers in solution, whereas the LRIG1-3Ig domain appears to be dimeric. We could not detect any binding of the LRIG1 domains or the LRIG1-LRR-1Ig fragment to the EGF receptor (EGFR), either in solution using biosensor analysis or when the EGFR was expressed on the cell surface. The FLAG-tagged LRIG1-LRR-1Ig fragment binds weakly to colon cancer cells regardless of the presence of EGFRs. Similarly, neither the soluble LRIG1-LRR nor the LRIG1-3Ig domains nor the full-length LRIG1 co-expressed in HEK293 cells inhibited ligand-stimulated activation of cell-surface EGFR.

  7. Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and Mycoplasma flocculare differential domains from orthologous surface proteins induce distinct cellular immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Leal, Fernanda Munhoz Dos Anjos; Virginio, Veridiana Gomes; Martello, Carolina Lumertz; Paes, Jéssica Andrade; Borges, Thiago J; Jaeger, Natália; Bonorino, Cristina; Ferreira, Henrique Bunselmeyer

    2016-07-15

    Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae and Mycoplasma flocculare are two genetically close species found in the swine respiratory tract. Despite their similarities, while M. hyopneumoniae is the causative agent of porcine enzootic pneumonia, M. flocculare is a commensal bacterium. Genomic and transcriptional comparative analyses so far failed to explain the difference in pathogenicity between these two species. We then hypothesized that such difference might be, at least in part, explained by amino acid sequence and immunological or functional differences between ortholog surface proteins. In line with that, it was verified that approximately 85% of the ortholog surface proteins from M. hyopneumoniae 7448 and M. flocculare present one or more differential domains. To experimentally assess possible immunological implications of this kind of difference, the extracellular differential domains from one pair of orthologous surface proteins (MHP7448_0612, from M. hyopneumoniae, and MF_00357, from M. flocculare) were expressed in E. coli and used to immunize mice. The recombinant polypeptides (rMHP61267-169 and rMF35767-196, respectively) induced distinct cellular immune responses. While, rMHP61267-169 induced both Th1 and Th2 responses, rMF35767-196 induced just an early pro-inflammatory response. These results indicate that immunological properties determined by differential domains in orthologous surface protein might play a role in pathogenicity, contributing to elicit specific and differential immune responses against each species.

  8. Specialized Information Processing Deficits and Distinct Metabolomic Profiles Following TM-Domain Disruption of Nrg1.

    PubMed

    O'Tuathaigh, Colm M P; Mathur, Naina; O'Callaghan, Matthew J; MacIntyre, Lynsey; Harvey, Richard; Lai, Donna; Waddington, John L; Pickard, Benjamin S; Watson, David G; Moran, Paula M

    2017-03-11

    Although there is considerable genetic and pathologic evidence for an association between neuregulin 1 (NRG1) dysregulation and schizophrenia, the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms remain unclear. Mutant mice containing disruption of the transmembrane (TM) domain of the NRG1 gene constitute a heuristic model for dysregulation of NRG1-ErbB4 signaling in schizophrenia. The present study focused on hitherto uncharacterized information processing phenotypes in this mutant line. Using a mass spectrometry-based metabolomics approach, we also quantified levels of unique metabolites in brain. Across 2 different sites and protocols, Nrg1 mutants demonstrated deficits in prepulse inhibition, a measure of sensorimotor gating, that is, disrupted in schizophrenia; these deficits were partially reversed by acute treatment with second, but not first-, generation antipsychotic drugs. However, Nrg1 mutants did not show a specific deficit in latent inhibition, a measure of selective attention that is also disrupted in schizophrenia. In contrast, in a "what-where-when" object recognition memory task, Nrg1 mutants displayed sex-specific (males only) disruption of "what-when" performance, indicative of impaired temporal aspects of episodic memory. Differential metabolomic profiling revealed that these behavioral phenotypes were accompanied, most prominently, by alterations in lipid metabolism pathways. This study is the first to associate these novel physiological mechanisms, previously independently identified as being abnormal in schizophrenia, with disruption of NRG1 function. These data suggest novel mechanisms by which compromised neuregulin function from birth might lead to schizophrenia-relevant behavioral changes in adulthood.

  9. Phylogeography of Y-Chromosome Haplogroup I Reveals Distinct Domains of Prehistoric Gene Flow in Europe

    PubMed Central

    Rootsi, Siiri; Magri, Chiara; Kivisild, Toomas; Benuzzi, Giorgia; Help, Hela; Bermisheva, Marina; Kutuev, Ildus; Barać, Lovorka; Peričić, Marijana; Balanovsky, Oleg; Pshenichnov, Andrey; Dion, Daniel; Grobei, Monica; Zhivotovsky, Lev A.; Battaglia, Vincenza; Achilli, Alessandro; Al-Zahery, Nadia; Parik, Jüri; King, Roy; Cinnioğlu, Cengiz; Khusnutdinova, Elsa; Rudan, Pavao; Balanovska, Elena; Scheffrahn, Wolfgang; Simonescu, Maya; Brehm, Antonio; Goncalves, Rita; Rosa, Alexandra; Moisan, Jean-Paul; Chaventre, Andre; Ferak, Vladimir; Füredi, Sandor; Oefner, Peter J.; Shen, Peidong; Beckman, Lars; Mikerezi, Ilia; Terzić, Rifet; Primorac, Dragan; Cambon-Thomsen, Anne; Krumina, Astrida; Torroni, Antonio; Underhill, Peter A.; Santachiara-Benerecetti, A. Silvana; Villems, Richard; Semino, Ornella

    2004-01-01

    To investigate which aspects of contemporary human Y-chromosome variation in Europe are characteristic of primary colonization, late-glacial expansions from refuge areas, Neolithic dispersals, or more recent events of gene flow, we have analyzed, in detail, haplogroup I (Hg I), the only major clade of the Y phylogeny that is widespread over Europe but virtually absent elsewhere. The analysis of 1,104 Hg I Y chromosomes, which were identified in the survey of 7,574 males from 60 population samples, revealed several subclades with distinct geographic distributions. Subclade I1a accounts for most of Hg I in Scandinavia, with a rapidly decreasing frequency toward both the East European Plain and the Atlantic fringe, but microsatellite diversity reveals that France could be the source region of the early spread of both I1a and the less common I1c. Also, I1b*, which extends from the eastern Adriatic to eastern Europe and declines noticeably toward the southern Balkans and abruptly toward the periphery of northern Italy, probably diffused after the Last Glacial Maximum from a homeland in eastern Europe or the Balkans. In contrast, I1b2 most likely arose in southern France/Iberia. Similarly to the other subclades, it underwent a postglacial expansion and marked the human colonization of Sardinia ∼9,000 years ago. PMID:15162323

  10. An Algebro-Topological Description of Protein Domain Structure

    PubMed Central

    Penner, Robert Clark; Knudsen, Michael; Wiuf, Carsten; Andersen, Jørgen Ellegaard

    2011-01-01

    The space of possible protein structures appears vast and continuous, and the relationship between primary, secondary and tertiary structure levels is complex. Protein structure comparison and classification is therefore a difficult but important task since structure is a determinant for molecular interaction and function. We introduce a novel mathematical abstraction based on geometric topology to describe protein domain structure. Using the locations of the backbone atoms and the hydrogen bonds, we build a combinatorial object – a so-called fatgraph. The description is discrete yet gives rise to a 2-dimensional mathematical surface. Thus, each protein domain corresponds to a particular mathematical surface with characteristic topological invariants, such as the genus (number of holes) and the number of boundary components. Both invariants are global fatgraph features reflecting the interconnectivity of the domain by hydrogen bonds. We introduce the notion of robust variables, that is variables that are robust towards minor changes in the structure/fatgraph, and show that the genus and the number of boundary components are robust. Further, we invesigate the distribution of different fatgraph variables and show how only four variables are capable of distinguishing different folds. We use local (secondary) and global (tertiary) fatgraph features to describe domain structures and illustrate that they are useful for classification of domains in CATH. In addition, we combine our method with two other methods thereby using primary, secondary, and tertiary structure information, and show that we can identify a large percentage of new and unclassified structures in CATH. PMID:21629687

  11. Crystal structure of domain-swapped STE20 OSR1 kinase domain

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Seung-Jae; Cobb, Melanie H.; Goldsmith, Elizabeth J.

    2009-09-15

    OSR1 (oxidative stress-responsive-1) and SPAK (Ste20/Sps1-related proline/alanine-rich kinase) belong to the GCK-VI subfamily of Ste20 group kinases. OSR1 and SPAK are key regulators of NKCCs (Na{sup +}/K{sup +}/2Cl{sup -} cotransporters) and activated by WNK family members (with-no-lysine kinase), mutations of which are known to cause Gordon syndrome, an autosomal dominant form of inherited hypertension. The crystal structure of OSR1 kinase domain has been solved at 2.25 {angstrom}. OSR1 forms a domain-swapped dimer in an inactive conformation, in which P+1 loop and {alpha}EF helix are swapped between dimer-related monomers. Structural alignment with nonswapped Ste20 TAO2 kinase indicates that the integrity of chemical interactions in the kinase domain is well preserved in the domain-swapped interfaces. The OSR1 kinase domain has now been added to a growing list of domain-swapped protein kinases recently reported, suggesting that the domain-swapping event provides an additional layer of complexity in regulating protein kinase activity.

  12. Ferroelectric domain engineering and micro-structuring of lithium niobate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mailis, Sakellaris

    2010-11-01

    This paper discusses a number of recently developed all optical and optically assisted methods for ferroelectric domain engineering in lithium niobate and their impact on the micro-structuring of this optical ferroelectric crystal. Optical radiation is used to change the response of lithium niobate crystals to externally applied electric field encouraging or inhibiting ferroelectric domain inversion in a simultaneous or latent manner. Optically assisted poling processes have the advantage of producing ferroelectric domains with arbitrary shapes free from crystal symmetry restrictions which is very important for fabricating surface micro/nano-structures in this material.

  13. Spatial Segregation of γ-Secretase and Substrates in Distinct Membrane Domains*

    PubMed Central

    Vetrivel, Kulandaivelu S.; Cheng, Haipeng; Kim, Seong-Hun; Chen, Ying; Barnes, Natalie Y.; Parent, Ange‘le T.; Sisodia, Sangram S.; Thinakaran, Gopal

    2005-01-01

    γ-Secretase facilitates the regulated intramembrane proteolysis of select type I membrane proteins that play diverse physiological roles in multiple cell types and tissue. In this study, we used biochemical approaches to examine the distribution of amyloid precursor protein (APP) and several additional γ-secretase substrates in membrane microdomains. We report that APP C-terminal fragments (CTFs) and γ-secretase reside in Lubrol WX detergent-insoluble membranes (DIM) of cultured cells and adult mouse brain. APP CTFs that accumulate in cells lacking γ-secretase activity preferentially associate with DIM. Cholesterol depletion and magnetic im-munoisolation studies indicate recruitment of APP CTFs into cholesterol- and sphingolipid-rich lipid rafts, and co-residence of APP CTFs, PS1, and syntaxin 6 in DIM patches derived from the trans-Golgi network. Photoaffinity cross-linking studies provided evidence for the preponderance of active γ-secretase in lipid rafts of cultured cells and adult brain. Remarkably, unlike the case of APP, CTFs derived from Notch1, Jagged2, deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC), and N-cadherin remain largely detergent-soluble, indicative of their spatial segregation in non-raft domains. In embryonic brain, the majority of PS1 and nicastrin is present in Lubrol WX-soluble membranes, wherein the CTFs derived from APP, Notch1, DCC, and N-cadherin also reside. We suggest that γ-secretase residence in non-raft membranes facilitates proteolysis of diverse substrates during embryonic development but that the translocation of γ-secretase to lipid rafts in adults ensures processing of certain substrates, including APP CTFs, while limiting processing of other potential substrates. PMID:15886206

  14. Distinct Neurobehavioural Effects of Cannabidiol in Transmembrane Domain Neuregulin 1 Mutant Mice

    PubMed Central

    Long, Leonora E.; Chesworth, Rose; Huang, Xu-Feng; Wong, Alexander; Spiro, Adena; McGregor, Iain S.; Arnold, Jonathon C.; Karl, Tim

    2012-01-01

    The cannabis constituent cannabidiol (CBD) possesses anxiolytic and antipsychotic properties. We have previously shown that transmembrane domain neuregulin 1 mutant (Nrg1 TM HET) mice display altered neurobehavioural responses to the main psychoactive constituent of cannabis, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol. Here we investigated whether Nrg1 TM HET mice respond differently to CBD and whether CBD reverses schizophrenia-related phenotypes expressed by these mice. Adult male Nrg1 TM HET and wild type-like littermates (WT) received vehicle or CBD (1, 50 or 100 mg/kg i.p.) for 21 days. During treatment and 48 h after withdrawal we measured behaviour, whole blood CBD concentrations and autoradiographic receptor binding. Nrg1 HET mice displayed locomotor hyperactivity, PPI deficits and reduced 5-HT2A receptor binding density in the substantia nigra, but these phenotypes were not reversed by CBD. However, long-term CBD (50 and 100 mg/kg) selectively enhanced social interaction in Nrg1 TM HET mice. Furthermore, acute CBD (100 mg/kg) selectively increased PPI in Nrg1 TM HET mice, although tolerance to this effect was manifest upon repeated CBD administration. Long-term CBD (50 mg/kg) also selectively increased GABAA receptor binding in the granular retrosplenial cortex in Nrg1 TM HET mice and reduced 5-HT2A binding in the substantia nigra in WT mice. Nrg1 appears necessary for CBD-induced anxiolysis since only WT mice developed decreased anxiety-related behaviour with repeated CBD treatment. Altered pharmacokinetics in mutant mice could not explain our findings since no genotype differences existed in CBD blood concentrations. Here we demonstrate that Nrg1 modulates acute and long-term neurobehavioural effects of CBD, which does not reverse the schizophrenia-relevant phenotypes. PMID:22509273

  15. Solution structure of the zinc finger HIT domain in protein FON

    PubMed Central

    He, Fahu; Umehara, Takashi; Tsuda, Kengo; Inoue, Makoto; Kigawa, Takanori; Matsuda, Takayoshi; Yabuki, Takashi; Aoki, Masaaki; Seki, Eiko; Terada, Takaho; Shirouzu, Mikako; Tanaka, Akiko; Sugano, Sumio; Muto, Yutaka; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2007-01-01

    The zinc finger HIT domain is a sequence motif found in many proteins, including thyroid hormone receptor interacting protein 3 (TRIP-3), which is possibly involved in maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY). Novel zinc finger motifs are suggested to play important roles in gene regulation and chromatin remodeling. Here, we determined the high-resolution solution structure of the zinc finger HIT domain in ZNHIT2 (protein FON) from Homo sapiens, by an NMR method based on 567 upper distance limits derived from NOE intensities measured in three-dimensional NOESY spectra. The structure yielded a backbone RMSD to the mean coordinates of 0.19 Å for the structured residues 12–48. The fold consists of two consecutive antiparallel β-sheets and two short C-terminal helices packed against the second β-sheet, and binds two zinc ions. Both zinc ions are coordinated tetrahedrally via a CCCC-CCHC motif to the ligand residues of the zf-HIT domain in an interleaved manner. The tertiary structure of the zinc finger HIT domain closely resembles the folds of the B-box, RING finger, and PHD domains with a cross-brace zinc coordination mode, but is distinct from them. The unique three-dimensional structure of the zinc finger HIT domain revealed a novel zinc-binding fold, as a new member of the treble clef domain family. On the basis of the structural data, we discuss the possible functional roles of the zinc finger HIT domain. PMID:17656577

  16. Structures of the NLRP14 pyrin domain reveal a conformational switch mechanism regulating its molecular interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Eibl, Clarissa; Hessenberger, Manuel; Wenger, Julia; Brandstetter, Hans

    2014-07-01

    Pyrin domains (PYDs) recruit downstream effector molecules in NLR signalling. A specific charge-relay system suggests a the formation of a signalling complex involving a PYD dimer. The cytosolic tripartite NLR receptors serve as important signalling platforms in innate immunity. While the C-terminal domains act as sensor and activation modules, the N-terminal death-like domain, e.g. the CARD or pyrin domain, is thought to recruit downstream effector molecules by homotypic interactions. Such homotypic complexes have been determined for all members of the death-domain superfamily except for pyrin domains. Here, crystal structures of human NLRP14 pyrin-domain variants are reported. The wild-type protein as well as the clinical D86V mutant reveal an unexpected rearrangement of the C-terminal helix α6, resulting in an extended α5/6 stem-helix. This reordering mediates a novel symmetric pyrin-domain dimerization mode. The conformational switching is controlled by a charge-relay system with a drastic impact on protein stability. How the identified charge relay allows classification of NLRP receptors with respect to distinct recruitment mechanisms is discussed.

  17. NMR solution structures of actin depolymerizing factor homology domains

    PubMed Central

    Goroncy, Alexander K; Koshiba, Seizo; Tochio, Naoya; Tomizawa, Tadashi; Sato, Manami; Inoue, Makato; Watanabe, Satoru; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Tanaka, Akiko; Kigawa, Takanori; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2009-01-01

    Actin is one of the most conserved proteins in nature. Its assembly and disassembly are regulated by many proteins, including the family of actin-depolymerizing factor homology (ADF-H) domains. ADF-H domains can be divided into five classes: ADF/cofilin, glia maturation factor (GMF), coactosin, twinfilin, and Abp1/drebrin. The best-characterized class is ADF/cofilin. The other four classes have drawn much less attention and very few structures have been reported. This study presents the solution NMR structure of the ADF-H domain of human HIP-55-drebrin-like protein, the first published structure of a drebrin-like domain (mammalian), and the first published structure of GMF β (mouse). We also determined the structures of mouse GMF γ, the mouse coactosin-like domain and the C-terminal ADF-H domain of mouse twinfilin 1. Although the overall fold of the five domains is similar, some significant differences provide valuable insights into filamentous actin (F-actin) and globular actin (G-actin) binding, including the identification of binding residues on the long central helix. This long helix is stabilized by three or four residues. Notably, the F-actin binding sites of mouse GMF β and GMF γ contain two additional β-strands not seen in other ADF-H structures. The G-actin binding site of the ADF-H domain of human HIP-55-drebrin-like protein is absent and distorted in mouse GMF β and GMF γ. PMID:19768801

  18. Distinct Structural Pathways Coordinate the Activation of AMPA Receptor-Auxiliary Subunit Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Dawe, G. Brent; Musgaard, Maria; Aurousseau, Mark R.P.; Nayeem, Naushaba; Green, Tim; Biggin, Philip C.; Bowie, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Summary Neurotransmitter-gated ion channels adopt different gating modes to fine-tune signaling at central synapses. At glutamatergic synapses, high and low activity of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) is observed when pore-forming subunits coassemble with or without auxiliary subunits, respectively. Whether a common structural pathway accounts for these different gating modes is unclear. Here, we identify two structural motifs that determine the time course of AMPAR channel activation. A network of electrostatic interactions at the apex of the AMPAR ligand-binding domain (LBD) is essential for gating by pore-forming subunits, whereas a conserved motif on the lower, D2 lobe of the LBD prolongs channel activity when auxiliary subunits are present. Accordingly, channel activity is almost entirely abolished by elimination of the electrostatic network but restored via auxiliary protein interactions at the D2 lobe. In summary, we propose that activation of native AMPAR complexes is coordinated by distinct structural pathways, favored by the association/dissociation of auxiliary subunits. PMID:26924438

  19. Polymodal activation of the TREK-2 K2P channel produces structurally distinct open states

    PubMed Central

    McClenaghan, Conor; Schewe, Marcus; Aryal, Prafulla; Carpenter, Elisabeth P.; Baukrowitz, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The TREK subfamily of two-pore domain (K2P) K+ channels exhibit polymodal gating by a wide range of physical and chemical stimuli. Crystal structures now exist for these channels in two main states referred to as the “up” and “down” conformations. However, recent studies have resulted in contradictory and mutually exclusive conclusions about the functional (i.e., conductive) status of these two conformations. To address this problem, we have used the state-dependent TREK-2 inhibitor norfluoxetine that can only bind to the down state, thereby allowing us to distinguish between these two conformations when activated by different stimuli. Our results reconcile these previously contradictory gating models by demonstrating that activation by pressure, temperature, voltage, and pH produce more than one structurally distinct open state and reveal that channel activation does not simply involve switching between the up and down conformations. These results also highlight the diversity of structural mechanisms that K2P channels use to integrate polymodal gating signals. PMID:27241700

  20. Modulation of elasticity in functionally distinct domains of the tropomyosin coiled-coil.

    PubMed

    Lakkaraju, Sirish Kaushik; Hwang, Wonmuk

    2009-03-01

    Alpha-helical coiled-coils are common protein structural motifs. Whereas vast information is available regarding their structure, folding, and stability, far less is known about their elastic properties, even though they play mechanical roles in many cases such as tropomyosin in muscle contraction or neck stalks of kinesin or myosin motor proteins. Using computer simulations, we characterized elastic properties of coiled-coils, either globally or locally. Global bending stiffness of standard leucine zipper coiled-coils was calculated using normal mode analysis. Mutations in hydrophobic residues involved in the knob-into-hole interface between the two alpha-helices affect elasticity significantly, whereas charged side chains forming inter-helical salt bridges do not. This suggests that coiled-coils with less regular heptad periodicity may have regional variations in flexibility. We show this by the flexibility map of tropomyosin, which was constructed by a local fluctuation analysis. Overall, flexibility varies by more than twofold and increases towards the C-terminal region of the molecule. Describing the coiled-coil as a twisted tape, it is generally more flexible in the splay bending than in the bending of the broad face. Actin binding sites in alpha zones show local rigidity minima. Broken core regions due to acidic residues at the hydrophobic face such as the Asp137 and the Glu218 are found to be the most labile with moduli for splay and broad face bending as 70 nm and 116 nm respectively. Such variation in flexibility could be relevant to the tropomyosin function, especially for moving across the non-uniform surface of F-actin to regulate myosin binding.

  1. Modulation of elasticity in functionally distinct domains of the tropomyosin coiled-coil

    PubMed Central

    Lakkaraju, Sirish Kaushik; Hwang, Wonmuk

    2009-01-01

    Alpha-helical coiled-coils are common protein structural motifs. Whereas vast information is available regarding their structure, folding, and stability, far less is known about their elastic properties, even though they play mechanical roles in many cases such as tropomyosin in muscle contraction or neck stalks of kinesin or myosin motor proteins. Using computer simulations, we characterized elastic properties of coiled-coils, either globally or locally. Global bending stiffness of standard leucine zipper coiled-coils was calculated using normal mode analysis. Mutations in hydrophobic residues involved in the knob-into-hole interface between the two α-helices affect elasticity significantly, whereas charged side chains forming inter-helical salt bridges do not. This suggests that coiled-coils with less regular heptad periodicity may have regional variations in flexibility. We show this by the flexibility map of tropomyosin, which was constructed by a local fluctuation analysis. Overall, flexibility varies by more than twofold and increases towards the C-terminal region of the molecule. Describing the coiled-coil as a twisted tape, it is generally more flexible in the splay bending than in the bending of the broad face. Actin binding sites in α zones show local rigidity minima. Broken core regions due to acidic residues at the hydrophobic face such as the Asp137 and the Glu218 are found to be the most labile with moduli for splay and broad face bending as 70 nm and 116 nm respectively. Such variation in flexibility could be relevant to the tropomyosin function, especially for moving across the non-uniform surface of F-actin to regulate myosin binding. PMID:19830262

  2. Structure and Signaling Mechanism of Per-ARNT-Sim Domains

    PubMed Central

    Möglich, Andreas; Ayers, Rebecca A.; Moffat, Keith

    2009-01-01

    Summary Per-ARNT-Sim (PAS) domains serve as widely-distributed, versatile, sensor and interaction modules in signal transduction proteins. PAS sensors detect a wide range of chemical and physical stimuli and regulate the activity of functionally diverse effector domains. In contrast to this chemical, physical and functional diversity, the structure of the core of PAS domains is broadly conserved and comprises a five-stranded antiparallel β-sheet and several α-helices. Signals originate within the conserved core and generate structural and dynamic changes predominantly within the β-sheet, from which they propagate via amphipathic α-helical and coiled-coil linkers at the N- or C-termini of the core to the covalently-attached effector domain. Effector domains are typically dimeric; their activity appears to be largely regulated by signal-dependent changes in quaternary structure and dynamics. The signaling mechanisms of PAS and other signaling domains share common features, and these commonalities can be exploited to enable structure-based design of artificial photo- and chemosensors. PMID:19836329

  3. Domain organization and crystal structure of the catalytic domain of E.coli RluF, a pseudouridine synthase that acts on 23S rRNA

    SciTech Connect

    Sunita,S.; Zhenxing, H.; Swaathi, J.; Cygler, M.; Matte, A.; Sivaraman, J.

    2006-01-01

    Pseudouridine synthases catalyze the isomerization of uridine to pseudouridine ({psi}) in rRNA and tRNA. The pseudouridine synthase RluF from Escherichia coli (E.C. 4.2.1.70) modifies U2604 in 23S rRNA, and belongs to a large family of pseudouridine synthases present in all kingdoms of life. Here we report the domain architecture and crystal structure of the catalytic domain of E. coli RluF at 2.6 Angstroms resolution. Limited proteolysis, mass spectrometry and N-terminal sequencing indicate that RluF has a distinct domain architecture, with the catalytic domain flanked at the N and C termini by additional domains connected to it by flexible linkers. The structure of the catalytic domain of RluF is similar to those of RsuA and TruB. RluF is a member of the RsuA sequence family of {psi}-synthases, along with RluB and RluE. Structural comparison of RluF with its closest structural homologues, RsuA and TruB, suggests possible functional roles for the N-terminal and C-terminal domains of RluF.

  4. Distinct Prion Domain Sequences Ensure Efficient Amyloid Propagation by Promoting Chaperone Binding or Processing In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Langlois, Christine R.; Serio, Tricia R.

    2016-01-01

    Prions are a group of proteins that can adopt a spectrum of metastable conformations in vivo. These alternative states change protein function and are self-replicating and transmissible, creating protein-based elements of inheritance and infectivity. Prion conformational flexibility is encoded in the amino acid composition and sequence of the protein, which dictate its ability not only to form an ordered aggregate known as amyloid but also to maintain and transmit this structure in vivo. But, while we can effectively predict amyloid propensity in vitro, the mechanism by which sequence elements promote prion propagation in vivo remains unclear. In yeast, propagation of the [PSI+] prion, the amyloid form of the Sup35 protein, has been linked to an oligopeptide repeat region of the protein. Here, we demonstrate that this region is composed of separable functional elements, the repeats themselves and a repeat proximal region, which are both required for efficient prion propagation. Changes in the numbers of these elements do not alter the physical properties of Sup35 amyloid, but their presence promotes amyloid fragmentation, and therefore maintenance, by molecular chaperones. Rather than acting redundantly, our observations suggest that these sequence elements make complementary contributions to prion propagation, with the repeat proximal region promoting chaperone binding to and the repeats promoting chaperone processing of Sup35 amyloid. PMID:27814358

  5. Structural Insights into Fibronectin Type III Domain Mediated Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bencharit, Sompop; Cui, Cai Bin; Siddiqui, Adnan; Howard-Williams, Escher L.; Sondek, John; Zuobi-Hasona, Kheir; Aukhil, Ikramuddin

    2007-01-01

    The alternatively spliced type-III extradomain B (EIIIB) of Fibronectin (FN) is only expressed during embryogenesis, wound healing and tumorigenesis. The biological function of this domain remains unclear. We describe here the first crystal structure of the interface between alternatively-spliced domain EIIIB and its adjacent FN type-III domain 8 (FN B-8). The opened CC′ loop of EIIIB and the rotation and tilt of EIIIB domain allows good access to the FG loop of FN-8 which is normally hindered by the CC′ loop of FN-7. In addition, the AGEGIP sequence of the CC′ loop of EIIIB replaces the NGQQGN sequence of the CC′ loop of FN-7. Finally, the CC” loop of EIIIB forms an acidic groove with FN-8. These structural findings warrant future studies directed at identifying potential binding partners for FN B-8 interface, linking EIIIB to skeletal and cartilagenous development, wound healing, and tumorigenesis, respectively. PMID:17261313

  6. Strain phase separation: Formation of ferroelastic domain structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Fei; Li, Yongjun; Gu, Yijia; Zhang, Jinxing; Chen, Long-Qing

    2016-12-01

    Phase decomposition is a well-known process leading to the formation of two-phase mixtures. Here we show that a strain imposed on a ferroelastic crystal promotes the formation of mixed phases and domains, i.e., strain phase separation with local strains determined by a common tangent construction on the free energy versus strain curves. It is demonstrated that a domain structure can be understood using the concepts of domain/phase rule, lever rule, and coherent and incoherent strain phase separation, in a complete analogy to phase decomposition. The proposed strain phase separation model is validated using phase-field simulations and experimental observations of PbTi O3 and BiFe O3 thin films as examples. The proposed model provides a simple tool to guide and design domain structures of ferroelastic systems.

  7. Domain structure and phase transition in Sc-doped zirconia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunauer, G.; Boysen, H.; Frey, F.; Ehrenberg, H.

    2002-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the domain structure associated with the ferroelastic phase transition (Fm↔R bar 3 m) in ZrO2 doped with 11% Sc2O3 has been determined from a peak shape analysis of high-resolution synchrotron x-ray powder diffraction data. In the temperature region of coexisting phases the observed characteristic anisotropic broadening and asymmetry of the lines is modelled by three different phases: a main rhombohedral phase, a distorted rhombohedral phase with a smaller c/a ratio, and a cubic phase. The latter two are assigned to the internal structure of the domain walls between two adjacent twin domains. The size and amount of the cubic phase show an initially slow increase with temperature followed by a very steep increase and a slow one after that. The size of the (main) rhombohedral domains remains nearly constant, while (micro-) strain in the distorted regions gradually decreases.

  8. Structure and Dynamics of the tRNA-like Structure Domain of Brome Mosaic Virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieweger, Mario; Nesbitt, David

    2014-03-01

    Conformational switching is widely accepted as regulatory mechanism in gene expression in bacterial systems. More recently, similar regulation mechanisms are emerging for viral systems. One of the most abundant and best studied systems is the tRNA-like structure domain that is found in a number of plant viruses across eight genera. In this work, the folding dynamics of the tRNA-like structure domain of Brome Mosaic Virus are investigated using single-molecule Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer techniques. In particular, Burst fluorescence is applied to observe metal-ion induced folding in freely diffusing RNA constructs resembling the 3'-terminal 169nt of BMV RNA3. Histograms of EFRET probabilities reveal a complex equilibrium of three distinct populations. A step-wise kinetic model for TLS folding is developed in accord with the evolution of conformational populations and structural information in the literature. In this mechanism, formation of functional TLS domains from unfolded RNAs requires two consecutive steps; 1) hybridization of a long-range stem interaction followed by 2) formation of a 3' pseudoknot. This three-state equilibrium is well described by step-wise dissociation constants K1(328(30) μM) and K2(1092(183) μM) for [Mg2+] and K1(74(6) mM) and K2(243(52) mM) for [Na+]-induced folding. The kinetic model is validated by oligo competition with the STEM interaction. Implications of this conformational folding mechanism are discussed in regards to regulation of virus replication.

  9. NMR structure of the human Mediator MED25 ACID domain.

    PubMed

    Bontems, François; Verger, Alexis; Dewitte, Frédérique; Lens, Zoé; Baert, Jean-Luc; Ferreira, Elisabeth; de Launoit, Yvan; Sizun, Christina; Guittet, Eric; Villeret, Vincent; Monté, Didier

    2011-04-01

    MED25 (ARC92/ACID1) is a 747 residues subunit specific to higher eukaryote Mediator complex, an essential component of the RNA polymerase II general transcriptional machinery. MED25 is a target of the Herpes simplex virus transactivator protein VP16. MED25 interacts with VP16 through a central MED25 PTOV (Prostate tumour overexpressed)/ACID (Activator interacting domain) domain of unknown structure. As a first step towards understanding the mechanism of recruitment of transactivation domains by MED25, we report here the NMR structure of the MED25 ACID domain. The domain architecture consists of a closed β-barrel with seven strands (Β1-Β7) and three α-helices (H1-H3), an architecture showing similarities to that of the SPOC (Spen paralog and ortholog C-terminal domain) domain-like superfamily. Preliminary NMR chemical shift mapping showed that VP16 H2 (VP16C) interacts with MED25 ACID through one face of the β-barrel, defined by strands B4-B7-B6.

  10. Analysis of time-domain scattering by periodic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yixian; Li, Peijun

    2016-11-01

    This paper is devoted to the mathematical analysis of a time-domain electromagnetic scattering by periodic structures which are known as diffraction gratings. The scattering problem is reduced equivalently into an initial-boundary value problem in a bounded domain by using an exact transparent boundary condition. The well-posedness and stability of the solution are established for the reduced problem. Moreover, a priori energy estimates are obtained with minimum regularity requirement for the data and explicit dependence on the time.

  11. Analysis of Exocyst Subunit EXO70 Family Reveals Distinct Membrane Polar Domains in Tobacco Pollen Tubes1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Šantrůček, Jiří; Vukašinović, Nemanja

    2017-01-01

    The vesicle-tethering complex exocyst is one of the crucial cell polarity regulators. The EXO70 subunit is required for the targeting of the complex and is represented by many isoforms in angiosperm plant cells. This diversity could be partly responsible for the establishment and maintenance of membrane domains with different composition. To address this hypothesis, we employed the growing pollen tube, a well-established cell polarity model system, and performed large-scale expression, localization, and functional analysis of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) EXO70 isoforms. Various isoforms localized to different regions of the pollen tube plasma membrane, apical vesicle-rich inverted cone region, nucleus, and cytoplasm. The overexpression of major pollen-expressed EXO70 isoforms resulted in growth arrest and characteristic phenotypic deviations of tip swelling and apical invaginations. NtEXO70A1a and NtEXO70B1 occupied two distinct and mutually exclusive plasma membrane domains. Both isoforms partly colocalized with the exocyst subunit NtSEC3a at the plasma membrane, possibly forming different exocyst complex subpopulations. NtEXO70A1a localized to the small area previously characterized as the site of exocytosis in the tobacco pollen tube, while NtEXO70B1 surprisingly colocalized with the zone of clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Both NtEXO70A1a and NtEXO70B1 colocalized to different degrees with markers for the anionic signaling phospholipids phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate and phosphatidic acid. In contrast, members of the EXO70 C class, which are specifically expressed in tip-growing cells, exhibited exocytosis-related functional effects in pollen tubes despite the absence of apparent plasma membrane localization. Taken together, our data support the existence of multiple membrane-trafficking domains regulated by different EXO70-containing exocyst complexes within a single cell. PMID:28082718

  12. Three-dimensional reconstructions of the bacteriophage CUS-3 virion reveal a conserved coat protein I-domain but a distinct tailspike receptor-binding domain

    SciTech Connect

    Parent, Kristin N.; Tang, Jinghua; Cardone, Giovanni; Gilcrease, Eddie B.; Janssen, Mandy E.; Olson, Norman H.; Casjens, Sherwood R.; Baker, Timothy S.

    2014-09-15

    CUS-3 is a short-tailed, dsDNA bacteriophage that infects serotype K1 Escherichia coli. We report icosahedrally averaged and asymmetric, three-dimensional, cryo-electron microscopic reconstructions of the CUS-3 virion. Its coat protein structure adopts the “HK97-fold” shared by other tailed phages and is quite similar to that in phages P22 and Sf6 despite only weak amino acid sequence similarity. In addition, these coat proteins share a unique extra external domain (“I-domain”), suggesting that the group of P22-like phages has evolved over a very long time period without acquiring a new coat protein gene from another phage group. On the other hand, the morphology of the CUS-3 tailspike differs significantly from that of P22 or Sf6, but is similar to the tailspike of phage K1F, a member of the extremely distantly related T7 group of phages. We conclude that CUS-3 obtained its tailspike gene from a distantly related phage quite recently. - Highlights: • Asymmetric and symmetric three-dimensional reconstructions of phage CUS-3 are presented. • CUS-3 major capsid protein has a conserved I-domain, which is found in all three categories of “P22-like phage”. • CUS-3 has very different tailspike receptor binding domain from those of P22 and Sf6. • The CUS-3 tailspike likely was acquired by horizontal gene transfer.

  13. Amino acid coevolution reveals three-dimensional structure and functional domains of insect odorant receptors.

    PubMed

    Hopf, Thomas A; Morinaga, Satoshi; Ihara, Sayoko; Touhara, Kazushige; Marks, Debora S; Benton, Richard

    2015-01-13

    Insect odorant receptors (ORs) comprise an enormous protein family that translates environmental chemical signals into neuronal electrical activity. These heptahelical receptors are proposed to function as ligand-gated ion channels and/or to act metabotropically as G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Resolving their signalling mechanism has been hampered by the lack of tertiary structural information and primary sequence similarity to other proteins. We use amino acid evolutionary covariation across these ORs to define restraints on structural proximity of residue pairs, which permit de novo generation of three-dimensional models. The validity of our analysis is supported by the location of functionally important residues in highly constrained regions of the protein. Importantly, insect OR models exhibit a distinct transmembrane domain packing arrangement to that of canonical GPCRs, establishing the structural unrelatedness of these receptor families. The evolutionary couplings and models predict odour binding and ion conduction domains, and provide a template for rationale structure-activity dissection.

  14. Structural basis for the Smad5 MH1 domain to recognize different DNA sequences

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Nan; Li, Wan-Xin; Wang, Jue; Wang, Zhi-Xin; Yang, Shi-Ming; Wu, Jia-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Smad proteins are important intracellular mediators of TGF-β signalling, which transmit signals directly from cell surface receptors to the nucleus. The MH1 domain of Smad plays a key role in DNA recognition. Two types of DNA sequence were identified as Smad binding motifs: the Smad binding element (SBE) and the GC-rich sequence. Here we report the first crystal structure of the Smad5 MH1 domain in complex with the GC-rich sequence. Compared with the Smad5-MH1/SBE complex structure, the Smad5 MH1 domain contacts the GC-rich site with the same β-hairpin, but the detailed interaction modes are different. Conserved β-hairpin residues make base specific contacts with the minimal GC-rich site, 5′-GGC-3′. The assembly of Smad5-MH1 on the GC-rich DNA also results in distinct DNA conformational changes. Moreover, the crystal structure of Smad5-MH1 in complex with a composite DNA sequence demonstrates that the MH1 domain is targeted to each binding site (GC-rich or SBE) with modular binding modes, and the length of the DNA spacer affects the MH1 assembly. In conclusion, our work provides the structural basis for the recognition and binding specificity of the Smad MH1 domain with the DNA targets. PMID:26304548

  15. Crystal structure of a functional dimer of the PhoQ sensor domain.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Jonah; Bingman, Craig A; Reyngold, Marsha; Hendrickson, Wayne A; Waldburger, Carey D

    2008-05-16

    The PhoP-PhoQ two-component system is a well studied bacterial signaling system that regulates virulence and stress response. Catalytic activity of the histidine kinase sensor protein PhoQ is activated by low extracellular concentrations of divalent cations such as Mg2+, and subsequently the response regulator PhoP is activated in turn through a classic phosphotransfer pathway that is typical in such systems. The PhoQ sensor domains of enteric bacteria contain an acidic cluster of residues (EDDDDAE) that has been implicated in direct binding to divalent cations. We have determined crystal structures of the wild-type Escherichia coli PhoQ periplasmic sensor domain and of a mutant variant in which the acidic cluster was neutralized to conservative uncharged residues (QNNNNAQ). The PhoQ domain structure is similar to that of DcuS and CitA sensor domains, and this PhoQ-DcuS-CitA (PDC) sensor fold is seen to be distinct from the superficially similar PAS domain fold. Analysis of the wild-type structure reveals a dimer that allows for the formation of a salt bridge across the dimer interface between Arg-50' and Asp-179 and with nickel ions bound to aspartate residues in the acidic cluster. The physiological importance of the salt bridge to in vivo PhoQ function has been confirmed by mutagenesis. The mutant structure has an alternative, non-physiological dimeric association.

  16. ASH structure alignment package: Sensitivity and selectivity in domain classification

    PubMed Central

    Standley, Daron M; Toh, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Haruki

    2007-01-01

    Background Structure alignment methods offer the possibility of measuring distant evolutionary relationships between proteins that are not visible by sequence-based analysis. However, the question of how structural differences and similarities ought to be quantified in this regard remains open. In this study we construct a training set of sequence-unique CATH and SCOP domains, from which we develop a scoring function that can reliably identify domains with the same CATH topology and SCOP fold classification. The score is implemented in the ASH structure alignment package, for which the source code and a web service are freely available from the PDBj website . Results The new ASH score shows increased selectivity and sensitivity compared with values reported for several popular programs using the same test set of 4,298,905 structure pairs, yielding an area of .96 under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. In addition, weak sequence homologies between similar domains are revealed that could not be detected by BLAST sequence alignment. Also, a subset of domain pairs is identified that exhibit high similarity, even though their CATH and SCOP classification differs. Finally, we show that the ranking of alignment programs based solely on geometric measures depends on the choice of the quality measure. Conclusion ASH shows high selectivity and sensitivity with regard to domain classification, an important step in defining distantly related protein sequence families. Moreover, the CPU cost per alignment is competitive with the fastest programs, making ASH a practical option for large-scale structure classification studies. PMID:17407606

  17. Spatial anisotropy of topological domain structure in hexagonal manganites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, K. L.; Zhang, Y.; Zheng, S. H.; Lin, L.; Yan, Z. B.; Liu, J.-M.; Cheong, S.-W.

    2017-01-01

    The domain structure of hexagonal manganites is simulated based on the phenomenological Ginzburg-Landau theory, and special attention is paid to the evolution of a topological vortex-antivortex pattern with the varying out-of-plane anisotropies of two stiffness parameters for the in-plane (x y -plane) trimerization amplitude Q and out-of-plane (z -axis) polarization P . It is revealed that the topological domain structure can be remarkably modulated by the stiffness anisotropies. A larger stiffness for Q along the z axis causes the trajectory lines of the vortex nodes and antivortex nodes to be seriously stretched along the z axis, eventually leading to the topological stripelike domain pattern. The larger stiffness for either Q or P along the z axis makes the domain walls perpendicular to the z axis wider, while the domain walls parallel to the z axis remain less affected. The present work suggests that the topological domain structure may be controlled by some approaches (e.g., lattice strain) which can change the trimerization stiffness and polarization stiffness in hexagonal manganites.

  18. Effects of sub-domain structure on initial magnetization curve and domain size distribution of stacked media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, S.; Kumagai, S.; Sugita, R.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, in order to confirm the sub-domain structure in stacked media demagnetized with in-plane field, initial magnetization curves and magnetic domain size distribution were investigated. Both experimental and simulation results showed that an initial magnetization curve for the medium demagnetized with in-plane field (MDI) initially rose faster than that for the medium demagnetized with perpendicular field (MDP). It is inferred that this is because the MDI has a larger number of domain walls than the MDP due to the existence of the sub-domains, resulting in an increase in the probability of domain wall motion. Dispersion of domain size for the MDI was larger than that for the MDP. This is because sub-domains are formed not only inside the domain but also at the domain boundary region, and they change the position of the domain boundary to affect the domain size.

  19. Distinct Genetic Influences on Cortical and Subcortical Brain Structures

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Wei; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Mather, Karen A.; Zhu, Wanlin; Jiang, Jiyang; de Micheaux, Pierre Lafaye; Wright, Margaret J.; Ames, David; Sachdev, Perminder S.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the heritability of brain grey matter structures in a subsample of older adult twins (93 MZ and 68 DZ twin pairs; mean age 70 years) from the Older Australian Twins Study. The heritability estimates of subcortical regions ranged from 0.41 (amygdala) to 0.73 (hippocampus), and of cortical regions, from 0.55 (parietal lobe) to 0.78 (frontal lobe). Corresponding structures in the two hemispheres were influenced by the same genetic factors and high genetic correlations were observed between the two hemispheric regions. There were three genetically correlated clusters, comprising (i) the cortical lobes (frontal, temporal, parietal and occipital lobes); (ii) the basal ganglia (caudate, putamen and pallidum) with weak genetic correlations with cortical lobes, and (iii) the amygdala, hippocampus, thalamus and nucleus accumbens grouped together, which genetically correlated with both basal ganglia and cortical lobes, albeit relatively weakly. Our study demonstrates a complex but patterned and clustered genetic architecture of the human brain, with divergent genetic determinants of cortical and subcortical structures, in particular the basal ganglia. PMID:27595976

  20. Homology model building of the HMG-1 box structural domain.

    PubMed Central

    Baxevanis, A D; Bryant, S H; Landsman, D

    1995-01-01

    Nucleoproteins belonging to the HMG-1/2 family possess homologous domains approximately 75 amino acids in length. These domains, termed HMG-1 boxes, are highly structured, compact, and mediate the interaction between HMG-1 box-containing proteins and DNA in a variety of biological contexts. Homology model building experiments on HMG-1 box sequences 'threaded' through the 1H-NMR structure of an HMG-1 box from rat indicate that the domain does not have rigid sequence requirements for its formation. Energy calculations indicate that the structure of all HMG-1 box domains is stabilized primarily through hydrophobic interactions. We have found structural relationships in the absence of statistically significant sequence similarity, identifying several candidate proteins which could possibly assume the same three-dimensional conformation as the rat HMG-1 box motif. The threading technique provides a method by which significant structural similarities in a diverse protein family can be efficiently detected, and the 'structural alignment' derived by this method provides a rational basis through which phylogenetic relationships and the precise sites of interaction between HMG-1 box proteins and DNA can be deduced. Images PMID:7731789

  1. A Novel Tetrameric PilZ Domain Structure from Xanthomonads

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tso-Ning; Chin, Ko-Hsin; Fung, Kit-Man; Yang, Ming-Te; Wang, Andrew H.-J.; Chou, Shan-Ho

    2011-01-01

    PilZ domain is one of the key receptors for the newly discovered secondary messenger molecule cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP). To date, several monomeric PilZ domain proteins have been identified. Some exhibit strong c-di-GMP binding activity, while others have barely detectable c-di-GMP binding activity and require an accessory protein such as FimX to indirectly respond to the c-di-GMP signal. We now report a novel tetrameric PilZ domain structure of XCC6012 from the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc). It is one of the four PilZ domain proteins essential for Xcc pathogenicity. Although the monomer adopts a structure similar to those of the PilZ domains with very weak c-di-GMP binding activity, it is nevertheless interrupted in the middle by two extra long helices. Four XCC6012 proteins are thus self-assembled into a tetramer via the extra heptad repeat α3 helices to form a parallel four-stranded coiled-coil, which is further enclosed by two sets of inclined α2 and α4 helices. We further generated a series of XCC6012 variants and measured the unfolding temperatures and oligomeric states in order to investigate the nature of this novel tetramer. Discovery of this new PilZ domain architecture increases the complexity of c-di-GMP-mediated regulation. PMID:21760949

  2. Frequency Domain Tomography Of Evolving Laser-Plasma Accelerator Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Peng; Reed, Stephen; Kalmykov, Serguei; Shvets, Gennady; Downer, Mike

    2009-01-22

    Frequency Domain Holography (FDH), a technique for visualizing quasistatic objects propagating near the speed of light, has produced 'snapshots' of laser wakefields, but they are averaged over structural variations that occur during propagation through the plasma medium. Here we explore via simulations a generalization of FDH--that we call Frequency Domain Tomography (FDT)--that can potentially record a time sequence of quasistatic snapshots, like the frames of a movie, of the wake structure as it propagates through the plasma. FDT utilizes a several probe-reference pulse pairs that propagate obliquely to the drive pulse and wakefield, along with tomographic reconstruction algorithms similar to those used in medical CAT scans.

  3. Periodic instantons and domain structure in a ferromagnetic film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, G.-P.; Liang, J.-Q.; Nie, Y.-H.; Yin, W.

    2003-11-01

    We in this paper study periodic instantons and domain structures in a theoretical film consisting of biaxial-anisotropic ferromagnets. In a proper approximation the equation of motion of the magnetization vector as a space-time function in the film is reduced to the 1 + 2-dimensional sine-Gordon field equation in strong anisotropy limit. Static periodic instantons, which are solutions of Euclidean field equantion, and various new domain structures are obtained analytically. We also investigate the energy density and stability of the periodic instantons.

  4. Structural features and domain organization of huntingtin fibrils.

    PubMed

    Bugg, Charles W; Isas, J Mario; Fischer, Torsten; Patterson, Paul H; Langen, Ralf

    2012-09-14

    Misfolding and aggregation of huntingtin is one of the hallmarks of Huntington disease, but the overall structure of these aggregates and the mechanisms by which huntingtin misfolds remain poorly understood. Here we used site-directed spin labeling and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to study the structural features of huntingtin exon 1 (HDx1) containing 46 glutamine residues in its polyglutamine (polyQ) region. Despite some residual structuring in the N terminus, we find that soluble HDx1 is highly dynamic. Upon aggregation, the polyQ domain becomes strongly immobilized indicating significant tertiary or quaternary packing interactions. Analysis of spin-spin interactions does not show the close contact between same residues that is characteristic of the parallel, in-register structure commonly found in amyloids. Nevertheless, the same residues are still within 20 Å of each other, suggesting that polyQ domains from different molecules come into proximity in the fibrils. The N terminus has previously been found to take up a helical structure in fibrils. We find that this domain not only becomes structured, but that it also engages in tertiary or quaternary packing interactions. The existence of spin-spin interactions in this region suggests that such contacts could be made between N-terminal domains from different molecules. In contrast, the C-terminal domain is dynamic, contains polyproline II structure, and lacks pronounced packing interactions. This region must be facing away from the core of the fibrils. Collectively, these data provide new constraints for building structural models of HDx1 fibrils.

  5. Distinct electronic structure for the extreme magnetoresistance in YSb

    SciTech Connect

    He, Junfeng; Zhang, Chaofan; Ghimire, Nirmal J.; Liang, Tian; Jia, Chunjing; Jiang, Juan; Tang, Shujie; Chen, Sudi; He, Yu; Mo, S. -K.; Hwang, C. C.; Hashimoto, M.; Lu, D. H.; Moritz, B.; Devereaux, T. P.; Chen, Y. L.; Mitchell, J. F.; Shen, Z. -X.

    2016-12-23

    An extreme magnetoresistance (XMR) has recently been observed in several nonmagnetic semimetals. Increasing experimental and theoretical evidence indicates that the XMR can be driven by either topological protection or electron-hole compensation. Moreover, by investigating the electronic structure of a XMR material, YSb, we present spectroscopic evidence for a special case which lacks topological protection and perfect electron-hole compensation. Further investigations reveal that a cooperative action of a substantial difference between electron and hole mobility and a moderate carrier compensation might contribute to the XMR in YSb.

  6. Distinct domains of the spinal muscular atrophy protein SMN are required for targeting to Cajal bodies in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Renvoisé, Benoît; Khoobarry, Kevinee; Gendron, Marie-Claude; Cibert, Christian; Viollet, Louis; Lefebvre, Suzie

    2006-02-15

    Mutations of the survival motor neuron gene SMN1 cause the inherited disease spinal muscular atrophy (SMA). The ubiquitous SMN protein facilitates the biogenesis of spliceosomal small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs). The protein is detected in the cytoplasm, nucleoplasm and enriched with snRNPs in nuclear Cajal bodies. It is structurally divided into at least an amino-terminal region rich in basic amino acid residues, a central Tudor domain, a self-association tyrosine-glycine-box and an exon7-encoded C-terminus. To examine the domains required for the intranuclear localization of SMN, we have used fluorescently tagged protein mutants transiently overexpressed in mammalian cells. The basic amino acid residues direct nucleolar localization of SMN mutants. The Tudor domain promotes localization of proteins in the nucleus and it cooperates with the basic amino acid residues and the tyrosine-glycine-box for protein localization in Cajal bodies. Moreover, the most frequent disease-linked mutant SMNDeltaex7 reduces accumulation of snRNPs in Cajal bodies, suggesting that the C-terminus of SMN participates in targeting to Cajal bodies. A reduced number of Cajal bodies in patient fibroblasts associates with the absence of snRNPs in Cajal bodies, revealing that intranuclear snRNA organization is modified in disease. These results indicate that direct and indirect mechanisms regulate localization of SMN in Cajal bodies.

  7. Structural Basis for Endosomal Targeting by the Bro1 Domain

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jaewon; Sitaraman, Sujatha; Hierro, Aitor; Beach, Bridgette M.; Odorizzi, Greg; Hurley, James H.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Proteins delivered to the lysosome or the yeast vacuole via late endosomes are sorted by the ESCRT complexes and by associated proteins, including Alix and its yeast homolog Bro1. Alix, Bro1, and several other late endosomal proteins share a conserved 160 residue Bro1 domain whose boundaries, structure, and function have not been characterized. The crystal structure of the Bro1 domain of Bro1 reveals a folded core of 367 residues. The extended Bro1 domain is necessary and sufficient for binding to the ESCRT-III subunit Snf7 and for the recruitment of Bro1 to late endosomes. The structure resembles a boomerang with its concave face filled in and contains a triple tetratricopeptide repeat domain as a substructure. Snf7 binds to a conserved hydrophobic patch on Bro1 that is required for protein complex formation and for the protein-sorting function of Bro1. These results define a conserved mechanism whereby Bro1 domain-containing proteins are targeted to endosomes by Snf7 and its orthologs. PMID:15935782

  8. Structural basis for endosomal targeting by the Bro1 domain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jaewon; Sitaraman, Sujatha; Hierro, Aitor; Beach, Bridgette M; Odorizzi, Greg; Hurley, James H

    2005-06-01

    Proteins delivered to the lysosome or the yeast vacuole via late endosomes are sorted by the ESCRT complexes and by associated proteins, including Alix and its yeast homolog Bro1. Alix, Bro1, and several other late endosomal proteins share a conserved 160 residue Bro1 domain whose boundaries, structure, and function have not been characterized. The crystal structure of the Bro1 domain of Bro1 reveals a folded core of 367 residues. The extended Bro1 domain is necessary and sufficient for binding to the ESCRT-III subunit Snf7 and for the recruitment of Bro1 to late endosomes. The structure resembles a boomerang with its concave face filled in and contains a triple tetratricopeptide repeat domain as a substructure. Snf7 binds to a conserved hydrophobic patch on Bro1 that is required for protein complex formation and for the protein-sorting function of Bro1. These results define a conserved mechanism whereby Bro1 domain-containing proteins are targeted to endosomes by Snf7 and its orthologs.

  9. Structural insight into CIDE domains: the Janus face of CIDEs.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun Ho

    2015-02-01

    Cell-death inducing DFF45-like effect domain (CIDE domain) is a protein interaction module that was initially found in DNA fragmentation factor (DFF) proteins DFF40 and DFF45. Several other CIDE-containing proteins, CIDE-A, CIDE-B, and CIDE-3, have since been identified in humans. Although the main function of these proteins is associated with apoptosis, recent studies have identified roles of CIDE-containing proteins in energy metabolism, especially involvement in control of the size of lipid droplets. Because CIDE-containing proteins perform critical tasks in apoptosis and energy metabolism and have been linked to many human diseases including cancer and obesity, studies of CIDE domains and CIDE-containing proteins are of great biological importance. This review summarizes the structural insight into CIDE and the CIDE-CIDE complex and speculates on a generalized strategy for the CIDE-CIDE interaction based on the available CIDE structures and molecular modelling.

  10. Structures of SemiSWEET transporters in two distinct conformations

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Chao; Chen, Li-Qing; Xu, Sophia; Perry, Kay; Frommer, Wolf B.; Feng, Liang

    2015-01-01

    SemiSWEETs and SWEETs are mono- and disaccharide transporters present from Archaea to higher plants and humans1-3. SWEETs play crucial roles in cellular sugar efflux processes, i.e. phloem loading4, pollen nutrition5 and nectar secretion6. Their bacterial homologs, SemiSWEETs, are among the smallest known transporters1,3. Here we show SemiSWEET, consisting of a triple-helix-bundle (THB), forms a symmetric parallel dimer to create the translocation pathway. Two SemiSWEET isoforms were crystallized in apparent open and occluded states, indicating that SemiSWEETs/SWEETs are transporters that undergo rocking-type movements during the transport cycle. The topology of THB is similar to the basic building block in MFS transporters (GLUTs, SUTs), indicating that they may have evolved from an ancestral THB into a parallel configuration to produce 6/6+1 transmembrane-helix pores for SemiSWEETs/SWEETs, and an antiparallel configuration of 2×2 THBs to generate 12 transmembrane-helix pores for MFS transporters. Given the similarity of SemiSWEETs/SWEETs to PQ-loop amino acid transporters and mitochondrial MPC organic acid transporters, the structures characterized here may also be relevant for other MtN3 clan transporters7-9. PMID:25186729

  11. Structural Studies on Cytosolic Domain of Magnesium Transporter MgtE from Enterococcus faecalis

    SciTech Connect

    Ragumani, S.; Sauder, J; Burley, S; Swaminathan, S

    2009-01-01

    Magnesium (Mg{sup 2+}) is an essential element for growth and maintenance of living cells. It acts as a cofactor for many enzymes and is also essential for stability of the plasma membrane. There are two distinct classes of magnesium transporters identified in bacteria that convey Mg{sup 2+} from periplasm to cytoplasm [ATPase-dependent (MgtA and MgtB) and constitutively active (CorA and MgtE)]. Previously published work on Mg{sup 2+} transporters yielded structures of full length MgtE from Thermus thermophilus, determined at 3.5 {angstrom} resolution, and its cytoplasmic domain with and without bond Mg{sup 2+} determined at 2.3 and 3.9 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. Here, they report the crystal structure of the Mg{sup 2+} bound form of the cytosolic portion of MgtE (residues 6-262) from Enterococcus faecalis at 2.2 {angstrom} resolution. The present structure and magnesium bound cytosolic domain structure from T. thermophilus (PDB ID: 2YVY) are structurally similar. Three magnesium binding sites are common to both MgtE full length and the present structure. Their work revealed an additional Mg{sup 2+} binding site in the E. faecalis structure. In this report, they discuss the functional significance of Mg{sup 2+} binding sites in the cytosolic domains of MgtE transporters.

  12. Fcp1 directly recognizes the C-terminal domain (CTD) and interacts with a site on RNA polymerase II distinct from the CTD

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Man-Hee; Ye, Ping; Zhang, Mincheng; Hausmann, Stéphane; Shuman, Stewart; Gnatt, Averell L.; Fu, Jianhua

    2005-01-01

    Fcp1 is an essential protein phosphatase that hydrolyzes phosphoserines within the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (Pol II). Fcp1 plays a major role in the regulation of CTD phosphorylation and, hence, critically influences the function of Pol II throughout the transcription cycle. The basic understanding of Fcp1–CTD interaction has remained ambiguous because two different modes have been proposed: the “dockingsite” model versus the “distributive” mechanism. Here we demonstrate biochemically that Fcp1 recognizes and dephosphorylates the CTD directly, independent of the globular non-CTD part of the Pol II structure. We point out that the recognition of CTD by the phosphatase is based on random access and is not driven by Pol II conformation. Results from three different types of experiments reveal that the overall interaction between Fcp1 and Pol II is not stable but dynamic. In addition, we show that Fcp1 also interacts with a region on the polymerase distinct from the CTD. We emphasize that this non-CTD site is functionally distinct from the docking site invoked previously as essential for the CTD phosphatase activity of Fcp1. We speculate that Fcp1 interaction with the non-CTD site may mediate its stimulatory effect on transcription elongation reported previously. PMID:16301539

  13. Parental Provision of Structure: Implementation and Correlates in Three Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grolnick, Wendy S.; Raftery-Helmer, Jacquelyn N.; Marbell, Kristine N; Flamm, Elizabeth S.; Cardemil, Esteban V.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined parents' provision of "structure," defined as the organization of the environment to facilitate competence, and the degree to which it supports versus controls children's autonomy, in the domains of homework and studying, unsupervised time, and responsibilities in a diverse sample of sixth-grade children and their…

  14. Structure and topological symmetry of the glyphosate target 5-enolpyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase: a distinctive protein fold.

    PubMed Central

    Stallings, W C; Abdel-Meguid, S S; Lim, L W; Shieh, H S; Dayringer, H E; Leimgruber, N K; Stegeman, R A; Anderson, K S; Sikorski, J A; Padgette, S R; Kishore, G M

    1991-01-01

    5-enol-Pyruvylshikimate-3-phosphate synthase (EPSP synthase; phosphoenolpyruvate:3-phosphoshikimate 1-carboxyvinyltransferase, EC 2.5.1.19) is an enzyme on the pathway toward the synthesis of aromatic amino acids in plants, fungi, and bacteria and is the target of the broad-spectrum herbicide glyphosate. The three-dimensional structure of the enzyme from Escherichia coli has been determined by crystallographic techniques. The polypeptide backbone chain was traced by examination of an electron density map calculated at 3-A resolution. The two-domain structure has a distinctive fold and appears to be formed by 6-fold replication of a protein folding unit comprising two parallel helices and a four-stranded sheet. Each domain is formed from three of these units, which are related by an approximate threefold symmetry axis; in each domain three of the helices are completely buried by a surface formed from the three beta-sheets and solvent-accessible faces of the other three helices. The domains are related by an approximate dyad, but in the present crystals the molecule does not display pseudo-symmetry related to the symmetry of point group 32 because its approximate threefold axes are almost normal. A possible relation between the three-dimensional structure of the protein and the linear sequence of its gene will be described. The topological threefold symmetry and orientation of each of the two observed globular domains may direct the binding of substrates and inhibitors by a helix macrodipole effect and implies that the active site is located near the interdomain crossover segments. The structure also suggests a rationale for the glyphosate tolerance conferred by sequence alterations. Images PMID:11607190

  15. Structure and function of regulator of G protein signaling homology domains.

    PubMed

    Tesmer, John J G

    2009-01-01

    All regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins contain a conserved domain of approximately 130 amino acids that binds to activated heterotrimeric G protein α subunits (Gα) and accelerates their rate of GTP hydrolysis. Homologous domains are found in at least six other protein families, including a family of Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors (RhoGEFs) and the G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs). Although some of the RhoGEF and GRK RGS-like domains can also bind to activated Gα subunits, they do so in distinct ways and with much lower levels of GTPase activation. In other protein families, the domains have as of yet no obvious relationship to heterotrimeric G protein signaling. These RGS homology (RH) domains are now recognized as mediators of extraordinarily diverse protein-protein interactions. Through these interactions, they play roles that range from enzyme to molecular scaffold to signal transducing module. In this review, the atomic structures of RH domains from RGS proteins, Axins, RhoGEFs, and GRKs are compared in light of what is currently known about their functional roles.

  16. Revealing and understanding the behavior of structural domain walls from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iniguez, Jorge

    2015-03-01

    Ferroelectric and ferroelastic domain walls (DWs) are becoming the focus of renewed excitement. Modern experimental techniques permit an unprecedented control on domain structures, and it is now possible to produce materials with a large volume fraction occupied by the DWs themselves. Also, recent experiments show that DWs can display distinct properties not present in the domains, which suggests the possibility of using the walls themselves as the functional material in nano-devices. In this talk I will review recent projects in which we have used theory and first-principles simulation to reveal and explain a variety of DW-related effects. The presentation will include the formation of novel two-dimensional crystals at the DWs of a ferroelastic material, the occurrence of ferroic orders (ferroelectric, ferromagnetic) confined at the DWs of various compounds, and cases in which peculiar (and useful) response and switching properties relie on existence of a multi-domain state. I will also summarize experimental evidence for most of these incredible findings, which clearly ratify domain and domain-wall engineering as a powerful strategy to obtain novel functional nano-materials. // Work done in collaboration with many researchers, the main ones being: J.C. Wojdeł (ICMAB-CSIC), C. Magén (INA at U. Zaragoza), M. Mostovoy (U. Groningen), P. Zubko (U. College London), as well as the groups of Beatriz Noheda (U. Groningen), R. Ramesh (UC Berkeley) and J.-M. Triscone (U. Geneva). Supported by MINECO-Spain.

  17. Unique Domain Structure of Two-Dimensional α-Mo2C Superconducting Crystals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhibo; Xu, Chuan; Kang, Ning; Wang, Libin; Jiang, Yixiao; Du, Jiao; Liu, Ying; Ma, Xiu-Liang; Cheng, Hui-Ming; Ren, Wencai

    2016-07-13

    The properties of two-dimensional (2D) materials such as graphene and monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides are strongly influenced by domain boundaries. Ultrathin transition metal carbides are a class of newly emerging 2D materials that are superconducting and have many potential applications such as in electrochemical energy storage, catalysis, and thermoelectric energy conversion. However, little is known about their domain structure and the influence of domain boundaries on their properties. Here we use atomic-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy combined with large-scale diffraction-filtered imaging to study the microstructure of chemical vapor deposited high-quality 2D α-Mo2C superconducting crystals of different regular shapes including triangles, rectangles, hexagons, octagons, nonagons, and dodecagons. The Mo atom sublattice in all these crystals has a uniform hexagonal closely packed arrangement without any boundaries. However, except for rectangular and octagonal crystals, the C atom sublattices are composed of three or six domains with rotational-symmetry and well-defined line-shaped domain boundaries because of the presence of three equivalent off-center directions of interstitial carbon atoms in Mo octahedra. We found that there is very small lattice shear strain across the domain boundary. In contrast to the single sharp transition observed in single-domain crystals, transport studies across domain boundaries show a broad resistive superconducting transition with two distinct transition processes due to the formation of localized phase slip events within the boundaries, indicating a significant influence of the boundary on 2D superconductivity. These findings provide new understandings on not only the microstructure of 2D transition metal carbides but also the intrinsic influence of domain boundaries on 2D superconductivity.

  18. Structures and Functions of the Multiple KOW Domains of Transcription Elongation Factor Spt5

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Peter A.; Li, Sheng; Zhang, Mincheng; Yamada, Kentaro; Takagi, Yuichiro; Hartzog, Grant A.

    2015-01-01

    The eukaryotic Spt4-Spt5 heterodimer forms a higher-order complex with RNA polymerase II (and I) to regulate transcription elongation. Extensive genetic and functional data have revealed diverse roles of Spt4-Spt5 in coupling elongation with chromatin modification and RNA-processing pathways. A mechanistic understanding of the diverse functions of Spt4-Spt5 is hampered by challenges in resolving the distribution of functions among its structural domains, including the five KOW domains in Spt5, and a lack of their high-resolution structures. We present high-resolution crystallographic results demonstrating that distinct structures are formed by the first through third KOW domains (KOW1-Linker1 [K1L1] and KOW2-KOW3) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Spt5. The structure reveals that K1L1 displays a positively charged patch (PCP) on its surface, which binds nucleic acids in vitro, as shown in biochemical assays, and is important for in vivo function, as shown in growth assays. Furthermore, assays in yeast have shown that the PCP has a function that partially overlaps that of Spt4. Synthesis of our results with previous evidence suggests a model in which Spt4 and the K1L1 domain of Spt5 form functionally overlapping interactions with nucleic acids upstream of the transcription bubble, and this mechanism may confer robustness on processes associated with transcription elongation. PMID:26217010

  19. Identification of multiple distinct Snf2 subfamilies with conserved structural motifs

    PubMed Central

    Flaus, Andrew; Martin, David M. A.; Barton, Geoffrey J.; Owen-Hughes, Tom

    2006-01-01

    The Snf2 family of helicase-related proteins includes the catalytic subunits of ATP-dependent chromatin remodelling complexes found in all eukaryotes. These act to regulate the structure and dynamic properties of chromatin and so influence a broad range of nuclear processes. We have exploited progress in genome sequencing to assemble a comprehensive catalogue of over 1300 Snf2 family members. Multiple sequence alignment of the helicase-related regions enables 24 distinct subfamilies to be identified, a considerable expansion over earlier surveys. Where information is known, there is a good correlation between biological or biochemical function and these assignments, suggesting Snf2 family motor domains are tuned for specific tasks. Scanning of complete genomes reveals all eukaryotes contain members of multiple subfamilies, whereas they are less common and not ubiquitous in eubacteria or archaea. The large sample of Snf2 proteins enables additional distinguishing conserved sequence blocks within the helicase-like motor to be identified. The establishment of a phylogeny for Snf2 proteins provides an opportunity to make informed assignments of function, and the identification of conserved motifs provides a framework for understanding the mechanisms by which these proteins function. PMID:16738128

  20. Distinct IFT mechanisms contribute to the generation of ciliary structural diversity in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Saikat; Lu, Yun; Qin, Hongmin; Lanjuin, Anne; Shaham, Shai; Sengupta, Piali

    2007-06-20

    Individual cell types can elaborate morphologically diverse cilia. Cilia are assembled via intraflagellar transport (IFT) of ciliary precursors; however, the mechanisms that generate ciliary diversity are unknown. Here, we examine IFT in the structurally distinct cilia of the ASH/ASI and the AWB chemosensory neurons in Caenorhabditis elegans, enabling us to compare IFT in specific cilia types. We show that unlike in the ASH/ASI cilia, the OSM-3 kinesin moves independently of the kinesin-II motor in the AWB cilia. Although OSM-3 is essential to extend the distal segments of the ASH/ASI cilia, it is not required to build the AWB distal segments. Mutations in the fkh-2 forkhead domain gene result in AWB-specific defects in ciliary morphology, and FKH-2 regulates kinesin-II subunit gene expression specifically in AWB. Our results suggest that cell-specific regulation of IFT contributes to the generation of ciliary diversity, and provide insights into the networks coupling the acquisition of ciliary specializations with other aspects of cell fate.

  1. High-resolution crystal structure of the PDZ1 domain of human protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP-Bas.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Ok; Lee, Mi-Kyung; Ku, Bonsu; Bae, Kwang-Hee; Lee, Sang Chul; Lim, Heon M; Kim, Seung Jun; Chi, Seung-Wook

    2016-09-23

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase-Basophil (PTP-Bas) is a membrane-associated protein tyrosine phosphatase with five PDZ domains and is involved in apoptosis, tumorigenesis, and insulin signaling. The interaction between PTP-Bas and tandem-PH-domain-containing protein 1/2 (TAPP1/2) plays an essential role in the regulation of insulin signaling. Despite its high sequence homology with the other PDZ domains, only the PDZ1 domain of PTP-Bas showed distinct binding specificity for TAPP1/2. Although the interaction between PTP-Bas PDZ1 and TAPP1/2 is a therapeutic target for diabetes, the structural basis for the interaction has not been elucidated. In the present study, we determined the crystal structure of the PTP-Bas PDZ1 domain at 1.6 Å resolution. In addition, we calculated the structural models of complexes of PTP-Bas PDZ1 and the C-terminal peptides of TAPP1/2 (referred to as TAPP1p/2p). Structural comparison with the PTP-Bas PDZ2/RA-GEF2 peptide complex revealed a structural basis for distinct binding specificity of PTP-Bas PDZ1 for TAPP1p/2p peptides. Our high-resolution crystal structure of PTP-Bas PDZ1 will serve as a useful template for rational structure-based design of novel anti-diabetes therapeutics.

  2. Structure of the adenylation domain of NAD[superscript +]-dependent DNA ligase from Staphylococcus aureus

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Seungil; Chang, Jeanne S.; Griffor, Matt; Pfizer

    2010-09-17

    DNA ligase catalyzes phosphodiester-bond formation between immediately adjacent 5'-phosphate and 3''-hydroxyl groups in double-stranded DNA and plays a central role in many cellular and biochemical processes, including DNA replication, repair and recombination. Bacterial NAD{sup +}-dependent DNA ligases have been extensively characterized as potential antibacterial targets because of their essentiality and their structural distinction from human ATP-dependent DNA ligases. The high-resolution structure of the adenylation domain of Staphylococcus aureus NAD{sup +}-dependent DNA ligase establishes the conserved domain architecture with other bacterial adenylation domains. Two apo crystal structures revealed that the active site possesses the preformed NAD{sup +}-binding pocket and the 'C2 tunnel' lined with hydrophobic residues: Leu80, Phe224, Leu287, Phe295 and Trp302. The C2 tunnel is unique to bacterial DNA ligases and the Leu80 side chain at the mouth of the tunnel points inside the tunnel and forms a narrow funnel in the S. aureus DNA ligase structure. Taken together with other DNA ligase structures, the S. aureus DNA ligase structure provides a basis for a more integrated understanding of substrate recognition and catalysis and will be also be of help in the development of small-molecule inhibitors.

  3. Structure of the adenylation domain of NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligase from Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Han, Seungil; Chang, Jeanne S; Griffor, Matt

    2009-11-01

    DNA ligase catalyzes phosphodiester-bond formation between immediately adjacent 5'-phosphate and 3'-hydroxyl groups in double-stranded DNA and plays a central role in many cellular and biochemical processes, including DNA replication, repair and recombination. Bacterial NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligases have been extensively characterized as potential antibacterial targets because of their essentiality and their structural distinction from human ATP-dependent DNA ligases. The high-resolution structure of the adenylation domain of Staphylococcus aureus NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligase establishes the conserved domain architecture with other bacterial adenylation domains. Two apo crystal structures revealed that the active site possesses the preformed NAD(+)-binding pocket and the 'C2 tunnel' lined with hydrophobic residues: Leu80, Phe224, Leu287, Phe295 and Trp302. The C2 tunnel is unique to bacterial DNA ligases and the Leu80 side chain at the mouth of the tunnel points inside the tunnel and forms a narrow funnel in the S. aureus DNA ligase structure. Taken together with other DNA ligase structures, the S. aureus DNA ligase structure provides a basis for a more integrated understanding of substrate recognition and catalysis and will be also be of help in the development of small-molecule inhibitors.

  4. Nonparametric identification of structural modifications in Laplace domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwała, G.; Jankowski, Ł.

    2017-02-01

    This paper proposes and experimentally verifies a Laplace-domain method for identification of structural modifications, which (1) unlike time-domain formulations, allows the identification to be focused on these parts of the frequency spectrum that have a high signal-to-noise ratio, and (2) unlike frequency-domain formulations, decreases the influence of numerical artifacts related to the particular choice of the FFT exponential window decay. In comparison to the time-domain approach proposed earlier, advantages of the proposed method are smaller computational cost and higher accuracy, which leads to reliable performance in more difficult identification cases. Analytical formulas for the first- and second-order sensitivity analysis are derived. The approach is based on a reduced nonparametric model, which has the form of a set of selected structural impulse responses. Such a model can be collected purely experimentally, which obviates the need for design and laborious updating of a parametric model, such as a finite element model. The approach is verified experimentally using a 26-node lab 3D truss structure and 30 identification cases of a single mass modification or two concurrent mass modifications.

  5. Structure of the Nucleoprotein Binding Domain of Mokola Virus Phosphoprotein▿

    PubMed Central

    Assenberg, René; Delmas, Olivier; Ren, Jingshan; Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier; Verma, Anil; Larrous, Florence; Graham, Stephen C.; Tangy, Frédéric; Grimes, Jonathan M.; Bourhy, Hervé

    2010-01-01

    Mokola virus (MOKV) is a nonsegmented, negative-sense RNA virus that belongs to the Lyssavirus genus and Rhabdoviridae family. MOKV phosphoprotein P is an essential component of the replication and transcription complex and acts as a cofactor for the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. P recruits the viral polymerase to the nucleoprotein-bound viral RNA (N-RNA) via an interaction between its C-terminal domain and the N-RNA complex. Here we present a structure for this domain of MOKV P, obtained by expression of full-length P in Escherichia coli, which was subsequently truncated during crystallization. The structure has a high degree of homology with P of rabies virus, another member of Lyssavirus genus, and to a lesser degree with P of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), a member of the related Vesiculovirus genus. In addition, analysis of the crystal packing of this domain reveals a potential binding site for the nucleoprotein N. Using both site-directed mutagenesis and yeast two-hybrid experiments to measure P-N interaction, we have determined the relative roles of key amino acids involved in this interaction to map the region of P that binds N. This analysis also reveals a structural relationship between the N-RNA binding domain of the P proteins of the Rhabdoviridae and the Paramyxoviridae. PMID:19906936

  6. Identification of distinct SET/TAF-Iβ domains required for core histone binding and quantitative characterisation of the interaction

    PubMed Central

    Karetsou, Zoe; Emmanouilidou, Anastasia; Sanidas, Ioannis; Liokatis, Stamatis; Nikolakaki, Eleni; Politou, Anastasia S; Papamarcaki, Thomais

    2009-01-01

    Background The assembly of nucleosomes to higher-order chromatin structures is finely tuned by the relative affinities of histones for chaperones and nucleosomal binding sites. The myeloid leukaemia protein SET/TAF-Iβ belongs to the NAP1 family of histone chaperones and participates in several chromatin-based mechanisms, such as chromatin assembly, nucleosome reorganisation and transcriptional activation. To better understand the histone chaperone function of SET/TAF-Iβ, we designed several SET/TAF-Iβ truncations, examined their structural integrity by circular Dichroism and assessed qualitatively and quantitatively the histone binding properties of wild-type protein and mutant forms using GST-pull down experiments and fluorescence spectroscopy-based binding assays. Results Wild type SET/TAF-Iβ binds to histones H2B and H3 with Kd values of 2.87 and 0.15 μM, respectively. The preferential binding of SET/TAF-Iβ to histone H3 is mediated by its central region and the globular part of H3. On the contrary, the acidic C-terminal tail and the amino-terminal dimerisation domain of SET/TAF-Iβ, as well as the H3 amino-terminal tail, are dispensable for this interaction. Conclusion This type of analysis allowed us to assess the relative affinities of SET/TAF-Iβ for different histones and identify the domains of the protein required for effective histone recognition. Our findings are consistent with recent structural studies of SET/TAF-Iβ and can be valuable to understand the role of SET/TAF-Iβ in chromatin function. PMID:19358706

  7. Structural features of the regulatory ACT domain of phenylalanine hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Carluccio, Carla; Fraternali, Franca; Salvatore, Francesco; Fornili, Arianna; Zagari, Adriana

    2013-01-01

    Phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) catalyzes the conversion of L-Phe to L-Tyr. Defects in PAH activity, caused by mutations in the human gene, result in the autosomal recessively inherited disease hyperphenylalaninemia. PAH activity is regulated by multiple factors, including phosphorylation and ligand binding. In particular, PAH displays positive cooperativity for L-Phe, which is proposed to bind the enzyme on an allosteric site in the N-terminal regulatory domain (RD), also classified as an ACT domain. This domain is found in several proteins and is able to bind amino acids. We used molecular dynamics simulations to obtain dynamical and structural insights into the isolated RD of PAH. Here we show that the principal motions involve conformational changes leading from an initial open to a final closed domain structure. The global intrinsic motions of the RD are correlated with exposure to solvent of a hydrophobic surface, which corresponds to the ligand binding-site of the ACT domain. Our results strongly suggest a relationship between the Phe-binding function and the overall dynamic behaviour of the enzyme. This relationship may be affected by structure-disturbing mutations. To elucidate the functional implications of the mutations, we investigated the structural effects on the dynamics of the human RD PAH induced by six missense hyperphenylalaninemia-causing mutations, namely p.G46S, p.F39C, p.F39L, p.I65S, p.I65T and p.I65V. These studies showed that the alterations in RD hydrophobic interactions induced by missense mutations could affect the functionality of the whole enzyme.

  8. Repeat proteins challenge the concept of structural domains.

    PubMed

    Espada, Rocío; Parra, R Gonzalo; Sippl, Manfred J; Mora, Thierry; Walczak, Aleksandra M; Ferreiro, Diego U

    2015-10-01

    Structural domains are believed to be modules within proteins that can fold and function independently. Some proteins show tandem repetitions of apparent modular structure that do not fold independently, but rather co-operate in stabilizing structural forms that comprise several repeat-units. For many natural repeat-proteins, it has been shown that weak energetic links between repeats lead to the breakdown of co-operativity and the appearance of folding sub-domains within an apparently regular repeat array. The quasi-1D architecture of repeat-proteins is crucial in detailing how the local energetic balances can modulate the folding dynamics of these proteins, which can be related to the physiological behaviour of these ubiquitous biological systems.

  9. Approximation method to compute domain related integrals in structural studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oanta, E.; Panait, C.; Raicu, A.; Barhalescu, M.; Axinte, T.

    2015-11-01

    Various engineering calculi use integral calculus in theoretical models, i.e. analytical and numerical models. For usual problems, integrals have mathematical exact solutions. If the domain of integration is complicated, there may be used several methods to calculate the integral. The first idea is to divide the domain in smaller sub-domains for which there are direct calculus relations, i.e. in strength of materials the bending moment may be computed in some discrete points using the graphical integration of the shear force diagram, which usually has a simple shape. Another example is in mathematics, where the surface of a subgraph may be approximated by a set of rectangles or trapezoids used to calculate the definite integral. The goal of the work is to introduce our studies about the calculus of the integrals in the transverse section domains, computer aided solutions and a generalizing method. The aim of our research is to create general computer based methods to execute the calculi in structural studies. Thus, we define a Boolean algebra which operates with ‘simple’ shape domains. This algebraic standpoint uses addition and subtraction, conditioned by the sign of every ‘simple’ shape (-1 for the shapes to be subtracted). By ‘simple’ shape or ‘basic’ shape we define either shapes for which there are direct calculus relations, or domains for which their frontiers are approximated by known functions and the according calculus is carried out using an algorithm. The ‘basic’ shapes are linked to the calculus of the most significant stresses in the section, refined aspect which needs special attention. Starting from this idea, in the libraries of ‘basic’ shapes, there were included rectangles, ellipses and domains whose frontiers are approximated by spline functions. The domain triangularization methods suggested that another ‘basic’ shape to be considered is the triangle. The subsequent phase was to deduce the exact relations for the

  10. Influence of domain structure induced coupling on magnetization reversal of Co/Pt/Co film with perpendicular anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matczak, Michał; Schäfer, Rudolf; Urbaniak, Maciej; Kuświk, Piotr; Szymański, Bogdan; Schmidt, Marek; Aleksiejew, Jacek; Stobiecki, Feliks

    2017-01-01

    A magnetic multilayer of substrate/Pt-15 nm/Co-0.8 nm/Pt-wedge 0-7 nm/Co-0.6 nm/Pt-2 nm structure is characterized by a perpendicular anisotropy of the Co layers and by graded interlayer coupling between them. Using magnetooptical Kerr microscopy we observed a distinct influence of magnetic domains in one Co layer on the nucleation field and positions of nucleation sites of reversed domains in the second Co layer. For sufficiently strong interlayer coupling a replication of magnetic domains from the magnetically harder layer to the magnetically softer layer is observed.

  11. Structure and evolution of the magnetochrome domains: no longer alone

    PubMed Central

    Arnoux, Pascal; Siponen, Marina I.; Lefèvre, Christopher T.; Ginet, Nicolas; Pignol, David

    2014-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) can swim along Earth's magnetic field lines, thanks to the alignment of dedicated cytoplasmic organelles. These organelles, termed magnetosomes, are proteolipidic vesicles filled by a 35–120 nm crystal of either magnetite or greigite. The formation and alignment of magnetosomes are mediated by a group of specific genes, the mam genes, encoding the magnetosome-associated proteins. The whole process of magnetosome biogenesis can be divided into four sequential steps; (i) cytoplasmic membrane invagination, (ii) magnetosomes alignment, (iii) iron crystal nucleation and (iv) species-dependent mineral size and shape control. Since both magnetite and greigite are a mix of iron (III) and iron (II), iron redox state management within the magnetosome vesicle is a key issue. Recently, studies have started pointing out the importance of a MTB-specific c-type cytochrome domain found in several magnetosome-associated proteins (MamE, P, T, and X). This magnetochrome (MCR) domain is almost always found in tandem, and this tandem is either found alone (MamT), in combination with a PDZ domain (MamP), a domain of unknown function (MamX) or with a trypsin combined to one or two PDZ domains (MamE). By taking advantage of new genomic data available on MTB and a recent structural study of MamP, which helped define the MCR domain boundaries, we attempt to retrace the evolutionary history within and between the different MCR-containing proteins. We propose that the observed tandem repeat of MCR is the result of a convergent evolution and attempt to explain why this domain is rarely found alone. PMID:24723915

  12. Crystal Structure and Oligomeric State of the RetS Signaling Kinase Sensory Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Jing, X.; Jaw, J; Robinson, H; Schubot, F

    2010-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa may cause both acute and chronic-persistent infections in predisposed individuals. Acute infections require the presence of a functional type III secretion system (T3SS), whereas chronic P. aeruginosa infections are characterized by the formation of drug-resistant biofilms. The T3SS and biofilm formation are reciprocally regulated by the signaling kinases LadS, RetS, and GacS. RetS downregulates biofilm formation and upregulates expression of the T3SS through a unique mechanism. RetS forms a heterodimeric complex with GacS and thus prevents GacS autophosphorylation and downstream signaling. The signals that regulate RetS are not known but RetS possesses a distinctive periplasmic sensor domain that is believed to serve as receptor for the regulatory ligand. We have determined the crystal structure of the RetS sensory domain at 2.0 {angstrom} resolution. The structure closely resembles those of carbohydrate binding modules of other proteins, suggesting that the elusive ligands are likely carbohydrate moieties. In addition to the conserved beta-sandwich structure, the sensory domain features two alpha helices which create a unique surface topology. Protein-protein crosslinking and fluorescence energy transfer experiments also revealed that the sensory domain dimerizes with a dissociation constant of K{sub d} = 580 {+-} 50 nM, a result with interesting implications for our understanding of the underlying signaling mechanism.

  13. Crystal structure of the human, FIC-domain containing protein HYPE and implications for its functions.

    PubMed

    Bunney, Tom D; Cole, Ambrose R; Broncel, Malgorzata; Esposito, Diego; Tate, Edward W; Katan, Matilda

    2014-12-02

    Protein AMPylation, the transfer of AMP from ATP to protein targets, has been recognized as a new mechanism of host-cell disruption by some bacterial effectors that typically contain a FIC-domain. Eukaryotic genomes also encode one FIC-domain protein,HYPE, which has remained poorly characterized.Here we describe the structure of human HYPE, solved by X-ray crystallography, representing the first structure of a eukaryotic FIC-domain protein. We demonstrate that HYPE forms stable dimers with structurally and functionally integrated FIC-domains and with TPR-motifs exposed for protein-protein interactions. As HYPE also uniquely possesses a transmembrane helix, dimerization is likely to affect its positioning and function in the membrane vicinity. The low rate of auto AMPylation of the wild-type HYPE could be due to autoinhibition, consistent with the mechanism proposed for a number of putative FIC AMPylators. Our findings also provide a basis to further consider possible alternative cofactors of HYPE and distinct modes of target-recognition.

  14. Domain wall spin structures in mesoscopic Fe rings probed by high resolution SEMPA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krautscheid, Pascal; Reeve, Robert M.; Lauf, Maike; Krüger, Benjamin; Kläui, Mathias

    2016-10-01

    We present a combined theoretical and experimental study of the energetic stability and accessibility of different domain wall spin configurations in mesoscopic magnetic iron rings. The evolution is investigated as a function of the width and thickness in a regime of relevance to devices, while Fe is chosen as a material due to its simple growth in combination with attractive magnetic properties including high saturation magnetization and low intrinsic anisotropy. Micromagnetic simulations are performed to predict the lowest energy states of the domain walls, which can be either the transverse or vortex wall spin structure, in good agreement with analytical models, with further simulations revealing the expected low temperature configurations observable on relaxation of the magnetic structure from saturation in an external field. In the latter case, following the domain wall nucleation process, transverse domain walls are found at larger widths and thicknesses than would be expected by just comparing the competing energy terms demonstrating the importance of metastability of the states. The simulations are compared to high spatial resolution experimental images of the magnetization using scanning electron microscopy with polarization analysis to provide a phase diagram of the various spin configurations. In addition to the vortex and simple symmetric transverse domain wall, a significant range of geometries are found to exhibit highly asymmetric transverse domain walls with properties distinct from the symmetric transverse wall. Simulations of the asymmetric walls reveal an evolution of the domain wall tilting angle with ring thickness which can be understood from the thickness dependencies of the contributing energy terms. Analysis of all the data reveals that in addition to the geometry, the influence of materials properties, defects and thermal activation all need to be taken into account in order to understand and reliably control the experimentally accessible

  15. Human DNA-Damage-Inducible 2 Protein Is Structurally and Functionally Distinct from Its Yeast Ortholog

    PubMed Central

    Sivá, Monika; Svoboda, Michal; Veverka, Václav; Trempe, Jean-François; Hofmann, Kay; Kožíšek, Milan; Hexnerová, Rozálie; Sedlák, František; Belza, Jan; Brynda, Jiří; Šácha, Pavel; Hubálek, Martin; Starková, Jana; Flaisigová, Iva; Konvalinka, Jan; Šašková, Klára Grantz

    2016-01-01

    Although Ddi1-like proteins are conserved among eukaryotes, their biological functions remain poorly characterized. Yeast Ddi1 has been implicated in cell cycle regulation, DNA-damage response, and exocytosis. By virtue of its ubiquitin-like (UBL) and ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domains, it has been proposed to serve as a proteasomal shuttle factor. All Ddi1-like family members also contain a highly conserved retroviral protease-like (RVP) domain with unknown substrate specificity. While the structure and biological function of yeast Ddi1 have been investigated, no such analysis is available for the human homologs. To address this, we solved the 3D structures of the human Ddi2 UBL and RVP domains and identified a new helical domain that extends on either side of the RVP dimer. While Ddi1-like proteins from all vertebrates lack a UBA domain, we identify a novel ubiquitin-interacting motif (UIM) located at the C-terminus of the protein. The UIM showed a weak yet specific affinity towards ubiquitin, as did the Ddi2 UBL domain. However, the full-length Ddi2 protein is unable to bind to di-ubiquitin chains. While proteomic analysis revealed no activity, implying that the protease requires other factors for activation, our structural characterization of all domains of human Ddi2 sets the stage for further characterization. PMID:27461074

  16. Structural and Functional Relationships between the Lectin and Arm Domains of Calreticulin*

    PubMed Central

    Pocanschi, Cosmin L.; Kozlov, Guennadi; Brockmeier, Ulf; Brockmeier, Achim; Williams, David B.; Gehring, Kalle

    2011-01-01

    Calreticulin and calnexin are key components in maintaining the quality control of glycoprotein folding within the endoplasmic reticulum. Although their lectin function of binding monoglucosylated sugar moieties of glycoproteins is well documented, their chaperone activity in suppressing protein aggregation is less well understood. Here, we use a series of deletion mutants of calreticulin to demonstrate that its aggregation suppression function resides primarily within its lectin domain. Using hydrophobic peptides as substrate mimetics, we show that aggregation suppression is mediated through a single polypeptide binding site that exhibits a Kd for peptides of 0.5–1 μm. This site is distinct from the oligosaccharide binding site and differs from previously identified sites of binding to thrombospondin and GABARAP (4-aminobutyrate type A receptor-associated protein). Although the arm domain of calreticulin was incapable of suppressing aggregation or binding hydrophobic peptides on its own, it did contribute to aggregation suppression in the context of the whole molecule. The high resolution x-ray crystal structure of calreticulin with a partially truncated arm domain reveals a marked difference in the relative orientations of the arm and lectin domains when compared with calnexin. Furthermore, a hydrophobic patch was detected on the arm domain that mediates crystal packing and may contribute to calreticulin chaperone function. PMID:21652723

  17. Specific anchoring modes of two distinct dystrophin rod sub-domains interacting in phospholipid Langmuir films studied by atomic force microscopy and PM-IRRAS.

    PubMed

    Vié, V; Legardinier, S; Chieze, L; Le Bihan, O; Qin, Y; Sarkis, J; Hubert, J-F; Renault, A; Desbat, B; Le Rumeur, E

    2010-08-01

    Dystrophin rod repeats 1-3 sub-domain binds to acidic phosphatidylserine in a small vesicle binding assay, while the repeats 20-24 sub-domain does not. In the present work, we studied the adsorption behaviour of both sub-domains at the air/liquid interface and at the air/lipid interface in a Langmuir trough in order to highlight differences in interfacial properties. The adsorption behaviour of the two proteins at the air/liquid interface shows that they display surface activity while maintaining their alpha-helical secondary structure as shown by PM-IRRAS. Strikingly, R20-24 needs to be highly hydrated even at the interface, while this is not the case for R1-3, indicating that the surface activity is dramatically higher for R1-3 than R20-24. Surface-pressure measurements, atomic force microscopy and PM-IRRAS are used in a Langmuir experiment with DOPC-DOPS monolayers at two different surface pressures, 20 mN/m and 30 mN/m. At the lower surface pressure, the proteins are adsorbed at the lipid film interface while maintaining its alpha-helical structure. After an increase of the surface pressure, R1-3 subsequently produces a stable film, while R20-24 induces a reorganization of the lipid film with a subsequent decrease of the surface pressure close to the initial value. AFM and PM-IRRAS show that R1-3 is present in high amounts at the interface, being arranged in clusters representing 3.3% of the surface at low pressure. By contrast, R20-24 is present at the interface in small amounts bound only by a few electrostatic residues to the lipid film while the major part of the molecule remains floating in the sub-phase. Then for R1-3, the electrostatic interaction between the proteins and the film is enhanced by hydrophobic interactions. At higher surface pressure, the number of protein clusters increases and becomes closer in both cases implying the electrostatic character of the binding. These results indicate that even if the repeats exhibit large structural

  18. Janus Model of The Na,K-ATPase β-subunit Transmembrane Domain: Distinct Faces Mediate α /β Assembly and β-β Homo-Oligomerization

    PubMed Central

    Barwe, Sonali P.; Kim, Sanguk; Rajasekaran, Sigrid A.; Bowie, James U.; Rajasekaran, Ayyappan K.

    2007-01-01

    Summary Na,K-ATPase is a hetero-oligomer of α- and β-subunits. The Na,K-ATPase β-subunit (Na,K-β ) is involved in both the regulation of ion transport activity, and in cell-cell adhesion. By structure prediction and evolutionary analysis, we identified two distinct faces on the Na,K-β transmembrane domain (TMD) that could mediate protein-protein interactions: a glycine zipper motif and a conserved heptad repeat. Here, we show that the heptad repeat face is involved in the hetero-oligomeric interaction of Na,K-β with Na,K-α , and the glycine zipper face is involved in the homo-oligomerization of Na,K-β . Point mutations in the heptad repeat motif reduced Na,K-β binding to Na,K-α , and Na,K-ATPase activity. Na,K-β TMD homo-oligomerized in biological membranes, and mutation of the glycine zipper motif affected oligomerization and cell-cell adhesion. These results provide a structural basis for understanding how Na,K-β links ion transport and cell-cell adhesion. PMID:17078968

  19. Origin and structure of polar domains in doped molecular crystals

    PubMed Central

    Meirzadeh, E.; Azuri, I.; Qi, Y.; Ehre, D.; Rappe, A. M.; Lahav, M.; Kronik, L.; Lubomirsky, I.

    2016-01-01

    Doping is a primary tool for the modification of the properties of materials. Occlusion of guest molecules in crystals generally reduces their symmetry by the creation of polar domains, which engender polarization and pyroelectricity in the doped crystals. Here we describe a molecular-level determination of the structure of such polar domains, as created by low dopant concentrations (<0.5%). The approach comprises crystal engineering and pyroelectric measurements, together with dispersion-corrected density functional theory and classical molecular dynamics calculations of the doped crystals, using neutron diffraction data of the host at different temperatures. This approach is illustrated using centrosymmetric α-glycine crystals doped with minute amounts of different L-amino acids. The experimentally determined pyroelectric coefficients are explained by the structure and polarization calculations, thus providing strong support for the local and global understanding of how different dopants influence the properties of molecular crystals. PMID:27824050

  20. SNP@Domain: a web resource of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within protein domain structures and sequences

    PubMed Central

    Han, Areum; Kang, Hyo Jin; Cho, Yoobok; Lee, Sunghoon; Kim, Young Joo; Gong, Sungsam

    2006-01-01

    The single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in conserved protein regions have been thought to be strong candidates that alter protein functions. Thus, we have developed SNP@Domain, a web resource, to identify SNPs within human protein domains. We annotated SNPs from dbSNP with protein structure-based as well as sequence-based domains: (i) structure-based using SCOP and (ii) sequence-based using Pfam to avoid conflicts from two domain assignment methodologies. Users can investigate SNPs within protein domains with 2D and 3D maps. We expect this visual annotation of SNPs within protein domains will help scientists select and interpret SNPs associated with diseases. A web interface for the SNP@Domain is freely available at and from . PMID:16845090

  1. A Global Genomic Characterization of Nairoviruses Identifies Nine Discrete Genogroups with Distinctive Structural Characteristics and Host-Vector Associations

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Peter J.; Widen, Steven G.; Wood, Thomas G.; Guzman, Hilda; Tesh, Robert B.; Vasilakis, Nikolaos

    2016-01-01

    Nairoviruses are primarily tick-borne bunyaviruses, some of which are known to cause mild-to-severe febrile illness in humans or livestock. We describe the genome sequences of 11 poorly characterized nairoviruses that have ecological associations with either birds (Farallon, Punta Salinas, Sapphire II, Zirqa, Avalon, Clo Mor, Taggert, and Abu Hammad viruses), rodents (Qalyub and Bandia viruses), or camels (Dera Ghazi Khan virus). Global phylogenetic analyses of proteins encoded in the L, M, and S RNA segments of these and 20 other available nairovirus genomes identified nine well-supported genogroups (Nairobi sheep disease, Thiafora, Sakhalin, Keterah, Qalyub, Kasokero, Dera Ghazi Khan, Hughes, and Tamdy). Genogroup-specific structural variations were evident, particularly in the M segment encoding a polyprotein from which virion envelope glycoproteins (Gn and Gc) are generated by proteolytic processing. Structural variations include the extension, abbreviation, or absence sequences encoding an O-glycosylated mucin-like protein in the N-terminal domain, distinctive patterns of conserved cysteine residues in the GP38-like domain, insertion of sequences encoding a double-membrane-spanning protein (NSm) between the Gn and Gc domains, and the presence of an alternative long open reading frame encoding a viroporin-like transmembrane protein (Gx). We also observed strong genogroup-specific associations with categories of hosts and tick vectors. PMID:26903607

  2. Structure and dynamics of nano-sized raft-like domains on the plasma membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Fernando E.; Pantano, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    Cell membranes are constitutively composed of thousands of different lipidic species, whose specific organization leads to functional heterogeneities. In particular, sphingolipids, cholesterol and some proteins associate among them to form stable nanoscale domains involved in recognition, signaling, membrane trafficking, etc. Atomic-detail information in the nanometer/second scale is still elusive to experimental techniques. In this context, molecular simulations on membrane systems have provided useful insights contributing to bridge this gap. Here we present the results of a series of simulations of biomembranes representing non-raft and raft-like nano-sized domains in order to analyze the particular structural and dynamical properties of these domains. Our results indicate that the smallest (5 nm) raft domains are able to preserve their distinctive structural and dynamical features, such as an increased thickness, higher ordering, lower lateral diffusion, and specific lipid-ion interactions. The insertion of a transmembrane protein helix into non-raft, extended raft-like, and raft-like nanodomain environments result in markedly different protein orientations, highlighting the interplay between the lipid-lipid and lipid-protein interactions.

  3. Complex structure of the fission yeast SREBP-SCAP binding domains reveals an oligomeric organization

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Xin; Qian, Hongwu; Shao, Wei; Li, Jingxian; Wu, Jianping; Liu, Jun-Jie; Li, Wenqi; Wang, Hong-Wei; Espenshade, Peter; Yan, Nieng

    2016-01-01

    Sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) transcription factors are master regulators of cellular lipid homeostasis in mammals and oxygen-responsive regulators of hypoxic adaptation in fungi. SREBP C-terminus binds to the WD40 domain of SREBP cleavage-activating protein (SCAP), which confers sterol regulation by controlling the ER-to-Golgi transport of the SREBP-SCAP complex and access to the activating proteases in the Golgi. Here, we biochemically and structurally show that the carboxyl terminal domains (CTD) of Sre1 and Scp1, the fission yeast SREBP and SCAP, form a functional 4:4 oligomer and Sre1-CTD forms a dimer of dimers. The crystal structure of Sre1-CTD at 3.5 Å and cryo-EM structure of the complex at 5.4 Å together with in vitro biochemical evidence elucidate three distinct regions in Sre1-CTD required for Scp1 binding, Sre1-CTD dimerization and tetrameric formation. Finally, these structurally identified domains are validated in a cellular context, demonstrating that the proper 4:4 oligomeric complex formation is required for Sre1 activation. PMID:27811944

  4. Structural Basis for Viral Late-Domain Binding to Alix

    SciTech Connect

    Lee,S.; Joshi, A.; Nagashima, K.; Freed, E.; Hurley, J.

    2007-01-01

    The modular protein Alix is a central node in endosomal-lysosomal trafficking and the budding of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1. The Gag p6 protein of HIV-1 contains a LYPx{sub n}LxxL motif that is required for Alix-mediated budding and binds a region of Alix spanning residues 360-702. The structure of this fragment of Alix has the shape of the letter 'V' and is termed the V domain. The V domain has a topologically complex arrangement of 11 {alpha}-helices, with connecting loops that cross three times between the two arms of the V. The conserved residue Phe676 is at the center of a large hydrophobic pocket and is crucial for binding to a peptide model of HIV-1 p6. Overexpression of the V domain inhibits HIV-1 release from cells. This inhibition of release is reversed by mutations that block binding of the Alix V domain to p6.

  5. Structural and functional analysis of domains of the progesterone receptor.

    PubMed

    Hill, Krista K; Roemer, Sarah C; Churchill, Mair E A; Edwards, Dean P

    2012-01-30

    Steroid hormone receptors are multi-domain proteins composed of conserved well-structured regions, such as ligand (LBD) and DNA binding domains (DBD), plus other naturally unstructured regions including the amino-terminal domain (NTD) and the hinge region between the LBD and DBD. The hinge is more than just a flexible region between the DBD and LBD and is capable of binding co-regulatory proteins and the minor groove of DNA flanking hormone response elements. Because the hinge can directly participate in DNA binding it has also been termed the carboxyl terminal extension (CTE) of the DNA binding domain. The CTE and NTD are dynamic regions of the receptor that can adopt multiple conformations depending on the environment of interacting proteins and DNA. Both regions have important regulatory roles for multiple receptor functions that are related to the ability of the CTE and NTD to form multiple active conformations. This review focuses on studies of the CTE and NTD of progesterone receptor (PR), as well as related work with other steroid/nuclear receptors.

  6. IS-Dom: a dataset of independent structural domains automatically delineated from protein structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebina, Teppei; Umezawa, Yuki; Kuroda, Yutaka

    2013-05-01

    Protein domains that can fold in isolation are significant targets in diverse area of proteomics research as they are often readily analyzed by high-throughput methods. Here, we report IS-Dom, a dataset of Independent Structural Domains (ISDs) that are most likely to fold in isolation. IS-Dom was constructed by filtering domains from SCOP, CATH, and DomainParser using quantitative structural measures, which were calculated by estimating inter-domain hydrophobic clusters and hydrogen bonds from the full length protein's atomic coordinates. The ISD detection protocol is fully automated, and all of the computed interactions are stored in the server which enables rapid update of IS-Dom. We also prepared a standard IS-Dom using parameters optimized by maximizing the Youden's index. The standard IS-Dom, contained 54,860 ISDs, of which 25.5 % had high sequence identity and termini overlap with a Protein Data Bank (PDB) cataloged sequence and are thus experimentally shown to fold in isolation [coined autonomously folded domain (AFDs)]. Furthermore, our ISD detection protocol missed less than 10 % of the AFDs, which corroborated our protocol's ability to define structural domains that are able to fold independently. IS-Dom is available through the web server (http://domserv.lab.tuat.ac.jp/IS-Dom.html), and users can either, download the standard IS-Dom dataset, construct their own IS-Dom by interactively varying the parameters, or assess the structural independence of newly defined putative domains.

  7. Solution structure of the focal adhesion adaptor PINCH LIM1 domain and characterization of its interaction with the integrin-linked kinase ankyrin repeat domain.

    PubMed

    Velyvis, A; Yang, Y; Wu, C; Qin, J

    2001-02-16

    PINCH is a recently identified adaptor protein that comprises an array of five LIM domains. PINCH functions through LIM-mediated protein-protein interactions that are involved in cell adhesion, growth, and differentiation. The LIM1 domain of PINCH interacts with integrin-linked kinase (ILK), thereby mediating focal adhesions via a specific integrin/ILK signaling pathway. We have solved the NMR structure of the PINCH LIM1 domain and characterized its binding to ILK. LIM1 contains two contiguous zinc fingers of the CCHC and CCCH types and adopts a global fold similar to that of functionally distinct LIM domains from cysteine-rich protein and cysteine-rich intestinal protein families with CCHC and CCCC zinc finger types. Gel-filtration and NMR experiments demonstrated a 1:1 complex between PINCH LIM1 and the ankyrin repeat domain of ILK. A chemical shift mapping experiment identified regions in PINCH LIM1 that are important for interaction with ILK. Comparison of surface features between PINCH LIM1 and other functionally different LIM domains indicated that the LIM motif might have a highly variable mode in recognizing various target proteins.

  8. NMR Structure Note: PHD Domain from Human SHPRH

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Luciana E. F.; Pustovalova, Yulia; Kile, Andrew C.; Pozhidaeva, Alexandra; Cimprich, Karlene A.; Almeida, Fabio C. L.; Bezsonova, Irina; Korzhnev, Dmitry M.

    2013-01-01

    SHPRH (SNF2, histone linker, PHD, RING, helicase) is a SWI2/SNF2-family ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling factor, and one of E3 ubiquitin ligases responsible for Ubc13-Mms2-dependent K63 poly-ubiquitination of PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen) that promotes error-free DNA damage tolerance in eukaryotes. In contrast to its functional homologues, S. cerevisiae Rad5 and human HLTF (helicase like transcription factor), SHPRH contains a PHD (plant homeodomain) finger embedded in the ‘minor’ insert region of the core helicase-like domain. PHD fingers are often found in proteins involved in chromatin remodeling and transcription regulation, and are generally considered as ‘readers’ of methylation state of histone tails, primarily the lysine 4 (K4) residue of histone H3 (H3K4). Here we report the solution NMR structure of the SHPRH PHD domain and investigate whether this domain is capable of recognizing H3K4 modifications. The domain adopts a canonical PHD-finger fold with a central two-stranded anti-parallel β-sheet flanked on both sides by the two interleaved zinc-binding sites. Despite the presence of a subset of aromatic residues characteristic for PHD-fingers that preferentially bind methylated H3K4, NMR titration experiments reveal that SHPRH PHD does not specifically interact with the H3-derived peptides irrespective of K4 methylation. This result suggests that the SHPRH PHD domain might have evolved a different function other than recognizing histone modifications. PMID:23907177

  9. Structural Studies of AAV2 Rep68 Reveal a Partially Structured Linker and Compact Domain Conformation

    PubMed Central

    Musayev, Faik N.; Zarate-Perez, Francisco; Bardelli, Martino; Bishop, Clayton; Saniev, Emil F.; Linden, R. Michael; Henckaerts, Els; Escalante, Carlos R.

    2015-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) nonstructural proteins Rep78 and Rep68 carry out all DNA transactions that regulate the AAV life cycle. They share two multifunctional domains: an N-terminal origin binding/nicking domain (OBD) from the HUH superfamily and a SF3 helicase domain. A short linker of ~20 amino acids that is critical for oligomerization and function connects the two domains. Although X-ray structures of the AAV5 OBD and AAV2 helicase domains have been determined, information about the full-length protein and linker conformation is not known. This article presents the solution structure of AAV2 Rep68 using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). We first determined the X-ray structures of the minimal AAV2 Rep68 OBD and of the OBD with the linker region. These X-ray structures reveal novel features that include a long C-terminal α-helix that protrudes from the core of the protein at a 45° angle and a partially structured linker. SAXS studies corroborate that the linker is not extended, and we show that a proline residue in the linker is critical for Rep68 oligomerization and function. SAXS-based rigid-body modeling of Rep68 confirms these observations, showing a compact arrangement of the two domains in which they acquire a conformation that positions key residues in all domains on one face of the protein, poised to interact with DNA. PMID:26314310

  10. Structural Studies of AAV2 Rep68 Reveal a Partially Structured Linker and Compact Domain Conformation.

    PubMed

    Musayev, Faik N; Zarate-Perez, Francisco; Bardelli, Martino; Bishop, Clayton; Saniev, Emil F; Linden, R Michael; Henckaerts, Els; Escalante, Carlos R

    2015-09-29

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) nonstructural proteins Rep78 and Rep68 carry out all DNA transactions that regulate the AAV life cycle. They share two multifunctional domains: an N-terminal origin binding/nicking domain (OBD) from the HUH superfamily and a SF3 helicase domain. A short linker of ∼20 amino acids that is critical for oligomerization and function connects the two domains. Although X-ray structures of the AAV5 OBD and AAV2 helicase domains have been determined, information about the full-length protein and linker conformation is not known. This article presents the solution structure of AAV2 Rep68 using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). We first determined the X-ray structures of the minimal AAV2 Rep68 OBD and of the OBD with the linker region. These X-ray structures reveal novel features that include a long C-terminal α-helix that protrudes from the core of the protein at a 45° angle and a partially structured linker. SAXS studies corroborate that the linker is not extended, and we show that a proline residue in the linker is critical for Rep68 oligomerization and function. SAXS-based rigid-body modeling of Rep68 confirms these observations, showing a compact arrangement of the two domains in which they acquire a conformation that positions key residues in all domains on one face of the protein, poised to interact with DNA.

  11. Maximum probability domains in crystals: the rock-salt structure.

    PubMed

    Causà, Mauro; Savin, Andreas

    2011-11-17

    The present paper studies MX crystals in rock-salt structure (M: Li, Na, K; X: F, Cl, Br, I). They are often described as being formed by ions. Pictures based on quantum mechanical calculations sustain and quantify it. The tools used are (i) the Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules, (ii) the Electron Localization Function, and (iii) the maximization of the probability to find in a spatial domain a number of electrons equal to that of the ion under consideration. The present paper shows that the images provided by these three different tools to analyze the quantum mechanical calculations yield, for these systems, very similar results, in the sense that the spatial domains and probability distributions are close. While results for the first two methods are already present in the literature, the last of the methods is applied for the first time to these systems, and details about the method of calculation and program are also given.

  12. Crystal structure of the polo-box domain of polo-like kinase 2.

    PubMed

    Shan, Hong-Mei; Wang, Tao; Quan, Jun-Min

    2015-01-16

    Polo-like kinase 2 (PLK2) is a crucial regulator in cell cycle progression, DNA damage response, and neuronal activity. PLK2 is characterized by the conserved N-terminal kinase domain and the unique C-terminal polo-box domain (PBD). The PBD mediates diverse functions of PLK2 by binding phosphorylated Ser-pSer/pThr motifs of its substrates. Here, we report the first crystal structure of the PBD of PLK2. The overall structure of the PLK2 PBD is similar to that of the PLK1 PBD, which is composed by two polo boxes each contain β6α structures that form a 12-stranded β sandwich domain. The edge of the interface between the two polo boxes forms the phosphorylated Ser-pSer/pThr motifs binding cleft. On the hand, the peripheral regions around the core binding cleft of the PLK2 PBD is distinct from that of the PLK1 PBD, which might confer the substrate specificity of the PBDs of the polo-like kinase family.

  13. Distinct functional and conformational states of the human lymphoid tyrosine phosphatase catalytic domain can be targeted by choice of the inhibitor chemotype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidović, Dušica; Xie, Yuli; Rinderspacher, Alison; Deng, Shi-Xian; Landry, Donald W.; Chung, Caty; Smith, Deborah H.; Tautz, Lutz; Schürer, Stephan C.

    2011-09-01

    The lymphoid tyrosine phosphatase (LYP), encoded by the PTPN22 gene, has recently been identified as a promising drug target for human autoimmunity diseases. Like the majority of protein-tyrosine phosphatases LYP can adopt two functionally distinct forms determined by the conformation of the WPD-loop. The WPD-loop plays an important role in the catalytic dephosphorylation by protein-tyrosine phosphatases. Here we investigate the binding modes of two chemotypes of small molecule LYP inhibitors with respect to both protein conformations using computational modeling. To evaluate binding in the active form, we built a LYP protein structure model of high quality. Our results suggest that the two different compound classes investigated, bind to different conformations of the LYP phosphatase domain. Binding to the closed form is facilitated by an interaction with Asp195 in the WPD-loop, presumably stabilizing the active conformation. The analysis presented here is relevant for the design of inhibitors that specifically target either the closed or the open conformation of LYP in order to achieve better selectivity over phosphatases with similar binding sites.

  14. The Novel Plant Protein INAPERTURATE POLLEN1 Marks Distinct Cellular Domains and Controls Formation of Apertures in the Arabidopsis Pollen Exine[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Dobritsa, Anna A.; Coerper, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Pollen grains protect the sperm cells inside them with the help of the unique cell wall, the exine, which exhibits enormous morphological variation across plant taxa, assembling into intricate and diverse species-specific patterns. How this complex extracellular structure is faithfully deposited at precise sites and acquires precise shape within a species is not understood. Here, we describe the isolation and characterization of the novel Arabidopsis thaliana gene INAPERTURATE POLLEN1 (INP1), which is specifically involved in formation of the pollen surface apertures, which arise by restriction of exine deposition at specific sites. Loss of INP1 leads to the loss of all three apertures in Arabidopsis pollen, and INP1 protein exhibits a unique tripartite localization in developing pollen, indicative of its direct involvement in specification of aperture positions. We also show that aperture length appears to be sensitive to INP1 dosage and INP1 misexpression can affect global exine patterning. Phenotypes of some inp1 mutants indicate that Arabidopsis apertures are initiated at three nonrandom positions around the pollen equator. The identification of INP1 opens up new avenues for studies of how formation of distinct cellular domains results in the production of different extracellular morphologies. PMID:23136373

  15. PAR-3 oligomerization may provide an actin-independent mechanism to maintain distinct par protein domains in the early Caenorhabditis elegans embryo.

    PubMed

    Dawes, Adriana T; Munro, Edwin M

    2011-09-21

    Par proteins establish discrete intracellular spatial domains to polarize many different cell types. In the single-cell embryo of the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans, the segregation of Par proteins is crucial for proper division and cell fate specification. Actomyosin-based cortical flows drive the initial formation of anterior and posterior Par domains, but cortical actin is not required for the maintenance of these domains. Here we develop a model of interactions between the Par proteins that includes both mutual inhibition and PAR-3 oligomerization. We show that this model gives rise to a bistable switch mechanism, allowing the Par proteins to occupy distinct anterior and posterior domains seen in the early C. elegans embryo, independent of dynamics or asymmetries in the actin cortex. The model predicts a sharp loss of cortical Par protein asymmetries during gradual depletion of the Par protein PAR-6, and we confirm this prediction experimentally. Together, these results suggest both mutual inhibition and PAR-3 oligomerization are sufficient to maintain distinct Par protein domains in the early C. elegans embryo.

  16. A distinct sortase SrtB anchors and processes a streptococcal adhesin AbpA with a novel structural property

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Xiaobo; Liu, Bing; Zhu, Fan; Scannapieco, Frank A.; Haase, Elaine M.; Matthews, Steve; Wu, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Surface display of proteins by sortases in Gram-positive bacteria is crucial for bacterial fitness and virulence. We found a unique gene locus encoding an amylase-binding adhesin AbpA and a sortase B in oral streptococci. AbpA possesses a new distinct C-terminal cell wall sorting signal. We demonstrated that this C-terminal motif is required for anchoring AbpA to cell wall. In vitro and in vivo studies revealed that SrtB has dual functions, anchoring AbpA to the cell wall and processing AbpA into a ladder profile. Solution structure of AbpA determined by NMR reveals a novel structure comprising a small globular α/β domain and an extended coiled-coil heliacal domain. Structural and biochemical studies identified key residues that are crucial for amylase binding. Taken together, our studies document a unique sortase/adhesion substrate system in streptococci adapted to the oral environment rich in salivary amylase. PMID:27492581

  17. Structurally Distinct Bacterial TBC-like GAPs Link Arf GTPase to Rab1 Inactivation to Counteract Host Defenses

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Na; Zhu, Yongqun; Lu, Qiuhe; Hu, Liyan; Zheng, Yuqing; Shao, Feng

    2012-10-10

    Rab GTPases are frequent targets of vacuole-living bacterial pathogens for appropriate trafficking of the vacuole. Here we discover that bacterial effectors including VirA from nonvacuole Shigella flexneri and EspG from extracellular Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) harbor TBC-like dual-finger motifs and exhibits potent RabGAP activities. Specific inactivation of Rab1 by VirA/EspG disrupts ER-to-Golgi trafficking. S. flexneri intracellular persistence requires VirA TBC-like GAP activity that mediates bacterial escape from autophagy-mediated host defense. Rab1 inactivation by EspG severely blocks host secretory pathway, resulting in inhibited interleukin-8 secretion from infected cells. Crystal structures of VirA/EspG-Rab1-GDP-aluminum fluoride complexes highlight TBC-like catalytic role for the arginine and glutamine finger residues and reveal a 3D architecture distinct from that of the TBC domain. Structure of Arf6-EspG-Rab1 ternary complex illustrates a pathogenic signaling complex that rewires host Arf signaling to Rab1 inactivation. Structural distinctions of VirA/EspG further predict a possible extensive presence of TBC-like RabGAP effectors in counteracting various host defenses.

  18. The crystal structure of the actin binding domain from alpha-actinin in its closed conformation: structural insight into phospholipid regulation of alpha-actinin.

    PubMed

    Franzot, Giacomo; Sjöblom, Björn; Gautel, Mathias; Djinović Carugo, Kristina

    2005-04-22

    Alpha-actinin is the major F-actin crosslinking protein in both muscle and non-muscle cells. We report the crystal structure of the actin binding domain of human muscle alpha-actinin-3, which is formed by two consecutive calponin homology domains arranged in a "closed" conformation. Structural studies and available biochemical data on actin binding domains suggest that two calponin homology domains come in a closed conformation in the native apo-form, and that conformational changes involving the relative orientation of the two calponin homology domains are required for efficient binding to actin filaments. The actin binding activity of muscle isoforms is supposed to be regulated by phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PtdIns(4,5)P2), which binds to the second calponin homology domain. On the basis of structural analysis we propose a distinct binding site for PtdIns(4,5)P2, where the fatty acid moiety would be oriented in a direction that allows it to interact with the linker sequence between the actin binding domain and the first spectrin-like repeat, regulating thereby the binding of the C-terminal calmodulin-like domain to this linker.

  19. Gene3D: Structural Assignment for Whole Genes and Genomes Using the CATH Domain Structure Database

    PubMed Central

    Buchan, Daniel W.A.; Shepherd, Adrian J.; Lee, David; Pearl, Frances M.G.; Rison, Stuart C.G.; Thornton, Janet M.; Orengo, Christine A.

    2002-01-01

    We present a novel web-based resource, Gene3D, of precalculated structural assignments to gene sequences and whole genomes. This resource assigns structural domains from the CATH database to whole genes and links these to their curated functional and structural annotations within the CATH domain structure database, the functional Dictionary of Homologous Superfamilies (DHS) and PDBsum. Currently Gene3D provides annotation for 36 complete genomes (two eukaryotes, six archaea, and 28 bacteria). On average, between 30% and 40% of the genes of a given genome can be structurally annotated. Matches to structural domains are found using the profile-based method (PSI-BLAST). and a novel protocol, DRange, is used to resolve conflicts in matches involving different homologous superfamilies. PMID:11875040

  20. Josephin Domain Structural Conformations Explored by Metadynamics in Essential Coordinates

    PubMed Central

    Tuszynski, Jack A.; Gallo, Diego; Morbiducci, Umberto; Danani, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The Josephin Domain (JD), i.e. the N-terminal domain of Ataxin 3 (At3) protein, is an interesting example of competition between physiological function and aggregation risk. In fact, the fibrillogenesis of Ataxin 3, responsible for the spinocerebbellar ataxia 3, is strictly related to the JD thermodynamic stability. Whereas recent NMR studies have demonstrated that different JD conformations exist, the likelihood of JD achievable conformational states in solution is still an open issue. Marked differences in the available NMR models are located in the hairpin region, supporting the idea that JD has a flexible hairpin in dynamic equilibrium between open and closed states. In this work we have carried out an investigation on the JD conformational arrangement by means of both classical molecular dynamics (MD) and Metadynamics employing essential coordinates as collective variables. We provide a representation of the free energy landscape characterizing the transition pathway from a JD open-like structure to a closed-like conformation. Findings of our in silico study strongly point to the closed-like conformation as the most likely for a Josephin Domain in water. PMID:26745628

  1. G-structures and domain walls in heterotic theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukas, Andre; Matti, Cyril

    2011-01-01

    We consider heterotic string solutions based on a warped product of a four-dimensional domain wall and a six-dimensional internal manifold, preserving two supercharges. The constraints on the internal manifolds with SU(3) structure are derived. They are found to be generalized half-flat manifolds with a particular pattern of torsion classes and they include half-flat manifolds and Strominger's complex non-Kahler manifolds as special cases. We also verify that previous heterotic compactifications on half-flat mirror manifolds are based on this class of solutions.

  2. Confinement in F4 Exceptional Gauge Group Using Domain Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafibakhsh, Shahnoosh; Shahlaei, Amir

    2017-03-01

    We calculate the potential between static quarks in the fundamental representation of the F4 exceptional gauge group using domain structures of the thick center vortex model. As non-trivial center elements are absent, the asymptotic string tension is lost while an intermediate linear potential is observed. SU(2) is a subgroup of F4. Investigating the decomposition of the 26 dimensional representation of F4 to the SU(2) representations, might explain what accounts for the intermediate linear potential, in the exceptional groups with no center element.

  3. Structurally divergent human T cell receptor. gamma. proteins encoded by distinct C. gamma. genes

    SciTech Connect

    Krangel, M.S.; Band, H.; Hata, S.; McLean, J.; Brenner, M.B.

    1987-07-03

    The human T cell receptor (TCR) ..gamma.. polypeptide occurs in structurally distinct forms on certain peripheral blood T lymphocytes. Complementary DNA clones representing the transcripts of functionally rearranged TCR ..gamma.. genes in these cells have been analyzed. The expression of a disulfide-linked and a nondisulfide-linked form of TCR ..gamma.. correlates with the use of the C..gamma..1 and C..gamma..2 constant-region gene segments, respectively. Variability in TCR ..gamma.. polypeptide and disulfide linkage is determined by the number of copies and the sequence of a repeated segment of the constant region. Thus, C..gamma..1 and C..gamma..2 are used to generate structurally distinct, yet functional, T3-associated receptor complexes on peripheral blood lymphocytes. Tryptic peptide mapping suggests that the T3-associated TCR ..gamma.. and delta peptides in the nondisulfide-linked form are distinct.

  4. Structural Studies of Geosmin Synthase, a Bifunctional Sesquiterpene Synthase with αα Domain Architecture That Catalyzes a Unique Cyclization-Fragmentation Reaction Sequence.

    PubMed

    Harris, Golda G; Lombardi, Patrick M; Pemberton, Travis A; Matsui, Tsutomu; Weiss, Thomas M; Cole, Kathryn E; Köksal, Mustafa; Murphy, Frank V; Vedula, L Sangeetha; Chou, Wayne K W; Cane, David E; Christianson, David W

    2015-12-08

    Geosmin synthase from Streptomyces coelicolor (ScGS) catalyzes an unusual, metal-dependent terpenoid cyclization and fragmentation reaction sequence. Two distinct active sites are required for catalysis: the N-terminal domain catalyzes the ionization and cyclization of farnesyl diphosphate to form germacradienol and inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi), and the C-terminal domain catalyzes the protonation, cyclization, and fragmentation of germacradienol to form geosmin and acetone through a retro-Prins reaction. A unique αα domain architecture is predicted for ScGS based on amino acid sequence: each domain contains the metal-binding motifs typical of a class I terpenoid cyclase, and each domain requires Mg(2+) for catalysis. Here, we report the X-ray crystal structure of the unliganded N-terminal domain of ScGS and the structure of its complex with three Mg(2+) ions and alendronate. These structures highlight conformational changes required for active site closure and catalysis. Although neither full-length ScGS nor constructs of the C-terminal domain could be crystallized, homology models of the C-terminal domain were constructed on the basis of ∼36% sequence identity with the N-terminal domain. Small-angle X-ray scattering experiments yield low-resolution molecular envelopes into which the N-terminal domain crystal structure and the C-terminal domain homology model were fit, suggesting possible αα domain architectures as frameworks for bifunctional catalysis.

  5. Structural Studies of Geosmin Synthase, a Bifunctional Sesquiterpene Synthase with Alpha-Alpha Domain Architecture that Catalyzes a Unique Cyclization-Fragmentation Reaction Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Golda G.; Lombardi, Patrick M.; Pemberton, Travis A.; Matsui, Tsutomu; Weiss, Thomas M.; Cole, Kathryn E.; Köksal, Mustafa; Murphy, Frank V.; Vedula, L. Sangeetha; Chou, Wayne K.W.; Cane, David E.; Christianson, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Geosmin synthase from Streptomyces coelicolor (ScGS) catalyzes an unusual, metal-dependent terpenoid cyclization and fragmentation reaction sequence. Two distinct active sites are required for catalysis: the N-terminal domain catalyzes the ionization and cyclization of farnesyl diphosphate to form germacradienol and inorganic pyrophosphate (PPi), and the C-terminal domain catalyzes the protonation, cyclization, and fragmentation of germacradienol to form geosmin and acetone through a retro-Prins reaction. A unique αα domain architecture is predicted for ScGS based on amino acid sequence: each domain contains the metal-binding motifs typical of a class I terpenoid cyclase, and each domain requires Mg2+ for catalysis. Here, we report the X-ray crystal structure of the unliganded N-terminal domain of ScGS and the structure of its complex with 3 Mg2+ ions and alendronate. These structures highlight conformational changes required for active site closure and catalysis. Although neither full-length ScGS nor constructs of the C-terminal domain could be crystallized, homology models of the C-terminal domain were constructed based on ~36% sequence identity with the N-terminal domain. Small-angle X-ray scattering experiments yield low resolution molecular envelopes into which the N-terminal domain crystal structure and the C-terminal domain homology model were fit, suggesting possible αα domain architectures as frameworks for bifunctional catalysis. PMID:26598179

  6. Binding of the cSH3 domain of Grb2 adaptor to two distinct RXXK motifs within Gab1 docker employs differential mechanisms.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Caleb B; Seldeen, Kenneth L; Deegan, Brian J; Bhat, Vikas; Farooq, Amjad

    2011-01-01

    A ubiquitous component of cellular signaling machinery, Gab1 docker plays a pivotal role in routing extracellular information in the form of growth factors and cytokines to downstream targets such as transcription factors within the nucleus. Here, using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) in combination with macromolecular modeling (MM), we show that although Gab1 contains four distinct RXXK motifs, designated G1, G2, G3, and G4, only G1 and G2 motifs bind to the cSH3 domain of Grb2 adaptor and do so with distinct mechanisms. Thus, while the G1 motif strictly requires the PPRPPKP consensus sequence for high-affinity binding to the cSH3 domain, the G2 motif displays preference for the PXVXRXLKPXR consensus. Such sequential differences in the binding of G1 and G2 motifs arise from their ability to adopt distinct polyproline type II (PPII)- and 3(10) -helical conformations upon binding to the cSH3 domain, respectively. Collectively, our study provides detailed biophysical insights into a key protein-protein interaction involved in a diverse array of signaling cascades central to health and disease.

  7. Binding of the cSH3 Domain of Grb2 Adaptor to Two Distinct RXXK Motifs within Gab1 Docker Employs Differential Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Caleb B.; Seldeen, Kenneth L.; Deegan, Brian J.; Bhat, Vikas; Farooq, Amjad

    2010-01-01

    A ubiquitous component of cellular signaling machinery, Gab1 docker plays a pivotal role in routing extracellular information in the form of growth factors and cytokines to downstream targets such as transcription factors within the nucleus. Here, using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) in combination with macromolecular modeling (MM), we show that although Gab1 contains four distinct RXXK motifs, designated G1, G2, G3 and G4, only G1 and G2 motifs bind to the cSH3 domain of Grb2 adaptor and do so with distinct mechanisms. Thus, while the G1 motif strictly requires the PPRPPKP consensus sequence for high-affinity binding to the cSH3 domain, the G2 motif displays preference for the PXVXRXLKPXR consensus. Such sequential differences in the binding of G1 and G2 motifs arise from their ability to adopt distinct polyproline type II (PPII)- and 310-helical conformations upon binding to the cSH3 domain, respectively. Collectively, our study provides detailed biophysical insights into a key protein-protein interaction involved in a diverse array of signaling cascades central to health and disease. PMID:21472810

  8. Structure and function of WD40 domain proteins.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chao; Min, Jinrong

    2011-03-01

    The WD40 domain exhibits a β-propeller architecture, often comprising seven blades. The WD40 domain is one of the most abundant domains and also among the top interacting domains in eukaryotic genomes. In this review, we will discuss the identification, definition and architecture of the WD40 domains. WD40 domain proteins are involved in a large variety of cellular processes, in which WD40 domains function as a protein-protein or protein-DNA interaction platform. WD40 domain mediates molecular recognition events mainly through the smaller top surface, but also through the bottom surface and sides. So far, no WD40 domain has been found to display enzymatic activity. We will also discuss the different binding modes exhibited by the large versatile family of WD40 domain proteins. In the last part of this review, we will discuss how post-translational modifications are recognized by WD40 domain proteins.

  9. CryoEM structure of the Methanospirillum hungatei archaellum reveals structural features distinct from the bacterial flagellum and type IV pili.

    PubMed

    Poweleit, Nicole; Ge, Peng; Nguyen, Hong H; Loo, Rachel R Ogorzalek; Gunsalus, Robert P; Zhou, Z Hong

    2016-12-05

    Archaea use flagella known as archaella-distinct both in protein composition and structure from bacterial flagella-to drive cell motility, but the structural basis of this function is unknown. Here, we report an atomic model of the archaella, based on the cryo electron microscopy (cryoEM) structure of the Methanospirillum hungatei archaellum at 3.4 Å resolution. Each archaellum contains ∼61,500 archaellin subunits organized into a curved helix with a diameter of 10 nm and average length of 10,000 nm. The tadpole-shaped archaellin monomer has two domains, a β-barrel domain and a long, mildly kinked α-helix tail. Our structure reveals multiple post-translational modifications to the archaella, including six O-linked glycans and an unusual N-linked modification. The extensive interactions among neighbouring archaellins explain how the long but thin archaellum maintains the structural integrity required for motility-driving rotation. These extensive inter-subunit interactions and the absence of a central pore in the archaellum distinguish it from both the bacterial flagellum and type IV pili.

  10. Oxidation of the N-terminal domain of the wheat metallothionein Ec -1 leads to the formation of three distinct disulfide bridges.

    PubMed

    Tarasava, Katsiaryna; Chesnov, Serge; Freisinger, Eva

    2016-05-01

    Metallothioneins (MTs) are low molecular weight proteins, characterized by a high cysteine content and the ability to coordinate large amounts of d(10) metal ions, for example, Zn(II), Cd(II), and Cu(I), in form of metal-thiolate clusters. Depending on intracellular conditions such as redox potential or metal ion concentrations, MTs can occur in various states ranging from the fully metal-loaded holo- to the metal-free apo-form. The Cys thiolate groups in the apo-form can be either reduced or be involved in disulfide bridges. Although oxidation-mediated Zn(II) release might be a possible mechanism for the regulation of Zn(II) availability by MTs, no concise information regarding the associated pathways and the structure of oxidized apo-MT forms is available. Using the well-studied Zn2 γ-Ec -1 domain of the wheat Zn6 Ec -1 MT we attempt here to answer several question regarding the structure and biophysical properties of oxidized MT forms, such as: (1) does disulfide bond formation increase the stability against proteolysis, (2) is the overall peptide backbone fold similar for the holo- and the oxidized apo-MT form, and (3) are disulfide bridges specifically or randomly formed? Our investigations show that oxidation leads to three distinct disulfide bridges independently of the applied oxidation conditions and of the initial species used for oxidation, that is, the apo- or the holo-form. In addition, the oxidized apo-form is as stable against proteolysis as Zn2 γ-Ec -1, rendering the currently assumed degradation of oxidized MTs unlikely and suggesting a role of the oxidation process for the extension of protein lifetime in absence of sufficient amounts of metal ions. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers (Pept Sci) 106: 295-308, 2016.

  11. The Structure of Treponema pallidum Tp0624 Reveals a Modular Assembly of Divergently Functionalized and Previously Uncharacterized Domains

    PubMed Central

    Wetherell, Charmaine; Cameron, Caroline E.

    2016-01-01

    Treponema pallidum subspecies pallidum is the causative agent of syphilis, a chronic, multistage, systemic infection that remains a major global health concern. The molecular mechanisms underlying T. pallidum pathogenesis are incompletely understood, partially due to the phylogenetic divergence of T. pallidum. One aspect of T. pallidum that differentiates it from conventional Gram-negative bacteria, and is believed to play an important role in pathogenesis, is its unusual cell envelope ultrastructure; in particular, the T. pallidum peptidoglycan layer is chemically distinct, thinner and more distal to the outer membrane. Established functional roles for peptidoglycan include contributing to the structural integrity of the cell envelope and stabilization of the flagellar motor complex, which are typically mediated by the OmpA domain-containing family of proteins. To gain insight into the molecular mechanisms that govern peptidoglycan binding and cell envelope biogenesis in T. pallidum we report here the structural characterization of the putative OmpA-like domain-containing protein, Tp0624. Analysis of the 1.70 Å resolution Tp0624 crystal structure reveals a multi-modular architecture comprised of three distinct domains including a C-terminal divergent OmpA-like domain, which we show is unable to bind the conventional peptidoglycan component diaminopimelic acid, and a previously uncharacterized tandem domain unit. Intriguingly, bioinformatic analysis indicates that the three domains together are found in all orthologs from pathogenic treponemes, but are not observed together in genera outside Treponema. These findings provide the first structural insight into a multi-modular treponemal protein containing an OmpA-like domain and its potential role in peptidoglycan coordination and stabilization of the T. pallidum cell envelope. PMID:27832149

  12. The binding domain structure of retinoblastoma-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Figge, J.; Breese, K.; Vajda, S.; Zhu, Q. L.; Eisele, L.; Andersen, T. T.; MacColl, R.; Friedrich, T.; Smith, T. F.

    1993-01-01

    The retinoblastoma gene product (Rb), a cellular growth suppressor, complexes with viral and cellular proteins that contain a specific binding domain incorporating three invariant residues: Leu-X-Cys-X-Glu, where X denotes a nonconserved residue. Hydrophobic and electrostatic properties are strongly conserved in this segment even though the nonconserved amino acids vary considerably from one Rb-binding protein to another. In this report, we present a diagnostic computer pattern for a high-affinity Rb-binding domain featuring the three conserved residues as well as the conserved physico-chemical properties. Although the pattern encompasses only 10 residues (with only 4 of these explicitly defined), it exhibits 100% sensitivity and 99.95% specificity in database searches. This implies that a certain pattern of structural and physico-chemical properties encoded by this short sequence is sufficient to govern specific Rb binding. We also present evidence that the secondary structural conformation through this region is important for effective Rb binding. PMID:8382993

  13. Structure of the effector-binding domain of the arabinose repressor AraR from Bacillus subtilis

    SciTech Connect

    Procházková, Kateřina; Čermáková, Kateřina; Pachl, Petr; Sieglová, Irena; Fábry, Milan; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Řezáčová, Pavlína

    2012-02-01

    The crystal structure of the effector-binding domain of the transcriptional repressor AraR from B. subtilis in complex with the effector molecule (l-arabinose) was determined at 2.2 Å resolution. A detailed analysis of the crystal identified a dimer organization that is distinctive from that of other members of the GalR/LacI family. In Bacillus subtilis, the arabinose repressor AraR negatively controls the expression of genes in the metabolic pathway of arabinose-containing polysaccharides. The protein is composed of two domains of different phylogenetic origin and function: an N-terminal DNA-binding domain belonging to the GntR family and a C-terminal effector-binding domain that shows similarity to members of the GalR/LacI family. The crystal structure of the C-terminal effector-binding domain of AraR in complex with the effector l-arabinose has been determined at 2.2 Å resolution. The l-arabinose binding affinity was characterized by isothermal titration calorimetry and differential scanning fluorimetry; the K{sub d} value was 8.4 ± 0.4 µM. The effect of l-arabinose on the protein oligomeric state was investigated in solution and detailed analysis of the crystal identified a dimer organization which is distinctive from that of other members of the GalR/LacI family.

  14. Sequence analysis of the non-recurring C-terminal domains shows that insect lipoprotein receptors constitute a distinct group of LDL receptor family members.

    PubMed

    Rodenburg, Kees W; Smolenaars, Marcel M W; Van Hoof, Dennis; Van der Horst, Dick J

    2006-04-01

    Lipoprotein-mediated delivery of lipids in mammals involves endocytic receptors of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor (LDLR) family. In contrast, in insects, the lipoprotein, lipophorin (Lp), functions as a reusable lipid shuttle in lipid delivery, and these animals, therefore, were not supposed to use endocytic receptors. However, recent data indicate additional endocytic uptake of Lp, mediated by a Lp receptor (LpR) of the LDLR family. The two N-terminal domains of LDLR family members are involved in ligand binding and dissociation, respectively, and are composed of a mosaic of multiple repeats. The three C-terminal domains, viz., the optional O-linked glycosylation domain, the transmembrane domain, and the intracellular domain, are of a non-repetitive sequence. The present classification of newly discovered LDLR family members, including the LpRs, bears no relevance to physiological function. Therefore, as a novel approach, the C-terminal domains of LDLR family members across the entire animal kingdom were used to perform a sequence comparison analysis in combination with a phylogenetic tree analysis. The LpRs appeared to segregate into a specific group distinct from the groups encompassing the other family members, and each of the three C-terminal domains of the insect receptors is composed of unique set of sequence motifs. Based on conservation of sequence motifs and organization of these motifs in the domains, LpR resembles most the groups of the LDLRs, very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) receptors, and vitellogenin receptors. However, in sequence aspects in which LpR deviates from these three receptor groups, it most notably resembles LDLR-related protein-2, or megalin. These features might explain the functional differences disclosed between insect and mammalian lipoprotein receptors.

  15. Structural Basis and Function of XRN2-Binding by XTB Domains

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Hannes; Katic, Iskra; Gut, Heinz; Großhans, Helge

    2016-01-01

    The ribonuclease XRN2 is an essential player in RNA metabolism. In Caenorhabditis elegans, XRN2 functions with PAXT-1, which shares a putative XRN2-binding domain (XTBD) with otherwise unrelated mammalian proteins. Here, we characterize structure and function of an XTBD – XRN2 complex. Although XTBD stably interconnects two XRN2 domains through numerous interacting residues, mutation of a single critical residue suffices to disrupt XTBD – XRN2 complexes in vitro, and recapitulates paxt-1 null mutant phenotypes in vivo. Demonstrating conservation of function, vertebrate XTBD-containing proteins bind XRN2 in vitro, and human CDKN2AIPNL (C2AIL) can substitute for PAXT-1 in vivo. In vertebrates, where three distinct XTBD-containing proteins exist, XRN2 may partition to distinct stable heterodimeric complexes, likely differing in subcellular localization or function. In C. elegans, complex formation with the unique PAXT-1 serves to preserve the stability of XRN2 in the absence of substrate. PMID:26779609

  16. Crystal Structures of the S. cerevisiae Spt6 Core and C-Terminal Tandem SH2 Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Close, D.; Robinson, H.; Johnson, S. J.; Sdano, M. A.; McDonald, S. M.; Formosa, T.; Hill, C. P.

    2011-05-13

    The conserved and essential eukaryotic protein Spt6 functions in transcription elongation, chromatin maintenance, and RNA processing. Spt6 has three characterized functions. It is a histone chaperone capable of reassembling nucleosomes, a central component of transcription elongation complexes, and is required for recruitment of RNA processing factors to elongating RNA polymerase II (RNAPII). Here, we report multiple crystal structures of the 168-kDa Spt6 protein from Saccharomyces cerevisiae that together represent essentially all of the ordered sequence. Our two structures of the {approx} 900-residue core region reveal a series of putative nucleic acid and protein-protein interaction domains that fold into an elongated form that resembles the bacterial protein Tex. The similarity to a bacterial transcription factor suggests that the core domain performs nucleosome-independent activities, and as with Tex, we find that Spt6 binds DNA. Unlike Tex, however, the Spt6 S1 domain does not contribute to this activity. Crystal structures of the Spt6 C-terminal region reveal a tandem SH2 domain structure composed of two closely associated SH2 folds. One of these SH2 folds is cryptic, while the other shares striking structural similarity with metazoan SH2 domains and possesses structural features associated with the ability to bind phosphorylated substrates including phosphotyrosine. Binding studies with phosphopeptides that mimic the RNAPII C-terminal domain revealed affinities typical of other RNAPII C-terminal domain-binding proteins but did not indicate a specific interaction. Overall, these findings provide a structural foundation for understanding how Spt6 encodes several distinct functions within a single polypeptide chain.

  17. Crystal Structures of the S. cerevisiae Spt6 Core and C-terminal Tandem SH2 Domain

    SciTech Connect

    D Close; S Johnson; M Sdano; S McDonald; H Robinson; T Formosa; C Hill

    2011-12-31

    The conserved and essential eukaryotic protein Spt6 functions in transcription elongation, chromatin maintenance, and RNA processing. Spt6 has three characterized functions. It is a histone chaperone capable of reassembling nucleosomes, a central component of transcription elongation complexes, and is required for recruitment of RNA processing factors to elongating RNA polymerase II (RNAPII). Here, we report multiple crystal structures of the 168-kDa Spt6 protein from Saccharomyces cerevisiae that together represent essentially all of the ordered sequence. Our two structures of the {approx} 900-residue core region reveal a series of putative nucleic acid and protein-protein interaction domains that fold into an elongated form that resembles the bacterial protein Tex. The similarity to a bacterial transcription factor suggests that the core domain performs nucleosome-independent activities, and as with Tex, we find that Spt6 binds DNA. Unlike Tex, however, the Spt6 S1 domain does not contribute to this activity. Crystal structures of the Spt6 C-terminal region reveal a tandem SH2 domain structure composed of two closely associated SH2 folds. One of these SH2 folds is cryptic, while the other shares striking structural similarity with metazoan SH2 domains and possesses structural features associated with the ability to bind phosphorylated substrates including phosphotyrosine. Binding studies with phosphopeptides that mimic the RNAPII C-terminal domain revealed affinities typical of other RNAPII C-terminal domain-binding proteins but did not indicate a specific interaction. Overall, these findings provide a structural foundation for understanding how Spt6 encodes several distinct functions within a single polypeptide chain.

  18. Structure of the GAF domain, a ubiquitous signaling motif and a new class of cyclic GMP receptor

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Yew-Seng J.; Burden, Lisa M.; Hurley, James H.

    2000-01-01

    GAF domains are ubiquitous motifs present in cyclic GMP (cGMP)-regulated cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases, certain adenylyl cyclases, the bacterial transcription factor FhlA, and hundreds of other signaling and sensory proteins from all three kingdoms of life. The crystal structure of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae YKG9 protein was determined at 1.9 Å resolution. The structure revealed a fold that resembles the PAS domain, another ubiquitous signaling and sensory transducer. YKG9 does not bind cGMP, but the isolated first GAF domain of phosphodiesterase 5 binds with Kd = 650 nM. The cGMP binding site of the phosphodiesterase GAF domain was identified by homology modeling and site-directed mutagenesis, and consists of conserved Arg, Asn, Lys and Asp residues. The structural and binding studies taken together show that the cGMP binding GAF domains form a new class of cyclic nucleotide receptors distinct from the regulatory domains of cyclic nucleotide-regulated protein kinases and ion channels. PMID:11032796

  19. The BARD1 C-Terminal Domain Structure and Interactions with Polyadenylation Factor CstF-50

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Ross A.; Lee, Megan S.; Tsutakawa, Susan E.; Williams, R. Scott; Tainer, John A.; Glover, J. N. Mark

    2009-07-13

    The BARD1 N-terminal RING domain binds BRCA1 while the BARD1 C-terminal ankyrin and tandem BRCT repeat domains bind CstF-50 to modulate mRNA processing and RNAP II stability in response to DNA damage. Here we characterize the BARD1 structural biochemistry responsible for CstF- 50 binding. The crystal structure of the BARD1 BRCT domain uncovers a degenerate phosphopeptide binding pocket lacking the key arginine required for phosphopeptide interactions in other BRCT proteins.Small angle X-ray scattering together with limited proteolysis results indicates that ankyrin and BRCT domains are linked by a flexible tether and do not adopt a fixed orientation relative to one another. Protein pull-down experiments utilizing a series of purified BARD1 deletion mutants indicate that interactions between the CstF-50 WD-40 domain and BARD1 involve the ankyrin-BRCT linker but do not require ankyrin or BRCT domains. The structural plasticity imparted by the ANK-BRCT linker helps to explain the regulated assembly of different protein BARD1 complexes with distinct functions in DNA damage signaling including BARD1-dependent induction of apoptosis plus p53 stabilization and interactions. BARD1 architecture and plasticity imparted by the ANK-BRCT linker are suitable to allow the BARD1 C-terminus to act as a hub with multiple binding sites to integrate diverse DNA damage signals directly to RNA polymerase.

  20. Structures of the autoproteolytic domain from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae nuclear pore complex component, Nup145

    SciTech Connect

    Sampathkumar, Parthasarathy; Ozyurt, Sinem A.; Do, Johnny; Bain, Kevin T.; Dickey, Mark; Rodgers, Logan A.; Gheyi, Tarun; Sali, Andrej; Kim, Seung Joong; Phillips, Jeremy; Pieper, Ursula; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Franke, Josef D.; Martel, Anne; Tsuruta, Hiro; Atwell, Shane; Thompson, Devon A.; Emtage, J. Spencer; Wasserman, Stephen R.; Rout, Michael P.; Sauder, J. Michael; Burley, Stephen K.

    2012-04-30

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are large, octagonally symmetric dynamic macromolecular assemblies responsible for exchange of proteins and RNAs between the nucleus and cytoplasm. NPCs are made up of at least 456 polypeptides from {approx}30 distinct nucleoporins. Several of these components, sharing similar structural motifs, form stable subcomplexes that form a coaxial structure containing two outer rings (the nuclear and cytoplasmic rings), two inner rings, and a membrane ring. The yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) Nup145 and its human counterpart are unique among the nucleoporins, in that they undergo autoproteolysis to generate functionally distinct proteins. The human counterpart of Nup145 is expressed as two alternatively spliced mRNA transcripts. The larger 190 kDa precursor undergoes post-translational autoproteolysis at the Phe863-Ser864 peptide bond yielding the 92 kDa Nup98 and the 96 kDa Nup96. The smaller 98 kDa precursor is also autoproteolysed at an analogous site giving 92 kDa Nup98-N and a 6 kDa C-terminal fragment, which may form a noncovalent complex. The yeast Nup145 precursor [Fig. 1(A)] contains twelve repeats of a 'GLFG' peptide motif (FG repeats) at its N-terminus, an internal autoproteolytic domain (a region of high conservation with the homologous yeast nucleoporins Nup110 and Nup116, neither of which undergo autoproteolysis), followed by the C-terminal domain. Various forms of the FG repeats are present in nearly half of all nucleoporins; they form intrinsically disordered regions implicated in gating mechanisms that control passage of macromolecules through NPCs. Nup145 undergoes autoproteolysis at the Phe605-Ser606 peptide bond to generate two functionally distinct proteins, Nup145N and Nup145C. Subsequently, Nup145C associates with six other proteins to form the heptameric Y-complex, a component of the outer rings of the NPC. Nup145N, on the other hand, can shuttle between the NPC and the nuclear interior. It has been suggested that Nup

  1. Atomimetic Mechanical Structures with Nonlinear Topological Domain Evolution Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Frazier, Michael J; Kochmann, Dennis M

    2017-03-21

    A mechanical metamaterial, a simple, periodic mechanical structure, is reported, which reproduces the nonlinear dynamic behavior of materials undergoing phase transitions and domain switching at the structural level. Tunable multistability is exploited to produce switching and transition phenomena whose kinetics are governed by the same Allen-Cahn law commonly used to describe material-level, structural-transition processes. The reported purely elastic mechanical system displays several key features commonly found in atomic- or mesoscale physics of solids. The rotating-mass network shows qualitatively analogous features as, e.g., ferroic ceramics or phase-transforming solids, and the discrete governing equation is shown to approach the phase field equation commonly used to simulate the above processes. This offers untapped opportunities for reproducing material-level, dissipative and diffusive kinetic phenomena at the structural level, which, in turn, invites experimental realization and paves the road for new active, intelligent, or phase-transforming mechanical metamaterials bringing small-scale processes to the macroscopically observable scale.

  2. Structure-function analysis of the NB-ARC domain of plant disease resistance proteins.

    PubMed

    van Ooijen, Gerben; Mayr, Gabriele; Kasiem, Mobien M A; Albrecht, Mario; Cornelissen, Ben J C; Takken, Frank L W

    2008-01-01

    Resistance (R) proteins in plants are involved in pathogen recognition and subsequent activation of innate immune responses. Most resistance proteins contain a central nucleotide-binding domain. This so-called NB-ARC domain consists of three subdomains: NB, ARC1, and ARC2. The NB-ARC domain is a functional ATPase domain, and its nucleotide-binding state is proposed to regulate activity of the R protein. A highly conserved methionine-histidine-aspartate (MHD) motif is present at the carboxy-terminus of ARC2. An extensive mutational analysis of the MHD motif in the R proteins I-2 and Mi-1 is reported. Several novel autoactivating mutations of the MHD invariant histidine and conserved aspartate were identified. The combination of MHD mutants with autoactivating hydrolysis mutants in the NB subdomain showed that the autoactivation phenotypes are not additive. This finding indicates an important regulatory role for the MHD motif in the control of R protein activity. To explain these observations, a three-dimensional model of the NB-ARC domain of I-2 was built, based on the APAF-1 template structure. The model was used to identify residues important for I-2 function. Substitution of the selected residues resulted in the expected distinct phenotypes. Based on the model, it is proposed that the MHD motif fulfils the same function as the sensor II motif found in AAA+ proteins (ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities)-co-ordination of the nucleotide and control of subdomain interactions. The presented 3D model provides a framework for the formulation of hypotheses on how mutations in the NB-ARC exert their effects.

  3. Structural Characterization of the Boca/Mesd Maturation Factors for LDL-Receptor-Type beta Propeller Domains

    SciTech Connect

    M Collins; W Hendrickson

    2011-12-31

    Folding and trafficking of low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) family members, which play essential roles in development and homeostasis, are mediated by specific chaperones. The Boca/Mesd chaperone family specifically promotes folding and trafficking of the YWTD {beta} propeller-EGF domain pair found in the ectodomain of all LDLR members. Limited proteolysis, NMR spectroscopy, analytical ultracentrifugation, and X-ray crystallography were used to define a conserved core composed of a structured domain that is preceded by a disordered N-terminal region. High-resolution structures of the ordered domain were determined for homologous proteins from three metazoans. Seven independent protomers reveal a novel ferrodoxin-like superfamily fold with two distinct {beta} sheet topologies. A conserved hydrophobic surface forms a dimer interface in each crystal, but these differ substantially at the atomic level, indicative of nonspecific hydrophobic interactions that may play a role in the chaperone activity of the Boca/Mesd family.

  4. Structure and interactions of the C-terminal metal binding domain of Archaeoglobus fulgidus CopA

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Sorabh; Hong, Deli; Desai, Nirav K.; Sazinsky, Matthew H.; Argüello, José M.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2010-01-01

    The Cu+-ATPase CopA from Archaeoglobus fulgidus belongs to the P1B family of the P-type ATPases. These integral membrane proteins couple the energy of ATP hydrolysis to heavy metal ion translocation across membranes. A defining feature of P1B-1-type ATPases is the presence of soluble metal binding domains at the N-terminus (N-MBDs). The N-MBDs exhibit a conserved ferredoxin-like fold, similar to that of soluble copper chaperones, and bind metal ions via a conserved CXXC motif. The N-MBDs enable Cu+ regulation of turnover rates apparently through Cu-sensitive interactions with catalytic domains. A. fulgidus CopA is unusual in that it contains both an N-terminal MBD and a C-terminal MBD (C-MBD). The functional role of the unique C-MBD has not been established. Here, we report the crystal structure of the apo, oxidized C-MBD to 2.0 Å resolution. In the structure, two C-MBD monomers form a domain-swapped dimer, which has not been observed previously for similar domains. In addition, the interaction of the C-MBD with the other cytoplasmic domains of CopA, the ATP binding domain (ATPBD) and actuator domain (A-domain) has been investigated. Interestingly, the C-MBD interacts specifically with both of these domains, independent of the presence of Cu+ or nucleotides. These data reinforce the uniqueness of the C-MBD and suggest a distinct structural role for the C-MBD in CopA transport. PMID:20602459

  5. The NMR structure of the sensory domain of the membranous two-component fumarate sensor (histidine protein kinase) DcuS of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pappalardo, Lucia; Janausch, Ingo G; Vijayan, Vinesh; Zientz, Eva; Junker, Jochen; Peti, Wolfgang; Zweckstetter, Markus; Unden, Gottfried; Griesinger, Christian

    2003-10-03

    The structure of the water-soluble, periplasmic domain of the fumarate sensor DcuS (DcuS-pd) has been determined by NMR spectroscopy in solution. DcuS is a prototype for a sensory histidine kinase with transmembrane signal transfer. DcuS belongs to the CitA family of sensors that are specific for sensing di- and tricarboxylates. The periplasmic domain is folded autonomously and shows helices at the N and the C terminus, suggesting direct linking or connection to helices in the two transmembrane regions. The structure constitutes a novel fold. The nearest structural neighbor is the Per-Arnt-Sim domain of the photoactive yellow protein that binds small molecules covalently. Residues Arg107, His110, and Arg147 are essential for fumarate sensing and are found clustered together. The structure constitutes the first periplasmic domain of a two component sensory system and is distinctly different from the aspartate sensory domain of the Tar chemotaxis sensor.

  6. The molecular structure of the Toll-like receptor 3 ligand-binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Jessica K.; Botos, Istvan; Hall, Pamela R.; Askins, Janine; Shiloach, Joseph; Segal, David M.; Davies, David R.

    2005-01-01

    Innate immunity is the first line of defense against invading pathogens. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) act as sentinels of the innate immune system, sensing a variety of ligands from lipopolysaccharide to flagellin to dsRNA through their ligand-binding domain that is composed of leucine-rich repeats (LRRs). Ligand binding initiates a signaling cascade that leads to the up-regulation of inflammation mediators. In this study, we have expressed and crystallized the ectodomain (ECD) of human TLR3, which recognizes dsRNA, a molecular signature of viruses, and have determined the molecular structure to 2.4-Å resolution. The overall horseshoe-shaped structure of the TLR3-ECD is formed by 23 repeating LRRs that are capped at each end by specialized non-LRR domains. The extensive β-sheet on the molecule's concave surface forms a platform for several modifications, including insertions in the LRRs and 11 N-linked glycans. The TLR3-ECD structure indicates how LRR loops can establish distinct pathogen recognition receptors. PMID:16043704

  7. Crystal structure of Ralstonia eutropha polyhydroxyalkanoate synthase C-terminal domain and reaction mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jieun; Kim, Yeo-Jin; Choi, So Young; Lee, Sang Yup; Kim, Kyung-Jin

    2017-01-01

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) are natural polyesters synthesized by numerous microorganisms as energy and reducing power storage materials, and have attracted much attention as substitutes for petroleum-based plastics. Here, we report the first crystal structure of Ralstonia eutropha PHA synthase at 1.8 Å resolution and structure-based mechanisms for PHA polymerization. RePhaC1 contains two distinct domains, the N-terminal (RePhaC1ND ) and C-terminal domains (RePhaC1CD ), and exists as a dimer. RePhaC1CD catalyzes polymerization via non-processive ping-pong mechanism using a Cys-His-Asp catalytic triad. Molecular docking simulation of 3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA to the active site of RePhaC1CD reveals residues involved in the formation of 3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA binding pocket and substrate binding tunnel. Comparative analysis with other polymerases elucidates how different classes of PHA synthases show different substrate specificities. Furthermore, we attempted structure-based protein engineering and developed a RePhaC1 mutant with enhanced PHA synthase activity.

  8. Frequency domain identification for robust large space structure control design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yam, Y.; Bayard, D. S.; Scheid, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    A methodology is demonstrated for frequency domain identification of large space structures which systematically transforms experimental raw data into a form required for synthesizing H(infinity) controllers using modern robust control design software (e.g., Matlab Toolboxes). A unique feature of this approach is that the additive uncertainty is characterized to a specified statistic confidence rather than with hard bounds. In this study, the difference in robust performance is minimal between the two levels of confidence. In general cases, the present methodology provides a tool for performance/confidence level tradeoff studies. For simplicity, the additive uncertainty on a frequency grid is considered and the interpolation error in between grid points is neglected.

  9. Frequency domain identification experiment on a large flexible structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, D. S.; Hadaegh, F. Y.; Yam, Y.; Scheid, R. E.; Mettler, E.; Milman, M. H.

    1989-01-01

    Recent experiences in the field of flexible structure control in space have indicated a need for on-orbit system identification to support robust control redesign to avoid in-flight instabilities and maintain high spacecraft performance. The authors highlight an automated frequency domain system identification methodology recently developed to fill this need. The methodology supports (1) the estimation of system quantities useful for robust control analysis and design, (2) experiment design tailored to performing system identification in a typically constrained on-orbit environment, and (3) the automation of operations to reduce human-in-the-loop requirements. A basic overview of the methodology is presented first, followed by an experimental verification of the approach performed on the JPL/AFAL testbed facility.

  10. Tracking the Fate of Genetically Distinct Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Matrix Proteins Highlights the Role for Late Domains in Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Soh, Timothy K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) assembly requires condensation of the viral ribonucleoprotein (RNP) core with the matrix protein (M) during budding from the plasma membrane. The RNP core comprises the negative-sense genomic RNA completely coated by the nucleocapsid protein (N) and associated by a phosphoprotein (P) with the large polymerase protein (L). To study the assembly of single viral particles, we tagged M and P with fluorescent proteins. We selected from a library of viruses with insertions in the M gene a replication-competent virus containing a fluorescent M and combined that with our previously described virus containing fluorescent P. Virus particles containing those fusions maintained the same bullet shape appearance as wild-type VSV but had a modest increase in particle length, reflecting the increased genome size. Imaging of the released particles revealed a variation in the amount of M and P assembled into the virions, consistent with a flexible packaging mechanism. We used the recombinants to further study the importance of the late domains in M, which serve to recruit the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery during budding. Mutations in late domains resulted in the accumulation of virions that failed to pinch off from the plasma membrane. Imaging of single virions released from cells that were coinfected with M tagged with enhanced green fluorescent protein and M tagged with mCherry variants in which the late domains of one virus were inactivated by mutation showed a strong bias against the incorporation of the late-domain mutant into the released virions. In contrast, the intracellular expression and membrane association of the two variants were unaltered. These studies provide new tools for imaging particle assembly and enhance our resolution of existing models for assembly of VSV. IMPORTANCE Assembly of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) particles requires the separate trafficking of the viral replication

  11. Gonococcal pili. Primary structure and receptor binding domain.

    PubMed

    Schoolnik, G K; Fernandez, R; Tai, J Y; Rothbard, J; Gotschlich, E C

    1984-05-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of pilin from gonococcal strain MS11 and the sequence of constant and variable regions from strain R10 pilin have been determined in order to elucidate the structural basis for adherence function, antigenic diversity, and polymeric structure. The MS11 pilin sequence consists of 159 amino acids in a single polypeptide chain with two cysteines in disulfide linkage and serine-bonded phosphate residues. TC-2 (31-111), a soluble monomeric pilus peptide prepared by arginine-specific digestion, bound human endocervical, but not buccal or HeLa cells and therefore is postulated to encompass the receptor binding domain. Variable regions of CNBr-3 appear to confer antigenic diversity and comprise segments in which changes in the position of charged residues occur in hydrophilic, beta-turns. Residues 2-21 and 202-221 of gonococcal pilins and lower eucaryotic actins, respectively, exhibit 50% homology. When these residues are arranged at intervals of 100 degrees of arc on "helical wheels," the identical amino acids comprise a hydrophobic face on one side of the helix. This observation, the hydrophobic character of this region and the tendency for TC-1 (residues 1-30) to aggregate in water, suggest that this stretch interacts with other subunits to stabilize polymeric structure.

  12. Structure of the microtubule-binding domain of flagellar dynein.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yusuke S; Yagi, Toshiki; Harris, Sarah A; Ohki, Shin-ya; Yura, Kei; Shimizu, Youské; Honda, Shinya; Kamiya, Ritsu; Burgess, Stan A; Tanokura, Masaru

    2014-11-04

    Flagellar dyneins are essential microtubule motors in eukaryotes, as they drive the beating motions of cilia and flagella. Unlike myosin and kinesin motors, the track binding mechanism of dyneins and the regulation between the strong and weak binding states remain obscure. Here we report the solution structure of the microtubule-binding domain of flagellar dynein-c/DHC9 (dynein-c MTBD). The structure reveals a similar overall helix-rich fold to that of the MTBD of cytoplasmic dynein (cytoplasmic MTBD), but dynein-c MTBD has an additional flap, consisting of an antiparallel b sheet. The flap is positively charged and highly flexible. Despite the structural similarity to cytoplasmic MTBD, dynein-c MTBD shows only a small change in the microtubule- binding affinity depending on the registry change of coiled coil-sliding, whereby lacks the apparent strong binding state. The surface charge distribution of dynein-c MTBD also differs from that of cytoplasmic MTBD, which suggests a difference in the microtubule-binding mechanism.

  13. Structure of an Antibody in Complex with Its Mucin Domain Linear Epitope That Is Protective against Ebola Virus

    PubMed Central

    Olal, Daniel; Kuehne, Ana I.; Bale, Shridhar; Halfmann, Peter; Hashiguchi, Takao; Fusco, Marnie L.; Lee, Jeffrey E.; King, Liam B.; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Dye, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Antibody 14G7 is protective against lethal Ebola virus challenge and recognizes a distinct linear epitope in the prominent mucin-like domain of the Ebola virus glycoprotein GP. The structure of 14G7 in complex with its linear peptide epitope has now been determined to 2.8 Å. The structure shows that this GP sequence forms a tandem β-hairpin structure that binds deeply into a cleft in the antibody-combining site. A key threonine at the apex of one turn is critical for antibody interaction and is conserved among all Ebola viruses. This work provides further insight into the mechanism of protection by antibodies that target the protruding, highly accessible mucin-like domain of Ebola virus and the structural framework for understanding and characterizing candidate immunotherapeutics. PMID:22171276

  14. Geographically Distinct and Domain-Specific Sequence Variations in the Alleles of Rice Blast Resistance Gene Pib

    PubMed Central

    Vasudevan, Kumar; Vera Cruz, Casiana M.; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Bhullar, Navreet K.

    2016-01-01

    Rice blast is caused by Magnaporthe oryzae, which is the most destructive fungal pathogen affecting rice growing regions worldwide. The rice blast resistance gene Pib confers broad-spectrum resistance against Southeast Asian M. oryzae races. We investigated the allelic diversity of Pib in rice germplasm originating from 12 major rice growing countries. Twenty-five new Pib alleles were identified that have unique single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), insertions and/or deletions, in addition to the polymorphic nucleotides that are shared between the different alleles. These partially or completely shared polymorphic nucleotides indicate frequent sequence exchange events between the Pib alleles. In some of the new Pib alleles, nucleotide diversity is high in the LRR domain, whereas, in others it is distributed among the NB-ARC and LRR domains. Most of the polymorphic amino acids in LRR and NB-ARC2 domains are predicted as solvent-exposed. Several of the alleles and the unique SNPs are country specific, suggesting a diversifying selection of alleles in various geographical locations in response to the locally prevalent M. oryzae population. Together, the new Pib alleles are an important genetic resource for rice blast resistance breeding programs and provide new information on rice-M. oryzae interactions at the molecular level. PMID:27446145

  15. Geographically Distinct and Domain-Specific Sequence Variations in the Alleles of Rice Blast Resistance Gene Pib.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, Kumar; Vera Cruz, Casiana M; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Bhullar, Navreet K

    2016-01-01

    Rice blast is caused by Magnaporthe oryzae, which is the most destructive fungal pathogen affecting rice growing regions worldwide. The rice blast resistance gene Pib confers broad-spectrum resistance against Southeast Asian M. oryzae races. We investigated the allelic diversity of Pib in rice germplasm originating from 12 major rice growing countries. Twenty-five new Pib alleles were identified that have unique single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), insertions and/or deletions, in addition to the polymorphic nucleotides that are shared between the different alleles. These partially or completely shared polymorphic nucleotides indicate frequent sequence exchange events between the Pib alleles. In some of the new Pib alleles, nucleotide diversity is high in the LRR domain, whereas, in others it is distributed among the NB-ARC and LRR domains. Most of the polymorphic amino acids in LRR and NB-ARC2 domains are predicted as solvent-exposed. Several of the alleles and the unique SNPs are country specific, suggesting a diversifying selection of alleles in various geographical locations in response to the locally prevalent M. oryzae population. Together, the new Pib alleles are an important genetic resource for rice blast resistance breeding programs and provide new information on rice-M. oryzae interactions at the molecular level.

  16. Domain Dynamics in Piezoresponse Force Spectroscopy: Quantitative Deconvolution and Hysteresis Loop Fine Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Bdikin, Igor; Kholkin, Andrei; Morozovska, A. N.; Svechnikov, S. V.; Kim, S.-H.; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2008-01-01

    Domain dynamics in the Piezoresponse Force Spectroscopy (PFS) experiment is studied using the combination of local hysteresis loop acquisition with simultaneous domain imaging. The analytical theory for PFS signal from domain of arbitrary cross-section and length is developed for the analysis of experimental data on Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 polycrystalline films. The results suggest formation of oblate domain at early stage of the nucleation and growth, consistent with efficient screening of depolarization field. The fine structure of the hysteresis loop is shown to be related to the observed jumps in the domain geometry during domain wall propagation (nanoscale Barkhausen jumps), indicative of strong domain-defect interactions.

  17. Distinct brain signatures of content and structure violation during action observation.

    PubMed

    Maffongelli, L; Bartoli, E; Sammler, D; Kölsch, S; Campus, C; Olivier, E; Fadiga, L; D'Ausilio, A

    2015-08-01

    Sentences, musical phrases and goal-directed actions are composed of elements that are linked by specific rules to form meaningful outcomes. In goal-directed actions including a non-canonical element or scrambling the order of the elements alters the action's content and structure, respectively. In the present study we investigated event-related potentials of the electroencephalographic (EEG) activity recorded during observation of both alterations of the action content (obtained by violating the semantic components of an action, e.g. making coffee with cola) and alterations of the action structure (obtained by inverting the order of two temporally adjacent pictures of sequences depicting daily life actions) interfering with the normal flow of the motor acts that compose an action. Action content alterations elicited a bilateral posterior distributed EEG negativity, peaking at around 400 ms after stimulus onset similar to the ERPs evoked by semantic violations in language studies. Alteration of the action structure elicited an early left anterior negativity followed by a late left anterior positivity, which closely resembles the ERP pattern found in language syntax violation studies. Our results suggest a functional dissociation between the processing of action content and structure, reminiscent of a similar dissociation found in the language or music domains. Importantly, this study provides further support to the hypothesis that some basic mechanisms, such as the rule-based structuring of sequential events, are shared between different cognitive domains.

  18. Crystal structure of the catalytic domain of human bile salt activated lipase.

    PubMed Central

    Terzyan, S.; Wang, C. S.; Downs, D.; Hunter, B.; Zhang, X. C.

    2000-01-01

    Bile-salt activated lipase (BAL) is a pancreatic enzyme that digests a variety of lipids in the small intestine. A distinct property of BAL is its dependency on bile salts in hydrolyzing substrates of long acyl chains or bulky alcoholic motifs. A crystal structure of the catalytic domain of human BAL (residues 1-538) with two surface mutations (N186D and A298D), which were introduced in attempting to facilitate crystallization, has been determined at 2.3 A resolution. The crystal form belongs to space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) with one monomer per asymmetric unit, and the protein shows an alpha/beta hydrolase fold. In the absence of bound bile salt molecules, the protein possesses a preformed catalytic triad and a functional oxyanion hole. Several surface loops around the active site are mobile, including two loops potentially involved in substrate binding (residues 115-125 and 270-285). PMID:11045623

  19. Quantitative image analysis reveals distinct structural transitions during aging in Caenorhabditis elegans tissues.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Josiah; Iser, Wendy B; Chow, David K; Goldberg, Ilya G; Wolkow, Catherine A

    2008-07-30

    Aging is associated with functional and structural declines in many body systems, even in the absence of underlying disease. In particular, skeletal muscles experience severe declines during aging, a phenomenon termed sarcopenia. Despite the high incidence and severity of sarcopenia, little is known about contributing factors and development. Many studies focus on functional aspects of aging-related tissue decline, while structural details remain understudied. Traditional approaches for quantifying structural changes have assessed individual markers at discrete intervals. Such approaches are inadequate for the complex changes associated with aging. An alternative is to consider changes in overall morphology rather than in specific markers. We have used this approach to quantitatively track tissue architecture during adulthood and aging in the C. elegans pharynx, the neuromuscular feeding organ. Using pattern recognition to analyze aged-grouped pharynx images, we identified discrete step-wise transitions between distinct morphologies. The morphology state transitions were maintained in mutants with pharynx neurotransmission defects, although the pace of the transitions was altered. Longitudinal measurements of pharynx function identified a predictive relationship between mid-life pharynx morphology and function at later ages. These studies demonstrate for the first time that adult tissues undergo distinct structural transitions reflecting postdevelopmental events. The processes that underlie these architectural changes may contribute to increased disease risk during aging, and may be targets for factors that alter the aging rate. This work further demonstrates that pattern analysis of an image series offers a novel and generally accessible approach for quantifying morphological changes and identifying structural biomarkers.

  20. Crystal Structures of Cyclohexanone Monooxygenase Reveal Complex Domain Movements and a Sliding Cofactor

    SciTech Connect

    Mirza, I.; Yachnin, B; Wang, S; Grosse, S; Bergeron, H; Imura, A; Iwaki, H; Hasegawa, Y; Lau, P; Berghuis, A

    2009-01-01

    Cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO) is a flavoprotein that carries out the archetypical Baeyer-Villiger oxidation of a variety of cyclic ketones into lactones. Using NADPH and O{sub 2} as cosubstrates, the enzyme inserts one atom of oxygen into the substrate in a complex catalytic mechanism that involves the formation of a flavin-peroxide and Criegee intermediate. We present here the atomic structures of CHMO from an environmental Rhodococcus strain bound with FAD and NADP+ in two distinct states, to resolutions of 2.3 and 2.2 {angstrom}. The two conformations reveal domain shifts around multiple linkers and loop movements, involving conserved arginine 329 and tryptophan 492, which effect a translation of the nicotinamide resulting in a sliding cofactor. Consequently, the cofactor is ideally situated and subsequently repositioned during the catalytic cycle to first reduce the flavin and later stabilize formation of the Criegee intermediate. Concurrent movements of a loop adjacent to the active site demonstrate how this protein can effect large changes in the size and shape of the substrate binding pocket to accommodate a diverse range of substrates. Finally, the previously identified BVMO signature sequence is highlighted for its role in coordinating domain movements. Taken together, these structures provide mechanistic insights into CHMO-catalyzed Baeyer-Villiger oxidation.

  1. Crystal structures of cyclohexanone monooxygenase reveal complex domain movements and a sliding cofactor.

    PubMed

    Mirza, I Ahmad; Yachnin, Brahm J; Wang, Shaozhao; Grosse, Stephan; Bergeron, Hélène; Imura, Akihiro; Iwaki, Hiroaki; Hasegawa, Yoshie; Lau, Peter C K; Berghuis, Albert M

    2009-07-01

    Cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO) is a flavoprotein that carries out the archetypical Baeyer-Villiger oxidation of a variety of cyclic ketones into lactones. Using NADPH and O(2) as cosubstrates, the enzyme inserts one atom of oxygen into the substrate in a complex catalytic mechanism that involves the formation of a flavin-peroxide and Criegee intermediate. We present here the atomic structures of CHMO from an environmental Rhodococcus strain bound with FAD and NADP(+) in two distinct states, to resolutions of 2.3 and 2.2 A. The two conformations reveal domain shifts around multiple linkers and loop movements, involving conserved arginine 329 and tryptophan 492, which effect a translation of the nicotinamide resulting in a sliding cofactor. Consequently, the cofactor is ideally situated and subsequently repositioned during the catalytic cycle to first reduce the flavin and later stabilize formation of the Criegee intermediate. Concurrent movements of a loop adjacent to the active site demonstrate how this protein can effect large changes in the size and shape of the substrate binding pocket to accommodate a diverse range of substrates. Finally, the previously identified BVMO signature sequence is highlighted for its role in coordinating domain movements. Taken together, these structures provide mechanistic insights into CHMO-catalyzed Baeyer-Villiger oxidation.

  2. Limited proteolysis differentially modulates the stability and subcellular localization of domains of RPGRIP1 that are distinctly affected by mutations in Leber's congenital amaurosis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xinrong; Guruju, Mallikarjuna; Oswald, John; Ferreira, Paulo A

    2005-05-15

    The retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator (RPGR) protein interacts with the retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator interacting protein-1 (RPGRIP1). Genetic lesions in the cognate genes lead to distinct and severe human retinal dystrophies. The biological role of these proteins in retinal function and pathogenesis of retinal diseases is elusive. Here, we present the first physiological assay of the role of RPGRIP1 and mutations therein. We found that the monoallelic and homozygous mutations, DeltaE1279 and D1114G, in the RPGR-interacting domain (RID) of RPGRIP1, enhance and abolish, respectively, its interaction in vivo with RPGR without affecting the stability of RID. In contrast to RID(WT) and RID(D1114G), chemical genetics shows that the interaction of RID(DeltaE1279) with RPGR is resistant to various stress treatments such as osmotic, pH and heat-shock stimuli. Hence, RID(D1114G) and RID(DeltaE1279) constitute loss- and gain-of-function mutations. Moreover, we find that the isoforms, bRPGRIP1 and bRPGRIP1b, undergo limited proteolysis constitutively in vivo in the cytoplasm compartment. This leads to the relocation and accumulation of a small and stable N-terminal domain of approximately 7 kDa to the nucleus, whereas the cytosolic C-terminal domain of RPGRIP1 is degraded and short-lived. The RID(D1114G) and RID(DeltaE1279) mutations exhibit strong cis-acting and antagonistic biological effects on the nuclear relocation, subcellular distribution and proteolytic cleavage of RPGRIP1 and/or domains thereof. These data support distinct and spatiotemporal subcellular-specific roles to RPGRIP1. A novel RPGRIP1-mediated nucleocytoplasmic crosstalk and transport pathway regulated by RID, and hence by RPGR, emerges with implications in the molecular pathogenesis of retinopathies, and a model to other diseases.

  3. Structural Insights into the HWE Histidine Kinase Family: The Brucella Blue Light-Activated Histidine Kinase Domain.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi, Jimena; Arrar, Mehrnoosh; Sycz, Gabriela; Cerutti, María Laura; Berguer, Paula M; Paris, Gastón; Estrín, Darío Ariel; Martí, Marcelo Adrián; Klinke, Sebastián; Goldbaum, Fernando Alberto

    2016-03-27

    In response to light, as part of a two-component system, the Brucella blue light-activated histidine kinase (LOV-HK) increases its autophosphorylation, modulating the virulence of this microorganism. The Brucella histidine kinase (HK) domain belongs to the HWE family, for which there is no structural information. The HWE family is exclusively present in proteobacteria and usually coupled to a wide diversity of light sensor domains. This work reports the crystal structure of the Brucella HK domain, which presents two different dimeric assemblies in the asymmetric unit: one similar to the already described canonical parallel homodimers (C) and the other, an antiparallel non-canonical (NC) dimer, each with distinct relative subdomain orientations and dimerization interfaces. Contrary to these crystallographic structures and unlike other HKs, in solution, the Brucella HK domain is monomeric and still active, showing an astonishing instability of the dimeric interface. Despite this instability, using cross-linking experiments, we show that the C dimer is the functionally relevant species. Mutational analysis demonstrates that the autophosphorylation activity occurs in cis. The different relative subdomain orientations observed for the NC and C states highlight the large conformational flexibility of the HK domain. Through the analysis of these alternative conformations by means of molecular dynamics simulations, we also propose a catalytic mechanism for Brucella LOV-HK.

  4. The Structural Basis for Activation and Inhibition of ZAP-70 Kinase Domain.

    PubMed

    Huber, Roland G; Fan, Hao; Bond, Peter J

    2015-10-01

    ZAP-70 (Zeta-chain-associated protein kinase 70) is a tyrosine kinase that interacts directly with the activated T-cell receptor to transduce downstream signals, and is hence a major player in the regulation of the adaptive immune response. Dysfunction of ZAP-70 causes selective T cell deficiency that in turn results in persistent infections. ZAP-70 is activated by a variety of signals including phosphorylation of the kinase domain (KD), and binding of its regulatory tandem Src homology 2 (SH2) domains to the T cell receptor. The present study investigates molecular mechanisms of activation and inhibition of ZAP-70 via atomically detailed molecular dynamics simulation approaches. We report microsecond timescale simulations of five distinct states of the ZAP-70 KD, comprising apo, inhibited and three phosphorylated variants. Extensive analysis of local flexibility and correlated motions reveal crucial transitions between the states, thus elucidating crucial steps in the activation mechanism of the ZAP-70 KD. Furthermore, we rationalize previously observed staurosporine-bound crystal structures, suggesting that whilst the KD superficially resembles an "active-like" conformation, the inhibitor modulates the underlying protein dynamics and restricts it in a compact, rigid state inaccessible to ligands or cofactors. Finally, our analysis reveals a novel, potentially druggable pocket in close proximity to the activation loop of the kinase, and we subsequently use its structure in fragment-based virtual screening to develop a pharmacophore model. The pocket is distinct from classical type I or type II kinase pockets, and its discovery offers promise in future design of specific kinase inhibitors, whilst mutations in residues associated with this pocket are implicated in immunodeficiency in humans.

  5. Physiological and structural differences in spatially distinct subpopulations of cardiac mitochondria: influence of cardiac pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Thapa, Dharendra; Shepherd, Danielle L.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac tissue contains discrete pools of mitochondria that are characterized by their subcellular spatial arrangement. Subsarcolemmal mitochondria (SSM) exist below the cell membrane, interfibrillar mitochondria (IFM) reside in rows between the myofibrils, and perinuclear mitochondria are situated at the nuclear poles. Microstructural imaging of heart tissue coupled with the development of differential isolation techniques designed to sequentially separate spatially distinct mitochondrial subpopulations have revealed differences in morphological features including shape, absolute size, and internal cristae arrangement. These findings have been complemented by functional studies indicating differences in biochemical parameters and, potentially, functional roles for the ATP generated, based upon subcellular location. Consequently, mitochondrial subpopulations appear to be influenced differently during cardiac pathologies including ischemia/reperfusion, heart failure, aging, exercise, and diabetes mellitus. These influences may be the result of specific structural and functional disparities between mitochondrial subpopulations such that the stress elicited by a given cardiac insult differentially impacts subcellular locales and the mitochondria contained within. The goal of this review is to highlight some of the inherent structural and functional differences that exist between spatially distinct cardiac mitochondrial subpopulations as well as provide an overview of the differential impact of various cardiac pathologies on spatially distinct mitochondrial subpopulations. As an outcome, we will instill a basis for incorporating subcellular spatial location when evaluating the impact of cardiac pathologies on the mitochondrion. Incorporation of subcellular spatial location may offer the greatest potential for delineating the influence of cardiac pathology on this critical organelle. PMID:24778166

  6. Distinct Growth Factor Families Are Recruited in Unique Spatiotemporal Domains during Long-Term Memory Formation in Aplysia californica.

    PubMed

    Kopec, Ashley M; Philips, Gary T; Carew, Thomas J

    2015-06-03

    Several growth factors (GFs) have been implicated in long-term memory (LTM), but no single GF can support all of the plastic changes that occur during memory formation. Because GFs engage highly convergent signaling cascades that often mediate similar functional outcomes, the relative contribution of any particular GF to LTM is difficult to ascertain. To explore this question, we determined the unique contribution of distinct GF families (signaling via TrkB and TGF-βr-II) to LTM formation in Aplysia. We demonstrate that TrkB and TGF-βr-II signaling are differentially recruited during two-trial training in both time (by trial 1 or 2, respectively) and space (in distinct subcellular compartments). These GFs independently regulate MAPK activation and synergistically regulate gene expression. We also show that trial 1 TrkB and trial 2 TGF-βr-II signaling are required for LTM formation. These data support the view that GFs engaged in LTM formation are interactive components of a complex molecular network.

  7. Banded Structure and Domain Arrangements in PbTiO3 Single Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Chen-Chia; Chen, Cheng-Sao

    1998-09-01

    In the present work we report the ferroelectric domain arrangements and characteristics of banded structures observed in flux-grown PbTiO3 single crystals. Investigations of etched crystals indicate that most of the specimens show banded structures which may correspond to surface relief characteristics of as-grown crystals. Banded structures, which are different from domain structures, possess structural characteristics similar to those of martensite variants in various alloys and ceramics. The stresses produced during transformation were relieved by the formation of the banded structures and the 90° domain structures, suggesting that the band structures and 90° domains are the products of self-accommodation in as-grown PbTiO3 crystals during the cubic/tetragonal (C/T) transformation. Image characteristics imply that banded-structure-induced domain intersections may store high strain energy in lead titanate crystals and therefore hinder polarization switching of the crystals.

  8. Structural and functional analysis of the pro-domain of human cathelicidin, LL-37

    PubMed Central

    Pazgier, Marzena; Ericksen, Bryan; Ling, Minhua; Toth, Eric; Shi, Jishu; Li, Xiangdong; Galliher-Beckley, Amy; Lan, Liqiong; Zou, Guozhang; Zhan, Changyou; Yuan, Weirong; Pozharski, Edwin; Lu, Wuyuan

    2013-01-01

    Cathelicidins form a family of small host defense peptides distinct from another class of cationic antimicrobial peptides, the defensins. They are expressed as large precursor molecules with a highly conserved pro-domain known as the cathelin-like domain (CLD). CLDs have high degrees of sequence homology to cathelin, a protein isolated from pig leukocytes and belonging to the cystatin family of cysteine protease inhibitors. In this report, we describe for the first time the X-ray crystal structure of the human CLD (hCLD) of the sole human cathelicidin, LL-37. The structure of hCLD, determined at 1.93 Å resolution, shows the cystatin-like fold and is highly similar to the structure of the CLD of the pig cathelicidin, protegrin-3. We assayed the in vitro antibacterial activities of hCLD, LL-37 and the precursor form, pro-cathelicidin (also known as hCAP18), and we found that the unprocessed protein inhibited the growth of Gram-negative bacteria with efficiencies comparable to the mature peptide, LL-37. In addition, the antibacterial activity of LL-37 was not inhibited by hCLD intermolecularly, since exogenously added hCLD had no effect on the bactericidal activity of the mature peptide. hCLD itself lacked antimicrobial function and did not inhibit the cysteine protease, cathepsin L. Our results contrast with previous reports of hCLD activity. A comparative structural analysis between hCLD and the cysteine protease inhibitor stefin A showed why hCLD is unable to function as an inhibitor of cysteine proteases. In this respect, the cystatin scaffold represents an ancestral structural platform from which proteins evolved divergently, with some losing inhibitory functions. PMID:23406372

  9. Crystal Structure of the Chromodomain Helicase DNA-binding Protein 1 (Chd1) DNA-binding Domain in Complex with DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma A.; Heroux A.; Jenkins K. R.; Bowman G. D.

    2011-12-09

    Chromatin remodelers are ATP-dependent machines that dynamically alter the chromatin packaging of eukaryotic genomes by assembling, sliding, and displacing nucleosomes. The Chd1 chromatin remodeler possesses a C-terminal DNA-binding domain that is required for efficient nucleosome sliding and believed to be essential for sensing the length of DNA flanking the nucleosome core. The structure of the Chd1 DNA-binding domain was recently shown to consist of a SANT and SLIDE domain, analogous to the DNA-binding domain of the ISWI family, yet the details of how Chd1 recognized DNA were not known. Here we present the crystal structure of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Chd1 DNA-binding domain in complex with a DNA duplex. The bound DNA duplex is straight, consistent with the preference exhibited by the Chd1 DNA-binding domain for extranucleosomal DNA. Comparison of this structure with the recently solved ISW1a DNA-binding domain bound to DNA reveals that DNA lays across each protein at a distinct angle, yet contacts similar surfaces on the SANT and SLIDE domains. In contrast to the minor groove binding seen for Isw1 and predicted for Chd1, the SLIDE domain of the Chd1 DNA-binding domain contacts the DNA major groove. The majority of direct contacts with the phosphate backbone occur only on one DNA strand, suggesting that Chd1 may not strongly discriminate between major and minor grooves.

  10. Structure of NS1A effector domain from the influenza A/Udorn/72 virus

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, Shuangluo; Monzingo, Arthur F.; Robertus, Jon D.

    2009-01-01

    The structure of the effector domain of the influenza protein NS1, a validated antiviral drug target, has been solved in two space groups. The nonstructural protein NS1A from influenza virus is a multifunctional virulence factor and a potent inhibitor of host immunity. It has two functional domains: an N-terminal 73-amino-acid RNA-binding domain and a C-terminal effector domain. Here, the crystallographic structure of the NS1A effector domain of influenza A/Udorn/72 virus is presented. Structure comparison with the NS1 effector domain from mouse-adapted influenza A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8) virus strain reveals a similar monomer conformation but a different dimer interface. Further analysis and evaluation shows that the dimer interface observed in the structure of the PR8 NS1 effector domain is likely to be a crystallographic packing effect. A hypothetical model of the intact NS1 dimer is presented.

  11. Novel exons in the tbx5 gene locus generate protein isoforms with distinct expression domains and function.

    PubMed

    Yamak, Abir; Georges, Romain O; Sheikh-Hassani, Massomeh; Morin, Martin; Komati, Hiba; Nemer, Mona

    2015-03-13

    TBX5 is the gene mutated in Holt-Oram syndrome, an autosomal dominant disorder with complex heart and limb deformities. Its protein product is a member of the T-box family of transcription factors and an evolutionarily conserved dosage-sensitive regulator of heart and limb development. Understanding TBX5 regulation is therefore of paramount importance. Here we uncover the existence of novel exons and provide evidence that TBX5 activity may be extensively regulated through alternative splicing to produce protein isoforms with differing N- and C-terminal domains. These isoforms are also present in human heart, indicative of an evolutionarily conserved regulatory mechanism. The newly identified isoforms have different transcriptional properties and can antagonize TBX5a target gene activation. Droplet Digital PCR as well as immunohistochemistry with isoform-specific antibodies reveal differential as well as overlapping expression domains. In particular, we find that the predominant isoform in skeletal myoblasts is Tbx5c, and we show that it is dramatically up-regulated in differentiating myotubes and is essential for myotube formation. Mechanistically, TBX5c antagonizes TBX5a activation of pro-proliferative signals such as IGF-1, FGF-10, and BMP4. The results provide new insight into Tbx5 regulation and function that will further our understanding of its role in health and disease. The finding of new exons in the Tbx5 locus may also be relevant to mutational screening especially in the 30% of Holt-Oram syndrome patients with no mutations in the known TBX5a exons.

  12. Attractant binding induces distinct structural changes to the polar and lateral signaling clusters in Bacillus subtilis chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kang; Walukiewicz, Hanna E; Glekas, George D; Ordal, George W; Rao, Christopher V

    2011-01-28

    Bacteria employ a modified two-component system for chemotaxis, where the receptors form ternary complexes with CheA histidine kinases and CheW adaptor proteins. These complexes are arranged in semi-ordered arrays clustered predominantly at the cell poles. The prevailing models assume that these arrays are static and reorganize only locally in response to attractant binding. Recent studies have shown, however, that these structures may in fact be much more fluid. We investigated the localization of the chemotaxis signaling arrays in Bacillus subtilis using immunofluorescence and live cell fluorescence microscopy. We found that the receptors were localized in clusters at the poles in most cells. However, when the cells were exposed to attractant, the number exhibiting polar clusters was reduced roughly 2-fold, whereas the number exhibiting lateral clusters distinct from the poles increased significantly. These changes in receptor clustering were reversible as polar localization was reestablished in adapted cells. We also investigated the dynamic localization of CheV, a hybrid protein consisting of an N-terminal CheW-like adaptor domain and a C-terminal response regulator domain that is known to be phosphorylated by CheA, using immunofluorescence. Interestingly, we found that CheV was localized predominantly at lateral clusters in unstimulated cells. However, upon exposure to attractant, CheV was found to be predominantly localized to the cell poles. Moreover, changes in CheV localization are phosphorylation-dependent. Collectively, these results suggest that the chemotaxis signaling arrays in B. subtilis are dynamic structures and that feedback loops involving phosphorylation may regulate the positioning of individual proteins.

  13. Structure of the homodimeric androgen receptor ligand-binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Nadal, Marta; Prekovic, Stefan; Gallastegui, Nerea; Helsen, Christine; Abella, Montserrat; Zielinska, Karolina; Gay, Marina; Vilaseca, Marta; Taulès, Marta; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B.; van Royen, Martin E.; Claessens, Frank; Fuentes-Prior, Pablo; Estébanez-Perpiñá, Eva

    2017-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) plays a crucial role in normal physiology, development and metabolism as well as in the aetiology and treatment of diverse pathologies such as androgen insensitivity syndromes (AIS), male infertility and prostate cancer (PCa). Here we show that dimerization of AR ligand-binding domain (LBD) is induced by receptor agonists but not by antagonists. The 2.15-Å crystal structure of homodimeric, agonist- and coactivator peptide-bound AR-LBD unveils a 1,000-Å2 large dimerization surface, which harbours over 40 previously unexplained AIS- and PCa-associated point mutations. An AIS mutation in the self-association interface (P767A) disrupts dimer formation in vivo, and has a detrimental effect on the transactivating properties of full-length AR, despite retained hormone-binding capacity. The conservation of essential residues suggests that the unveiled dimerization mechanism might be shared by other nuclear receptors. Our work defines AR-LBD homodimerization as an essential step in the proper functioning of this important transcription factor. PMID:28165461

  14. Parallel Finite Element Domain Decomposition for Structural/Acoustic Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Duc T.; Tungkahotara, Siroj; Watson, Willie R.; Rajan, Subramaniam D.

    2005-01-01

    A domain decomposition (DD) formulation for solving sparse linear systems of equations resulting from finite element analysis is presented. The formulation incorporates mixed direct and iterative equation solving strategics and other novel algorithmic ideas that are optimized to take advantage of sparsity and exploit modern computer architecture, such as memory and parallel computing. The most time consuming part of the formulation is identified and the critical roles of direct sparse and iterative solvers within the framework of the formulation are discussed. Experiments on several computer platforms using several complex test matrices are conducted using software based on the formulation. Small-scale structural examples are used to validate thc steps in the formulation and large-scale (l,000,000+ unknowns) duct acoustic examples are used to evaluate the ORIGIN 2000 processors, and a duster of 6 PCs (running under the Windows environment). Statistics show that the formulation is efficient in both sequential and parallel computing environmental and that the formulation is significantly faster and consumes less memory than that based on one of the best available commercialized parallel sparse solvers.

  15. Molecular evolution and domain structure of plasminogen-related growth factors (HGF/SF and HGF1/MSP).

    PubMed Central

    Donate, L. E.; Gherardi, E.; Srinivasan, N.; Sowdhamini, R.; Aparicio, S.; Blundell, T. L.

    1994-01-01

    Plasminogen-related growth factors, a new family of polypeptide growth factors with the basic domain organization and mechanism of activation of the blood proteinase plasminogen, include hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF), a potent effector of the growth, movement, and differentiation of epithelia and endothelia, and hepatocyte growth factor-like/macrophage stimulating protein (HGF1/MSP), an effector of macrophage chemotaxis and phagocytosis. Phylogeny of the serine proteinase domains and analysis of intron-exon boundaries and kringle sequences indicate that HGF/SF, HGF1/MSP, plasminogen, and apolipoprotein (a) have evolved from a common ancestral gene that consisted of an N-terminal domain corresponding to plasminogen activation peptide (PAP), 3 copies of the kringle domain, and a serine proteinase domain. Models of the N domains of HGF/SF, HGF1/MSP, and plasminogen, characterized by the presence of 4 conserved Cys residues forming a loop in a loop, have been modeled based on disulfide-bond constraints. There is a distinct pattern of charged and hydrophobic residues in the helix-strand-helix motif proposed for the PAP domain of HGF/SF; these may be important for receptor interaction. Three-dimensional structures of the 4 kringle and the serine proteinase domains of HGF/SF were constructed by comparative modeling using the suite of programs COMPOSER and were energy minimized. Docking of a lysine analogue indicates a putative lysine-binding pocket within kringle 2 (and possibly another in kringle 4). The models suggest a mechanism for the formation of a noncovalent HGF/SF homodimer that may be responsible for the activation of the Met receptor. These data provide evidence for the divergent evolution and structural similarity of plasminogen, HGF/SF, and HGF1/MSP, and highlight a new strategy for growth factor evolution, namely the adaptation of a proteolytic enzyme to a role in receptor activation. PMID:7756992

  16. Crystal structures of the viral protease Npro imply distinct roles for the catalytic water in catalysis.

    PubMed

    Zögg, Thomas; Sponring, Michael; Schindler, Sabrina; Koll, Maria; Schneider, Rainer; Brandstetter, Hans; Auer, Bernhard

    2013-06-04

    Npro is a key effector protein of pestiviruses such as bovine viral diarrhea virus and abolishes host cell antiviral defense mechanisms. Synthesized as the N-terminal part of the viral polyprotein, Npro releases itself via an autoproteolytic cleavage, triggering its immunological functions. However, the mechanisms of its proteolytic action and its immune escape were unclear. Here, we present the crystal structures of Npro to 1.25 Å resolution. Structures of pre- and postcleavage intermediates identify three catalytically relevant elements. The trapping of the putative catalytic water reveals its distinct roles as a base, acid, and nucleophile. The presentation of the substrate further explains the enigmatic latency of the protease, ensuring a single in cis cleavage. Additionally, we identified a zinc-free, disulfide-linked conformation of the TRASH motif, an interaction hub of immune factors. The structure opens additional opportunities in utilizing Npro as an autocleaving fusion protein and as a pharmaceutical target.

  17. Structural And Functional Studies of ALIX Interactions With YPXnL Late Domains of HIV-1 And EIAV

    SciTech Connect

    Zhai, Q.; Fisher, R.D.; Chung, H.-Y.; Myszka, D.G.; Sundquist, W.I.; Hill, C.P.

    2009-05-28

    Retrovirus budding requires short peptide motifs (late domains) located within the viral Gag protein that function by recruiting cellular factors. The YPX{sub n}L late domains of HIV and other lentiviruses recruit the protein ALIX (also known as AIP1), which also functions in vesicle formation at the multivesicular body and in the abscission stage of cytokinesis. Here, we report the crystal structures of ALIX in complex with the YPX{sub n}L late domains from HIV-1 and EIAV. The two distinct late domains bind at the same site on the ALIX V domain but adopt different conformations that allow them to make equivalent contacts. Binding studies and functional assays verified the importance of key interface residues and revealed that binding affinities are tuned by context-dependent effects. These results reveal how YPX{sub n}L late domains recruit ALIX to facilitate virus budding and how ALIX can bind YPX{sub n}L sequences with both n = 1 and n = 3.

  18. Coordination of distinct motor structures through remote axonal coupling of projection interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Jian; Sasaki, Kosei; Perkins, Matthew H; Siniscalchi, Michael J; Ludwar, Bjoern C; Cropper, Elizabeth C; Weiss, Klaudiusz R

    2011-01-01

    Complex behaviors often require coordinated movements of dissimilar motor structures. The underlying neural mechanisms are poorly understood. We investigated cycle-by-cycle coordination of two dissimilar feeding structures in Aplysia californica: the external lips and the internal radula. During feeding, the lips open while the radula protracts. Lip and radula motoneurons are located in the cerebral and buccal ganglia respectively, and radula motoneurons are controlled by a well-characterized buccal central pattern generator (CPG). Here, we examined whether the three electrically-coupled lip motoneurons C15/16/17 are controlled by the buccal CPG or by a previously-postulated cerebral CPG. Two buccal-cerebral projection interneurons, B34 and B63, which are part of the buccal CPG and mediate radula protraction, monosynaptically excite C15/16/17. Recordings from the B34 axon in the cerebral ganglion demonstrate its direct electrical coupling with C15/16/17, eliminating the need for a cerebral CPG. Moreover, when the multifunctional buccal CPG generates multiple forms of motor programs due to the activation of two inputs: the command-like neuron CBI-2 and the esophageal nerve (EN), C15/16 exhibit activity patterns that are distinct from C17. These distinct activity patterns result from combined activity of B34 and B63 and their differential excitation of C15/16 vs. C17. In more general terms, we identified neuronal mechanisms that allow a single CPG to coordinate the phasing and activity of remotely-located motoneurons innervating distinct structures that participate in the production of different motor outputs. We also demonstrated that axo-dendritic electrical coupling by projection interneurons plays a pivotal role in coordinating activity of these remotely-located neurons. PMID:22031890

  19. Distinct local electronic structure and magnetism for Mn in amorphous Si and Ge

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Li; Cao, J. X.; Helgren, E.; Karel, J.; Arenholz, E.; Ouyang, Lu; Smith, David J.; Wu, R. Q.; Hellman, F.

    2010-06-01

    Transition metals such as Mn generally have large local moments in covalent semiconductors due to their partially filled d shells. However, Mn magnetization in group-IV semiconductors is more complicated than often recognized. Here we report a striking crossover from a quenched Mn moment (<0.1 {mu}{sub B}) in amorphous Si (a-Si) to a large distinct local Mn moment ({ge}3{mu}{sub B}) in amorphous Ge (a-Ge) over a wide range of Mn concentrations (0.005-0.20). Corresponding differences are observed in d-shell electronic structure and the sign of the Hall effect. Density-functional-theory calculations show distinct local structures, consistent with different atomic density measured for a-Si and a-Ge, respectively, and the Mn coordination number N{sub c} is found to be the key factor. Despite the amorphous structure, Mn in a-Si is in a relatively well-defined high coordination interstitial type site with broadened d bands, low moment, and electron (n-type) carriers, while Mn in a-Ge is in a low coordination substitutional type site with large local moment and holes (p-type) carriers. Moreover, the correlation between N{sub c} and the magnitude of the local moment is essentially independent of the matrix; the local Mn moments approach zero when N{sub c} > 7 for both a-Si and a-Ge.

  20. Solution structure of Q388A3 PDZ domain from Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Mei, Song; Dong, Yuanqiu; Zhang, Jiahai; Zhang, Xuecheng; Tu, Xiaoming

    2016-05-01

    PDZ domains are abundant protein interaction modules that often recognize short amino acid motifs at the C-termini of target proteins and regulate multiple biological processes. So far, no PDZ domain in Trypanosoma brucei, an eukaryotic parasite causing sleeping sickness, has been studied. Q388A3, conserved in the related kinetoplastid parasites, is a 1634-residue protein containing a PDZ domain at its C-terminus. In this work, the solution structure of Q388A3 PDZ domain was solved by NMR spectroscopy. Q388A3 PDZ domain adopts a PDZ-like fold composed by a five-stranded β-sheet capped by two α-helices, which is similar to the PDZ domains from HtrA family proteins. Meanwhile, Q388A3 PDZ domain shows some structural features quite different from HtrA PDZ domain.

  1. Structural insights of ZIP4 extracellular domain critical for optimal zinc transport

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tuo; Sui, Dexin; Hu, Jian

    2016-01-01

    The ZIP zinc transporter family is responsible for zinc uptake from the extracellular milieu or intracellular vesicles. The LIV-1 subfamily, containing nine out of the 14 human ZIP proteins, is featured with a large extracellular domain (ECD). The critical role of the ECD is manifested by disease-causing mutations on ZIP4, a representative LIV-1 protein. Here we report the first crystal structure of a mammalian ZIP4-ECD, which reveals two structurally independent subdomains and an unprecedented dimer centred at the signature PAL motif. Structure-guided mutagenesis, cell-based zinc uptake assays and mapping of the disease-causing mutations indicate that the two subdomains play pivotal but distinct roles and that the bridging region connecting them is particularly important for ZIP4 function. These findings lead to working hypotheses on how ZIP4-ECD exerts critical functions in zinc transport. The conserved dimeric architecture in ZIP4-ECD is also demonstrated to be a common structural feature among the LIV-1 proteins. PMID:27321477

  2. Structural insights of ZIP4 extracellular domain critical for optimal zinc transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tuo; Sui, Dexin; Hu, Jian

    2016-06-01

    The ZIP zinc transporter family is responsible for zinc uptake from the extracellular milieu or intracellular vesicles. The LIV-1 subfamily, containing nine out of the 14 human ZIP proteins, is featured with a large extracellular domain (ECD). The critical role of the ECD is manifested by disease-causing mutations on ZIP4, a representative LIV-1 protein. Here we report the first crystal structure of a mammalian ZIP4-ECD, which reveals two structurally independent subdomains and an unprecedented dimer centred at the signature PAL motif. Structure-guided mutagenesis, cell-based zinc uptake assays and mapping of the disease-causing mutations indicate that the two subdomains play pivotal but distinct roles and that the bridging region connecting them is particularly important for ZIP4 function. These findings lead to working hypotheses on how ZIP4-ECD exerts critical functions in zinc transport. The conserved dimeric architecture in ZIP4-ECD is also demonstrated to be a common structural feature among the LIV-1 proteins.

  3. Projectin PEVK domain, splicing variants and domain structure in basal and derived insects.

    PubMed

    Ayme-Southgate, A; Philipp, R A; Southgate, R J

    2011-06-01

    The third elastic filament of striated muscles consists of giant proteins: titin (in vertebrates) and kettin/projectin (in insects). In all three proteins, elasticity is at least partly associated with the so-called PEVK domain. The projectin PEVK domains of diverse insects are highly divergent compared with an otherwise conserved protein organization. We present the characterization of the PEVK domain in two dragonflies and in human lice. A conserved segment at the end of the PEVK, the NH(2)-terminal conserved segment-1 (NTCS-1), may serve as an anchor point for projectin to either myosin or actin, providing a mechanical link. The analysis of alternative splicing variants identifies the shortest PEVK isoform as the predominant form in the flight muscles of several insects, possibly contributing to myofibrillar stiffness.

  4. Existence of a Steady Flow of Stokes Fluid Past a Linear Elastic Structure Using Fictitious Domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halanay, Andrei; Murea, Cornel Marius; Tiba, Dan

    2016-06-01

    We use fictitious domain method with penalization for the Stokes equation in order to obtain approximate solutions in a fixed larger domain including the domain occupied by the structure. The coefficients of the fluid problem, excepting the penalizing term, are independent of the deformation of the structure. It is easy to check the inf-sup condition and the coercivity of the Stokes problem in the fixed domain. Subtracting the structure equations from the fictitious fluid equations in the structure domain, we obtain a weak formulation in a fixed domain, where the continuity of the stress at the interface does not appear explicitly. Existence of a solution is proved when the structure displacement is generated by a finite number of modes.

  5. Redox-coupled structural changes of the catalytic a' domain of protein disulfide isomerase.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Koya; Satoh, Tadashi; Yagi-Utsumi, Maho; Le Gulluche, Anne-Charlotte; Anzai, Takahiro; Uekusa, Yoshinori; Kamiya, Yukiko; Kato, Koichi

    2015-09-14

    Protein disulfide isomerase functions as a folding catalyst in the endoplasmic reticulum. Its b' and a' domains provide substrate-binding sites and undergo a redox-dependent domain rearrangement coupled to an open-closed structural change. Here we determined the first solution structure of the a' domain in its oxidized form and thereby demonstrate that oxidation of the a' domain induces significant conformational changes not only in the vicinity of the active site but also in the distal b'-interfacial segment. Based on these findings, we propose that this conformational transition triggers the domain segregation coupled with the exposure of the hydrophobic surface.

  6. The HIV-1 Envelope Transmembrane Domain Binds TLR2 through a Distinct Dimerization Motif and Inhibits TLR2-Mediated Responses

    PubMed Central

    Rotem, Etai; Schwarzter, Roland; Gramatica, Andrea; Futerman, Anthony H.; Shai, Yechiel

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 uses a number of means to manipulate the immune system, to avoid recognition and to highjack signaling pathways. HIV-1 infected cells show limited Toll-Like Receptor (TLR) responsiveness via as yet unknown mechanisms. Using biochemical and biophysical approaches, we demonstrate that the trans-membrane domain (TMD) of the HIV-1 envelope (ENV) directly interacts with TLR2 TMD within the membrane milieu. This interaction attenuates TNFα, IL-6 and MCP-1 secretion in macrophages, induced by natural ligands of TLR2 both in in vitro and in vivo models. This was associated with decreased levels of ERK phosphorylation. Furthermore, mutagenesis demonstrated the importance of a conserved GxxxG motif in driving this interaction within the membrane milieu. The administration of the ENV TMD in vivo to lipotechoic acid (LTA)/Galactosamine-mediated septic mice resulted in a significant decrease in mortality and in tissue damage, due to the weakening of systemic macrophage activation. Our findings suggest that the TMD of ENV is involved in modulation of the innate immune response during HIV infection. Furthermore, due to the high functional homology of viral ENV proteins this function may be a general character of viral-induced immune modulation. PMID:25121610

  7. The HIV-1 envelope transmembrane domain binds TLR2 through a distinct dimerization motif and inhibits TLR2-mediated responses.

    PubMed

    Reuven, Eliran Moshe; Ali, Mohammad; Rotem, Etai; Schwarzer, Roland; Schwarzter, Roland; Gramatica, Andrea; Futerman, Anthony H; Shai, Yechiel

    2014-08-01

    HIV-1 uses a number of means to manipulate the immune system, to avoid recognition and to highjack signaling pathways. HIV-1 infected cells show limited Toll-Like Receptor (TLR) responsiveness via as yet unknown mechanisms. Using biochemical and biophysical approaches, we demonstrate that the trans-membrane domain (TMD) of the HIV-1 envelope (ENV) directly interacts with TLR2 TMD within the membrane milieu. This interaction attenuates TNFα, IL-6 and MCP-1 secretion in macrophages, induced by natural ligands of TLR2 both in in vitro and in vivo models. This was associated with decreased levels of ERK phosphorylation. Furthermore, mutagenesis demonstrated the importance of a conserved GxxxG motif in driving this interaction within the membrane milieu. The administration of the ENV TMD in vivo to lipotechoic acid (LTA)/Galactosamine-mediated septic mice resulted in a significant decrease in mortality and in tissue damage, due to the weakening of systemic macrophage activation. Our findings suggest that the TMD of ENV is involved in modulation of the innate immune response during HIV infection. Furthermore, due to the high functional homology of viral ENV proteins this function may be a general character of viral-induced immune modulation.

  8. Two Polo-like kinase 4 binding domains in Asterless perform distinct roles in regulating kinase stability

    PubMed Central

    Klebba, Joseph E.; Galletta, Brian J.; Nye, Jonathan; Plevock, Karen M.; Buster, Daniel W.; Hollingsworth, Natalie A.; Slep, Kevin C.

    2015-01-01

    Plk4 (Polo-like kinase 4) and its binding partner Asterless (Asl) are essential, conserved centriole assembly factors that induce centriole amplification when overexpressed. Previous studies found that Asl acts as a scaffolding protein; its N terminus binds Plk4’s tandem Polo box cassette (PB1-PB2) and targets Plk4 to centrioles to initiate centriole duplication. However, how Asl overexpression drives centriole amplification is unknown. In this paper, we investigated the Asl–Plk4 interaction in Drosophila melanogaster cells. Surprisingly, the N-terminal region of Asl is not required for centriole duplication, but a previously unidentified Plk4-binding domain in the C terminus is required. Mechanistic analyses of the different Asl regions revealed that they act uniquely during the cell cycle: the Asl N terminus promotes Plk4 homodimerization and autophosphorylation during interphase, whereas the Asl C terminus stabilizes Plk4 during mitosis. Therefore, Asl affects Plk4 in multiple ways to regulate centriole duplication. Asl not only targets Plk4 to centrioles but also modulates Plk4 stability and activity, explaining the ability of overexpressed Asl to drive centriole amplification. PMID:25688134

  9. Conservation of Domain Structure in a Fast-Evolving Heterochromatic SUUR Protein in Drosophilids

    PubMed Central

    Yurlova, Anna A.; Makunin, Igor V.; Kolesnikova, Tatyana D.; Posukh, Olga V.; Belyaeva, Elena S.; Zhimulev, Igor F.

    2009-01-01

    Different genomic regions replicate at a distinct time during S-phase. The SuUR mutation alters replication timing and the polytenization level of intercalary and pericentric heterochromatin in Drosophila melanogaster salivary gland polytene chromosomes. We analyzed SuUR in different insects, identified conserved regions in the protein, substituted conserved amino acid residues, and studied effects of the mutations on SUUR function. SuUR orthologs were identified in all sequenced drosophilids, and a highly divergent ortholog was found in the mosquito genome. We demonstrated that SUUR evolves at very high rate comparable with that of Transformer. Remarkably, upstream ORF within 5′ UTR of the gene is more conserved than SUUR in drosophilids, but it is absent in the mosquito. The domain structure and charge of SUUR are maintained in drosophilids despite the high divergence of the proteins. The N-terminal part of SUUR with similarity to the SNF2/SWI2 proteins displays the highest level of conservation. Mutation of two conserved amino acid residues in this region impairs binding of SUUR to polytene chromosomes and reduces the ability of the protein to cause DNA underreplication. The least conserved middle part of SUUR interacting with HP1 retains positively and negatively charged clusters and nuclear localization signals. The C terminus contains interlacing conserved and variable motifs. Our results suggest that SUUR domains evolve with different rates and patterns but maintain their features. PMID:19596903

  10. The N- and C-Terminal Domains Differentially Contribute to the Structure and Function of Dystrophin and Utrophin Tandem Calponin-Homology Domains.

    PubMed

    Singh, Surinder M; Bandi, Swati; Mallela, Krishna M G

    2015-11-24

    Dystrophin and utrophin are two muscle proteins involved in Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy. Both proteins use tandem calponin-homology (CH) domains to bind to F-actin. We probed the role of N-terminal CH1 and C-terminal CH2 domains in the structure and function of dystrophin tandem CH domain and compared with our earlier results on utrophin to understand the unifying principles of how tandem CH domains work. Actin cosedimentation assays indicate that the isolated CH2 domain of dystrophin weakly binds to F-actin compared to the full-length tandem CH domain. In contrast, the isolated CH1 domain binds to F-actin with an affinity similar to that of the full-length tandem CH domain. Thus, the obvious question is why the dystrophin tandem CH domain requires CH2, when its actin binding is determined primarily by CH1. To answer, we probed the structural stabilities of CH domains. The isolated CH1 domain is very unstable and is prone to serious aggregation. The isolated CH2 domain is very stable, similar to the full-length tandem CH domain. These results indicate that the main role of CH2 is to stabilize the tandem CH domain structure. These conclusions from dystrophin agree with our earlier results on utrophin, indicating that this phenomenon of differential contribution of CH domains to the structure and function of tandem CH domains may be quite general. The N-terminal CH1 domains primarily determine the actin binding function whereas the C-terminal CH2 domains primarily determine the structural stability of tandem CH domains, and the extent of stabilization depends on the strength of inter-CH domain interactions.

  11. Structure of a two-CAP-domain protein from the human hookworm parasite Necator americanus

    SciTech Connect

    Asojo, Oluwatoyin A.

    2011-05-01

    The first structure of a two-CAP-domain protein, Na-ASP-1, from the major human hookworm parasite N. americanus refined to a resolution limit of 2.2 Å is presented. Major proteins secreted by the infective larval stage hookworms upon host entry include Ancylostoma secreted proteins (ASPs), which are characterized by one or two CAP (cysteine-rich secretory protein/antigen 5/pathogenesis related-1) domains. The CAP domain has been reported in diverse phylogenetically unrelated proteins, but has no confirmed function. The first structure of a two-CAP-domain protein, Na-ASP-1, from the major human hookworm parasite Necator americanus was refined to a resolution limit of 2.2 Å. The structure was solved by molecular replacement (MR) using Na-ASP-2, a one-CAP-domain ASP, as the search model. The correct MR solution could only be obtained by truncating the polyalanine model of Na-ASP-2 and removing several loops. The structure reveals two CAP domains linked by an extended loop. Overall, the carboxyl-terminal CAP domain is more similar to Na-ASP-2 than to the amino-terminal CAP domain. A large central cavity extends from the amino-terminal CAP domain to the carboxyl-terminal CAP domain, encompassing the putative CAP-binding cavity. The putative CAP-binding cavity is a characteristic cavity in the carboxyl-terminal CAP domain that contains a His and Glu pair. These residues are conserved in all single-CAP-domain proteins, but are absent in the amino-terminal CAP domain. The conserved His residues are oriented such that they appear to be capable of directly coordinating a zinc ion as observed for CAP proteins from reptile venoms. This first structure of a two-CAP-domain ASP can serve as a template for homology modeling of other two-CAP-domain proteins.

  12. Distinct Functional Domains Contribute to Degradation of the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor (LDLR) by the E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Inducible Degrader of the LDLR (IDOL)

    PubMed Central

    Sorrentino, Vincenzo; Scheer, Lilith; Santos, Ana; Reits, Eric; Bleijlevens, Boris; Zelcer, Noam

    2011-01-01

    We recently identified the liver X receptor-regulated E3 ubiquitin ligase inducible degrader of the LDL receptor (IDOL) as a modulator of lipoprotein metabolism. Acting as an E3 ubiquitin ligase, IDOL triggers ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR). We demonstrate here that this outcome requires the conserved FERM and RING domains present in IDOL. The RING domain promotes ubiquitination in vitro and Lys-63-specific ubiquitination of the LDLR in vivo in response to IDOL or liver X receptor activation. We further identify RING residues that differentially influence ubiquitination of the LDLR or stability of IDOL. The FERM domain interacts with the LDLR and in living cells co-localizes with the receptor at the plasma membrane. Homology modeling revealed a phosphotyrosine-binding element embedded in the FERM domain. Mutating residues within this region or residues in the LDLR preceding the NPVY endocytosis motif abrogate LDLR degradation by IDOL. Collectively, our results indicate that both the FERM and RING domains are required for promoting lysosomal degradation of the LDLR by IDOL. Our findings may facilitate development of structure-based IDOL inhibitors aimed at increasing LDLR abundance in therapeutic strategies to treat cardiovascular disease. PMID:21734303

  13. Experimental observation of the interaction of propagating spin waves with Néel domain walls in a Landau domain structure

    SciTech Connect

    Pirro, P.; Sebastian, T.; Leven, B.; Hillebrands, B.; Koyama, T.; Brächer, T.

    2015-06-08

    The interaction of propagating dipolar spin waves with magnetic domain walls is investigated in square-shaped microstructures patterned from the Heusler compound Co{sub 2}Mn{sub 0.6}Fe{sub 0.4}Si. Using magnetic force microscopy, the reversible preparation of a Landau state with four magnetic domains separated by Néel domain walls is confirmed. A local spin-wave excitation using a microstructured antenna is realized in one of the domains. It is shown by Brillouin light scattering microscopy that the domain structure in the remanence state has a strong influence on the spin-wave excitation and propagation. The domain walls strongly reflect the spin waves and can be used as spin-wave reflectors. A comparison with micromagnetic simulations shows that the strong reflection is due to the long-range dipolar interaction which has important implications for the use of these spin waves for exerting an all-magnonic spin-transfer torque.

  14. Distinct Structural Elements Dictate the Specificity of the Type III Pentaketide Synthase from Neurospora crassa

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin-Pitel, Sheryl B.; Zhang, Houjin; Vu, Trang; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Zhao, Huimin; Nair, Satish K.

    2009-01-15

    The fungal type III polyketide synthase 2'-oxoalkylresorcyclic acid synthase (ORAS) primes with a range of acyl-Coenzyme A thioesters (C{sub 4}--C{sub 20}) and extends using malonyl-Coenzyme A to produce pyrones, resorcinols, and resorcylic acids. To gain insight into this unusual substrate specificity and product profile, we have determined the crystal structures of ORAS to 1.75 {angstrom} resolution, the Phe-252{yields}Gly site-directed mutant to 2.1 {angstrom} resolution, and a binary conplex of ORAS with eicosanoic acid to 2.0 {angstrom} resolution. The structures reveal a distinct rearrangement of structural elements near the active site that allows accomodation of long-chain fatty acid esters and a reorientation of the gating mechanism that controls cyclization and polyketide chain length. The roles of these structural elements are further elucidated by characterization of various structure-based site-directed variants. These studies establish an unexpected plasticity to the PKS fold, unanticipated from structural studies of other members of this enzyme family.

  15. Endotoxin structures in the psychrophiles Psychromonas marina and Psychrobacter cryohalolentis contain distinctive acyl features.

    PubMed

    Sweet, Charles R; Alpuche, Giancarlo M; Landis, Corinne A; Sandman, Benjamin C

    2014-07-09

    Lipid A is the essential component of endotoxin (Gram-negative lipopolysaccharide), a potent immunostimulatory compound. As the outer surface of the outer membrane, the details of lipid A structure are crucial not only to bacterial pathogenesis but also to membrane integrity. This work characterizes the structure of lipid A in two psychrophiles, Psychromonas marina and Psychrobacter cryohalolentis, and also two mesophiles to which they are related using MALDI-TOF MS and fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) GC-MS. P. marina lipid A is strikingly similar to that of Escherichia coli in organization and total acyl size, but incorporates an unusual doubly unsaturated tetradecadienoyl acyl residue. P. cryohalolentis also shows structural organization similar to a closely related mesophile, Acinetobacter baumannii, however it has generally shorter acyl constituents and shows many acyl variants differing by single methylene (-CH2-) units, a characteristic it shares with the one previously reported psychrotolerant lipid A structure. This work is the first detailed structural characterization of lipid A from an obligate psychrophile and the second from a psychrotolerant species. It reveals distinctive structural features of psychrophilic lipid A in comparison to that of related mesophiles which suggest constitutive adaptations to maintain outer membrane fluidity in cold environments.

  16. The novel finding of four distinct prepro-IGF-I E domains in a perciform fish, Sciaenops ocellatus, during ontogeny.

    PubMed

    Faulk, Cynthia K; Pérez-Domínguez, Rafael; Webb, Kenneth A; Holt, G Joan

    2010-10-01

    In fishes, insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) stimulates growth and differentiation but also plays a role in a number of other processes including osmoregulation, metabolism, immune response and reproduction. This study presents the cDNA encoding multiple prepro-IGF-I transcripts obtained from red drum, Sciaenopsocellatus, and examines differential expression in select adult tissues and during ontogeny. Four distinct transcripts were sequenced which were identical in the coding region for the signal (132 bp) and mature (204 bp) peptides but differed in the coding region of the E peptide by the exclusion of 117 (Ea-1), 81 (Ea-2) or 36 (Ea-3) bp compared to the 222 bp present in Ea-4. Analysis of the pertinent portion of the genomic sequence of this gene suggests that the transcripts are a result of alternative splicing. This is the first report of the expression of all four known prepro-IGF-I transcripts in a teleost other than a salmonid. The deduced amino acid sequences exhibited 70-95% identity with teleosts and somewhat lower identity to other vertebrates (60-75%). Three of the 4 transcripts (Ea-2, Ea-3, Ea-4) were expressed in the liver, ovary, spleen, gall bladder, brain, red muscle, pancreas and spinal cord of adults. Only the Ea-4 transcript was expressed in adult stomach tissue while no signal was detected in pituitary, retina, intestine, adipose or white muscle. In contrast, all 4 transcripts were expressed throughout ontogeny. The apparent expression of the Ea-1 transcript only during the larval stage may indicate a developmental role for this E peptide in red drum.

  17. Crystal structure of the Candida albicans Kar3 kinesin motor domain fused to maltose-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Delorme, Caroline; Joshi, Monika; Allingham, John S.

    2012-11-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Candida albicans Kar3 motor domain structure was solved as a maltose-binding protein fusion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The electrostatic surface and part of the ATPase pocket of the motor domain differs markedly from other kinesins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The MBP-Kar3 interface highlights a new site for intramolecular or intermolecular interactions. -- Abstract: In the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans, the Kinesin-14 motor protein Kar3 (CaKar3) is critical for normal mitotic division, nuclear fusion during mating, and morphogenic transition from the commensal yeast form to the virulent hyphal form. As a first step towards detailed characterization of this motor of potential medical significance, we have crystallized and determined the X-ray structure of the motor domain of CaKar3 as a maltose-binding protein (MBP) fusion. The structure shows strong conservation of overall motor domain topology to other Kar3 kinesins, but with some prominent differences in one of the motifs that compose the nucleotide-binding pocket and the surface charge distribution. The MBP and Kar3 modules are arranged such that MBP interacts with the Kar3 motor domain core at the same site where the neck linker of conventional kinesins docks during the 'ATP state' of the mechanochemical cycle. This site differs from the Kar3 neck-core interface in the recent structure of the ScKar3Vik1 heterodimer. The position of MBP is also completely distinct from the Vik1 subunit in this complex. This may suggest that the site of MBP interaction on the CaKar3 motor domain provides an interface for the neck, or perhaps a partner subunit, at an intermediate state of its motile cycle that has not yet been observed for Kinesin-14 motors.

  18. Structural model of the cytosolic domain of the plant ethylene receptor 1 (ETR1).

    PubMed

    Mayerhofer, Hubert; Panneerselvam, Saravanan; Kaljunen, Heidi; Tuukkanen, Anne; Mertens, Haydyn D T; Mueller-Dieckmann, Jochen

    2015-01-30

    Ethylene initiates important aspects of plant growth and development through disulfide-linked receptor dimers located in the endoplasmic reticulum. The receptors feature a small transmembrane, ethylene binding domain followed by a large cytosolic domain, which serves as a scaffold for the assembly of large molecular weight complexes of different ethylene receptors and other cellular participants of the ethylene signaling pathway. Here we report the crystallographic structures of the ethylene receptor 1 (ETR1) catalytic ATP-binding and the ethylene response sensor 1 dimerization histidine phosphotransfer (DHp) domains and the solution structure of the entire cytosolic domain of ETR1, all from Arabidopsis thaliana. The isolated dimeric ethylene response sensor 1 DHp domain is asymmetric, the result of different helical bending angles close to the conserved His residue. The structures of the catalytic ATP-binding, DHp, and receiver domains of ethylene receptors and of a homologous, but dissimilar, GAF domain were refined against experimental small angle x-ray scattering data, leading to a structural model of the entire cytosolic domain of the ethylene receptor 1. The model illustrates that the cytosolic domain is shaped like a dumbbell and that the receiver domain is flexible and assumes a position different from those observed in prokaryotic histidine kinases. Furthermore the cytosolic domain of ETR1 plays a key role, interacting with all other receptors and several participants of the ethylene signaling pathway. Our model, therefore, provides the first step toward a detailed understanding of the molecular mechanics of this important signal transduction process in plants.

  19. Crystal Structure of Human Soluble Adenylate Cyclase Reveals a Distinct, Highly Flexible Allosteric Bicarbonate Binding Pocket

    PubMed Central

    Saalau-Bethell, Susanne M; Berdini, Valerio; Cleasby, Anne; Congreve, Miles; Coyle, Joseph E; Lock, Victoria; Murray, Christopher W; O'Brien, M Alistair; Rich, Sharna J; Sambrook, Tracey; Vinkovic, Mladen; Yon, Jeff R; Jhoti, Harren

    2014-01-01

    Soluble adenylate cyclases catalyse the synthesis of the second messenger cAMP through the cyclisation of ATP and are the only known enzymes to be directly activated by bicarbonate. Here, we report the first crystal structure of the human enzyme that reveals a pseudosymmetrical arrangement of two catalytic domains to produce a single competent active site and a novel discrete bicarbonate binding pocket. Crystal structures of the apo protein, the protein in complex with α,β-methylene adenosine 5′-triphosphate (AMPCPP) and calcium, with the allosteric activator bicarbonate, and also with a number of inhibitors identified using fragment screening, all show a flexible active site that undergoes significant conformational changes on binding of ligands. The resulting nanomolar-potent inhibitors that were developed bind at both the substrate binding pocket and the allosteric site, and can be used as chemical probes to further elucidate the function of this protein. PMID:24616449

  20. Structural domains and their potential impact on recharge to intermontane-basin aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ohlmacher, G.C.

    1999-01-01

    Variations in the structures exposed in structural domains associated with faults can affect the amount of ground-water recharge to fractured rock aquifers supplying intermontane-basin aquifers. In the south-western Franklin Mountains, El Paso, Texas, an outcrop of the Ordovician Scenic Drive Formation exposes a group of structures including faults, joints, and folds associated with a left-lateral fault striking N74??E and dipping 81??NW. Slip along this fault has produced a structural domain with extensional structures (normal faults and joints) and a domain with contractional structures (folds and joints). These extensional and contractional domains occur on opposite sides of the fault. Properties of fractures within the different structural domains can influence ground-water recharge and migration. For example, the domain with extensional structures contains nearly vertical joints that extend from the soil-bedrock interface to normal faults and along which precipitation can infiltrate. Since the left-lateral fault is approximately normal to the trend of the Franklin Mountains, this fault may be a conduit for ground-water flow from the mountains to the basin. The domain with contractional structures is limited in extent, and the fractures in this domain are poorly connected. Therefore, surface infiltration in this domain is reduced, and may not contribute as much to ground-water migration. Structural domains that are analogous to this outcrop and cover larger areas can be found throughout the Franklin Mountains. Understanding the variations between structural domains can aid in siting water-supply wells and determining contaminant transport in fractured rock.

  1. Disclosing the distinct interfacial behaviors of structurally and configurationally diverse triazologlycolipids.

    PubMed

    He, Xiao-Peng; Xu, Xiaolian; Zhang, Hai-Lin; Chen, Guo-Rong; Xu, Shouhong; Liu, Honglai

    2011-08-16

    1- or 6-Triazologluco- and galactolipid derivatives bearing a lipid chain length of 16 carbons were efficiently constructed via click chemistry. The differentiation in their surface pressure-molecular area (π-A) isotherms first implies that these structurally and configurationally diverse amphiphiles adopt different distribution manner at air-water interfaces. The Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films of the synthesized glycoconjugates on mica surface were subsequently prepared and visualized via atomic force microscopy (AFM), which exhibited diverse topographies and possess different contact angles with water. These data further suggest that the structural variation as well as epimeric identity of triazologlycolipids may result in their distinct interfacial behaviors at the air-solid interface. Furthermore, the addition of increasing amounts of 1-triazologalactolipid 2 to poly-diacetylene (PDA) was determined to impact the π-A isotherm of the latter, prompting us to further fabricate new colorimetrically detectable mixed-type vesicles containing triazologlycolipids for biochemical studies.

  2. Structure-mechanism-based engineering of chemical regulators targeting distinct pathological factors in Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Michael W.; Derrick, Jeffrey S.; Kerr, Richard A.; Oh, Shin Bi; Cho, Woo Jong; Lee, Shin Jung C.; Ji, Yonghwan; Han, Jiyeon; Tehrani, Zahra Aliakbar; Suh, Nayoung; Kim, Sujeong; Larsen, Scott D.; Kim, Kwang S.; Lee, Joo-Yong; Ruotolo, Brandon T.; Lim, Mi Hee

    2016-10-01

    The absence of effective therapeutics against Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a result of the limited understanding of its multifaceted aetiology. Because of the lack of chemical tools to identify pathological factors, investigations into AD pathogenesis have also been insubstantial. Here we report chemical regulators that demonstrate distinct specificity towards targets linked to AD pathology, including metals, amyloid-β (Aβ), metal-Aβ, reactive oxygen species, and free organic radicals. We obtained these chemical regulators through a rational structure-mechanism-based design strategy. We performed structural variations of small molecules for fine-tuning their electronic properties, such as ionization potentials and mechanistic pathways for reactivity towards different targets. We established in vitro and/or in vivo efficacies of the regulators for modulating their targets' reactivities, ameliorating toxicity, reducing amyloid pathology, and improving cognitive deficits. Our chemical tools show promise for deciphering AD pathogenesis and discovering effective drugs.

  3. The leader peptide of mutacin 1140 has distinct structural components compared to related class I lantibiotics.

    PubMed

    Escano, Jerome; Stauffer, Byron; Brennan, Jacob; Bullock, Monica; Smith, Leif

    2014-12-01

    Lantibiotics are ribosomally synthesized peptide antibiotics composed of an N-terminal leader peptide that promotes the core peptide's interaction with the post translational modification (PTM) enzymes. Following PTMs, mutacin 1140 is transported out of the cell and the leader peptide is cleaved to yield the antibacterial peptide. Mutacin 1140 leader peptide is structurally unique compared to other class I lantibiotic leader peptides. Herein, we further our understanding of the structural differences of mutacin 1140 leader peptide with regard to other class I leader peptides. We have determined that the length of the leader peptide is important for the biosynthesis of mutacin 1140. We have also determined that mutacin 1140 leader peptide contains a novel four amino acid motif compared to related lantibiotics. PTM enzyme recognition of the leader peptide appears to be evolutionarily distinct from related class I lantibiotics. Our study on mutacin 1140 leader peptide provides a basis for future studies aimed at understanding its interaction with the PTM enzymes.

  4. Structure-mechanism-based engineering of chemical regulators targeting distinct pathological factors in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Beck, Michael W; Derrick, Jeffrey S; Kerr, Richard A; Oh, Shin Bi; Cho, Woo Jong; Lee, Shin Jung C; Ji, Yonghwan; Han, Jiyeon; Tehrani, Zahra Aliakbar; Suh, Nayoung; Kim, Sujeong; Larsen, Scott D; Kim, Kwang S; Lee, Joo-Yong; Ruotolo, Brandon T; Lim, Mi Hee

    2016-10-13

    The absence of effective therapeutics against Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a result of the limited understanding of its multifaceted aetiology. Because of the lack of chemical tools to identify pathological factors, investigations into AD pathogenesis have also been insubstantial. Here we report chemical regulators that demonstrate distinct specificity towards targets linked to AD pathology, including metals, amyloid-β (Aβ), metal-Aβ, reactive oxygen species, and free organic radicals. We obtained these chemical regulators through a rational structure-mechanism-based design strategy. We performed structural variations of small molecules for fine-tuning their electronic properties, such as ionization potentials and mechanistic pathways for reactivity towards different targets. We established in vitro and/or in vivo efficacies of the regulators for modulating their targets' reactivities, ameliorating toxicity, reducing amyloid pathology, and improving cognitive deficits. Our chemical tools show promise for deciphering AD pathogenesis and discovering effective drugs.

  5. Distinct population structure for co-occurring Anopheles goeldii and Anopheles triannulatus in Amazonian Brazil

    PubMed Central

    McKeon, Sascha Naomi; Moreno, Marta; Sallum, Maria Anise; Povoa, Marinete Marins; Conn, Jan Evelyn

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate whether environmental heterogeneity contributes to the genetic heterogeneity in Anopheles triannulatus, larval habitat characteristics across the Brazilian states of Roraima and Pará and genetic sequences were examined. A comparison with Anopheles goeldii was utilised to determine whether high genetic diversity was unique to An. triannulatus. Student t test and analysis of variance found no differences in habitat characteristics between the species. Analysis of population structure of An. triannulatus and An. goeldii revealed distinct demographic histories in a largely overlapping geographic range. Cytochrome oxidase I sequence parsimony networks found geographic clustering for both species; however nuclear marker networks depicted An. triannulatus with a more complex history of fragmentation, secondary contact and recent divergence. Evidence of Pleistocene expansions suggests both species are more likely to be genetically structured by geographic and ecological barriers than demography. We hypothesise that niche partitioning is a driving force for diversity, particularly in An. triannulatus. PMID:23903977

  6. Structure-mechanism-based engineering of chemical regulators targeting distinct pathological factors in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Michael W.; Derrick, Jeffrey S.; Kerr, Richard A.; Oh, Shin Bi; Cho, Woo Jong; Lee, Shin Jung C.; Ji, Yonghwan; Han, Jiyeon; Tehrani, Zahra Aliakbar; Suh, Nayoung; Kim, Sujeong; Larsen, Scott D.; Kim, Kwang S.; Lee, Joo-Yong; Ruotolo, Brandon T.; Lim, Mi Hee

    2016-01-01

    The absence of effective therapeutics against Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a result of the limited understanding of its multifaceted aetiology. Because of the lack of chemical tools to identify pathological factors, investigations into AD pathogenesis have also been insubstantial. Here we report chemical regulators that demonstrate distinct specificity towards targets linked to AD pathology, including metals, amyloid-β (Aβ), metal–Aβ, reactive oxygen species, and free organic radicals. We obtained these chemical regulators through a rational structure-mechanism-based design strategy. We performed structural variations of small molecules for fine-tuning their electronic properties, such as ionization potentials and mechanistic pathways for reactivity towards different targets. We established in vitro and/or in vivo efficacies of the regulators for modulating their targets' reactivities, ameliorating toxicity, reducing amyloid pathology, and improving cognitive deficits. Our chemical tools show promise for deciphering AD pathogenesis and discovering effective drugs. PMID:27734843

  7. Diversity of Structure and Function of Response Regulator Output Domains

    PubMed Central

    Galperin, Michael Y.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Response regulators (RRs) within two-component signal transduction systems control a variety of cellular processes. Most RRs contain DNA-binding output domains and serve as transcriptional regulators. Other RR types contain RNA-binding, ligand-binding, protein-binding or transporter output domains and exert regulation at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional or post-translational levels. In a significant fraction of RRs, output domains are enzymes that themselves participate in signal transduction: methylesterases, adenylate or diguanylate cyclases, c-di-GMP-specific phosphodiesterases, histidine kinases, serine/threonine protein kinases and protein phosphatases. In addition, there remain output domains whose functions are still unknown. Patterns of the distribution of various RR families are generally conserved within key microbial lineages and can be used to trace adaptations of various species to their unique ecological niches. PMID:20226724

  8. Diversity of structure and function of response regulator output domains.

    PubMed

    Galperin, Michael Y

    2010-04-01

    Response regulators (RRs) within two-component signal transduction systems control a variety of cellular processes. Most RRs contain DNA-binding output domains and serve as transcriptional regulators. Other RR types contain RNA-binding, ligand-binding, protein-binding or transporter output domains and exert regulation at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional or post-translational levels. In a significant fraction of RRs, output domains are enzymes that themselves participate in signal transduction: methylesterases, adenylate or diguanylate cyclases, c-di-GMP-specific phosphodiesterases, histidine kinases, serine/threonine protein kinases and protein phosphatases. In addition, there remain output domains whose functions are still unknown. Patterns of the distribution of various RR families are generally conserved within key microbial lineages and can be used to trace adaptations of various species to their unique ecological niches.

  9. The Crystal Structures of EAP Domains from Staphylococcus aureus Reveal an Unexpected Homology to Bacterial Superantigens

    SciTech Connect

    Geisbrecht, B V; Hamaoka, B Y; Perman, B; Zemla, A; Leahy, D J

    2005-10-14

    The Eap (extracellular adherence protein) of Staphylococcus aureus functions as a secreted virulence factor by mediating interactions between the bacterial cell surface and several extracellular host proteins. Eap proteins from different Staphylococcal strains consist of four to six tandem repeats of a structurally uncharacterized domain (EAP domain). We have determined the three-dimensional structures of three different EAP domains to 1.8, 2.2, and 1.35 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. These structures reveal a core fold that is comprised of an {alpha}-helix lying diagonally across a five-stranded, mixed {beta}-sheet. Comparison of EAP domains with known structures reveals an unexpected homology with the C-terminal domain of bacterial superantigens. Examination of the structure of the superantigen SEC2 bound to the {beta}-chain of a T-cell receptor suggests a possible ligand-binding site within the EAP domain (Fields, B. A., Malchiodi, E. L., Li, H., Ysern, X., Stauffacher, C. V., Schlievert, P. M., Karjalainen, K., and Mariuzza, R. (1996) Nature 384, 188-192). These results provide the first structural characterization of EAP domains, relate EAP domains to a large class of bacterial toxins, and will guide the design of future experiments to analyze EAP domain structure/function relationships.

  10. Fractal parameterization analysis of ferroelectric domain structure evolution induced by electron beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslovskaya, A. G.; Barabash, T. K.

    2017-01-01

    The article presents some results of fractal analysis of ferroelectric domain structure images visualized with scanning electron microscope (SEM) techniques. The fractal and multifractal characteristics were estimated to demonstrate self-similar organization of ferroelectric domain structure registered with static and dynamic contrast modes of SEM. Fractal methods as sensitive analytical tools were used to indicate degree of domain structure and domain boundary imperfections. The electron irradiation-induced erosion effect of ferroelectric domain boundaries in electron beam-stimulated polarization current mode of SEM is characterized by considerable raising of fractal dimension. For dynamic contrast mode of SEM there was revealed that complication of domain structure during its dynamics is specified by increase in fractal dimension of images and slight raising of boundary fractal dimension.

  11. Time domain Rankine-Green panel method for offshore structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhifu; Ren, Huilong; Liu, Riming; Li, Hui

    2017-02-01

    To solve the numerical divergence problem of the direct time domain Green function method for the motion simulation of floating bodies with large flare, a time domain hybrid Rankine-Green boundary element method is proposed. In this numerical method, the fluid domain is decomposed by an imaginary control surface, at which the continuous condition should be satisfied. Then the Rankine Green function is adopted in the inner domain. The transient free surface Green function is applied in the outer domain, which is used to find the relationship between the velocity potential and its normal derivative for the inner domain. Besides, the velocity potential at the mean free surface between body surface and control surface is directly solved by the integration scheme. The wave exciting force is computed through the convolution integration with wave elevation, by introducing the impulse response function. Additionally, the nonlinear Froude-Krylov force and hydrostatic force, which is computed under the instantaneous incident wave free surface, are taken into account by the direct pressure integration scheme. The corresponding numerical computer code is developed and first used to compute the hydrodynamic coefficients of the hemisphere, as well as the time history of a ship with large flare; good agreement is obtained with the analytical solutions as well as the available numerical results. Then the hydrodynamic properties of a FPSO are studied. The hydrodynamic coefficients agree well with the results computed by the frequency method; the influence of the time interval and the truncated time is investigated in detail.

  12. Recombinant human IgG antibodies recognizing distinct extracellular domains of EGF receptor exhibit different degrees of growth inhibitory effects on human A431 cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chialun; Takayanagi, Atsushi; Yoshida, Tetsuhiko; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi

    2013-05-01

    Recently, we isolated 4 distinct kinds of single chain antibody against human EGF receptor (EGFR) after screening the Keio phage display scFv library by using two methods of target-guided proximity labeling. In the current study, these monovalent scFv antibodies were converted to bivalent IgGs of humanized forms (hIgGs) by recombinant technology using the specially designed expression vectors followed by protein production in CHO cells. The resulting recombinant hIgGs were examined for their binding specificity using several different transformed human BJ cell lines that express deletion mutants of EGFR, each lacking one of 4 distinct extracellular domains (L1, L2, C1 and C2). Immuno-fluorescent microscopy and immuno-precipitation assay on these cells indicated that 4 distinct kinds of hIgGs bind to one of 3 different domains (L1, C1 and C2). Then, these hIgGs were further examined for biological effects on human A431 cancer cells, which overexpress EGFR. The results indicated that hIgG38 binding to L1 and hIgG45 binding to C2 substantially suppressed the EGF-induced phosphorylation of EGFR, resulting in the growth inhibition of A431 cancer cells. On the contrary, hIgG40 binding to C1 and hIgG42 binding to another site (epitope) of C2 exhibited no such inhibitory effects. Thus, the newly produced four recombinant hIgG antibodies recognize 4 different sites (epitopes) in 3 different extracellular domains of EGFR and exhibit different biological effects on cancer cells. These characteristics are somewhat different from the currently utilized therapeutic anti-EGFR antibodies. Hence, these hIgG antibodies will be invaluable as a research tool for the detailed molecular analysis of the EGFR-mediated signal transduction mechanism and more importantly a possible application as new therapeutic agents to treat certain types of cancers.

  13. Domain-wall guided nucleation of superconductivity in hybrid ferromagnet-superconductor-ferromagnet layered structures.

    PubMed

    Gillijns, W; Aladyshkin, A Yu; Lange, M; Van Bael, M J; Moshchalkov, V V

    2005-11-25

    Domain-wall superconductivity is studied in a superconducting Nb film placed between two ferromagnetic Co/Pd multilayers with perpendicular magnetization. The parameters of top and bottom ferromagnetic films are chosen to provide different coercive fields, so that the magnetic domain structure of the ferromagnets can be selectively controlled. From the dependence of the critical temperature Tc on the applied magnetic field H, we have found evidence for domain-wall superconductivity in this three-layered F/S/F structure for different magnetic domain patterns. The phase boundary, calculated numerically for this structure from the linearized Ginzburg-Landau equation, is in good agreement with the experimental data.

  14. Highly distinct chromosomal structures in cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), as revealed by molecular cytogenetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Iwata-Otsubo, Aiko; Lin, Jer-Young; Gill, Navdeep; Jackson, Scott A

    2016-05-01

    Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp) is an important legume, particularly in developing countries. However, little is known about its genome or chromosome structure. We used molecular cytogenetics to characterize the structure of pachytene chromosomes to advance our knowledge of chromosome and genome organization of cowpea. Our data showed that cowpea has highly distinct chromosomal structures that are cytologically visible as brightly DAPI-stained heterochromatic regions. Analysis of the repetitive fraction of the cowpea genome present at centromeric and pericentromeric regions confirmed that two retrotransposons are major components of pericentromeric regions and that a 455-bp tandem repeat is found at seven out of 11 centromere pairs in cowpea. These repeats likely evolved after the divergence of cowpea from common bean and form chromosomal structure unique to cowpea. The integration of cowpea genetic and physical chromosome maps reveals potential regions of suppressed recombination due to condensed heterochromatin and a lack of pairing in a few chromosomal termini. This study provides fundamental knowledge on cowpea chromosome structure and molecular cytogenetics tools for further chromosome studies.

  15. Domain Structure of R2Fe17 Intermetallic Compounds with Planar-Type Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastushenkov, Yu. G.; Skokov, K. P.; Lyakhova, M. B.; Antonova, E. S.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic domain structure is studied in single crystals of R2Fe17 (R = Tb, Dy, Ho, Er) intermetallic compounds in a wide range of temperatures (10 - 300 K) and magnetic fields (μ0 H = 0 - 0.1 T). It is shown that single crystal specimens of hexagonal magnetics with planar-type anisotropy acquire domain structures containing not only 180-degree domain boundaries but also 60- and 120-degree ones.

  16. 2.0 A crystal structure of a four-domain segment of human fibronectin encompassing the RGD loop and synergy region.

    PubMed

    Leahy, D J; Aukhil, I; Erickson, H P

    1996-01-12

    We have determined the 2.0 A crystal structure of a fragment of human fibronectin encompassing the seventh through the RGD-containing tenth type III repeats (FN7-10). The structure reveals an extended rod-like molecule with a long axis of approximately 140 A and highly variable relationships between adjacent domains. An unusually small rotation between domains 9 and 10 creates a distinctive binding site, in which the RGD loop from domain 10 and the "synergy" region from domain 9 are on the same face of FN7-10 and thus easily accessible to a single integrin molecule. The cell-binding RGD loop is well-ordered in this structure and extends approximately 10 A away from the FN7-10 core.

  17. Crystal Structure of the Neuropilin-1 MAM Domain: Completing the Neuropilin-1 Ectodomain Picture.

    PubMed

    Yelland, Tamas; Djordjevic, Snezana

    2016-11-01

    Neuropilins (NRPs) are single-pass transmembrane receptors involved in several signaling pathways that regulate key physiological processes such as vascular morphogenesis and axon guidance. The MAM domain of NRP, which has previously been implicated in receptor multimerization, was the only portion of the ectopic domain of the NRPs for which the structure, until now, has been elusive. Using site-directed mutagenesis in the linker region preceding the MAM domain we generated a protein construct amenable to crystallization. Here we present the crystal structure of the MAM domain of human NRP1 at 2.24 Å resolution. The protein exhibits a jellyroll topology, with Ca(2+) ions bound at the inter-strand space enhancing the thermostability of the domain. We show that the MAM domain of NRP1 is monomeric in solution and insufficient to drive receptor dimerization, which leads us to propose a different role for this domain in the context of NRP membrane assembly and signaling.

  18. Domain Dynamics in Piezoresponse Force Microscopy: Quantitative Deconvolution and Hysteresis Loop Fine Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Bdikin, Igor; Kholkin, Andrei; Morozovska, A. N.; Svechnikov, S. V.; Kim, S.-H.; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2008-01-01

    Domain dynamics in the Piezoresponse Force Spectroscopy (PFS) experiment is studied using the combination of local hysteresis loop acquisition with simultaneous domain imaging. The analytical theory for PFS signal from domain of arbitrary cross-section is developed and used for the analysis of experimental data on Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 polycrystalline films. The results suggest formation of oblate domain at early stage of the domain nucleation and growth, consistent with efficient screening of depolarization field within the material. The fine structure of the hysteresis loop is shown to be related to the observed jumps in the domain geometry during domain wall propagation (nanoscale Barkhausen jumps), indicative of strong domain-defect interactions.

  19. Composite structured mesh generation with automatic domain decomposition in complex geometries

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper presents a novel automatic domain decomposition method to generate quality composite structured meshes in complex domains with arbitrary shapes, in which quality structured mesh generation still remains a challenge. The proposed decomposition algorithm is based on the analysis of an initi...

  20. The RST and PARP-like domain containing SRO protein family: analysis of protein structure, function and conservation in land plants

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The SROs (SIMILAR TO RCD-ONE) are a group of plant-specific proteins which have important functions in stress adaptation and development. They contain the catalytic core of the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) domain and a C-terminal RST (RCD-SRO-TAF4) domain. In addition to these domains, several, but not all, SROs contain an N-terminal WWE domain. Results SROs are present in all analyzed land plants and sequence analysis differentiates between two structurally distinct groups; cryptogams and monocots possess only group I SROs whereas eudicots also contain group II. Group I SROs possess an N-terminal WWE domain (PS50918) but the WWE domain is lacking in group II SROs. Group I domain structure is widely represented in organisms as distant as humans (for example, HsPARP11). We propose a unified nomenclature for the SRO family. The SROs are able to interact with transcription factors through the C-terminal RST domain but themselves are generally not regulated at the transcriptional level. The most conserved feature of the SROs is the catalytic core of the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PS51059) domain. However, bioinformatic analysis of the SRO PARP domain fold-structure and biochemical assays of AtRCD1 suggested that SROs do not possess ADP-ribosyl transferase activity. Conclusions The SROs are a highly conserved family of plant specific proteins. Sequence analysis of the RST domain implicates a highly preserved protein structure in that region. This might have implications for functional conservation. We suggest that, despite the presence of the catalytic core of the PARP domain, the SROs do not possess ADP-ribosyl transferase activity. Nevertheless, the function of SROs is critical for plants and might be related to transcription factor regulation and complex formation. PMID:20226034

  1. New hexagonal perovskite with Mn4+ and Mn5+ at distinct structural positions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarakina, N. V.; Tyutyunnik, A. P.; Bazuev, G. V.; Vasiliev, A. D.; Berger, I. F.; Gould, C.; Nikolaenko, I. V.

    2015-10-01

    A new hexagonal perovskite, Ba7Li1.75Mn3.5O15.75, has been synthesised using microwave-assisted solid-state synthesis. Its crystal structure has elements typical for the layered hexagonal perovskites and quasi-one-dimensional oxides, hence representing a new polytype. Structural solution based on simultaneous refinement of X-ray and neutron diffraction data shows that Ba7Li1.75Mn3.5O15.75 crystallizes in a hexagonal unit cell with parameters a = 5.66274(2) Å and c = 16.7467(1) Å (V = 465.063(4) Å3). Columns of face- shared octahedra occupied by Mn4+, Li+ cations and vacancies along the c axis are separated in the ab plane by barium atoms, so that every sixth layer, the coordination of Mn5+ and Li+ changes to tetrahedral. Separation of Mn4+ and Mn5+ cations in two distinct structural positions makes the structure unique. A scanning transmission electron microscopy study revealed the formation of a rhombohedrally centered supercell, which might be attributed to the ordering of manganese and lithium atoms among cationic sites.

  2. Catalytic Thr or Ser Residue Modulates Structural Switches in 2-Cys Peroxiredoxin by Distinct Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Tairum, Carlos A.; Santos, Melina Cardoso; Breyer, Carlos A.; Geyer, R. Ryan; Nieves, Cecilia J.; Portillo-Ledesma, Stephanie; Ferrer-Sueta, Gerardo; Toledo, José Carlos; Toyama, Marcos H.; Augusto, Ohara; Netto, Luis E. S.; de Oliveira, Marcos A.

    2016-01-01

    Typical 2-Cys Peroxiredoxins (2-Cys Prxs) reduce hydroperoxides with extraordinary rates due to an active site composed of a catalytic triad, containing a peroxidatic cysteine (CP), an Arg, and a Thr (or Ser). 2-Cys Prx are involved in processes such as cancer; neurodegeneration and host-pathogen interactions. During catalysis, 2-Cys Prxs switch between decamers and dimers. Analysis of 2-Cys Prx structures in the fully folded (but not locally unfolded) form revealed a highly conserved, non-conventional hydrogen bond (CH-π) between the catalytic triad Thr of a dimer with an aromatic residue of an adjacent dimer. In contrast, structures of 2-Cys Prxs with a Ser in place of the Thr do not display this CH-π bond. Chromatographic and structural data indicate that the Thr (but not Ser) destabilizes the decamer structure in the oxidized state probably through steric hindrance. As a general trend, mutations in a yeast 2-Cys Prx (Tsa1) favoring the dimeric state also displayed a decreased catalytic activity. Remarkably, yeast naturally contains Thr-Ser variants (Tsa1 and Tsa2, respectively) with distinct oligomeric stabilities in their disulfide states. PMID:27629822

  3. Distinct C9orf72-Associated Dipeptide Repeat Structures Correlate with Neuronal Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Krans, Amy; Sawaya, Michael R.; Paulson, Henry L.; Todd, Peter K.; Barmada, Sami J.; Ivanova, Magdalena I.

    2016-01-01

    Hexanucleotide repeat expansions in C9orf72 are the most common inherited cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). The expansions elicit toxicity in part through repeat-associated non-AUG (RAN) translation of the intronic (GGGGCC)n sequence into dipeptide repeat-containing proteins (DPRs). Little is known, however, about the structural characteristics and aggregation propensities of the dipeptide units comprising DPRs. To address this question, we synthesized dipeptide units corresponding to the three sense-strand RAN translation products, analyzed their structures by circular dichroism, electron microscopy and dye binding assays, and assessed their relative toxicity when applied to primary cortical neurons. Short, glycine-arginine (GR)3 dipeptides formed spherical aggregates and selectively reduced neuronal survival compared to glycine-alanine (GA)3 and glycine-proline (GP)3 dipeptides. Doubling peptide length had little effect on the structure of GR or GP peptides, but (GA)6 peptides formed β-sheet rich aggregates that bound thioflavin T and Congo red yet lacked the typical fibrillar morphology of amyloids. Aging of (GA)6 dipeptides increased their β-sheet content and enhanced their toxicity when applied to neurons. We also observed that the relative toxicity of each tested dipeptide was proportional to peptide internalization. Our results demonstrate that different C9orf72-related dipeptides exhibit distinct structural properties that correlate with their relative toxicity. PMID:27776165

  4. Three-dimensional Phase-field Simulation of Domain Structures in Ferroelectric Islands

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang , J.X.; Wu, R.; Choudhury, S.; Li, Yulan; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Chen , L.Q.

    2008-03-24

    A three-dimensional phase-field model was developed for studying the domain structures and their evolution in ferroelectric islands attached onto a substrate. It simultaneously takes into account the long-range interactions such as electric and elastic interactions, substrate constraint, as well as the stress relaxation caused by the surfaces of an island. As an example, we studied the domain structures of PbZr0.2Ti0.8O3 islands. It was demonstrated that the domain structures of ferroelectric islands could be dramatically different from those of continuous thin films due to the relief of substrate constraint. The stress distribution inside islands is highly dependent on the aspect ratio, i.e., lateral dimension over island thickness, which provides us a new way for engineering the domain structures of ferroelectric materials. The effect of electrostatic energy on the domain structures of ferroelectric islands was also discussed.

  5. Benefits of Matching Domain Structure for Planning Software: The Right Stuff

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billman, Dorrit Owen; Arsintescu, Lucica; Feary, Michael S.; Lee, Jessica Chia-Rong; Smith, Asha Halima; Tiwary, Rachna

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the role of domain structure in software design. We compared 2 planning applications, for a Mission Control group (International Space Station), and measured users speed and accuracy. Based on our needs analysis, we identified domain structure and used this to develop new prototype software that matched domain structure better than the legacy system. We took a high-fidelity analog of the natural task into the laboratory and found (large) periformance differences, favoring the system that matched domain structure. Our task design enabled us to attribute better periormance to better match of domain structure. We ran through the whole development cycle, in miniature, from needs analysis through design, development, and evaluation. Doing so enabled inferences not just about the particular systems compared, but also provided evidence for the viability of the design process (particularly needs analysis) that we are exploring.

  6. Surface binding sites in amylase have distinct roles in recognition of starch structure motifs and degradation.

    PubMed

    Cockburn, Darrell; Nielsen, Morten M; Christiansen, Camilla; Andersen, Joakim M; Rannes, Julie B; Blennow, Andreas; Svensson, Birte

    2015-04-01

    Carbohydrate converting enzymes often possess extra substrate binding regions that enhance their activity. These can be found either on separate domains termed carbohydrate binding modules or as so-called surface binding sites (SBSs) situated on the catalytic domain. SBSs are common in starch degrading enzymes and critically important for their function. The affinity towards a variety of starch granules as well as soluble poly- and oligosaccharides of barley α-amylase 1 (AMY1) wild-type and mutants of two SBSs (SBS1 and SBS2) was investigated using Langmuir binding analysis, confocal laser scanning microscopy, affinity gel electrophoresis and surface plasmon resonance to unravel functional roles of the SBSs. SBS1 was critical for binding to different starch types as Kd increased by 7-62-fold or was not measurable upon mutation. By contrast SBS2 was particularly important for binding to soluble polysaccharides and oligosaccharides with α-1,6 linkages, suggesting that branch points are key structural elements in recognition by SBS2. Mutation at both SBS1 and SBS2 eliminated binding to all starch granule types tested. Taken together, the findings indicate that the two SBSs act in concert to localize AMY1 to the starch granule surface and that SBS2 works synergistically with the active site in the degradation of amylopectin.

  7. Comparative structural and energetic analysis of WW domain-peptide interactions.

    PubMed

    Schleinkofer, Karin; Wiedemann, Urs; Otte, Livia; Wang, Ting; Krause, Gerd; Oschkinat, Hartmut; Wade, Rebecca C

    2004-11-26

    WW domains are small globular protein interaction modules found in a wide spectrum of proteins. They recognize their target proteins by binding specifically to short linear peptide motifs that are often proline-rich. To infer the determinants of the ligand binding propensities of WW domains, we analyzed 42 WW domains. We built models of the 3D structures of the WW domains and their peptide complexes by comparative modeling supplemented with experimental data from peptide library screens. The models provide new insights into the orientation and position of the peptide in structures of WW domain-peptide complexes that have not yet been determined experimentally. From a protein interaction property similarity analysis (PIPSA) of the WW domain structures, we show that electrostatic potential is a distinguishing feature of WW domains and we propose a structure-based classification of WW domains that expands the existent ligand-based classification scheme. Application of the comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA), GRID/GOLPE and comparative binding energy (COMBINE) analysis methods permitted the derivation of quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) that aid in identifying the specificity-determining residues within WW domains and their ligand-recognition motifs. Using these QSARs, a new group-specific sequence feature of WW domains that target arginine-containing peptides was identified. Finally, the QSAR models were applied to the design of a peptide to bind with greater affinity than the known binding peptide sequences of the yRSP5-1 WW domain. The prediction was verified experimentally, providing validation of the QSAR models and demonstrating the possibility of rationally improving peptide affinity for WW domains. The QSAR models may also be applied to the prediction of the specificity of WW domains with uncharacterized ligand-binding properties.

  8. Domain structure and Raman modes in PbTiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartasyte, A.; Margueron, S.; Santiso, J.; Hlinka, J.; Simon, E.; Gregora, I.; Chaix-Pluchery, O.; Kreisel, J.; Jimenez, C.; Weiss, F.; Kubilius, V.; Abrutis, A.

    2011-05-01

    A comparative analysis of Raman spectra from poly-domain PbTiO3 thin films with poly-domain and single-domain PbTiO3 crystals is presented. Raman spectroscopy reveals that the profiles of A1-symmetry modes can be significantly modified by the existence of the domain structure. The possible origins of these complex profiles of the A1(LO) and A1(TO) modes are discussed. It is emphasized that analysis of stresses, domain structure and phase transitions in the PbTiO3 thin films has to be based on the E(TO) modes presenting profiles that are not affected by the domain structure.

  9. The structure of the Ca{sup 2+}-binding , glycosylated F-spondin domain of F-spondin- A C2-domain variant in an extracellular matrix protein.

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, K.; Lawler, J.

    2011-05-10

    F-spondin is a multi-domain extracellular matrix (ECM) protein and a contact-repellent molecule that directs axon outgrowth and cell migration during development. The reelin{_}N domain and the F-spondin domain (FS domain) comprise a proteolytic fragment that interacts with the cell membrane and guides the projection of commissural axons to floor plate. The FS domain is found in F-spondins, mindins, M-spondin and amphiF-spondin. We present the crystal structure of human F-spondin FS domain at 1.95{angstrom} resolution. The structure reveals a Ca{sup 2+}-binding C2 domain variant with an 8-stranded antiparallel {beta}-sandwich fold. Though the primary sequences of the FS domains of F-spondin and mindin are less than 36% identical, their overall structures are very similar. The unique feature of F-spondin FS domain is the presence of three disulfide bonds associated with the N- and C-termini of the domain and a highly conserved N-linked glycosylation site. The integrin-binding motif found in mindin is not conserved in the F-spondin FS domain. The structure of the F-spondin FS domain completes the structural studies of the multiple-domain ECM molecule. The homology of its core structure to a common Ca{sup 2+}- and lipid-binding C2 domain suggests that the F-spondin FS domain may be responsible for part of the membrane targeting of F-spondin in its regulation of axon development. The structural properties of the FS domain revealed in this study pave the way for further exploration into the functions of F-spondin.

  10. Structure of a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored domain from a trypanosome variant surface glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Jones, Nicola G; Nietlispach, Daniel; Sharma, Reuben; Burke, David F; Eyres, Isobel; Mues, Marsilius; Mott, Helen R; Carrington, Mark

    2008-02-08

    The cell surface of African trypanosomes is covered by a densely packed monolayer of a single protein, the variant surface glycoprotein (VSG). The VSG protects the trypanosome cell surface from effector molecules of the host immune system and is the mediator of antigenic variation. The sequence divergence between VSGs that is necessary for antigenic variation can only occur within the constraints imposed by the structural features necessary to form the monolayer barrier. Here, the structures of the two domains that together comprise the C-terminal di-domain of VSG ILTat1.24 have been determined. The first domain has a structure similar to the single C-terminal domain of VSG MITat1.2 and provides proof of structural conservation in VSG C-terminal domains complementing the conservation of structure present in the N-terminal domain. The second domain, although based on the same fold, is a minimized version missing several structural features. The structure of the second domain contains the C-terminal residue that in the native VSG is attached to a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor that retains the VSG on the external face of the plasma membrane. The solution structures of this domain and a VSG GPI glycan have been combined to produce the first structure-based model of a GPI-anchored protein. The model suggests that the core glycan of the GPI anchor lies in a groove on the surface of the domain and that there is a close association between the GPI glycan and protein. More widely, the GPI glycan may be an integral part of the structure of other GPI-anchored proteins.

  11. Genes encoding proteins with peritrophin A-type chitin-binding domains in Tribolium castaneum are grouped into three distinct families based on phylogeny, expression and function.

    PubMed

    Jasrapuria, Sinu; Arakane, Yasuyuki; Osman, Gamal; Kramer, Karl J; Beeman, Richard W; Muthukrishnan, Subbaratnam

    2010-03-01

    different orders suggests that ChtBD2s are ancient protein domains whose affinity for chitin in extracellular matrices has been exploited many times for a range of biological functions. The differences in the expression profiles of PMPs and CPAPs indicate that even though they share the peritrophin A motif for chitin binding, these three families of proteins have quite distinct biological functions.

  12. Distinct quaternary structures of the AAA+ Lon protease control substrate degradation

    PubMed Central

    Vieux, Ellen F.; Wohlever, Matthew L.; Chen, James Z.; Sauer, Robert T.; Baker, Tania A.

    2013-01-01

    Lon is an ATPase associated with cellular activities (AAA+) protease that controls cell division in response to stress and also degrades misfolded and damaged proteins. Subunits of Lon are known to assemble into ring-shaped homohexamers that enclose an internal degradation chamber. Here, we demonstrate that hexamers of Escherichia coli Lon also interact to form a dodecamer at physiological protein concentrations. Electron microscopy of this dodecamer reveals a prolate structure with the protease chambers at the distal ends and a matrix of N domains forming an equatorial hexamer–hexamer interface, with portals of ∼45 Å providing access to the enzyme lumen. Compared with hexamers, Lon dodecamers are much less active in degrading large substrates but equally active in degrading small substrates. Our results support a unique gating mechanism that allows the repertoire of Lon substrates to be tuned by its assembly state. PMID:23674680

  13. High diversity and distinctive community structure of bacteria on glaciers in China revealed by 454 pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing; Zhou, Yu-Guang; Xin, Yu-Hua

    2015-12-01

    The bacterial diversity, community structure and preliminary microbial biogeographic pattern were assessed on glacier surfaces, including three northern glaciers (cold glaciers) and three southern glaciers (temperate glaciers) in China that experienced distinct climatic conditions. Pyrosequencing revealed that bacterial diversities were surprisingly high. With respect to operational taxonomic units (OTUs), Proteobacteria was the most dominant phylum on the glacier surfaces, especially Betaproteobacteria. Significant differences of the bacterial communities were observed between northern and southern glacier surfaces. The rare and abundant populations showed similar clustering patterns to the whole community. The analysis of the culturable bacterial compositions from four glaciers supported this conclusion. Redundancy analysis (RDA) and partial Mantel tests indicated that annual mean temperature, as well as geographical distance, was significantly correlated with the bacterial communities on the glaciers. It was inferred that bacterial communities on northern and southern glacier surfaces experienced different climate, water and nutrient patterns, and consequently evolved different lifestyles.

  14. Genomic microarray analysis reveals distinct locations for the CENP-A binding domains in three human chromosome 13q32 neocentromeres.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Alicia; Mahmood, Radma; Li, Shulan; Cheung, Fanny; Yoda, Kinya; Warburton, Peter E

    2003-10-15

    Human neocentromeres are fully functional centromeres that provide mitotic stability to rearranged chromosomes that have separated from endogenous centromeres. A disproportionate number of neocentromeres has been observed in certain regions such as chromosome 3q (n=6), 15q (n=9) and 13q32 (n=7), suggesting that these regions contain DNA sequences with a high propensity for neocentromere formation. Therefore, we have addressed the role of primary DNA sequence in neocentromere formation by asking whether multiple independent neocentromeres that were cytologically localized to chromosome 13q32 are in fact localized to the same underlying genomic DNA. Analysis of four independent 13q32 neocentromeres using simultaneous FISH with ordered YAC probes and immunofluorescence with antibodies to CENP-C have localized three neocentromeres to a distal approximately 7 Mb domain in chromosome 13q32, and one to an overlapping proximal domain of approximately 7 Mb. DNA was obtained from three of these neocentromeres by CENP-A chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and used to screen ordered BACs using both a slot-blotted BAC pool approach and a genomic microarray that contiguously spans 13q31.3-13q33.1. The CENP-A binding domains from each of these neocentromeres was identified to distinct genomic locations of approximately 130, 215 and 275 kb within an approximately 6.5 Mb region. Thus, the lack of coincidence of these neocentromeres to the same underlying DNA sequence refutes the idea of a DNA sequence based neocentromere 'hotspot' in 13q32 and further supports the sequence-independent epigenetic formation of human neocentromeres. The screening of genomic microarrays with ChIP DNA provides a powerful method to identify mammalian DNA sequences associated with particular functional chromatin states.

  15. Linking structure and function in food webs: maximization of different ecological functions generates distinct food web structures.

    PubMed

    Yen, Jian D L; Cabral, Reniel B; Cantor, Mauricio; Hatton, Ian; Kortsch, Susanne; Patrício, Joana; Yamamichi, Masato

    2016-03-01

    Trophic interactions are central to ecosystem functioning, but the link between food web structure and ecosystem functioning remains obscure. Regularities (i.e. consistent patterns) in food web structure suggest the possibility of regularities in ecosystem functioning, which might be used to relate structure to function. We introduce a novel, genetic algorithm approach to simulate food webs with maximized throughput (a proxy for ecosystem functioning) and compare the structure of these simulated food webs to real empirical food webs using common metrics of food web structure. We repeat this analysis using robustness to secondary extinctions (a proxy for ecosystem resilience) instead of throughput to determine the relative contributions of ecosystem functioning and ecosystem resilience to food web structure. Simulated food webs that maximized robustness were similar to real food webs when connectance (i.e. levels of interaction across the food web) was high, but this result did not extend to food webs with low connectance. Simulated food webs that maximized throughput or a combination of throughput and robustness were not similar to any real food webs. Simulated maximum-throughput food webs differed markedly from maximum-robustness food webs, which suggests that maximizing different ecological functions can generate distinct food web structures. Based on our results, food web structure would appear to have a stronger relationship with ecosystem resilience than with ecosystem throughput. Our genetic algorithm approach is general and is well suited to large, realistically complex food webs. Genetic algorithms can incorporate constraints on structure and can generate outputs that can be compared directly to empirical data. Our method can be used to explore a range of maximization or minimization hypotheses, providing new perspectives on the links between structure and function in ecological systems.

  16. Atomic structure of the nuclear pore complex targeting domain of a Nup116 homologue from the yeast, Candida glabrata

    SciTech Connect

    Sampathkumar, Parthasarathy; Kim, Seung Joong; Manglicmot, Danalyn; Bain, Kevin T.; Gilmore, Jeremiah; Gheyi, Tarun; Phillips, Jeremy; Pieper, Ursula; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Franke, Josef D.; Matsui, Tsutomu; Tsuruta, Hiro; Atwell, Shane; Thompson, Devon A.; Emtage, J. Spencer; Wasserman, Stephen R.; Rout, Michael P.; Sali, Andrej; Sauder, J. Michael; Almo, Steven C.; Burley, Stephen K.

    2012-10-23

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC), embedded in the nuclear envelope, is a large, dynamic molecular assembly that facilitates exchange of macromolecules between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. The yeast NPC is an eightfold symmetric annular structure composed of {approx}456 polypeptide chains contributed by {approx}30 distinct proteins termed nucleoporins. Nup116, identified only in fungi, plays a central role in both protein import and mRNA export through the NPC. Nup116 is a modular protein with N-terminal 'FG' repeats containing a Gle2p-binding sequence motif and a NPC targeting domain at its C-terminus. We report the crystal structure of the NPC targeting domain of Candida glabrata Nup116, consisting of residues 882-1034 [CgNup116(882-1034)], at 1.94 {angstrom} resolution. The X-ray structure of CgNup116(882-1034) is consistent with the molecular envelope determined in solution by small-angle X-ray scattering. Structural similarities of CgNup116(882-1034) with homologous domains from Saccharomyces cerevisiae Nup116, S. cerevisiae Nup145N, and human Nup98 are discussed.

  17. Atomic structure of the nuclear pore complex targeting domain of a Nup116 homologue from the yeast, Candida glabrata.

    PubMed

    Sampathkumar, Parthasarathy; Kim, Seung Joong; Manglicmot, Danalyn; Bain, Kevin T; Gilmore, Jeremiah; Gheyi, Tarun; Phillips, Jeremy; Pieper, Ursula; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Franke, Josef D; Matsui, Tsutomu; Tsuruta, Hiro; Atwell, Shane; Thompson, Devon A; Emtage, J Spencer; Wasserman, Stephen R; Rout, Michael P; Sali, Andrej; Sauder, J Michael; Almo, Steven C; Burley, Stephen K

    2012-08-01

    The nuclear pore complex (NPC), embedded in the nuclear envelope, is a large, dynamic molecular assembly that facilitates exchange of macromolecules between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. The yeast NPC is an eightfold symmetric annular structure composed of ~456 polypeptide chains contributed by ~30 distinct proteins termed nucleoporins. Nup116, identified only in fungi, plays a central role in both protein import and mRNA export through the NPC. Nup116 is a modular protein with N-terminal "FG" repeats containing a Gle2p-binding sequence motif and a NPC targeting domain at its C-terminus. We report the crystal structure of the NPC targeting domain of Candida glabrata Nup116, consisting of residues 882-1034 [CgNup116(882-1034)], at 1.94 Å resolution. The X-ray structure of CgNup116(882-1034) is consistent with the molecular envelope determined in solution by small-angle X-ray scattering. Structural similarities of CgNup116(882-1034) with homologous domains from Saccharomyces cerevisiae Nup116, S. cerevisiae Nup145N, and human Nup98 are discussed.

  18. Native Thrombocidin-1 and Unfolded Thrombocidin-1 Exert Antimicrobial Activity via Distinct Structural Elements

    PubMed Central

    Kwakman, Paulus H. S.; Krijgsveld, Jeroen; de Boer, Leonie; Nguyen, Leonard T.; Boszhard, Laura; Vreede, Jocelyne; Dekker, Henk L.; Speijer, Dave; Drijfhout, Jan W.; te Velde, Anje A.; Crielaard, Wim; Vogel, Hans J.; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M. J. E.; Zaat, Sebastian A. J.

    2011-01-01

    Chemokines (chemotactic cytokines) can have direct antimicrobial activity, which is apparently related to the presence of a distinct positively charged patch on the surface. However, chemokines can retain antimicrobial activity upon linearization despite the loss of their positive patch, thus questioning the importance of this patch for activity. Thrombocidin-1 (TC-1) is a microbicidal protein isolated from human blood platelets. TC-1 only differs from the chemokine NAP-2/CXCL7 by a two-amino acid C-terminal deletion, but this truncation is crucial for antimicrobial activity. We assessed the structure-activity relationship for antimicrobial activity of TC-1. Reduction of the charge of the TC-1-positive patch by replacing lysine 17 with alanine reduced the activity against bacteria and almost abolished activity against the yeast Candida albicans. Conversely, augmentation of the positive patch by increasing charge density or size resulted in a 2–3-fold increased activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and Bacillus subtilis but did not substantially affect activity against C. albicans. Reduction of TC-1 resulted in loss of the folded conformation, but this disruption of the positive patch did not affect antimicrobial activity. Using overlapping 15-mer synthetic peptides, we demonstrate peptides corresponding to the N-terminal part of TC-1 to have similar antimicrobial activity as intact TC-1. Although we demonstrate that the positive patch is essential for activity of folded TC-1, unfolded TC-1 retained antimicrobial activity despite the absence of a positive patch. This activity is probably exerted by a linear peptide stretch in the N-terminal part of the molecule. We conclude that intact TC-1 and unfolded TC-1 exert antimicrobial activity via distinct structural elements. PMID:22025617

  19. Quasi-static and Dynamic Nanoindentation of Soft and Spatially Distinct Materials and Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Nannan

    Quasi-static nanoindentation has been used to assess the mechanical properties of soft and spatially distinct materials for several years. Most of the soft materials exhibit time-dependent (viscoelastic) behavior; thereby dynamic nanoindentation analysis increased the possibility of obtaining an accurate mechanical response from the materials. Normally, the heterogonous microstructure of specimens can result in experimental error when analyzing nanoindentation results. The accurate assessment of nanoindentation on soft materials with spatially distinct structures is not fully understood in previous studies. Some existing features in specimens, such as the residual stresses generated during polymer parts processing, also significantly influences nanoindentation data analysis. The objective of this study is to systematically consider some of the uncertainties when it comes to characterize soft materials by nanoindentation and thus develop several improved characterization methods, and provide guidance for future measurement. The study sought to clear out four main uncertainties within nanoindentation analysis for viscoelastic and heterogeneous materials: 1. Does the free edge close to the indents affect the dynamic nanoindentation results? How can we improve the analysis method? 2. How should indentation results be utilized to estimate the potential residual stresses? 3. Could we perform the statistical nanoindnentation to obtain the comparable results of volume fraction of individual phases in heterogeneous materials? 4. During nanoindentation, what is the appropriate combination of the loading rate, unloading rate and the holding time setup in terms of viscoelastic materials? In this dissertation, the correlation of quasi-static nanoindentation analysis methods with the structural compliance, residual stress, sampling volume and various relaxation processes will be covered in the following chapters. Dynamic nanoindentation will be used to access the time

  20. Disparate evolution of prion protein domains and the distinct origin of Doppel- and prion-related loci revealed by fish-to-mammal comparisons.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Milla, Eric; Oidtmann, Birgit; Panagiotidis, Cynthia H; Baier, Michael; Sklaviadis, Theodoros; Hoffmann, Rudolf; Zhou, Yi; Solis, Gonzalo P; Stuermer, Claudia A O; Málaga-Trillo, Edward

    2006-02-01

    Prions result from the misfolding and selective accumulation of the host-encoded prion protein (PrP) in the brain. Despite intensive research on mammalian models, basic questions about the biological role of PrP and the evolutionary origin of prion disease remain unanswered. Following our previous identification of novel fish PrP homologues, here we generated new fish PrP sequences and performed genomic analysis to demonstrate the existence of two homologous PrP loci in bony fish, which display extensive molecular variation and are highly expressed in adult and developing fish brains. The fish PrP genomic regions contain PrP-related loci directly downstream of each PrP locus, suggesting an independent origin of prion-related proteins in fish and mammals. Our structural prediction analysis uncovers a conserved molecular "bauplan" for all vertebrate PrPs. The C- and N-terminal protein domains have evolved independently from one another, the former having retained its basic globular structure despite high sequence divergence and the latter having undergone differential expansion-degeneration cycles in its repetitive domains. Our evolutionary analysis redefines fundamental concepts on the functional significance of PrP domains and opens up new possibilities for the experimental analysis of prion misfolding and neurodegeneration in a non-mammalian model like the zebrafish.

  1. Structural and Functional Dissection of the Abp1 ADFH Actin-binding Domain Reveals Versatile In Vivo Adapter Functions

    SciTech Connect

    Quintero-Monzon,O.; Rodal, A.; Strokopytov, B.; Almo, S.; Goode, B.

    2005-01-01

    Abp1 is a multidomain protein that regulates the Arp2/3 complex and links proteins involved in endocytosis to the actin cytoskeleton. All of the proposed cellular functions of Abp1 involve actin filament binding, yet the actin binding site(s) on Abp1 have not been identified, nor has the importance of actin binding for Abp1 localization and function in vivo been tested. Here, we report the crystal structure of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Abp1 actin-binding actin depolymerizing factor homology (ADFH) domain and dissect its activities by mutagenesis. Abp1-ADFH domain and ADF/cofilin structures are similar, and they use conserved surfaces to bind actin; however, there are also key differences that help explain their differential effects on actin dynamics. Using point mutations, we demonstrate that actin binding is required for localization of Abp1 in vivo, the lethality caused by Abp1 overexpression, and the ability of Abp1 to activate Arp2/3 complex. Furthermore, we genetically uncouple ABP1 functions that overlap with SAC6, SLA1, and SLA2, showing they require distinct combinations of activities and interactions. Together, our data provide the first structural and functional view of the Abp1-actin interaction and show that Abp1 has distinct cellular roles as an adapter, linking different sets of ligands for each function.

  2. Structure of an isolated unglycosylated antibody C{sub H}2 domain

    SciTech Connect

    Prabakaran, Ponraj; Vu, Bang K.; Gan, Jianhua; Feng, Yang; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.; Ji, Xinhua

    2008-10-01

    The crystal structure of an isolated unglycosylated antibody C{sub H}2 domain has been determined at 1.7 Å resolution. The C{sub H}2 (C{sub H}3 for IgM and IgE) domain of an antibody plays an important role in mediating effector functions and preserving antibody stability. It is the only domain in human immunoglobulins (Igs) which is involved in weak interchain protein–protein interactions with another C{sub H}2 domain solely through sugar moieties. The N-linked glycosylation at Asn297 is conserved in mammalian IgGs as well as in homologous regions of other antibody isotypes. To examine the structural details of the C{sub H}2 domain in the absence of glycosylation and other antibody domains, the crystal structure of an isolated unglycosylated antibody γ1 C{sub H}2 domain was determined at 1.7 Å resolution and compared with corresponding C{sub H}2 structures from intact Fc, IgG and Fc receptor complexes. Furthermore, the oligomeric state of the protein in solution was studied using size-exclusion chromatography. The results suggested that the unglycosylated human antibody C{sub H}2 domain is a monomer and that its structure is similar to that found in the intact Fc, IgG and Fc receptor complex structures. However, certain structural variations were observed in the Fc receptor-binding sites. Owing to its small size, stability and non-immunogenic Ig template, the C{sub H}2-domain structure could be useful for the development by protein design of antibody domains exerting effector functions and/or antigen specificity and as a robust scaffold in protein-engineering applications.

  3. Evolution of ferroelectric domain structures embedded inside polychrystalline BaTiO3 during heating

    SciTech Connect

    Varlioglu, Mesut; Ustundag, Ersan; Tamura, Nobumichi; Jones, Jacob L.

    2010-01-01

    The evolution of ferroelectric domains inside a single grain of a polycrystalline BaTiO{sub 3} ceramic was investigated under quasistatic heating by using polychromatic scanning x-ray microdiffraction. Four domain orientations were observed, three of which exhibited a classic of {approx}90{sup o} ferroelastic relationship. The fourth domain orientation was found to be crystallographically related with one of the other orientations by a rotation of either 180.47{sup o} or 0.47{sup o}. While heating the polycrystalline BaTiO{sub 3} from room temperature to above the Curie temperature (125 C), all four ferroelectric domain orientations rotated toward a paraelectric cubic orientation which was found to be at an intermediate orientation relative to the four domain orientations. The crystallographic relationships of the domains with respect to paraelectric phase were explained using a domain structure model by Nepochatenko.

  4. Molecular characterization of a Penicillium chrysogenum exo-rhamnogalacturonan lyase that is structurally distinct from other polysaccharide lyase family proteins.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Marin; Kawakami, Takuya; Ikemoto, Takeshi; Fujiwara, Daisuke; Takenaka, Shigeo; Nakazawa, Masami; Ueda, Mitsuhiro; Sakamoto, Tatsuji

    2015-10-01

    We previously described an endo-acting rhamnogalacturonan (RG) lyase, termed PcRGL4A, of Penicillium chrysogenum 31B. Here, we describe a second RG lyase, called PcRGLX. We determined the cDNA sequence of the Pcrglx gene, which encodes PcRGLX. Based on analyses using a BLAST search and a conserved domain search, PcRGLX was found to be structurally distinct from known RG lyases and might belong to a new polysaccharide lyase family together with uncharacterized fungal proteins of Nectria haematococca, Aspergillus oryzae, and Fusarium oxysporum. The Pcrglx cDNA gene product (rPcRGLX) expressed in Escherichia coli demonstrated specific activity against RG but not against homogalacturonan. Divalent cations were not essential for the enzymatic activity of rPcRGLX. rPcRGLX mainly released unsaturated galacturonosyl rhamnose (ΔGR) from RG backbones used as the substrate from the initial stage of the reaction, indicating that the enzyme can be classified as an exo-acting RG lyase (EC 4.2.2.24). This is the first report of an RG lyase with this mode of action in Eukaryota. rPcRGLX acted synergistically with PcRGL4A to degrade soybean RG and released ΔGR. This ΔGR was partially decorated with galactose (Gal) residues, indicating that rPcRGLX preferred oligomeric RGs to polymeric RGs, that the enzyme did not require Gal decoration of RG backbones for degradation, and that the enzyme bypassed the Gal side chains of RG backbones. These characteristics of rPcRGLX might be useful in the determination of complex structures of pectins.

  5. C-terminal domains of bacterial proteases: structure, function and the biotechnological applications.

    PubMed

    Huang, J; Wu, C; Liu, D; Yang, X; Wu, R; Zhang, J; Ma, C; He, H

    2017-01-01

    C-terminal domains widely exist in the C-terminal region of multidomain proteases. As a β-sandwich domain in multidomain protease, the C-terminal domain plays an important role in proteolysis including regulation of the secretory process, anchoring and swelling the substrate molecule, presenting as an inhibitor for the preprotease and adapting the protein structural flexibility and stability. In this review, the diversity, structural characteristics and biological function of C-terminal protease domains are described. Furthermore, the application prospects of C-terminal domains, including polycystic kidney disease, prepeptidase C-terminal and collagen-binding domain, in the area of medicine and biological artificial materials are also discussed.

  6. Structures and target recognition modes of PDZ domains: recurring themes and emerging pictures.

    PubMed

    Ye, Fei; Zhang, Mingjie

    2013-10-01

    PDZ domains are highly abundant protein-protein interaction modules and are often found in multidomain scaffold proteins. PDZ-domain-containing scaffold proteins regulate multiple biological processes, including trafficking and clustering receptors and ion channels at defined membrane regions, organizing and targeting signalling complexes at specific cellular compartments, interfacing cytoskeletal structures with membranes, and maintaining various cellular structures. PDZ domains, each with ~90-amino-acid residues folding into a highly similar structure, are best known to bind to short C-terminal tail peptides of their target proteins. A series of recent studies have revealed that, in addition to the canonical target-binding mode, many PDZ-target interactions involve amino acid residues beyond the regular PDZ domain fold, which we refer to as extensions. Such extension sequences often form an integral structural and functional unit with the attached PDZ domain, which is defined as a PDZ supramodule. Correspondingly, PDZ-domain-binding sequences from target proteins are frequently found to require extension sequences beyond canonical short C-terminal tail peptides. Formation of PDZ supramodules not only affords necessary binding specificities and affinities demanded by physiological functions of PDZ domain targets, but also provides regulatory switches to be built in the PDZ-target interactions. At the 20th anniversary of the discovery of PDZ domain proteins, we try to summarize structural features and target-binding properties of such PDZ supramodules emerging from studies in recent years.

  7. Defining the boundaries: structure and function of LOB domain proteins.

    PubMed

    Majer, Christine; Hochholdinger, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The plant-specific LBD (Lateral Organ Boundaries Domain) gene family is essential in the regulation of plant lateral organ development and is involved in the regulation of anthocyanin and nitrogen metabolism. LBD proteins contain a characteristic LOB domain composed of a C-motif required for DNA-binding, a conserved glycine residue, and a leucine-zipper-like sequence required for protein-protein interactions. Recently, several LBD genes associated with mutant phenotypes related to almost all aspects of plant development, including embryo, root, leaf, and inflorescence development have been functionally characterized. These novel insights contribute to a better understanding of the molecular definition of boundaries between organs or boundaries between organs and meristems and the regulation of these processes by environmental cues and phytohormones.

  8. Structure of the C-terminal heme-binding domain of THAP domain containing protein 4 from Homo sapiens

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Bingman, Craig A.; Phillips, Jr., George N.

    2012-03-15

    The thanatos (the Greek god of death)-associated protein (THAP) domain is a sequence-specific DNA-binding domain that contains a C2-CH (Cys-Xaa{sub 2-4}-Cys-Xaa{sub 35-50}-Cys-Xaa{sub 2}-His) zinc finger that is similar to the DNA domain of the P element transposase from Drosophila. THAP-containing proteins have been observed in the proteome of humans, pigs, cows, chickens, zebrafish, Drosophila, C. elegans, and Xenopus. To date, there are no known THAP domain proteins in plants, yeast, or bacteria. There are 12 identified human THAP domain-containing proteins (THAP0-11). In all human THAP protein, the THAP domain is located at the N-terminus and is {approx}90 residues in length. Although all of the human THAP-containing proteins have a homologous N-terminus, there is extensive variation in both the predicted structure and length of the remaining protein. Even though the exact function of these THAP proteins is not well defined, there is evidence that they play a role in cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle modulation, chromatin modification, and transcriptional regulation. THAP-containing proteins have also been implicated in a number of human disease states including heart disease, neurological defects, and several types of cancers. Human THAP4 is a 577-residue protein of unknown function that is proposed to bind DNA in a sequence-specific manner similar to THAP1 and has been found to be upregulated in response to heat shock. THAP4 is expressed in a relatively uniform manner in a broad range of tissues and appears to be upregulated in lymphoma cells and highly expressed in heart cells. The C-terminal domain of THAP4 (residues 415-577), designated here as cTHAP4, is evolutionarily conserved and is observed in all known THAP4 orthologs. Several single-domain proteins lacking a THAP domain are found in plants and bacteria and show significant levels of homology to cTHAP4. It appears that cTHAP4 belongs to a large class of proteins that have yet to be fully

  9. Crystal structure of the hemolytic lectin CEL-III isolated from the marine invertebrate Cucumaria echinata: implications of domain structure for its membrane pore-formation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Tatsuya; Yamasaki, Takayuki; Eto, Seiichiro; Sugawara, Hajime; Kurisu, Genji; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Kusunoki, Masami; Hatakeyama, Tomomitsu

    2004-08-27

    CEL-III is a Ca(2+)-dependent and galactose-specific lectin purified from the sea cucumber, Cucumaria echinata, which exhibits hemolytic and hemagglutinating activities. Six molecules of CEL-III are assumed to oligomerize to form an ion-permeable pore in the cell membrane. We have determined the crystal structure of CELIII by using single isomorphous replacement aided by anomalous scattering in lead at 1.7 A resolution. CEL-III consists of three distinct domains as follows: the N-terminal two carbohydrate-binding domains (1 and 2), which adopt beta-trefoil folds such as the B-chain of ricin and are members of the (QXW)(3) motif family; and domain 3, which is a novel fold composed of two alpha-helices and one beta-sandwich. CEL-III is the first Ca(2+)-dependent lectin structure with two beta-trefoil folds. Despite sharing the structure of the B-chain of ricin, CEL-III binds five Ca(2+) ions at five of the six subdomains in both domains 1 and 2. Considering the relatively high similarity among the five subdomains, they are putative binding sites for galactose-related carbohydrates, although it remains to be elucidated whether bound Ca(2+) is directly involved in interaction with carbohydrates. The paucity of hydrophobic interactions in the interfaces between the domains and biochemical data suggest that these domains rearrange upon carbohydrate binding in the erythrocyte membrane. This conformational change may be responsible for oligomerization of CEL-III molecules and hemolysis in the erythrocyte membranes.

  10. Structural-Functional Analysis Reveals a Specific Domain Organization in Family GH20 Hexosaminidases.

    PubMed

    Val-Cid, Cristina; Biarnés, Xevi; Faijes, Magda; Planas, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    Hexosaminidases are involved in important biological processes catalyzing the hydrolysis of N-acetyl-hexosaminyl residues in glycosaminoglycans and glycoconjugates. The GH20 enzymes present diverse domain organizations for which we propose two minimal model architectures: Model A containing at least a non-catalytic GH20b domain and the catalytic one (GH20) always accompanied with an extra α-helix (GH20b-GH20-α), and Model B with only the catalytic GH20 domain. The large Bifidobacterium bifidum lacto-N-biosidase was used as a model protein to evaluate the minimal functional unit due to its interest and structural complexity. By expressing different truncated forms of this enzyme, we show that Model A architectures cannot be reduced to Model B. In particular, there are two structural requirements general to GH20 enzymes with Model A architecture. First, the non-catalytic domain GH20b at the N-terminus of the catalytic GH20 domain is required for expression and seems to stabilize it. Second, the substrate-binding cavity at the GH20 domain always involves a remote element provided by a long loop from the catalytic domain itself or, when this loop is short, by an element from another domain of the multidomain structure or from the dimeric partner. Particularly, the lacto-N-biosidase requires GH20b and the lectin-like domain at the N- and C-termini of the catalytic GH20 domain to be fully soluble and functional. The lectin domain provides this remote element to the active site. We demonstrate restoration of activity of the inactive GH20b-GH20-α construct (model A architecture) by a complementation assay with the lectin-like domain. The engineering of minimal functional units of multidomain GH20 enzymes must consider these structural requirements.

  11. Structural-Functional Analysis Reveals a Specific Domain Organization in Family GH20 Hexosaminidases

    PubMed Central

    Val-Cid, Cristina; Biarnés, Xevi; Faijes, Magda; Planas, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    Hexosaminidases are involved in important biological processes catalyzing the hydrolysis of N-acetyl-hexosaminyl residues in glycosaminoglycans and glycoconjugates. The GH20 enzymes present diverse domain organizations for which we propose two minimal model architectures: Model A containing at least a non-catalytic GH20b domain and the catalytic one (GH20) always accompanied with an extra α-helix (GH20b-GH20-α), and Model B with only the catalytic GH20 domain. The large Bifidobacterium bifidum lacto-N-biosidase was used as a model protein to evaluate the minimal functional unit due to its interest and structural complexity. By expressing different truncated forms of this enzyme, we show that Model A architectures cannot be reduced to Model B. In particular, there are two structural requirements general to GH20 enzymes with Model A architecture. First, the non-catalytic domain GH20b at the N-terminus of the catalytic GH20 domain is required for expression and seems to stabilize it. Second, the substrate-binding cavity at the GH20 domain always involves a remote element provided by a long loop from the catalytic domain itself or, when this loop is short, by an element from another domain of the multidomain structure or from the dimeric partner. Particularly, the lacto-N-biosidase requires GH20b and the lectin-like domain at the N- and C-termini of the catalytic GH20 domain to be fully soluble and functional. The lectin domain provides this remote element to the active site. We demonstrate restoration of activity of the inactive GH20b-GH20-α construct (model A architecture) by a complementation assay with the lectin-like domain. The engineering of minimal functional units of multidomain GH20 enzymes must consider these structural requirements. PMID:26024355

  12. The Crystal Structure of Streptococcus pyogenes Uridine Phosphorylase Reveals a Distinct Subfamily of Nucleoside Phosphorylases

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, Timothy H.; Christoffersen, S.; Allan, Paula W.; Parker, William B.; Piskur, Jure; Serra, I.; Terreni, M.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2011-09-20

    Uridine phosphorylase (UP), a key enzyme in the pyrimidine salvage pathway, catalyzes the reversible phosphorolysis of uridine or 2'-deoxyuridine to uracil and ribose 1-phosphate or 2'-deoxyribose 1-phosphate. This enzyme belongs to the nucleoside phosphorylase I superfamily whose members show diverse specificity for nucleoside substrates. Phylogenetic analysis shows Streptococcus pyogenes uridine phosphorylase (SpUP) is found in a distinct branch of the pyrimidine subfamily of nucleoside phosphorylases. To further characterize SpUP, we determined the crystal structure in complex with the products, ribose 1-phosphate and uracil, at 1.8 {angstrom} resolution. Like Escherichia coli UP (EcUP), the biological unit of SpUP is a hexamer with an ?/? monomeric fold. A novel feature of the active site is the presence of His169, which structurally aligns with Arg168 of the EcUP structure. A second active site residue, Lys162, is not present in previously determined UP structures and interacts with O2 of uracil. Biochemical studies of wild-type SpUP showed that its substrate specificity is similar to that of EcUP, while EcUP is {approx}7-fold more efficient than SpUP. Biochemical studies of SpUP mutants showed that mutations of His169 reduced activity, while mutation of Lys162 abolished all activity, suggesting that the negative charge in the transition state resides mostly on uracil O2. This is in contrast to EcUP for which transition state stabilization occurs mostly at O4.

  13. Distinct Structural Features of the Peroxide Response Regulator from Group A Streptococcus Drive DNA Binding

    PubMed Central

    Hammel, Michal; Nix, Jay C.; Tseng, Hsiao-Ling; Tsou, Chih-Cheng; Fei, Chun-Hsien; Chiou, Huo-Sheng; Jeng, U-Ser; Lin, Yee-Shin; Chuang, Woei-Jer; Wu, Jiunn-Jong; Wang, Shuying

    2014-01-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS, Streptococcus pyogenes) is a strict human pathogen that causes severe, invasive diseases. GAS does not produce catalase, but has an ability to resist killing by reactive oxygen species (ROS) through novel mechanisms. The peroxide response regulator (PerR), a member of ferric uptake regulator (Fur) family, plays a key role for GAS to cope with oxidative stress by regulating the expression of multiple genes. Our previous studies have found that expression of an iron-binding protein, Dpr, is under the direct control of PerR. To elucidate the molecular interactions of PerR with its cognate promoter, we have carried out structural studies on PerR and PerR-DNA complex. By combining crystallography and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), we confirmed that the determined PerR crystal structure reflects its conformation in solution. Through mutagenesis and biochemical analysis, we have identified DNA-binding residues suggesting that PerR binds to the dpr promoter at the per box through a winged-helix motif. Furthermore, we have performed SAXS analysis and resolved the molecular architecture of PerR-DNA complex, in which two 30 bp DNA fragments wrap around two PerR homodimers by interacting with the adjacent positively-charged winged-helix motifs. Overall, we provide structural insights into molecular recognition of DNA by PerR and define the hollow structural arrangement of PerR-30bpDNA complex, which displays a unique topology distinct from currently proposed DNA-binding models for Fur family regulators. PMID:24586487

  14. Measuring and Altering Ferroelectric Domain Structures in Lead Perovskite Single-Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harker, John Chamberlain

    Relaxor ferroelectric single-crystal materials PMN-PT and PZN-PT are currently of interest to the scientific community due to their enhanced properties and possible role as next-generation piezoelectric transducers in applications such as sonar and medical ultrasound. One key phenomenon affecting both the properties and the mechanical integrity of these materials is the ferroelectric domain structure within the material. In this work we examine the morphology and behavior of domain structures in PMN-29%PT. In order to do this we first present details of the construction and testing of a working piezo-response force microscope (PFM), and then use the PFM to verify a new domain observation technique called "relief polishing". Relief polishing is shown to reveal surface domains in the same manner as acid etching, preserving domain details as small as 0.5mum. Using these two techniques, we then determine that cutting and polishing strongly affect the surface and subsurface ferroelectric domain structures in PMN-29%PT. Specifically, we show that saw cutting can create characteristic striated domain structures as deep as 130mum within a sample, while straight polishing creates a characteristic domain structure known as the "fingerprint" pattern to a depth proportional to the size of the polishing grit, on the order of 0--12mum for grits as large as 15mum. We hypothesize that most samples contain these "skin effect" domain structures. In consequence, it is suggested that researchers presenting experimental results on domain structures should report the physical treatment history of the samples along with the experimental data.

  15. Structural and biochemical studies of the distinct activity profiles of Rai1 enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Vivien Ya-Fan; Jiao, Xinfu; Kiledjian, Megerditch; Tong, Liang

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies showed that Rai1 and its homologs are a crucial component of the mRNA 5′-end capping quality control mechanism. They can possess RNA 5′-end pyrophosphohydrolase (PPH), decapping, and 5′-3′ exonuclease (toward 5′ monophosphate RNA) activities, which help to degrade mRNAs with incomplete 5′-end capping. A single active site in the enzyme supports these apparently distinct activities. However, each Rai1 protein studied so far has a unique set of activities, and the molecular basis for these differences are not known. Here, we have characterized the highly diverse activity profiles of Rai1 homologs from a collection of fungal organisms and identified a new activity for these enzymes, 5′-end triphosphonucleotide hydrolase (TPH) instead of PPH activity. Crystal structures of two of these enzymes bound to RNA oligonucleotides reveal differences in the RNA binding modes. Structure-based mutations of these enzymes, changing residues that contact the RNA but are poorly conserved, have substantial effects on their activity, providing a framework to begin to understand the molecular basis for the different activity profiles. PMID:26101253

  16. Characterization of Two Distinct Structural Classes of Selective Aldehyde Dehydrogenase 1A1 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Cynthia A.; Hurley, Thomas D.

    2015-01-01

    Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH) catalyze the irreversible oxidation of aldehydes to their corresponding carboxylic acid. Alterations in ALDH1A1 activity are associated with such diverse diseases as cancer, Parkinson’s disease, obesity, and cataracts. Inhibitors of ALDH1A1 could aid in illuminating the role of this enzyme in disease processes. However, there are no commercially available selective inhibitors for ALDH1A1. Here we characterize two distinct chemical classes of inhibitors that are selective for human ALDH1A1 compared to eight other ALDH isoenzymes. The prototypical members of each structural class, CM026 and CM037, exhibit sub-micromolar inhibition constants, but have different mechanisms of inhibition. The crystal structures of these compounds bound to ALDH1A1 demonstrate that they bind within the aldehyde binding pocket of ALDH1A1 and exploit the presence of a unique Glycine residue to achieve their selectivity. These two novel and selective ALDH1A1 inhibitors may serve as chemical tools to better understand the contributions of ALDH1A1 to normal biology and to disease states. PMID:25634381

  17. Inter-Specific Coral Chimerism: Genetically Distinct Multicellular Structures Associated with Tissue Loss in Montipora capitata

    PubMed Central

    Work, Thierry M.; Forsman, Zac H.; Szabó, Zoltán; Lewis, Teresa D.; Aeby, Greta S.; Toonen, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Montipora white syndrome (MWS) results in tissue-loss that is often lethal to Montipora capitata, a major reef building coral that is abundant and dominant in the Hawai'ian Archipelago. Within some MWS-affected colonies in Kane'ohe Bay, Oahu, Hawai'i, we saw unusual motile multicellular structures within gastrovascular canals (hereafter referred to as invasive gastrovascular multicellular structure-IGMS) that were associated with thinning and fragmentation of the basal body wall. IGMS were in significantly greater densities in coral fragments manifesting tissue-loss compared to paired normal fragments. Mesenterial filaments from these colonies yielded typical M. capitata mitochondrial haplotypes (CO1, CR), while IGMS from the same colony consistently yielded distinct haplotypes previously only found in a different Montipora species (Montipora flabellata). Protein profiles showed consistent differences between paired mesenterial filaments and IGMS from the same colonies as did seven microsatellite loci that also exhibited an excess of alleles per locus inconsistent with a single diploid organism. We hypothesize that IGMS are a parasitic cellular lineage resulting from the chimeric fusion between M. capitata and M. flabellata larvae followed by morphological reabsorption of M. flabellata and subsequent formation of cell-lineage parasites. We term this disease Montiporaiasis. Although intra-specific chimerism is common in colonial animals, this is the first suspected inter-specific example and the first associated with tissue loss. PMID:21829541

  18. Inter-specific coral chimerism: Genetically distinct multicellular structures associated with tissue loss in Montipora capitata

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Work, Thierry M.; Forsman, Zac H.; Szabo, Zoltan; Lewis, Teresa D.; Aeby, Greta S.; Toonen, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Montipora white syndrome (MWS) results in tissue-loss that is often lethal to Montipora capitata, a major reef building coral that is abundant and dominant in the Hawai'ian Archipelago. Within some MWS-affected colonies in Kane'ohe Bay, Oahu, Hawai'i, we saw unusual motile multicellular structures within gastrovascular canals (hereafter referred to as invasive gastrovascular multicellular structure-IGMS) that were associated with thinning and fragmentation of the basal body wall. IGMS were in significantly greater densities in coral fragments manifesting tissue-loss compared to paired normal fragments. Mesenterial filaments from these colonies yielded typical M. capitata mitochondrial haplotypes (CO1, CR), while IGMS from the same colony consistently yielded distinct haplotypes previously only found in a different Montipora species (Montipora flabellata). Protein profiles showed consistent differences between paired mesenterial filaments and IGMS from the same colonies as did seven microsatellite loci that also exhibited an excess of alleles per locus inconsistent with a single diploid organism. We hypothesize that IGMS are a parasitic cellular lineage resulting from the chimeric fusion between M. capitata and M. flabellata larvae followed by morphological reabsorption of M. flabellata and subsequent formation of cell-lineage parasites. We term this disease Montiporaiasis. Although intra-specific chimerism is common in colonial animals, this is the first suspected inter-specific example and the first associated with tissue loss.

  19. Overlapping and Divergent Actions of Structurally Distinct Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors in Cardiac Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Schuetze, Katherine B; Stratton, Matthew S; Blakeslee, Weston W; Wempe, Michael F; Wagner, Florence F; Holson, Edward B; Kuo, Yin-Ming; Andrews, Andrew J; Gilbert, Tonya M; Hooker, Jacob M; McKinsey, Timothy A

    2017-04-01

    Inhibitors of zinc-dependent histone deacetylases (HDACs) profoundly affect cellular function by altering gene expression via changes in nucleosomal histone tail acetylation. Historically, investigators have employed pan-HDAC inhibitors, such as the hydroxamate trichostatin A (TSA), which simultaneously targets members of each of the three zinc-dependent HDAC classes (classes I, II, and IV). More recently, class- and isoform-selective HDAC inhibitors have been developed, providing invaluable chemical biology probes for dissecting the roles of distinct HDACs in the control of various physiologic and pathophysiological processes. For example, the benzamide class I HDAC-selective inhibitor, MGCD0103 [N-(2-aminophenyl)-4-[[(4-pyridin-3-ylpyrimidin-2-yl)amino]methyl] benzamide], was shown to block cardiac fibrosis, a process involving excess extracellular matrix deposition, which often results in heart dysfunction. Here, we compare the mechanisms of action of structurally distinct HDAC inhibitors in isolated primary cardiac fibroblasts, which are the major extracellular matrix-producing cells of the heart. TSA, MGCD0103, and the cyclic peptide class I HDAC inhibitor, apicidin, exhibited a common ability to enhance histone acetylation, and all potently blocked cardiac fibroblast cell cycle progression. In contrast, MGCD0103, but not TSA or apicidin, paradoxically increased expression of a subset of fibrosis-associated genes. Using the cellular thermal shift assay, we provide evidence that the divergent effects of HDAC inhibitors on cardiac fibroblast gene expression relate to differential engagement of HDAC1- and HDAC2-containing complexes. These findings illustrate the importance of employing multiple compounds when pharmacologically assessing HDAC function in a cellular context and during HDAC inhibitor drug development.

  20. A minimum of two distinct heritable factors are required to explain correlation structures in proliferating lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Markham, John F.; Wellard, Cameron J.; Hawkins, Edwin D.; Duffy, Ken R.; Hodgkin, Philip D.

    2010-01-01

    During the adaptive immune response, lymphocyte populations undergo a characteristic three-phase process: expansion through a series of cell divisions; cessation of expansion; and, finally, most of the accumulated lymphocytes die by apoptosis. The data used, thus far, to inform understanding of these processes, both in vitro and in vivo, are taken from flow cytometry experiments. One significant drawback of flow cytometry is that individual cells cannot be tracked, so that it is not possible to investigate interdependencies in the fate of cells within a family tree. This deficit in experimental information has recently been overcome by Hawkins et al. (Hawkins et al. 2009 Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 106, 13 457–13 462 (doi:10.1073/pnas.0905629106)), who reported on time-lapse microscopy experiments in which B-cells were stimulated through the TLR-9 receptor. Cells stimulated in this way do not aggregate, so that data regarding family trees can be recorded. In this article, we further investigate the Hawkins et al. data. Our conclusions are striking: in order to explain the familial correlation structure in division times, death times and propensity to divide, a minimum of two distinct heritable factors are necessary. As the data show that two distinct factors are necessary, we develop a stochastic model that has two heritable factors and demonstrate that it can reproduce the key features of the data. This model shows that two heritable factors are sufficient. These deductions have a clear impact upon biological understanding of the adaptive immune response. They also necessitate changes to the fundamental premises behind the tools developed by statisticians to draw deductions from flow cytometry data. Finally, they affect the mathematical modelling paradigms that are used to study these systems, as these are widely developed based on assumptions of cellular independence that are not accurate. PMID:20053654

  1. Structural basis of focal adhesion targeting domain-mediated signaling in cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Pallavi; Bhatnagar, Sonika

    2017-02-01

    The focal adhesion targeting (FAT) domain of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) exists in monomeric closed (c) or arm exchanged (ae) dimeric state. FAT interaction with Grb2 necessitates an intermediate open (o) state that interacts with Grb2 and activates signaling pathways leading to pathological cardiac hypertrophy. Targeted molecular dynamics (TMD) simulation was carried out in order to capture the structure of the intermediate formed by opening of Helix1 (H1) from monomeric cFAT leading to the formation of monomeric aeFAT. During TMD, H1 separated from the four helices bundle of cFAT, completely unfolded and performed a full turn before folding back to a helix inclined at an acute angle to the helical bundle in aeFAT. The entire transition can be described in six distinct intermediate structural stages. The most significant correlation of H1 motion was observed with Loop3 (L3) and is the likely reason for the complete disruption of the FAT interaction with paxillin during the transition. High-affinity analogs of the paxillin LD4 region can be a promising strategy to drive the equilibrium towards cFAT, thus antagonizing FAT-Grb2 association. During transition, the overall shift in orientation of all the four helices rejects paxillin binding and approves Grb2 association. Exposure and β-turn conformation of the YENV motif (residues 925-928) in oFAT-facilitated phosphorylation and Grb2 binding. Docking, MD simulation and conservation analysis of oFAT-Grb2 complex provided insight into the structural determinants of binding and specificity. Our work provides a structural basis for pharmacological modulation of dynamic conformational changes and interactions of FAT.

  2. Structural insights into the functional versatility of WW domain-containing oxidoreductase tumor suppressor

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Recent work on WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) tumor suppressor is beginning to shed new light on both the molecular mechanism of action of its WW domains as well as the contiguous catalytic domain. Herein, the structural basis underlying the ability of WW1 domain to bind to various physiological ligands and how the orphan WW2 tandem partner synergizes its ligand binding in the context of WW1–WW2 tandem module of WWOX is discussed. Notably, the WW domains within the WW1–WW2 tandem module physically associate so as to adopt a fixed spatial orientation relative to each other. In this manner, the association of WW2 domain with WW1 hinders ligand binding to the latter. Consequently, ligand binding to WW1 domain not only results in the displacement of WW2 lid but also disrupts the fixed orientation of WW domains in the liganded conformation. Equally importantly, structure-guided functional approach suggests that the catalytic domain of WWOX likely serves as a retinal oxidoreductase that catalyzes the reversible oxidation and reduction of all-trans-retinal. Collectively, this review provides structural insights into the functional versatility of a key signaling protein with important implications on its biology. PMID:25662954

  3. Structural insights into the functional versatility of WW domain-containing oxidoreductase tumor suppressor.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Amjad

    2015-03-01

    Recent work on WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) tumor suppressor is beginning to shed new light on both the molecular mechanism of action of its WW domains as well as the contiguous catalytic domain. Herein, the structural basis underlying the ability of WW1 domain to bind to various physiological ligands and how the orphan WW2 tandem partner synergizes its ligand binding in the context of WW1-WW2 tandem module of WWOX is discussed. Notably, the WW domains within the WW1-WW2 tandem module physically associate so as to adopt a fixed spatial orientation relative to each other. In this manner, the association of WW2 domain with WW1 hinders ligand binding to the latter. Consequently, ligand binding to WW1 domain not only results in the displacement of WW2 lid but also disrupts the fixed orientation of WW domains in the liganded conformation. Equally importantly, structure-guided functional approach suggests that the catalytic domain of WWOX likely serves as a retinal oxidoreductase that catalyzes the reversible oxidation and reduction of all-trans-retinal. Collectively, this review provides structural insights into the functional versatility of a key signaling protein with important implications on its biology.

  4. The structure-function relationships in Drosophila neurotactin show that cholinesterasic domains may have adhesive properties.

    PubMed Central

    Darboux, I; Barthalay, Y; Piovant, M; Hipeau-Jacquotte, R

    1996-01-01

    Neurotactin (Nrt), a Drosophila transmembrane glycoprotein which is expressed in neuronal and epithelial tissues during embryonic and larval stages, exhibits heterophilic adhesive properties. The extracellular domain is composed of a catalytically inactive cholinesterase-like domain. A three-dimensional model deduced from the crystal structure of Torpedo acetylcholinesterase (AChE) has been constructed for Nrt and suggests that its extracellular domain is composed of two sub-domains organized around a gorge: an N-terminal region, whose three-dimensional structure is almost identical to that of Torpedo AChE, and a less conserved C-terminal region. By using truncated Nrt molecules and a homotypic cell aggregation assay which involves a soluble ligand activity, it has been possible to show that the adhesive function is localized in the N-terminal region of the extracellular domain comprised between His347 and His482. The C-terminal region of the protein can be removed without impairing Nrt adhesive properties, suggesting that the two sub-domains are structurally independent. Chimeric molecules in which the Nrt cholinesterase-like domain has been replaced by homologous domains from Drosophila AChE, Torpedo AChE or Drosophila glutactin (Glt), share similar adhesive properties. These properties may require the presence of Nrt cytoplasmic and transmembrane domains since authentic Drosophila AChE does not behave as an adhesive molecule when transfected in S2 cells. Images PMID:8890157

  5. Structures of minute virus of mice replication initiator protein N-terminal domain: Insights into DNA nicking and origin binding

    SciTech Connect

    Tewary, Sunil K.; Liang, Lingfei; Lin, Zihan; Lynn, Annie; Cotmore, Susan F.; Tattersall, Peter; Zhao, Haiyan; Tang, Liang

    2015-02-15

    Members of the Parvoviridae family all encode a non-structural protein 1 (NS1) that directs replication of single-stranded viral DNA, packages viral DNA into capsid, and serves as a potent transcriptional activator. Here we report the X-ray structure of the minute virus of mice (MVM) NS1 N-terminal domain at 1.45 Å resolution, showing that sites for dsDNA binding, ssDNA binding and cleavage, nuclear localization, and other functions are integrated on a canonical fold of the histidine-hydrophobic-histidine superfamily of nucleases, including elements specific for this Protoparvovirus but distinct from its Bocaparvovirus or Dependoparvovirus orthologs. High resolution structural analysis reveals a nickase active site with an architecture that allows highly versatile metal ligand binding. The structures support a unified mechanism of replication origin recognition for homotelomeric and heterotelomeric parvoviruses, mediated by a basic-residue-rich hairpin and an adjacent helix in the initiator proteins and by tandem tetranucleotide motifs in the replication origins. - Highlights: • The structure of a parvovirus replication initiator protein has been determined; • The structure sheds light on mechanisms of ssDNA binding and cleavage; • The nickase active site is preconfigured for versatile metal ligand binding; • The binding site for the double-stranded replication origin DNA is identified; • A single domain integrates multiple functions in virus replication.

  6. Structural basis of interactions between epidermal growth factor receptor and SH2 domain proteins.

    PubMed

    Sierke, S L; Longo, G M; Koland, J G

    1993-02-26

    The structural basis of the interactions between the activated epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor and SH2 domain proteins was investigated. The c-src SH2 domain (second domain of src homology) was expressed as a recombinant fusion protein, and an in vitro assay was developed to monitor EGF receptor/SH2 domain interactions. EGF receptor tyrosine kinase domain (TKD) forms expressed in the baculovirus/insect cell system were shown to bind to the SH2 domain when phosphorylated. These TKD/SH2 domain interactions were characterized by dissociation constants of 60-320 nM. Deletion analysis indicated that the entire SH2 domain was required for recognition of the phosphorylated TKD. The binding of a highly truncated TKD protein to the SH2 domain suggested that the sites recognized by the SH2 domain included the EGF receptor autophosphorylation site, tyr992. A phosphorylated EGF receptor peptide containing tyr992 was also shown to interact with the SH2 domain. This residue may therefore mediate interactions between the EGF receptor and tyrosine kinases in the src family.

  7. Structural insight into the inhibition of tubulin by vinca domain peptide ligands.

    PubMed

    Cormier, Anthony; Marchand, Matthieu; Ravelli, Raimond B G; Knossow, Marcel; Gigant, Benoît

    2008-11-01

    The tubulin vinca domain is the target of widely different microtubule inhibitors that interfere with the binding of vinblastine. Although all these ligands inhibit the hydrolysis of GTP, they affect nucleotide exchange to variable extents. The structures of two vinca domain antimitotic peptides--phomopsin A and soblidotin (a dolastatin 10 analogue)--bound to tubulin in a complex with a stathmin-like domain show that their sites partly overlap with that of vinblastine and extend the definition of the vinca domain. The structural data, together with the biochemical results from the ligands we studied, highlight two main contributors in nucleotide exchange: the flexibility of the tubulin subunits' arrangement at their interfaces and the residues in the carboxy-terminal part of the beta-tubulin H6-H7 loop. The structures also highlight common features of the mechanisms by which vinca domain ligands favour curved tubulin assemblies and destabilize microtubules.

  8. Structural similarities and functional diversity of eukaryotic discoidin-like domains.

    PubMed

    Kiedzierska, A; Smietana, K; Czepczynska, H; Otlewski, J

    2007-09-01

    The discoidin domain is a approximately 150 amino acid motif common in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic proteins. It is found in a variety of extracellular, intracellular and transmembrane multidomain proteins characterized by a considerable functional diversity, mostly involved in developmental processes. The biological role of the domain depends on its interactions with different molecules, including growth factors, phospholipids and lipids, galactose or its derivatives, and collagen. The conservation of the motif, as well as the serious physiological consequences of discoidin domain disorders underscore the importance of the fold, while the ability to accommodate such an extraordinarily broad range of ligand molecules makes it a fascinating research target. In present review we characterize the distinctive features of discoidin domains and briefly outline the biological role of this module in various eukaryotic proteins.

  9. Variation of magnetic domain structure during martensite variants rearrangement in ferromagnetic shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingzhe; Li, Fang

    2012-07-01

    Studies of magnetic domain and anisotropy in ferromagnetic shape memory alloys (FSMAs) are crucial for both understanding their ferromagnetism and engineering in applications. The experimental measurements showed that magnetization rotations and domain-wall motions exhibit distinct characteristics in the field-preferred variants and stress-preferred variants of FSMAs [Y. W. Lai, N. Scheerbaum, D. Hinz, O. Gutfleisch, R. Schäfer, L. Schultz, and J. McCord, Appl. Phys. Lett. 90, 192504 (2007)]. Aiming at characterization of formation and variation of the complex magnetic microstructure in FSMAs, we present an analytical approach based on the energy minimization theory and Boltzmann relation on magnetic domains. The magnetic domain behavior during the martensite variants rearrangement is captured to show a good agreement with the experimental observations.

  10. Structure and function of Toll/interleukin-1 receptor/resistance protein (TIR) domains.

    PubMed

    Ve, Thomas; Williams, Simon J; Kobe, Bostjan

    2015-02-01

    The Toll/interleukin-1 receptor/resistance protein (TIR) domain is a protein-protein interaction domain consisting of 125-200 residues, widely distributed in animals, plants and bacteria but absent from fungi, archea and viruses. In plants and animals, these domains are found in proteins with functions in innate immune pathways, while in bacteria, some TIR domain-containing proteins interfere with the innate immune pathways in the host. TIR domains function as protein scaffolds, mostly involving self-association and homotypic interactions with other TIR domains. In the last 15 years, the three-dimensional structures of TIR domains from several mammalian, plant and bacterial proteins have been reported. These structures, jointly with functional data including the identification of interacting proteins, have started to provide insight into the molecular basis of the assembly of animal and plant immune signaling complexes, and for host immunosuppression by bacterial pathogens. This review focuses on the current knowledge of the structures of the TIR domains and how the structure relates to function.

  11. Ligand-binding PAS domains in a genomic, cellular, and structural context.

    PubMed

    Henry, Jonathan T; Crosson, Sean

    2011-01-01

    Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) domains occur in proteins from all kingdoms of life. In the bacterial kingdom, PAS domains are commonly positioned at the amino terminus of signaling proteins such as sensor histidine kinases, cyclic-di-GMP synthases/hydrolases, and methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins. Although these domains are highly divergent at the primary sequence level, the structures of dozens of PAS domains across a broad section of sequence space have been solved, revealing a conserved three-dimensional architecture. An all-versus-all alignment of 63 PAS structures demonstrates that the PAS domain family forms structural clades on the basis of two principal variables: (a) topological location inside or outside the plasma membrane and (b) the class of small molecule that they bind. The binding of a chemically diverse range of small-molecule metabolites is a hallmark of the PAS domain family. PAS ligand binding either functions as a primary cue to initiate a cellular signaling response or provides the domain with the capacity to respond to secondary physical or chemical signals such as gas molecules, redox potential, or photons. This review synthesizes the current state of knowledge of the structural foundations and evolution of ligand recognition and binding by PAS domains.

  12. Ligand binding PAS domains in a genomic, cellular, and structural context

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Jonathan T.; Crosson, Sean

    2012-01-01

    Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) domains occur in proteins from all kingdoms of life. In the bacterial kingdom, PAS domains are commonly positioned at the amino terminus of signaling proteins such as sensor histidine kinases, cyclic-di-GMP synthases/hydrolases, and methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins. Although these domains are highly divergent at the primary sequence level, the structures of dozens of PAS domains across a broad section of sequence space have been solved, revealing a conserved three-dimensional architecture. An all-versus-all alignment of 63 PAS structures demonstrates that the PAS domain family forms structural clades on the basis of two principal variables: (a) topological location inside or outside the plasma membrane and (b) the class of small molecule that they bind. The binding of a chemically diverse range of small-molecule metabolites is a hallmark of the PAS domain family. PAS ligand binding either functions as a primary cue to initiate a cellular signaling response or provides the domain with the capacity to respond to secondary physical or chemical signals such as gas molecules, redox potential, or photons. This review synthesizes the current state of knowledge of the structural foundations and evolution of ligand recognition and binding by PAS domains. PMID:21663441

  13. The self-inhibited structure of full-length PCSK9 at 1.9 A reveals structural homology with resistin within the C-terminal domain.

    PubMed

    Hampton, Eric N; Knuth, Mark W; Li, Jun; Harris, Jennifer L; Lesley, Scott A; Spraggon, Glen

    2007-09-11

    Mutations in proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) are strongly associated with levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in the blood plasma and, thereby, occurrence or resistance to atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. Despite this importance, relatively little is known about the biology of PCSK9. Here, the crystal structure of a full-length construct of PCSK9 solved to 1.9-A resolution is presented. The structure contains a fully folded C-terminal cysteine-rich domain (CRD), showing a distinct structural similarity to the resistin homotrimer, a small cytokine associated with obesity and diabetes. This structural relationship between the CRD of PCSK9 and the resistin family is not observed in primary sequence comparisons and strongly suggests a distant evolutionary link between the two molecules. This three-dimensional homology provides insight into the function of PCSK9 at the molecular level and will help to dissect the link between PCSK9 and CHD.

  14. Domain structures and inter-domain interactions defining the holoenzyme architecture of archaeal d-family DNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Ikuo; Matsui, Eriko; Yamasaki, Kazuhiko; Yokoyama, Hideshi

    2013-07-05

    Archaea-specific D-family DNA polymerase (PolD) forms a dimeric heterodimer consisting of two large polymerase subunits and two small exonuclease subunits. According to the protein-protein interactions identified among the domains of large and small subunits of PolD, a symmetrical model for the domain topology of the PolD holoenzyme is proposed. The experimental evidence supports various aspects of the model. The conserved amphipathic nature of the N-terminal putative α-helix of the large subunit plays a key role in the homodimeric assembly and the self-cyclization of the large subunit and is deeply involved in the archaeal PolD stability and activity. We also discuss the evolutional transformation from archaeal D-family to eukaryotic B-family polymerase on the basis of the structural information.

  15. Structure of the effector-binding domain of the arabinose repressor AraR from Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Procházková, Kateřina; Cermáková, Kateřina; Pachl, Petr; Sieglová, Irena; Fábry, Milan; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Rezáčová, Pavlína

    2012-02-01

    In Bacillus subtilis, the arabinose repressor AraR negatively controls the expression of genes in the metabolic pathway of arabinose-containing polysaccharides. The protein is composed of two domains of different phylogenetic origin and function: an N-terminal DNA-binding domain belonging to the GntR family and a C-terminal effector-binding domain that shows similarity to members of the GalR/LacI family. The crystal structure of the C-terminal effector-binding domain of AraR in complex with the effector L-arabinose has been determined at 2.2 Å resolution. The L-arabinose binding affinity was characterized by isothermal titration calorimetry and differential scanning fluorimetry; the K(d) value was 8.4 ± 0.4 µM. The effect of L-arabinose on the protein oligomeric state was investigated in solution and detailed analysis of the crystal identified a dimer organization which is distinctive from that of other members of the GalR/LacI family.

  16. Engagement of two distinct binding domains on CCL17 is required for signaling through CCR4 and establishment of localized inflammatory conditions in the lung.

    PubMed

    Santulli-Marotto, Sandra; Boakye, Ken; Lacy, Eilyn; Wu, Sheng-Jiun; Luongo, Jennifer; Kavalkovich, Karl; Coelho, Ana; Hogaboam, Cory M; Ryan, Mary

    2013-01-01

    CCL17 (TARC) function can be completely abolished by mAbs that block either one of two distinct sites required for CCR4 signaling. This chemokine is elevated in sera of asthma patients and is responsible for establishing inflammatory sites through CCR4-mediated recruitment of immune cells. CCL17 shares the GPCR CCR4, with CCL22 (MDC) but these two chemokines differentially affect the immune response. To better understand chemokine mediated effects through CCR4, we have generated chimeric anti-mouse CCL17 surrogate antibodies that inhibit function of this ligand in vitro and in vivo. The affinities of the surrogate antibodies for CCL17 range from 685 pM for B225 to 4.9 nM for B202. One antibody, B202, also exhibits weak binding to CCL22 (KD∼2 µM) and no binding to CCL22 is detectable with the second antibody, B225. In vitro, both antibodies inhibit CCL17-mediated calcium mobilization, β-arrestin recruitment and chemotaxis; B202 can also partially inhibit CCL22-mediated β-arrestin recruitment. Both B202 and B225 antibodies neutralize CCL17 in vivo as demonstrated by reduction of methacholine-induced airway hyperreactivity in the A. fumigatus model of asthma. That both antibodies block CCL17 function but only B202 shows any inhibition of CCL22 function suggests that they bind CCL17 at different sites. Competition binding studies confirm that these two antibodies recognize unique epitopes that are non-overlapping despite the small size of CCL17. Taking into consideration the data from both the functional and binding studies, we propose that effective engagement of CCR4 by CCL17 involves two distinct binding domains and interaction with both is required for signaling.

  17. Structure of an isolated unglycosylated antibody C(H)2 domain.

    PubMed

    Prabakaran, Ponraj; Vu, Bang K; Gan, Jianhua; Feng, Yang; Dimitrov, Dimiter S; Ji, Xinhua

    2008-10-01

    The C(H)2 (C(H)3 for IgM and IgE) domain of an antibody plays an important role in mediating effector functions and preserving antibody stability. It is the only domain in human immunoglobulins (Igs) which is involved in weak interchain protein-protein interactions with another C(H)2 domain solely through sugar moieties. The N-linked glycosylation at Asn297 is conserved in mammalian IgGs as well as in homologous regions of other antibody isotypes. To examine the structural details of the C(H)2 domain in the absence of glycosylation and other antibody domains, the crystal structure of an isolated unglycosylated antibody gamma1 C(H)2 domain was determined at 1.7 A resolution and compared with corresponding C(H)2 structures from intact Fc, IgG and Fc receptor complexes. Furthermore, the oligomeric state of the protein in solution was studied using size-exclusion chromatography. The results suggested that the unglycosylated human antibody C(H)2 domain is a monomer and that its structure is similar to that found in the intact Fc, IgG and Fc receptor complex structures. However, certain structural variations were observed in the Fc receptor-binding sites. Owing to its small size, stability and non-immunogenic Ig template, the C(H)2-domain structure could be useful for the development by protein design of antibody domains exerting effector functions and/or antigen specificity and as a robust scaffold in protein-engineering applications.

  18. Structure of an isolated unglycosylated antibody C[subscript H]2 domain

    SciTech Connect

    Prabakaran, Ponraj; Vu, Bang K.; Gan, Jianhua; Feng, Yang; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.; Ji, Xinhua

    2009-01-15

    The C{sub H}2 (C{sub H}3 for IgM and IgE) domain of an antibody plays an important role in mediating effector functions and preserving antibody stability. It is the only domain in human immunoglobulins (Igs) which is involved in weak interchain protein-protein interactions with another C{sub H}2 domain solely through sugar moieties. The N-linked glycosylation at Asn297 is conserved in mammalian IgGs as well as in homologous regions of other antibody isotypes. To examine the structural details of the C{sub H}2 domain in the absence of glycosylation and other antibody domains, the crystal structure of an isolated unglycosylated antibody gamma1 C{sub H}2 domain was determined at 1.7 A resolution and compared with corresponding C{sub H}2 structures from intact Fc, IgG and Fc receptor complexes. Furthermore, the oligomeric state of the protein in solution was studied using size-exclusion chromatography. The results suggested that the unglycosylated human antibody C{sub H}2 domain is a monomer and that its structure is similar to that found in the intact Fc, IgG and Fc receptor complex structures. However, certain structural variations were observed in the Fc receptor-binding sites. Owing to its small size, stability and non-immunogenic Ig template, the C{sub H}2-domain structure could be useful for the development by protein design of antibody domains exerting effector functions and/or antigen specificity and as a robust scaffold in protein-engineering applications.

  19. The structure of the catalytic domain of a plant cellulose synthase and its assembly into dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Olek, Anna T.; Rayon, Catherine; Makowski, Lee; Kim, Hyung Rae; Ciesielski, Peter; Badger, John; Paul, Lake N.; Ghosh, Subhangi; Kihara, Daisuke; Crowley, Michael; Himmel, Michael E.; Bolin, Jeffrey T.; Carpita, Nicholas C.

    2014-07-10

    Cellulose microfibrils are para-crystalline arrays of several dozen linear (1→4)-β-d-glucan chains synthesized at the surface of the cell membrane by large, multimeric complexes of synthase proteins. Recombinant catalytic domains of rice (Oryza sativa) CesA8 cellulose synthase form dimers reversibly as the fundamental scaffold units of architecture in the synthase complex. Specificity of binding to UDP and UDP-Glc indicates a properly folded protein, and binding kinetics indicate that each monomer independently synthesizes single glucan chains of cellulose, i.e., two chains per dimer pair. In contrast to structure modeling predictions, solution x-ray scattering studies demonstrate that the monomer is a two-domain, elongated structure, with the smaller domain coupling two monomers into a dimer. The catalytic core of the monomer is accommodated only near its center, with the plant-specific sequences occupying the small domain and an extension distal to the catalytic domain. This configuration is in stark contrast to the domain organization obtained in predicted structures of plant CesA. As a result, the arrangement of the catalytic domain within the CesA monomer and dimer provides a foundation for constructing structural models of the synthase complex and defining the relationship between the rosette structure and the cellulose microfibrils they synthesize.

  20. The structure of the catalytic domain of a plant cellulose synthase and its assembly into dimers

    DOE PAGES

    Olek, Anna T.; Rayon, Catherine; Makowski, Lee; ...

    2014-07-10

    Cellulose microfibrils are para-crystalline arrays of several dozen linear (1→4)-β-d-glucan chains synthesized at the surface of the cell membrane by large, multimeric complexes of synthase proteins. Recombinant catalytic domains of rice (Oryza sativa) CesA8 cellulose synthase form dimers reversibly as the fundamental scaffold units of architecture in the synthase complex. Specificity of binding to UDP and UDP-Glc indicates a properly folded protein, and binding kinetics indicate that each monomer independently synthesizes single glucan chains of cellulose, i.e., two chains per dimer pair. In contrast to structure modeling predictions, solution x-ray scattering studies demonstrate that the monomer is a two-domain, elongatedmore » structure, with the smaller domain coupling two monomers into a dimer. The catalytic core of the monomer is accommodated only near its center, with the plant-specific sequences occupying the small domain and an extension distal to the catalytic domain. This configuration is in stark contrast to the domain organization obtained in predicted structures of plant CesA. As a result, the arrangement of the catalytic domain within the CesA monomer and dimer provides a foundation for constructing structural models of the synthase complex and defining the relationship between the rosette structure and the cellulose microfibrils they synthesize.« less

  1. The structure of the catalytic domain of a plant cellulose synthase and its assembly into dimers.

    PubMed

    Olek, Anna T; Rayon, Catherine; Makowski, Lee; Kim, Hyung Rae; Ciesielski, Peter; Badger, John; Paul, Lake N; Ghosh, Subhangi; Kihara, Daisuke; Crowley, Michael; Himmel, Michael E; Bolin, Jeffrey T; Carpita, Nicholas C

    2014-07-01

    Cellulose microfibrils are para-crystalline arrays of several dozen linear (1→4)-β-d-glucan chains synthesized at the surface of the cell membrane by large, multimeric complexes of synthase proteins. Recombinant catalytic domains of rice (Oryza sativa) CesA8 cellulose synthase form dimers reversibly as the fundamental scaffold units of architecture in the synthase complex. Specificity of binding to UDP and UDP-Glc indicates a properly folded protein, and binding kinetics indicate that each monomer independently synthesizes single glucan chains of cellulose, i.e., two chains per dimer pair. In contrast to structure modeling predictions, solution x-ray scattering studies demonstrate that the monomer is a two-domain, elongated structure, with the smaller domain coupling two monomers into a dimer. The catalytic core of the monomer is accommodated only near its center, with the plant-specific sequences occupying the small domain and an extension distal to the catalytic domain. This configuration is in stark contrast to the domain organization obtained in predicted structures of plant CesA. The arrangement of the catalytic domain within the CesA monomer and dimer provides a foundation for constructing structural models of the synthase complex and defining the relationship between the rosette structure and the cellulose microfibrils they synthesize.

  2. Crystal Structure of the HEAT Domain from the Pre-mRNA Processing Factor Symplekin

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, Sarah A.; Frazier, Monica L.; Steiniger, Mindy; Mast, Ann M.; Marzluff, William F.; Redinbo, Matthew R.

    2010-09-30

    The majority of eukaryotic pre-mRNAs are processed by 3'-end cleavage and polyadenylation, although in metazoa the replication-dependent histone mRNAs are processed by 3'-end cleavage but not polyadenylation. The macromolecular complex responsible for processing both canonical and histone pre-mRNAs contains the {approx} 1160-residue protein Symplekin. Secondary-structural prediction algorithms identified putative HEAT domains in the 300 N-terminal residues of all Symplekins of known sequence. The structure and dynamics of this domain were investigated to begin elucidating the role Symplekin plays in mRNA maturation. The crystal structure of the Drosophila melanogaster Symplekin HEAT domain was determined to 2.4 {angstrom} resolution with single-wavelength anomalous dispersion phasing methods. The structure exhibits five canonical HEAT repeats along with an extended 31-amino-acid loop (loop 8) between the fourth and fifth repeat that is conserved within closely related Symplekin sequences. Molecular dynamics simulations of this domain show that the presence of loop 8 dampens correlated and anticorrelated motion in the HEAT domain, therefore providing a neutral surface for potential protein-protein interactions. HEAT domains are often employed for such macromolecular contacts. The Symplekin HEAT region not only structurally aligns with several established scaffolding proteins, but also has been reported to contact proteins essential for regulating 3'-end processing. Together, these data support the conclusion that the Symplekin HEAT domain serves as a scaffold for protein-protein interactions essential to the mRNA maturation process.

  3. Structure of the GH1 domain of guanylate kinase-associated protein from Rattus norvegicus

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Junsen; Yang, Huiseon; Eom, Soo Hyun; Chun, ChangJu; Im, Young Jun

    2014-09-12

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The crystal structure of GKAP homology domain 1 (GH1) was determined. • GKAP GH1 is a three-helix bundle connected by short flexible loops. • The predicted helix α4 associates weakly with the helix α3, suggesting dynamic nature of the GH1 domain. - Abstract: Guanylate-kinase-associated protein (GKAP) is a scaffolding protein that links NMDA receptor-PSD-95 to Shank–Homer complexes by protein–protein interactions at the synaptic junction. GKAP family proteins are characterized by the presence of a C-terminal conserved GKAP homology domain 1 (GH1) of unknown structure and function. In this study, crystal structure of the GH1 domain of GKAP from Rattus norvegicus was determined in fusion with an N-terminal maltose-binding protein at 2.0 Å resolution. The structure of GKAP GH1 displays a three-helix bundle connected by short flexible loops. The predicted helix α4 which was not visible in the crystal structure associates weakly with the helix α3 suggesting dynamic nature of the GH1 domain. The strict conservation of GH1 domain across GKAP family members and the lack of a catalytic active site required for enzyme activity imply that the GH1 domain might serve as a protein–protein interaction module for the synaptic protein clustering.

  4. Structure of a Longitudinal Actin Dimer Assembled by Tandem W Domains: Implications for Actin Filament Nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Rebowski, Grzegorz; Namgoong, Suk; Boczkowska, Malgorzata; Leavis, Paul C.; Navaza, Jorge; Dominguez, Roberto

    2013-11-20

    Actin filament nucleators initiate polymerization in cells in a regulated manner. A common architecture among these molecules consists of tandem WASP homology 2 domains (W domains) that recruit three to four actin subunits to form a polymerization nucleus. We describe a low-resolution crystal structure of an actin dimer assembled by tandem W domains, where the first W domain is cross-linked to Cys374 of the actin subunit bound to it, whereas the last W domain is followed by the C-terminal pointed end-capping helix of thymosin {beta}4. While the arrangement of actin subunits in the dimer resembles that of a long-pitch helix of the actin filament, important differences are observed. These differences result from steric hindrance of the W domain with intersubunit contacts in the actin filament. We also determined the structure of the first W domain of Vibrio parahaemolyticus VopL cross-linked to actin Cys374 and show it to be nearly identical with non-cross-linked W-Actin structures. This result validates the use of cross-linking as a tool for the study of actin nucleation complexes, whose natural tendency to polymerize interferes with most structural methods. Combined with a biochemical analysis of nucleation, the structures may explain why nucleators based on tandem W domains with short inter-W linkers have relatively weak activity, cannot stay bound to filaments after nucleation, and are unlikely to influence filament elongation. The findings may also explain why nucleation-promoting factors of the Arp2/3 complex, which are related to tandem-W-domain nucleators, are ejected from branch junctions after nucleation. We finally show that the simple addition of the C-terminal pointed end-capping helix of thymosin {beta}4 to tandem W domains can change their activity from actin filament nucleation to monomer sequestration.

  5. Structure of a longitudinal actin dimer assembled by tandem w domains: implications for actin filament nucleation.

    PubMed

    Rebowski, Grzegorz; Namgoong, Suk; Boczkowska, Malgorzata; Leavis, Paul C; Navaza, Jorge; Dominguez, Roberto

    2010-10-15

    Actin filament nucleators initiate polymerization in cells in a regulated manner. A common architecture among these molecules consists of tandem WASP homology 2 domains (W domains) that recruit three to four actin subunits to form a polymerization nucleus. We describe a low-resolution crystal structure of an actin dimer assembled by tandem W domains, where the first W domain is cross-linked to Cys374 of the actin subunit bound to it, whereas the last W domain is followed by the C-terminal pointed end-capping helix of thymosin β4. While the arrangement of actin subunits in the dimer resembles that of a long-pitch helix of the actin filament, important differences are observed. These differences result from steric hindrance of the W domain with intersubunit contacts in the actin filament. We also determined the structure of the first W domain of Vibrio parahaemolyticus VopL cross-linked to actin Cys374 and show it to be nearly identical with non-cross-linked W-Actin structures. This result validates the use of cross-linking as a tool for the study of actin nucleation complexes, whose natural tendency to polymerize interferes with most structural methods. Combined with a biochemical analysis of nucleation, the structures may explain why nucleators based on tandem W domains with short inter-W linkers have relatively weak activity, cannot stay bound to filaments after nucleation, and are unlikely to influence filament elongation. The findings may also explain why nucleation-promoting factors of the Arp2/3 complex, which are related to tandem-W-domain nucleators, are ejected from branch junctions after nucleation. We finally show that the simple addition of the C-terminal pointed end-capping helix of thymosin β4 to tandem W domains can change their activity from actin filament nucleation to monomer sequestration.

  6. Magnetic properties and magnetic domain structure of grain-oriented Fe-3%Si steel under compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perevertov, O.; Schäfer, R.

    2016-09-01

    The influence of an applied compressive stress on the magnetic properties and domain structure in Goss-textured (110) [001] Fe-3%Si steel is studied. The magnetic domains and magnetization processes were observed by longitudinal Kerr microscopy at different levels of compressive stress. With stress increase the domain structure without applied field evolves from 180° slab-like domains along the surface-parallel easy axis first into stress pattern I, then into the checkerboard pattern and finally into stress pattern II, in which all internal domains are oriented along the transverse axes. The magnetization process under compression is realized by surface closure [001] domains that grow into the bulk at the expense of transverse domains. The domain evolution by these three stress patterns is not practically noticeable in hysteresis curves above 10 MPa—they change continuously with the same effective field being valid for curves from 10 to 67 MPa. The comparison with previous measurements under different stress/cutting angle combinations shows that for the prediction of a constricted hysteresis loop it is sufficient to consider the energy difference between surface-parallel and transverse easy axes neglecting details of the spatial organization of transverse domains.

  7. Structural basis for antibody recognition in the receptor-binding domains of toxins A and B from Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Murase, Tomohiko; Eugenio, Luiz; Schorr, Melissa; Hussack, Greg; Tanha, Jamshid; Kitova, Elena N; Klassen, John S; Ng, Kenneth K S

    2014-01-24

    Clostridium difficile infection is a serious and highly prevalent nosocomial disease in which the two large, Rho-glucosylating toxins TcdA and TcdB are the main virulence factors. We report for the first time crystal structures revealing how neutralizing and non-neutralizing single-domain antibodies (sdAbs) recognize the receptor-binding domains (RBDs) of TcdA and TcdB. Surprisingly, the complexes formed by two neutralizing antibodies recognizing TcdA do not show direct interference with the previously identified carbohydrate-binding sites, suggesting that neutralization of toxin activity may be mediated by mechanisms distinct from steric blockage of receptor binding. A camelid sdAb complex also reveals the molecular structure of the TcdB RBD for the first time, facilitating the crystallization of a strongly negatively charged protein fragment that has resisted previous attempts at crystallization and structure determination. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry measurements confirm the stoichiometries of sdAbs observed in the crystal structures. These studies indicate how key epitopes in the RBDs from TcdA and TcdB are recognized by sdAbs, providing molecular insights into toxin structure and function and providing for the first time a basis for the design of highly specific toxin-specific therapeutic and diagnostic agents.

  8. Structural Basis for Antibody Recognition in the Receptor-binding Domains of Toxins A and B from Clostridium difficile*

    PubMed Central

    Murase, Tomohiko; Eugenio, Luiz; Schorr, Melissa; Hussack, Greg; Tanha, Jamshid; Kitova, Elena N.; Klassen, John S.; Ng, Kenneth K. S.

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection is a serious and highly prevalent nosocomial disease in which the two large, Rho-glucosylating toxins TcdA and TcdB are the main virulence factors. We report for the first time crystal structures revealing how neutralizing and non-neutralizing single-domain antibodies (sdAbs) recognize the receptor-binding domains (RBDs) of TcdA and TcdB. Surprisingly, the complexes formed by two neutralizing antibodies recognizing TcdA do not show direct interference with the previously identified carbohydrate-binding sites, suggesting that neutralization of toxin activity may be mediated by mechanisms distinct from steric blockage of receptor binding. A camelid sdAb complex also reveals the molecular structure of the TcdB RBD for the first time, facilitating the crystallization of a strongly negatively charged protein fragment that has resisted previous attempts at crystallization and structure determination. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry measurements confirm the stoichiometries of sdAbs observed in the crystal structures. These studies indicate how key epitopes in the RBDs from TcdA and TcdB are recognized by sdAbs, providing molecular insights into toxin structure and function and providing for the first time a basis for the design of highly specific toxin-specific therapeutic and diagnostic agents. PMID:24311789

  9. Pinkbar is an epithelial-specific BAR domain protein that generates planar membrane structures

    SciTech Connect

    Pykäläinen, Anette; Boczkowska, Malgorzata; Zhao, Hongxia; Saarikangas, Juha; Rebowski, Grzegorz; Jansen, Maurice; Hakanen, Janne; Koskela, Essi V.; Peränen, Johan; Vihinen, Helena; Jokitalo, Eija; Salminen, Marjo; Ikonen, Elina; Dominguez, Roberto; Lappalainen, Pekka

    2013-05-29

    Bin/amphipysin/Rvs (BAR)-domain proteins sculpt cellular membranes and have key roles in processes such as endocytosis, cell motility and morphogenesis. BAR domains are divided into three subfamilies: BAR- and F-BAR-domain proteins generate positive membrane curvature and stabilize cellular invaginations, whereas I-BAR-domain proteins induce negative curvature and stabilize protrusions. We show that a previously uncharacterized member of the I-BAR subfamily, Pinkbar, is specifically expressed in intestinal epithelial cells, where it localizes to Rab13-positive vesicles and to the plasma membrane at intercellular junctions. Notably, the BAR domain of Pinkbar does not induce membrane tubulation but promotes the formation of planar membrane sheets. Structural and mutagenesis analyses reveal that the BAR domain of Pinkbar has a relatively flat lipid-binding interface and that it assembles into sheet-like oligomers in crystals and in solution, which may explain its unique membrane-deforming activity.

  10. Outer domain of HIV-1 gp120: antigenic optimization, structural malleability, and crystal structure with antibody VRC-PG04.

    PubMed

    Joyce, M Gordon; Kanekiyo, Masaru; Xu, Ling; Biertümpfel, Christian; Boyington, Jeffrey C; Moquin, Stephanie; Shi, Wei; Wu, Xueling; Yang, Yongping; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Zhang, Baoshan; Zheng, Anqi; Zhou, Tongqing; Zhu, Jiang; Mascola, John R; Kwong, Peter D; Nabel, Gary J

    2013-02-01

    The outer domain of the HIV-1 gp120 envelope glycoprotein contains the epitope for broadly neutralizing antibodies directed to the CD4-binding site, many of which are able to neutralize over 90% of circulating HIV-1 isolates. While the outer domain is conformationally more stable than other portions of the HIV-1 envelope, efforts to express the outer domain as an immunogen for eliciting broadly neutralizing antibodies have not been successful, potentially because natural outer domain variants do not bind strongly to antibodies such as VRC01. In this study, we optimized the antigenic properties of the HIV-1 Env outer domain to generate OD4.2.2, from the KER2018 strain of clade A HIV-1, enabling it to bind antibodies such as VRC01 with nanomolar affinity. The crystal structure of OD4.2.2 in complex with VRC-PG04 was solved at 3.0-Å resolution and compared to known crystal structures including (i) the structure of core gp120 bound by VRC-PG04 and (ii) a circularly permutated version of the outer domain in complex with antibody PGT128. Much of the VRC-PG04 epitope was preserved in the OD4.2.2 structure, though with altered N and C termini conformations. Overall, roughly one-third of the outer domain structure appeared to be fixed in conformation, independent of alterations in termini, clade, or ligand, while other portions of the outer domain displayed substantial structural malleability. The crystal structure of OD4.2.2 with VRC-PG04 provides atomic-level details for an HIV-1 domain recognized by broadly neutralizing antibodies and insights relevant to the rational design of an immunogen that could elicit such antibodies by vaccination.

  11. 1.15 Å resolution structure of the proteasome-assembly chaperone Nas2 PDZ domain

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Chingakham R.; Lovell, Scott; Mehzabeen, Nurjahan; Chowdhury, Wasimul Q.; Geanes, Eric S.; Battaile, Kevin P.; Roelofs, Jeroen

    2014-03-25

    The proteasome-assembly chaperone Nas2 binds to the proteasome subunit Rpt5 using its PDZ domain. The structure of the Nas2 PDZ domain has been determined. The 26S proteasome is a 2.5 MDa protease dedicated to the degradation of ubiquitinated proteins in eukaryotes. The assembly of this complex containing 66 polypeptides is assisted by at least nine proteasome-specific chaperones. One of these, Nas2, binds to the proteasomal AAA-ATPase subunit Rpt5. The PDZ domain of Nas2 binds to the C-terminal tail of Rpt5; however, it does not require the C-terminus of Rpt5 for binding. Here, the 1.15 Å resolution structure of the PDZ domain of Nas2 is reported. This structure will provide a basis for further insights regarding the structure and function of Nas2 in proteasome assembly.

  12. The Structural Basis of Cyclic Diguanylate Signal Transduction by PilZ Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Benach,J.; Swaminathan, S.; Tamayo, R.; Handelman, S.; Folta-Stogniew, E.; Ramos, J.; Forouhar, F.; Neely, H.; Seetharaman, J.; et al

    2007-01-01

    The second messenger cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) controls the transition between motile and sessile growth in eubacteria, but little is known about the proteins that sense its concentration. Bioinformatics analyses suggested that PilZ domains bind c-di-GMP and allosterically modulate effector pathways. We have determined a 1.9 Angstroms crystal structure of c-di-GMP bound to VCA0042/PlzD, a PilZ domain-containing protein from Vibrio cholerae. Either this protein or another specific PilZ domain-containing protein is required for V. cholerae to efficiently infect mice. VCA0042/PlzD comprises a C-terminal PilZ domain plus an N-terminal domain with a similar beta-barrel fold. C-di-GMP contacts seven of the nine strongly conserved residues in the PilZ domain, including three in a seven-residue long N-terminal loop that undergoes a conformational switch as it wraps around c-di-GMP. This switch brings the PilZ domain into close apposition with the N-terminal domain, forming a new allosteric interaction surface that spans these domains and the c-di-GMP at their interface. The very small size of the N-terminal conformational switch is likely to explain the facile evolutionary diversification of the PilZ domain.

  13. Differential Loss of Prolyl Isomerase or Chaperone Activity of Ran-binding Protein 2 (Ranbp2) Unveils Distinct Physiological Roles of Its Cyclophilin Domain in Proteostasis*

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kyoung-in; Patil, Hemangi; Senda, Eugene; Wang, Jessica; Yi, Haiqing; Qiu, Sunny; Yoon, Dosuk; Yu, Minzhong; Orry, Andrew; Peachey, Neal S.; Ferreira, Paulo A.

    2014-01-01

    The immunophilins, cyclophilins, catalyze peptidyl cis-trans prolyl-isomerization (PPIase), a rate-limiting step in protein folding and a conformational switch in protein function. Cyclophilins are also chaperones. Noncatalytic mutations affecting the only cyclophilins with known but distinct physiological substrates, the Drosophila NinaA and its mammalian homolog, cyclophilin-B, impair opsin biogenesis and cause osteogenesis imperfecta, respectively. However, the physiological roles and substrates of most cyclophilins remain unknown. It is also unclear if PPIase and chaperone activities reflect distinct cyclophilin properties. To elucidate the physiological idiosyncrasy stemming from potential cyclophilin functions, we generated mice lacking endogenous Ran-binding protein-2 (Ranbp2) and expressing bacterial artificial chromosomes of Ranbp2 with impaired C-terminal chaperone and with (Tg-Ranbp2WT-HA) or without PPIase activities (Tg-Ranbp2R2944A-HA). The transgenic lines exhibit unique effects in proteostasis. Either line presents selective deficits in M-opsin biogenesis with its accumulation and aggregation in cone photoreceptors but without proteostatic impairment of two novel Ranbp2 cyclophilin partners, the cytokine-responsive effectors, STAT3/STAT5. Stress-induced STAT3 activation is also unaffected in Tg-Ranbp2R2944A-HA::Ranbp2−/−. Conversely, proteomic analyses found that the multisystem proteinopathy/amyotrophic lateral sclerosis proteins, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins A2/B1, are down-regulated post-transcriptionally only in Tg-Ranbp2R2944A-HA::Ranbp2−/−. This is accompanied by the age- and tissue-dependent reductions of diubiquitin and ubiquitylated proteins, increased deubiquitylation activity, and accumulation of the 26 S proteasome subunits S1 and S5b. These manifestations are absent in another line, Tg-Ranbp2CLDm-HA::Ranbp2−/−, harboring SUMO-1 and S1-binding mutations in the Ranbp2 cyclophilin-like domain. These results unveil

  14. Structures of the activator of K. pneumonia biofilm formation, MrkH, indicates PilZ domains involved in c-di-GMP and DNA binding

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Maria A.; Zeng, Wenjie

    2016-01-01

    The pathogenesis of Klebsiella pneumonia is linked to the bacteria’s ability to form biofilms. Mannose-resistant Klebsiella-like (Mrk) hemagglutinins are critical for K. pneumonia biofilm development, and the expression of the genes encoding these proteins is activated by a 3′,5′-cyclic diguanylic acid (c-di-GMP)–regulated transcription factor, MrkH. To gain insight into MrkH function, we performed structural and biochemical analyses. Data revealed MrkH to be a monomer with a two-domain architecture consisting of a PilZ C-domain connected to an N domain that unexpectedly also harbors a PilZ-like fold. Comparison of apo- and c-di-GMP–bound MrkH structures reveals a large 138° interdomain rotation that is induced by binding an intercalated c-di-GMP dimer. c-di-GMP interacts with PilZ C-domain motifs 1 and 2 (RxxxR and D/NxSxxG) and a newly described c-di-GMP–binding motif in the MrkH N domain. Strikingly, these c-di-GMP–binding motifs also stabilize an open state conformation in apo MrkH via contacts from the PilZ motif 1 to residues in the C-domain motif 2 and the c-di-GMP–binding N-domain motif. Use of the same regions in apo structure stabilization and c-di-GMP interaction allows distinction between the states. Indeed, domain reorientation by c-di-GMP complexation with MrkH, which leads to a highly compacted structure, suggests a mechanism by which the protein is activated to bind DNA. To our knowledge, MrkH represents the first instance of specific DNA binding mediated by PilZ domains. The MrkH structures also pave the way for the rational design of inhibitors that target K. pneumonia biofilm formation. PMID:27551088

  15. Crystal Structure of the SPOC Domain of the Arabidopsis Flowering Regulator FPA.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yinglu; Rataj, Katarzyna; Simpson, Gordon G; Tong, Liang

    2016-01-01

    The Arabidopsis protein FPA controls flowering time by regulating the alternative 3'-end processing of the FLOWERING LOCUS (FLC) antisense RNA. FPA belongs to the split ends (SPEN) family of proteins, which contain N-terminal RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) and a SPEN paralog and ortholog C-terminal (SPOC) domain. The SPOC domain is highly conserved among FPA homologs in plants, but the conservation with the domain in other SPEN proteins is much lower. We have determined the crystal structure of Arabidopsis thaliana FPA SPOC domain at 2.7 Å resolution. The overall structure is similar to that of the SPOC domain in human SMRT/HDAC1 Associated Repressor Protein (SHARP), although there are also substantial conformational differences between them. Structural and sequence analyses identify a surface patch that is conserved among plant FPA homologs. Mutations of two residues in this surface patch did not disrupt FPA functions, suggesting that either the SPOC domain is not required for the role of FPA in regulating RNA 3'-end formation or the functions of the FPA SPOC domain cannot be disrupted by the combination of mutations, in contrast to observations with the SHARP SPOC domain.

  16. Crystal Structure of the SPOC Domain of the Arabidopsis Flowering Regulator FPA

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yinglu; Rataj, Katarzyna; Simpson, Gordon G.; Tong, Liang

    2016-01-01

    The Arabidopsis protein FPA controls flowering time by regulating the alternative 3′-end processing of the FLOWERING LOCUS (FLC) antisense RNA. FPA belongs to the split ends (SPEN) family of proteins, which contain N-terminal RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) and a SPEN paralog and ortholog C-terminal (SPOC) domain. The SPOC domain is highly conserved among FPA homologs in plants, but the conservation with the domain in other SPEN proteins is much lower. We have determined the crystal structure of Arabidopsis thaliana FPA SPOC domain at 2.7 Å resolution. The overall structure is similar to that of the SPOC domain in human SMRT/HDAC1 Associated Repressor Protein (SHARP), although there are also substantial conformational differences between them. Structural and sequence analyses identify a surface patch that is conserved among plant FPA homologs. Mutations of two residues in this surface patch did not disrupt FPA functions, suggesting that either the SPOC domain is not required for the role of FPA in regulating RNA 3′-end formation or the functions of the FPA SPOC domain cannot be disrupted by the combination of mutations, in contrast to observations with the SHARP SPOC domain. PMID:27513867

  17. Crystal Structure of the Passenger Domain of the Escherichia coli Autotransporter EspP

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Shekeb; Mian, Hira S.; Sandercock, Linda E.; Chirgadze, Nickolay Y.; Pai, Emil F.

    2013-03-07

    Autotransporters represent a large superfamily of known and putative virulence factors produced by Gram-negative bacteria. They consist of an N-terminal 'passenger domain' responsible for the specific effector functions of the molecule and a C-terminal '{beta}-domain' responsible for translocation of the passenger across the bacterial outer membrane. Here, we present the 2.5-{angstrom} crystal structure of the passenger domain of the extracellular serine protease EspP, produced by the pathogen Escherichia coli O157:H7 and a member of the serine protease autotransporters of Enterobacteriaceae (SPATEs). Like the previously structurally characterized SPATE passenger domains, the EspP passenger domain contains an extended right-handed parallel {beta}-helix preceded by an N-terminal globular domain housing the catalytic function of the protease. Of note, however, is the absence of a second globular domain protruding from this {beta}-helix. We describe the structure of the EspP passenger domain in the context of previous results and provide an alternative hypothesis for the function of the {beta}-helix within SPATEs.

  18. Crystal Structures of the Outer Membrane Domain of Intimin and Invasin from Enterohemorrhagic E. coli and Enteropathogenic Y. pseudotuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Fairman, James W.; Dautin, Nathalie; Wojtowicz, Damian; Liu, Wei; Noinaj, Nicholas; Barnard, Travis J.; Udho, Eshwar; Przytycka, Teresa M.; Cherezov, Vadim; Buchanan, Susan K.

    2012-12-10

    Intimins and invasins are virulence factors produced by pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria. They contain C-terminal extracellular passenger domains that are involved in adhesion to host cells and N-terminal {beta} domains that are embedded in the outer membrane. Here, we identify the domain boundaries of an E. coli intimin {beta} domain and use this information to solve its structure and the {beta} domain structure of a Y. pseudotuberculosis invasin. Both {beta} domain structures crystallized as monomers and reveal that the previous range of residues assigned to the {beta} domain also includes a protease-resistant domain that is part of the passenger. Additionally, we identify 146 nonredundant representative members of the intimin/invasin family based on the boundaries of the highly conserved intimin and invasin {beta} domains. We then use this set of sequences along with our structural data to find and map the evolutionarily constrained residues within the {beta} domain.

  19. Distinct Z-DNA binding mode of a PKR-like protein kinase containing a Z-DNA binding domain (PKZ)

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Doyoun; Hur, Jeonghwan; Park, Kwangsoo; Bae, Sangsu; Shin, Donghyuk; Ha, Sung Chul; Hwang, Hye-Yeon; Hohng, Sungchul; Lee, Joon-Hwa; Lee, Sangho; Kim, Yang-Gyun; Kim, Kyeong Kyu

    2014-01-01

    Double-stranded ribonucleic acid-activated protein kinase (PKR) downregulates translation as a defense mechanism against viral infection. In fish species, PKZ, a PKR-like protein kinase containing left-handed deoxyribonucleic acid (Z-DNA) binding domains, performs a similar role in the antiviral response. To understand the role of PKZ in Z-DNA recognition and innate immune response, we performed structural and functional studies of the Z-DNA binding domain (Zα) of PKZ from Carassius auratus (caZαPKZ). The 1.7-Å resolution crystal structure of caZαPKZ:Z-DNA revealed that caZαPKZ shares the overall fold with other Zα, but has discrete structural features that differentiate its DNA binding mode from others. Functional analyses of caZαPKZ and its mutants revealed that caZαPKZ mediates the fastest B-to-Z transition of DNA among Zα, and the minimal interaction for Z-DNA recognition is mediated by three backbone phosphates and six residues of caZαPKZ. Structure-based mutagenesis and B-to-Z transition assays confirmed that Lys56 located in the β-wing contributes to its fast B-to-Z transition kinetics. Investigation of the DNA binding kinetics of caZαPKZ further revealed that the B-to-Z transition rate is positively correlated with the association rate constant. Taking these results together, we conclude that the positive charge in the β-wing largely affects fast B-to-Z transition activity by enhancing the DNA binding rate. PMID:24682817

  20. Effect of grain size on the domain structures and electromechanical responses of ferroelectric polycrystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinkai; Wang, Jie

    2017-01-01

    The effect of grain size on the domain structures and electromechanical responses of ferroelectric polycrystals is investigated by a phase field model. The phase field simulations show that the different types of domains in different size of grains play an important role in the size-dependent properties of ferroelectric polycrystals. It is found that the remnant polarization, coercive field and dielectric coefficient increase monotonously with the increase of grain size. However, the piezoelectric coefficient increases first and then decreases as the grain size increases. The decrease of vortex domains is responsible for the increase of piezoelectric coefficient in the range of small grain size, the decrease of 90° domain walls results in the decrease of piezoelectric coefficient in the range of large grain size. In addition, different domain structures in different size of grains have also great influence on the mechanical depolarization of the ferroelectric polycrystals subjected to a compressive stress.

  1. BAR Domains as Sensors of Membrane Curvature: The Amphiphysin BAR Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peter, Brian J.; Kent, Helen M.; Mills, Ian G.; Vallis, Yvonne; Butler, P. Jonathan G.; Evans, Philip R.; McMahon, Harvey T.

    2004-01-01

    The BAR (Bin/amphiphysin/Rvs) domain is the most conserved feature in amphiphysins from yeast to human and is also found in endophilins and nadrins. We solved the structure of the Drosophila amphiphysin BAR domain. It is a crescent-shaped dimer that binds preferentially to highly curved negatively charged membranes. With its N-terminal amphipathic helix and BAR domain (N-BAR), amphiphysin can drive membrane curvature in vitro and in vivo. The structure is similar to that of arfaptin2, which we find also binds and tubulates membranes. From this, we predict that BAR domains are in many protein families, including sorting nexins, centaurins, and oligophrenins. The universal and minimal BAR domain is a dimerization, membrane-binding, and curvature-sensing module.

  2. Conformational changes in tertiary structure near the ligand binding site of an integrin I domain

    PubMed Central

    Oxvig, Claus; Lu, Chafen; Springer, Timothy A.

    1999-01-01

    For efficient ligand binding, integrins must be activated. Specifically, a conformational change has been proposed in a ligand binding domain present within some integrins, the inserted (I) domain [Lee, J., Bankston, L., Arnaout, M. & Liddington, R. C. (1995) Structure (London) 3, 1333–1340]. This proposal remains controversial, however, despite extensive crystal structure studies on the I domain [Lee, J., Bankston, L., Arnaout, M. & Liddington, R. C. (1995) Structure (London) 3, 1333–1340; Liddington, R. & Bankston, L. (1998) Structure (London) 6, 937–938; Qu, A. & Leahy, D. J. (1996) Structure (London) 4, 931–942; and Baldwin, E. T., Sarver, R. W., Bryant, G. L., Jr., Curry, K. A., Fairbanks, M. B., Finzel, B. C., Garlick, R. L., Heinrikson, R. L., Horton, N. C. & Kelly, L. L. (1998) Structure (London) 6, 923–935]. By defining the residues present in the epitope of a mAb against the human Mac-1 integrin (αMβ2, CD11b/CD18) that binds only the active receptor, we provide biochemical evidence that the I domain itself undergoes a conformational change with activation. This mAb, CBRM1/5, binds the I domain very close to the ligand binding site in a region that is widely exposed regardless of activation as judged by reactivity with other antibodies. The conformation of the epitope differs in two crystal forms of the I domain, previously suggested to represent active and inactive receptor. Our data suggests that conformational differences in the I domain are physiologically relevant and not merely a consequence of different crystal lattice interactions. We also demonstrate that the transition between the two conformational states depends on species-specific residues at the bottom of the I domain, which are proposed to be in an interface with another integrin domain, and that this transition correlates with functional activity. PMID:10051621

  3. The sensitivity of GNSS measurements in Fennoscandia to distinct three-dimensional upper-mantle structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffen, Holger; Wu, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    : Steffen, H. and Wu, P.: The sensitivity of GNSS measurements in Fennoscandia to distinct three-dimensional upper-mantle structures, Solid Earth, 5, 557-567, doi:10.5194/se-5-557-2014, 2014.

  4. Hierarchical spatial genetic structure in a distinct population segment of greater sage-grouse

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oyler-McCance, Sara J.; Casazza, Michael L.; Fike, Jennifer A.; Coates, Peter S.

    2014-01-01

    Greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) within the Bi-State Management Zone (area along the border between Nevada and California) are geographically isolated on the southwestern edge of the species’ range. Previous research demonstrated that this population is genetically unique, with a high proportion of unique mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplotypes and with significant differences in microsatellite allele frequencies compared to populations across the species’ range. As a result, this population was considered a distinct population segment (DPS) and was recently proposed for listing as threatened under the U.S. Endangered Species Act. A more comprehensive understanding of the boundaries of this genetically unique population (where the Bi-State population begins) and an examination of genetic structure within the Bi-State is needed to help guide effective management decisions. We collected DNA from eight sampling locales within the Bi-State (N = 181) and compared those samples to previously collected DNA from the two most proximal populations outside of the Bi-State DPS, generating mtDNA sequence data and amplifying 15 nuclear microsatellites. Both mtDNA and microsatellite analyses support the idea that the Bi-State DPS represents a genetically unique population, which has likely been separated for thousands of years. Seven mtDNA haplotypes were found exclusively in the Bi-State population and represented 73 % of individuals, while three haplotypes were shared with neighboring populations. In the microsatellite analyses both STRUCTURE and FCA separate the Bi-State from the neighboring populations. We also found genetic structure within the Bi-State as both types of data revealed differences between the northern and southern part of the Bi-State and there was evidence of isolation-by-distance. STRUCTURE revealed three subpopulations within the Bi-State consisting of the northern Pine Nut Mountains (PNa), mid Bi-State, and White Mountains (WM) following a

  5. Distinct functional domains within the acidic cluster of tegument protein pp28 required for trafficking and cytoplasmic envelopment of human cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jun-Young; Jeon, Hyejin; Hong, Sookyung; Britt, William J

    2016-10-01

    Human cytomegalovirus UL99-encoded tegument protein pp28 contains a 16 aa acidic cluster that is required for pp28 trafficking to the assembly compartment (AC) and the virus assembly. However, functional signals within the acidic cluster of pp28 remain undefined. Here, we demonstrated that an acidic cluster rather than specific sorting signals was required for trafficking to the AC. Recombinant viruses with chimeric pp28 proteins expressing non-native acidic clusters exhibited delayed viral growth kinetics and decreased production of infectious virus, indicating that the native acidic cluster of pp28 was essential for wild-type virus assembly. These results suggested that the acidic cluster of pp28 has distinct functional domains required for trafficking and for efficient virus assembly. The first half (aa 44-50) of the acidic cluster was sufficient for pp28 trafficking, whereas the native acidic cluster consisting of aa 51-59 was required for the assembly of wild-type levels of infectious virus.

  6. The carboxyl terminus of the chemokine receptor CCR3 contains distinct domains which regulate chemotactic signaling and receptor down-regulation in a ligand-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Sabroe, Ian; Jorritsma, Annelies; Stubbs, Victoria E L; Xanthou, Georgina; Jopling, Louise A; Ponath, Paul D; Williams, Timothy J; Murphy, Philip M; Pease, James E

    2005-04-01

    The chemokine receptor CCR3 regulates the chemotaxis of leukocytes implicated in allergic disease, such as eosinophils. Incubation of eosinophils with CCL11, CCL13 or CCL5 resulted in a rapid decrease of cell-surface CCR3 which was replicated using CCR3 transfectants. Progressive truncation of the CCR3 C terminus by 15 amino acids produced three constructs, Delta340, Delta325 and Delta310. Delta340 and Delta325 were able to bind CCL11 with affinities similar to wild-type CCR3. Delta340 transfectants exhibited enhanced migration and reduced receptor down-regulation in response to CCL11 and CCL13. Delta325 transfectants displayed chemotactic responses to CCL11 and CCL13 similar to wild-type CCR3, and had impaired down-regulation when stimulated with CCL13 but not CCL11. In contrast, neither the Delta325 nor Delta340 truncation affected chemotaxis or receptor down-regulation induced by CCL5. Delta310 transfectants bound CCL11 poorly and were biologically inactive. Inhibitors of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and PI3-kinase antagonized eosinophil shape change responses and chemotaxis of transfectants to CCL11 and CCL13. In contrast, shape change but not chemotaxis was sensitive to inhibition of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase pathway suggesting differential regulation of the two responses. Thus, the CCR3 C terminus contains distinct domains responsible for the regulation of receptor desensitization and for coupling to chemotactic responses.

  7. Structural analysis of the DAP5 MIF4G domain and its interaction with eIF4A

    PubMed Central

    Virgili, Geneviève; Frank, Filipp; Feoktistova, Kateryna; Sawicki, Maxime; Sonenberg, Nahum; Fraser, Christopher S.; Nagar, Bhushan

    2013-01-01

    Summary Death-associated protein 5 (DAP5/p97) is a homolog of the eukaryotic initiation factor 4G (eIF4G) that promotes the IRES-driven translation of multiple cellular mRNAs. Central to its function is the middle domain (MIF4G), which recruits the RNA helicase eIF4A. The middle domain of eIF4G consists of tandem HEAT repeats that coalesce to form a solenoid-type structure. Here, we report the crystal structure of the DAP5 MIF4G domain. Its overall fold is very similar to that of eIF4G, however, significant conformational variations impart distinct surface properties that could explain the observed differences in IRES binding between the two proteins. Interestingly, quantitative analysis of the DAP5-eIF4A interaction using isothermal titration calorimetry reveals a 10-fold lower affinity than with the eIF4G-eIF4A interaction that appears to affect their ability to stimulate eIF4A RNA unwinding activity in vitro. This difference in stability of the complex may have functional implications in selecting the mode of translation initiation. PMID:23478064

  8. Structural Characterization of a Newly Identified Component of α-Carboxysomes: The AAA+ Domain Protein CsoCbbQ.

    PubMed

    Sutter, Markus; Roberts, Evan W; Gonzalez, Raul C; Bates, Cassandra; Dawoud, Salma; Landry, Kimberly; Cannon, Gordon C; Heinhorst, Sabine; Kerfeld, Cheryl A

    2015-11-05

    Carboxysomes are bacterial microcompartments that enhance carbon fixation by concentrating ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) and its substrate CO2 within a proteinaceous shell. They are found in all cyanobacteria, some purple photoautotrophs and many chemoautotrophic bacteria. Carboxysomes consist of a protein shell that encapsulates several hundred molecules of RuBisCO, and contain carbonic anhydrase and other accessory proteins. Genes coding for carboxysome shell components and the encapsulated proteins are typically found together in an operon. The α-carboxysome operon is embedded in a cluster of additional, conserved genes that are presumably related to its function. In many chemoautotrophs, products of the expanded carboxysome locus include CbbO and CbbQ, a member of the AAA+ domain superfamily. We bioinformatically identified subtypes of CbbQ proteins and show that their genes frequently co-occur with both Form IA and Form II RuBisCO. The α-carboxysome-associated ortholog, CsoCbbQ, from Halothiobacillus neapolitanus forms a hexamer in solution and hydrolyzes ATP. The crystal structure shows that CsoCbbQ is a hexamer of the typical AAA+ domain; the additional C-terminal domain, diagnostic of the CbbQ subfamily, structurally fills the inter-monomer gaps, resulting in a distinctly hexagonal shape. We show that CsoCbbQ interacts with CsoCbbO and is a component of the carboxysome shell, the first example of ATPase activity associated with a bacterial microcompartment.

  9. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Structure of a Novel Globular Domain in RBM10 Containing OCRE, the Octamer Repeat Sequence Motif.

    PubMed

    Martin, Bryan T; Serrano, Pedro; Geralt, Michael; Wüthrich, Kurt

    2016-01-05

    The OCtamer REpeat (OCRE) has been annotated as a 42-residue sequence motif with 12 tyrosine residues in the spliceosome trans-regulatory elements RBM5 and RBM10 (RBM [RNA-binding motif]), which are known to regulate alternative splicing of Fas and Bcl-x pre-mRNA transcripts. Nuclear magnetic resonance structure determination showed that the RBM10 OCRE sequence motif is part of a 55-residue globular domain containing 16 aromatic amino acids, which consists of an anti-parallel arrangement of six β strands, with the first five strands containing complete or incomplete Tyr triplets. This OCRE globular domain is a distinctive component of RBM10 and is more widely conserved in RBM10s across the animal kingdom than the ubiquitous RNA recognition components. It is also found in the functionally related RBM5. Thus, it appears that the three-dimensional structure of the globular OCRE domain, rather than the 42-residue OCRE sequence motif alone, confers specificity on RBM10 intermolecular interactions in the spliceosome.

  10. Structure of the adenylylation domain of E. coli glutamine synthetase adenylyl transferase: evidence for gene duplication and evolution of a new active site.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yibin; Carr, Paul D; Vasudevan, Subhash G; Ollis, David L

    2010-02-26

    The X-ray structure of the C-terminal fragment, containing residues 449-946, of Escherichia coli glutamine synthetase adenylyl transferase (ATase) has been determined. ATase is part of the cascade that regulates the enzymatic activity of E. coli glutamine synthetase, a key component of the cell's machinery for the uptake of ammonia. It has two enzymatic activities, adenylyl removase (AR) and adenylyl transferase (AT), which are located in distinct catalytic domains that are separated by a regulatory (R) domain. We previously reported the three-dimensional structure of the AR domain (residues 1-440). The present structure contains both the R and AT domains. AR and AT share 24% sequence identity and also contain the beta-polymerase motif that is characteristic of many nucleotidylyl transferase enzymes. The structures overlap with an rmsd of 2.4 A when the superhelical R domain is omitted. A model for the complete ATase molecule is proposed, along with some refinements of domain boundaries. A rather more speculative model for the complex of ATase with glutamine synthetase and the nitrogen signal transduction protein PII is also presented.

  11. Achievement of Diverse Domain Structures in Soft Magnetic Thin Film through Adjusting Intrinsic Magnetocrystalline Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Juanying; Wang, Tao; Ma, Tianyong; Wang, Ying; Li, Fashen

    2017-01-01

    Oriented soft magnetic hcp-Co1 - x Ir x films with a fixed thickness of 120 nm were fabricated. All prepared films exhibit soft magnetic properties but various magnetocrystalline anisotropies with the variation of Ir content. The measured data shows that diverse domain structures including the Néel wall, Bloch wall, and stripe domains present in a fixed film thickness. It is singular for the single-layer soft magnetic film to possess diverse domains in a fixed thickness. This phenomenon was explained by introducing intrinsic magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy into soft magnetic films rather than the structural parameters of the film, inner stress, and microstructure effect.

  12. Achievement of Diverse Domain Structures in Soft Magnetic Thin Film through Adjusting Intrinsic Magnetocrystalline Anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Juanying; Wang, Tao; Ma, Tianyong; Wang, Ying; Li, Fashen

    2017-12-01

    Oriented soft magnetic hcp-Co1 - x Ir x films with a fixed thickness of 120 nm were fabricated. All prepared films exhibit soft magnetic properties but various magnetocrystalline anisotropies with the variation of Ir content. The measured data shows that diverse domain structures including the Néel wall, Bloch wall, and stripe domains present in a fixed film thickness. It is singular for the single-layer soft magnetic film to possess diverse domains in a fixed thickness. This phenomenon was explained by introducing intrinsic magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy into soft magnetic films rather than the structural parameters of the film, inner stress, and microstructure effect.

  13. Secondary Structural Analysis of the Carboxyl-Terminal Domain from Different Connexin Isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Spagnol, Gaëelle; Al-Mugotir, Mona; Kopanic, Jennifer L.; Zach, Sydney; Li, Hanjun; Trease, Andrew J.; Stauch, Kelly L.; Grosely, Rosslyn; Cervantes, Matthew; Sorgen, Paul L.

    2016-01-01

    The connexin carboxyl-terminal (CxCT) domain plays a role in the trafficking, localization, and turnover of gap junction channels, as well as the level of gap junction intercellular communication via numerous post-translational modifications and protein–protein interactions. As a key player in the regulation of gap junctions, the CT presents itself as a target for manipulation intended to modify function. Specific to intrinsically disordered proteins, identifying residues whose secondary structure can be manipulated will be critical toward unlocking the therapeutic potential of the CxCT domain. To accomplish this goal, we used biophysical methods to characterize CxCT domains attached to their fourth transmembrane domain (TM4). Circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance were complementary in demonstrating the connexin isoforms that form the greatest amount of α-helical structure in their CT domain (Cx45 > Cx43 > Cx32 > Cx50 > Cx37 ≈ Cx40 ≈ Cx26). Studies compared the influence of 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol, pH, phosphorylation, and mutations (Cx32, X-linked Charcot-Marie Tooth disease; Cx26, hearing loss) on the TM4-CxCT structure. While pH modestly influences the CT structure, a major structural change was associated with phosphomimetic substitutions. Since most connexin CT domains are phosphorylated throughout their life cycle, studies of phospho-TM4-CxCT isoforms will be critical toward understanding the role that structure plays in regulating gap junction function. PMID:26542351

  14. Structurally Similar but Functionally Diverse ZU5 Domains in Human Erythrocyte Ankyrin

    SciTech Connect

    Yasunaga, Mai; Ipsaro, Jonathan J.; Mondragón, Alfonso

    2014-10-02

    The metazoan cell membrane is highly organized. Maintaining such organization and preserving membrane integrity under different conditions are accomplished through intracellular tethering to an extensive, flexible protein network. Spectrin, the principal component of this network, is attached to the membrane through the adaptor protein ankyrin, which directly bridges the interaction between {beta}-spectrin and membrane proteins. Ankyrins have a modular structure that includes two tandem ZU5 domains. The first domain, ZU5A, is directly responsible for binding {beta}-spectrin. Here, we present a structure of the tandem ZU5 repeats of human erythrocyte ankyrin. Structural and biophysical experiments show that the second ZU5 domain, ZU5B, does not participate in spectrin binding. ZU5B is structurally similar to the ZU5 domain found in the netrin receptor UNC5b supramodule, suggesting that it could interact with other domains in ankyrin. Comparison of several ZU5 domains demonstrates that the ZU5 domain represents a compact and versatile protein interaction module.

  15. Structure of the SANT domain from the Xenopus chromatin remodeling factor ISWI

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, John R.; Elgar, Stuart J.; Khan, Seema I.; Zhang, Xing; Wade, Paul A.; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2008-09-17

    The SANT (Swi3, Ada2, N-Cor, and TFIIIB) module was first described as a putative DNA-binding domain with strong similarity to the helix-turn-helix DNA binding domain of Myb-related proteins. The X-ray structure of the C-terminal one third portion of the ATPase ISWI of Drosophila melangoaster, containing both SANT and SLIDE (SANT-Like ISWI Domain), confirmed the overall helix-turn-helix structural architecture of SANT as well as SLIDE. However, the DNA-contacting residues in Myb are not conserved in SANT and the structurally corresponding residues in the ISWI SANT domain are acidic, and therefore incompatible with DNA interaction. Recent studies suggested that SANT domains might be a histone-tail-binding module, including the DNA binding SANT domain of c-Myb. Here they present the X-ray structure of Xenopus laevis ISWI SANT domain, derived from limited proteolysis of a C-terminal fragment of ISWI protein.

  16. Probing the two-domain structure of homodimeric prokaryotic and eukaryotic catalase-peroxidases.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Srijib; Zamocky, Marcel; Furtmüller, Paul G; Obinger, Christian

    2010-11-01

    Catalase-peroxidases (KatGs) are ancestral bifunctional heme peroxidases found in archaeons, bacteria and lower eukaryotes. In contrast to homologous cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP) and ascorbate peroxidase (APx) homodimeric KatGs have a two-domain monomeric structure with a catalytic N-terminal heme domain and a C-terminal domain of high sequence and structural similarity but without obvious function. Nevertheless, without its C-terminal counterpart the N-terminal domain exhibits neither catalase nor peroxidase activity. Except some hybrid-type proteins all other members of the peroxidase-catalase superfamily lack this C-terminal domain. In order to probe the role of the two-domain monomeric structure for conformational and thermal stability urea and temperature-dependent unfolding experiments were performed by using UV-Vis-, electronic circular dichroism- and fluorescence spectroscopy, as well as differential scanning calorimetry. Recombinant prokaryotic (cyanobacterial KatG from Synechocystis sp. PCC6803) and eukaryotic (fungal KatG from Magnaporthe grisea) were investigated. The obtained data demonstrate that the conformational and thermal stability of bifunctional KatGs is significantly lower compared to homologous monofunctional peroxidases. The N- and C-terminal domains do not unfold independently. Differences between the cyanobacterial and the fungal enzyme are relatively small. Data will be discussed with respect to known structure and function of KatG, CcP and APx.

  17. Structure of Pseudoknot PK26 Shows 3D Domain Swapping in an RNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lietzke, Susan E; Barnes, Cindy L.

    1998-01-01

    3D domain swapping provides a facile pathway for the evolution of oligomeric proteins and allosteric mechanisms and a means for using monomer-oligomer equilibria to regulate biological activity. The term "3D domain swapping" describes the exchange of identical domains between two protein monomers to create an oligomer. 3D domain swapping has, so far, only been recognized in proteins. In this study, the structure of the pseudoknot PK26 is reported and it is a clear example of 3D domain swapping in RNA. PK26 was chosen for study because RNA pseudoknots are required structures in several biological processes and they arise frequently in in vitro selection experiments directed against protein targets. PK26 specifically inhibits HIV-1 reverse transcriptase with nanomolar affinity. We have now determined the 3.1 A resolution crystal structure of PK26 and find that it forms a 3D domain swapped dimer. PK26 shows extensive base pairing between and within strands. Formation of the dimer requires the linker region between the pseudoknot folds to adopt a unique conformation that allows a base within a helical stem to skip one base in the stacking register. Rearrangement of the linker would permit a monomeric pseudoknot to form. This structure shows how RNA can use 3D domain swapping to build large scale oligomers like the putative hexamer in the packaging RNA of bacteriophage Phi29.

  18. Structure of the redox sensor domain of Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) MmoS‡

    PubMed Central

    Ukaegbu, Uchechi E.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2009-01-01

    MmoS from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) is the multidomain sensor protein of a two component signaling system proposed to play a role in the copper-mediated regulation of soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO). MmoS binds an FAD cofactor within its N-terminal tandem Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) domains, suggesting that it functions as a redox sensor. The crystal structure of the MmoS tandem PAS domains, designated PAS-A and PAS-B, has been determined to 2.34 Å resolution. Both domains adopt the typical PAS domain α/β topology and are structurally similar. The two domains are linked by a long α helix and do not interact with one another. The FAD cofactor is housed solely within PAS-A and is stabilized by an extended hydrogen bonding network. The overall fold of PAS-A is similar to other flavin-containing PAS domains, but homodimeric interactions in other structures are not observed in the MmoS sensor, which crystallized as a monomer. The structure both provides new insight into the architecture of tandem PAS domains and suggests specific residues that may play a role in MmoS FAD redox chemistry and subsequent signal transduction. PMID:19271777

  19. High-resolution structure of the Tiam1 PHn-CC-Ex domain.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Monika; Gakhar, Lokesh; Fuentes, Ernesto J

    2013-07-01

    The T-lymphoma and metastasis gene 1 (TIAM1) encodes a guanine nucleotide-exchange factor protein (Tiam1) that is specific for the Rho-family GTPase Rac1 and is important for cell polarity, migration and adhesion. Tiam1 is a large multi-domain protein that contains several protein-protein binding domains that are important for regulating cellular function. The PHn-CC-Ex domain is critical for plasma-membrane association and interactions with protein-scaffold proteins (e.g. Par3b, spinophilin, IRSp53 and JIP2) that direct Tiam1-Rac1 signaling specificity. It was determined that the coiled-coil domain of Par3b binds the PHn-CC-Ex domain with a dissociation constant of ≈ 30 µM. Moreover, the structures of two variants of the Tiam1 PHn-CC-Ex domain were solved at resolutions of 1.98 and 2.15 Å, respectively. The structures indicate that the PHn, CC and Ex regions form independent subdomains that together provide an integrated platform for binding partner proteins. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) data indicate that the Tiam1 PHn-CC-Ex domain is monomeric in solution and that the solution and crystal structures are very similar. Together, these data provide the foundation necessary to elucidate the structural mechanism of the PHn-CC-Ex/scaffold interactions that are critical for Tiam1-Rac1 signaling specificity.

  20. Structure, dynamics and folding of an immunoglobulin domain of the gelation factor (ABP-120) from Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Shang-Te Danny; Cabrita, Lisa D; Fucini, Paola; Dobson, Christopher M; Christodoulou, John

    2009-05-15

    We have carried out a detailed structural and dynamical characterisation of the isolated fifth repeat of the gelation factor (ABP-120) from Dictyostelium discoideum (ddFLN5) by NMR spectroscopy to provide a basis for studies of co-translational folding on the ribosome of this immunoglobulin-like domain. The isolated ddFLN5 can fold autonomously in solution into a structure that resembles very closely the crystal structure of the domain in a construct in which the adjacent sixth repeat (ddFLN6) is covalently linked to its C-terminus in tandem but deviates locally from a second crystal structure in which ddFLN5 is flanked by ddFLN4 and ddFLN6 at both N- and C-termini. Conformational fluctuations were observed via (15)N relaxation methods and are primarily localised in the interstrand loops that encompass the C-terminal hemisphere. These fluctuations are distinct in location from the region where line broadening is observed in ddFLN5 when attached to the ribosome as part of a nascent chain. This observation supports the conclusion that the broadening is associated with interactions with the ribosome surface [Hsu, S. T. D., Fucini, P., Cabrita, L. D., Launay, H., Dobson, C. M. & Christodoulou, J. (2007). Structure and dynamics of a ribosome-bound nascent chain by NMR spectroscopy. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 104, 16516-16521]. The unfolding of ddFLN5 induced by high concentrations of urea shows a low population of a folding intermediate, as inferred from an intensity-based analysis, a finding that differs from that of ddFLN5 as a ribosome-bound nascent chain. These results suggest that interesting differences in detail may exist between the structure of the domain in isolation and when linked to the ribosome and between protein folding in vitro and the folding of a nascent chain as it emerges from the ribosome.

  1. Covalent Tethering and Residues with Bulky Hydrophobic Side Chains Enable Self-Assembly of Distinct Amyloid Structures.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Jérémy; Boehringer, Régis; Grogg, Marcel; Raya, Jésus; Schirer, Alicia; Crucifix, Corinne; Hellwig, Petra; Schultz, Patrick; Torbeev, Vladimir

    2016-12-02

    Polymorphism is a common property of amyloid fibers that complicates their detailed structural and functional studies. Here we report experiments illustrating the chemical principles that enable the formation of amyloid polymorphs with distinct stoichiometric composition. Using appropriate covalent tethering we programmed self-assembly of a model peptide corresponding to the [20-41] fragment of human β2-microglobulin into fibers with either trimeric or dimeric amyloid cores. Using a set of biophysical and biochemical methods we demonstrated their distinct structural, morphological, and templating properties. Furthermore, we showed that supramolecular approaches in which the peptide is modified with bulky substituents can also be applied to modulate the formation of different fiber polymorphs. Such strategies, when applied to disease-related peptides and proteins, will greatly help in the evaluation of the biological properties of structurally distinct amyloids.

  2. Seismic Structure of Shallow Lithosphere at Locations of Distinctive Seafloor Spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henig, Ashlee Shae

    Multichannel Seismic (MCS) Refraction and Reflection analyses are used to determine the structure of the upper 1-2 km of lithosphere at two distinct seafloor spreading regions at 1) the Atlantis Massif Oceanic Core Complex (OCC) at 30°N on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR), and 2) the southward propagating tip and pseudofault regions of the Central Lau Spreading Center (CLSC) in the Lau Backarc Basin. The Synthetic Ocean Bottom Experiment (SOBE) downward continuation technique is employed to increase the number of usable near-offset first arrival picks within the data allowing the creation of a continuous 2-D upper crustal tomographic model while also improving resolution in the shallow crust. Seismic velocity structure from the resultant tomography models is analyzed in context of the local surroundings and additional available data, and interpreted for formation history and accretionary mechanism of the lithosphere. Summaries of findings at the two study locations are as follows. Atlantis Massif Oceanic Core Complex: At Atlantis Massif, axis-parallel and -perpendicular seismic tomography models indicate that lithospheric structure deviates significantly from the typical oceanic "layer cake" model. Surface velocities change as much as 3 km/s over several hundred meters lateral distance and local vertical velocity gradients are as high as 6 s-1. Velocities as high as 5 km/s, characteristic of gabbro and confirmed by a 1.4 km drill hole, outcrop directly at the seafloor on the Central Dome and the eastern Southern Ridge and compose the main internal structure of the core complex. These high velocities are surrounded by sheaths of lower velocity structure interpreted as sepentinized peridotite. This gabbroic core with surrounding altered mantle rock implies a history of detachment faulting and the exhumation of originally deep-seated crustal rock. The geometry of Atlantis Massif and the location and orientation of the gabbroic core are consistent with a southeast dipping

  3. Structures of oncogenic, suppressor and rescued p53 core-domain variants: mechanisms of mutant p53 rescue

    SciTech Connect

    Wallentine, Brad D.; Wang, Ying; Tretyachenko-Ladokhina, Vira; Tan, Martha; Senear, Donald F.; Luecke, Hartmut

    2013-10-01

    X-ray crystallographic structures of four p53 core-domain variants were determined in order to gain insights into the mechanisms by which certain second-site suppressor mutations rescue the function of a significant number of cancer mutations of the tumor suppressor protein p53. To gain insights into the mechanisms by which certain second-site suppressor mutations rescue the function of a significant number of cancer mutations of the tumor suppressor protein p53, X-ray crystallographic structures of four p53 core-domain variants were determined. These include an oncogenic mutant, V157F, two single-site suppressor mutants, N235K and N239Y, and the rescued cancer mutant V157F/N235K/N239Y. The V157F mutation substitutes a smaller hydrophobic valine with a larger hydrophobic phenylalanine within strand S4 of the hydrophobic core. The structure of this cancer mutant shows no gross structural changes in the overall fold of the p53 core domain, only minor rearrangements of side chains within the hydrophobic core of the protein. Based on biochemical analysis, these small local perturbations induce instability in the protein, increasing the free energy by 3.6 kcal mol{sup −1} (15.1 kJ mol{sup −1}). Further biochemical evidence shows that each suppressor mutation, N235K or N239Y, acts individually to restore thermodynamic stability to V157F and that both together are more effective than either alone. All rescued mutants were found to have wild-type DNA-binding activity when assessed at a permissive temperature, thus pointing to thermodynamic stability as the critical underlying variable. Interestingly, thermodynamic analysis shows that while N239Y demonstrates stabilization of the wild-type p53 core domain, N235K does not. These observations suggest distinct structural mechanisms of rescue. A new salt bridge between Lys235 and Glu198, found in both the N235K and rescued cancer mutant structures, suggests a rescue mechanism that relies on stabilizing the

  4. Crystal structures of Mycobacterium tuberculosis HspAT and ArAT reveal structural basis of their distinct substrate specificities

    PubMed Central

    Nasir, Nazia; Anant, Avishek; Vyas, Rajan; Biswal, Bichitra Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Aminotransferases of subfamily Iβ, which include histidinol phosphate aminotransferases (HspATs) and aromatic amino acid aminotransferases (ArATs), are structurally similar but possess distinct substrate specificities. This study, encompassing structural and biochemical characterisation of HspAT and ArAT from Mycobacterium tuberculosis demonstrates that the residues lining the substrate binding pocket and N-terminal lid are the primary determinants of their substrate specificities. In mHspAT, hydrophilic residues in the substrate binding pocket and N-terminal lid allow the entry and binding of its preferential substrate, Hsp. On the other hand, the hydrophobic nature of both the substrate binding pocket and the N-terminal lid of mArAT is responsible for the discrimination of a polar substrate such as Hsp, while facilitating the binding of Phe and other aromatic residues such as Tyr and Trp. In addition, the present study delineates the ligand induced conformational rearrangements, providing insights into the plasticity of aminotransferases. Furthermore, the study also demonstrates that the adventitiously bound ligand 2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid (MES) is indeed a specific inhibitor of HspAT. These results suggest that previously untapped morpholine-ring scaffold compounds could be explored for the design of new anti-TB agents. PMID:26738801

  5. The crystal structure of PD1, a Haemophilus surface fibril domain

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Jack; Thomsen, Maren; Kolodziejczyk, Robert; Ridley, Joshua; Carrington, Glenn; Singh, Birendra; Riesbeck, Kristian; Goldman, Adrian

    2017-01-01

    The Haemophilus surface fibril (Hsf) is an unusually large trimeric autotransporter adhesin (TAA) expressed by the most virulent strains of H. influenzae. Hsf is known to mediate adhesion between pathogen and host, allowing the establishment of potentially deadly diseases such as epiglottitis, meningitis and pneumonia. While recent research has suggested that this TAA might adopt a novel ‘hairpin-like’ architecture, the characterization of Hsf has been limited to in silico modelling and electron micrographs, with no high-resolution structural data available. Here, the crystal structure of Hsf putative domain 1 (PD1) is reported at 3.3 Å resolution. The structure corrects the previous domain annotation by revealing the presence of an unexpected N-terminal TrpRing domain. PD1 represents the first Hsf domain to be solved, and thus paves the way for further research on the ‘hairpin-like’ hypothesis. PMID:28177321

  6. SPECTRUS: A Dimensionality Reduction Approach for Identifying Dynamical Domains in Protein Complexes from Limited Structural Datasets.

    PubMed

    Ponzoni, Luca; Polles, Guido; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Micheletti, Cristian

    2015-08-04

    Identifying dynamical, quasi-rigid domains in proteins provides a powerful means for characterizing functionally oriented structural changes via a parsimonious set of degrees of freedom. In fact, the relative displacements of few dynamical domains usually suffice to rationalize the mechanics underpinning biological functionality in proteins and can even be exploited for structure determination or refinement purposes. Here we present SPECTRUS, a general scheme that, by solely using amino acid distance fluctuations, can pinpoint the innate quasi-rigid domains of single proteins or large complexes in a robust way. Consistent domains are usually obtained by using either a pair of representative structures or thousands of conformers. The functional insights offered by the approach are illustrated for biomolecular systems of very different size and complexity such as kinases, ion channels, and viral capsids. The decomposition tool is available as a software package and web server at spectrus.sissa.it.

  7. The crystal structure of Aspergillus fumigatus cyclophilin reveals 3D domain swapping of a central element.

    PubMed

    Limacher, Andreas; Kloer, Daniel P; Flückiger, Sabine; Folkers, Gerd; Crameri, Reto; Scapozza, Leonardo

    2006-02-01

    The crystal structure of Aspergillus fumigatus cyclophilin (Asp f 11) was solved by the multiwavelength anomalous dispersion method and was refined to a resolution of 1.85 A with R and R(free) values of 18.9% and 21.4%, respectively. Many cyclophilin structures have been solved to date, all showing the same monomeric conformation. In contrast, the structure of A. fumigatus cyclophilin reveals dimerization by 3D domain swapping and represents one of the first proteins with a swapped central domain. The domain-swapped element consists of two beta strands and a subsequent loop carrying a conserved tryptophan. The tryptophan binds into the active site, inactivating cis-trans isomerization. This might be a means of biological regulation. The two hinge loops leave the protein prone to misfolding. In this context, alternative forms of 3D domain swapping that can lead to N- or C-terminally swapped dimers, oligomers, and aggregates are discussed.

  8. Structure of the C-Terminal Domain of Lettuce Necrotic Yellows Virus Phosphoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Nicolas; Ribeiro, Euripedes A.; Leyrat, Cédric; Tarbouriech, Nicolas; Ruigrok, Rob W. H.

    2013-01-01

    Lettuce necrotic yellows virus (LNYV) is a prototype of the plant-adapted cytorhabdoviruses. Through a meta-prediction of disorder, we localized a folded C-terminal domain in the amino acid sequence of its phosphoprotein. This domain consists of an autonomous folding unit that is monomeric in solution. Its structure, solved by X-ray crystallography, reveals a lollipop-shaped structure comprising five helices. The structure is different from that of the corresponding domains of other Rhabdoviridae, Filoviridae, and Paramyxovirinae; only the overall topology of the polypeptide chain seems to be conserved, suggesting that this domain evolved under weak selective pressure and varied in size by the acquisition or loss of functional modules. PMID:23785215

  9. Magnetic domain structure in small diameter magnetic nanowire arrays [rapid communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Dong-Huan; Zhang, Hao-Li; Xu, Cai-Ling; Xu, Tao; Li, Hu-Lin

    2005-01-01

    Fe 0.3Co 0.7 alloy nanowire arrays were prepared by ac electrodepositing Fe 2+ and Co 2+ into a porous anodic aluminum oxide (PAO) template with diameter about 50 nm. The surface of the samples were polished by 100 nm diamond particle then chemical polishing to give a very smooth surface (below ±10 nm/μm 2). The morphology properties were characterized by SEM and AFM. The bulk magnetic properties and domain structure of nanowire arrays were investigated by VSM and MFM respectively. We found that such alloy arrays showed strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy with easy axis parallel to nanowire arrays. Each nanowire was in single domain structure with several opposite single domains surrounding it. Additionally, we investigated the domain structure with a variable external magnetic field applied parallel to the nanowire arrays. The MFM results showed a good agreement with our magnetic hysteresis loop.

  10. Crystal structure of the TLDc domain of oxidation resistance protein 2 from zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Blaise, Mickaël; Alsarraf, Husam M A B; Wong, Jaslyn E M M; Midtgaard, Søren Roi; Laroche, Fabrice; Schack, Lotte; Spaink, Herman; Stougaard, Jens; Thirup, Søren

    2012-06-01

    The oxidation resistance proteins (OXR) help to protect eukaryotes from reactive oxygen species. The sole C-terminal domain of the OXR, named TLDc is sufficient to perform this function. However, the mechanism by which oxidation resistance occurs is poorly understood. We present here the crystal structure of the TLDc domain of the oxidation resistance protein 2 from zebrafish. The structure was determined by X-ray crystallography to atomic resolution (0.97Å) and adopts an overall globular shape. Two antiparallel β-sheets form a central β-sandwich, surrounded by two helices and two one-turn helices. The fold shares low structural similarity to known structures.

  11. It takes two to tango: the structure and function of LIM, RING, PHD and MYND domains.

    PubMed

    Matthews, J M; Bhati, M; Lehtomaki, E; Mansfield, R E; Cubeddu, L; Mackay, J P

    2009-01-01

    LIM (Lin-11, Isl-1, Mec-3), RING (Really interesting new gene), PHD (Plant homology domain) and MYND (myeloid, Nervy, DEAF-1) domains are all zinc-binding domains that ligate two zinc ions. Unlike the better known classical zinc fingers, these domains do not bind DNA, but instead mediate interactions with other proteins. LIM-domain containing proteins have diverse functions as regulators of gene expression, cell adhesion and motility and signal transduction. RING finger proteins are generally associated with ubiquitination; the presence of such a domain is the defining feature of a class of E3 ubiquitin protein ligases. PHD proteins have been associated with SUMOylation but most recently have emerged as a chromatin recognition motif that reads the methylation state of histones. The function of the MYND domain is less clear, but MYND domains are also found in proteins that have ubiquitin ligase and/or histone methyltransferase activity. Here we review the structure-function relationships for these domains and discuss strategies to modulate their activity.

  12. Structural Characterization of the Predominant Family of Histidine Kinase Sensor Domains

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Hendrickson, W

    2010-01-01

    Histidine kinase (HK) receptors are used ubiquitously by bacteria to monitor environmental changes, and they are also prevalent in plants, fungi, and other protists. Typical HK receptors have an extracellular sensor portion that detects a signal, usually a chemical ligand, and an intracellular transmitter portion that includes both the kinase domain itself and the site for histidine phosphorylation. While kinase domains are highly conserved, sensor domains are diverse. HK receptors function as dimers, but the molecular mechanism for signal transduction across cell membranes remains obscure. In this study, eight crystal structures were determined from five sensor domains representative of the most populated family, family HK1, found in a bioinformatic analysis of predicted sensor domains from transmembrane HKs. Each structure contains an inserted repeat of PhoQ/DcuS/CitA (PDC) domains, and similarity between sequence and structure is correlated across these and other double-PDC sensor proteins. Three of the five sensors crystallize as dimers that appear to be physiologically relevant, and comparisons between ligated structures and apo-state structures provide insights into signal transmission. Some HK1 family proteins prove to be sensors for chemotaxis proteins or diguanylate cyclase receptors, implying a combinatorial molecular evolution.

  13. Direct observation of Σ7 domain boundary core structure in magnetic skyrmion lattice

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Takao; So, Yeong-Gi; Kohno, Yuji; Sawada, Hidetaka; Ikuhara, Yuichi; Shibata, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    Skyrmions are topologically protected nanoscale magnetic spin entities in helical magnets. They behave like particles and tend to form hexagonal close-packed lattices, like atoms, as their stable structure. Domain boundaries in skyrmion lattices are considered to be important as they affect the dynamic properties of magnetic skyrmions. However, little is known about the fine structure of such skyrmion domain boundaries. We use differential phase contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy to directly visualize skyrmion domain boundaries in FeGe1−xSix induced by the influence of an “edge” of a crystal grain. Similar to hexagonal close-packed atomic lattices, we find the formation of skyrmion “Σ7” domain boundary, whose orientation relationship is predicted by the coincidence site lattice theory to be geometrically stable. On the contrary, the skyrmion domain boundary core structure shows a very different structure relaxation mode. Individual skyrmions can flexibly change their size and shape to accommodate local coordination changes and free volumes formed at the domain boundary cores. Although atomic rearrangement is a common structural relaxation mode in crystalline grain boundaries, skyrmions show very unique and thus different responses to such local lattice disorders. PMID:26933690

  14. Structural characterization of the predominant family of histidine kinase sensor domains.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhen; Hendrickson, Wayne A

    2010-07-16

    Histidine kinase (HK) receptors are used ubiquitously by bacteria to monitor environmental changes, and they are also prevalent in plants, fungi, and other protists. Typical HK receptors have an extracellular sensor portion that detects a signal, usually a chemical ligand, and an intracellular transmitter portion that includes both the kinase domain itself and the site for histidine phosphorylation. While kinase domains are highly conserved, sensor domains are diverse. HK receptors function as dimers, but the molecular mechanism for signal transduction across cell membranes remains obscure. In this study, eight crystal structures were determined from five sensor domains representative of the most populated family, family HK1, found in a bioinformatic analysis of predicted sensor domains from transmembrane HKs. Each structure contains an inserted repeat of PhoQ/DcuS/CitA (PDC) domains, and similarity between sequence and structure is correlated across these and other double-PDC sensor proteins. Three of the five sensors crystallize as dimers that appear to be physiologically relevant, and comparisons between ligated structures and apo-state structures provide insights into signal transmission. Some HK1 family proteins prove to be sensors for chemotaxis proteins or diguanylate cyclase receptors, implying a combinatorial molecular evolution.

  15. Molecular Basis for the Recognition of Structurally Distinct Autoinducer Mimics by the Pseudomonas aeruginosa LasR Quorum-Sensing Signaling Receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Zou, Yaozhong; Nair, Satish K.

    2010-01-12

    The human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa coordinates the expression of virulence factors using quorum sensing, a signaling cascade triggered by the activation of signal receptors by small-molecule autoinducers. These homoserine lactone autoinducers stabilize their cognate receptors and activate their functions as transcription factors. Because quorum sensing regulates the progression of infection and host immune resistance, significant efforts have been devoted toward the identification of small molecules that disrupt this process. Screening efforts have identified a class of triphenyl compounds that are structurally distinct from the homoserine lactone autoinducer, yet interact specifically and potently with LasR receptor to modulate quorum sensing (Muh et al., 2006a). Here we present the high-resolution crystal structures of the ligand binding domain of LasR in complex with the autoinducer N-3-oxo-dodecanoyl homoserine lactone (1.4 {angstrom} resolution), and with the triphenyl mimics TP-1, TP-3, and TP-4 (to between 1.8 {angstrom} and 2.3 {angstrom} resolution). These crystal structures provide a molecular rationale for understanding how chemically distinct compounds can be accommodated by a highly selective receptor, and provide the framework for the development of novel quorum-sensing regulators, utilizing the triphenyl scaffold.

  16. Comparative Genome Analyses Reveal Distinct Structure in the Saltwater Crocodile MHC

    PubMed Central

    Jaratlerdsiri, Weerachai; Deakin, Janine; Godinez, Ricardo M.; Shan, Xueyan; Peterson, Daniel G.; Marthey, Sylvain; Lyons, Eric; McCarthy, Fiona M.; Isberg, Sally R.; Higgins, Damien P.; Chong, Amanda Y.; John, John St; Glenn, Travis C.; Ray, David A.; Gongora, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a dynamic genome region with an essential role in the adaptive immunity of vertebrates, especially antigen presentation. The MHC is generally divided into subregions (classes I, II and III) containing genes of similar function across species, but with different gene number and organisation. Crocodylia (crocodilians) are widely distributed and represent an evolutionary distinct group among higher vertebrates, but the genomic organisation of MHC within this lineage has been largely unexplored. Here, we studied the MHC region of the saltwater crocodile (Crocodylus porosus) and compared it with that of other taxa. We characterised genomic clusters encompassing MHC class I and class II genes in the saltwater crocodile based on sequencing of bacterial artificial chromosomes. Six gene clusters spanning ∼452 kb were identified to contain nine MHC class I genes, six MHC class II genes, three TAP genes, and a TRIM gene. These MHC class I and class II genes were in separate scaffold regions and were greater in length (2–6 times longer) than their counterparts in well-studied fowl B loci, suggesting that the compaction of avian MHC occurred after the crocodilian-avian split. Comparative analyses between the saltwater crocodile MHC and that from the alligator and gharial showed large syntenic areas (>80% identity) with similar gene order. Comparisons with other vertebrates showed that the saltwater crocodile had MHC class I genes located along with TAP, consistent with birds studied. Linkage between MHC class I and TRIM39 observed in the saltwater crocodile resembled MHC in eutherians compared, but absent in avian MHC, suggesting that the saltwater crocodile MHC appears to have gene organisation intermediate between these two lineages. These observations suggest that the structure of the saltwater crocodile MHC, and other crocodilians, can help determine the MHC that was present in the ancestors of archosaurs. PMID:25503521

  17. Comparative genome analyses reveal distinct structure in the saltwater crocodile MHC.

    PubMed

    Jaratlerdsiri, Weerachai; Deakin, Janine; Godinez, Ricardo M; Shan, Xueyan; Peterson, Daniel G; Marthey, Sylvain; Lyons, Eric; McCarthy, Fiona M; Isberg, Sally R; Higgins, Damien P; Chong, Amanda Y; John, John St; Glenn, Travis C; Ray, David A; Gongora, Jaime

    2014-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) is a dynamic genome region with an essential role in the adaptive immunity of vertebrates, especially antigen presentation. The MHC is generally divided into subregions (classes I, II and III) containing genes of similar function across species, but with different gene number and organisation. Crocodylia (crocodilians) are widely distributed and represent an evolutionary distinct group among higher vertebrates, but the genomic organisation of MHC within this lineage has been largely unexplored. Here, we studied the MHC region of the saltwater crocodile (Crocodylus porosus) and compared it with that of other taxa. We characterised genomic clusters encompassing MHC class I and class II genes in the saltwater crocodile based on sequencing of bacterial artificial chromosomes. Six gene clusters spanning ∼452 kb were identified to contain nine MHC class I genes, six MHC class II genes, three TAP genes, and a TRIM gene. These MHC class I and class II genes were in separate scaffold regions and were greater in length (2-6 times longer) than their counterparts in well-studied fowl B loci, suggesting that the compaction of avian MHC occurred after the crocodilian-avian split. Comparative analyses between the saltwater crocodile MHC and that from the alligator and gharial showed large syntenic areas (>80% identity) with similar gene order. Comparisons with other vertebrates showed that the saltwater crocodile had MHC class I genes located along with TAP, consistent with birds studied. Linkage between MHC class I and TRIM39 observed in the saltwater crocodile resembled MHC in eutherians compared, but absent in avian MHC, suggesting that the saltwater crocodile MHC appears to have gene organisation intermediate between these two lineages. These observations suggest that the structure of the saltwater crocodile MHC, and other crocodilians, can help determine the MHC that was present in the ancestors of archosaurs.

  18. How do disordered regions achieve comparable functions to structured domains?

    PubMed

    Latysheva, Natasha S; Flock, Tilman; Weatheritt, Robert J; Chavali, Sreenivas; Babu, M Madan

    2015-06-01

    The traditional structure to function paradigm conceives of a protein's function as emerging from its structure. In recent years, it has been established that unstructured, intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs) in proteins are equally crucial elements for protein function, regulation and homeostasis. In this review, we provide a brief overview of how IDRs can perform similar functions to structured proteins, focusing especially on the formation of protein complexes and assemblies and the mediation of regulated conformational changes. In addition to highlighting instances of such functional equivalence, we explain how differences in the biological and physicochemical properties of IDRs allow them to expand the functional and regulatory repertoire of proteins. We also discuss studies that provide insights into how mutations within functional regions of IDRs can lead to human diseases.

  19. Structure of the F-spondin domain of mindin, an integrin ligand and pattern recognition molecule.

    PubMed

    Li, Yili; Cao, Chunzhang; Jia, Wei; Yu, Lily; Mo, Min; Wang, Qian; Huang, Yuping; Lim, Jae-Min; Ishihara, Mayumi; Wells, Lance; Azadi, Parastoo; Robinson, Howard; He, You-Wen; Zhang, Li; Mariuzza, Roy A

    2009-02-04

    Mindin (spondin-2) is an extracellular matrix protein of unknown structure that is required for efficient T-cell priming by dendritic cells. Additionally, mindin functions as a pattern recognition molecule for initiating innate immune responses. These dual functions are mediated by interactions with integrins and microbial pathogens, respectively. Mindin comprises an N-terminal F-spondin (FS) domain and C-terminal thrombospondin type 1 repeat (TSR). We determined the structure of the FS domain at 1.8-A resolution. The structure revealed an eight-stranded antiparallel beta-sandwich motif resembling that of membrane-targeting C2 domains, including a bound calcium ion. We demonstrated that the FS domain mediates integrin binding and identified the binding site by mutagenesis. The mindin FS domain therefore represents a new integrin ligand. We further showed that mindin recognizes lipopolysaccharide (LPS) through its TSR domain, and obtained evidence that C-mannosylation of the TSR influences LPS binding. Through these dual interactions, the FS and TSR domains of mindin promote activation of both adaptive and innate immune responses.

  20. Loop-length-dependent SVM prediction of domain linkers for high-throughput structural proteomics.

    PubMed

    Ebina, Teppei; Toh, Hiroyuki; Kuroda, Yutaka

    2009-01-01

    The prediction of structural domains in novel protein sequences is becoming of practical importance. One important area of application is the development of computer-aided techniques for identifying, at a low cost, novel protein domain targets for large-scale functional and structural proteomics. Here, we report a loop-length-dependent support vector machine (SVM) prediction of domain linkers, which are loops separating two structural domains. (DLP-SVM is freely available at: http://www.tuat.ac.jp/ approximately domserv/cgi-bin/DLP-SVM.cgi.) We constructed three loop-length-dependent SVM predictors of domain linkers (SVM-All, SVM-Long and SVM-Short), and also built SVM-Joint, which combines the results of SVM-Short and SVM-Long into a single consolidated prediction. The performances of SVM-Joint were, in most aspects, the highest, with a sensitivity of 59.7% and a specificity of 43.6%, which indicated that the specificity and the sensitivity were improved by over 2 and 3% respectively, when loop-length-dependent characteristics were taken into account. Furthermore, the sensitivity and specificity of SVM-Joint were, respectively, 37.6 and 17.4% higher than those of a random guess, and also superior to those of previously reported domain linker predictors. These results indicate that SVMs can be used to predict domain linkers, and that loop-length-dependent characteristics are useful for improving SVM prediction performances.

  1. Resilience of biochemical activity in protein domains in the face of structural divergence.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dapeng; Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Burroughs, A Maxwell; Aravind, L

    2014-06-01

    Recent studies point to the prevalence of the evolutionary phenomenon of drastic structural transformation of protein domains while continuing to preserve their basic biochemical function. These transformations span a wide spectrum, including simple domains incorporated into larger structural scaffolds, changes in the structural core, major active site shifts, topological rewiring and extensive structural transmogrifications. Proteins from biological conflict systems, such as toxin-antitoxin, restriction-modification, CRISPR/Cas, polymorphic toxin and secondary metabolism systems commonly display such transformations. These include endoDNases, metal-independent RNases, deaminases, ADP ribosyltransferases, immunity proteins, kinases and E1-like enzymes. In eukaryotes such transformations are seen in domains involved in chromatin-related peptide recognition and protein/DNA-modification. Intense selective pressures from 'arms-race'-like situations in conflict and macromolecular modification systems could favor drastic structural divergence while preserving function.

  2. Structure and dynamics of the epidermal growth factor receptor C-terminal phosphorylation domain.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nam Y; Hazlett, Theodore L; Koland, John G

    2006-05-01

    The C-terminal phosphorylation domain of the epidermal growth factor receptor is believed to regulate protein kinase activity as well as mediate the assembly of signal transduction complexes. The structure and dynamics of this proposed autoregulatory domain were examined by labeling the extreme C terminus of the EGFR intracellular domain (ICD) with an extrinsic fluorophore. Fluorescence anisotropy decay analysis of the nonphosphorylated EGFR-ICD yielded two rotational correlation times: a longer time, consistent with the global rotational motion of a 60- to 70-kDa protein with an elongated globular conformation, and a shorter time, presumably contributed by segmental motion near the fluorophore. A C-terminally truncated form of EGFR-ICD yielded a slow component consistent with the rotational motion of the 38-kDa kinase core. These findings suggested a structural arrangement of the EGFR-ICD in which the C-terminal phosphorylation domain interacts with the kinase core to move as an extended structure. A marked reduction in the larger correlation time of EGFR-ICD was observed upon its autophosphorylation. This dynamic component was faster than predicted for the globular motion of the 62-kDa EGFR-ICD, suggesting an increase in the mobility of the C-terminal domain and a likely displacement of this domain from the kinase core. The interaction between the SH2 domain of c-Src and the phosphorylated EGFR C-terminal domain was shown to impede its mobility. Circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated that the EGFR C-terminal domain possessed a significant level of secondary structure in the form of alpha-helices and beta-sheets, with a marginal change in beta-sheet content occurring upon phosphorylation.

  3. Structure and dynamics of the epidermal growth factor receptor C-terminal phosphorylation domain

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Nam Y.; Hazlett, Theodore L.; Koland, John G.

    2006-01-01

    The C-terminal phosphorylation domain of the epidermal growth factor receptor is believed to regulate protein kinase activity as well as mediate the assembly of signal transduction complexes. The structure and dynamics of this proposed autoregulatory domain were examined by labeling the extreme C terminus of the EGFR intracellular domain (ICD) with an extrinsic fluorophore. Fluorescence anisotropy decay analysis of the nonphosphorylated EGFR-ICD yielded two rotational correlation times: a longer time, consistent with the global rotational motion of a 60- to 70-kDa protein with an elongated globular conformation, and a shorter time, presumably contributed by segmental motion near the fluorophore. A C-terminally truncated form of EGFR-ICD yielded a slow component consistent with the rotational motion of the 38-kDa kinase core. These findings suggested a structural arrangement of the EGFR-ICD in which the C-terminal phosphorylation domain interacts with the kinase core to move as an extended structure. A marked reduction in the larger correlation time of EGFR-ICD was observed upon its autophosphorylation. This dynamic component was faster than predicted for the globular motion of the 62-kDa EGFR-ICD, suggesting an increase in the mobility of the C-terminal domain and a likely displacement of this domain from the kinase core. The interaction between the SH2 domain of c-Src and the phosphorylated EGFR C-terminal domain was shown to impede its mobility. Circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated that the EGFR C-terminal domain possessed a significant level of secondary structure in the form of α-helices and β-sheets, with a marginal change in β-sheet content occurring upon phosphorylation. PMID:16597832

  4. Structures of the Porphyromonas gingivalis OxyR regulatory domain explain differences in expression of the OxyR regulon in Escherichia coli and P. gingivalis

    SciTech Connect

    Svintradze, David V.; Peterson, Darrell L.; Collazo-Santiago, Evys A.; Lewis, Janina P.; Wright, H. Tonie

    2013-10-01

    Differences in OxyR regulated expression of oxidative stress genes between Escherichia coli and Porphyromonas gingivalis are explained by very minor differences in structure and amino-acid sequence of the respective oxidized and reduced OxyR regulatory domains. These differences affect OxyR quaternary structures and are predicted from model building of full length OxyR–DNA complexes to confer distinct modes of DNA binding on this transcriptional regulator. OxyR transcriptionally regulates Escherichia coli oxidative stress response genes through a reversibly reducible cysteine disulfide biosensor of cellular redox status. Structural changes induced by redox changes in these cysteines are conformationally transmitted to the dimer subunit interfaces, which alters dimer and tetramer interactions with DNA. In contrast to E. coli OxyR regulatory-domain structures, crystal structures of Porphyromonas gingivalis OxyR regulatory domains show minimal differences in dimer configuration on changes in cysteine disulfide redox status. This locked configuration of the P. gingivalis OxyR regulatory-domain dimer closely resembles the oxidized (activating) form of the E. coli OxyR regulatory-domain dimer. It correlates with the observed constitutive activation of some oxidative stress genes in P. gingivalis and is attributable to a single amino-acid insertion in P. gingivalis OxyR relative to E. coli OxyR. Modelling of full-length P. gingivalis, E. coli and Neisseria meningitidis OxyR–DNA complexes predicts different modes of DNA binding for the reduced and oxidized forms of each.

  5. Structural mapping of the coiled-coil domain of a bacterial condensin and comparative analyses across all domains of life suggest conserved features of SMC proteins.

    PubMed

    Waldman, Vincent M; Stanage, Tyler H; Mims, Alexandra; Norden, Ian S; Oakley, Martha G

    2015-06-01

    The structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) proteins form the cores of multisubunit complexes that are required for the segregation and global organization of chromosomes in all domains of life. These proteins share a common domain structure in which N- and C- terminal regions pack against one another to form a globular ATPase domain. This "head" domain is connected to a central, globular, "hinge" or dimerization domain by a long, antiparallel coiled coil. To date, most efforts for structural characterization of SMC proteins have focused on the globular domains. Recently, however, we developed a method to map interstrand interactions in the 50-nm coiled-coil domain of MukB, the divergent SMC protein found in γ-proteobacteria. Here, we apply that technique to map the structure of the Bacillus subtilis SMC (BsSMC) coiled-coil domain. We find that, in contrast to the relatively complicated coiled-coil domain of MukB, the BsSMC domain is nearly continuous, with only two detectable coiled-coil interruptions. Near the middle of the domain is a break in coiled-coil structure in which there are three more residues on the C-terminal strand than on the N-terminal strand. Close to the head domain, there is a second break with a significantly longer insertion on the same strand. These results provide an experience base that allows an informed interpretation of the output of coiled-coil prediction algorithms for this family of proteins. A comparison of such predictions suggests that these coiled-coil deviations are highly conserved across SMC types in a wide variety of organisms, including humans.

  6. Shape transitions and lattice structuring of ceramide-enriched domains generated by sphingomyelinase in lipid monolayers.

    PubMed

    Härtel, Steffen; Fanani, María Laura; Maggio, Bruno

    2005-01-01

    Sphingomyelinases (SMases) hydrolyze the membrane constituent sphingomyelin (SM) to phosphocholine and ceramide (Cer). Growing evidence supports that SMase-induced SM-->Cer conversion leads to the formation of lateral Cer-enriched domains which drive structural reorganization in lipid membranes. We previously provided visual evidence in real-time for the formation of Cer-enriched domains in SM monolayers through the action of the neutral Bacillus cereus SMase. In this work, we disclose a succession of discrete morphologic transitions and lateral organization of Cer-enriched domains that underlay the SMase-generated surface topography. We further reveal how these structural parameters couple to the generation of two-dimensional electrostatic fields, based upon the specific orientation of the lipid dipole moments in the Cer-enriched domains. Advanced image processing routines in combination with time-resolved epifluorescence microscopy on Langmuir monolayers revealed: 1), spontaneous nucleation and circular growth of Cer-enriched domains after injection of SMase into the subphase of the SM monolayer; 2), domain-intrinsic discrete transitions from circular to periodically undulating shapes followed by a second transition toward increasingly branched morphologies; 3), lateral superstructure organization into predominantly hexagonal domain lattices; 4), formation of super-superstructures by the hexagonal lattices; and 5), rotationally and laterally coupled domain movement before domain border contact. All patterns proved to be specific for the SMase-driven system since they could not be observed with Cer-enriched domains generated by defined mixtures of SM/Cer in enzyme-free monolayers at the same surface pressure (pi = 10 mN/m). Following the theories of lateral shape transitions, dipolar electrostatic interactions of lipid domains, and direct determinations of the monolayer dipole potential, our data show that SMase induces a domain-specific packing and orientation of

  7. Critical taper wedge strength varies with structural style: results from distinct-element models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strayer, L. M.; Suppe, J.

    2015-12-01

    Critical-taper theory has given diverse insight into kinematics, roles of erosion and sedimentation, and the morphology of compressive mountain belts. We have made progress by recasting the parameter-rich mathematics into a simpler form that describes a linear, co-varying relationship between surface slope and detachment dip (α, β), and internal- and basal-sliding strengths (W, F). Using distinct-element models, we tested this simpler theory over a range of wedge strengths and structural styles. We also obtained W & F from observations of surface slope α and detachment dip β in active natural systems, all of which including the numerical models, show wedges are strong but detachments are weak, with F/W=0.1 or less. Model-derived W & F vary about a mean that matches geometry-derived values. Time- and spatially-averaged dynamical F & W are observed to be equal to wedge-derived results. Critical taper reflects the dynamical strengths during wedge growth and is controlled dynamically as base friction varies between an assigned quasi-static value and lower values during slip events. In the wedge, W varies more than F, which may also be true for natural systems. Detachments have frictional stick/slip behavior on a basal wall, but the wedge has more going on within it. Tandem faulting & folding serve to simultaneously weaken and strengthen the wedge, and may occur anywhere: structural style appears to be important to wedge strength evolution. The dynamics of deformation within the wedge and slip upon the base control the finite wedge geometry: static strengths drop to dynamic levels during seismicity, resulting in materials and faults that are weaker than prescribed in models or determined by testing. Relationships between α and W & F are complex. All sudden, stepwise changes in α, W & F with time coincide with seismicity spikes in the models. Large events trigger or are triggered by large changes in F and W. We examine the complex details of dynamically driven

  8. Structurally distinct polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons induce differential transcriptional responses in developing zebrafish

    SciTech Connect

    Goodale, Britton C.; Tilton, Susan C.; Corvi, Margaret M.; Wilson, Glenn R.; Janszen, Derek B.; Anderson, Kim A.; Waters, Katrina M.; Tanguay, Robert L.

    2013-11-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous in the environment as components of fossil fuels and by-products of combustion. These multi-ring chemicals differentially activate the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) in a structurally dependent manner, and induce toxicity via both AHR-dependent and -independent mechanisms. PAH exposure is known to induce developmental malformations in zebrafish embryos, and recent studies have shown cardiac toxicity induced by compounds with low AHR affinity. Unraveling the potentially diverse molecular mechanisms of PAH toxicity is essential for understanding the hazard posed by complex PAH mixtures present in the environment. We analyzed transcriptional responses to PAH exposure in zebrafish embryos exposed to benz(a)anthracene (BAA), dibenzothiophene (DBT) and pyrene (PYR) at concentrations that induced developmental malformations by 120 h post-fertilization (hpf). Whole genome microarray analysis of mRNA expression at 24 and 48 hpf identified genes that were differentially regulated over time and in response to the three PAH structures. PAH body burdens were analyzed at both time points using GC–MS, and demonstrated differences in PAH uptake into the embryos. This was important for discerning dose-related differences from those that represented unique molecular mechanisms. While BAA misregulated the least number of transcripts, it caused strong induction of cyp1a and other genes known to be downstream of the AHR, which were not induced by the other two PAHs. Analysis of functional roles of misregulated genes and their predicted regulatory transcription factors also distinguished the BAA response from regulatory networks disrupted by DBT and PYR exposure. These results indicate that systems approaches can be used to classify the toxicity of PAHs based on the networks perturbed following exposure, and may provide a path for unraveling the toxicity of complex PAH mixtures. - Highlights: • Defined global mRNA expression

  9. Hypervariable Domains of nsP3 Proteins of New World and Old World Alphaviruses Mediate Formation of Distinct, Virus-Specific Protein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Foy, Niall J.; Akhrymuk, Maryna; Akhrymuk, Ivan; Atasheva, Svetlana; Bopda-Waffo, Alain; Frolov, Ilya

    2013-01-01

    Alphaviruses are a group of single-stranded RNA viruses with genomes of positive polarity. They are divided into two geographically isolated groups: the Old World and the New World alphaviruses. Despite their similar genome organizations and virion structures, they differ in many aspects of pathogenesis and interaction with the host cell. Here we present new data highlighting previously unknown differences between these two groups. We found that nsP3 proteins of Sindbis virus (SINV) and Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) form cytoplasmic complexes with different morphologies and protein compositions. Unlike the amorphous aggregates formed by SINV nsP3 and other Old World alphavirus-specific nsP3s, VEEV nsP3 forms unique, large spherical structures with striking symmetry. Moreover, VEEV nsP3 does not interact with proteins previously identified as major components of SINV nsP3 complexes, such as G3BP1 and G3BP2. Importantly, the morphology of the complexes and the specificity of the interaction with cellular proteins are largely determined by the hypervariable domain (HVD) of nsP3. Replacement of the VEEV nsP3 HVD with the corresponding domain of SINV nsP3 rendered this protein capable of interaction with G3BPs. Conversely, replacement of the SINV nsP3 HVD with that of VEEV abolished SINV nsP3's interaction with G3BPs. The replacement of natural HVDs with those from heterologous viruses did not abrogate virus replication, despite these fragments demonstrating very low levels of sequence identity. Our data suggest that in spite of the differences in morphology and composition of the SINV- and VEEV-specific nsP3 complexes, it is likely that they have similar functions in virus replication and modification of the cellular environment. PMID:23221551

  10. T3 glycoprotein is functional although structurally distinct on human T-cell receptor. gamma. T lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Krangel, M.S.; Bierer, B.E.; Devlin, P.; Clabby, M.; Strominger, J.L.; McLean, J.; Brenner, M.B.

    1987-06-01

    The T-cell receptor (TCR) ..gamma.. gene product occurs in association with T3 (CD3) polypeptides on the surface of human T lymphocytes. TCR ..gamma.. lymphocytes express arrays of T3 polypeptides distinct from those typically observed on TCR ..cap alpha beta.. lymphocytes. This report demonstrates that identical T3 ..gamma.., delta, and element of polypeptides are synth