Science.gov

Sample records for distributed block virtualization

  1. Distributed Virtual System (DIVIRS) project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schorr, Herbert; Neuman, B. Clifford

    1993-01-01

    As outlined in the continuation proposal 92-ISI-50R (revised) on NASA cooperative agreement NCC 2-539, the investigators are developing software, including a system manager and a job manager, that will manage available resources and that will enable programmers to develop and execute parallel applications in terms of a virtual configuration of processors, hiding the mapping to physical nodes; developing communications routines that support the abstractions implemented; continuing the development of file and information systems based on the Virtual System Model; and incorporating appropriate security measures to allow the mechanisms developed to be used on an open network. The goal throughout the work is to provide a uniform model that can be applied to both parallel and distributed systems. The authors believe that multiprocessor systems should exist in the context of distributed systems, allowing them to be more easily shared by those that need them. The work provides the mechanisms through which nodes on multiprocessors are allocated to jobs running within the distributed system and the mechanisms through which files needed by those jobs can be located and accessed.

  2. Distributed Virtual System (DIVIRS) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schorr, Herbert; Neuman, B. Clifford

    1993-01-01

    As outlined in our continuation proposal 92-ISI-50R (revised) on contract NCC 2-539, we are (1) developing software, including a system manager and a job manager, that will manage available resources and that will enable programmers to program parallel applications in terms of a virtual configuration of processors, hiding the mapping to physical nodes; (2) developing communications routines that support the abstractions implemented in item one; (3) continuing the development of file and information systems based on the virtual system model; and (4) incorporating appropriate security measures to allow the mechanisms developed in items 1 through 3 to be used on an open network. The goal throughout our work is to provide a uniform model that can be applied to both parallel and distributed systems. We believe that multiprocessor systems should exist in the context of distributed systems, allowing them to be more easily shared by those that need them. Our work provides the mechanisms through which nodes on multiprocessors are allocated to jobs running within the distributed system and the mechanisms through which files needed by those jobs can be located and accessed.

  3. DIstributed VIRtual System (DIVIRS) project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schorr, Herbert; Neuman, Clifford B.

    1995-01-01

    As outlined in our continuation proposal 92-ISI-50R (revised) on NASA cooperative agreement NCC2-539, we are (1) developing software, including a system manager and a job manager, that will manage available resources and that will enable programmers to develop and execute parallel applications in terms of a virtual configuration of processors, hiding the mapping to physical nodes; (2) developing communications routines that support the abstractions implemented in item one; (3) continuing the development of file and information systems based on the Virtual System Model; and (4) incorporating appropriate security measures to allow the mechanisms developed in items 1 through 3 to be used on an open network. The goal throughout our work is to provide a uniform model that can be applied to both parallel and distributed systems. We believe that multiprocessor systems should exist in the context of distributed systems, allowing them to be more easily shared by those that need them. Our work provides the mechanisms through which nodes on multiprocessors are allocated to jobs running within the distributed system and the mechanisms through which files needed by those jobs can be located and accessed.

  4. DIstributed VIRtual System (DIVIRS) project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schorr, Herbert; Neuman, B. Clifford

    1994-01-01

    As outlined in our continuation proposal 92-ISI-. OR (revised) on NASA cooperative agreement NCC2-539, we are (1) developing software, including a system manager and a job manager, that will manage available resources and that will enable programmers to develop and execute parallel applications in terms of a virtual configuration of processors, hiding the mapping to physical nodes; (2) developing communications routines that support the abstractions implemented in item one; (3) continuing the development of file and information systems based on the Virtual System Model; and (4) incorporating appropriate security measures to allow the mechanisms developed in items 1 through 3 to be used on an open network. The goal throughout our work is to provide a uniform model that can be applied to both parallel and distributed systems. We believe that multiprocessor systems should exist in the context of distributed systems, allowing them to be more easily shared by those that need them. Our work provides the mechanisms through which nodes on multiprocessors are allocated to jobs running within the distributed system and the mechanisms through which files needed by those jobs can be located and accessed.

  5. Evidence of Blocking with Geometric Cues in a Virtual Watermaze

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Redhead, Edward S.; Hamilton, Derek A.

    2009-01-01

    Three computer based experiments, testing human participants in a non-immersive virtual watermaze task, used a blocking design to assess whether two sets of geometric cues would compete in a manner described by associative models of learning. In stage 1, participants were required to discriminate between visually distinct platforms. In stage 2,…

  6. Distributed virtual environment for emergency medical training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stytz, Martin R.; Banks, Sheila B.; Garcia, Brian W.; Godsell-Stytz, Gayl M.

    1997-07-01

    In many professions where individuals must work in a team in a high stress environment to accomplish a time-critical task, individual and team performance can benefit from joint training using distributed virtual environments (DVEs). One professional field that lacks but needs a high-fidelity team training environment is the field of emergency medicine. Currently, emergency department (ED) medical personnel train by using words to create a metal picture of a situation for the physician and staff, who then cooperate to solve the problems portrayed by the word picture. The need in emergency medicine for realistic virtual team training is critical because ED staff typically encounter rarely occurring but life threatening situations only once in their careers and because ED teams currently have no realistic environment in which to practice their team skills. The resulting lack of experience and teamwork makes diagnosis and treatment more difficult. Virtual environment based training has the potential to redress these shortfalls. The objective of our research is to develop a state-of-the-art virtual environment for emergency medicine team training. The virtual emergency room (VER) allows ED physicians and medical staff to realistically prepare for emergency medical situations by performing triage, diagnosis, and treatment on virtual patients within an environment that provides them with the tools they require and the team environment they need to realistically perform these three tasks. There are several issues that must be addressed before this vision is realized. The key issues deal with distribution of computations; the doctor and staff interface to the virtual patient and ED equipment; the accurate simulation of individual patient organs' response to injury, medication, and treatment; and an accurate modeling of the symptoms and appearance of the patient while maintaining a real-time interaction capability. Our ongoing work addresses all of these issues. In this

  7. Exploiting virtual synchrony in distributed systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birman, Kenneth P.; Joseph, Thomas A.

    1987-01-01

    Applications of a virtually synchronous environment are described for distributed programming, which underlies a collection of distributed programming tools in the ISIS2 system. A virtually synchronous environment allows processes to be structured into process groups, and makes events like broadcasts to the group as an entity, group membership changes, and even migration of an activity from one place to another appear to occur instantaneously, in other words, synchronously. A major advantage to this approach is that many aspects of a distributed application can be treated independently without compromising correctness. Moreover, user code that is designed as if the system were synchronous can often be executed concurrently. It is argued that this approach to building distributed and fault tolerant software is more straightforward, more flexible, and more likely to yield correct solutions than alternative approaches.

  8. Performance studies on distributed virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Jens; Grunzke, Richard; Herres-Pawlis, Sonja; Hoffmann, Alexander; de la Garza, Luis; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Nagel, Wolfgang E; Gesing, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Virtual high-throughput screening (vHTS) is an invaluable method in modern drug discovery. It permits screening large datasets or databases of chemical structures for those structures binding possibly to a drug target. Virtual screening is typically performed by docking code, which often runs sequentially. Processing of huge vHTS datasets can be parallelized by chunking the data because individual docking runs are independent of each other. The goal of this work is to find an optimal splitting maximizing the speedup while considering overhead and available cores on Distributed Computing Infrastructures (DCIs). We have conducted thorough performance studies accounting not only for the runtime of the docking itself, but also for structure preparation. Performance studies were conducted via the workflow-enabled science gateway MoSGrid (Molecular Simulation Grid). As input we used benchmark datasets for protein kinases. Our performance studies show that docking workflows can be made to scale almost linearly up to 500 concurrent processes distributed even over large DCIs, thus accelerating vHTS campaigns significantly. PMID:25032219

  9. Virtuality Distributions and Pion Transition Form Factor

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Radyushkin, Anatoly V.

    2015-03-01

    Using the example of hard exclusive transition process γ*γ → π0 at the handbag level, we outline basics of a new approach to transverse momentum dependence in hard processes. In coordinate representation, matrix elements of operators (in the simplest case, bilocal O(0,z)) describing a hadron with momentum p, are functions of (pz) and z2 parametrized through virtuality distribution amplitudes (VDA) Φ(x, σ), with x being Fourier-conjugate to (pz) and σ Laplace-conjugate to z2. For intervals with z+=0, we introduce the transverse momentum distribution amplitude (TMDA) Ψ(x, k_perp), and write it in terms of VDA Φ(x,σ). We propose models for softmore » VDAs/TMDAs, and use them for comparison of handbag results with experimental (BaBar and BELLE) data. We also discuss the generation of hard tails of TMDAs from initially soft forms.« less

  10. Virtuality Distributions and Pion Transition Form Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radyushkin, A. V.

    2015-02-01

    Using the example of hard exclusive transition process γ*γ → π0 at the handbag level, we outline basics of a new approach to transverse momentum dependence in hard processes. In coordinate representation, matrix elements of operators (in the simplest case, bilocal 𝒪(0, z)) describing a hadron with momentum p, are functions of (pz) and z2 parametrized through virtuality distribution amplitudes (VDA) Φ(x, σ), with x being Fourier-conjugate to (pz) and σ Laplace-conjugate to z2. For intervals with z+ = 0, we introduce the transverse momentum distribution amplitude (TMDA) Ψ(x, k⊥), and write it in terms of VDA Φ(x, σ). We propose models for soft VDAs/TMDAs, and use them for comparison of handbag results with experimental (BaBar and BELLE) data. We also discuss the generation of hard tails of TMDAs from initially soft forms.

  11. Virtual Solar Observatory Distributed Query Construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurman, J. B.; Dimitoglou, G.; Bogart, R.; Davey, A.; Hill, F.; Martens, P.

    2003-01-01

    Through a prototype implementation (Tian et al., this meeting) the VSO has already demonstrated the capability of unifying geographically distributed data sources following the Web Services paradigm and utilizing mechanisms such as the Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP). So far, four participating sites (Stanford, Montana State University, National Solar Observatory and the Solar Data Analysis Center) permit Web-accessible, time-based searches that allow browse access to a number of diverse data sets. Our latest work includes the extension of the simple, time-based queries to include numerous other searchable observation parameters. For VSO users, this extended functionality enables more refined searches. For the VSO, it is a proof of concept that more complex, distributed queries can be effectively constructed and that results from heterogeneous, remote sources can be synthesized and presented to users as a single, virtual data product.

  12. Distributed Slip Model for Simulating Virtual Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shani-Kadmiel, S.; Tsesarsky, M.; Gvirtzman, Z.

    2014-12-01

    We develop a physics based, generic finite fault source, which we call the Distributed Slip Model (DSM) for simulating large virtual earthquakes. This task is a necessary step towards ground motion prediction in earthquake-prone areas with limited instrumental coverage. A reliable ground motion prediction based on virtual earthquakes must account for site, path, and source effects. Assessment of site effect mainly depends on near-surface material properties which are relatively well constrained, using geotechnical site data and borehole measurements. Assessment of path effect depends on the deeper geological structure, which is also typically known to an acceptable resolution. Contrarily to these two effects, which remain constant for a given area of interest, the earthquake rupture process and geometry varies from one earthquake to the other. In this study we focus on a finite fault source representation which is both generic and physics-based, for simulating large earthquakes where limited knowledge is available. Thirteen geometric and kinematic parameters are used to describe the smooth "pseudo-Gaussian" slip distribution, such that slip decays from a point of peak slip within an elliptical rupture patch to zero at the borders of the patch. Radiation pattern and spectral charectaristics of our DSM are compared to those of commonly used finite fault models, i.e., the classical Haskell's Model (HM) and the modified HM with Radial Rupture Propagation (HM-RRP) and the Point Source Model (PSM). Ground motion prediction based on our DSM benefits from the symmetry of the PSM and the directivity of the HM while overcoming inadequacy for modeling large earthquakes of the former and the non-physical uniform slip of the latter.

  13. Virtuality Distributions and Pion Transition Form Factor

    SciTech Connect

    Radyushkin, Anatoly V.

    2015-03-01

    Using the example of hard exclusive transition process γ*γ → π0 at the handbag level, we outline basics of a new approach to transverse momentum dependence in hard processes. In coordinate representation, matrix elements of operators (in the simplest case, bilocal O(0,z)) describing a hadron with momentum p, are functions of (pz) and z2 parametrized through virtuality distribution amplitudes (VDA) Φ(x, σ), with x being Fourier-conjugate to (pz) and σ Laplace-conjugate to z2. For intervals with z+=0, we introduce the transverse momentum distribution amplitude (TMDA) Ψ(x, k_perp), and write it in terms of VDA Φ(x,σ). We propose models for soft VDAs/TMDAs, and use them for comparison of handbag results with experimental (BaBar and BELLE) data. We also discuss the generation of hard tails of TMDAs from initially soft forms.

  14. MOCHA/ISAIA: Building Blocks for Interoperability in a Virtual Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, C. Y.; Hanisch, R. J.; McGlynn, T. A.; Plante, R. L.; Shaya, E. J.

    2000-12-01

    Some basic building blocks must be put in place before we can realize the vision of a National or Global Virtual Observatory. MOCHA is a project that is building a prototype interoperability infrastructure for a Virtual Observatory. ISAIA is an effort that defines the astrophysics query profile to enables searches to networked astrophysics resources that have very different data structures. Both projects are funded by the NASA Applied Information Systems Research Program. We shall describe a joint demonstration by these two projects that involves four data centers: the Astronomical Data Center (ADC), the High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC), the Astronomical Digital Image Library (ADIL), the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI); and the University of Maryland. We shall show how a positional query for astrophysical data in a region of arbitrary geometrical boundary can be carried out using these basic components. We shall also describe a scheme by which user software can be deployed to a data center to extend its services, and how the system will return to the researcher only the desired scientific results. This capability is very important for multispectral studies using the large all-sky surveys that reside in distributed data archives.

  15. Recoverable distributed shared virtual memory - Memory coherence and storage structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Kun-Lung; Fuchs, W. Kent

    1989-01-01

    This paper examines the problem of implementing rollback recovery in multicomputer distributed shared virtual memory environments, in which the shared memory is implemented in software and exists only virtually. A user-transparent checkpointing recovery scheme and new twin-page disk storage management are presented to implement a recoverable distributed shared virtual memory. The checkpointing scheme is integrated with the shared virtual memory management. The twin-page disk approach allows incremental checkpointing without an explicit undo at the time of recovery. A single consistent checkpoint state is maintained on stable disk storage. The recoverable distributed shared virtual memory allows the system to restart computation from a previous checkpoint due to a processor failure without a global restart.

  16. Virtual Observatory and Distributed Data Mining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borne, Kirk D.

    2012-03-01

    New modes of discovery are enabled by the growth of data and computational resources (i.e., cyberinfrastructure) in the sciences. This cyberinfrastructure includes structured databases, virtual observatories (distributed data, as described in Section 20.2.1 of this chapter), high-performance computing (petascale machines), distributed computing (e.g., the Grid, the Cloud, and peer-to-peer networks), intelligent search and discovery tools, and innovative visualization environments. Data streams from experiments, sensors, and simulations are increasingly complex and growing in volume. This is true in most sciences, including astronomy, climate simulations, Earth observing systems, remote sensing data collections, and sensor networks. At the same time, we see an emerging confluence of new technologies and approaches to science, most clearly visible in the growing synergism of the four modes of scientific discovery: sensors-modeling-computing-data (Eastman et al. 2005). This has been driven by numerous developments, including the information explosion, development of large-array sensors, acceleration in high-performance computing (HPC) power, advances in algorithms, and efficient modeling techniques. Among these, the most extreme is the growth in new data. Specifically, the acquisition of data in all scientific disciplines is rapidly accelerating and causing a data glut (Bell et al. 2007). It has been estimated that data volumes double every year—for example, the NCSA (National Center for Supercomputing Applications) reported that their users cumulatively generated one petabyte of data over the first 19 years of NCSA operation, but they then generated their next one petabyte in the next year alone, and the data production has been growing by almost 100% each year after that (Butler 2008). The NCSA example is just one of many demonstrations of the exponential (annual data-doubling) growth in scientific data collections. In general, this putative data-doubling is an

  17. Virtual global positioning system for distributed interactive simulation environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Gary; Stytz, Martin R.; Banks, Sheila B.

    1997-07-01

    A major shortfall in the fidelity of current military distributed virtual environments (DVEs) is the lack of virtual global positioning system (GPS) timing and position signals for entities within the environment. The DVE's usefulness is reduced because positional errors and positional accuracy that would be available in the real world are not present in the DVE. This, in turn, affects the validity of the results of training, analysis, and evaluations involving systems that rely on GPS. The magnitude of the affect depends on the degree that the systems involved in the DVE rely on GPS in the real world. The project reported in this paper addresses this deficit in current military DVEs. The capability we developed to provide a virtual GPS-based navigation capability within a DVE is based upon three components. These components are a complete virtual GPS satellite constellation, a means for broadcasting GPS signals using the Distributed Interactive Simulation (DIS) simulation protocols, and a software system, the Virtual GPS Receiver (VGPSR), to calculate simulation entity position using the virtual GPS time and position signals. The virtual GPS satellites are propagated in their orbits using the solar system modeler (SM). The SM also performs the simulated GPS signal broadcast by transmitting a DIS protocol data unit (PDU) with the data that would appear within a real world GPS satellite broadcast. The VGPSR is a plug-in module available for simulation applications that require virtual GPS navigation. To demonstrate the capability of this system, we used the VGPSR in conjunction with the virtual cockpit to simulate virtual weapons deployment. We present the design of the VGPSR and the design of the modules added to the SM for GPS broadcast. We describe the calculations the system performs to calculate position in the virtual environment and we describe the accuracy and performance the system achieves when calculating virtual environment position using our system. We

  18. A distributed framework for inter-domain virtual network embedding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zihua; Han, Yanni; Lin, Tao; Tang, Hui

    2013-03-01

    Network virtualization has been a promising technology for overcoming the Internet impasse. A main challenge in network virtualization is the efficient assignment of virtual resources. Existing work focused on intra-domain solutions whereas inter-domain situation is more practical in realistic setting. In this paper, we present a distributed inter-domain framework for mapping virtual networks to physical networks which can ameliorate the performance of the virtual network embedding. The distributed framework is based on a Multi-agent approach. A set of messages for information exchange is defined. We design different operations and IPTV use scenarios to validate the advantages of our framework. Use cases shows that our framework can solve the inter-domain problem efficiently.

  19. Distributed Cognition in a Virtual World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillen, Julia; Ferguson, Rebecca; Peachey, Anna; Twining, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Over a 13-month period, the Schome Park Programme operated the first "closed" (i.e. protected) Teen Second Life project in Europe. The project organised diverse educational events that centred on use of a virtual world and an associated asynchronous forum and wiki. Students and staff together exploited the affordances of the environment to develop…

  20. The MammoGrid Virtual Organisation - Federating Distributed Mammograms.

    PubMed

    Estrella, Florida; McClatchey, Richard; Rogulin, Dmitry

    2005-01-01

    The MammoGrid project aims to deliver a prototype which enables the effective collaboration between radiologists using grid, service-orientation and database solutions. The grid technologies and service-based database management solution provide the platform for integrating diverse and distributed resources, creating what is called a 'virtual organisation'. The MammoGrid Virtual Organisation facilitates the sharing and coordinated access to mammography data, medical imaging software and computing resources of participating hospitals. Hospitals manage their local database of mammograms, but in addition, radiologists who are part of this organisation can share mammograms, reports, results and image analysis software. The MammoGrid Virtual Organisation is a federation of autonomous multi-centres sites which transcends national boundaries. This paper outlines the service-based approach in the creation and management of the federated distributed mammography database and discusses the role of virtual organisations in distributed image analysis.

  1. DIVE: a scaleable network architecture for distributed virtual environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frécon, Emmanuel; Stenius, Mårten

    1998-09-01

    We introduce the network software architecture of the distributed interactive virtual environment platform. The platform is designed to scale with a large number of simultaneous participants, while ensuring maximum interaction at each site. Scalability is achieved by making extensive use of multicast techniques and by partitioning the virtual space into smaller regions. We also present an application-level backbone that can connect islands of multicast-aware networks together.

  2. EGR Distribution in Engine Cylinders Using Advanced Virtual Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Xuetong

    2000-08-20

    Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) is a well-known technology for reduction of NOx in diesel engines. With the demand for extremely low engine out NOx emissions, it is important to have a consistently balanced EGR flow to individual engine cylinders. Otherwise, the variation in the cylinders' NOx contribution to the overall engine emissions will produce unacceptable variability. This presentation will demonstrate the effective use of advanced virtual simulation in the development of a balanced EGR distribution in engine cylinders. An initial design is analyzed reflecting the variance in the EGR distribution, quantitatively and visually. Iterative virtual lab tests result in an optimized system.

  3. Generalized Parton Distributions And Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering At Clas

    SciTech Connect

    De Masi, Rita

    2007-09-01

    The deeply virtual Compton scattering is the simplest process to access the generalized parton distributions of the nucleon. A dedicated large statistics experiment for the measurement of deeply virtual Compton scattering with a 6 GeV polarized electron beam on a proton target has been performed at the Hall-B of Jefferson Laboratory with the CLAS spectrometer. The experiment covered a wide kinematic range, allowing the study of the beam spin asymmetry as function of the Bjorken variable xB, the Mandelstam variable t, the virtual photon four-momentum squared Q2 and the angle phi between leptonic and hadronic planes. The preliminary results are in agreement with previous measurements and with the predicted twist-2 dominance.

  4. Distributed deformation and block rotation in 3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scotti, Oona; Nur, Amos; Estevez, Raul

    1990-01-01

    The authors address how block rotation and complex distributed deformation in the Earth's shallow crust may be explained within a stationary regional stress field. Distributed deformation is characterized by domains of sub-parallel fault-bounded blocks. In response to the contemporaneous activity of neighboring domains some domains rotate, as suggested by both structural and paleomagnetic evidence. Rotations within domains are achieved through the contemporaneous slip and rotation of the faults and of the blocks they bound. Thus, in regions of distributed deformation, faults must remain active in spite of their poor orientation in the stress field. The authors developed a model that tracks the orientation of blocks and their bounding faults during rotation in a 3D stress field. In the model, the effective stress magnitudes of the principal stresses (sigma sub 1, sigma sub 2, and sigma sub 3) are controlled by the orientation of fault sets in each domain. Therefore, adjacent fault sets with differing orientations may be active and may display differing faulting styles, and a given set of faults may change its style of motion as it rotates within a stationary stress regime. The style of faulting predicted by the model depends on a dimensionless parameter phi = (sigma sub 2 - sigma sub 3)/(sigma sub 1 - sigma sub 3). Thus, the authors present a model for complex distributed deformation and complex offset history requiring neither geographical nor temporal changes in the stress regime. They apply the model to the Western Transverse Range domain of southern California. There, it is mechanically feasible for blocks and faults to have experienced up to 75 degrees of clockwise rotation in a phi = 0.1 strike-slip stress regime. The results of the model suggest that this domain may first have accommodated deformation along preexisting NNE-SSW faults, reactivated as normal faults. After rotation, these same faults became strike-slip in nature.

  5. Distributed collaborative environments for virtual capability-based planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQuay, William K.

    2003-09-01

    Distributed collaboration is an emerging technology that will significantly change how decisions are made in the 21st century. Collaboration involves two or more geographically dispersed individuals working together to share and exchange data, information, knowledge, and actions. The marriage of information, collaboration, and simulation technologies provides the decision maker with a collaborative virtual environment for planning and decision support. This paper reviews research that is focusing on the applying open standards agent-based framework with integrated modeling and simulation to a new Air Force initiative in capability-based planning and the ability to implement it in a distributed virtual environment. Virtual Capability Planning effort will provide decision-quality knowledge for Air Force resource allocation and investment planning including examining proposed capabilities and cost of alternative approaches, the impact of technologies, identification of primary risk drivers, and creation of executable acquisition strategies. The transformed Air Force business processes are enabled by iterative use of constructive and virtual modeling, simulation, and analysis together with information technology. These tools are applied collaboratively via a technical framework by all the affected stakeholders - warfighter, laboratory, product center, logistics center, test center, and primary contractor.

  6. Running a distributed virtual observatory: U.S. Virtual Astronomical Observatory operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGlynn, Thomas A.; Hanisch, Robert J.; Berriman, G. Bruce; Thakar, Aniruddha R.

    2012-09-01

    Operation of the US Virtual Astronomical Observatory shares some issues with modern physical observatories, e.g., intimidating data volumes and rapid technological change, and must also address unique concerns like the lack of direct control of the underlying and scattered data resources, and the distributed nature of the observatory itself. In this paper we discuss how the VAO has addressed these challenges to provide the astronomical community with a coherent set of science-enabling tools and services. The distributed nature of our virtual observatory-with data and personnel spanning geographic, institutional and regime boundaries-is simultaneously a major operational headache and the primary science motivation for the VAO. Most astronomy today uses data from many resources. Facilitation of matching heterogeneous datasets is a fundamental reason for the virtual observatory. Key aspects of our approach include continuous monitoring and validation of VAO and VO services and the datasets provided by the community, monitoring of user requests to optimize access, caching for large datasets, and providing distributed storage services that allow user to collect results near large data repositories. Some elements are now fully implemented, while others are planned for subsequent years. The distributed nature of the VAO requires careful attention to what can be a straightforward operation at a conventional observatory, e.g., the organization of the web site or the collection and combined analysis of logs. Many of these strategies use and extend protocols developed by the international virtual observatory community. Our long-term challenge is working with the underlying data providers to ensure high quality implementation of VO data access protocols (new and better 'telescopes'), assisting astronomical developers to build robust integrating tools (new 'instruments'), and coordinating with the research community to maximize the science enabled.

  7. TeleMed: A distributed virtual patient record system

    SciTech Connect

    Forslund, D.W.; Phillips, R.L.; Kilman, D.G.; Cook, J.L.

    1996-06-01

    TeleMed is a distributed diagnosis and analysis system, which permits physicians who are not collocated to consult on the status of a patient. The patient`s record is dynamically constructed from data that may reside at several sites but which can be quickly assembled for viewing by pointing to the patient`s name. Then, a graphical patient record appears, through which consulting physicians can retrieve textual and radiographic data with a single mouse click. TeleMed uses modern distributed object technology and emerging telecollaboration tools. The authors describe in this paper some of the motivation for this change, what they mean by a virtual patient record, and some results of some early implementations of a virtual patient record.

  8. Dynamic shared state maintenance in distributed virtual environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamza-Lup, Felix George

    Advances in computer networks and rendering systems facilitate the creation of distributed collaborative environments in which the distribution of information at remote locations allows efficient communication. Particularly challenging are distributed interactive Virtual Environments (VE) that allow knowledge sharing through 3D information. The purpose of this work is to address the problem of latency in distributed interactive VE and to develop a conceptual model for consistency maintenance in these environments based on the participant interaction model. An area that needs to be explored is the relationship between the dynamic shared state and the interaction with the virtual entities present in the shared scene. Mixed Reality (MR) and VR environments must bring the human participant interaction into the loop through a wide range of electronic motion sensors, and haptic devices. Part of the work presented here defines a novel criterion for categorization of distributed interactive VE and introduces, as well as analyzes, an adaptive synchronization algorithm for consistency maintenance in such environments. As part of the work, a distributed interactive Augmented Reality (AR) testbed and the algorithm implementation details are presented. Currently the testbed is part of several research efforts at the Optical Diagnostics and Applications Laboratory including 3D visualization applications using custom built head-mounted displays (HMDs) with optical motion tracking and a medical training prototype for endotracheal intubation and medical prognostics. An objective method using quaternion calculus is applied for the algorithm assessment. In spite of significant network latency, results show that the dynamic shared state can be maintained consistent at multiple remotely located sites. In further consideration of the latency problems and in the light of the current trends in interactive distributed VE applications, we propose a hybrid distributed system architecture for

  9. Deeply Virtual Exclusive Processes and Generalized Parton Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    ,

    2011-06-01

    The goal of the comprehensive program in Deeply Virtual Exclusive Scattering at Jefferson Laboratory is to create transverse spatial images of quarks and gluons as a function of their longitudinal momentum fraction in the proton, the neutron, and in nuclei. These functions are the Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) of the target nucleus. Cross section measurements of the Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) reaction ep {yields} ep{gamma} in Hall A support the QCD factorization of the scattering amplitude for Q^2 {>=} 2 GeV^2. Quasi-free neutron-DVCS measurements on the Deuteron indicate sensitivity to the quark angular momentum sum rule. Fully exclusive H(e, e'p{gamma} ) measurements have been made in a wide kinematic range in CLAS with polarized beam, and with both unpolarized and longitudinally polarized targets. Existing models are qualitatively consistent with the JLab data, but there is a clear need for less constrained models. Deeply virtual vector meson production is studied in CLAS. The 12 GeV upgrade will be essential for for these channels. The {rho} and {omega} channels reactions offer the prospect of flavor sensitivity to the quark GPDs, while the {phi}-production channel is dominated by the gluon distribution.

  10. Addressing security issues related to virtual institute distributed activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stytz, Martin R.; Banks, Sheila B.

    2008-03-01

    One issue confounding the development and experimentation of distributed modeling and simulation environments is the inability of the project team to identify and collaborate with resources, both human and technical, from outside the United States. This limitation is especially significant within the human behavior representation area where areas such as cultural effects research and joint command team behavior modeling require the participation of various cultural and national representatives. To address this limitation, as well as other human behavior representation research issues, NATO Research and Technology Organization initiated a project to develop a NATO virtual institute that enables more effective and more collaborative research into human behavior representation. However, in building and operating a virtual institute one of the chief concerns must be the cyber security of the institute. Because the institute "exists" in cyberspace, all of its activities are susceptible to cyberattacks, subterfuge, denial of service and all of the vulnerabilities that networked computers must face. In our opinion, for the concept of virtual institutes to be successful and useful, their operations and services must be protected from the threats in the cyber environment. A key to developing the required protection is the development and promulgation of standards for cyber security. In this paper, we discuss the types of cyber standards that are required, how new internet technologies can be exploited and can benefit the promulgation, development, maintenance, and robustness of the standards. This paper is organized as follows. Section One introduces the concept of the virtual institutes, the expected benefits, and the motivation for our research and for research in this area. Section Two presents background material and a discussion of topics related to VIs, uman behavior and cultural modeling, and network-centric warfare. Section Three contains a discussion of the

  11. Generalized parton distributions from deep virtual compton scattering at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Guidal, M.

    2010-04-24

    Here, we have analyzed the beam spin asymmetry and the longitudinally polarized target spin asymmetry of the Deep Virtual Compton Scattering process, recently measured by the Jefferson Lab CLAS collaboration. Our aim is to extract information about the Generalized Parton Distributions of the proton. By fitting these data, in a largely model-independent procedure, we are able to extract numerical values for the two Compton Form Factors $H_{Im}$ and $\\tilde{H}_{Im}$ with uncertainties, in average, of the order of 30%.

  12. Generalized parton distributions from deep virtual compton scattering at CLAS

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Guidal, M.

    2010-04-24

    Here, we have analyzed the beam spin asymmetry and the longitudinally polarized target spin asymmetry of the Deep Virtual Compton Scattering process, recently measured by the Jefferson Lab CLAS collaboration. Our aim is to extract information about the Generalized Parton Distributions of the proton. By fitting these data, in a largely model-independent procedure, we are able to extract numerical values for the two Compton Form Factorsmore » $$H_{Im}$$ and $$\\tilde{H}_{Im}$$ with uncertainties, in average, of the order of 30%.« less

  13. Research on distributed virtual reality system in electronic commerce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Qiang; Wang, Jiening; Sun, Jizhou

    2004-03-01

    In this paper, Distributed Virtual Reality (DVR) technology applied in Electronical Commerce (EC) is discussed. DVR has the capability of providing a new means for human being to recognize, analyze and resolve the large scale, complex problems, which makes it develop quickly in EC fields. The technology of CSCW (Computer Supported Cooperative Work) and middleware is introduced into the development of EC-DVR system to meet the need of a platform which can provide the necessary cooperation and communication services to avoid developing the basic module repeatedly. Finally, the paper gives a platform structure of EC-DVR system.

  14. Estimate Soil Erodibility Factors Distribution for Maioli Block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wen-Ying

    2014-05-01

    The natural conditions in Taiwan are poor. Because of the steep slopes, rushing river and fragile geology, soil erosion turn into a serious problem. Not only undermine the sloping landscape, but also created sediment disaster like that reservoir sedimentation, river obstruction…etc. Therefore, predict and control the amount of soil erosion has become an important research topic. Soil erodibility factor (K) is a quantitative index of distinguish the ability of soil to resist the erosion separation and handling. Taiwan soil erodibility factors have been calculated 280 soil samples' erodibility factors by Wann and Huang (1989) use the Wischmeier and Smith nomorgraph. 221 samples were collected at the Maioli block in Miaoli. The coordinates of every sample point and the land use situations were recorded. The physical properties were analyzed for each sample. Three estimation methods, consist of Kriging, Inverse Distance Weighted (IDW) and Spline, were applied to estimate soil erodibility factors distribution for Maioli block by using 181 points data, and the remaining 40 points for the validation. Then, the SPSS regression analysis was used to comparison of the accuracy of the training data and validation data by three different methods. Then, the best method can be determined. In the future, we can used this method to predict the soil erodibility factors in other areas.

  15. Managing distributed software development in the Virtual Astronomical Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Janet D.; Plante, Raymond L.; Boneventura, Nina; Busko, Ivo; Cresitello-Dittmar, Mark; D'Abrusco, Raffaele; Doe, Stephen; Ebert, Rick; Laurino, Omar; Pevunova, Olga; Refsdal, Brian; Thomas, Brian

    2012-09-01

    The U.S. Virtual Astronomical Observatory (VAO) is a product-driven organization that provides new scientific research capabilities to the astronomical community. Software development for the VAO follows a lightweight framework that guides development of science applications and infrastructure. Challenges to be overcome include distributed development teams, part-time efforts, and highly constrained schedules. We describe the process we followed to conquer these challenges while developing Iris, the VAO application for analysis of 1-D astronomical spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Iris was successfully built and released in less than a year with a team distributed across four institutions. The project followed existing International Virtual Observatory Alliance inter-operability standards for spectral data and contributed a SED library as a by-product of the project. We emphasize lessons learned that will be folded into future development efforts. In our experience, a well-defined process that provides guidelines to ensure the project is cohesive and stays on track is key to success. Internal product deliveries with a planned test and feedback loop are critical. Release candidates are measured against use cases established early in the process, and provide the opportunity to assess priorities and make course corrections during development. Also key is the participation of a stakeholder such as a lead scientist who manages the technical questions, advises on priorities, and is actively involved as a lead tester. Finally, frequent scheduled communications (for example a bi-weekly tele-conference) assure issues are resolved quickly and the team is working toward a common vision.

  16. Pion Electromagnetic Form Factor in Virtuality Distribution Formalism

    SciTech Connect

    Radyushkin, Anatoly V.

    2016-01-01

    We discuss two applications of the {\\it Virtuality Distribution Amplitudes} (VDA) formalism developed in our recent papers. We start with an overview of the main properties of the pion distribution amplitude emphasizing the quantitative measures of its width, and possibility to access them through the pion transition form factor studies. We formulate the basic concepts of the VDA approach and introduce the pion {\\it transverse momentum distribution amplitude} (TMDA) which plays, in a covariant Lagrangian formulation, a role similar to that of the pion wave function in the 3-dimensional Hamiltonian light-front approach. We propose simple factorized models for soft TMDAs, and use them to describe existing data on the pion transition form factor, thus fixing the scale determining the size of the transverse-momentum effects. Finally, we apply the VDA approach to the one-gluon exchange contribution for the pion electromagnetic form factor. We observe a very late $Q^2 \\gtrsim 20$ GeV$^2$ onset of transition to the asymptotic pQCD predictions and show that in the $Q^2 \\lesssim 10$ GeV$^2$ region there is essentially no sensitivity to the shape of the pion distribution amplitude. Furthermore, the magnitude of the one-gluon exchange contribution in this region is estimated to be an order of magnitude below the Jefferson Lab data, thus leaving the Feynman mechanism as the only one relevant to the pion electromagnetic form factor behavior for accessible $Q^2$.

  17. Derived virtual devices: a secure distributed file system mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanMeter, Rodney; Hotz, Steve; Finn, Gregory

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents the design of derived virtual devices (DVDs). DVDs are the mechanism used by the Netstation Project to provide secure shared access to network-attached peripherals distributed in an untrusted network environment. DVDs improve Input/Output efficiency by allowing user processes to perform I/O operations directly from devices without intermediate transfer through the controlling operating system kernel. The security enforced at the device through the DVD mechanism includes resource boundary checking, user authentication, and restricted operations, e.g., read-only access. To illustrate the application of DVDs, we present the interactions between a network-attached disk and a file system designed to exploit the DVD abstraction. We further discuss third-party transfer as a mechanism intended to provide for efficient data transfer in a typical NAP environment. We show how DVDs facilitate third-party transfer, and provide the security required in a more open network environment.

  18. Virtuality and transverse momentum dependence of the pion distribution amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radyushkin, A. V.

    2016-03-01

    We describe basics of a new approach to transverse momentum dependence in hard exclusive processes. We develop it in application to the transition process γ*γ →π0 at the handbag level. Our starting point is coordinate representation for matrix elements of operators [in the simplest case, bilocal O (0 ,z ) ] describing a hadron with momentum p . Treated as functions of (p z ) and z2, they are parametrized through virtuality distribution amplitudes (VDA) Φ (x ,σ ) , with x being Fourier conjugate to (p z ) and σ Laplace conjugate to z2. For intervals with z+=0 , we introduce the transverse momentum distribution amplitude (TMDA) Ψ (x ,k⊥), and write it in terms of VDA Φ (x ,σ ). The results of covariant calculations, written in terms of Φ (x ,σ ), are converted into expressions involving Ψ (x ,k⊥). Starting with scalar toy models, we extend the analysis onto the case of spin-1 /2 quarks and QCD. We propose simple models for soft VDAs/TMDAs, and use them for comparison of handbag results with experimental (BABAR and BELLE) data on the pion transition form factor. We also discuss how one can generate high-k⊥ tails from primordial soft distributions.

  19. Virtuality and transverse momentum dependence of the pion distribution amplitude

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Radyushkin, Anatoly V.

    2016-03-08

    We describe basics of a new approach to transverse momentum dependence in hard exclusive processes. We develop it in application to the transition process γ*γ → π0 at the handbag level. Our starting point is coordinate representation for matrix elements of operators (in the simplest case, bilocal O (0,z)) describing a hadron with momentum p. Treated as functions of (pz) and z2, they are parametrized through virtuality distribution amplitudes (VDA) Φ(x,σ), with x being Fourier-conjugate to (pz) and σ Laplace-conjugate to z2. For intervals with z+ = 0, we introduce the transverse momentum distribution amplitude (TMDA) ψ(x, k), and writemore » it in terms of VDA Φ(x,σ). The results of covariant calculations, written in terms of Φ(x, σ) are converted into expressions involving ψ(x, k). Starting with scalar toy models, we extend the analysis onto the case of spin-1/2 quarks and QCD. We propose simple models for soft VDAs/TMDAs, and use them for comparison of handbag results with experimental (BaBar and BELLE) data on the pion transition form factor. Furthermore, we discuss how one can generate high-k tails from primordial soft distributions.« less

  20. Approximating the imbibition and absorption behavior of a distribution of matrix blocks by an equivalent spherical block

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, R.W.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    1994-03-01

    A theoretical study is presented of the effect of matrix block shape and matrix block size distribution on liquid imbibition and solute absorption in a fractured rock mass. It is shown that the behavior of an individual irregularly-shaped matrix block can be modeled with reasonable accuracy by using the results for a spherical matrix block, if one uses an effective radius {tilde a} = 3V/A, where V is the volume of the block and A is its surface area. In the early-time regime of matrix imbibition, it is shown that a collection of blocks of different sizes can be modeled by a single equivalent block, with an equivalent radius of {sup {minus}1}, where the average is taken on a volumetrically-weighted basis. In an intermediate time regime, it is shown for the case where the radii are normally distributed that the equivalent radius is reasonably well approximated by the mean radius . In the long-time limit, where no equivalent radius can be rigorously defined, an asymptotic expression is derived for the cumulative diffusion as a function of the mean and the standard deviation of the radius distribution function.

  1. Guest Editor's introduction: Special issue on distributed virtual environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lea, Rodger

    1998-09-01

    Distributed virtual environments (DVEs) combine technology from 3D graphics, virtual reality and distributed systems to provide an interactive 3D scene that supports multiple participants. Each participant has a representation in the scene, often known as an avatar, and is free to navigate through the scene and interact with both the scene and other viewers of the scene. Changes to the scene, for example, position changes of one avatar as the associated viewer navigates through the scene, or changes to objects in the scene via manipulation, are propagated in real time to all viewers. This ensures that all viewers of a shared scene `see' the same representation of it, allowing sensible reasoning about the scene. Early work on such environments was restricted to their use in simulation, in particular in military simulation. However, over recent years a number of interesting and potentially far-reaching attempts have been made to exploit the technology for a range of other uses, including: Social spaces. Such spaces can be seen as logical extensions of the familiar text chat space. In 3D social spaces avatars, representing participants, can meet in shared 3D scenes and in addition to text chat can use visual cues and even in some cases spatial audio. Collaborative working. A number of recent projects have attempted to explore the use of DVEs to facilitate computer-supported collaborative working (CSCW), where the 3D space provides a context and work space for collaboration. Gaming. The shared 3D space is already familiar, albeit in a constrained manner, to the gaming community. DVEs are a logical superset of existing 3D games and can provide a rich framework for advanced gaming applications. e-commerce. The ability to navigate through a virtual shopping mall and to look at, and even interact with, 3D representations of articles has appealed to the e-commerce community as it searches for the best method of presenting merchandise to electronic consumers. The technology

  2. Constructing and Analyzing Spectral Energy Distributions with the Virtual Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurino, Omar; Busko, I.; Cresitello-Dittmar, M.; D'Abrusco, R.; Doe, S.; Evans, J.; Pevunova, O.; Norris, P.

    2013-01-01

    Spectral energy distributions (SEDs) are a common and useful means of assessing the relative contributions of different emission processes occurring within an object. Iris, the Virtual Astronomical Observatory (VAO) SED tool, seamlessly combines key features of several existing astronomical software applications to streamline and enhance the SED analysis process. With Iris, users may build and display SEDs, browse data and metadata and apply filters to them, fit models to SEDs, and calculate confidence limits on best-fit parameters. SED data may be built from a number of sources using the SED Builder. Iris supports the Simple Application Messaging Protocol for interoperability with other Virtual Observatory applications, like the VAO Data Discovery tool, and can directly fetch SEDs from the NASA Extragalactic Database SED service. Particular attention has been paid to the integration of user spectrophotometric data from files in several different formats. File readers for custom formats can be provided at runtime, as well as custom models to fit the data, as template libraries for template fitting or arbitrary python functions. New functionalities can be added by installing plugins, i.e. third party components that are developed using the Iris Software Development Kit. The VAO was established as a partnership of the Associated Universities, Inc. and the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. Iris Individual components have also been supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) through the Chandra X-ray Center, which is operated by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory for and on behalf of the NASA contract NAS8-03060, and by the Space Telescope Science Institute, operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under NASA contract NAS5-26555. This research has made use of the NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database which is operated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of

  3. Deeply virtual Compton scattering and generalized parton distributions at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Niccolai, Silvia

    2008-11-01

    The exclusive electroproduction of real photons and mesons at high momentum transfer allows us to access the Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs). The formalism of the GPDs provides a unified description of the hadronic structure in terms of quark and gluonic degrees of freedom. In particular, the Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS), ep â e2p2Å , is one of the key reactions to determine the GPDs experimentally, as it is the simplest process that can be described in terms of GPDs. A dedicated experiment to study DVCS has been carried out in Hall B at Jefferson Lab. Beam-spin asymmetries, resulting from the interference of the Bethe-Heitler process and DVCS have been extracted over the widest kinematic range ever accessed for this reaction ( 1.2 < Q 2 < 3.7 (GeV/c 2, 0.09 < - t < 1.3 (GeV/c 2, 0.13 < x B < 0.46 . In this paper, the results obtained experimentally are shown and compared to GPD parametrizations.

  4. Distributed Data Mining System with Gateway for Virtual Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimabadi, H.

    2007-05-01

    Progress in space physics has always been strongly dependent on analysis of in situ spacecraft measurements. However, the vast majority of spacecraft data go unexplored and with upcoming multi-spacecraft NASA missions (THEMIS, MMS, etc.) the growing size of data promises to outpace the ability of scientists to analyze them. There are several NASA funded initiatives such as VSO, CoSEC, VHO, and VSPO to use the Internet to develop a software environment for searching, obtaining and analyzing data from archives of data distributed at many sites around the world. A natural extension of the function of such portals is to provide sophisticated data mining capabilities. Accordingly we have combined the latest advances in the fields of distributed computing and data mining to develop a unique tool that serves as the "computational" engine for Virtual Observatories (VOs). This tool extends the capability of VOs from data portal to a science analysis center. As one of the initial utility of this software, we have applied the algorithms to study of flux transfer events. Results from analysis of CLUSTER data will be presented. Our customized data mining software can work as a stand alone or be integrated into existing and future space physics data assimilation infrastructures (e.g., VSPO, VHO). Finally, we note that San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) has agreed to host data as well as our software on one of their clusters and make it available at no cost to the scientific community. This will enable access to their CPU farm and will be particularly valuable to promote usage of our software.

  5. Virtual time and time warp on the JPL hypercube. [operating system implementation for distributed simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jefferson, David; Beckman, Brian

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the concept of virtual time and its implementation in the Time Warp Operating System at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Virtual time is a distributed synchronization paradigm that is appropriate for distributed simulation, database concurrency control, real time systems, and coordination of replicated processes. The Time Warp Operating System is targeted toward the distributed simulation application and runs on a 32-node JPL Mark II Hypercube.

  6. Guest Editor's introduction: Special issue on distributed virtual environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lea, Rodger

    1998-09-01

    Distributed virtual environments (DVEs) combine technology from 3D graphics, virtual reality and distributed systems to provide an interactive 3D scene that supports multiple participants. Each participant has a representation in the scene, often known as an avatar, and is free to navigate through the scene and interact with both the scene and other viewers of the scene. Changes to the scene, for example, position changes of one avatar as the associated viewer navigates through the scene, or changes to objects in the scene via manipulation, are propagated in real time to all viewers. This ensures that all viewers of a shared scene `see' the same representation of it, allowing sensible reasoning about the scene. Early work on such environments was restricted to their use in simulation, in particular in military simulation. However, over recent years a number of interesting and potentially far-reaching attempts have been made to exploit the technology for a range of other uses, including: Social spaces. Such spaces can be seen as logical extensions of the familiar text chat space. In 3D social spaces avatars, representing participants, can meet in shared 3D scenes and in addition to text chat can use visual cues and even in some cases spatial audio. Collaborative working. A number of recent projects have attempted to explore the use of DVEs to facilitate computer-supported collaborative working (CSCW), where the 3D space provides a context and work space for collaboration. Gaming. The shared 3D space is already familiar, albeit in a constrained manner, to the gaming community. DVEs are a logical superset of existing 3D games and can provide a rich framework for advanced gaming applications. e-commerce. The ability to navigate through a virtual shopping mall and to look at, and even interact with, 3D representations of articles has appealed to the e-commerce community as it searches for the best method of presenting merchandise to electronic consumers. The technology

  7. Experiential Virtual Scenarios With Real-Time Monitoring (Interreality) for the Management of Psychological Stress: A Block Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Pallavicini, Federica; Morganti, Luca; Serino, Silvia; Scaratti, Chiara; Briguglio, Marilena; Crifaci, Giulia; Vetrano, Noemi; Giulintano, Annunziata; Bernava, Giuseppe; Tartarisco, Gennaro; Pioggia, Giovanni; Raspelli, Simona; Cipresso, Pietro; Vigna, Cinzia; Grassi, Alessandra; Baruffi, Margherita; Wiederhold, Brenda; Riva, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Background The recent convergence between technology and medicine is offering innovative methods and tools for behavioral health care. Among these, an emerging approach is the use of virtual reality (VR) within exposure-based protocols for anxiety disorders, and in particular posttraumatic stress disorder. However, no systematically tested VR protocols are available for the management of psychological stress. Objective Our goal was to evaluate the efficacy of a new technological paradigm, Interreality, for the management and prevention of psychological stress. The main feature of Interreality is a twofold link between the virtual and the real world achieved through experiential virtual scenarios (fully controlled by the therapist, used to learn coping skills and improve self-efficacy) with real-time monitoring and support (identifying critical situations and assessing clinical change) using advanced technologies (virtual worlds, wearable biosensors, and smartphones). Methods The study was designed as a block randomized controlled trial involving 121 participants recruited from two different worker populations—teachers and nurses—that are highly exposed to psychological stress. Participants were a sample of teachers recruited in Milan (Block 1: n=61) and a sample of nurses recruited in Messina, Italy (Block 2: n=60). Participants within each block were randomly assigned to the (1) Experimental Group (EG): n=40; B1=20, B2=20, which received a 5-week treatment based on the Interreality paradigm; (2) Control Group (CG): n=42; B1=22, B2=20, which received a 5-week traditional stress management training based on cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT); and (3) the Wait-List group (WL): n=39, B1=19, B2=20, which was reassessed and compared with the two other groups 5 weeks after the initial evaluation. Results Although both treatments were able to significantly reduce perceived stress better than WL, only EG participants reported a significant reduction (EG=12% vs CG=0

  8. Collaborative Virtual Environments as Means to Increase the Level of Intersubjectivity in a Distributed Cognition System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ligorio, M. Beatrice; Cesareni, Donatella; Schwartz, Neil

    2008-01-01

    Virtual environments are able to extend the space of interaction beyond the classroom. In order to analyze how distributed cognition functions in such an extended space, we suggest focusing on the architecture of intersubjectivity. The Euroland project--a virtual land created and populated by seven classrooms supported by a team of…

  9. Live Virtual Constructive Distributed Test Environment Characterization Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Jim; Kim, Sam K.

    2013-01-01

    This report documents message latencies observed over various Live, Virtual, Constructive, (LVC) simulation environment configurations designed to emulate possible system architectures for the Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Integration in the National Airspace System (NAS) Project integrated tests. For each configuration, four scenarios with progressively increasing air traffic loads were used to determine system throughput and bandwidth impacts on message latency.

  10. Virtual reality-based regional anaesthesia simulator for axillary nerve blocks.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, Sebastian; Frommen, Thorsten; Rossaint, Rolf; Kuhlen, Torsten

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present a simulator for regional anaesthesia for nerve blocks in the axillary plexus region. We use a novel approach based on electric distance to simulate electronic impulse transmission through soft tissue. The traversal of electrons emitted from the needle tip is calculated by modified pathfinding algorithms. Kinematic algorithms visualize the motor response of the forearm by skeletal animation. PMID:19377191

  11. Block distributions on the lunar surface: A comparison between measurements obtained from surface and orbital photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cintala, Mark J.; Mcbride, Kathleen M.

    1995-01-01

    Among the hazards that must be negotiated by lunar-landing spacecraft are blocks on the surface of the Moon. Unfortunately, few data exist that can be used to evaluate the threat posed by such blocks to landing spacecraft. Perhaps the best information is that obtained from Surveyor photographs, but those data do not extend to the dimensions of the large blocks that would pose the greatest hazards. Block distributions in the vicinities of the Surveyor 1, 3, 6, and 7 sites have been determined from Lunar Orbiter photography and are presented here. Only large (i.e., greater than or equal to 2.5 m) blocks are measurable in these pictures, resulting in a size gap between the Surveyor and Lunar Orbiter distributions. Nevertheless, the orbital data are self-consistent, a claim supported by the similarity in behavior between the subsets of data from the Surveyor 1, 3, and 6 sites and by the good agreement in position (if not slopes) between the data obtained from the Surveyor 3 photography and those derived from the Lunar Orbiter photographs. Confidence in the results is also justified by the well-behaved distribution of large blocks at the surveyor site. Comparisons between the Surveyor distributions and those derived from the orbital photography permit these observations: (1) in all cases but that for Surveyor 3, the density of large blocks is overestimated by extrapolation of the Surveyor-derived trends; (2) the slopes of the Surveyor-derived distributions are consistently lower than those determined for the large blocks; and (3) these apparent disagreements could be mitigated if the overall shapes of the cumulative lunar block populations were nonlinear, allowing for different slopes over different size intervals. The relatively large gaps between the Surveyor-derived and Orbiter-derived data sets, however, do not permit a determination of those shapes.

  12. Phobos, Deimos, and the moon - Size and distribution of crater ejecta blocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. W.; Thomas, P.; Veverka, J.

    1986-01-01

    Ejecta block characteristics observed on Phobos, Deimos, and the moon are examined. The analyzed source craters on Deimos are 0.8-2.3 km in diameter, those on Phobos are 1.5-10 km, and the lunar craters are between 0.2-3.5 km in diameter. The size and radial distribution of the ejecta blocks for the three bodies are compared. It is observed that the size distribution of the ejecta blocks surrounding craters on the three objects are basically similar, and the radial distribution of the blocks for Phobos and the moon are the same (within 2 radii of the crater center); however, the ejecta on Deimos are more dispersed (greater than or equal to 2 radii from the crater center).

  13. Towards Web/Java-based high performance distributed computing - an evolving virtual machine

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, G.; Furmanski, W.

    1996-12-31

    We discuss here the emergent Web based distributed environments for HPCC on the NII with the focus on Java as an enabling technology. We start with a review of the past, presence and the near term future of the {open_quotes}Java phenomenon{close_quotes}, exposed here in the background of some related previous approaches towards a distributed interpretative virtual machine architecture.

  14. Building Blocks for Distributed Information Systems in Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Rutt, Thomas E.

    1987-01-01

    In order to provide a consistent view of work functions which can be supported by successive releases of hospital information systems, a hospital business model was developed. The business model describes potential system functions along with their data access needs. This model was used to determine an optimal set of mutually exclusive logical databases. These logical databases are seeds around which design of distributed systems should be based. The logical databases derived by this work can be used as a starting point for defining application protocol standards for hospital system interface transactions.

  15. The Impact of Virtual Collaboration and Collaboration Technologies on Knowledge Transfer and Team Performance in Distributed Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ngoma, Ngoma Sylvestre

    2013-01-01

    Virtual teams are increasingly viewed as a powerful determinant of competitive advantage in geographically distributed organizations. This study was designed to provide insights into the interdependencies between virtual collaboration, collaboration technologies, knowledge transfer, and virtual team performance in an effort to understand whether…

  16. Mesoscopic capacitor and zero-point energy: Poisson's distribution for virtual charges, pressure, and decoherence control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, J. C.

    2014-08-01

    Mesoscopic capacitor theory, which includes intrinsic inductive effects from quantum tunneling, is applied to conducting spherical shells. The zero-point pressure and the number of virtual charged pairs are determined assuming a Poisson distribution. They are completely defined by a dimensionless mesoscopic parameter (χc) measuring the average number of virtual pairs per solid angle and carrying mesoscopic information. Fluctuations remain finite and well defined. Connections with usual quantum-field-theory limit enables us to evaluate χc 1.007110. Equivalently, for a mesoscopic parallel-plate capacitor, the shot noise distribution becomes operative with χc 0.94705 as well being related to the density of virtual pairs. Temperature decoherence and capacitor control are discussed by considering typical values of quantum dot devices and Coulomb blockade theory.

  17. Distributed Visualization of Dust Storm in Virtual Globes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Yang, C.; Wu, H.; Huang, Q.; Wong, D.

    2009-12-01

    Recent advancements of scientific modeling allow high resolution simulation of natural phenomena, such as metrological parameters. And the simulation results are offered online in increasing data volume. In the Internet arena, a distributed visualization approach for representing the resulting data is critical for data sharing and understanding. Our objective is to utilize spatial computing to develop a distributed visualization system, which provides three visualization modes for Earth Scientists to analyze spatial data. The system involves the data server, the application server, Internet and the visualization client. At the server side, the data are preprocessed to generate visualization results, such as images, models and geometries. When large volume data are involved, parallel computing is invoked to accelerate the processing. At the client side, NASA World Wind and enhanced development are deployed to display the results from the server. Using our dust storm simulation data as an example, this system can visualize the metrological parameters associated with dust storm events produced by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Current visualization modes include 2D images, 3D volume rendering, and time enabled animation. With the distributed visualization approach, the research featured with multi-dimensional view of Earth phenomena interactively. Acknowledgements: Research reported is sponsored by a NASA project (NNX07AD99G).

  18. Integrating a distributed, agile, virtual enterprise in the TEAM program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobb, C. K.; Gray, W. Harvey; Hewgley, Robert E.; Klages, Edward J.; Neal, Richard E.

    1997-01-01

    The technologies enabling agile manufacturing (TEAM) program enhances industrial capability by advancing and deploying manufacturing technologies that promote agility. TEAM has developed a product realization process that features the integration of product design and manufacturing groups. TEAM uses the tools it collects, develops, and integrates in support of the product realization process to demonstrate and deploy agile manufacturing capabilities for three high- priority processes identified by industry: material removal, forming, and electromechanical assembly. In order to provide a proof-of-principle, the material removal process has been addressed first and has been successfully demonstrate din an 'interconnected' mode. An internet-accessible intersite file manager (IFM) application has been deployed to allow geographically distributed TEAM participants to share and distribute information as the product realization process is executed. An automated inspection planning application has been demonstrated, importing a solid model form the IFM, generating an inspection plan and a part program to be used in the inspection process, and then distributing the part program to the inspection site via the IFM. TEAM seeks to demonstrate the material removal process in an integrated mode in June 1997 complete with an object-oriented framework and infrastructure. The current status and future plans for this project are presented here.

  19. Spatial distribution of ice blocks on Enceladus and implications for their origin and emplacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martens, Hilary R.; Ingersoll, Andrew P.; Ewald, Shawn P.; Helfenstein, Paul; Giese, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    We have mapped the locations of over 100,000 ice blocks across the south polar region of Saturn's moon Enceladus, thus generating the first quantitative estimates of ice-block number density distribution in relation to major geological features. Ice blocks were manually identified and mapped from twenty of the highest resolution (4-25 m per pixel) Cassini Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) narrow-angle images using ArcGIS software. The 10-100 m-diameter positive-relief features are marginally visible at the resolution of the images, making ice-block identifications difficult but not impossible. Our preliminary results reveal that ice blocks in the southern hemisphere are systematically most concentrated within the geologically active South Polar Terrain (SPT) and exhibit peak concentrations within 20 km of the tiger-stripe fractures as well as close to the south pole. We find that ice blocks are concentrated just as heavily between tiger-stripe fractures as on the directly adjacent margins; although significant local fluctuations in ice-block number density do occur, we observe no clear pattern with respect to the tiger stripes or jet sources. We examine possible roles of several mechanisms for ice-block origin, emplacement, and evolution: impact cratering, ejection from fissures during cryovolcanic eruptions, tectonic disruption of lithospheric ice, mass wasting, seismic disturbance, and vapor condensation around icy fumeroles. We conclude that impact cratering as well as mass wasting, perhaps triggered by seismic events, cannot account for a majority of ice-block features within the inner SPT. The pervasiveness of fracturing at many size scales, the ubiquity of ice blocks in the inner SPT, as well as the occurrence of linear block arrangements that parallel through-cutting crack networks along the flanks of tiger stripes indicate that tectonic deformation is an important source of blocky-ice features in the SPT. Ejection during catastrophic cryovolcanic eruptions

  20. Block distributions on the lunar surface: A comparison between measurements obtained from surface and orbital photography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cintala, Mark J.; Mcbride, Kathleen M.

    1994-01-01

    Enlargements of Lunar-Orbiter photography were used in conjunction with a digitizing tablet to collect the locations and dimensions of blocks surrounding the Surveyor 1, 3, 6, and 7 landing sites. Data were reduced to the location and the major axis of the visible portion of each block. Shadows sometimes made it difficult to assess whether the visible major axis corresponded with the actual principal dimension. These data were then correlated with the locations of major craters in the study areas, thus subdividing the data set into blocks obviously associated with craters and those in intercrater areas. A block was arbitrarily defined to be associated with a crater when its location was within 1.1 crater radii of the crater's center. Since this study was commissioned for the ultimate purpose of determining hazards to landing spacecraft, such a definition was deemed appropriate in defining block-related hazards associated with craters. Size distributions of smaller fragments as determined from Surveyor photography were obtained as measurements from graphical data. Basic comparisons were performed through use of cumulative frequency distributions identical to those applied to studies of crater-count data.

  1. Responses of European precipitation distributions and regimes to different blocking locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, Pedro M.; Trigo, Ricardo M.; Barriopedro, David; Soares, Pedro M. M.; Ramos, Alexandre M.; Liberato, Margarida L. R.

    2016-04-01

    In this work we performed an analysis on the impacts of blocking episodes on seasonal and annual European precipitation and the associated physical mechanisms. Distinct domains were considered in detail taking into account different blocking center positions spanning between the Atlantic and western Russia. Significant positive precipitation anomalies are found for southernmost areas while generalized negative anomalies (up to 75 % in some areas) occur in large areas of central and northern Europe. This dipole of anomalies is reversed when compared to that observed during episodes of strong zonal flow conditions. We illustrate that the location of the maximum precipitation anomalies follows quite well the longitudinal positioning of the blocking centers and discuss regional and seasonal differences in the precipitation responses. To better understand the precipitation anomalies, we explore the blocking influence on cyclonic activity. The results indicate a split of the storm-tracks north and south of blocking systems, leading to an almost complete reduction of cyclonic centers in northern and central Europe and increases in southern areas, where cyclone frequency doubles during blocking episodes. However, the underlying processes conductive to the precipitation anomalies are distinct between northern and southern European regions, with a significant role of atmospheric instability in southern Europe, and moisture availability as the major driver at higher latitudes. This distinctive underlying process is coherent with the characteristic patterns of latent heat release from the ocean associated with blocked and strong zonal flow patterns. We also analyzed changes in the full range of the precipitation distribution of several regional sectors during blocked and zonal days. Results show that precipitation reductions in the areas under direct blocking influence are driven by a substantial drop in the frequency of moderate rainfall classes. Contrarily, southwards of

  2. Drift-insensitive distributed calibration of probe microscope scanner in nanometer range: Virtual mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapshin, Rostislav V.

    2016-08-01

    A method of distributed calibration of a probe microscope scanner is suggested. The main idea consists in a search for a net of local calibration coefficients (LCCs) in the process of automatic measurement of a standard surface, whereby each point of the movement space of the scanner can be characterized by a unique set of scale factors. Feature-oriented scanning (FOS) methodology is used as a basis for implementation of the distributed calibration permitting to exclude in situ the negative influence of thermal drift, creep and hysteresis on the obtained results. Possessing the calibration database enables correcting in one procedure all the spatial systematic distortions caused by nonlinearity, nonorthogonality and spurious crosstalk couplings of the microscope scanner piezomanipulators. To provide high precision of spatial measurements in nanometer range, the calibration is carried out using natural standards - constants of crystal lattice. One of the useful modes of the developed calibration method is a virtual mode. In the virtual mode, instead of measurement of a real surface of the standard, the calibration program makes a surface image "measurement" of the standard, which was obtained earlier using conventional raster scanning. The application of the virtual mode permits simulation of the calibration process and detail analysis of raster distortions occurring in both conventional and counter surface scanning. Moreover, the mode allows to estimate the thermal drift and the creep velocities acting while surface scanning. Virtual calibration makes possible automatic characterization of a surface by the method of scanning probe microscopy (SPM).

  3. Study on the grid-based distributed virtual geo-environment (DVGE-G)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Lu-liang; Li, Qing-quan

    2005-10-01

    It is publicly considered that the next generational Internet technology is grid computing, which supports the sharing and coordinated use of diverse resources in dynamic virtual organizations from geographically and organizationally distributed components. Grid computing characters strong computing ability and broad width information exchange. After analyzing the characteristic of grid computing, this paper expatiates on current application status of grid computing with middleware technology on DVGE-G and the problems it faces. Cooperating with IBM, Microsoft and HP, Globus Toolkit as a standard for grid computing is widely used to develop application on grid, which can run on Unix and Windows operation systems. On the basis of "the five-tiers sandglass structure" and web services technology, Globus presented Open Grid Services Architecture (OGSA), which centered on grid services. According to the characteristic of DVGE-G and the development of current grid computing, this paper put forward the Grid-Oriented Distributed Network Model for DVGE-G. Virtual group is corresponding with the Virtual Organization in OGSA service, which is easier and more directly for the dynamic virtual groups in GDNM to utilize the grid source and communication each other. The GDNM is not only more advantage to the distributed database consistency management, but also it is more convenient to the virtual group users acquiring the DVGE-G data information, The architecture of DVGE-G designed in this paper is based on OGSA and web services, which is keep to "the five-tiers sandglass structure" of the OGSA. This architecture is more convenient to utilizing grid service and decreasing the conflict with the grid environment. At last, this paper presents the implementation of DVGE-G and the interfaces of Grid Service.

  4. Numerical Convergence of the Block-Maxima Approach to the Generalized Extreme Value Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faranda, Davide; Lucarini, Valerio; Turchetti, Giorgio; Vaienti, Sandro

    2011-12-01

    In this paper we perform an analytical and numerical study of Extreme Value distributions in discrete dynamical systems. In this setting, recent works have shown how to get a statistics of extremes in agreement with the classical Extreme Value Theory. We pursue these investigations by giving analytical expressions of Extreme Value distribution parameters for maps that have an absolutely continuous invariant measure. We compare these analytical results with numerical experiments in which we study the convergence to limiting distributions using the so called block-maxima approach, pointing out in which cases we obtain robust estimation of parameters. In regular maps for which mixing properties do not hold, we show that the fitting procedure to the classical Extreme Value Distribution fails, as expected. However, we obtain an empirical distribution that can be explained starting from a different observable function for which Nicolis et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett. 97(21): 210602, 2006) have found analytical results.

  5. A study of standard building blocks for the design of fault-tolerant distributed computer systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rennels, D. A.; Avizienis, A.; Ercegovac, M.

    1978-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study that has established a standard set of four semiconductor VLSI building-block circuits. These circuits can be assembled with off-the-shelf microprocessors and semiconductor memory modules into fault-tolerant distributed computer configurations. The resulting multi-computer architecture uses self-checking computer modules backed up by a limited number of spares. A redundant bus system is employed for communication between computer modules.

  6. Rapid prototyping, astronaut training, and experiment control and supervision: distributed virtual worlds for COLUMBUS, the European Space Laboratory module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, Eckhard; Rossmann, Juergen

    2002-02-01

    In 2004, the European COLUMBUS Module is to be attached to the International Space Station. On the way to the successful planning, deployment and operation of the module, computer generated and animated models are being used to optimize performance. Under contract of the German Space Agency DLR, it has become IRF's task to provide a Projective Virtual Reality System to provide a virtual world built after the planned layout of the COLUMBUS module let astronauts and experimentators practice operational procedures and the handling of experiments. The key features of the system currently being realized comprise the possibility for distributed multi-user access to the virtual lab and the visualization of real-world experiment data. Through the capabilities to share the virtual world, cooperative operations can be practiced easily, but also trainers and trainees can work together more effectively sharing the virtual environment. The capability to visualize real-world data will be used to introduce measured data of experiments into the virtual world online in order to realistically interact with the science-reference model hardware: The user's actions in the virtual world are translated into corresponding changes of the inputs of the science reference model hardware; the measured data is than in turn fed back into the virtual world. During the operation of COLUMBUS, the capabilities for distributed access and the capabilities to visualize measured data through the use of metaphors and augmentations of the virtual world may be used to provide virtual access to the COLUMBUS module, e.g. via Internet. Currently, finishing touches are being put to the system. In November 2001 the virtual world shall be operational, so that besides the design and the key ideas, first experimental results can be presented.

  7. Iris: Constructing and Analyzing Spectral Energy Distributions with the Virtual Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurino, O.; Budynkiewicz, J.; Busko, I.; Cresitello-Dittmar, M.; D'Abrusco, R.; Doe, S.; Evans, J.; Pevunova, O.

    2014-05-01

    We present Iris 2.0, the latest release of the Virtual Astronomical Observatory application for building and analyzing Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs). With Iris, users may read in and display SEDs inspect and edit any selection of SED data, fit models to SEDs in arbitrary spectral ranges, and calculate confidence limits on best-fit parameters. SED data may be loaded into the application from VOTable and FITS files compliant with the International Virtual Observatoy Alliance interoperable data models, or retrieved directly from NED or the Italian Space Agency Science Data Center; data in non-standard formats may also be converted within the application. Users may seamlessy exchange data between Iris and other Virtual Observatoy tools using the Simple Application Messaging Protocol. Iris 2.0 also provides a tool for redshifting, interpolating, and measuring integratd fluxes, and allows simple aperture corrections for individual points and SED segments. Custom Python functions, template models and template libraries may be imported into Iris for fitting SEDs. Iris may be extended through Java plugins; users can install third-party packages, or develop their own plugin using Iris' Software Development Kit. Iris 2.0 is available for Linux and Mac OS X systems.

  8. Distributed cluster testing using new virtualized framework for XRootD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmon, Justin L.; Janyst, Lukasz

    2014-06-01

    The Extended ROOT Daemon (XRootD) is a distributed, scalable system for low-latency clustered data access. XRootD is mature and widely used in HEP, both standalone and as a core server framework for the EOS system at CERN, and hence requires extensive testing to ensure general stability. However, there are many difficulties posed by distributed testing, such as cluster set up, synchronization, orchestration, inter-cluster communication and controlled failure handling. A three-layer master/hypervisor/slave model is presented to ameloirate these difficulties by utilizing libvirt and QEMU/KVM virtualization technologies to automate spawning of configurable virtual clusters and orchestrate multi-stage test suites. The framework also incorporates a user-friendly web interface for scheduling and monitoring tests. The prototype has been used successfully to build new test suites for XRootD and EOS with existing unit test integration. It is planned for the future to sufficiently generalize the framework to encourage usage by potentially any distributed system.

  9. A virtual species set for robust and reproducible species distribution modelling tests

    PubMed Central

    Garzon-Lopez, Carol X.; Bastin, Lucy; Foody, Giles M.; Rocchini, Duccio

    2016-01-01

    Predicting species potential and future distribution has become a relevant tool in biodiversity monitoring and conservation. In this data article we present the suitability map of a virtual species generated based on two bioclimatic variables, and a dataset containing more than 700,000 random observations at the extent of Europe. The dataset includes spatial attributes such as: distance to roads, protected areas, country codes, and the habitat suitability of two spatially clustered species (grassland and forest species) and a wide-spread species. PMID:27014734

  10. Characterization of rock matrix block size distribution, dispersivity, and mass transfer coefficients in fractured porous media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifi Haddad, Amin

    Fractured porous media are important structures in petroleum engineering and geohydrology. The accelerating global demand for energy has turned the focus to fractured formations. The fractured porous media are also found in conventional naturally fractured reservoirs and the water supply from karst (carbonate) aquifers. Studying mass transfer processes allows us to explore the complexities and uncertainties encountered with fractured rocks. This dissertation is developing an analytical methodology for the study of mass transfer in fractured reservoirs. The dissertation begins with two cases that demonstrate the importance of the rock matrix block size distribution and dispersivity through a transient mass exchange mechanism between rock matrix blocks and fractures. The first case assumes a medium with no surface adsorption, and the second case includes the surface adsorption variable. One of the main focuses of this work is the characterization of the rock matrix block size distribution in fractured porous media. Seismic surveying, well test analysis, well logging, and geomechanical tools are currently used to characterize this property, based on measurements of different variables. This study explores an innovative method of using solute transport to determine the fracture intensity. This methodology is applied to slab-shaped rock matrix blocks and can easily be extended to other geometries. Another focus of this dissertation is the characterization of dispersivity in field scale studies. Improving our knowledge of dispersivity will enable more accurate mass transfer predictions and advance the study of transport processes. Field tracer tests demonstrated that dispersivity is scale-dependent. Proposed functions for the increasing trend of dispersivity include linear and asymptotic scale-dependence. This study investigated the linear dispersivity trend around the injection wellbore. An analysis of the tracer concentration in a monitoring well was used to

  11. LIDAR-based outcrop characterisation - joint classification, surface and block size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, David C.; Dietrich, Patrick; Krawczyk, Charlotte M.

    2013-04-01

    Outcrops, in the first instance, only offer at best a 2-2.5D view of the available geological information, such as joints and fractures. In order to study geodynamic processes, it is necessary to calculate true values of, for example, fracture densities and block dimensions. We show how LIDAR-generated point-cloud data of outcrops can be used to delineate such geological surfaces. Our methods do not require the point-set to be meshed; instead we work with the original point cloud, thus avoiding meshing errors. In a first step we decompose the point-cloud into tiny volumes; in each volume we calculate the best fitting plane. An expert can then decide which of the planes are important (in an interactive density pole diagram) and classify them. Actual block surfaces are identified by applying a clustering algorithm to the mini-planes. Subsequently, we calculate the size of these surfaces. Finally we estimate the block size distribution within the outcrop by projecting the block surfaces into the rock volume. To assess the reproducibility of our results we show to which extent they depend on various parameters, such as the resolution of the LIDAR scan and algorithm parameters. In theory the results can be calculated at the site of measurement to ensure the LIDAR scan resolution is sufficient and if necessary rerun the scan with different parameters. We demonstrate our methods with LIDAR data that we produced in a sandstone quarry in Germany. The part of the outcrop which we measured with the LIDAR was out-of-reach for measurements with a geological compass, but our results correlate well with compass measurements from a different outcrop in the same quarry. Three main surfaces could be delineated from the point cloud: the bedding, and two major joint types. The three fabrics are almost orthogonal. Our statistical results suggest that blocks with a volume of several hundred liters can be expected regularly within the quarry. The results can be directly used to

  12. Water distributions in polystyrene-block-poly[styrene-g-poly(ethylene oxide)] block grafted copolymer system in aqueous solutions revealed by contrast variation small angle neutron scattering study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Hong, Kunlun; Liu, Yun; Shew, Chwen-Yang; Liu, Emily; Herwig, Kenneth W.; Smith, Gregory S.; Zhao, Junpeng; Zhang, Guangzhao; Pispas, Stergios; Chen, Wei-Ren

    2010-10-01

    We develop an experimental approach to analyze the water distribution around a core-shell micelle formed by polystyrene-block-poly[styrene-g-poly(ethylene oxide (PEO)] block copolymers in aqueous media at a fixed polymeric concentration of 10 mg/ml through contrast variation small angle neutron scattering (SANS) study. Through varying the D2O/H2O ratio, the scattering contributions from the water molecules and the micellar constituent components can be determined. Based on the commonly used core-shell model, a theoretical coherent scattering cross section incorporating the effect of water penetration is developed and used to analyze the SANS I(Q ). We have successfully quantified the intramicellar water distribution and found that the overall micellar hydration level increases with the increase in the molecular weight of hydrophilic PEO side chains. Our work presents a practical experimental means for evaluating the intramacromolecular solvent distributions of general soft matter systems.

  13. Adaptive Zero-Coefficient Distribution Scan for Inter Block Mode Coding of H.264/AVC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing-Xin; Su, Alvin W. Y.

    Scanning quantized transform coefficients is an important tool for video coding. For example, the MPEG-4 video coder adopts three different scans to get better coding efficiency. This paper proposes an adaptive zero-coefficient distribution scan in inter block coding. The proposed method attempts to improve H.264/AVC zero coefficient coding by modifying the scan operation. Since the zero-coefficient distribution is changed by the proposed scan method, new VLC tables for syntax elements used in context-adaptive variable length coding (CAVLC) are also provided. The savings in bit-rate range from 2.2% to 5.1% in the high bit-rate cases, depending on different test sequences.

  14. DOA Estimation of Coherently Distributed Sources Based on Block-Sparse Constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Lu; Wang, Xiao Qing; Liao, Hong Shu

    In this letter, a new method is proposed to solve the direction-of-arrivals (DOAs) estimation problem of coherently distributed sources based on the block-sparse signal model of compressed sensing (CS) and the convex optimization theory. We make use of a certain number of point sources and the CS array architecture to establish the compressive version of the discrete model of coherently distributed sources. The central DOA and the angular spread can be estimated simultaneously by solving a convex optimization problem which employs a joint norm constraint. As a result we can avoid the two-dimensional search used in conventional algorithms. Furthermore, the multiple-measurement-vectors (MMV) scenario is also considered to achieve robust estimation. The effectiveness of our method is confirmed by simulation results.

  15. A Distributed Parallel Genetic Algorithm of Placement Strategy for Virtual Machines Deployment on Cloud Platform

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yu-Shuang; Xu, Gao-Chao; Fu, Xiao-Dong

    2014-01-01

    The cloud platform provides various services to users. More and more cloud centers provide infrastructure as the main way of operating. To improve the utilization rate of the cloud center and to decrease the operating cost, the cloud center provides services according to requirements of users by sharding the resources with virtualization. Considering both QoS for users and cost saving for cloud computing providers, we try to maximize performance and minimize energy cost as well. In this paper, we propose a distributed parallel genetic algorithm (DPGA) of placement strategy for virtual machines deployment on cloud platform. It executes the genetic algorithm parallelly and distributedly on several selected physical hosts in the first stage. Then it continues to execute the genetic algorithm of the second stage with solutions obtained from the first stage as the initial population. The solution calculated by the genetic algorithm of the second stage is the optimal one of the proposed approach. The experimental results show that the proposed placement strategy of VM deployment can ensure QoS for users and it is more effective and more energy efficient than other placement strategies on the cloud platform. PMID:25097872

  16. A distributed parallel genetic algorithm of placement strategy for virtual machines deployment on cloud platform.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yu-Shuang; Xu, Gao-Chao; Fu, Xiao-Dong

    2014-01-01

    The cloud platform provides various services to users. More and more cloud centers provide infrastructure as the main way of operating. To improve the utilization rate of the cloud center and to decrease the operating cost, the cloud center provides services according to requirements of users by sharding the resources with virtualization. Considering both QoS for users and cost saving for cloud computing providers, we try to maximize performance and minimize energy cost as well. In this paper, we propose a distributed parallel genetic algorithm (DPGA) of placement strategy for virtual machines deployment on cloud platform. It executes the genetic algorithm parallelly and distributedly on several selected physical hosts in the first stage. Then it continues to execute the genetic algorithm of the second stage with solutions obtained from the first stage as the initial population. The solution calculated by the genetic algorithm of the second stage is the optimal one of the proposed approach. The experimental results show that the proposed placement strategy of VM deployment can ensure QoS for users and it is more effective and more energy efficient than other placement strategies on the cloud platform.

  17. A distributed parallel genetic algorithm of placement strategy for virtual machines deployment on cloud platform.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yu-Shuang; Xu, Gao-Chao; Fu, Xiao-Dong

    2014-01-01

    The cloud platform provides various services to users. More and more cloud centers provide infrastructure as the main way of operating. To improve the utilization rate of the cloud center and to decrease the operating cost, the cloud center provides services according to requirements of users by sharding the resources with virtualization. Considering both QoS for users and cost saving for cloud computing providers, we try to maximize performance and minimize energy cost as well. In this paper, we propose a distributed parallel genetic algorithm (DPGA) of placement strategy for virtual machines deployment on cloud platform. It executes the genetic algorithm parallelly and distributedly on several selected physical hosts in the first stage. Then it continues to execute the genetic algorithm of the second stage with solutions obtained from the first stage as the initial population. The solution calculated by the genetic algorithm of the second stage is the optimal one of the proposed approach. The experimental results show that the proposed placement strategy of VM deployment can ensure QoS for users and it is more effective and more energy efficient than other placement strategies on the cloud platform. PMID:25097872

  18. A comparison of distributed memory and virtual shared memory parallel programming models

    SciTech Connect

    Keane, J.A.; Grant, A.J.; Xu, M.Q.

    1993-04-01

    The virtues of the different parallel programming models, shared memory and distributed memory, have been much debated. Conventionally the debate could be reduced to programming convenience on the one hand, and high salability factors on the other. More recently the debate has become somewhat blurred with the provision of virtual shared memory models built on machines with physically distributed memory. The intention of such models/machines is to provide scalable shared memory, i.e. to provide both programmer convenience and high salability. In this paper, the different models are considered from experiences gained with a number of system ranging from applications in both commerce and science to languages and operating systems. Case studies are introduced as appropriate.

  19. Near-exact distributions for the block equicorrelation and equivariance likelihood ratio test statistic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coelho, Carlos A.; Marques, Filipe J.

    2013-09-01

    In this paper the authors combine the equicorrelation and equivariance test introduced by Wilks [13] with the likelihood ratio test (l.r.t.) for independence of groups of variables to obtain the l.r.t. of block equicorrelation and equivariance. This test or its single block version may find applications in many areas as in psychology, education, medicine, genetics and they are important "in many tests of multivariate analysis, e.g. in MANOVA, Profile Analysis, Growth Curve analysis, etc" [12, 9]. By decomposing the overall hypothesis into the hypotheses of independence of groups of variables and the hypothesis of equicorrelation and equivariance we are able to obtain the expressions for the overall l.r.t. statistic and its moments. From these we obtain a suitable factorization of the characteristic function (c.f.) of the logarithm of the l.r.t. statistic, which enables us to develop highly manageable and precise near-exact distributions for the test statistic.

  20. A Virtual Geophysical Network: Using Industry Standard Technology to Link Geographically Distributed Sensors and Data Centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahern, T. K.; Benson, R. B.; Crotwell, H. P.

    2003-12-01

    The IRIS Data Management System has long supported distributed data centers as a method of providing scientific researchers access to data from seismological networks around the world. For nearly a decade, the NetDC system used email as the method through which users could access data centers located around the globe in a seamless fashion. More recently the IRIS DMC has partnered with the University of South Carolina to develop a new method through which a virtual data center can be created. The Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) technology is an industry standard distributed computing architecture. Traditionally used by major corporations, IRIS has developed a Data Handling Interface (DHI) system that is capable of connecting services at participating data centers (servers) to applications running on end-users computing platforms (clients). For seismology we have identified three services. 1) A network service that provides information about geophysical observatories around the world such as where the sensors exist, what types of information are recorded on the sensors, and calibration information that allows proper use of the data, 2) an event service that allows applications to access information about earthquakes and seismological events and 3) waveform services that allow users to gain access to seismograms or time series data from other geophysical sensors. Seismological Data Centers operate the servers thereby allowing a variety of client applications to directly access the information at these data centers. Currently IRIS, the U. of South Carolina, UC Berkeley, and a European Data Center (ORFEUS) have been involved in the DHI project. This talk will highlight some of the DHI enabled clients that allow geophysical information to be directly transferred to the clients. Since the data center servers appear with the same interface specification (Interface Definition Language) a client that can talk to one DHI server can talk to any DHI enabled

  1. Quantification of hepatic flow distribution using particle tracking for patient specific virtual Fontan surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Weiguang; Vignon-Clementel, Irene; Troianowski, Guillaume; Shadden, Shawn; Mohhan Reddy, V.; Feinstein, Jeffrey; Marsden, Alison

    2010-11-01

    The Fontan surgery is the third and final stage in a palliative series to treat children with single ventricle heart defects. In the extracardiac Fontan procedure, the inferior vena cava (IVC) is connected to the pulmonary arteries via a tube-shaped Gore-tex graft. Clinical observations have shown that the absence of a hepatic factor, carried in the IVC flow, can cause pulmonary arteriovenous malformations. Although it is clear that hepatic flow distribution is an important determinant of Fontan performance, few studies have quantified its relation to Fontan design. In this study, we virtually implanted three types of grafts (T-junction, offset and Y-graft) into 5 patient specific models of the Glenn (stage 2) anatomy. We then performed 3D time-dependent simulations and systematically compared the IVC flow distribution, energy loss, and pressure levels in different surgical designs. A robustness test is performed to evaluate the sensitivity of hepatic distribution to pulmonary flow split. Results show that the Y-graft design effectively improves the IVC flow distribution, compared to traditional designs and that surgical designs could be customized on a patient-by-patient basis.

  2. Preliminary analysis of Block Island Power Company's use of clean distributed resources to provide power to its customers

    SciTech Connect

    Hoff, T.E.

    2000-01-25

    This report is an analysis of the potential for Block Island Power Company (BIPCO) to use renewable energy and clean distributed resources to supply power to its customers. The preliminary conclusion of this work is that a system composed of clean distributed resources has the potential to be a technically and economically feasible alternative for BIPCO.

  3. Stabilization of a Power System including Inverter Type Distributed Generators by the Virtual Synchronous Generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakimoto, Kenichi; Miura, Yushi; Ise, Toshifumi

    The capacity of Distributed Generators (DGs) connected to grid by inverters are growing year and year. The inverters are generally controlled by PLL (Phase Locked Loop) in order to synchronize with power system frequency. Power systems will become unstable, if the capacity of inverter type DGs become larger and larger, because inverter frequency is controlled just to follow the frequency decided by other synchronous generators. There is the idea that inverters are controlled to behave like a synchronous generator. This concept is called Virtual Synchronous Generator (VSG). In this paper, a control scheme of VSG is presented, and the design method of required energy storage and the ability of grid stabilizing control by VSG is investigated by computer simulations.

  4. Virtuality Distributions in application to gamma gamma* to pi^0 Transition Form Factor at Handbag Level

    SciTech Connect

    Radyushkin, Anatoly V.

    2014-07-01

    We outline basics of a new approach to transverse momentum dependence in hard processes. As an illustration, we consider hard exclusive transition process gamma*gamma -> to pi^0 at the handbag level. Our starting point is coordinate representation for matrix elements of operators (in the simplest case, bilocal O(0,z)) describing a hadron with momentum p. Treated as functions of (pz) and z^2, they are parametrized through a virtuality distribution amplitude (VDA) Phi (x, sigma), with x being Fourier-conjugate to (pz) and sigma Laplace-conjugate to z^2. For intervals with z^+=0, we introduce transverse momentum distribution amplitude (TMDA) Psi (x, k_\\perp), and write it in terms of VDA Phi (x, \\sigma). The results of covariant calculations, written in terms of Phi (x sigma) are converted into expressions involving Psi (x, k_\\perp. Starting with scalar toy models, we extend the analysis onto the case of spin-1/2 quarks and QCD. We propose simple models for soft VDAs/TMDAs, and use them for comparison of handbag results with experimental (BaBar and BELLE) data on the pion transition form factor. We also discuss how one can generate high-k_\\perp tails from primordial soft distributions.

  5. Distributed computing as a virtual supercomputer: Tools to run and manage large-scale BOINC simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorgino, Toni; Harvey, M. J.; de Fabritiis, Gianni

    2010-08-01

    Distributed computing (DC) projects tackle large computational problems by exploiting the donated processing power of thousands of volunteered computers, connected through the Internet. To efficiently employ the computational resources of one of world's largest DC efforts, GPUGRID, the project scientists require tools that handle hundreds of thousands of tasks which run asynchronously and generate gigabytes of data every day. We describe RBoinc, an interface that allows computational scientists to embed the DC methodology into the daily work-flow of high-throughput experiments. By extending the Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing (BOINC), the leading open-source middleware for current DC projects, with mechanisms to submit and manage large-scale distributed computations from individual workstations, RBoinc turns distributed grids into cost-effective virtual resources that can be employed by researchers in work-flows similar to conventional supercomputers. The GPUGRID project is currently using RBoinc for all of its in silico experiments based on molecular dynamics methods, including the determination of binding free energies and free energy profiles in all-atom models of biomolecules.

  6. Interevent time distributions of human multi-level activity in a virtual world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mryglod, O.; Fuchs, B.; Szell, M.; Holovatch, Yu.; Thurner, S.

    2015-02-01

    Studying human behavior in virtual environments provides extraordinary opportunities for a quantitative analysis of social phenomena with levels of accuracy that approach those of the natural sciences. In this paper we use records of player activities in the massive multiplayer online game Pardus over 1238 consecutive days, and analyze dynamical features of sequences of actions of players. We build on previous work where temporal structures of human actions of the same type were quantified, and provide an empirical understanding of human actions of different types. This study of multi-level human activity can be seen as a dynamic counterpart of static multiplex network analysis. We show that the interevent time distributions of actions in the Pardus universe follow highly non-trivial distribution functions, from which we extract action-type specific characteristic 'decay constants'. We discuss characteristic features of interevent time distributions, including periodic patterns on different time scales, bursty dynamics, and various functional forms on different time scales. We comment on gender differences of players in emotional actions, and find that while males and females act similarly when performing some positive actions, females are slightly faster for negative actions. We also observe effects on the age of players: more experienced players are generally faster in making decisions about engaging in and terminating enmity and friendship, respectively.

  7. The distribution of KIR-HLA functional blocks is different from north to south of Italy.

    PubMed

    Fasano, M E; Rendine, S; Pasi, A; Bontadini, A; Cosentini, E; Carcassi, C; Capittini, C; Cornacchini, G; Espadas de Arias, A; Garbarino, L; Carella, G; Mariotti, M L; Mele, L; Miotti, V; Moscetti, A; Nesci, S; Ozzella, G; Piancatelli, D; Porfirio, B; Riva, M R; Romeo, G; Tagliaferri, C; Lombardo, C; Testi, M; Amoroso, A; Martinetti, M

    2014-03-01

    The killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR)-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) interaction represents an example of genetic epistasis, where the concomitant presence of specific genes or alleles encoding receptor-ligand units is necessary for the activity of natural killer (NK) cells. Although KIR and HLA genes segregate independently, they co-evolved under environmental pressures to maintain particular KIR-HLA functional blocks for species survival. We investigated, in 270 Italian healthy individuals, the distribution of KIR and HLA polymorphisms in three climatic areas (from cold north to warm south), to verify their possible geographical stratification. We analyzed the presence of 13 KIR genes and genotyped KIR ligands belonging to HLA class I: HLA-C, HLA-B and HLA-A. We did not observe any genetic stratification for KIR genes and HLA-C ligands in Italy. By contrast, in a north-to-south direction, we found a decreasing trend for the HLA-A3 and HLA-A11 ligands (P = 0.012) and an increasing trend for the HLA-B ligands carrying the Bw4 epitope (P = 0.0003) and the Bw4 Ile80 epitope (P = 0.0005). The HLA-A and HLA-B KIR ligands were in negative linkage disequilibrium (correlation coefficient -0.1211), possibly as a consequence of their similar function in inhibiting NK cells. The distribution of the KIR-HLA functional blocks was different along Italy, as we observed a north-to-south ascending trend for KIR3DL1, when coupled with HLA-B Bw4 ligands (P = 0.0067) and with HLA-B Bw4 Ile80 (P = 0.0027), and a descending trend for KIR3DL2 when coupled with HLA-A3 and HLA-A11 ligands (P = 0.0044). Overall, people from South Italy preferentially use the KIR3DL1-HLA-B Bw4 functional unit, while those from the North Italy equally use both the KIR3DL2-HLA-A3/A11 and the KIR3DL1-HLA-B Bw4 functional units to fight infections. Thus, only KIR3DL receptors, which exert the unique role of microbial sensors through the specific D0 domain, and their cognate

  8. Distributed execution of recovery blocks - An approach for uniform treatment of hardware and software faults in real-time applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, K. H.; Welch, Howard O.

    1989-01-01

    The concept of distributed execution of recovery blocks is examined as an approach for uniform treatment of hardware and software faults. A useful characteristic of the approach is the relatively small time cost it requires. The approach is thus suitable for incorporation into real-time computer systems. A specific formulation of the approach that is aimed at minimizing the recovery time is presented, called the distributed recovery block (DRB) scheme. The DRB scheme is capable of effecting forward recovery while handling both hardware and software faults in a uniform manner. An approach to incorporating the capability for multiprocessing scheme is also discussed. Two experiments aimed at testing the execution efficiency of the scheme in real-time applications have been conducted on two different multimicrocomputer networks. The results clearly indicate the feasibility of achieving tolerance of hardware and software faults in a broad range of real-time computer systems by use of the schemes for distributed execution of recovery blocks.

  9. Analysis of G-block distributions and their impact on gel properties of in vitro epimerized mannuronan.

    PubMed

    Aarstad, Olav; Strand, Berit Løkensgard; Klepp-Andersen, Lise Mari; Skjåk-Bræk, Gudmund

    2013-10-14

    This paper reports a study of the distribution and function of homopolymeric guluronic acid blocks (G-blocks) in enzymatically modified alginate. High molecular weight mannuronan was incubated with one native (AlgE6) and two engineered G-block generating mannuronan C-5 epimerases (AlgE64 and EM1). These samples were found to contain G-blocks with a DP ranging from 20 to approximately 50, lacking the extremely long G-blocks (DP > 100) found in algal alginates. Calcium gels from epimerized materials were highly compressible and exhibited higher syneresis and rupture strength but lower Youngs modulus than gels made from algal polymers of similar G-content. Addition of extremely long G-blocks to the epimerized alginate resulted in decreased syneresis and rupture strength and an increased Young's modulus that can be explained by reinforcement of the cross-linking zones at the cost of length and/or numbers of elastic segments. The presence and impact of these extremely long G-blocks found in natural alginates suggest that alginate gels can be viewed as a nanocomposite material.

  10. Virtual Oregon: A Proof-of-Concept for Seamless Access to Distributed Environmental Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keon, D.; Pancake, C.; Wright, D. J.; Walsh, K.

    2002-12-01

    Virtual Oregon is a new data coordination center established at Oregon State University in order to: (1) archive environmental and other place-based data on Oregon and associated areas; (2) make those data accessible to a broad spectrum of agencies and individuals via innovative web interfaces; (3) identify key data sets that are not yet available and encourage their collection and dissemination; and (4) facilitate development of statewide standards for archiving, documenting, and disseminating data. Rather than co-locating researchers and data in a physical center, Virtual Oregon employs a distributed architecture that occupies multiple locations while users are presented with the illusion of a single, centralized facility. This approach was selected not just to maximize the impact on campus students, faculty, and staff but also to service broader interactions with extension agents and other members of Oregon State's statewide community. Virtual Oregon builds on regional GIS centers and databanks in a wide range of disciplines, providing decades of research data on topics as varied as coastal processes, climate, biodiversity, land ownership, water quality, wildfire, and agricultural production. There are four distributed nodes, each serving as a center and clearinghouse for distinct types of information and services: - Department of Geosciences (College of Science): geospatial coverages, digital aerial and ortho imagery and associated base data - Forestry Sciences Laboratory (USDA Forest Service and Oregon State's College of Forestry): ecological and resource management databases; data analyses; data from computational simulations - Northwest Alliance for Computational Science and Engineering (NACSE): databases based on specimen collections, field observation, images, or analysis of historical documents; user interface design - Valley Library: published maps, books and archival publications, gray literature, photographs and video Data are harvested from a variety

  11. Distributed attitude synchronization of formation flying via consensus-based virtual structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Bing-Long; Liu, Xiang-Dong; Chen, Zhen

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents a general framework for synchronized multiple spacecraft rotations via consensus-based virtual structure. In this framework, attitude control systems for formation spacecrafts and virtual structure are designed separately. Both parametric uncertainty and external disturbance are taken into account. A time-varying sliding mode control (TVSMC) algorithm is designed to improve the robustness of the actual attitude control system. As for the virtual attitude control system, a behavioral consensus algorithm is presented to accomplish the attitude maneuver of the entire formation and guarantee a consistent attitude among the local virtual structure counterparts during the attitude maneuver. A multiple virtual sub-structures (MVSSs) system is introduced to enhance current virtual structure scheme when large amounts of spacecrafts are involved in the formation. The attitude of spacecraft is represented by modified Rodrigues parameter (MRP) for its non-redundancy. Finally, a numerical simulation with three synchronization situations is employed to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed strategy.

  12. Electrical Resistivity Investigation of Gas Hydrate Distribution in Mississippi Canyon Block 118, Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Dunbar, John

    2012-12-31

    Electrical methods offer a geophysical approach for determining the sub-bottom distribution of hydrate in deep marine environments. Methane hydrate is essentially non-conductive. Hence, sediments containing hydrate are more resistive than sediments without hydrates. To date, the controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) method has been used in marine hydrates studies. This project evaluated an alternative electrical method, direct current resistivity (DCR), for detecting marine hydrates. DCR involves the injection of direct current between two source electrodes and the simultaneous measurement of the electric potential (voltage) between multiple receiver electrodes. The DCR method provides subsurface information comparable to that produced by the CSEM method, but with less sophisticated instrumentation. Because the receivers are simple electrodes, large numbers can be deployed to achieve higher spatial resolution. In this project a prototype seafloor DCR system was developed and used to conduct a reconnaissance survey at a site of known hydrate occurrence in Mississippi Canyon Block 118. The resulting images of sub-bottom resistivities indicate that high-concentration hydrates at the site occur only in the upper 50 m, where deep-seated faults intersect the seafloor. Overall, there was evidence for much less hydrate at the site than previously thought based on available seismic and CSEM data alone.

  13. Pore size distribution and methane equilibrium conditions at Walker Ridge Block 313, northern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Bihani, Abhishek; Daigle, Hugh; Cook, Ann; Glosser, Deborah; Shushtarian, Arash

    2015-12-15

    Coexistence of three methane phases (liquid (L), gas (G), hydrate (H)) in marine gas hydrate systems may occur according to in-situ pressure, temperature, salinity and pore size. In sediments with salinity close to seawater, a discrete zone of three-phase (3P) equilibrium may occur near the base of the regional hydrate stability zone (RHSZ) due to capillary effects. The existence of a 3P zone influences the location of the bottom-simulating reflection (BSR) and has implications for methane fluxes at the base of the RHSZ. We studied hydrate stability conditions in two wells, WR313-G and WR313-H, at Walker Ridge Block 313 in the northern Gulf of Mexico. We determined pore size distributions (PSD) by constructing a synthetic nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation time distribution. Correlations were obtained by non-linear regression on NMR, gamma ray, and bulk density logs from well KC-151 at Keathley Canyon. The correlations enabled construction of relaxation time distributions for WR313-G and WR313-H, which were used to predict PSD through comparison with mercury injection capillary pressure measurements. With the computed PSD, L+H and L+G methane solubility was determined from in-situ pressure and temperature. The intersection of the L+G and L+H curves for various pore sizes allowed calculation of the depth range of the 3P equilibrium zone. As in previous studies at Blake Ridge and Hydrate Ridge, the top of the 3P zone moves upwards with increasing water depth and overlies the bulk 3P equilibrium depth. In clays at Walker Ridge, the predicted thickness of the 3P zone is approximately 35 m, but in coarse sands it is only a few meters due to the difference in absolute pore sizes and the width of the PSD. The thick 3P zone in the clays may explain in part why the BSR is only observed in the sand layers at Walker Ridge, although other factors may influence the presence or absence of a BSR.

  14. Pore Size Distribution and Methane Equilibrium Conditions at Walker Ridge Block 313, Northern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bihani, A. D.; Daigle, H.; Cook, A.; Glosser, D.; Shushtarian, A.

    2015-12-01

    Coexistence of three methane phases (liquid (L), gas (G), hydrate (H)) in marine gas hydrate systems may occur according to in-situ pressure, temperature, salinity and pore size. In sediments with salinity close to seawater, a discrete zone of three-phase (3P) equilibrium may occur near the base of the regional hydrate stability zone (RHSZ) due to capillary effects. The existence of a 3P zone influences the location of the bottom-simulating reflection (BSR) and has implications for methane fluxes at the base of the RHSZ. We studied hydrate stability conditions in two wells, WR313-G and WR313-H, at Walker Ridge Block 313 in the northern Gulf of Mexico. We determined pore size distributions (PSD) by constructing a synthetic nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation time distribution. Correlations were obtained by non-linear regression on NMR, gamma ray, and bulk density logs from well KC-151 at Keathley Canyon. The correlations enabled construction of relaxation time distributions for WR313-G and WR313-H, which were used to predict PSD through comparison with mercury injection capillary pressure measurements. With the computed PSD, L+H and L+G methane solubility was determined from in-situ pressure and temperature. The intersection of the L+G and L+H curves for various pore sizes allowed calculation of the depth range of the 3P equilibrium zone. As in previous studies at Blake Ridge and Hydrate Ridge, the top of the 3P zone moves upwards with increasing water depth and overlies the bulk 3P equilibrium depth. In clays at Walker Ridge, the predicted thickness of the 3P zone is approximately 35 m, but in coarse sands it is only a few meters due to the difference in absolute pore sizes and the width of the PSD. The thick 3P zone in the clays may explain in part why the BSR is only observed in the sand layers at Walker Ridge, although other factors may influence the presence or absence of a BSR.

  15. Distributed interactive simulation virtual cassette recorder (DIS VCR); A datalogger with variable speed replay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortner, Jonathan L.

    1994-12-01

    The overall objective of the Distributed Interactive Simulation Virtual Cassette Recorder (DIS VCR) is to add a flexible replay capability to any DIS environment and specifically to the Remote Debriefing Tool (RDT). The DIS VCR's abilities include selective filtering of incoming DIS Protocol Data Units (PDUs), variable-speed replays, ability to pause, fast-forward, rewind, efficient data storage and retrieval, and an interface that simplifies the execution of those functions. The thesis includes a DIS VCR-compatible design for concurrent replay of audio extracted from signal PDUs and an extension to the replay design that supports unmodifiable rendering or receiving applications. For variable-speed replays, the authors created a scalable simulation clock and a new PDU (the Replay PDU). Applications modified for replays use the simulation clock to govern their dead reckoning algorithms while the DIS VCR uses it to control the timed release of stored PDUs. The Replay PDU communicates mode and speed changes between the DIS VCR and replay-modified applications. The DIS VCR's full functionality was successfully demonstrated at the 1994 AFA convention.

  16. Application of tracer injection tests to characterize rock matrix block size distribution and dispersivity in fractured aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifi Haddad, Amin; Hassanzadeh, Hassan; Abedi, Jalal; Chen, Zhangxin

    2014-03-01

    The complexity of mass transfer processes between the mobile and immobile zones in geohydrologic settings and the limitations that currently exist in the characterization of contaminated sites demand the development of improved models. In this work, we present a model that describes the mass transfer in structured porous media. This model considers divergent radial advective-dispersive transport in fractures and diffusive mass transfer inside rock matrix blocks. The heterogeneous nature of fractured formations is included with the integration of various distributions of rock matrix block sizes into the transport model. Breakthrough curves generated based on the developed model are analyzed to investigate the effects of the rate of injection, dispersivity and the immobile to mobile porosity ratio on mass transfer between mobile and immobile zones. It is shown that the developed model, in conjunction with tracer data collected from a monitoring well, can be used to estimate the dispersivity and fracture intensity. Results reveal that the dispersivity is independent of the rock matrix block size distribution for dispersion-dominant transport in fractures. These findings are used to develop a methodology to characterize rock matrix block size distribution in fractured aquifers and to estimate dispersivity based on a tracer test, which will improve our decisions concerning the remediation of contaminated sites.

  17. Multimilling-Insert Wear Assessment Using Non-Linear Virtual Sensor, Time-Frequency Distribution and Neural Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James Li, C.; Tzeng, Tzong-Chyi

    2000-11-01

    The objective of this study is to establish a signal processing methodology that can infer the state of milling insert wear from translational vibration measured on the spindle housing of a milling machine. First, the tool wear signature in a translational vibration is accentuated by mapping the translational vibration into a torsional vibration using a previously identified non-linear relationship between the two, i.e. a virtual sensor. Second, a time-frequency distribution, i.e. a Choi-Williams distribution, is calculated from the torsional vibration. Third, scattering matrices and orthogonalisation are employed to identify the time-frequency components that are best correlated to the state of wear. Fourth, a neural network is trained to estimate the extent of wear from these critical time frequency components. The combination of the virtual sensor, time-frequency analysis and neural network is then validated with data obtained from real cutting tests.

  18. The Evolution of Constructivist Learning Environments: Immersion in Distributed, Virtual Worlds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dede, Chris

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the evolution of constructivist learning environments and examines the collaboration of simulated software models, virtual environments, and evolving mental models via immersion in artificial realities. A sidebar gives a realistic example of a student navigating through cyberspace. (JMV)

  19. The Effect of Audio and Visual Aids on Task Performance in Distributed Collaborative Virtual Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, Sehat; Richard, Paul; Otman, Samir; Mallem, Malik

    2009-03-01

    Collaborative virtual environments (CVE) has recently gained the attention of many researchers due to its numerous potential application domains. Cooperative virtual environments, where users simultaneously manipulate objects, is one of the subfields of CVEs. In this paper we present a framework that enables two users to cooperatively manipulate objects in virtual environment, while setting on two separate machines connected through local network. In addition the article presents the use of sensory feedback (audio and visual) and investigates their effects on the cooperation and user's performance. Six volunteers subject had to cooperatively perform a peg-in-hole task. Results revealed that visual and auditory aid increase users' performance. However majority of the users preferred visual feedback to audio. We hope this framework will greatly help in the development of CAD systems that allow the designers to collaboratively design while being distant. Similarly other application domains may be cooperative assembly, surgical training and rehabilitation systems.

  20. Technophiles to Newbies: The Challenge of Supporting Distributed Teams to Maintain Engagement in Virtual Worlds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffith, Karen

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to look for links in a virtual trainee's interest and self-efficacy in a simulated event as it relates to their previous self-reported technical skill level. Ultimately, the idea would be to provide the right amount of support at the right place at the right time to set the conditions for maximum transfer of the skill sets to the work place. An anecdotal recap of a recent experiment of a medium-scale training event produced in a virtual world will provide examples for discussion. In July 2010, a virtual training event was produced for the Air Force Research Lab's Games for Team Training (GaMeTT) at the Patriot Exercise at Volk Field in Wisconsin. There were 29 EMEDS participants who completed the simulated OCO event using the OLIVE gaming engine. Approximately 25 avatars were present at any given time; including role players, observers, coordinators and participants.

  1. Low-cost system for real-time integration of virtual and real distributed environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balossino, Nello; Bresciani, Fulvio; Lucenteforte, Maurizio; Siracusa, Simona

    2000-12-01

    As is known, the term virtual studio is usually referred to the integration of synthetic and real environments: if an action occurs in the real world, the same must be reproduced in the artificial scene. The integration may be realized using one of the available systems which are generally characterized by high and expensive technology. Our work proposes an approach with two important advantages: low cost and possibility of building collaborative work. The system consists in a location named SM (generator of Synthetic worlds Meshing between real and virtual worlds) and in a differently located site indicated as V. The system SM is a powerful graphics oriented machine, which is able both to make highly realistic real time rendering of a complex virtual world, and to mesh the virtual scene with the video signal received from the V system. We suppose the V system characterized by a uniform background and a subject captured by a web cam whose video frames are sent to the SM system. In order to obtain the right information about the position of each video camera in the real world coordinate system and the zoom parameters, we propose an easy approach based on detecting the shape variations of a flag, with known aspect and dimension, placed in a defined position in the uniform background. This means that in a particular frame the scene modifications are codified in a few parameters related to the flag variations, so the integration between real and virtual becomes easy. The mesh results are sent to V, while just the selected meshed image is available for a generic user connected to the net service. The system may be applied in different contexts, for example video conferences and multiplayer virtual sets.

  2. Supporting Distributed Team Working in 3D Virtual Worlds: A Case Study in Second Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minocha, Shailey; Morse, David R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on a study into how a three-dimensional (3D) virtual world (Second Life) can facilitate socialisation and team working among students working on a team project at a distance. This models the situation in many commercial sectors where work is increasingly being conducted across time zones and between…

  3. Practical quantum private query of blocks based on unbalanced-state Bennett-Brassard-1984 quantum-key-distribution protocol

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Chun-Yan; Gao, Fei; Wen, Qiao-Yan; Wang, Tian-Yin

    2014-01-01

    Until now, the only kind of practical quantum private query (QPQ), quantum-key-distribution (QKD)-based QPQ, focuses on the retrieval of a single bit. In fact, meaningful message is generally composed of multiple adjacent bits (i.e., a multi-bit block). To obtain a message from database, the user Alice has to query l times to get each ai. In this condition, the server Bob could gain Alice's privacy once he obtains the address she queried in any of the l queries, since each ai contributes to the message Alice retrieves. Apparently, the longer the retrieved message is, the worse the user privacy becomes. To solve this problem, via an unbalanced-state technique and based on a variant of multi-level BB84 protocol, we present a protocol for QPQ of blocks, which allows the user to retrieve a multi-bit block from database in one query. Our protocol is somewhat like the high-dimension version of the first QKD-based QPQ protocol proposed by Jacobi et al., but some nontrivial modifications are necessary. PMID:25518810

  4. Practical quantum private query of blocks based on unbalanced-state Bennett-Brassard-1984 quantum-key-distribution protocol.

    PubMed

    Wei, Chun-Yan; Gao, Fei; Wen, Qiao-Yan; Wang, Tian-Yin

    2014-01-01

    Until now, the only kind of practical quantum private query (QPQ), quantum-key-distribution (QKD)-based QPQ, focuses on the retrieval of a single bit. In fact, meaningful message is generally composed of multiple adjacent bits (i.e., a multi-bit block). To obtain a message a1a2···al from database, the user Alice has to query l times to get each ai. In this condition, the server Bob could gain Alice's privacy once he obtains the address she queried in any of the l queries, since each a(i) contributes to the message Alice retrieves. Apparently, the longer the retrieved message is, the worse the user privacy becomes. To solve this problem, via an unbalanced-state technique and based on a variant of multi-level BB84 protocol, we present a protocol for QPQ of blocks, which allows the user to retrieve a multi-bit block from database in one query. Our protocol is somewhat like the high-dimension version of the first QKD-based QPQ protocol proposed by Jacobi et al., but some nontrivial modifications are necessary. PMID:25518810

  5. John H. Dillon Medal: Tapered Block Copolymers: Tuning Self-Assembly and Properties by Manipulating Monomer Segment Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epps, Thomas

    The self-assembly of block copolymers (BCPs) presents unique opportunities to design materials with attractive chemical and mechanical properties based on the ability of BCPs to form periodic structures with nanoscale domain spacings. One area of recent progress in our group focuses on the behavior of tapered BCPs in which the segment distribution at the interface between blocks is synthetically varied to tune morphology, domain density profiles, thermal transitions as well as mechanical and transport properties. Two application targets for these materials are lithium-ion conducting membranes for batteries and nanostructured thin films for nanotemplates and barrier membranes. In the first target area, we found that the taper volume fraction and composition allow us to manipulate the self-assembly of salt-doped BCPs in a well-defined manner that permits optimization of morphology and ion-content. Additionally, we found that the tapered interfaces influence the glass-transition behavior of the ion-conducting block leading to significant changes in lithium-ion transport (ion conductivity). In the second target area, we found the taper content alters the rate of self-assembly as well as the rate of island/hole formation (and ultimate island/hole size) upon thermal annealing. Additionally, using reflectivity techniques, we probed the domain density profiles as a function of taper composition and linked these profiles to changes in domain spacing and glass transition temperature. Overall, these studies show the versatility of tapering to provide a unique handle for simultaneously optimizing multiple materials properties.

  6. Scaling properties and fractality in the distribution of coding segments in eukaryotic genomes revealed through a block entropy approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athanasopoulou, Labrini; Athanasopoulos, Stavros; Karamanos, Kostas; Almirantis, Yannis

    2010-11-01

    Statistical methods, including block entropy based approaches, have already been used in the study of long-range features of genomic sequences seen as symbol series, either considering the full alphabet of the four nucleotides or the binary purine or pyrimidine character set. Here we explore the alternation of short protein-coding segments with long noncoding spacers in entire chromosomes, focusing on the scaling properties of block entropy. In previous studies, it has been shown that the sizes of noncoding spacers follow power-law-like distributions in most chromosomes of eukaryotic organisms from distant taxa. We have developed a simple evolutionary model based on well-known molecular events (segmental duplications followed by elimination of most of the duplicated genes) which reproduces the observed linearity in log-log plots. The scaling properties of block entropy H(n) have been studied in several works. Their findings suggest that linearity in semilogarithmic scale characterizes symbol sequences which exhibit fractal properties and long-range order, while this linearity has been shown in the case of the logistic map at the Feigenbaum accumulation point. The present work starts with the observation that the block entropy of the Cantor-like binary symbol series scales in a similar way. Then, we perform the same analysis for the full set of human chromosomes and for several chromosomes of other eukaryotes. A similar but less extended linearity in semilogarithmic scale, indicating fractality, is observed, while randomly formed surrogate sequences clearly lack this type of scaling. Genomic sequences always present entropy values much lower than their random surrogates. Symbol sequences produced by the aforementioned evolutionary model follow the scaling found in genomic sequences, thus corroborating the conjecture that “segmental duplication-gene elimination” dynamics may have contributed to the observed long rangeness in the coding or noncoding alternation in

  7. The Distributive and Educational Consequences of Chapter 2 Block Grants in Pennsylvania.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuriloff, Peter J.

    1985-01-01

    Explores the association of district enrollment, minority enrollment, wealth, poverty level, fiscal capacity, and tax effort with changes in the distribution of Pennsylvania's federal aid due to implementation of Chapter 2 of the Education Consolidation and Improvement Act. Examines the law's effect on paperwork, local control, and encouragement…

  8. Extended Virtual Spring Mesh (EVSM): The Distributed Self-Organizing Mobile Ad Hoc Network for Area Exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Kurt Derr

    2011-12-01

    Mobile Ad hoc NETworks (MANETs) are distributed self-organizing networks that can change locations and configure themselves on the fly. This paper focuses on an algorithmic approach for the deployment of a MANET within an enclosed area, such as a building in a disaster scenario, which can provide a robust communication infrastructure for search and rescue operations. While a virtual spring mesh (VSM) algorithm provides scalable, self-organizing, and fault-tolerant capabilities required by aMANET, the VSM lacks the MANET's capabilities of deployment mechanisms for blanket coverage of an area and does not provide an obstacle avoidance mechanism. This paper presents a new technique, an extended VSM (EVSM) algorithm that provides the following novelties: (1) new control laws for exploration and expansion to provide blanket coverage, (2) virtual adaptive springs enabling the mesh to expand as necessary, (3) adapts to communications disturbances by varying the density and movement of mobile nodes, and (4) new metrics to assess the performance of the EVSM algorithm. Simulation results show that EVSM provides up to 16% more coverage and is 3.5 times faster than VSM in environments with eight obstacles.

  9. Deviations from the Gutenberg-Richter law on account of a random distribution of block sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sibiryakov, B. P.

    2015-10-01

    This paper studies properties of a continuum with structure. The characteristic size of the structure governs the fact that difference relations are nonautomatically transformed into differential ones. It is impossible to consider an infinitesimal volume of a body, to which the major conservation laws could be applied, because the minimum representative volume of the body must contain at least a few elementary microstructures. The corresponding equations of motion are equations of infinite order, solutions of which include, along with usual sound waves, unusual waves with abnormally low velocities without a lower limit. It is shown that in such media weak perturbations can increase or decrease outside the limits. The number of complex roots of the corresponding dispersion equation, which can be interpreted as the number of unstable solutions, depends on the specific surface of cracks and is an almost linear dependence on a logarithmic scale, as in the seismological Gutenberg-Richter law. If the distance between one pore (crack) to another one is a random value with some distribution, we must write another dispersion equation and examine different scenarios depending on the statistical characteristics of the random distribution. In this case, there are sufficient deviations from the Gutenberg-Richter law and this theoretical result corresponds to some field and laboratory observations.

  10. Deviations from the Gutenberg–Richter law on account of a random distribution of block sizes

    SciTech Connect

    Sibiryakov, B. P.

    2015-10-27

    This paper studies properties of a continuum with structure. The characteristic size of the structure governs the fact that difference relations are nonautomatically transformed into differential ones. It is impossible to consider an infinitesimal volume of a body, to which the major conservation laws could be applied, because the minimum representative volume of the body must contain at least a few elementary microstructures. The corresponding equations of motion are equations of infinite order, solutions of which include, along with usual sound waves, unusual waves with abnormally low velocities without a lower limit. It is shown that in such media weak perturbations can increase or decrease outside the limits. The number of complex roots of the corresponding dispersion equation, which can be interpreted as the number of unstable solutions, depends on the specific surface of cracks and is an almost linear dependence on a logarithmic scale, as in the seismological Gutenberg–Richter law. If the distance between one pore (crack) to another one is a random value with some distribution, we must write another dispersion equation and examine different scenarios depending on the statistical characteristics of the random distribution. In this case, there are sufficient deviations from the Gutenberg–Richter law and this theoretical result corresponds to some field and laboratory observations.

  11. Preliminary investigations on the determination of three-dimensional dose distributions using scintillator blocks and optical tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Kroll, Florian; Karsch, Leonhard; Pawelke, Jörg

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Clinical QA in teletherapy as well as the characterization of experimental radiation sources for future medical applications requires effective methods for measuring three-dimensional (3D) dose distributions generated in a water-equivalent medium. Current dosimeters based on ionization chambers, diodes, thermoluminescence detectors, radiochromic films, or polymer gels exhibit various drawbacks: High quality 3D dose determination is either very sophisticated and expensive or requires high amounts of effort and time for the preparation or read out. New detectors based on scintillator blocks in combination with optical tomography are studied, since they have the potential to facilitate the desired cost-effective, transportable, and long-term stable dosimetry system that is able to determine 3D dose distributions with high spatial resolution in a short time.Methods: A portable detector prototype was set up based on a plastic scintillator block and four digital cameras. During irradiation the scintillator emits light, which is detected by the fixed cameras. The light distribution is then reconstructed by optical tomography, using maximum-likelihood expectation maximization. The result of the reconstruction approximates the 3D dose distribution. First performance tests of the prototype using laser light were carried out. Irradiation experiments were performed with ionizing radiation, i.e., bremsstrahlung (6 to 21 MV), electrons (6 to 21 MeV), and protons (68 MeV), provided by clinical and research accelerators.Results: Laser experiments show that the current imaging properties differ from the design specifications: The imaging scale of the optical systems is position dependent, ranging from 0.185 mm/pixel to 0.225 mm/pixel. Nevertheless, the developed dosimetry method is proven to be functional for electron and proton beams. Induced radiation doses of 50 mGy or more made 3D dose reconstructions possible. Taking the imaging properties into account, determined

  12. Policy Building Blocks: Helping Policymakers Determine Policy Staging for the Development of Distributed PV Markets: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Doris, E.

    2012-04-01

    There is a growing body of qualitative and a limited body of quantitative literature supporting the common assertion that policy drives development of clean energy resources. Recent work in this area indicates that the impact of policy depends on policy type, length of time in place, and economic and social contexts of implementation. This work aims to inform policymakers about the impact of different policy types and to assist in the staging of those policies to maximize individual policy effectiveness and development of the market. To do so, this paper provides a framework for policy development to support the market for distributed photovoltaic systems. Next steps include mathematical validation of the framework and development of specific policy pathways given state economic and resource contexts.

  13. Generalized parton distributions and Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering on proton at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    R. De Masi

    2007-12-01

    Two measurements of target and beam spin asymmetries for the reaction ep→epγ were performed with CLAS at Jefferson Laboratory. Polarized 5.7 GeV electrons were impinging on a longitudinally polarized ammonia and liquid hydrogen target respectively. These measurements are sensitive to Generalized Parton Distributions. Sizable sin phi azimuthal angular dependences were observed in both experiments, indicating the dominance of leading twist terms and the possibility of extracting combinations of Generalized Parton Distributions on the nucleon.

  14. A revolution in Distributed Virtual Globes creation with e-CORCE space program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antikidis, Jean-Pierre

    2010-05-01

    Space applications are to-day participating to our everyday life on a continuous fashion and most of the time in an invisible way. Meteorology, telecom and more recently GPS driven applications are these days fully participating to our modern and comfortable way of life. Therefore a new revolution is underway by which Space Remote Sensing technology will bring the full of the Earth available in a digital form. Present requirements for digital Earth creation at high resolution requirement are pushing space technology to a new technological frontier that could be called the: 1 day to one week, 1 meter, 1 Earth, challenge.The e-CORCE vision (e-Constellation d'Observation Recurrente Cellulaire) relies on a complete new avenue to create a full virtual earth with the help of small satellite constellation and make them operated as sensors connected to a powerful internet based ground network. To handle this incredibly high quantity of information (10 000 Billions metric pixel ), maximum use of psycho-visual compression associated to over-simplified platforms considered as space IP nodes and a massive World-wide Grid-based system composed of more than 40 receiving and processing nodes is contemplated. The presentation will introduce the technological hurdles and the way modern upcoming cyber-infrastructure technologies called WAG (Wide Area Grid) may open a practical and economically sound solution to this never attempted challenge.

  15. Thermally driven asymmetric responses of grains versus spin-glass related distributions of blocking temperature in exchange biased Co/IrMn bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Baltz, V.

    2013-02-11

    Controlling ferromagnetic/antiferromagnetic blocking temperatures in exchange biased based devices appears crucial for applications. The blocking temperature is ascribed to the ability of both antiferromagnetic grains and interfacial spin-glass-like phases to withstand ferromagnetic magnetization reversal. To better understand the respective contributions of grains versus spin-glass, blocking temperature distributions were measured after various thermal treatments for cobalt/iridium-manganese bilayers. The high-temperature contribution linked to antiferromagnetic grains shifts towards lower temperatures above a threshold thermal annealing. In contrast, the occurrence and evolution of training effects for the low-temperature contribution only agree with its inferred interfacial spin-glass-like origin.

  16. Virtual libraries of tetrapyrrole macrocycles. Combinatorics, isomers, product distributions, and data mining.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Masahiko; Du, Hai; Lindsey, Jonathan S

    2011-09-26

    A software program (PorphyrinViLiGe) has been developed to enumerate the type and relative amounts of substituted tetrapyrrole macrocycles in a virtual library formed by one of four different classes of reactions. The classes include (1) 4-fold reaction of n disubstituted heterocycles (e.g., pyrroles or diiminoisoindolines) to form β-substituted porphyrins, β-substituted tetraazaporphyrins, or α- or β-substituted phthalocyanines; (2) combination of m aminoketones and n diones to form m × n pyrroles, which upon 4-fold reaction give β-substituted porphyrins; (3) derivatization of an 8-point tetrapyrrole scaffold with n reagents, and (4) 4-fold reaction of n aldehydes and pyrrole to form meso-substituted porphyrins. The program accommodates variable ratios of reactants, reversible or irreversible reaction (reaction classes 1 and 2), and degenerate modes of formation. Pólya's theorem (for enumeration of cyclic entities) has also been implemented and provides validation for reaction classes 3 and 4. The output includes the number and identity of distinct reaction-accessible substituent combinations, the number and identity of isomers thereof, and the theoretical mass spectrum. Provisions for data mining enable assessment of the number of products having a chosen pattern of substituents. Examples include derivatization of an octa-substituted phthalocyanine with eight reagents to afford a library of 2,099,728 members (yet only 6435 distinct substituent combinations) and reversible reaction of six distinct disubstituted pyrroles to afford 2649 members (yet only 126 distinct substituent combinations). In general, libraries of substituted tetrapyrrole macrocycles occupy a synthetically accessible region of chemical space that is rich in isomers (>99% or 95% for the two examples, respectively).

  17. Virtual libraries of tetrapyrrole macrocycles. Combinatorics, isomers, product distributions, and data mining.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Masahiko; Du, Hai; Lindsey, Jonathan S

    2011-09-26

    A software program (PorphyrinViLiGe) has been developed to enumerate the type and relative amounts of substituted tetrapyrrole macrocycles in a virtual library formed by one of four different classes of reactions. The classes include (1) 4-fold reaction of n disubstituted heterocycles (e.g., pyrroles or diiminoisoindolines) to form β-substituted porphyrins, β-substituted tetraazaporphyrins, or α- or β-substituted phthalocyanines; (2) combination of m aminoketones and n diones to form m × n pyrroles, which upon 4-fold reaction give β-substituted porphyrins; (3) derivatization of an 8-point tetrapyrrole scaffold with n reagents, and (4) 4-fold reaction of n aldehydes and pyrrole to form meso-substituted porphyrins. The program accommodates variable ratios of reactants, reversible or irreversible reaction (reaction classes 1 and 2), and degenerate modes of formation. Pólya's theorem (for enumeration of cyclic entities) has also been implemented and provides validation for reaction classes 3 and 4. The output includes the number and identity of distinct reaction-accessible substituent combinations, the number and identity of isomers thereof, and the theoretical mass spectrum. Provisions for data mining enable assessment of the number of products having a chosen pattern of substituents. Examples include derivatization of an octa-substituted phthalocyanine with eight reagents to afford a library of 2,099,728 members (yet only 6435 distinct substituent combinations) and reversible reaction of six distinct disubstituted pyrroles to afford 2649 members (yet only 126 distinct substituent combinations). In general, libraries of substituted tetrapyrrole macrocycles occupy a synthetically accessible region of chemical space that is rich in isomers (>99% or 95% for the two examples, respectively). PMID:21866949

  18. Distribution and textures of K-feldspar grains in the George Ashley Block layered-aplite pegmatite intrusive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleck, W. D.

    2013-12-01

    Both Johns & Tuttle (1963) and London (2008) note that the distribution of potassium is neither uniform nor symmetrical in some pegmatite bodies. A detailed chemical and mineral analysis of the George Ashley Block (Kleck & Foord 1999) shows that the distribution of K-feldspar over the entire body is generally uniform, but not symmetrical. The amounts of quartz, plagioclase, muscovite, and garnet are neither uniform nor symmetrical. It is noted that layered-aplite, pegmatite intrusives (terminology of Jahns & Tuttle 1963) are intruded horizontally, and it is suggested that these are the pegmatite bodies which have this non-uniform distribution of minerals. These types of pegmatite bodies are distinctly different from other pegmatite bodies in several ways. The core zone in these bodies is not centrally located and typically divides these bodies into a pegmatitic top and an aplitic bottom; the top and bottom appear to be contemporaneous. The features and content of the border- and core-zones are not included in this discussion. The texture of the K-feldspar in the top of these bodies is generally pegmatitic; some of the K-feldspar grains may exist as ultra-large grains which have a teardrop shape or minor-crystal surfaces. In the bottom of these bodies, the K-feldspar is commonly rounded grains approximately 1 mm in diameter; rarely, some K-feldspar grains here are centimeter-grained with crystal surfaces indicating growth. In the George Ashley Block, the concentration and distribution of K-feldspar is inversely symmetrical in the top vs. bottom. In the top it increases toward the core zone; K-feldspar--20 increasing to 60 vol% (all values one significant figure) and K2O--3 increasing to 8 wt%. In the bottom it decreases toward the core zone; K-feldspar--40 decreasing to 0 vol% and K2O--4 decreasing to 0 wt%. The two trends are approximately parallel and the total amounts are approximately constant. The suggested conditions and mechanisms (with the added condition of

  19. Virtuality Distributions and γγ* -> π0 Transition at Handbag Level

    SciTech Connect

    Radyushkin, Anatoly V.

    2015-09-01

    We outline a new approach to transverse momentum dependence in hard processes using as an example the exclusive transition ${\\gamma^{*}\\gamma \\to \\pi^{0}}$ at the handbag level. We start with the coordinate representation for a matrix element ${\\langle p |{\\cal O}(0,z) |0 \\rangle}$ of a bilocal operator ${{\\cal O} (0,z)}$ describing a hadron with momentum p. Treated as a function of (pz) and z$^{2}$, it is parametrized through virtuality distribution amplitude (VDA) Φ (x, σ), with x being Fourier-conjugate to (pz) and σ Laplace-conjugate to z$^{2}$. For intervals with z$^{+}$ = 0, we introduce the transverse momentum distribution amplitude (TMDA) ${\\Ψ (x,k_{\\perp})}$ , and write it in terms of VDA Φ (x, σ). The results of covariant calculations, written in terms of Φ (x, σ) are converted into expressions involving ${\\Ψ (x,k_{\\perp})}$ . We propose simple models for soft VDAs/TMDAs, and use them for comparison of handbag results with experimental (BaBar and BELLE) data on the pion transition form factor.

  20. A concave tray with divergent block for desired dose distribution around shielded region in megavoltage radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Avadhani, J S; Pradhan, A S; Sankar, A; Viswanathan, P S

    1995-10-01

    In clinical situations large numbers of rectangular divergent blocks are required at different off-axis positions from central axis to shield sensitive organs. Superiority of divergent blocks over non-divergent blocks on a flat tray lies in improving the dose homogeneity. A method has been developed to minimize the number of divergent shielding blocks by using a concave tray at the collimator. The results of use of a single divergent block are similar to that of the use of several divergent blocks, each to match at different off-axis positions in the radiation beam. This type of single concave tray thus provides a considerable ease of handling divergent blocks in a busy radiotherapy centre. PMID:8539460

  1. Simulated Tempering Distributed Replica Sampling, Virtual Replica Exchange, and Other Generalized-Ensemble Methods for Conformational Sampling.

    PubMed

    Rauscher, Sarah; Neale, Chris; Pomès, Régis

    2009-10-13

    Generalized-ensemble algorithms in temperature space have become popular tools to enhance conformational sampling in biomolecular simulations. A random walk in temperature leads to a corresponding random walk in potential energy, which can be used to cross over energetic barriers and overcome the problem of quasi-nonergodicity. In this paper, we introduce two novel methods: simulated tempering distributed replica sampling (STDR) and virtual replica exchange (VREX). These methods are designed to address the practical issues inherent in the replica exchange (RE), simulated tempering (ST), and serial replica exchange (SREM) algorithms. RE requires a large, dedicated, and homogeneous cluster of CPUs to function efficiently when applied to complex systems. ST and SREM both have the drawback of requiring extensive initial simulations, possibly adaptive, for the calculation of weight factors or potential energy distribution functions. STDR and VREX alleviate the need for lengthy initial simulations, and for synchronization and extensive communication between replicas. Both methods are therefore suitable for distributed or heterogeneous computing platforms. We perform an objective comparison of all five algorithms in terms of both implementation issues and sampling efficiency. We use disordered peptides in explicit water as test systems, for a total simulation time of over 42 μs. Efficiency is defined in terms of both structural convergence and temperature diffusion, and we show that these definitions of efficiency are in fact correlated. Importantly, we find that ST-based methods exhibit faster temperature diffusion and correspondingly faster convergence of structural properties compared to RE-based methods. Within the RE-based methods, VREX is superior to both SREM and RE. On the basis of our observations, we conclude that ST is ideal for simple systems, while STDR is well-suited for complex systems.

  2. Highly efficient and reliable high power LEDs with patterned sapphire substrate and strip-shaped distributed current blocking layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shengjun; Yuan, Shu; Liu, Yingce; Guo, L. Jay; Liu, Sheng; Ding, Han

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrated that the improvement in optical and electrical performance of high power LEDs was achieved using cone-shaped patterned sapphire substrate (PSS) and strip-shaped SiO2 distributed current blocking layer (DCBL). We found through transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation that densities of both the screw dislocation and edge dislocation existing in GaN epitaxial layer grown on PSS were much less than that of GaN epitaxial layer grown on flat sapphire substrate (FSS). Compared to LED grown on FSS, LED grown on PSS showed higher sub-threshold forward-bias voltage and lower reverse leakage current, resulting in an enhancement in device reliability. We also designed a strip-shaped SiO2 DCBL beneath a strip-shaped p-electrode, which prevents the current from being concentrated on regions immediately adjacent the strip-shaped p-electrode, thereby facilitating uniform current spreading into the active region. By implementing strip-shaped SiO2 DCBL, light output power of high power PSS-LED chip could be further increased by 13%.

  3. Size and aspect ratio distributions of blocks in a mélange of the Shimanto accretionary complex, southwest Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabuchi, Y.; Tonai, S.

    2015-12-01

    Block-in-matrix fabrics in accretionary complex have variety based on their deformation processes. We report characteristics of blocks in the Hioki mélange, which constitutes part of the youngest (late Oligocene to early Miocene) portion of the Shimanto accretionary complex, Shikoku, southwest Japan. The Hioki mélange is regarded as a tectonic mélange which has formed at a few km depth below the surface (e.g., Hibbard et al., 1993; Underwood et al., 1993). The ample exposure of the mélange in the study area provides a good opportunity to observe detailed structure of the block-in-matrix fabrics. The matrix, which is partly folded, is composed of dark gray shale and some green tuff and dark brown shale. Foliations of the matrix, which are manifested by cleavages, roughly strike ENE-WSW and steeply dip mostly toward the north. Blocks consist mainly of sandstone. The size of blocks ranges from millimeter to meter in length of major axes. These blocks are divided into brecciated, boudinage, and playted types on the basis of their shapes. Each type of blocks can be observed throughout the study area. We measured size and aspect ratio of blocks that are more than 10 cm in length of major axes. The average and standard deviation of the block size are 28.5 cm and 41.0 cm, respectively. The median of the aspect ratio is 2.0. To compare with the characteristics of blocks, we also measured length of the major axis and the aspect ratio for blocks of a sedimentary mélange (the Cretaceous Ukibuchi Formation), which also constitutes part of the Shimanto accretionary complex. The Ukibuchi Formation consists mainly of dark-gray shale matrix containing sandstone blocks. The average and standard deviation of block size are 12.2 cm and 8.6 cm, respectively. The median of aspect ratio is 1.6. Each parameter is lower than those of blocks in the Hioki mélange.

  4. CROSS DRIVE: A Collaborative and Distributed Virtual Environment for Exploitation of Atmospherical and Geological Datasets of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cencetti, Michele

    2016-07-01

    European space exploration missions have produced huge data sets of potentially immense value for research as well as for planning and operating future missions. For instance, Mars Exploration programs comprise a series of missions with launches ranging from the past to beyond present, which are anticipated to produce exceptional volumes of data which provide prospects for research breakthroughs and advancing further activities in space. These collected data include a variety of information, such as imagery, topography, atmospheric, geochemical datasets and more, which has resulted in and still demands, databases, versatile visualisation tools and data reduction methods. Such rate of valuable data acquisition requires the scientists, researchers and computer scientists to coordinate their storage, processing and relevant tools to enable efficient data analysis. However, the current position is that expert teams from various disciplines, the databases and tools are fragmented, leaving little scope for unlocking its value through collaborative activities. The benefits of collaborative virtual environments have been implemented in various industrial fields allowing real-time multi-user collaborative work among people from different disciplines. Exploiting the benefits of advanced immersive virtual environments (IVE) has been recognized as an important interaction paradigm to facilitate future space exploration. The current work is mainly aimed towards the presentation of the preliminary results coming from the CROSS DRIVE project. This research received funding from the European Union Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under grant agreement n° 607177 and is mainly aimed towards the implementation of a distributed virtual workspace for collaborative scientific discovery, mission planning and operations. The purpose of the CROSS DRIVE project is to lay foundations of collaborative European workspaces for space science. It will demonstrate the feasibility and

  5. Heart Block

    MedlinePlus

    ... Block Explore Heart Block What Is... Electrical System & EKG Results Types Causes Who Is at Risk Signs & ... heart block. Doctors use a test called an EKG (electrocardiogram) to help diagnose heart block. This test ...

  6. Platinum-group element abundance and distribution in chromite deposits of the Acoje Block, Zambales Ophiolite Complex, Philippines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bacuta, G.C.; Kay, R.W.; Gibbs, A.K.; Lipin, B.R.

    1990-01-01

    Platinum-group elements (PGE) occur in ore-grade concentration in some of the chromite deposits related to the ultramafic section of the Acoje Block of the Zambales Ophiolite Complex. The deposits are of three types: Type 1 - associated with cumulate peridotites at the base of the crust; Type 2 - in dunite pods from the top 1 km of mantle harzburgite; and Type 3 - like Type 2, but in deeper levels of the harzburgite. Most of the deposites have chromite compositions that are high in Cr with Cr/(Cr + Al) (expressed as chromium index, Cr#) > 0.6; high-Al (Cr# Pd, thought to be characteristic of PGE-barren deposits) and positive slope (Ir < Pd, characteristic of PGE-rich deposits). Iridium, Ru and Os commonly occur as micron-size laurite (sulfide) inclusions in unfractured chromite. Laurite and native Os are also found as inclusions in interstitial sulfides. Platinum and Pd occur as alloy inclusions (and possibly as solid solution) in interstitial Ni-Cu sulfides and as tellurobismuthides in serpentine and altered sulfides. Variability of PGE distribution may be explained by alteration, crystal fractionation or partial melting processes. Alteration and metamorphism were ruled out, because PGE contents do not correlate with degree of serpentinization or the abundance and type (hydroxyl versus non-hydroxyl) of silicate inclusions in chromite. Preliminary Os isotopic data do not support crustal contamination as a source of the PGEs in the Acoje deposits. The anomalous PGE concentrations in Type 1 high-Cr chromite deposits are attributed to two stages of enrichment: an early enrichment of their mantle source from previous melting events and a later stage of sulfide segregation accompanying chromite crystallization. High-Al chromite deposits which crystallized from basalts derived from relatively low degrees of melting owe their low PGE content to partitioning of PGEs in sulfides and alloys that remain in the mantle. High-Cr deposits crystallized from melts that were

  7. Influence of the Sb dopant distribution on far infrared photoconductivity in Ge:Sb blocked impurity band detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Bandaru, Jordana; Beeman, Jeffrey W.; Haller, Eugene E.; Samperi, Stacy; Haegel, Nancy M.

    2002-02-06

    Extended long wavelength response to {approx}200 {micro}m (50 cm{sup -1}) has been observed in Ge:Sb Blocked Impurity Band (BIB) detectors with N{sub D} {approx} 1 x 10{sup 16} cm{sup -3}. The cut-off wavelength increases from 150 {micro}m (65 cm{sup -1}) to 200 {micro}m (50 cm{sup -1}) with increasing bias. The responsivity at long wavelengths was lower than expected. This can be explained by considering the observed Sb diffusion profile in a transition region between the blocking layer and active layer. BIB modeling is presented which indicates that this Sb concentration profile increases the electric field in the transition region and reduces the field in the blocking layer. The depletion region consists partially of the transition region between the active and blocking layer, which could contribute to the reduced long wavelength response. The field spike at the interface is the likely cause of breakdown at a lower bias than expected.

  8. Sedimentation and reservoir distribution related to a tilted block system in the Sardinia Oligocene-Miocene rift (Italy)

    SciTech Connect

    Tremolieres, P.; Cherchi, A.; Eschard, R.; De Graciansky, P.C.; Montadert, L.

    1988-08-01

    In the western Mediterranean basin lies a rift system about 250 km long and 50 km wide and its infilling outcrop (central Sardinia). Seismic reflection surveys show its offshore extension. Block tilting started during the late Oligocene and lasted during Aquitanian-early Burdigalian time. Two main fault trends, with synthetic and antithetic throws, define the more-or-less collapsed blocks. This morphology guided the transit and trapping of sediments. The sedimentation started in a continental environment then, since the Chattian, in marine conditions. In the central part, the series can reach a thickness of 2,000 m. The basement composition and the volcanics products related to the main fault motion controlled the nature of the synrift deposits. According to their location in the rift context, the tilted blocks trap either continental deposits or marine siliciclastic or carbonate deposits. In the deeper part of the graben, sands were redeposited by gravity flows into the basinal marls. The younger prerift deposits are from Eocene to early Oligocene age and locally comprise thick coal layers. Postrift deposits, mainly marls, sealed the blocks and synrift sedimentary bodies. In middle and late Miocene time some faults were reactivated during compressional events. Then, a quaternary extensional phase created the Campidano graben, filled with about 1,000 m of sediments superimposed on the Oligocene-Miocene rift.

  9. Measuring Virtual Student-Student Cooperation: A Case Study on the Evaluation of Cooperative Learning in a Virtual Distributed Computer and Law Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nett, Bernhard

    2005-01-01

    This article demonstrates the evaluation of a German Computer and Law (C&L) seminar, which has been conducted in an experimental, distributed manner with five institutes co-operating. The evaluation was dedicated to the question, in which way the course supported cooperative learning among the students of the different participating institutes. As…

  10. Agreements in Virtual Organizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankowska, Malgorzata

    This chapter is an attempt to explain the important impact that contract theory delivers with respect to the concept of virtual organization. The author believes that not enough research has been conducted in order to transfer theoretical foundations for networking to the phenomena of virtual organizations and open autonomic computing environment to ensure the controllability and management of them. The main research problem of this chapter is to explain the significance of agreements for virtual organizations governance. The first part of this chapter comprises explanations of differences among virtual machines and virtual organizations for further descriptions of the significance of the first ones to the development of the second. Next, the virtual organization development tendencies are presented and problems of IT governance in highly distributed organizational environment are discussed. The last part of this chapter covers analysis of contracts and agreements management for governance in open computing environments.

  11. Water distributions in PS-b-P(S-g-PEO) block grafted copolymer system in aqueous solutions revealed by contrast variation SANS study

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wei-Ren; Hong, Kunlun; Li, Xin; Liu, Emily; Liu, Yun; Shew, Chwen-Yang; Smith, Gregory Scott

    2010-01-01

    In this report, we present a contrast variation small angle neutron scattering (SANS) study of PS-b-P(S-g-PEO) block graft copolymers in aqueous media at a concentration of 10 mg/ml. Through varying the solvent D2O/H2O ratio, the scattering contributions from the water molecules and the micellar constituent components can be determined. Based on the commonly used core-shell model, a theoretical coherent scattering cross section incorporating the effect of water penetration is developed and used to analyze the SANS I(Q), we have successfully quantified the micellar structure and the number of - water molecules associated with the core and corona. We have found that the overall micellar hydration level increase with the increase in the molecular weight of hydrophilic PEO side chains. This study provides key information in understanding solvent distributions within self-assembled amphiphilic block grafted copolymers.

  12. Study of Generalized Parton Distributions and Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering on the nucleon with the CLAS and CLAS12 detectors at the Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Guegan, Baptiste

    2012-11-01

    The exclusive leptoproduction of a real photon is considered to be the "cleanest" way to access the Generalized Parton Distribution (GPD). This process is called Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) lN {yields} lN{gamma} , and is sensitive to all the four GPDs. Measuring the DVCS cross section is one of the main goals of this thesis. In this thesis, we present the work performed to extract on a wide phase-space the DVCS cross-section from the JLab data at a beam energy of 6 GeV.

  13. Population Blocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Martin H.

    1992-01-01

    Describes an educational game called "Population Blocks" that is designed to illustrate the concept of exponential growth of the human population and some potential effects of overpopulation. The game material consists of wooden blocks; 18 blocks are painted green (representing land), 7 are painted blue (representing water); and the remaining…

  14. Virtual screening of virtual libraries.

    PubMed

    Green, Darren V S

    2003-01-01

    methods, algorithms that manage the combinatorial explosion, high throughput crystallography and ADME measurements and the massive increase in computational horsepower from distributed computing. The author is confident that the synergy of these technologies will bring great benefit to the industry, with more efficient production of higher quality clinical candidates. The future is bright. The future is virtual!

  15. Virtual Machine Language

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grasso, Christopher; Page, Dennis; O'Reilly, Taifun; Fteichert, Ralph; Lock, Patricia; Lin, Imin; Naviaux, Keith; Sisino, John

    2005-01-01

    Virtual Machine Language (VML) is a mission-independent, reusable software system for programming for spacecraft operations. Features of VML include a rich set of data types, named functions, parameters, IF and WHILE control structures, polymorphism, and on-the-fly creation of spacecraft commands from calculated values. Spacecraft functions can be abstracted into named blocks that reside in files aboard the spacecraft. These named blocks accept parameters and execute in a repeatable fashion. The sizes of uplink products are minimized by the ability to call blocks that implement most of the command steps. This block approach also enables some autonomous operations aboard the spacecraft, such as aerobraking, telemetry conditional monitoring, and anomaly response, without developing autonomous flight software. Operators on the ground write blocks and command sequences in a concise, high-level, human-readable programming language (also called VML ). A compiler translates the human-readable blocks and command sequences into binary files (the operations products). The flight portion of VML interprets the uplinked binary files. The ground subsystem of VML also includes an interactive sequence- execution tool hosted on workstations, which runs sequences at several thousand times real-time speed, affords debugging, and generates reports. This tool enables iterative development of blocks and sequences within times of the order of seconds.

  16. Ionic Blocks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sevcik, Richard S.; Gamble, Rex; Martinez, Elizabet; Schultz, Linda D.; Alexander, Susan V.

    2008-01-01

    "Ionic Blocks" is a teaching tool designed to help middle school students visualize the concepts of ions, ionic compounds, and stoichiometry. It can also assist high school students in reviewing their subject mastery. Three dimensional blocks are used to represent cations and anions, with color indicating charge (positive or negative) and size…

  17. Deep proteomic profiling of vasopressin-sensitive collecting duct cells. I. Virtual Western blots and molecular weight distributions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chin-Rang; Tongyoo, Pumipat; Emamian, Milad; Sandoval, Pablo C; Raghuram, Viswanathan; Knepper, Mark A

    2015-12-15

    The mouse mpkCCD cell line is a continuous cultured epithelial cell line with characteristics of renal collecting duct principal cells. This line is widely used to study epithelial transport and its regulation. To provide a data resource useful for experimental design and interpretation in studies using mpkCCD cells, we have carried out "deep" proteomic profiling of these cells using three levels of fractionation (differential centrifugation, SDS-PAGE, and HPLC) followed by tandem mass spectrometry to identify and quantify proteins. The analysis of all resulting samples generated 34.6 gigabytes of spectral data. As a result, we identified 6,766 proteins in mpkCCD cells at a high level of stringency. These proteins are expressed over eight orders of magnitude of protein abundance. The data are provided to users as a public data base (https://helixweb.nih.gov/ESBL/Database/mpkFractions/). The mass spectrometry data were mapped back to their gel slices to generate "virtual Western blots" for each protein. For most of the 6,766 proteins, the apparent molecular weight from SDS-PAGE agreed closely with the calculated molecular weight. However, a substantial fraction (>15%) of proteins was found to run aberrantly, with much higher or much lower mobilities than predicted. These proteins were analyzed to identify mechanisms responsible for altered mobility on SDS-PAGE, including high or low isoelectric point, high or low hydrophobicity, physiological cleavage, residence in the lysosome, posttranslational modifications, and expression of alternative isoforms due to alternative exon usage. Additionally, this analysis identified a previously unrecognized isoform of aquaporin-2 with apparent molecular mass <20 kDa.

  18. System Management Software for Virtual Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Vallee, Geoffroy R; Naughton, III, Thomas J; Scott, Stephen L

    2007-01-01

    Recently there has been an increased interest in the use of system-level virtualization using mature solutions such as Xen, QEMU, or VMWare. These virtualization platforms are being used in distributed and parallel environments including high performance computing. The use of virtual machines within such environments introduces new challenges to system management. These include tedious tasks such as deploying para-virtualized host operating systems to support virtual machine execution or virtual overlay networks to connect these virtual machines. Additionally, there is the problem of machine definition and deployment, which is complicated by differentiation in the underlying virtualization technology. This paper discusses tools for the deployment and management of both host operating systems and virtual machines in clusters. We begin with an overview of system-level virtualization and move on to a description of tools that we have developed to aid with these environments. These tools extend prior work in the area of cluster installation, configuration and management.

  19. Ethnographies across Virtual and Physical Spaces: A Reflexive Commentary on a Live Canadian/UK Ethnography of Distributed Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tummons, Jonathan; Macleod, Anna; Kits, Olga

    2015-01-01

    This article draws on an ongoing ethnography of distributed medical education (DME) provision in Canada in order to explore the methodological choices of the researchers as well as the wider pluralisation of ethnographic frameworks that is reflected within current research literature. The article begins with a consideration of the technologically…

  20. Engineering the Carrier Dynamics of InGaN Nanowire White Light-Emitting Diodes by Distributed p-AlGaN Electron Blocking Layers

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Hieu Pham Trung; Djavid, Mehrdad; Woo, Steffi Y.; Liu, Xianhe; Connie, Ashfiqua T.; Sadaf, Sharif; Wang, Qi; Botton, Gianluigi A.; Shih, Ishiang; Mi, Zetian

    2015-01-01

    We report on the demonstration of a new type of axial nanowire LED heterostructures, with the use of self-organized InGaN/AlGaN dot-in-a-wire core-shell nanowire arrays. The large bandgap AlGaN shell is spontaneously formed on the sidewall of the nanowire during the growth of AlGaN barrier of the quantum dot active region. As such, nonradiative surface recombination, that dominates the carrier dynamics of conventional axial nanowire LED structures, can be largely eliminated, leading to significantly increased carrier lifetime from ~0.3 ns to 4.5 ns. The luminescence emission is also enhanced by orders of magnitude. Moreover, the p-doped AlGaN barrier layers can function as distributed electron blocking layers (EBLs), which is found to be more effective in reducing electron overflow, compared to the conventional AlGaN EBL. The device displays strong white-light emission, with a color rendering index of ~95. An output power of >5 mW is measured for a 1 mm × 1 mm device, which is more than 500 times stronger than the conventional InGaN axial nanowire LEDs without AlGaN distributed EBLs. PMID:25592057

  1. Virtual Laboratories and Virtual Worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hut, Piet

    2008-05-01

    Since we cannot put stars in a laboratory, astrophysicists had to wait till the invention of computers before becoming laboratory scientists. For half a century now, we have been conducting experiments in our virtual laboratories. However, we ourselves have remained behind the keyboard, with the screen of the monitor separating us from the world we are simulating. Recently, 3D on-line technology, developed first for games but now deployed in virtual worlds like Second Life, is beginning to make it possible for astrophysicists to enter their virtual labs themselves, in virtual form as avatars. This has several advantages, from new possibilities to explore the results of the simulations to a shared presence in a virtual lab with remote collaborators on different continents. I will report my experiences with the use of Qwaq Forums, a virtual world developed by a new company (see http://www.qwaq.com).

  2. Dual parametrization of the proton generalized parton distribution functions H and E, and description of the deeply virtual Compton scattering cross sections and asymmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Guzey, V.; Teckentrup, T.

    2006-09-01

    We develop the minimal model of a new leading order parametrization of generalized parton distributions (GPDs) introduced by Polyakov and Shuvaev. The model for GPDs H and E is formulated in terms of the forward quark distributions, the Gegenbauer moments of the D-term, and the forward limit of the GPD E. The model is designed primarily for small and medium-size values of x{sub B}, x{sub B}{<=}0.2. We examine two different models of the t dependence of the GPDs: the factorized exponential model and the nonfactorized Regge-motivated model. Using our model, we successfully described the deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) cross section measured by H1 and ZEUS, the moments of the beam-spin A{sub LU}{sup sin{phi}}, the beam-charge A{sub C}{sup cos{phi}}, and the transversely polarized target A{sub UT}{sup sin{phi}}{sup cos{phi}} DVCS asymmetries measured by HERMES and A{sub LU}{sup sin{phi}} measured by CLAS. The data on A{sub C}{sup cos{phi}} prefer the Regge-motivated model of the t dependence of the GPDs. The data on A{sub UT}{sup sin{phi}}{sup cos{phi}} indicate that the u and d quarks carry only a small fraction of the proton total angular momentum.

  3. Guidance of Block Needle Insertion by Electrical Nerve Stimulation: A Pilot Study of the Resulting Distribution of Injected Solution in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Rigaud, Marcel; Filip, Patrick; Lirk, Philipp; Fuchs, Andreas; Gemes, Geza; Hogan, Quinn

    2009-01-01

    Background Little is known regarding the final needle tip location when various intensities of nerve stimulation are used to guide block needle insertion. Therefore, in control and hyperglycemic dogs, the authors examined whether lower-intensity stimulation results in injection closer to the sciatic nerve than higher-threshold stimulation. Methods During anesthesia, the sciatic nerve was approached with an insulated nerve block needle emitting either 1 mA (high-current group, n = 9) or 0.5 mA (low-current group, n = 9 in control dogs and n = 6 in hyperglycemic dogs). After positioning to obtain a distal motor response, the lowest current producing a response was identified, and ink (0.5 ml) was injected. Frozen sections of the tissue revealed whether the ink was in contact with the epineurium of the nerve, distant to it, or within it. Results In control dogs, the patterns of distribution using high-threshold (final current 0.99 ± 0.03 mA, mean ± SD) and low-threshold (final current 0.33 ± 0.08 mA) stimulation equally showed ink that was in contact with the epineurium or distant to it. One needle placement in the high-threshold group resulted in intraneural injection. In hyperglycemic dogs, all needle insertions used a low-threshold technique (n = 6, final threshold 0.35 ± 0.08 mA), and all resulted in intraneural injections. Conclusions In normal dogs, current stimulation levels in the range of 0.33–1.0 mA result in needle placement comparably close to the sciatic nerve but do not correlate with distance from the target nerve. In this experimental design, low-threshold electrical stimulation does not offer satisfactory protection against intraneural injection in the presence of hyperglycemia. PMID:18719445

  4. Virtual Labs and Virtual Worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehler, Ted

    2006-12-01

    Virtual Labs and Virtual Worlds Coastline Community College has under development several virtual lab simulations and activities that range from biology, to language labs, to virtual discussion environments. Imagine a virtual world that students enter online, by logging onto their computer from home or anywhere they have web access. Upon entering this world they select a personalized identity represented by a digitized character (avatar) that can freely move about, interact with the environment, and communicate with other characters. In these virtual worlds, buildings, gathering places, conference rooms, labs, science rooms, and a variety of other “real world” elements are evident. When characters move about and encounter other people (players) they may freely communicate. They can examine things, manipulate objects, read signs, watch video clips, hear sounds, and jump to other locations. Goals of critical thinking, social interaction, peer collaboration, group support, and enhanced learning can be achieved in surprising new ways with this innovative approach to peer-to-peer communication in a virtual discussion world. In this presentation, short demos will be given of several online learning environments including a virtual biology lab, a marine science module, a Spanish lab, and a virtual discussion world. Coastline College has been a leader in the development of distance learning and media-based education for nearly 30 years and currently offers courses through PDA, Internet, DVD, CD-ROM, TV, and Videoconferencing technologies. Its distance learning program serves over 20,000 students every year. sponsor Jerry Meisner

  5. Virtually Possible

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellon, Ericka

    2011-01-01

    Diane Lewis began building her popular virtual education program in a storage closet. The drab room, just big enough to squeeze in a tiny table, was her office at the headquarters of Seminole County (Florida) Public Schools. She had a computer and a small staff of temporary workers. Lewis, who managed to open two successful virtual schools for…

  6. Virtual Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammrs, Stephan R.

    2008-01-01

    Virtual Satellite (VirtualSat) is a computer program that creates an environment that facilitates the development, verification, and validation of flight software for a single spacecraft or for multiple spacecraft flying in formation. In this environment, enhanced functionality and autonomy of navigation, guidance, and control systems of a spacecraft are provided by a virtual satellite that is, a computational model that simulates the dynamic behavior of the spacecraft. Within this environment, it is possible to execute any associated software, the development of which could benefit from knowledge of, and possible interaction (typically, exchange of data) with, the virtual satellite. Examples of associated software include programs for simulating spacecraft power and thermal- management systems. This environment is independent of the flight hardware that will eventually host the flight software, making it possible to develop the software simultaneously with, or even before, the hardware is delivered. Optionally, by use of interfaces included in VirtualSat, hardware can be used instead of simulated. The flight software, coded in the C or C++ programming language, is compilable and loadable into VirtualSat without any special modifications. Thus, VirtualSat can serve as a relatively inexpensive software test-bed for development test, integration, and post-launch maintenance of spacecraft flight software.

  7. Virtual seminars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, H. Roice

    1997-06-01

    A virtual seminar (SM) is an economic and effective instructional tool for teaching students who are at a distance from their instructor. Like conventional class room teaching, a virtual seminar requires an instructor, a student, and a method of communication. Teleconferencing, video conferencing, intranets and the Internet give learners in a Virtual Seminar the ability to interact immediately with their mentors and receive real and relevant answers. This paper shows how industry and academia can benefit from using methods developed and experience gained in presenting the first virtual seminars to academic and petroleum industry participants in mid-1996. The information explosion in industry means that business or technical information is worthless until it is assimilated into a corporate knowledge management system. A search for specific information often turns into a filtering exercise or an attempt to find patterns and classify retrieved material. In the setting of an interactive corporate information system, virtual seminars meet the need for a productive new relationship between creative people and the flux of corporate knowledge. Experience shows that it is more efficient to circulate timesensitive and confidential information electronically through a virtual seminar. Automating the classification of information and removing that task from the usual work load creates an electronic corporate memory and enhances the value of the knowledge to both users and a corporation. Catalogued benchmarks, best-practice standards, and Knowledge Maps (SM) of experience serve as key aids to communicating knowledge through virtual seminars and converting that knowledge into a profit-making asset.

  8. Incorporating Virtual Teamwork Training into MIS Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Fang; Sager, James; Corbitt, Gail; Gardiner, Stanley C.

    2008-01-01

    Due to increasing industry demand for personnel who work effectively in virtual/distributed teams, MIS students should undergo training to improve their awareness of and competence in virtual teamwork. This paper proposes a model for virtual teamwork training and describes the implementation of the model in a class where students were located in…

  9. Improving hole injection and carrier distribution in InGaN light-emitting diodes by removing the electron blocking layer and including a unique last quantum barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Liwen Chen, Haitao; Wu, Shudong

    2015-08-28

    The effects of removing the AlGaN electron blocking layer (EBL), and using a last quantum barrier (LQB) with a unique design in conventional blue InGaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs), were investigated through simulations. Compared with the conventional LED design that contained a GaN LQB and an AlGaN EBL, the LED that contained an AlGaN LQB with a graded-composition and no EBL exhibited enhanced optical performance and less efficiency droop. This effect was caused by an enhanced electron confinement and hole injection efficiency. Furthermore, when the AlGaN LQB was replaced with a triangular graded-composition, the performance improved further and the efficiency droop was lowered. The simulation results indicated that the enhanced hole injection efficiency and uniform distribution of carriers observed in the quantum wells were caused by the smoothing and thinning of the potential barrier for the holes. This allowed a greater number of holes to tunnel into the quantum wells from the p-type regions in the proposed LED structure.

  10. Improving hole injection and carrier distribution in InGaN light-emitting diodes by removing the electron blocking layer and including a unique last quantum barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Liwen; Chen, Haitao; Wu, Shudong

    2015-08-01

    The effects of removing the AlGaN electron blocking layer (EBL), and using a last quantum barrier (LQB) with a unique design in conventional blue InGaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs), were investigated through simulations. Compared with the conventional LED design that contained a GaN LQB and an AlGaN EBL, the LED that contained an AlGaN LQB with a graded-composition and no EBL exhibited enhanced optical performance and less efficiency droop. This effect was caused by an enhanced electron confinement and hole injection efficiency. Furthermore, when the AlGaN LQB was replaced with a triangular graded-composition, the performance improved further and the efficiency droop was lowered. The simulation results indicated that the enhanced hole injection efficiency and uniform distribution of carriers observed in the quantum wells were caused by the smoothing and thinning of the potential barrier for the holes. This allowed a greater number of holes to tunnel into the quantum wells from the p-type regions in the proposed LED structure.

  11. Neuromuscular block

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, W C

    2006-01-01

    Descriptions of the South American arrow poisons known as curares were reported by explorers in the 16th century, and their site of action in producing neuromuscular block was determined by Claude Bernard in the mid-19th century. Tubocurarine, the most important curare alkaloid, played a large part in experiments to determine the role of acetylcholine in neuromuscular transmission, but it was not until after 1943 that neuromuscular blocking drugs became established as muscle relaxants for use during surgical anaesthesia. Tubocurarine causes a number of unwanted effects, and there have been many attempts to replace it. The available drugs fall into two main categories: the depolarising blocking drugs and the nondepolarising blocking drugs. The former act by complex mixed actions and are now obsolete with the exception of suxamethonium, the rapid onset and brief duration of action of which remain useful for intubation at the start of surgical anaesthesia. The nondepolarising blocking drugs are reversible acetylcholine receptor antagonists. The main ones are the atracurium group, which possess a built-in self-destruct mechanism that makes them especially useful in kidney or liver failure, and the vecuronium group, which are especially free from unwanted side effects. Of this latter group, the compound rocuronium is of especial interest because its rapid onset of action allows it to be used for intubation, and there is promise that its duration of action may be rapidly terminated by a novel antagonist, a particular cyclodextrin, that chelates the drug, thereby removing it from the acetylcholine receptors. PMID:16402115

  12. Virtual Worlds for Virtual Organizing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhoten, Diana; Lutters, Wayne

    The members and resources of a virtual organization are dispersed across time and space, yet they function as a coherent entity through the use of technologies, networks, and alliances. As virtual organizations proliferate and become increasingly important in society, many may exploit the technical architecture s of virtual worlds, which are the confluence of computer-mediated communication, telepresence, and virtual reality originally created for gaming. A brief socio-technical history describes their early origins and the waves of progress followed by stasis that brought us to the current period of renewed enthusiasm. Examination of contemporary examples demonstrates how three genres of virtual worlds have enabled new arenas for virtual organizing: developer-defined closed worlds, user-modifiable quasi-open worlds, and user-generated open worlds. Among expected future trends are an increase in collaboration born virtually rather than imported from existing organizations, a tension between high-fidelity recreations of the physical world and hyper-stylized imaginations of fantasy worlds, and the growth of specialized worlds optimized for particular sectors, companies, or cultures.

  13. Virtual memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denning, P. J.

    1986-01-01

    Virtual memory was conceived as a way to automate overlaying of program segments. Modern computers have very large main memories, but need automatic solutions to the relocation and protection problems. Virtual memory serves this need as well and is thus useful in computers of all sizes. The history of the idea is traced, showing how it has become a widespread, little noticed feature of computers today.

  14. Virtual reality and virtual bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Catherine; Korba, Larry W.; Shaw, Christopher D.; Green, Mark

    1994-04-01

    There are many ways to produce the sense of `presence' or telepresence in the user of virtual reality. For example attempting to increase the realism of the visual environment is a commonly accepted strategy. In contrast, this paper explores a way for the user to feel present in an unrealistic virtual body. It investigates an unusual approach, proprioceptive illusions. Proprioceptive or body illusions are used to generate and explore the experience of virtuality and presence outside of the normal body limits. These projects are realized in art installations.

  15. Virtual Machine Logbook - Enabling virtualization for ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yushu; Calafiura, Paolo; Poffet, Julien; Cavalli, Andrea; Leggett, Charles; Frédéric, Bapst

    2010-04-01

    ATLAS software has been developed mostly on CERN linux cluster lxplus or on similar facilities at the experiment Tier 1 centers. The fast rise of virtualization technology has the potential to change this model, turning every laptop or desktop into an ATLAS analysis platform. In the context of the CernVM project we are developing a suite of tools and CernVM plug-in extensions to promote the use of virtualization for ATLAS analysis and software development. The Virtual Machine Logbook (VML), in particular, is an application to organize work of physicists on multiple projects, logging their progress, and speeding up "context switches" from one project to another. An important feature of VML is the ability to share with a single "click" the status of a given project with other colleagues. VML builds upon the save and restore capabilities of mainstream virtualization software like VMware, and provides a technology-independent client interface to them. A lot of emphasis in the design and implementation has gone into optimizing the save and restore process to makepractical to store many VML entries on a typical laptop disk or to share a VML entry over the network. At the same time, taking advantage of CernVM's plugin capabilities, we are extending the CernVM platform to help increase the usability of ATLAS software. For example, we added the ability to start the ATLAS event display on any computer running CernVM simply by clicking a button in a web browser. We want to integrate seamlessly VML with CernVM unique file system design to distribute efficiently ATLAS software on every physicist computer. The CernVM File System (CVMFS) download files on-demand via HTTP, and cache it locally for future use. This reduces by one order of magnitude the download sizes, making practical for a developer to work with multiple software releases on a virtual machine.

  16. Virtual Specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Paor, D. G.

    2009-12-01

    Virtual Field Trips have been around almost as long as the Worldwide Web itself yet virtual explorers do not generally return to their desktops with folders full of virtual hand specimens. Collection of real specimens on fields trips for later analysis in the lab (or at least in the pub) has been an important part of classical field geoscience education and research for generations but concern for the landscape and for preservation of key outcrops from wanton destruction has lead to many restrictions. One of the author’s favorite outcrops was recently vandalized presumably by a geologist who felt the need to bash some of the world’s most spectacular buckle folds with a rock sledge. It is not surprising, therefore, that geologists sometimes leave fragile localities out of field trip itineraries. Once analyzed, most specimens repose in drawers or bins, never to be seen again. Some end up in teaching collections but recent pedagogical research shows that undergraduate students have difficulty relating specimens both to their collection location and ultimate provenance in the lithosphere. Virtual specimens can be created using 3D modeling software and imported into virtual globes such as Google Earth (GE) where, they may be linked to virtual field trip stops or restored to their source localities on the paleo-globe. Sensitive localities may be protected by placemark approximation. The GE application program interface (API) has a distinct advantage over the stand-alone GE application when it comes to viewing and manipulating virtual specimens. When instances of the virtual globe are embedded in web pages using the GE plug-in, Collada models of specimens can be manipulated with javascript controls residing in the enclosing HTML, permitting specimens to be magnified, rotated in 3D, and sliced. Associated analytical data may be linked into javascript and localities for comparison at various points on the globe referenced by ‘fetching’ KML. Virtual specimens open up

  17. Block People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Rayma

    1999-01-01

    Discusses an activity in which students in an after-school art class drew one another on pieces of 2-by-4 scrap lumber in order to create a class portrait in three dimensions. Stresses that the portraits on the wood blocks were done in-the-round, or each side was covered. (CMK)

  18. DIstributed VIRtual System (DIVIRS) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schorr, Herbert; Neuman, B. Clifford; Gaines, Stockton R.; Mizell, David

    1996-01-01

    The development of Prospero moved from the University of Washington to ISI and several new versions of the software were released from ISI during the contract period. Changes in the first release from ISI included bug fixes and extensions to support the needs of specific users. Among these changes was a new option to directory queries that allows attributes to be returned for all files in a directory together with the directory listing. This change greatly improves the performance of their server and reduces the number of packets sent across their trans-pacific connection to the rest of the internet. Several new access method were added to the Prospero file method. The Prospero Data Access Protocol was designed, to support secure retrieval of data from systems running Prospero.

  19. Groundwater arsenic contamination in one of the 107 arsenic-affected blocks in West Bengal, India: Status, distribution, health effects and factors responsible for arsenic poisoning.

    PubMed

    Roychowdhury, Tarit

    2010-11-01

    A somewhat detailed study was carried out in Gaighata, one of the 107 arsenic-affected blocks in West Bengal, India, to determine the degree of groundwater contamination with arsenic, its depth wise distribution, correlation with iron, arsenical health effects to the inhabitants and the factors responsible for arsenic poisoning. Groundwater in all the 107 mouzas over 13 gram-panchayets in Gaighata block contains arsenic above 0.01mgl(-1) and in 91 mouzas, arsenic concentration has been found above 0.05mgl(-1). About 59.2 and 40.3% of the tubewell water samples contain arsenic above 0.01 and 0.05mgl(-1), respectively. The approximate population drinking arsenic-contaminated water above 0.01 and 0.05mgl(-1) are 106,560 and 72,540, respectively. The tubewells that were installed within the depth range of 15.4-30.3m are mostly arsenic-contaminated. Even the shallow groundwater level (7.87-15.1m) is arsenic-contaminated. Both arsenic and iron concentrations in groundwater gradually increase from lower depth to higher depth up to 39.4m, and then decrease with increasing depth. About 58% of the deep tubewell water samples (depth range 122-182m, n=31) contain arsenic ≥0.05mgl(-1). About 72% of the arsenic-contaminated deep tubewells (n=18) were safe when surveyed first time. But within a span of 2-5 years, they became contaminated with arsenic. The linear regression shows direct correlation between arsenic and iron concentrations in groundwater (r(2)=0.8114, p<0.0001, n=912). Intakes of inorganic arsenic from water by an adult male and female in the surveyed areas are 11.7 and 13.1μg/kg body wt./day, respectively and these values are higher than the WHO recommended PTDI value of inorganic arsenic (2.1μg/kg body wt./day). Mean arsenic concentrations in urine, hair and nail samples, collected from the inhabitants of Gutri mouza are higher than their normal level and the values are 292μgl(-1) (range: 8.35-1024μg l(-1), n=193), 2.50mgkg(-1) (range: 0.17-5.99mgkg(-1), n

  20. Virtual sound for virtual reality

    SciTech Connect

    Blattner, M.M. ||; Papp, A.L. III |

    1993-02-01

    The computational limitations of real-time interactive computing do not meet our requirements for producing realistic images for virtual reality in a convincing manner. Regardless of the real-time restrictions on virtual reality interfaces, the representations can be no better than the graphics. Computer graphics is still limited in its ability to generate complex objects such as landscapes and humans. Nevertheless, useful and convincing visualizations are made through a variety of techniques. The central theme of this article is that a similar situation is true with sound for virtual reality. It is beyond our abilityto create interactive soundscapes that create a faithful reproduction of real world sounds, however, by choosing one`s application carefully and using sound to enhance a display rather than only mimic real-world scenes, a very effective use of sound can be made.

  1. Virtual sound for virtual reality

    SciTech Connect

    Blattner, M.M. Cancer Center, Houston, TX . Dept. of Biomathematics Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA California Univ., Davis, CA ); Papp, A.L. III Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA )

    1993-02-01

    The computational limitations of real-time interactive computing do not meet our requirements for producing realistic images for virtual reality in a convincing manner. Regardless of the real-time restrictions on virtual reality interfaces, the representations can be no better than the graphics. Computer graphics is still limited in its ability to generate complex objects such as landscapes and humans. Nevertheless, useful and convincing visualizations are made through a variety of techniques. The central theme of this article is that a similar situation is true with sound for virtual reality. It is beyond our abilityto create interactive soundscapes that create a faithful reproduction of real world sounds, however, by choosing one's application carefully and using sound to enhance a display rather than only mimic real-world scenes, a very effective use of sound can be made.

  2. Virtualize Me!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, John K.

    2009-01-01

    John Abdelmalak, director of technology for the School District of the Chathams, was pretty sure it was time to jump on the virtualization bandwagon last year when he invited Dell to conduct a readiness assessment of his district's servers. When he saw just how little of their capacity was being used, he lost all doubt. Abdelmalak is one of many…

  3. Virtually There.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanier, Jaron

    2001-01-01

    Describes tele-immersion, a new medium for human interaction enabled by digital technologies. It combines the display and interaction techniques of virtual reality with new vision technologies that transcend the traditional limitations of a camera. Tele-immersion stations observe people as moving sculptures without favoring a single point of view.…

  4. Virtual Labs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Ruth

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the potential of computers in teaching laboratories to spare the lives of animals; however, it is felt that in areas of physiology education, virtual labs are not as desirable a learning experience for advanced students as live animal labs. (Author/AIM)

  5. Virtual Reality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newby, Gregory B.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the current state of the art in virtual reality (VR), its historical background, and future possibilities. Highlights include applications in medicine, art and entertainment, science, business, and telerobotics; and VR for information science, including graphical display of bibliographic data, libraries and books, and cyberspace.…

  6. Tuning magnetization, blocking temperature, cation distribution of nanosized Co0.2Zn0.8Fe2O4 by mechanical activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, S.; Mondal, R.; Dey, S. K.; Majumder, S.; Dasgupta, P.; Poddar, A.; Reddy, V. R.; Kumar, S.

    2015-09-01

    The study on structural, microstructural, magnetic, and hyperfine properties of nanosized Co0.2Zn0.8Fe2O4 having particle size ˜18 nm (CZM) synthesized by high energy ball milling of Co0.2Zn0.8Fe2O4 nanoparticles of size ˜20 nm (CZ) produced by flow rate controlled coprecipitation method has revealed that the inclusion of strain induced anisotropy produced by mechanical treatment and escalation of oxygen mediated intersublattice exchange interaction of spinel ferrites by tuning cation distribution properly, can improve the magnetic quality of nanosized ferrites significantly. This upshot will be of immense help in promoting the technological application of nanostructured ferrites. The Rietveld refinement of powder x-ray diffraction pattern and the analysis of transmission electron micrographs, energy dispersive x-ray spectrum, and FTIR spectrum of the sample have confirmed that CZM is single phase cubic nanometric spinel ferrite of Fd 3 ¯ m symmetry and it possesses large microstrain within its crystal lattice. The dc magnetic and Mössbauer spectroscopic studies together with indicate that the particles in the sample are composed of ferrimagnetically aligned core and spin-glass like shell and the system behaves superparamagnetically at 300 K. The saturation magnetization (44 and 87 emu g-1 at 300 and 10 K) and hyperfine field of the sample are substantially higher than its counterparts reported earlier. In spite of its lower size compared to CZ, the blocking temperature (˜220 K) of CZM is higher than that of CZ (70 K) and also that of its counterparts synthesized by chemical methods. The strengthening of the intersublattice A-O-B superexchange interaction because of migration of Fe3+ ions from octahedral [B] to tetrahedral (A) sites in lieu of the relocation of Zn2+ among (A) and [B] sites helps in enhancement of magnetization and hyperfine field of CZM. The giant coercivity (HC ˜ 5600 Oe at 10 K) of CZM is accounted by the presence of spin glass like surface

  7. Virtual Sensor Test Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Roy

    2011-01-01

    Virtual Sensor Test Instrumentation is based on the concept of smart sensor technology for testing with intelligence needed to perform sell-diagnosis of health, and to participate in a hierarchy of health determination at sensor, process, and system levels. A virtual sensor test instrumentation consists of five elements: (1) a common sensor interface, (2) microprocessor, (3) wireless interface, (4) signal conditioning and ADC/DAC (analog-to-digital conversion/ digital-to-analog conversion), and (5) onboard EEPROM (electrically erasable programmable read-only memory) for metadata storage and executable software to create powerful, scalable, reconfigurable, and reliable embedded and distributed test instruments. In order to maximize the efficient data conversion through the smart sensor node, plug-and-play functionality is required to interface with traditional sensors to enhance their identity and capabilities for data processing and communications. Virtual sensor test instrumentation can be accessible wirelessly via a Network Capable Application Processor (NCAP) or a Smart Transducer Interlace Module (STIM) that may be managed under real-time rule engines for mission-critical applications. The transducer senses the physical quantity being measured and converts it into an electrical signal. The signal is fed to an A/D converter, and is ready for use by the processor to execute functional transformation based on the sensor characteristics stored in a Transducer Electronic Data Sheet (TEDS). Virtual sensor test instrumentation is built upon an open-system architecture with standardized protocol modules/stacks to interface with industry standards and commonly used software. One major benefit for deploying the virtual sensor test instrumentation is the ability, through a plug-and-play common interface, to convert raw sensor data in either analog or digital form, to an IEEE 1451 standard-based smart sensor, which has instructions to program sensors for a wide variety of

  8. Collaborative virtual experience based on reconfigurable simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahab, Qonita M.; Kwon, Yong-Moo; Ko, Heedong

    2006-10-01

    Virtual Reality simulation enables immersive 3D experience of a Virtual Environment. A simulation-based Virtual Environment can be used to map real world phenomena onto virtual experience. With a reconfigurable simulation, users can reconfigure the parameters of the involved objects, so that they can see different effects from the different configurations. This concept is suitable for a classroom learning of physics law. This research studies the Virtual Reality simulation of Newton's physics law on rigid body type of objects. With network support, collaborative interaction is enabled so that people from different places can interact with the same set of objects in immersive Collaborative Virtual Environment. The taxonomy of the interaction in different levels of collaboration is described as: distinct objects and same object, in which there are same object - sequentially, same object - concurrently - same attribute, and same object - concurrently - distinct attributes. The case studies are the interaction of users in two cases: destroying and creating a set of arranged rigid bodies. In Virtual Domino, users can observe physics law while applying force to the domino blocks in order to destroy the arrangements. In Virtual Dollhouse, users can observe physics law while constructing a dollhouse using existing building blocks, under gravity effects.

  9. Mapping of the thermal neutron distribution in the lead block assembly of the PS-211 experiment at CERN, using thermoluminescence and nuclear track detectors.

    PubMed

    Savvidis, E; Eleftheriadis, C A; Kitis, G

    2002-01-01

    The main purpose of the TARC (Transmutation by Adiabatic Resonance Crossing) experiment (PS-211), was to demonstrate the possibility to destroy efficiently Long-Lived Fission Fragments (LLFF) in Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS). The experimental set-up which consisted of a lead block with dimensions 3.3 x 3.3 x 3 m3, was installed in a CERN Proton Synchrotron (PS) beam line. The proton beam at 2.5 GeV/c and 3.5 GeV/c, was incident in the centre of the lead block assembly producing neutrons via spallation reactions. In this study, neutron flux measurements are presented in the lead block assembly using thermoluminescence and nuclear track detectors. The results are in good agreement with Monte Carlo calculations as well as with the results of the other methods used in the framework of the TARC experiment.

  10. Blocking farnesylation of the prelamin A variant in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome alters the distribution of A-type lamins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuexia; Ӧstlund, Cecilia; Choi, Jason C.; Swayne, Theresa C.; Gundersen, Gregg G.; Worman, Howard J.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the lamin A/C gene that cause Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome lead to expression of a truncated, permanently farnesylated prelamin A variant called progerin. Blocking farnesylation leads to an improvement in the abnormal nuclear morphology observed in cells expressing progerin, which is associated with a re-localization of the variant protein from the nuclear envelope to the nuclear interior. We now show that a progerin construct that cannot be farnesylated is localized primarily in intranuclear foci and that its diffusional mobility is significantly greater than that of farnesylated progerin localized predominantly at the nuclear envelope. Expression of non-farnesylated progerin in transfected cells leads to a redistribution of lamin A and lamin C away from the nuclear envelope into intranuclear foci but does not significantly affect the localization of endogenous lamin B1 at nuclear envelope. There is a similar redistribution of lamin A and lamin C into intranuclear foci in transfected cells expressing progerin in which protein farnesylation is blocked by treatment with a protein farnesyltransferase inhibitor. Blocking farnesylation of progerin can lead to a redistribution of normal A-type lamins away from the inner nuclear envelope. This may have implications for using drugs that block protein prenylation to treat children with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome. These findings also provide additional evidence that A-type and B-type lamins can form separate microdomains within the nucleus. PMID:22895092

  11. Blocking farnesylation of the prelamin A variant in Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome alters the distribution of A-type lamins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuexia; Ostlund, Cecilia; Choi, Jason C; Swayne, Theresa C; Gundersen, Gregg G; Worman, Howard J

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the lamin A/C gene that cause Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome lead to expression of a truncated, permanently farnesylated prelamin A variant called progerin. Blocking farnesylation leads to an improvement in the abnormal nuclear morphology observed in cells expressing progerin, which is associated with a re-localization of the variant protein from the nuclear envelope to the nuclear interior. We now show that a progerin construct that cannot be farnesylated is localized primarily in intranuclear foci and that its diffusional mobility is significantly greater than that of farnesylated progerin localized predominantly at the nuclear envelope. Expression of non-farnesylated progerin in transfected cells leads to a redistribution of lamin A and lamin C away from the nuclear envelope into intranuclear foci but does not significantly affect the localization of endogenous lamin B1 at nuclear envelope. There is a similar redistribution of lamin A and lamin C into intranuclear foci in transfected cells expressing progerin in which protein farnesylation is blocked by treatment with a protein farnesyltransferase inhibitor. Blocking farnesylation of progerin can lead to a redistribution of normal A-type lamins away from the inner nuclear envelope. This may have implications for using drugs that block protein prenylation to treat children with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome. These findings also provide additional evidence that A-type and B-type lamins can form separate microdomains within the nucleus.

  12. Virtual anthropology.

    PubMed

    Weber, Gerhard W

    2015-02-01

    Comparative morphology, dealing with the diversity of form and shape, and functional morphology, the study of the relationship between the structure and the function of an organism's parts, are both important subdisciplines in biological research. Virtual anthropology (VA) contributes to comparative morphology by taking advantage of technological innovations, and it also offers new opportunities for functional analyses. It exploits digital technologies and pools experts from different domains such as anthropology, primatology, medicine, paleontology, mathematics, statistics, computer science, and engineering. VA as a technical term was coined in the late 1990s from the perspective of anthropologists with the intent of being mostly applied to biological questions concerning recent and fossil hominoids. More generally, however, there are advanced methods to study shape and size or to manipulate data digitally suitable for application to all kinds of primates, mammals, other vertebrates, and invertebrates or to issues regarding plants, tools, or other objects. In this sense, we could also call the field "virtual morphology." The approach yields permanently available virtual copies of specimens and data that comprehensively quantify geometry, including previously neglected anatomical regions. It applies advanced statistical methods, supports the reconstruction of specimens based on reproducible manipulations, and promotes the acquisition of larger samples by data sharing via electronic archives. Finally, it can help identify new, hidden traits, which is particularly important in paleoanthropology, where the scarcity of material demands extracting information from fragmentary remains. This contribution presents a current view of the six main work steps of VA: digitize, expose, compare, reconstruct, materialize, and share. The VA machinery has also been successfully used in biomechanical studies which simulate the stress and strains appearing in structures. Although

  13. Virtual impactor

    DOEpatents

    Yeh, Hsu-Chi; Chen, Bean T.; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Newton, George J.

    1988-08-30

    A virtual impactor having improved efficiency and low wall losses in which a core of clean air is inserted into the aerosol flow while aerosol flow is maintained adjacent inner wall surfaces of the focusing portion of the impactor. The flow rate of the core and the length of the throat of the impactor's collection probe, as well as the dimensional relationships of other components of the impactor adjacent the separation region of the impactor, are selected to optimize separation efficiency.

  14. Virtual anthropology.

    PubMed

    Weber, Gerhard W

    2015-02-01

    Comparative morphology, dealing with the diversity of form and shape, and functional morphology, the study of the relationship between the structure and the function of an organism's parts, are both important subdisciplines in biological research. Virtual anthropology (VA) contributes to comparative morphology by taking advantage of technological innovations, and it also offers new opportunities for functional analyses. It exploits digital technologies and pools experts from different domains such as anthropology, primatology, medicine, paleontology, mathematics, statistics, computer science, and engineering. VA as a technical term was coined in the late 1990s from the perspective of anthropologists with the intent of being mostly applied to biological questions concerning recent and fossil hominoids. More generally, however, there are advanced methods to study shape and size or to manipulate data digitally suitable for application to all kinds of primates, mammals, other vertebrates, and invertebrates or to issues regarding plants, tools, or other objects. In this sense, we could also call the field "virtual morphology." The approach yields permanently available virtual copies of specimens and data that comprehensively quantify geometry, including previously neglected anatomical regions. It applies advanced statistical methods, supports the reconstruction of specimens based on reproducible manipulations, and promotes the acquisition of larger samples by data sharing via electronic archives. Finally, it can help identify new, hidden traits, which is particularly important in paleoanthropology, where the scarcity of material demands extracting information from fragmentary remains. This contribution presents a current view of the six main work steps of VA: digitize, expose, compare, reconstruct, materialize, and share. The VA machinery has also been successfully used in biomechanical studies which simulate the stress and strains appearing in structures. Although

  15. Virtual System Environments

    SciTech Connect

    Vallee, Geoffroy R; Naughton, III, Thomas J; Ong, Hong Hoe; Tikotekar, Anand A; Engelmann, Christian; Bland, Wesley B; Aderholdt, Ferrol; Scott, Stephen L

    2008-01-01

    Distributed and parallel systems are typically managed with "static" settings: the operating system (OS) and the runtime environment (RTE) are specified at a given time and cannot be changed to fit an application's needs. This means that every time application developers want to use their application on a new execution platform, the application has to be ported to this new environment, which may be expensive in terms of application modifications and developer time. However, the science resides in the applications and not in the OS or the RTE. Therefore, it should be beneficial to adapt the OS and the RTE to the application instead of adapting the applications to the OS and the RTE. This document presents the concept of Virtual System Environments (VSE), which enables application developers to specify and create a virtual environment that properly fits their application's needs. For that four challenges have to be addressed: (i) definition of the VSE itself by the application developers, (ii) deployment of the VSE, (iii) system administration for the platform, and (iv) protection of the platform from the running VSE. We therefore present an integrated tool for the definition and deployment of VSEs on top of traditional and virtual (i.e., using system-level virtualization) execution platforms. This tool provides the capability to choose the degree of delegation for system administration tasks and the degree of protection from the application (e.g., using virtual machines). To summarize, the VSE concept enables the customization of the OS/RTE used for the execution of application by users without compromising local system administration rules and execution platform protection constraints.

  16. Large Block Test Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, W

    2001-12-01

    This report documents the Large-Block Test (LBT) conducted at Fran Ridge near Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The LBT was a thermal test conducted on an exposed block of middle non-lithophysal Topopah Spring tuff (Tptpmn) and was designed to assist in understanding the thermal-hydrological-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes associated with heating and then cooling a partially saturated fractured rock mass. The LBT was unique in that it was a large (3 x 3 x 4.5 m) block with top and sides exposed. Because the block was exposed at the surface, boundary conditions on five of the six sides of the block were relatively well known and controlled, making this test both easier to model and easier to monitor. This report presents a detailed description of the test as well as analyses of the data and conclusions drawn from the test. The rock block that was tested during the LBT was exposed by excavation and removal of the surrounding rock. The block was characterized and instrumented, and the sides were sealed and insulated to inhibit moisture and heat loss. Temperature on the top of the block was also controlled. The block was heated for 13 months, during which time temperature, moisture distribution, and deformation were monitored. After the test was completed and the block cooled down, a series of boreholes were drilled, and one of the heater holes was over-cored to collect samples for post-test characterization of mineralogy and mechanical properties. Section 2 provides background on the test. Section 3 lists the test objectives and describes the block site, the site configuration, and measurements made during the test. Section 3 also presents a chronology of events associated with the LBT, characterization of the block, and the pre-heat analyses of the test. Section 4 describes the fracture network contained in the block. Section 5 describes the heating/cooling system used to control the temperature in the block and presents the thermal history of the block during the test

  17. Hillslope-derived blocks retard river incision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shobe, Charles M.; Tucker, Gregory E.; Anderson, Robert S.

    2016-05-01

    The most common detachment-limited river incision models ignore the effects of sediment on fluvial erosion, yet steep reaches of mountain rivers often host clusters of large (>1 m) blocks. We argue that this distribution of blocks is a manifestation of an autogenic negative feedback in which fast vertical river incision steepens adjacent hillslopes, which deliver blocks to the channel. Blocks inhibit incision by shielding the bed and enhancing form drag. We explore this feedback with a 1-D channel-reach model in which block delivery by hillslopes depends on the river incision rate. Results indicate that incision-dependent block delivery can explain the block distribution in Boulder Creek, Colorado. The proposed negative feedback may significantly slow knickpoint retreat, channel adjustment, and landscape response compared to rates predicted by current theory. The influence of hillslope-derived blocks may complicate efforts to extract base level histories from river profiles.

  18. Virtual impactor

    DOEpatents

    Yeh, H.C.; Chen, B.T.; Cheng, Y.S.; Newton, G.J.

    1988-08-30

    A virtual impactor is described having improved efficiency and low wall losses in which a core of clean air is inserted into the aerosol flow while aerosol flow is maintained adjacent to the inner wall surfaces of the focusing portion of the impactor. The flow rate of the core and the length of the throat of the impactor's collection probe, as well as the dimensional relationships of other components of the impactor adjacent the separation region of the impactor, are selected to optimize separation efficiency. 4 figs.

  19. Blocking of Goal-Location Learning Based on Shape

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Tim; Wilson, Stuart P.; Wilson, Paul N.

    2009-01-01

    Using desktop, computer-simulated virtual environments (VEs), the authors conducted 5 experiments to investigate blocking of learning about a goal location based on Shape B as a consequence of preliminary training to locate that goal using Shape A. The shapes were large 2-dimensional horizontal figures on the ground. Blocking of spatial learning…

  20. Two implementations of shared virtual space environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Disz, T. L.

    1998-01-13

    While many issues in the area of virtual reality (VR) research have been addressed in recent years, the constant leaps forward in technology continue to push the field forward. VR research no longer is focused only on computer graphics, but instead has become even more interdisciplinary, combining the fields of networking, distributed computing, and even artificial intelligence. In this article we discuss some of the issues associated with distributed, collaborative virtual reality, as well as lessons learned during the development of two distributed virtual reality applications.

  1. Virtual microscopy:applications to hematology.

    PubMed

    Lee, Szu-Hee

    2005-01-01

    Virtual microscopy is the simulation of microscopy over a computer network. A virtual slide is a giant digital image file of a glass slide that can be displayed, panned, zoomed, and focused in a virtual slide viewer on a computer screen. Virtual slides represent a revolutionary advance over glass slides. They are easy to file, store, retrieve, annotate, and mark and can be preserved indefinitely. Furthermore, they are easy to duplicate and distribute and can be integrated into electronic patient records. Large virtual slides can be readily transmitted to users over a standard broadband connection. With the recent introduction of viewers that can focus virtual slides, virtual microscopy can simulate all the functions of real microscopy. Virtual microscopy has significant advantages over real microscopy in education and in proficiency testing. In education, virtual microscopy enables "anytime, anywhere" learning and has been favorably received by students and teachers. In proficiency surveys, all users view the same image, virtual slides are easy to distribute, and the slides do not deteriorate. Potential applications for hematology proficiency surveys include blood and bone marrow morphology, differential cell counts, cytochemistry and immunocytochemistry, detection of malarial parasites, and other tests. Virtual microscopy enables proficiency surveys of critical clinical parameters, such as the bone marrow blast count, and implementation of "locate and identify" exercises. It is conceivable that with the next generation of technological developments, virtual microscopy can be extended to diagnostic applications. Important goals are to minimize slide file size without loss of relevant detail, to establish diagnostic equivalence, and to automate virtual slide capture with high throughput for integration into laboratory information systems. Key factors that will drive implementation include user-friendliness, cost, data storage requirements, and throughput speed

  2. STALK : an interactive virtual molecular docking system.

    SciTech Connect

    Levine, D.; Facello, M.; Hallstrom, P.; Reeder, G.; Walenz, B.; Stevens, F.; Univ. of Illinois

    1997-04-01

    Several recent technologies-genetic algorithms, parallel and distributed computing, virtual reality, and high-speed networking-underlie a new approach to the computational study of how biomolecules interact or 'dock' together. With the Stalk system, a user in a virtual reality environment can interact with a genetic algorithm running on a parallel computer to help in the search for likely geometric configurations.

  3. The virtual microscope.

    PubMed

    Catalyürek, Umit; Beynon, Michael D; Chang, Chialin; Kurc, Tahsin; Sussman, Alan; Saltz, Joel

    2003-12-01

    We present the design and implementation of the Virtual Microscope, a software system employing a client/server architecture to provide a realistic emulation of a high power light microscope. The system provides a form of completely digital telepathology, allowing simultaneous access to archived digital slide images by multiple clients. The main problem the system targets is storing and processing the extremely large quantities of data required to represent a collection of slides. The Virtual Microscope client software runs on the end user's PC or workstation, while database software for storing, retrieving and processing the microscope image data runs on a parallel computer or on a set of workstations at one or more potentially remote sites. We have designed and implemented two versions of the data server software. One implementation is a customization of a database system framework that is optimized for a tightly coupled parallel machine with attached local disks. The second implementation is component-based, and has been designed to accommodate access to and processing of data in a distributed, heterogeneous environment. We also have developed caching client software, implemented in Java, to achieve good response time and portability across different computer platforms. The performance results presented show that the Virtual Microscope systems scales well, so that many clients can be adequately serviced by an appropriately configured data server.

  4. The Impact of Multimodal Virtual Manipulatives on Young Children's Mathematics Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paek, Seungoh

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to demonstrate how virtual manipulatives, designed to provide multimodal interactions, support richer perceptual experiences that promote conceptual learning. To study this phenomenon, a virtual manipulative called, "Puzzle Blocks," was developed by the researcher. "Puzzle Blocks" introduces the…

  5. Virtual Reality and the Virtual Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oppenheim, Charles

    1993-01-01

    Explains virtual reality, including proper and improper uses of the term, and suggests ways that libraries might be affected by it. Highlights include elements of virtual reality systems; possible virtual reality applications, including architecture, the chemical industry, transport planning, armed forces, and entertainment; and the virtual…

  6. Peripheral nerve blocks for distal extremity surgery.

    PubMed

    Offierski, Chris

    2013-10-01

    Peripheral nerve block is well suited for distal extremity surgery. Blocking the nerves at the distal extremity is easily done. It does not require ultrasound or stimulators to identify the nerve. Blocking nerves in the distal extremity is safe with low risk of toxicity. The effect of the nerve block is limited to the distribution of the nerve. The distal nerves in the lower extremity are sensory branches of the sciatic nerve. This provides a sensory block only. This has the advantage of allowing the patient to actively contract tendons in the foot and ambulate more quickly after surgery. PMID:24093651

  7. Types of Heart Block

    MedlinePlus

    ... Block Explore Heart Block What Is... Electrical System & EKG Results Types Causes Who Is at Risk Signs & ... the P and the R waves on the EKG (electrocardiogram). First-degree heart block may not cause ...

  8. The Russian Virtual Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dluzhnevskaya, O. B.; Malkov, O. Yu.; Kilpio, A. A.; Kilpio, E. Yu.; Kovaleva, D. A.; Sat, L. A.

    The Russian Virtual Observatory (RVO) will be an integral component of the International Virtual Observatory (IVO). The RVO has the main goal of integrating resources of astronomical data accumulated in Russian observatories and institutions (databases, archives, digitized glass libraries, bibliographic data, a remote access system to information and technical resources of telescopes etc.), and providing transparent access for scientific and educational purposes to the distributed information and data services that comprise its content. Another goal of the RVO is to provide Russian astronomers with on-line access to the rich volumes of data and metadata that have been, and will continue to be, produced by astronomical survey projects. Centre for Astronomical Data (CAD), among other Russian institutions, has had the greatest experience in collecting and distributing astronomical data for more than 20 years. Some hundreds of catalogs and journal tables are currently available from the CAD repository. More recently, mirrors of main astronomical data resources (VizieR, ADS, etc) are now maintained in CAD. Besides, CAD accumulates and makes available for the astronomical community information on principal Russian astronomical resources.

  9. Virtual Worlds, Real Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyers, Eric M.

    2009-01-01

    Many children between the ages of four and twelve log in to Web-based virtual play spaces each day, and these virtual worlds are quickly becoming an important aspect of their out-of-school lives. Consequently, educators' challenge is to see how they can leverage virtual spaces, such as the virtual play spaces, for learning and literacy. Over the…

  10. Rethinking Virtual School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schomburg, Gary; Rippeth, Michelle

    2009-01-01

    Virtual schooling has been touted as one of the best ways to meet the needs of at-risk students, but what happens when a district's virtual education program is unsuccessful? That was the problem in Eastern Local School District, a small rural district in Beaver, Ohio. The district contracted virtual school services and used the virtual school for…

  11. The Active Mai'iu Low Angle Normal Fault, Woodlark Rift: Spatial and Temporal Slip Distributions, and Rider Block Abandonment Chronology.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webber, S. M.; Little, T.; Norton, K. P.; Mizera, M.; Oesterle, J.; Ellis, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Low-angle normal faults (LANFs) have induced debate due to their apparent non-Andersonian behavior and lack of significant seismicity associated with slip. Dipping ~21°, the Mai'iu Fault, Woodlark Rift is an active, rapidly slipping LANF located at the transition between continental extension and seafloor spreading. Based on campaign GPS data [Wallace et al., 2014] the Mai'iu Fault is thought to slip at 7-9 mm/yr, accommodating a large fraction of total basinal extension, although it is uncertain whether slip is seismic or aseismic. Surface geomorphology indicates that the fault scarp is not significantly eroded despite high rainfall and ~3000 m relief. We have obtained 15 rock samples (~5 m spacing) from the lowermost Mai'iu Fault scarp in order to determine Holocene slip rate and style over the last ~10 kyr using cosmogenic 10Be in quartz. This slip direction-parallel profile in exposed bedrock is supported by a suite of soil samples for 10Be analysis, which extend our temporal coverage. We model exposure age data in terms of slip rate and style by identification of discontinuities within the profile. Of particular interest is whether slip is seismic or aseismic. In addition we analyze the structure of conglomeratic strata and abandoned, back-rotated rider blocks in the Mai'iu Fault hanging wall, which record Quaternary splay faulting and tilting in response to sustained LANF slip. 20 quartz pebble samples were obtained from hanging wall conglomerates for the purpose of calculating cosmogenic burial (26Al/10Be) ages. These constrain the chronology of Quaternary hanging wall deformation. High-angle (~50°) faulting competes with LANF slip at <2 km depths, with high-angle faults cutting the main LANF and exposing footwall metabasalt up to 2 km north of the Mai'iu Fault. Past splay faulting is recorded in the progressive back-tilting and folding of the Gwoira rider block in a ~2 km deep depression in the corrugated Mai'iu fault plane. Our results provide new

  12. Virtual courseware for geoscience education: Virtual Earthquake and Virtual Dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Gary A.

    1999-05-01

    Virtual courseware developed for introductory-level, on-line geology labs is an interactive teaching/learning model that has an enormous pedagogical potential for making Web sites places where students learn by doing. Virtual Earthquake and Virtual Dating are modest examples of the `virtual courseware' paradigm. Virtual Earthquake helps students explore the techniques of how an earthquake's epicenter is located and how its Richter magnitude is determined. Virtual Dating models the theory and techniques of the radiometric age determination of rocks and minerals. Virtual courseware applications offer several advantages over traditional floppy disk or CD ROM-based courseware, the most significant being the ease of dissemination. The author's experience with bringing these two virtual applications on-line suggests that there is a need for interactive geology labs on-line and that the approach will be received with enthusiasm by the educational community. The widespread implementation and adoption of virtual courseware can bring meaningful educational content and interactivity for the geosciences that goes beyond multimedia on the World-Wide-Web.

  13. Virtual button interface

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Jake S.

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus and method of issuing commands to a computer by a user interfacing with a virtual reality environment. To issue a command, the user directs gaze at a virtual button within the virtual reality environment, causing a perceptible change in the virtual button, which then sends a command corresponding to the virtual button to the computer, optionally after a confirming action is performed by the user, such as depressing a thumb switch.

  14. Virtual button interface

    DOEpatents

    Jones, J.S.

    1999-01-12

    An apparatus and method of issuing commands to a computer by a user interfacing with a virtual reality environment are disclosed. To issue a command, the user directs gaze at a virtual button within the virtual reality environment, causing a perceptible change in the virtual button, which then sends a command corresponding to the virtual button to the computer, optionally after a confirming action is performed by the user, such as depressing a thumb switch. 4 figs.

  15. Virtual goods recommendations in virtual worlds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kuan-Yu; Liao, Hsiu-Yu; Chen, Jyun-Hung; Liu, Duen-Ren

    2015-01-01

    Virtual worlds (VWs) are computer-simulated environments which allow users to create their own virtual character as an avatar. With the rapidly growing user volume in VWs, platform providers launch virtual goods in haste and stampede users to increase sales revenue. However, the rapidity of development incurs virtual unrelated items which will be difficult to remarket. It not only wastes virtual global companies' intelligence resources, but also makes it difficult for users to find suitable virtual goods fit for their virtual home in daily virtual life. In the VWs, users decorate their houses, visit others' homes, create families, host parties, and so forth. Users establish their social life circles through these activities. This research proposes a novel virtual goods recommendation method based on these social interactions. The contact strength and contact influence result from interactions with social neighbors and influence users' buying intention. Our research highlights the importance of social interactions in virtual goods recommendation. The experiment's data were retrieved from an online VW platform, and the results show that the proposed method, considering social interactions and social life circle, has better performance than existing recommendation methods. PMID:25834837

  16. Virtual goods recommendations in virtual worlds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kuan-Yu; Liao, Hsiu-Yu; Chen, Jyun-Hung; Liu, Duen-Ren

    2015-01-01

    Virtual worlds (VWs) are computer-simulated environments which allow users to create their own virtual character as an avatar. With the rapidly growing user volume in VWs, platform providers launch virtual goods in haste and stampede users to increase sales revenue. However, the rapidity of development incurs virtual unrelated items which will be difficult to remarket. It not only wastes virtual global companies' intelligence resources, but also makes it difficult for users to find suitable virtual goods fit for their virtual home in daily virtual life. In the VWs, users decorate their houses, visit others' homes, create families, host parties, and so forth. Users establish their social life circles through these activities. This research proposes a novel virtual goods recommendation method based on these social interactions. The contact strength and contact influence result from interactions with social neighbors and influence users' buying intention. Our research highlights the importance of social interactions in virtual goods recommendation. The experiment's data were retrieved from an online VW platform, and the results show that the proposed method, considering social interactions and social life circle, has better performance than existing recommendation methods.

  17. Virtual Goods Recommendations in Virtual Worlds

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kuan-Yu; Liao, Hsiu-Yu; Chen, Jyun-Hung; Liu, Duen-Ren

    2015-01-01

    Virtual worlds (VWs) are computer-simulated environments which allow users to create their own virtual character as an avatar. With the rapidly growing user volume in VWs, platform providers launch virtual goods in haste and stampede users to increase sales revenue. However, the rapidity of development incurs virtual unrelated items which will be difficult to remarket. It not only wastes virtual global companies' intelligence resources, but also makes it difficult for users to find suitable virtual goods fit for their virtual home in daily virtual life. In the VWs, users decorate their houses, visit others' homes, create families, host parties, and so forth. Users establish their social life circles through these activities. This research proposes a novel virtual goods recommendation method based on these social interactions. The contact strength and contact influence result from interactions with social neighbors and influence users' buying intention. Our research highlights the importance of social interactions in virtual goods recommendation. The experiment's data were retrieved from an online VW platform, and the results show that the proposed method, considering social interactions and social life circle, has better performance than existing recommendation methods. PMID:25834837

  18. Method and structure for skewed block-cyclic distribution of lower-dimensional data arrays in higher-dimensional processor grids

    DOEpatents

    Chatterjee, Siddhartha; Gunnels, John A.

    2011-11-08

    A method and structure of distributing elements of an array of data in a computer memory to a specific processor of a multi-dimensional mesh of parallel processors includes designating a distribution of elements of at least a portion of the array to be executed by specific processors in the multi-dimensional mesh of parallel processors. The pattern of the designating includes a cyclical repetitive pattern of the parallel processor mesh, as modified to have a skew in at least one dimension so that both a row of data in the array and a column of data in the array map to respective contiguous groupings of the processors such that a dimension of the contiguous groupings is greater than one.

  19. Virtual PCR

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, S N; Clague, D S; Vandersall, J A; Hon, G; Williams, P L

    2006-02-23

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) stands among the keystone technologies for analysis of biological sequence data. PCR is used to amplify DNA, to generate many copies from as little as a single template. This is essential, for example, in processing forensic DNA samples, pathogen detection in clinical or biothreat surveillance applications, and medical genotyping for diagnosis and treatment of disease. It is used in virtually every laboratory doing molecular, cellular, genetic, ecologic, forensic, or medical research. Despite its ubiquity, we lack the precise predictive capability that would enable detailed optimization of PCR reaction dynamics. In this LDRD, we proposed to develop Virtual PCR (VPCR) software, a computational method to model the kinetic, thermodynamic, and biological processes of PCR reactions. Given a successful completion, these tools will allow us to predict both the sequences and concentrations of all species that are amplified during PCR. The ability to answer the following questions will allow us both to optimize the PCR process and interpret the PCR results: What products are amplified when sequence mixtures are present, containing multiple, closely related targets and multiplexed primers, which may hybridize with sequence mismatches? What are the effects of time, temperature, and DNA concentrations on the concentrations of products? A better understanding of these issues will improve the design and interpretation of PCR reactions. The status of the VPCR project after 1.5 years of funding is consistent with the goals of the overall project which was scoped for 3 years of funding. At half way through the projected timeline of the project we have an early beta version of the VPCR code. We have begun investigating means to improve the robustness of the code, performed preliminary experiments to test the code and begun drafting manuscripts for publication. Although an experimental protocol for testing the code was developed, the preliminary

  20. Blocking of Spatial Learning between Enclosure Geometry and a Local Landmark

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Paul N.; Alexander, Tim

    2008-01-01

    In a virtual environment, blocking of spatial learning to locate an invisible target was found reciprocally between a distinctively shaped enclosure and a local landmark within its walls. The blocking effect was significantly stronger when the shape of the enclosure rather than the landmark served as the blocking cue. However, the extent to which…

  1. Distribution of lithostratigraphic units within the central block of Yucca Mountain, Nevada: A three-dimensional computer-based model, Version YMP.R2.0

    SciTech Connect

    Buesch, D.C.; Nelson, J.E.; Dickerson, R.P.; Drake, R.M. II; San Juan, C.A.; Spengler, R.W.; Geslin, J.K.; Moyer, T.C.

    1996-09-01

    Yucca Mountain, Nevada is underlain by 14.0 to 11.6 Ma volcanic rocks tilted eastward 3{degree} to 20{degree} and cut by faults that were primarily active between 12.7 and 11.6 Ma. A three-dimensional computer-based model of the central block of the mountain consists of seven structural subblocks composed of six formations and the interstratified-bedded tuffaceous deposits. Rocks from the 12.7 Ma Tiva Canyon Tuff, which forms most of the exposed rocks on the mountain, to the 13.1 Ma Prow Pass Tuff are modeled with 13 surfaces. Modeled units represent single formations such as the Pah Canyon Tuff, grouped units such as the combination of the Yucca Mountain Tuff with the superjacent bedded tuff, and divisions of the Topopah Spring Tuff such as the crystal-poor vitrophyre interval. The model is based on data from 75 boreholes from which a structure contour map at the base of the Tiva Canyon Tuff and isochore maps for each unit are constructed to serve as primary input. Modeling consists of an iterative cycle that begins with the primary structure-contour map from which isochore values of the subjacent model unit are subtracted to produce the structure contour map on the base of the unit. This new structure contour map forms the input for another cycle of isochore subtraction to produce the next structure contour map. In this method of solids modeling, the model units are presented by surfaces (structure contour maps), and all surfaces are stored in the model. Surfaces can be converted to form volumes of model units with additional effort. This lithostratigraphic and structural model can be used for (1) storing data from, and planning future, site characterization activities, (2) preliminary geometry of units for design of Exploratory Studies Facility and potential repository, and (3) performance assessment evaluations.

  2. Evolving virtual creatures and catapults.

    PubMed

    Chaumont, Nicolas; Egli, Richard; Adami, Christoph

    2007-01-01

    We present a system that can evolve the morphology and the controller of virtual walking and block-throwing creatures (catapults) using a genetic algorithm. The system is based on Sims' work, implemented as a flexible platform with an off-the-shelf dynamics engine. Experiments aimed at evolving Sims-type walkers resulted in the emergence of various realistic gaits while using fairly simple objective functions. Due to the flexibility of the system, drastically different morphologies and functions evolved with only minor modifications to the system and objective function. For example, various throwing techniques evolved when selecting for catapults that propel a block as far as possible. Among the strategies and morphologies evolved, we find the drop-kick strategy, as well as the systematic invention of the principle behind the wheel, when allowing mutations to the projectile. PMID:17355189

  3. Evolving virtual creatures and catapults.

    PubMed

    Chaumont, Nicolas; Egli, Richard; Adami, Christoph

    2007-01-01

    We present a system that can evolve the morphology and the controller of virtual walking and block-throwing creatures (catapults) using a genetic algorithm. The system is based on Sims' work, implemented as a flexible platform with an off-the-shelf dynamics engine. Experiments aimed at evolving Sims-type walkers resulted in the emergence of various realistic gaits while using fairly simple objective functions. Due to the flexibility of the system, drastically different morphologies and functions evolved with only minor modifications to the system and objective function. For example, various throwing techniques evolved when selecting for catapults that propel a block as far as possible. Among the strategies and morphologies evolved, we find the drop-kick strategy, as well as the systematic invention of the principle behind the wheel, when allowing mutations to the projectile.

  4. Creative Construction: Unit Blocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Child Care, 1999

    1999-01-01

    Describes the use of unit blocks with young children in early childhood education (ECE) settings to expand all areas of the curriculum. Discusses the origin of blocks in ECE programs, presents developmental stages of block play, describes children's building styles, and makes recommendations for getting started in block play for children of…

  5. Mevalonate regulates polysome distribution and blocks translation-dependent suppression of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase mRNA: relationship to translational control.

    PubMed

    Peffley, D M; Gayen, A K

    1995-05-01

    We reported previously that 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase synthesis is regulated at the translational level by mevalonate. To determine at what stage mevalonate affects reductase synthesis, we examined the distribution of reductase mRNA in polysomes from cells treated with lovastatin alone; lovastatin and 25-hydroxycholesterol; or lovastatin, 25-hydroxycholesterol, and mevalonate. In lovastatin-treated cells, reductase mRNA was primarily associated with heavy polysome fractions. When 25-hydroxycholesterol was added to lovastatin-treated cells, reductase mRNA levels were reduced approximately fourfold in all polysome fractions, with no accompanying redistribution of reductase mRNA into lighter polysome fractions. However, addition of both 25-hydroxycholesterol and mevalonate to lovastatin-treated cells shifted reductase mRNA from heavier to lighter polysome fractions. No change in the distribution of control beta-actin or ribosomal protein S17 mRNA occurred with any of the treatments. These results suggest that mevalonate suppresses reductase synthesis at the level of initiation. When the translation inhibitor cycloheximide was added to all three regimens, reductase mRNA shifted into heavy polysome fractions. Treatment with either lovastatin alone or lovastatin plus 25-hydroxycholesterol resulted in a 50% greater loss of reductase mRNA from the heavy polysome fractions compared to the same fractions from noncycloheximide-treated cells. No loss of reductase mRNA occurred when cycloheximide was added to cells treated with both 25-hydroxycholesterol and mevalonate. beta-Actin mRNA levels and polysome distribution were not significantly changed by cycloheximide under any of these conditions. Translationally mediated suppression of reductase mRNA did not occur when protein synthesis was inhibited with puromycin. Our results indicate that regulation of reductase mRNA levels is translation-dependent and is linked to the rate of elongation.

  6. Large-scale horizontally aligned ZnO microrod arrays with controlled orientation, periodic distribution as building blocks for chip-in piezo-phototronic LEDs.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhen; Li, Haiwen; Zhou, Lianqun; Zhao, Dongxu; Wu, Yihui; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Wei; Li, Chuanyu; Yao, Jia

    2015-01-27

    A novel method of fabricating large-scale horizontally aligned ZnO microrod arrays with controlled orientation and periodic distribution via combing technology is introduced. Horizontally aligned ZnO microrod arrays with uniform orientation and periodic distribution can be realized based on the conventional bottom-up method prepared vertically aligned ZnO microrod matrix via the combing method. When the combing parameters are changed, the orientation of horizontally aligned ZnO microrod arrays can be adjusted (θ = 90° or 45°) in a plane and a misalignment angle of the microrods (0.3° to 2.3°) with low-growth density can be obtained. To explore the potential applications based on the vertically and horizontally aligned ZnO microrods on p-GaN layer, piezo-phototronic devices such as heterojunction LEDs are built. Electroluminescence (EL) emission patterns can be adjusted for the vertically and horizontally aligned ZnO microrods/p-GaN heterojunction LEDs by applying forward bias. Moreover, the emission color from UV-blue to yellow-green can be tuned by investigating the piezoelectric properties of the materials. The EL emission mechanisms of the LEDs are discussed in terms of band diagrams of the heterojunctions and carrier recombination processes.

  7. Testing block subdivision algorithms on block designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiseman, Natalie; Patterson, Zachary

    2016-01-01

    Integrated land use-transportation models predict future transportation demand taking into account how households and firms arrange themselves partly as a function of the transportation system. Recent integrated models require parcels as inputs and produce household and employment predictions at the parcel scale. Block subdivision algorithms automatically generate parcel patterns within blocks. Evaluating block subdivision algorithms is done by way of generating parcels and comparing them to those in a parcel database. Three block subdivision algorithms are evaluated on how closely they reproduce parcels of different block types found in a parcel database from Montreal, Canada. While the authors who developed each of the algorithms have evaluated them, they have used their own metrics and block types to evaluate their own algorithms. This makes it difficult to compare their strengths and weaknesses. The contribution of this paper is in resolving this difficulty with the aim of finding a better algorithm suited to subdividing each block type. The proposed hypothesis is that given the different approaches that block subdivision algorithms take, it's likely that different algorithms are better adapted to subdividing different block types. To test this, a standardized block type classification is used that consists of mutually exclusive and comprehensive categories. A statistical method is used for finding a better algorithm and the probability it will perform well for a given block type. Results suggest the oriented bounding box algorithm performs better for warped non-uniform sites, as well as gridiron and fragmented uniform sites. It also produces more similar parcel areas and widths. The Generalized Parcel Divider 1 algorithm performs better for gridiron non-uniform sites. The Straight Skeleton algorithm performs better for loop and lollipop networks as well as fragmented non-uniform and warped uniform sites. It also produces more similar parcel shapes and patterns.

  8. Open multi-agent control architecture to support virtual-reality-based man-machine interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, Eckhard; Rossmann, Juergen; Brasch, Marcel

    2001-10-01

    Projective Virtual Reality is a new and promising approach to intuitively operable man machine interfaces for the commanding and supervision of complex automation systems. The user interface part of Projective Virtual Reality heavily builds on latest Virtual Reality techniques, a task deduction component and automatic action planning capabilities. In order to realize man machine interfaces for complex applications, not only the Virtual Reality part has to be considered but also the capabilities of the underlying robot and automation controller are of great importance. This paper presents a control architecture that has proved to be an ideal basis for the realization of complex robotic and automation systems that are controlled by Virtual Reality based man machine interfaces. The architecture does not just provide a well suited framework for the real-time control of a multi robot system but also supports Virtual Reality metaphors and augmentations which facilitate the user's job to command and supervise a complex system. The developed control architecture has already been used for a number of applications. Its capability to integrate sensor information from sensors of different levels of abstraction in real-time helps to make the realized automation system very responsive to real world changes. In this paper, the architecture will be described comprehensively, its main building blocks will be discussed and one realization that is built based on an open source real-time operating system will be presented. The software design and the features of the architecture which make it generally applicable to the distributed control of automation agents in real world applications will be explained. Furthermore its application to the commanding and control of experiments in the Columbus space laboratory, the European contribution to the International Space Station (ISS), is only one example which will be described.

  9. Next Generation Virtual Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, P.; McGuinness, D. L.

    2008-12-01

    Virtual Observatories (VO) are now being established in a variety of geoscience disciplines beyond their origins in Astronomy and Solar Physics. Implementations range from hydrology and environmental sciences to solid earth sciences. Among the goals of VOs are to provide search/ query, access and use of distributed, heterogeneous data resources. With many of these goals being met and usage increasing, new demands and requirements are arising. In particular there are two of immediate and pressing interest. The first is use of VOs by non-specialists, especially for information products that go beyond the usual data, or data products that are sought for scientific research. The second area is citation and attribution of artifacts that are being generated by VOs. In some sense VOs are re-publishing (re-packaging, or generating new synthetic) data and information products. At present only a few VOs address this need and it is clear that a comprehensive solution that includes publishers is required. Our work in VOs and related semantic data framework and integration areas has lead to a view of the next generation of virtual observatories which the two above-mentioned needs as well as others that are emerging. Both of the needs highlight a semantic gap, i.e. that the meaning and use for a user or users beyond the original design intention is very often difficult or impossible to bridge. For example, VOs created for experts with complex, arcane or jargon vocabularies are not accessible to the non-specialist and further, information products the non-specialist may use are not created or considered for creation. In the second case, use of a (possibly virtual) data or information product (e.g. an image or map) as an intellectual artifact that can be accessed as part of the scientific publication and review procedure also introduces terminology gaps, as well as services that VOs may need to provide. Our supposition is that formalized methods in semantics and semantic web

  10. Secondary craters from large impacts on Europa and Ganymede: Ejecta size-velocity distributions on icy worlds, and the scaling of ejected blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singer, Kelsi N.; McKinnon, William B.; Nowicki, L. T.

    2013-09-01

    We have mapped fields of secondary craters around three large primary craters on Europa and Ganymede and estimated the size and velocity of the fragments that formed the secondaries using updated scaling equations for ice impacts. We characterize the upper envelope of the fragment size-velocity distribution to obtain a function for the largest fragments at a given ejection velocity. Power-law velocity exponents found in our study of icy satellite secondary fields are compared to the exponents found for similar studies of mercurian, lunar, and martian craters; for all but basin-scale impacts, fragment size decreases more slowly with increasing ejection velocity than on rocky bodies. Spallation theory provides estimates of the size of ejected spall plates at a given velocity, but this theory predicts fragments considerably smaller than are necessary to form most of our observed secondaries. In general, ejecta fragment sizes scale with primary crater diameter and decrease with increasing ejection velocity, υej, by 1/υej or greater, and point-source scaling implies a relation between the two. The largest crater represented in any of these studies, Gilgamesh on Ganymede, exhibits a relatively steep velocity dependence. Extrapolating the results to the escape speed for each icy moon yields the size of the largest fragment that could later re-impact to form a so-called sesquinary crater, either on the parent moon or a neighboring satellite. We find that craters above 2 km in diameter on Europa and Ganymede are unlikely to be sesquinaries.

  11. Postural instability detection: aging and the complexity of spatial-temporal distributional patterns for virtually contacting the stability boundary in human stance.

    PubMed

    Kilby, Melissa C; Slobounov, Semyon M; Newell, Karl M

    2014-01-01

    Falls among the older population can severely restrict their functional mobility and even cause death. Therefore, it is crucial to understand the mechanisms and conditions that cause falls, for which it is important to develop a predictive model of falls. One critical quantity for postural instability detection and prediction is the instantaneous stability of quiet upright stance based on motion data. However, well-established measures in the field of motor control that quantify overall postural stability using center-of-pressure (COP) or center-of-mass (COM) fluctuations are inadequate predictors of instantaneous stability. For this reason, 2D COP/COM virtual-time-to-contact (VTC) is investigated to detect the postural stability deficits of healthy older people compared to young adults. VTC predicts the temporal safety margin to the functional stability boundary ( =  limits of the region of feasible COP or COM displacement) and, therefore, provides an index of the risk of losing postural stability. The spatial directions with increased instability were also determined using quantities of VTC that have not previously been considered. Further, Lempel-Ziv-Complexity (LZC), a measure suitable for on-line monitoring of stability/instability, was applied to explore the temporal structure or complexity of VTC and the predictability of future postural instability based on previous behavior. These features were examined as a function of age, vision and different load weighting on the legs. The primary findings showed that for old adults the stability boundary was contracted and VTC reduced. Furthermore, the complexity decreased with aging and the direction with highest postural instability also changed in aging compared to the young adults. The findings reveal the sensitivity of the time dependent properties of 2D VTC to the detection of postural instability in aging, availability of visual information and postural stance and potential applicability as a predictive

  12. Intelligent Virtual Station (IVS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Intelligent Virtual Station (IVS) is enabling the integration of design, training, and operations capabilities into an intelligent virtual station for the International Space Station (ISS). A viewgraph of the IVS Remote Server is presented.

  13. Frequency and type-distribution of human papillomavirus from paraffin-embedded blocks of high grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia lesions in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Swangvaree, Sukumarn Sanersak; Kongkaew, Phon; Ngamkham, Jarunya

    2013-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the most important female gynecological cancer, the second leading cause of cancer mortality in women worldwide and the second most common cancer in Thai women. The major cause of cervical cancer is persistent infection of human papillomavirus (HPV), leading to abnormal epithelial lesions, with progression to precancerous and invasive cancer. This study was conducted to investigate the frequency and type distribution of HPV in Thai women who had abnormal cytology. HPV detection from FFPE confirmed abnormal of high grade cervical intraepithelial lesions were for SPF-10-Innogenic Line Probe Assay. HPV-positivity was detected in 320/355 cases (90.14%) and HPV-negativity in 35/355 (9.86%). HPV-positive was found 147/320 cases (41.4%) of single infection, whereas 173/320 cases (48.7%) showed the multiple HPV infection. The most common seven types were HPV-16, -52, -18, -11, -51, -31 and -33, in that order. HPV 16 and 18, the important oncogenic HPV type, were observed in 64.8% of HSIL cases. Interestingly, a high proportion of multiple infections was found in this study and more than ten types could be detected in one case. Therefore, HPV infection screening program in women is essential, particularly in Thailand. Effective primary and secondary prevention campaigns that reinforce HPV screening for HPV detection and typing may be decrease the incidence and mortality of cervical cancer in the future and may lead to significantly improve the quality of life in Thai women.

  14. The global virtual water trade network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tretkoff, Ernie

    2011-06-01

    While some countries have substantial supplies of freshwater, others need to import water to sustain their populations. Because food products contain significant amounts of water, global trade in food effectively moves water from one country to another in a “virtual water trade.” Konar et al. consider the global virtual water trade as a weighted complex network. The nations that participate in international food trade correspond to the nodes, and the links represent the flow of virtual water; weights are assigned to the links based on the volume of virtual water traded. They found that the number of trade connections follows an exponential distribution. There is a global hierarchy in which nations that trade large volumes of virtual water are more likely to link to other nations that trade large volumes of water. Several nations play a critical role in this network. For instance, the United States is the dominant exporter of virtual water, and Japan is the dominant importer. Furthermore, trade volume follows a power law relationship with the number of trade partners of each nation: The more trading partners a country has, the more virtual water it trades. The study could help in global water resource management; for instance, water-scarce nations could consider increasing their access to virtual water resources by increasing the number of nations with which they trade food. (Water Resources Research, doi:10.1029/ 2010WR010307, 2011)

  15. Simplified Virtualization in a HEP/NP Environment with Condor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strecker-Kellogg, W.; Caramarcu, C.; Hollowell, C.; Wong, T.

    2012-12-01

    In this work we will address the development of a simple prototype virtualized worker node cluster, using Scientific Linux 6.x as a base OS, KVM and the libvirt API for virtualization, and the Condor batch software to manage virtual machines. The discussion in this paper provides details on our experience with building, configuring, and deploying the various components from bare metal, including the base OS, creation and distribution of the virtualized OS images and the integration of batch services with the virtual machines. Our focus was on simplicity and interoperability with our existing architecture.

  16. Virtual Worlds? "Outlook Good"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelton, AJ

    2008-01-01

    Many people believed that virtual worlds would end up like the eight-track audiotape: a memory of something no longer used (or useful). Yet today there are hundreds of higher education institutions represented in three-dimensional (3D) virtual worlds such as Active Worlds and Second Life. The movement toward the virtual realm as a viable teaching…

  17. Virtual Reality: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franchi, Jorge

    1994-01-01

    Highlights of this overview of virtual reality include optics; interface devices; virtual worlds; potential applications, including medicine and archaeology; problems, including costs; current research and development; future possibilities; and a listing of vendors and suppliers of virtual reality products. (Contains 11 references.) (LRW)

  18. Synchronizing Self and Object Movement: How Child and Adult Cyclists Intercept Moving Gaps in a Virtual Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chihak, Benjamin J.; Plumert, Jodie M.; Ziemer, Christine J.; Babu, Sabarish; Grechkin, Timofey; Cremer, James F.; Kearney, Joseph K.

    2010-01-01

    Two experiments examined how 10- and 12-year-old children and adults intercept moving gaps while bicycling in an immersive virtual environment. Participants rode an actual bicycle along a virtual roadway. At 12 test intersections, participants attempted to pass through a gap between 2 moving, car-sized blocks without stopping. The blocks were…

  19. Learning with Large Blocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cartwright, Sally

    1990-01-01

    Discusses how large hollow blocks can meet many preschool children's learning needs through creative dramatic play, and also gives some guidelines on how these blocks can be constructed by parents and teachers. (BB)

  20. Block That Pain!

    MedlinePlus

    ... combination produces a unique effect, blocking pain-sensing neurons without impairing signals from other cells. In contrast, ... surgical procedures block activity in all types of neurons. This can cause numbness, paralysis, and other nervous ...

  1. Block Scheduling. Research Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muir, Mike

    2003-01-01

    What are the effects of block scheduling? Results of transitioning from traditional to block scheduling are mixed. Some studies indicate no change in achievement results, nor change in teachers' opinions about instructional strategies. Other studies show that block scheduling doesn't work well for Advanced Placement or Music courses, that "hard to…

  2. Blocking and associability change.

    PubMed

    Jones, Peter M; Haselgrove, Mark

    2013-07-01

    Blocking of learning about a conditioned stimulus (the "blocked" cue) occurs when it is trained alongside an additional stimulus (the "blocking" cue) that has been previously presented with the outcome. A number of theories (e.g., N. J. Mackintosh. 1975a. A Theory of Attention: Variations in the Associability of Stimuli With Reinforcement. Psychological Review, 82, 276-298; J. M. Pearce & G. Hall. 1980. A Model for Pavlovian Learning: Variation in the Effectiveness of Conditioned But Not Unconditioned Stimuli. Psychological Review, 87, 532-552) account for this attenuation in learning by proposing that attention paid to the blocked cue is restricted. In three experiments, we examined the associability of both blocked and blocking cues. In Experiment 1, rats were trained with a blocking protocol before being given a test discrimination composed of two components; one of these components required the use of the previously blocked cue as a discriminative stimulus, and the other component was soluble by using the blocking cue. To our surprise, the component that depended on the blocked cue was more readily solved than the component dependent on the blocking cue. The results of Experiments 2 and 3 suggest that this is due to the quantity of exposure that each stimulus received during initial training. Implications for theories of blocking, and more widely associative learning, are discussed.

  3. Block LU factorization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demmel, James W.; Higham, Nicholas J.; Schreiber, Robert S.

    1992-01-01

    Many of the currently popular 'block algorithms' are scalar algorithms in which the operations have been grouped and reordered into matrix operations. One genuine block algorithm in practical use is block LU factorization, and this has recently been shown by Demmel and Higham to be unstable in general. It is shown here that block LU factorization is stable if A is block diagonally dominant by columns. Moreover, for a general matrix the level of instability in block LU factorization can be founded in terms of the condition number kappa(A) and the growth factor for Gaussian elimination without pivoting. A consequence is that block LU factorization is stable for a matrix A that is symmetric positive definite or point diagonally dominant by rows or columns as long as A is well-conditioned.

  4. Virtual annotation: Verbal communication in virtual reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verlinden, Jouke C.; Bolter, Jay David; Vandermast, Charles

    A system that was developed to explore communication in virtual reality and which offers a simple and powerful method to embed verbal communication in simulations and visualizers by means of voice annotation is described. The prototype demonstrates that the addition of verbal communication opens up a range of new uses for virtual environments. A similar voice annotation facility is easily added to existing visualizers and simulations, and it enables reading, writing and communicating.

  5. Shared virtual environments for aerospace training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loftin, R. Bowen; Voss, Mark

    1994-01-01

    Virtual environments have the potential to significantly enhance the training of NASA astronauts and ground-based personnel for a variety of activities. A critical requirement is the need to share virtual environments, in real or near real time, between remote sites. It has been hypothesized that the training of international astronaut crews could be done more cheaply and effectively by utilizing such shared virtual environments in the early stages of mission preparation. The Software Technology Branch at NASA's Johnson Space Center has developed the capability for multiple users to simultaneously share the same virtual environment. Each user generates the graphics needed to create the virtual environment. All changes of object position and state are communicated to all users so that each virtual environment maintains its 'currency.' Examples of these shared environments will be discussed and plans for the utilization of the Department of Defense's Distributed Interactive Simulation (DIS) protocols for shared virtual environments will be presented. Finally, the impact of this technology on training and education in general will be explored.

  6. A Blueprint for Effectively Using RTI Intervention Block Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins Averill, Orla; Baker, Diana; Rinaldi, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Many schools have adopted schoolwide intervention blocks as a component of response-to-intervention (RTI) implementation to ensure that students who need intervention are receiving it. However, virtually no peer-reviewed guidance exists for helping teachers manage this time effectively. This article presents a blueprint for organizing intervention…

  7. Grids, virtualization, and clouds at Fermilab

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Timm, S.; Chadwick, K.; Garzoglio, G.; Noh, S.

    2014-06-11

    Fermilab supports a scientific program that includes experiments and scientists located across the globe. To better serve this community, in 2004, the (then) Computing Division undertook the strategy of placing all of the High Throughput Computing (HTC) resources in a Campus Grid known as FermiGrid, supported by common shared services. In 2007, the FermiGrid Services group deployed a service infrastructure that utilized Xen virtualization, LVS network routing and MySQL circular replication to deliver highly available services that offered significant performance, reliability and serviceability improvements. This deployment was further enhanced through the deployment of a distributed redundant network core architecture andmore » the physical distribution of the systems that host the virtual machines across multiple buildings on the Fermilab Campus. In 2010, building on the experience pioneered by FermiGrid in delivering production services in a virtual infrastructure, the Computing Sector commissioned the FermiCloud, General Physics Computing Facility and Virtual Services projects to serve as platforms for support of scientific computing (FermiCloud 6 GPCF) and core computing (Virtual Services). Lastly, this work will present the evolution of the Fermilab Campus Grid, Virtualization and Cloud Computing infrastructure together with plans for the future.« less

  8. Grids, virtualization, and clouds at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Timm, S.; Chadwick, K.; Garzoglio, G.; Noh, S.

    2014-06-11

    Fermilab supports a scientific program that includes experiments and scientists located across the globe. To better serve this community, in 2004, the (then) Computing Division undertook the strategy of placing all of the High Throughput Computing (HTC) resources in a Campus Grid known as FermiGrid, supported by common shared services. In 2007, the FermiGrid Services group deployed a service infrastructure that utilized Xen virtualization, LVS network routing and MySQL circular replication to deliver highly available services that offered significant performance, reliability and serviceability improvements. This deployment was further enhanced through the deployment of a distributed redundant network core architecture and the physical distribution of the systems that host the virtual machines across multiple buildings on the Fermilab Campus. In 2010, building on the experience pioneered by FermiGrid in delivering production services in a virtual infrastructure, the Computing Sector commissioned the FermiCloud, General Physics Computing Facility and Virtual Services projects to serve as platforms for support of scientific computing (FermiCloud 6 GPCF) and core computing (Virtual Services). Lastly, this work will present the evolution of the Fermilab Campus Grid, Virtualization and Cloud Computing infrastructure together with plans for the future.

  9. Widespread inclination shallowing in Permian and Triassic paleomagnetic data from Laurentia: Support from new paleomagnetic data from Middle Permian shallow intrusions in southern Illinois (USA) and virtual geomagnetic pole distributions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Domeier, M.; Van Der Voo, R.; Denny, F.B.

    2011-01-01

    Recent paleomagnetic work has highlighted a common and shallow inclination bias in continental redbeds. The Permian and Triassic paleomagnetic records from Laurentia are almost entirely derived from such sedimentary rocks, so a pervasive inclination error will expectedly bias the apparent polar wander path of Laurentia in a significant way. The long-standing discrepancy between the apparent polar wander paths of Laurentia and Gondwana in Permian and Triassic time may be a consequence of such a widespread data-pathology. Here we present new Middle Permian paleomagnetic data from igneous rocks and a contact metamorphosed limestone from cratonic Laurentia. The exclusively reversed Middle Permian magnetization is hosted by low-Ti titanomagnetite and pyrrhotite and yields a paleomagnetic pole at 56.3??S, 302.9??E (A95=3.8, N=6). This pole, which is unaffected by inclination shallowing, suggests that a shallow inclination bias may indeed be present in the Laurentian records. To further consider this hypothesis, we conduct a virtual geomagnetic pole distribution analysis, comparing theoretical expectations of a statistical field model (TK03.GAD) against published data-sets. This exercise provides independent evidence that the Laurentian paleomagnetic data is widely biased, likely because of sedimentary inclination shallowing. We estimate the magnitude of this error from our model results and present and discuss several alternative corrections. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  10. MITRE's virtual model shop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wingfield, Michael A.

    1995-04-01

    The exploration of visual data and the use of visual information during the design process can be greatly enhanced by working within the virtual environment where the user is closely coupled to the data by means of immersive technologies and natural user interfaces. Current technology enables us to construct a virtual environment utilizing 3D graphics projection, object generated stereo sound, tactile feedback, and voice command input. Advances in software architectures and user interfaces enable us to focus on enhancing the design process within the virtual environment. These explorations at MITRE have evolved into an application which focuses on the ability to create, manipulate, and explore photo and audio realistic 3D models of work spaces, office complexes, and entire communities in real-time. This application, the Virtual Interactive Planning System, is a component of the MITRE virtual model shop, a suite of applications which permits the user to design and manipulate computer graphics models within the virtual environment.

  11. Sharing visualization experiences among remote virtual environments

    SciTech Connect

    Disz, T.L.; Papka, M.E.; Pellegrino, M.; Stevens, R.

    1995-12-31

    Virtual reality has become an increasingly familiar part of the science of visualization and communication of information. This, combined with the increase in connectivity of remote sites via high-speed networks, allows for the development of a collaborative distributed virtual environment. Such an environment enables the development of supercomputer simulations with virtual reality visualizations that can be displayed at multiple sites, with each site interacting, viewing, and communicating about the results being discovered. The early results of an experimental collaborative virtual reality environment are discussed in this paper. The issues that need to be addressed in the implementation, as well as preliminary results are covered. Also provided are a discussion of plans and a generalized application programmers interface for CAVE to CAVE will be provided.

  12. Island custom blocking technique

    SciTech Connect

    Carabetta, R.J. )

    1988-03-01

    The technique of Island blocking is being used more frequently since the advent of our new head and neck blocking techniques and the implementation of a newly devised lung protocol. The system presented affords the mould room personnel a quick and accurate means of island block fabrication without the constant remeasuring or subtle shifting to approximate correct placement. The cookie cutter is easily implemented into any department's existing block cutting techniques. The device is easily and inexpensively made either in a machine shop or acquired by contacting the author.

  13. Protein based Block Copolymers

    PubMed Central

    Rabotyagova, Olena S.; Cebe, Peggy; Kaplan, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in genetic engineering have led to the synthesis of protein-based block copolymers with control of chemistry and molecular weight, resulting in unique physical and biological properties. The benefits from incorporating peptide blocks into copolymer designs arise from the fundamental properties of proteins to adopt ordered conformations and to undergo self-assembly, providing control over structure formation at various length scales when compared to conventional block copolymers. This review covers the synthesis, structure, assembly, properties, and applications of protein-based block copolymers. PMID:21235251

  14. Congenital complete atrioventricular block.

    PubMed Central

    Kertesz, N J; Fenrich, A L; Friedman, R A

    1997-01-01

    Congenital complete atrioventricular block is found in 1 of 22,000 live births. Over time, it has become apparent that these patients represent not a single distinct disease process, but several processes with the common manifestation of atrioventricular block. The evaluation of these patients to determine their risk of sudden death and need for pacing is not well defined. Images PMID:9456483

  15. High Relief Block Printing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Michael

    1989-01-01

    Explains a method of block printing using styrofoam shapes to make high relief. Describes the creation of the block design as well as the actual printing process. Uses a range of paper types for printing so children can see the results of using different media. (LS)

  16. Surviving Block Scheduling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haley, Marjorie

    A discussion of block scheduling for second language instruction looks at the advantages and disadvantages and offers some suggestions for classroom management and course organization. It is argued that block scheduling may offer a potential solution to large classes, insufficient time for labs, too little individualized instruction; few…

  17. Thermally actuated wedge block

    DOEpatents

    Queen, Jr., Charles C.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to an automatically-operating wedge block for maintaining intimate structural contact over wide temperature ranges, including cryogenic use. The wedging action depends on the relative thermal expansion of two materials having very different coefficients of thermal expansion. The wedge block expands in thickness when cooled to cryogenic temperatures and contracts in thickness when returned to room temperature.

  18. Multi-level block permutation

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Anderson M.; Webster, Matthew A.; Vidaurre, Diego; Nichols, Thomas E.; Smith, Stephen M.

    2015-01-01

    Under weak and reasonable assumptions, mainly that data are exchangeable under the null hypothesis, permutation tests can provide exact control of false positives and allow the use of various non-standard statistics. There are, however, various common examples in which global exchangeability can be violated, including paired tests, tests that involve repeated measurements, tests in which subjects are relatives (members of pedigrees) — any dataset with known dependence among observations. In these cases, some permutations, if performed, would create data that would not possess the original dependence structure, and thus, should not be used to construct the reference (null) distribution. To allow permutation inference in such cases, we test the null hypothesis using only a subset of all otherwise possible permutations, i.e., using only the rearrangements of the data that respect exchangeability, thus retaining the original joint distribution unaltered. In a previous study, we defined exchangeability for blocks of data, as opposed to each datum individually, then allowing permutations to happen within block, or the blocks as a whole to be permuted. Here we extend that notion to allow blocks to be nested, in a hierarchical, multi-level definition. We do not explicitly model the degree of dependence between observations, only the lack of independence; the dependence is implicitly accounted for by the hierarchy and by the permutation scheme. The strategy is compatible with heteroscedasticity and variance groups, and can be used with permutations, sign flippings, or both combined. We evaluate the method for various dependence structures, apply it to real data from the Human Connectome Project (HCP) as an example application, show that false positives can be avoided in such cases, and provide a software implementation of the proposed approach. PMID:26074200

  19. Using Immersive Virtual Reality for Electrical Substation Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanaka, Eduardo H.; Paludo, Juliana A.; Cordeiro, Carlúcio S.; Domingues, Leonardo R.; Gadbem, Edgar V.; Euflausino, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Usually, distribution electricians are called upon to solve technical problems found in electrical substations. In this project, we apply problem-based learning to a training program for electricians, with the help of a virtual reality environment that simulates a real substation. Using this virtual substation, users may safely practice maneuvers…

  20. Virtual acoustic prototyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Marty

    2003-10-01

    In this paper the re-creation of 3-D sound fields so the full psycho-acoustic impact of sound sources can be assessed before the manufacture of a product or environment is examined. Using head related transfer functions (HRTFs) coupled with a head tracked set of headphones the sound field at the left and right ears of a listener can be re-created for a set of sound sources. However, the HRTFs require that sources have a defined location and this is not the typical output from numerical codes which describe the sound field as a set of distributed modes. In this paper a method of creating a set of equivalent sources is described such that the standard set of HRTFs can be applied in real time. A structural-acoustic model of a cylinder driving an enclosed acoustic field will be used as an example. It will be shown that equivalent sources can be used to recreate all of the reverberation of the enclosed space. An efficient singular value decomposition technique allows the large number of sources required to be simulated in real time. An introduction to the requirements necessary for 3-D virtual prototyping using high frequency Statistical Energy Analysis models will be presented. [Work supported by AuSim and NASA.

  1. Improved Blocking at 25km Resolution?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiemann, R.; Demory, M. E.; Mizielinski, M.; Roberts, M.; Shaffrey, L.; Strachan, J.; Vidale, P. L.; Matsueda, M.

    2014-12-01

    It has been suggested that relatively coarse resolution of atmospheric general circulation models (AGCMs) limits their ability to represent mid-latitude blocking. Assessing the role of model resolution for blocking is computationally expensive, as multi-decadal simulations at the desired resolution are necessary for a robust estimation of blocking statistics. Here, we use an ensemble of three atmosphere-only global models for which simulations that fulfil this requirement are available at resolutions of roughly 25km horizontal grid spacing in the mid-latitudes. This corresponds to about a fourfold increase in resolution over the highest-resolution CMIP5 (Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, Phase 5) models. The three models are (i) the ECMWF model (IFS) as used in the project Athena, (ii) the MRI-AGCM 3.2, and (iii) our own HadGEM3-GA3 simulations obtained in the UPSCALE project (UK on PrACE - weather-resolving Simulations of Climate for globAL Environmental risk). We use a two-dimensional blocking index to assess the representation of blocking in these simulations and in three reanalyses (ERA-Interim, ERA-40, MERRA). We evaluate the spatial distribution of climatological blocking frequency, the interannual variability of blocking occurrence as well as the persistence of blocking events. Furthermore, the degree to which blocking biases are associated with mean-state biases is quantified in the different models. We find that the representation of blocking remains very sensitive to atmospheric resolution as the grid spacing is reduced to about 25km. The simulated blocking frequency increases with resolution, mostly so as to reduce the model bias, yet there is considerable variation between the results obtained for different models, seasons, and for the Atlantic and Pacific regions.

  2. A Virtual Good Idea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolch, Matt

    2009-01-01

    School districts across the country have always had to do more with less. Funding goes only so far, leaving administrators and IT staff to find innovative ways to save money while maintaining a high level of academic quality. Creating virtual servers accomplishes both tasks, district technology personnel say. Virtual environments not only allow…

  3. 10 Myths of Virtualization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaffhauser, Dian

    2012-01-01

    Half of servers in higher ed are virtualized. But that number's not high enough for Link Alander, interim vice chancellor and CIO at the Lone Star College System (Texas). He aspires to see 100 percent of the system's infrastructure requirements delivered as IT services from its own virtualized data centers or other cloud-based operators. Back in…

  4. Virtual Worlds for Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dembo, Steve

    2008-01-01

    This article describes an online experience that has not only created a fantasy world for the general public but has enabled some tech-savvy educators to create virtual educational opportunities. Second Life, or SL, is a 3-D Internet-based virtual world created by Linden Lab and populated by nearly 1,000,000 active users worldwide since 2003.…

  5. Virtual Peace Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Firer, Ruth

    2008-01-01

    This article is based on the convictions that peace education is the basis for any sustainable non-violent relations between parties in a conflict, and that virtual peace education is almost the only feasible way to practise peace education in an open violent conflict as is the current Israeli/Palestinians one. Moreover, virtual peace education…

  6. Digging the Virtual Past

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polymeropoulou, Panagiota

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we will investigate the way that the technological progress and the Informatics contributed greatly to the field of Archaeology. There will be analyzed the terms of virtual archaeology and virtual reality in archaeology and there will be an extended reference to the applications and the computer graphics that archaeologists could use…

  7. Virtual School Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborn, Debra S.; Peterson, Gary W.; Hale, Rebecca R.

    2015-01-01

    The advent of virtual schools opens doors to opportunity for delivery of student services via the Internet. Through the use of structured interviews with four practicing Florida virtual school counselors, and a follow-up survey, the authors examined the experiences and reflections of school counselors who are employed full time in a statewide…

  8. Virtual Schools. Literature Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blazer, Christie

    2009-01-01

    The majority of school districts in the U.S. are providing some form of online learning for their students. In the past, virtual schools primarily targeted advanced students who didn't have access to certain courses in their regular schools. Recently, however, many virtual schools have shifted their focus to credit recovery as a way to provide…

  9. Rethinking the Virtual

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burbules, Nicholas C.

    2004-01-01

    The author builds theoretically off an alternative conception of the virtual, through a series of steps. First, he explores four processes of engagement through which immersion happens (interest, involvement, imagination and interaction); these will prove especially important for understanding the educational potential of virtuality. Second, he…

  10. Virtual Learning Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Follows, Scott B.

    1999-01-01

    Illustrates the possibilities and educational benefits of virtual learning environments (VLEs), based on experiences with "Thirst for Knowledge," a VLE that simulates the workplace of a major company. While working in this virtual office world, students walk through the building, attend meetings, read reports, receive e-mail, answer the telephone,…

  11. Intelligent virtual teacher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takács, Ondřej; Kostolányová, Kateřina

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes the Virtual Teacher that uses a set of rules to automatically adapt the way of teaching. These rules compose of two parts: conditions on various students' properties or learning situation; conclusions that specify different adaptation parameters. The rules can be used for general adaptation of each subject or they can be specific to some subject. The rule based system of Virtual Teacher is dedicated to be used in pedagogical experiments in adaptive e-learning and is therefore designed for users without education in computer science. The Virtual Teacher was used in dissertation theses of two students, who executed two pedagogical experiments. This paper also describes the phase of simulating and modeling of the theoretically prepared adaptive process in the modeling tool, which has all the required parameters and has been created especially for the occasion. The experiments are being conducted on groups of virtual students and by using a virtual study material.

  12. Reports on block rotations, fault domains and crustal deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nur, Amos

    1990-01-01

    Studies of block rotations, fault domains and crustal deformation in the western United States, Israel, and China are discussed. Topics include a three-dimensional model of crustal fracture by distributed fault sets, distributed deformation and block rotation in 3D, stress field rotation, and multiple strike slip fault sets.

  13. Flying Cassini with Virtual Operations Teams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodd, Suzanne; Gustavson, Robert

    1998-01-01

    The Cassini Program's challenge is to fly a large, complex mission with a reduced operations budget. A consequence of the reduced budget is elimination of the large, centrally located group traditionally used for uplink operations. Instead, responsibility for completing parts of the uplink function is distributed throughout the Program. A critical strategy employed to handle this challenge is the use of Virtual Uplink Operations Teams. A Virtual Team is comprised of a group of people with the necessary mix of engineering and science expertise who come together for the purpose of building a specific uplink product. These people are drawn from throughout the Cassini Program and participate across a large geographical area (from Germany to the West coast of the USA), covering ten time zones. The participants will often split their time between participating in the Virtual Team and accomplishing their core responsibilities, requiring significant planning and time management. When the particular uplink product task is complete, the Virtual Team disbands and the members turn back to their home organization element for future work assignments. This time-sharing of employees is used on Cassini to build mission planning products, via the Mission Planning Virtual Team, and sequencing products and monitoring of the sequence execution, via the Sequence Virtual Team. This challenging, multitasking approach allows efficient use of personnel in a resource constrained environment.

  14. Accuracy Validation of Large-scale Block Adjustment without Control of ZY3 Images over China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bo

    2016-06-01

    Mapping from optical satellite images without ground control is one of the goals of photogrammetry. Using 8802 three linear array stereo images (a total of 26406 images) of ZY3 over China, we propose a large-scale and non-control block adjustment method of optical satellite images based on the RPC model, in which a single image is regarded as an adjustment unit to be organized. To overcome the block distortion caused by unstable adjustment without ground control and the excessive accumulation of errors, we use virtual control points created by the initial RPC model of the images as the weighted observations and add them into the adjustment model to refine the adjustment. We use 8000 uniformly distributed high precision check points to evaluate the geometric accuracy of the DOM (Digital Ortho Model) and DSM (Digital Surface Model) production, for which the standard deviations of plane and elevation are 3.6 m and 4.2 m respectively. The geometric accuracy is consistent across the whole block and the mosaic accuracy of neighboring DOM is within a pixel, thus, the seamless mosaic could take place. This method achieves the goal of an accuracy of mapping without ground control better than 5 m for the whole China from ZY3 satellite images.

  15. Virtual Worlds, Virtual Literacy: An Educational Exploration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoerger, Sharon

    2008-01-01

    Virtual worlds enable students to learn through seeing, knowing, and doing within visually rich and mentally engaging spaces. Rather than reading about events, students become part of the events through the adoption of a pre-set persona. Along with visual feedback that guides the players' activities and the development of visual skills, visual…

  16. Teaching Scientific Concepts Using a Virtual World--Minecraft

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Short, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Minecraft is a multiplayer sandbox video game based in a virtual world modeled on the real world. Players are able to build and craft everyday items using blocks. The cubic geometry of Minecraft lends itself to the teaching of various academic subjects. Minecraft also has a functioning ecology, with chemistry and physics aspects interwoven within…

  17. Real-time ultrasound-guided comparison of adductor canal block and psoas compartment block combined with sciatic nerve block in laparoscopic knee surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Messeha, Medhat M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lumbar plexus block, combined with a sciatic nerve block, is an effective locoregional anesthetic technique for analgesia and anesthesia of the lower extremity. The aim of this study was to compare the clinical results outcome of the adductor canal block versus the psoas compartment block combined with sciatic nerve block using real time ultrasound guidance in patients undergoing elective laparoscopic knee surgeries. Patients and Methods: Ninety patients who were undergoing elective laparoscopic knee surgeries were randomly allocated to receive a sciatic nerve block in addition to lumbar plexus block using either an adductor canal block (ACB) or a posterior psoas compartment approach (PCB) using 25 ml of bupivacine 0.5% with adrenaline 1:400,000 injection over 2-3 minutes while observing the distribution of the local anesthetic in real time. Successful nerve block was defined as a complete loss of pinprick sensation in the region that is supplied by the three nerves along with adequate motor block, 30 minutes after injection. The degree of motor block was evaluated 30 minutes after the block procedure. The results of the present study showed that the real time ultrasound guidance of PCB is more effective than ACB approach. Although the sensory blockade of the femoral nerve achieved equally by both techniques, the LFC and OBT nerves were faster and more effectively blocked with PCB technique. Also PCB group showed significant complete sensory block without need for general anesthesia, significant decrease in the post-operative VAS and significant increase time of first analgesic requirement as compared to the ACB group. Result and Conclusion: The present study demonstrates that blockade of lumber plexus by psoas compartment block is more effective in complete sensory block without general anesthesia supplementation in addition to decrease post-operative analgesic requirement than adductor canal block. PMID:27212766

  18. Characterization of blocked isocyanates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirčeva, A.; Janežič, M.; Žigon, M.; Malavašič, T.

    1992-03-01

    An ionomer crosslinker on the basis of partly blocked hexamethylene isocyanurate was synthesized and characterized by FTIR and NMR spectroscopy and by gel permeation chromatography. To determine the selectivity of the blocking reaction. model compounds were also prepared. Deblocking and curing courses were studied by FTIR thermal methods. The selectivity of the blocking reaction was found to be poor and therefore the obtained ionomer crosslinker consisted of different monomer and oligomer components. Deblocking and curing were highly temperature dependent. Curing was more efficient in one-pack systems consisting of the ionomer crosslinker and of an OH groups rich ionomer polyurethane resin.

  19. Virtual Learning Environments: Three Implementation Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Christina

    2005-01-01

    Universities worldwide offer web-based courses distributed by virtual learning environments (VLEs). A common theoretical framework for implementing VLEs is the pedagogical perspective of instructional design. In this paper, three perspectives of implementation from information systems implementation research and organization theory are presented:…

  20. Virtual Teaming: Faculty Collaboration in Online Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Almjeld, Jen; Rybas, Natalia; Rybas, Sergey

    2013-01-01

    This collaborative article chronicles the experiences of three faculty at three universities utilizing wiki technology to transform themselves and their students into a virtual team. Rooted in workplace approaches to distributed teaming, the project expands notions of classroom collaboration to include planning, administration, and assessment of a…

  1. Atmospheric Blocking in the Northern Hemisphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knox, John Lewis

    Blocking is generally understood as the obstruction on a large scale of the normal west - to - east motion of mid-latitude pressure systems. It is a persistent phenomenon lasting from one to several weeks and the resulting prolonged weather regimes may have serious economic and social consequences. The recent Northern Hemisphere winters, starting with 1976 -77, featured unusually large circulation anomalies, many of which can be directly related to prolonged episodes of large scale blocking. The intent of this study is to investigate the statistics and certain diagnostics of blocking in the Northern Hemisphere. The first of the three primary objectives is to present and interpret the spatial and temporal distribution of blocking during the past 33 years. We develop objective identification criteria, adaptable to machine processing methods, by relating the blocking anticyclone to its associated positive anomaly of 5-day mean 500MB height. Anomalies meeting the criteria are called 'blocking signatures.' We present the seasonal frequency of occurrence of these signatures by longitude and by area. The results are in good agreement with published studies for the oceans, but they also reveal a high frequency of blocking signatures over the Northeastern Canadian Archipelago. This result, dubbed the 'Baffin Island Paradox' is further investigated and rationalized. A catalogue has been prepared which identifies the date, centre location and magnitude of every blocking signature which occurred from January 1, 1946 to December 31, 1978. A supplementary Catalogue identifies sequences of these signatures corresponding to actual blocking episodes. The second objective is to investigate whether regions with high incidence of blocking, in either the developing or the mature stage, features non-Gaussian distributions of 5-day mean geopotential. During winter, fields of significantly low kurtosis are found in certain mid-latitude regions where the genesis and amplification of

  2. Optoelectronics using block copolymers.

    SciTech Connect

    Botiz, I.; Darling, S. B.; Center for Nanoscale Materials

    2010-05-01

    Block copolymers, either as semiconductors themselves or as structure directors, are emerging as a promising class of materials for understanding and controlling processes associated with both photovoltaic energy conversion and light emitting devices.

  3. Superalloy Lattice Block Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nathal, M. V.; Whittenberger, J. D.; Hebsur, M. G.; Kantzos, P. T.; Krause, D. L.

    2004-01-01

    Initial investigations of investment cast superalloy lattice block suggest that this technology will yield a low cost approach to utilize the high temperature strength and environmental resistance of superalloys in lightweight, damage tolerant structural configurations. Work to date has demonstrated that relatively large superalloy lattice block panels can be successfully investment cast from both IN-718 and Mar-M247. These castings exhibited mechanical properties consistent with the strength of the same superalloys measured from more conventional castings. The lattice block structure also accommodates significant deformation without failure, and is defect tolerant in fatigue. The potential of lattice block structures opens new opportunities for the use of superalloys in future generations of aircraft applications that demand strength and environmental resistance at elevated temperatures along with low weight.

  4. Resolving writer's block.

    PubMed Central

    Huston, P.

    1998-01-01

    PROBLEM BEING ADDRESSED: Writer's block, or a distinctly uncomfortable inability to write, can interfere with professional productivity. OBJECTIVE OF PROGRAM: To identify writer's block and to outline suggestions for its early diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. MAIN COMPONENTS OF PROGRAM: Once the diagnosis has been established, a stepwise approach to care is recommended. Mild blockage can be resolved by evaluating and revising expectations, conducting a task analysis, and giving oneself positive feedback. Moderate blockage can be addressed by creative exercises, such as brainstorming and role-playing. Recalcitrant blockage can be resolved with therapy. Writer's block can be prevented by taking opportunities to write at the beginning of projects, working with a supportive group of people, and cultivating an ongoing interest in writing. CONCLUSIONS: Writer's block is a highly treatable condition. A systematic approach can help to alleviate anxiety, build confidence, and give people the information they need to work productively. PMID:9481467

  5. Blocked tear duct

    MedlinePlus

    ... your baby may have an eye infection called conjunctivitis . ... increase the chance of other infections, such as conjunctivitis. ... be prevented. Proper treatment of nasal infections and conjunctivitis may reduce the risk of having a blocked ...

  6. Block copolymer battery separator

    DOEpatents

    Wong, David; Balsara, Nitash Pervez

    2016-04-26

    The invention herein described is the use of a block copolymer/homopolymer blend for creating nanoporous materials for transport applications. Specifically, this is demonstrated by using the block copolymer poly(styrene-block-ethylene-block-styrene) (SES) and blending it with homopolymer polystyrene (PS). After blending the polymers, a film is cast, and the film is submerged in tetrahydrofuran, which removes the PS. This creates a nanoporous polymer film, whereby the holes are lined with PS. Control of morphology of the system is achieved by manipulating the amount of PS added and the relative size of the PS added. The porous nature of these films was demonstrated by measuring the ionic conductivity in a traditional battery electrolyte, 1M LiPF.sub.6 in EC/DEC (1:1 v/v) using AC impedance spectroscopy and comparing these results to commercially available battery separators.

  7. Cell block eleven (left) and cell block fifteen, looking from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Cell block eleven (left) and cell block fifteen, looking from cell block two into the "Death Row" exercise yard - Eastern State Penitentiary, 2125 Fairmount Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  8. View of cell block eight (left), cell block seven, and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of cell block eight (left), cell block seven, and southwest guard tower, looking from cell block eight roof - Eastern State Penitentiary, 2125 Fairmount Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  9. Virtual Human Project

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, RD

    2001-06-12

    This paper describes the development of a comprehensive human modeling environment, the Virtual Human, which will be used initially to model the human respiratory system for purposes of predicting pulmonary disease or injury using lung sounds. The details of the computational environment, including the development of a Virtual Human Thorax, a database for storing models, model parameters, and experimental data, and a Virtual Human web interface are outlined. Preliminary progress in developing this environment will be presented. A separate paper at the conference describes the modeling of sound generation using computational fluid dynamics and the modeling of sound propagation in the human respiratory system.

  10. Virtual slit scanning microscopy.

    PubMed

    Fiolka, Reto; Stemmer, Andreas; Belyaev, Yury

    2007-12-01

    We present a novel slit scanning confocal microscope with a CCD camera image sensor and a virtual slit aperture for descanning that can be adjusted during post-processing. A very efficient data structure and mathematical criteria for aligning the virtual aperture guarantee the ease of use. We further introduce a method to reduce the anisotropic lateral resolution of slit scanning microscopes. System performance is evaluated against a spinning disk confocal microscope on identical specimens. The virtual slit scanning microscope works as the spinning disk type and outperforms on thick specimens. PMID:17891411

  11. Superalloy Lattice Block Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whittenberger, J. D.; Nathal, M. V.; Hebsur, M. G.; Kraus, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    In their simplest form, lattice block panels are produced by direct casting and result in lightweight, fully triangulated truss-like configurations which provide strength and stiffness [2]. The earliest realizations of lattice block were made from A1 and steels, primarily under funding from the US Navy [3]. This work also showed that the mechanical efficiency (eg., specific stiffness) of lattice block structures approached that of honeycomb structures [2]. The lattice architectures are also less anisotropic, and the investment casting route should provide a large advantage in cost and temperature capability over honeycombs which are limited to alloys that can be processed into foils. Based on this early work, a program was initiated to determine the feasibility of extending the high temperature superalloy lattice block [3]. The objective of this effort was to provide an alternative to intermetallics and composites in achieving a lightweight high temperature structure without sacrificing the damage tolerance and moderate cost inherent in superalloys. To establish the feasibility of the superalloy lattice block concept, work was performed in conjunction with JAMCORP, Inc. Billerica, MA, to produce a number of lattice block panels from both IN71 8 and Mar-M247.

  12. Working Group Reports and Presentations: Virtual Worlds and Virtual Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LAmoreaux, Claudia

    2006-01-01

    Scientists and engineers are continually developing innovative methods to capitalize on recent developments in computational power. Virtual worlds and virtual exploration present a new toolset for project design, implementation, and resolution. Replication of the physical world in the virtual domain provides stimulating displays to augment current data analysis techniques and to encourage public participation. In addition, the virtual domain provides stakeholders with a low cost, low risk design and test environment. The following document defines a virtual world and virtual exploration, categorizes the chief motivations for virtual exploration, elaborates upon specific objectives, identifies roadblocks and enablers for realizing the benefits, and highlights the more immediate areas of implementation (i.e. the action items). While the document attempts a comprehensive evaluation of virtual worlds and virtual exploration, the innovative nature of the opportunities presented precludes completeness. The authors strongly encourage readers to derive additional means of utilizing the virtual exploration toolset.

  13. A workout for virtual bodybuilders (design issues for embodiment in multi-actor virtual environments)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Steve; Bowers, John; Fahlen, Lennart E.; Greenhalgh, Chris; Snowdon, Dave

    1994-01-01

    This paper explores the issue of user embodiment within collaborative virtual environments. By user embodiment we mean the provision of users with appropriate body images so as to represent them to others and also to themselves. By collaborative virtual environments we mean multi-user virtual reality systems which support cooperative work (although we argue that the results of our exploration may also be applied to other kinds of collaborative systems). The main part of the paper identifies a list of embodiment design issues including: presence, location, identity, activity, availability, history of activity, viewpoint, action point, gesture, facial expression, voluntary versus involuntary expression, degree of presence, reflecting capabilities, manipulating the user's view of others, representation across multiple media, autonomous and distributed body parts, truthfulness and efficiency. Following this, we show how these issues are reflected in our own DIVE and MASSIVE prototype collaborative virtual environments.

  14. The Virtual Reference Librarian's Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipow, Anne Grodzins

    This book is a practical guide to librarians and their administrators who are thinking about or in the early stages of providing virtual reference service. Part 1, "The Decision to Go Virtual," provides a context for thinking about virtual reference, including the benefits and problems, getting in the virtual frame of mind, and shopping for…

  15. Memory access in shared virtual memory

    SciTech Connect

    Berrendorf, R.

    1992-09-01

    Shared virtual memory (SVM) is a virtual memory layer with a single address space on top of a distributed real memory on parallel computers. We examine the behavior and performance of SVM running a parallel program with medium-grained, loop-level parallelism on top of it. A simulator for the underlying parallel architecture can be used to examine the behavior of SVM more deeply. The influence of several parameters, such as the number of processors, page size, cold or warm start, and restricted page replication, is studied.

  16. Memory access in shared virtual memory

    SciTech Connect

    Berrendorf, R. )

    1992-01-01

    Shared virtual memory (SVM) is a virtual memory layer with a single address space on top of a distributed real memory on parallel computers. We examine the behavior and performance of SVM running a parallel program with medium-grained, loop-level parallelism on top of it. A simulator for the underlying parallel architecture can be used to examine the behavior of SVM more deeply. The influence of several parameters, such as the number of processors, page size, cold or warm start, and restricted page replication, is studied.

  17. Jefferson Lab Virtual Tour

    SciTech Connect

    2013-07-13

    Take a virtual tour of the campus of Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. You can see inside our two accelerators, three experimental areas, accelerator component fabrication and testing areas, high-performance computing areas and laser labs.

  18. Nuevo Observatorio Virtual Argentino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tissera, P. B.

    We summarized the main events in the creation of the Nuevo Observatorio Virtual Argentino (NOVA) and its objectives. We also discuss the present advances and the goals for the near future. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  19. Virtual Organizations: An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nami, Mohammad Reza

    The need to remain competitive in the open market forces companies to concentrate on their core competencies while searching for alliances when additional skills or resources are needed to fulfill business opportunities. The changing business situation of companies and customer needs have motivated researchers to introduce Virtual Organization (VO) idea. A Virtual Organization is always a form of partnership and managing partners and handling partnerships are crucial. Virtual organizations are defined as a temporary collection of enterprises that cooperate and share resources, knowledge, and competencies to better respond to business opportunities. This paper presents base concepts of virtual organizations including properties, management concepts, operational concepts, and main issues in collaboration such as security and authentication.

  20. ISIS Workshops Using Virtualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, K. J.; Becker, T. L.

    2015-06-01

    ISIS workshops are now using virtualization technology to improve the user experience and create a stable, consistent and useful ISIS installation for educational purposes as well as future processing needs.

  1. Going Virtual, Getting Real.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alford, Randall J.

    1999-01-01

    Presents an account of how one company went completely virtual--no office at all--and reaped the eventual rewards. Describes implementation processes, communication challenges, and customer reactions. (JOW)

  2. Jefferson Lab Virtual Tour

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Take a virtual tour of the campus of Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. You can see inside our two accelerators, three experimental areas, accelerator component fabrication and testing areas, high-performance computing areas and laser labs.

  3. Growing Up with Their Blocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winarski, Diana L.

    1995-01-01

    Describes one teacher's use of traditional wooden blocks in fifth-grade curriculum. Notes that use of blocks can teach communication, teamwork, precision, and arithmetic concepts. Also describes four easy classroom block projects. (TM)

  4. The Virtual Wave Observatory (VWO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, S. F.; VWO Team

    2008-12-01

    Heliophysics wave data are currently not easily searchable by computers, making identifying pertinent wave data features for analyses and cross comparisons difficult and laborious. Since wave data analysis requires specialized knowledge about waves, which spans the spectrum of microphysics to macrophysics, researchers having varied expertise cannot easily use wave data. To resolve these difficulties and to allow wave data to contribute more fully to Heliophysics research, we are developing a Virtual Wave Observatory (VWO) whose goal is to enable all Heliophysics wave data to become searchable, understandable and usable by the Heliosphysics community. The VWO objective is to enable search of multiple and distributed wave data (from both active and passive measurements). This presentation provides and overview of the VWO, a new VxO component within the emerging distributed Heliophysics data and model environment.

  5. Virtual Reality Lab Assistant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, Hrishikesh; Palmer, Timothy A.

    1996-01-01

    Virtual Reality Lab Assistant (VRLA) demonstration model is aligned for engineering and material science experiments to be performed by undergraduate and graduate students in the course as a pre-lab simulation experience. This will help students to get a preview of how to use the lab equipment and run experiments without using the lab hardware/software equipment. The quality of the time available for laboratory experiments can be significantly improved through the use of virtual reality technology.

  6. NASA New Virtual Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    NASA's Virtual Airport Tower is located at the Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California. The Virtual Airport Tower's two-story structure is a full-scale, highly sophisticated simulation facility that will emulate Level 5 air traffic control towers and the busiest airports. It provides the platform to conduct in-depth human factors studies with quantifiable results using actual air traffic controllers, airline dispatchers and airport managers.

  7. The Virtual Observatory: I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanisch, R. J.

    2014-11-01

    The concept of the Virtual Observatory arose more-or-less simultaneously in the United States and Europe circa 2000. Ten pages of Astronomy and Astrophysics in the New Millennium: Panel Reports (National Academy Press, Washington, 2001), that is, the detailed recommendations of the Panel on Theory, Computation, and Data Exploration of the 2000 Decadal Survey in Astronomy, are dedicated to describing the motivation for, scientific value of, and major components required in implementing the National Virtual Observatory. European initiatives included the Astrophysical Virtual Observatory at the European Southern Observatory, the AstroGrid project in the United Kingdom, and the Euro-VO (sponsored by the European Union). Organizational/conceptual meetings were held in the US at the California Institute of Technology (Virtual Observatories of the Future, June 13-16, 2000) and at ESO Headquarters in Garching, Germany (Mining the Sky, July 31-August 4, 2000; Toward an International Virtual Observatory, June 10-14, 2002). The nascent US, UK, and European VO projects formed the International Virtual Observatory Alliance (IVOA) at the June 2002 meeting in Garching, with yours truly as the first chair. The IVOA has grown to a membership of twenty-one national projects and programs on six continents, and has developed a broad suite of data access protocols and standards that have been widely implemented. Astronomers can now discover, access, and compare data from hundreds of telescopes and facilities, hosted at hundreds of organizations worldwide, stored in thousands of databases, all with a single query.

  8. VIRTUAL FRAME BUFFER INTERFACE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, T. L.

    1994-01-01

    Large image processing systems use multiple frame buffers with differing architectures and vendor supplied user interfaces. This variety of architectures and interfaces creates software development, maintenance, and portability problems for application programs. The Virtual Frame Buffer Interface program makes all frame buffers appear as a generic frame buffer with a specified set of characteristics, allowing programmers to write code which will run unmodified on all supported hardware. The Virtual Frame Buffer Interface converts generic commands to actual device commands. The virtual frame buffer consists of a definition of capabilities and FORTRAN subroutines that are called by application programs. The virtual frame buffer routines may be treated as subroutines, logical functions, or integer functions by the application program. Routines are included that allocate and manage hardware resources such as frame buffers, monitors, video switches, trackballs, tablets and joysticks; access image memory planes; and perform alphanumeric font or text generation. The subroutines for the various "real" frame buffers are in separate VAX/VMS shared libraries allowing modification, correction or enhancement of the virtual interface without affecting application programs. The Virtual Frame Buffer Interface program was developed in FORTRAN 77 for a DEC VAX 11/780 or a DEC VAX 11/750 under VMS 4.X. It supports ADAGE IK3000, DEANZA IP8500, Low Resolution RAMTEK 9460, and High Resolution RAMTEK 9460 Frame Buffers. It has a central memory requirement of approximately 150K. This program was developed in 1985.

  9. Stable domain size and conformational segregation of short and long blocks during microphase separation in random block copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markina, A.; Chertovich, A.

    2015-03-01

    In this Letter we use computer simulations and test microphase separation for AB-diblock copolymers with different block's statistics. We show that the domain size during microphase separation is stable only for the system with large enough polydispersity, namely with exponential (Flory-type) block length distribution. The reason for stable domain size is a conformational segregation of short and long blocks during the increase of the incompatibility in the system. While short blocks became elongated and occupy the surface of the interphase region, long blocks pushed out to the center of the domain and formed their compact conformations.

  10. Factors to keep in mind when introducing virtual microscopy.

    PubMed

    Glatz-Krieger, Katharina; Spornitz, Udo; Spatz, Alain; Mihatsch, Michael J; Glatz, Dieter

    2006-03-01

    Digitization of glass slides and delivery of so-called virtual slides (VS) emulating a real microscope over the Internet have become reality due to recent improvements in technology. We have implemented a virtual microscope for instruction of medical students and for continuing medical education. Up to 30,000 images per slide are captured using a microscope with an automated stage. The images are post-processed and then served by a plain hypertext transfer protocol (http)-server. A virtual slide client (vMic) based on Macromedia's Flash MX, a highly accepted technology available on every modern Web browser, has been developed. All necessary virtual slide parameters are stored in an XML file together with the image. Evaluation of the courses by questionnaire indicated that most students and many but not all pathologists regard virtual slides as an adequate replacement for traditional slides. All our virtual slides are publicly accessible over the World Wide Web (WWW) at http://vmic.unibas.ch . Recently, several commercially available virtual slide acquisition systems (VSAS) have been developed that use various technologies to acquire and distribute virtual slides. These systems differ in speed, image quality, compatibility, viewer functionalities and price. This paper gives an overview of the factors to keep in mind when introducing virtual microscopy.

  11. Rendered virtual view image objective quality assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Gang; Li, Xiangchun; Zhang, Yi; Peng, Kai

    2013-08-01

    The research on rendered virtual view image (RVVI) objective quality assessment is important for integrated imaging system and image quality assessment (IQA). Traditional IQA algorithms cannot be applied directly on the system receiver-side due to interview displacement and the absence of original reference. This study proposed a block-based neighbor reference (NbR) IQA framework for RVVI IQA. Neighbor views used for rendering are employed for quality assessment in the proposed framework. A symphonious factor handling noise and interview displacement is defined and applied to evaluate the contribution of the obtained quality index in each block pair. A three-stage experiment scheme is also presented to testify the proposed framework and evaluate its homogeneity performance when comparing to full reference IQA. Experimental results show the proposed framework is useful in RVVI objective quality assessment at system receiver-side and benchmarking different rendering algorithms.

  12. Simulation of spinal nerve blocks for training anesthesiology residents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blezek, Daniel J.; Robb, Richard A.; Camp, Jon J.; Nauss, Lee A.; Martin, David P.

    1998-06-01

    Deep nerve regional anesthesiology procedures, such as the celiac plexus block, are challenging to learn. The current training process primarily involves studying anatomy and practicing needle insertion is cadavers. Unfortunately, the training often continues on the first few patients subjected to the care of the new resident. To augment the training, we have developed a virtual reality surgical simulation designed to provide an immersive environment in which an understanding of the complex 3D relationships among the anatomic structures involved can be obtained and the mechanics of the celiac block procedure practiced under realistic conditions. Study of the relevant anatomy is provided by interactive 3D visualization of patient specific data nd the practice simulated using a head mounted display, a 6 degree of freedom tracker, and a haptic feedback device simulating the needle insertion. By training in a controlled environment, the resident may practice procedures repeatedly without the risks associated with actual patient procedures, and may become more adept and confident in the ability to perform nerve blocks. The resident may select a variety of different nerve block procedures to practice, and may place the virtual patient in any desired position and orientation. The preliminary anatomic models used in the simulation have been computed from the Visible Human Male; however, patient specific models may be generated from patient image data, allowing the physician to evaluate, plan, and practice difficult blocks and/or understand variations in anatomy before attempting the procedure on any specific patient.

  13. Virtual data in CMS production

    SciTech Connect

    Arbree, A. et al.

    2004-08-26

    Initial applications of the GriPhyN Chimera Virtual Data System have been performed within the context of CMS Production of Monte Carlo Simulated Data. The GriPhyN Chimera system consists of four primary components: (1) a Virtual Data Language, which is used to describe virtual data products, (2) a Virtual Data Catalog, which is used to store virtual data entries, (3) an Abstract Planner, which resolves all dependencies of a particular virtual data product and forms a location and existence independent plan, (4) a Concrete Planner, which maps an abstract, logical plan onto concrete, physical grid resources accounting for staging in/out files and publishing results to a replica location service. A CMS Workflow Planner, MCRunJob, is used to generate virtual data products using the Virtual Data Language. Subsequently, a prototype workflow manager, known as WorkRunner, is used to schedule the instantiation of virtual data products across a grid.

  14. Varieties of virtualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Stephen R.

    1991-01-01

    Natural environments have a content, i.e., the objects in them; a geometry, i.e., a pattern of rules for positioning and displacing the objects; and a dynamics, i.e., a system of rules describing the effects of forces acting on the objects. Human interaction with most common natural environments has been optimized by centuries of evolution. Virtual environments created through the human-computer interface similarly have a content, geometry, and dynamics, but the arbitrary character of the computer simulation creating them does not insure that human interaction with these virtual environments will be natural. The interaction, indeed, could be supernatural but it also could be impossible. An important determinant of the comprehensibility of a virtual environment is the correspondence between the environmental frames of reference and those associated with the control of environmental objects. The effects of rotation and displacement of control frames of reference with respect to corresponding environmental references differ depending upon whether perceptual judgement or manual tracking performance is measured. The perceptual effects of frame of reference displacement may be analyzed in terms of distortions in the process of virtualizing the synthetic environment space. The effects of frame of reference displacement and rotation have been studied by asking subjects to estimate exocentric direction in a virtual space.

  15. A Place for Block Play.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Gary T.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the importance of block play--including its contributions to perceptual, fine motor, and cognitive development--and components of a good preschool block play area. Recommends unit blocks complemented by stacking blocks, toys, beads, cubes, and Brio wooden toys. Makes recommendations for space, size, locations and connections to other…

  16. A Fluid Block Schedule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ubben, Gerald C.

    1976-01-01

    Achieving flexibility without losing student accountability is a challenge that faces every school. With a fluid block schedule, as described here, accountability is maintained without inhibiting flexibility. An additional advantage is that three levels of schedule decision making take some of the pressure off the principal. (Editor)

  17. Spice Blocks Melanoma Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Curcumin, the pungent yellow spice found in both turmeric and curry powders, blocks a key biological pathway needed for development of melanoma and other cancers, according to a study that appears in the journal Cancer. Researchers from The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center demonstrate how curcumin stops laboratory strains of…

  18. Flattening basic blocks.

    SciTech Connect

    Utke, J.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    2006-01-01

    The application of cross country elimination strategies requires access to the computational graph or at least subgraphs for certain scopes, e.g. a basic block. Under the presence of aliased variables the construction of these (sub)graphs encounters ambiguities. We propose an algorithm to construct ambiguity free subgraphs.

  19. Ischemic Nerve Block.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Ian D.

    This experiment investigated the capability for movement and muscle spindle function at successive stages during the development of ischemic nerve block (INB) by pressure cuff. Two male subjects were observed under six randomly ordered conditions. The duration of index finger oscillation to exhaustion, paced at 1.2Hz., was observed on separate…

  20. What's behind Block Scheduling?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gierke, Carolyn

    1999-01-01

    Discussion of block scheduling in secondary schools focuses on its impact on the school library media center. Discusses increased demand for library services, scheduling classes, the impact on librarians' time, teaching information technology, local area networks, and the increased pace of activity. (LRW)

  1. RoBlock: a prototype autonomous manufacturing cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baekdal, Lars K.; Balslev, Ivar; Eriksen, Rene D.; Jensen, Soren P.; Jorgensen, Bo N.; Kirstein, Brian; Kristensen, Bent B.; Olsen, Martin M.; Perram, John W.; Petersen, Henrik G.; Petersen, Morten L.; Ruhoff, Peter T.; Skjolstrup, Carl E.; Sorensen, Anders S.; Wagenaar, Jeroen M.

    2000-10-01

    RoBlock is the first phase of an internally financed project at the Institute aimed at building a system in which two industrial robots suspended from a gantry, as shown below, cooperate to perform a task specified by an external user, in this case, assembling an unstructured collection of colored wooden blocks into a specified 3D pattern. The blocks are identified and localized using computer vision and grasped with a suction cup mechanism. Future phases of the project will involve other processes such as grasping and lifting, as well as other types of robot such as autonomous vehicles or variable geometry trusses. Innovative features of the control software system include: The use of an advanced trajectory planning system which ensures collision avoidance based on a generalization of the method of artificial potential fields, the use of a generic model-based controller which learns the values of parameters, including static and kinetic friction, of a detailed mechanical model of itself by comparing actual with planned movements, the use of fast, flexible, and robust pattern recognition and 3D-interpretation strategies, integration of trajectory planning and control with the sensor systems in a distributed Java application running on a network of PC's attached to the individual physical components. In designing this first stage, the aim was to build in the minimum complexity necessary to make the system non-trivially autonomous and to minimize the technological risks. The aims of this project, which is planned to be operational during 2000, are as follows: To provide a platform for carrying out experimental research in multi-agent systems and autonomous manufacturing systems, to test the interdisciplinary cooperation architecture of the Maersk Institute, in which researchers in the fields of applied mathematics (modeling the physical world), software engineering (modeling the system) and sensor/actuator technology (relating the virtual and real worlds) could

  2. Block copolymer adhesion promoters via ring-opening metathesis polymerization

    DOEpatents

    Kent, Michael S.; Saunders, Randall

    1997-01-01

    Coupling agents based on functionalized block copolymers for bonding thermoset polymers to solid materials. These are polymers which possess at least two types of functional groups, one which is able to attach to and react with solid surfaces, and another which can react with a thermoset resin, which are incorporated as pendant groups in monomers distributed in blocks (typically two) along the backbone of the chain. The block copolymers in this invention are synthesized by living ring-opening metathesis polymerization.

  3. High efficiency virtual impactor

    DOEpatents

    Loo, B.W.

    1980-03-27

    Environmental monitoring of atmospheric air is facilitated by a single stage virtual impactor for separating an inlet flow (Q/sub 0/) having particulate contaminants into a coarse particle flow (Q/sub 1/) and a fine particle flow (Q/sub 2/) to enable collection of such particles on different filters for separate analysis. An inlet particle acceleration nozzle and coarse particle collection probe member having a virtual impaction opening are aligned along a single axis and spaced apart to define a flow separation region at which the fine particle flow (Q/sub 2/) is drawn radially outward into a chamber while the coarse particle flow (Q/sub 1/) enters the virtual impaction opening.

  4. A virtual water network of the Roman world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dermody, B. J.; van Beek, R. P. H.; Meeks, E.; Klein Goldewijk, K.; Scheidel, W.; van der Velde, Y.; Bierkens, M. F. P.; Wassen, M. J.; Dekker, S. C.

    2014-06-01

    The Romans were perhaps the most impressive exponents of water resource management in preindustrial times with irrigation and virtual water trade facilitating unprecedented urbanisation and socioeconomic stability for hundreds of years in a region of highly variable climate. To understand Roman water resource management in response to urbanisation and climate variability, a Virtual Water Network of the Roman World was developed. Using this network we find that irrigation and virtual water trade increased Roman resilience to climate variability in the short term. However, urbanisation arising from virtual water trade likely pushed the Empire closer to the boundary of its water resources, led to an increase in import costs, and reduced its resilience to climate variability in the long-term. In addition to improving our understanding of Roman water resource management, our cost-distance based analysis illuminates how increases in import costs arising from climatic and population pressures are likely to be distributed in the future global virtual water network.

  5. Intraoperative virtual brain counseling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhaowei; Grosky, William I.; Zamorano, Lucia J.; Muzik, Otto; Diaz, Fernando

    1997-06-01

    Our objective is to offer online real-tim e intelligent guidance to the neurosurgeon. Different from traditional image-guidance technologies that offer intra-operative visualization of medical images or atlas images, virtual brain counseling goes one step further. It can distinguish related brain structures and provide information about them intra-operatively. Virtual brain counseling is the foundation for surgical planing optimization and on-line surgical reference. It can provide a warning system that alerts the neurosurgeon if the chosen trajectory will pass through eloquent brain areas. In order to fulfill this objective, tracking techniques are involved for intra- operativity. Most importantly, a 3D virtual brian environment, different from traditional 3D digitized atlases, is an object-oriented model of the brain that stores information about different brain structures together with their elated information. An object-oriented hierarchical hyper-voxel space (HHVS) is introduced to integrate anatomical and functional structures. Spatial queries based on position of interest, line segment of interest, and volume of interest are introduced in this paper. The virtual brain environment is integrated with existing surgical pre-planning and intra-operative tracking systems to provide information for planning optimization and on-line surgical guidance. The neurosurgeon is alerted automatically if the planned treatment affects any critical structures. Architectures such as HHVS and algorithms, such as spatial querying, normalizing, and warping are presented in the paper. A prototype has shown that the virtual brain is intuitive in its hierarchical 3D appearance. It also showed that HHVS, as the key structure for virtual brain counseling, efficiently integrates multi-scale brain structures based on their spatial relationships.This is a promising development for optimization of treatment plans and online surgical intelligent guidance.

  6. Virtual Flow Simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Calderer, Antoni; Yang, Xiaolei; Angelidis, Dionysios; Khosronejad, Ali; Le, Trung; Kang, Seokkoo; Gilmanov, Anvar; Ge, Liang; Borazjani, Iman

    2015-10-05

    Virtual Flow Simulator (VFS) is a state-of-the-art computational fluid mechanics (CFD) package that is capable of simulating multi-physics/multi-phase flows with the most advanced turbulence models (RANS, LES) over complex terrains. The flow solver is based on the Curvilinear Immersed Boundary (CURVIB) method to handle geometrically complex and moving domains. Different modules of the VFS package can provide different simulation capabilities for specific applications ranging from the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) of solid and deformable bodies, the two-phase free surface flow solver based on the level set method for ocean waves, sediment transport models in rivers and the large-scale models of wind farms based on actuator lines and surfaces. All numerical features of VFS package have been validated with known analytical and experimental data as reported in the related journal articles. VFS package is suitable for a broad range of engineering applications within different industries. VFS has been used in different projects with applications in wind and hydrokinetic energy, offshore and near-shore ocean studies, cardiovascular and biological flows, and natural streams and river morphodynamics. Over the last decade, the development of VFS has been supported and assisted with the help of various United States companies and federal agencies that are listed in the sponsor lists. In this version, VFS-Wind contains all the necessary modeling tools for wind energy applications, including land-based and offshore wind farms. VFS is highly scalable to run on either desktop computers or high performance clusters (up to 16,000 CPUs). This released version comes with a detailed user’s manual and a set of case studies designed to facilitate the learning of the various aspects of the code in a comprehensive manner. The included documentation and support material has been elaborated in a collaboration effort with Sandia National Labs under the contract DE-EE0005482. The VFS

  7. Virtual Flow Simulator

    2015-10-05

    Virtual Flow Simulator (VFS) is a state-of-the-art computational fluid mechanics (CFD) package that is capable of simulating multi-physics/multi-phase flows with the most advanced turbulence models (RANS, LES) over complex terrains. The flow solver is based on the Curvilinear Immersed Boundary (CURVIB) method to handle geometrically complex and moving domains. Different modules of the VFS package can provide different simulation capabilities for specific applications ranging from the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) of solid and deformable bodies, themore » two-phase free surface flow solver based on the level set method for ocean waves, sediment transport models in rivers and the large-scale models of wind farms based on actuator lines and surfaces. All numerical features of VFS package have been validated with known analytical and experimental data as reported in the related journal articles. VFS package is suitable for a broad range of engineering applications within different industries. VFS has been used in different projects with applications in wind and hydrokinetic energy, offshore and near-shore ocean studies, cardiovascular and biological flows, and natural streams and river morphodynamics. Over the last decade, the development of VFS has been supported and assisted with the help of various United States companies and federal agencies that are listed in the sponsor lists. In this version, VFS-Wind contains all the necessary modeling tools for wind energy applications, including land-based and offshore wind farms. VFS is highly scalable to run on either desktop computers or high performance clusters (up to 16,000 CPUs). This released version comes with a detailed user’s manual and a set of case studies designed to facilitate the learning of the various aspects of the code in a comprehensive manner. The included documentation and support material has been elaborated in a collaboration effort with Sandia National Labs under the contract DE-EE0005482

  8. A VIRTUAL OPERATING SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Dennis E.; Scherrer, Deborah K.; Sventek, Joseph S.

    1980-05-01

    Significant progress toward disentangling computing environments from their under lying operating systern has been made. An approach is presented that achieves inter-system uniformity at all three levels of user interface - virtual machine, utilities, and command language. Under specifiable conditions, complete uniformity is achievable without disturbing the underlying operating system. The approach permits accurate computation of the cost to move both people and software to a new system. The cost of moving people is zero, and the cost of moving software is equal to the cost of implementing a virtual machine. Efficiency is achieved through optimization of the primitive functions.

  9. Virtual reality welder training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Steven A.; Reiners, Dirk; Prachyabrued, Mores; Borst, Christoph W.; Chambers, Terrence L.

    2010-01-01

    This document describes the Virtual Reality Simulated MIG Lab (sMIG), a system for Virtual Reality welder training. It is designed to reproduce the experience of metal inert gas (MIG) welding faithfully enough to be used as a teaching tool for beginning welding students. To make the experience as realistic as possible it employs physically accurate and tracked input devices, a real-time welding simulation, real-time sound generation and a 3D display for output. Thanks to being a fully digital system it can go beyond providing just a realistic welding experience by giving interactive and immediate feedback to the student to avoid learning wrong movements from day 1.

  10. Virtual reality for emergency training

    SciTech Connect

    Altinkemer, K.

    1995-12-31

    Virtual reality is a sequence of scenes generated by a computer as a response to the five different senses. These senses are sight, sound, taste, touch, smell. Other senses that can be used in virtual reality include balance, pheromonal, and immunological senses. Many application areas include: leisure and entertainment, medicine, architecture, engineering, manufacturing, and training. Virtual reality is especially important when it is used for emergency training and management of natural disasters including earthquakes, floods, tornados and other situations which are hard to emulate. Classical training methods for these extraordinary environments lack the realistic surroundings that virtual reality can provide. In order for virtual reality to be a successful training tool the design needs to include certain aspects; such as how real virtual reality should be and how much fixed cost is entailed in setting up the virtual reality trainer. There are also pricing questions regarding the price per training session on virtual reality trainer, and the appropriate training time length(s).

  11. Mixing thermodynamics of block-random copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckingham, Bryan Scott

    Random copolymerization of A and B monomers represents a versatile method to tune interaction strengths between polymers, as ArB random copolymers will exhibit a smaller effective Flory interaction parameter chi; (or interaction energy density X) upon mixing with A or B homopolymers than upon mixing A and B homopolymers with each other, and the ArB composition can be tuned continuously. Thus, the incorporation of a random copolymer block into the classical block copolymer architecture to yield "block-random" copolymers introduces an additional tuning mechanism for the control of structure-property relationships, as the interblock interactions and physical properties can be tuned continuously through the random block's composition. However, typical living or controlled polymerizations produce compositional gradients along the "random" block, which can in turn influence the phase behavior. This dissertation demonstrates a method by which narrow-distribution copolymers of styrene and isoprene of any desired composition, with no measurable down-chain gradient, are synthesized. This synthetic method is then utilized to incorporate random copolymers of styrene and isoprene as blocks into block-random copolymers in order to examine the resulting interblock mixing thermodynamics. A series of well-defined near-symmetric block and block-random copolymers (S-I, Bd-S, I-SrI, S-SrI and Bd-S rI diblocks, where S is polystyrene, I is polyisoprene and Bd is polybutadiene), with varying molecular weight and random-block composition are synthesized and the mixing thermodynamics---via comparison of their interaction energy densities, X---of their hydrogenated derivatives is examined through measurement of the order-disorder transition (ODT) temperature. Hydrogenated derivatives of I-SrI and S-SrI block-random copolymers, both wherein the styrene aromaticity is retained and derivatives wherein the styrene units are saturated to vinylcyclohexane (VCH), are found to hew closely to the

  12. Characterizing a complex aquifer system using geophysics, hydrodynamics and geochemistry: A new distribution of Miocene aquifers in the Zéramdine and Mahdia-Jébéniana blocks (east-central Tunisia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachaal, Fethi; Bédir, Mourad; Tarhouni, Jamila; Gacha, Ayadi Ben; Leduc, Christian

    2011-06-01

    The Zéramdine and Mahdia-Jébéniana blocks are located in the Sahel region in east-central Tunisia. Active tectonics have divided the region into numerous sub-units, as result of multiple phases of distension and compression. The Miocene fluvio-deltaic sediment sandy layers have aquiferous capacities but their hydraulic properties are still unknown, due to the lack of investigation wells. This study proposes a new description of the regional hydrogeology of Miocene deposits. Seismic-reflection and wireline logging of petroleum and water wells were used to understand the structure and the geometry of the Miocene reservoirs. The groundwater flow and its relationship to the sedimentary and tectonic context were then identified by studying piezometry and hydrochemistry. Two Miocene deep aquifer systems were identified: (1) Zéramdine-Béni Hassen to the north and (2) Jébéniana-Ksour Essef to the south. These aquifers are separated by the Mahdia graben. Other major tectonic structures, such as the Zéramdine fault corridor, the Moknine graben, and the El-Jem half-graben represent lateral boundaries for these aquifers. Other deeper sandy and clayey-sandy reservoirs were also identified in the area. Their repartition, thickness and depth vary from one block to other. Hydrodynamics of the deep aquifers seems to be controlled by geological structures. Two independent compartments were identified: in the northern block groundwater flows from West to East and from Northwest to Southeast, while in the southern block it flows from Northwest to Southeast. Geochemical facies are of two types: Na-Ca-Cl-SO 4 for the Zéramdine-Béni Hassen deep aquifer and Na-Cl for the Jébéniana-Ksour Essef deep aquifer. The hydrodynamic and geochemical results confirm the sharing of the Miocene sediments into two aquifers.

  13. Connecting Mobile Data Collection with Virtual Globes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marks, M.

    2009-12-01

    An ever growing number of mobile devices are GPS enabled. iPhones, Android devices, GPS loggers, cameras with geo location built in and many others are all capable of collecting data and displaying that in a variety of formats. This type of data collection has implications for a wide variety of scientific, commercial, and humanitarian endeavors. There are a number of challenges in developing and distributing this kind of data collection system, including cross platform issues, bandwidth and latency, and display on small screens. This session will cover some of the possible applications of this type of data collection. It will also cover some of the challenges and how to overcome them to create a system for the distributed collection of data and displaying it on a virtual globe. Some of the topics will include: 1) Different devices available 2) Frameworks for cross-platform development 3) Server options 4) Displaying in Google Earth and other Virtual Globes

  14. Virtual Inquiry Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harlow, Danielle; Nilsen, Katy

    2011-01-01

    Children in classrooms and scientists in laboratories engage in similar activities: they observe, ask questions, and try to explain phenomena. Video conferencing technology can remove the wall between the classroom and the laboratory, bringing children and scientists together. Virtual experiences and field trips can provide many of the benefits of…

  15. Virtual Bridge Design Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitts, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    This design/problem-solving activity challenges students to design a replacement bridge for one that has been designated as either structurally deficient or functionally obsolete. The Aycock MS Technology/STEM Magnet Program Virtual Bridge Design Challenge is an authentic introduction to the engineering design process. It is a socially relevant…

  16. Definition of Virtual Levels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shore, Bruce W.

    1979-01-01

    Presents an examination of graphical displays of solutions to time-dependent Schrodinger equation modeling a laser-excited three-level atom. It suggests that an energy level may be regarded as virtual when it is detuned from resonance by more than two Rabi frequencies. (Author/HM)

  17. War Games Go Virtual

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Scott

    2006-01-01

    This article describes how researchers work with military to create the next generation of training technology. This article also describes the features of Flatworld, a virtual military training technology. Flatworld is one of many projects under development at the Institute for Creative Technologies, a research group that is supported primarily…

  18. Rethinking Virtual Reference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tenopir, Carol

    2004-01-01

    Virtual reference services seem a natural extension of libraries digital collections and the emphasis on access to the library anytime, anywhere. If patrons use the library from home, it makes sense to provide them with person-to-person online reference. The Library of Congress (LC), OCLC, and several large library systems have developed and…

  19. Virtual Jupiter - Real Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzhitskaya, Lanika; Speck, A.; Laffey, J.

    2010-01-01

    How many earthlings went to visit Jupiter? None. How many students visited virtual Jupiter to fulfill their introductory astronomy courses’ requirements? Within next six months over 100 students from University of Missouri will get a chance to explore the planet and its Galilean Moons using a 3D virtual environment created especially for them to learn Kepler's and Newton's laws, eclipses, parallax, and other concepts in astronomy. The virtual world of Jupiter system is a unique 3D environment that allows students to learn course material - physical laws and concepts in astronomy - while engaging them into exploration of the Jupiter's system, encouraging their imagination, curiosity, and motivation. The virtual learning environment let students to work individually or collaborate with their teammates. The 3D world is also a great opportunity for research in astronomy education to investigate impact of social interaction, gaming features, and use of manipulatives offered by a learning tool on students’ motivation and learning outcomes. Use of 3D environment is also a valuable source for exploration of how the learners’ spatial awareness can be enhanced by working in 3-dimensional environment.

  20. The Virtual Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valenza, Joyce Kasman

    2006-01-01

    Today's school libraries must meet student needs as both a physical and virtual space. Existing both offline and online, they must offer around-the-clock access as well as instruction and guidance that support the face-to-face interactions of students with librarians and classroom teachers. Although students are often technologically proficient,…

  1. Virtual extracorporeal circulation process.

    PubMed

    Boschetti, F; Montevecchi, F M; Fumero, R

    1997-06-01

    Virtual instruments for an extracorporeal circulation (ECC) process were developed to simulate the reactions of a patient to different artificial perfusion conditions. The computer simulation of the patient takes into account the hydraulic, volume, thermal and biochemical phenomena and their interaction with the devices involved in ECC (cannulae dimensions, oxygenator and filter types, pulsatile or continuous pump and thermal exchangers). On the basis of the patient's initialisation data (height, weight, Ht) and perfusion variables (pump flow rate, water temperature, gas flow rate and composition) imposed by the operator, the virtual ECC monitors simulated arterial and venous pressure tracings in real time, along with arterial and venous flow rate tracings, urine production tracing and temperature levels. Oxyhemoglobin arterial and venous blood saturation together with other related variables (pO2, pCO2, pH, HCO3 are also monitored. A drug model which allows the simulation of the effect of vasodilator and diuretic drugs is also implemented. Alarms are provided in order to check which variables (pressure, saturation, pH, urine flow) are out of the expected ranges during the ECC simulation. Consequently the possibility of modifying the control parameters of the virtual devices of the ECC in run-time mode offers an interaction mode between the operator and the virtual environment. PMID:9259211

  2. The Virtual Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Ronald

    1997-01-01

    Increasingly, college teachers and instructional designers are exploring use of the technology of virtual reality to enhance student learning in math, science, and the social sciences. It is found particularly useful for teaching psychomotor skills and may have potential to make scientific concepts and abstract subjects more accessible to…

  3. Virtual manufacturing in reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papstel, Jyri; Saks, Alo

    2000-10-01

    SMEs play an important role in manufacturing industry. But from time to time there is a shortage in resources to complete the particular order in time. Number of systems is introduced to produce digital information in order to support product and process development activities. Main problem is lack of opportunity for direct data transition within design system modules when needed temporary extension of design capacity (virtuality) or to implement integrated concurrent product development principles. The planning experience in the field is weakly used as well. The concept of virtual manufacturing is a supporting idea to solve this problem. At the same time a number of practical problems should be solved like information conformity, data transfer, unified technological concepts acceptation etc. In the present paper the proposed ways to solve the practical problems of virtual manufacturing are described. General objective is to introduce the knowledge-based CAPP system as missing module for Virtual Manufacturing in the selected product domain. Surface-centered planning concept based on STEP- based modeling principles, and knowledge-based process planning methodology will be used to gain the objectives. As a result the planning module supplied by design data with direct access, and supporting advising environment is expected. Mould producing SME would be as test basis.

  4. Virtual Libraries: Service Realities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novak, Jan

    This paper discusses client service issues to be considered when transitioning to a virtual library situation. Themes related to the transitional nature of society in the knowledge era are presented, including: paradox and a contradictory nature; blurring of boundaries; networks, systems, and holistic thinking; process/not product, becoming/not…

  5. Virtual Beach Manager Toolset

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Virtual Beach Manager Toolset (VB) is a set of decision support software tools developed to help local beach managers make decisions as to when beaches should be closed due to predicted high levels of water borne pathogens. The tools are being developed under the umbrella of...

  6. Virtual First Impressions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergren, Martha Dewey

    2005-01-01

    Frequently, a nurse's first and only contact with a graduate school, legislator, public health official, professional organization, or school nursing colleague is made through e-mail. The format, the content, and the appearance of the e-mail create a virtual first impression. Nurses can manage their image and the image of the profession by…

  7. Virtual Field Trips.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter, Virginia A.

    1997-01-01

    Virtual field trips can provide experiences beyond the reach of average K-12 students. Describes multimedia products for school use: Africa Trail, Dinosaur Hunter, Louvre Museum, Magic School Bus Explores the Rainforest, and Up to the Himalayas: Kingdoms in the Clouds and provides book and Internet connections for additional learning, highlighting…

  8. Learning in Virtual Reality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bricken, William

    The essence of the computer revolution is yet to come, for computers are essentially generators of realities. Virtual reality (VR) is the next step in the evolutionary path; the user is placed inside the image and becomes a participant within the computational space. A VR computer generates a direct experience of the computational environment. The…

  9. Virtual Classes, Real Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beem, Kate

    2010-01-01

    As Internet technology encroached on the public school classroom about a decade ago, Kim Ross, superintendent of the Houston (MN) School District saw an opportunity. The entrepreneurial spirit overtook Ross and his team, and out of that was born the Minnesota Virtual Academy and the Minnesota Center of Online Learning, or MCoOL--two virtual…

  10. Managing access block.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Peter; Scown, Paul; Campbell, Donald

    2002-01-01

    There is pessimism regarding the ability of the Acute Health Sector to manage access block for emergency and elective patients. Melbourne Health suffered an acute bed crisis in 2001 resulting in record ambulance diversions and emergency department (ED) delays. We conducted an observational study to reduce access block for emergency patients whilst maintaining elective throughput at Melbourne Health. This involved a clinician-led taskforce using previously proven principles for organisational change to implement 51 actions to improve patient access over a three-month period. The primary outcome measures were ambulance diversion, emergency patients waiting more than 12 hours for an inpatient bed, elective throughput and theatre cancellations. Despite a reduction in multi-day bed numbers all primary objectives were met, ambulance diversion decreased to minimal levels, 12-hour waits decreased by 40% and elective throughput was maintained. Theatre cancellations were also minimised. We conclude that access block can be improved by clinician-led implementation of proven process improvements over a short time frame. The ability to sustain change over the longer term requires further study.

  11. Block 3. This photograph depicts the northern view of Block ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Block 3. This photograph depicts the northern view of Block 2 towards the May D & F Tower from the main path along the western facades - Skyline Park, 1500-1800 Arapaho Street, Denver, Denver County, CO

  12. Using Virtual Observatory Services in Sky View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGlynn, Thomas A.

    2007-01-01

    For over a decade Skyview has provided astronomers and the public with easy access to survey and imaging data from all wavelength regimes. SkyView has pioneered many of the concepts that underlie the Virtual Observatory. Recently SkyView has been released as a distributable package which uses VO protocols to access image and catalog services. This chapter describes how to use the Skyview as a local service and how to customize it to access additional VO services and local data.

  13. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering with CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    F.X. Girod

    2007-12-17

    The beam spin asymmetries of the reaction ep -> epg in the Bjorken regime were measured over a wide kinematical domain using the CLAS detector and a new lead-tungstate calorimeter. Through the interference of the Bethe-Heitler process with Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering, those asymmetries provide constraints for the nucleon Generalized Parton Distributions models. The observed shapes are in agreement with twist-2 dominance predictions.

  14. Deeply virtual Compton scattering off nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Voutier, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) is the golden exclusive channel for the study of the partonic structure of hadrons, within the universal framework of generalized parton distributions (GPDs). This paper presents the aim and general ideas of the DVCS experimental program off nuclei at the Jefferson Laboratory. The benefits of the study of the coherent and incoherent channels to the understanding of the EMC (European Muon Collaboration) effect are discussed, along with the case of nuclear targets to access neutron GPDs.

  15. Ethnography in a Virtual World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shumar, Wesley; Madison, Nora

    2013-01-01

    This article situates the discussion of virtual ethnography within the larger political/economic changes of twenty-first century consumer capitalism and suggests that increasingly our entire social world is a virtual world and that there were very particular utopian and dystopian framings of virtual community growing out of that history. The…

  16. Virtual Reality in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pantelidis, Veronica S.

    1993-01-01

    Considers the concept of virtual reality; reviews its history; describes general uses of virtual reality, including entertainment, medicine, and design applications; discusses classroom uses of virtual reality, including a software program called Virtus WalkThrough for use with a computer monitor; and suggests future possibilities. (34 references)…

  17. Team Development of Virtual Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Sooyoung

    2004-01-01

    Advanced technologies, globalization, the competitiveness of business, flexible working practices, and other rapid changes in the nature of work have all led to the booming of "virtual teams." This paper will provide an overview of virtual teams, including a description of their emergence, a definition and typology of the term "virtual team," an…

  18. Leading Virtual Teams: Three Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, James R.; Jeris, Laurel

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated virtual team members' and leaders' perceptions of the role of the leader, and hindering and helping forces within virtual teams and their host organizations for developing leaders of such teams. It addresses the expressed need of virtual team leaders for the field of HRD to guide leadership development for this emerging…

  19. Constructing Meaning with Virtual Reality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iaonnou-Georgiou, Sophie

    2002-01-01

    Presents a constructivist rationale for introducing virtual reality in language learning and teaching and describes various virtual reality environments that are available. Ways of implementing constuctivist learning through virtual reality are suggested as well as basic guidelines for successful implementation in the classroom. (Author/VWL)

  20. Virtual Worlds in Computing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crellin, Jonathan; Duke-Williams, Emma; Chandler, Jane; Collinson, Timothy

    2009-01-01

    This article reports on the use of a virtual world ("Second Life") in computing education, and identifies the precursors of current virtual world systems. The article reviews the potential for virtual worlds as tools in computing education. It describes two areas where "Second Life" has been used in computing education: as a development…

  1. Technology Counts 2012: Virtual Shift

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Week, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Virtual education is moving into that intersection where rising popularity meets calls for greater accountability. How the virtual education movement responds to those calls will have a significant impact on how it evolves in K-12 over the next five to 10 years. This report tackles this shift in the virtual education landscape. It examines the…

  2. World Reaction to Virtual Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    DRaW Computing developed virtual reality software for the International Space Station. Open Worlds, as the software has been named, can be made to support Java scripting and virtual reality hardware devices. Open Worlds permits the use of VRML script nodes to add virtual reality capabilities to the user's applications.

  3. Concentration Dependent Structure of Block Copolymer Solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Soohyung; Bates, Frank S.; Lodge, Timothy P.

    2015-03-01

    Addition of solvent molecules into block copolymer can induce additional interactions between the solvent and both blocks, and therefore expands the range of accessible self-assembled morphologies. In particular, the distribution of solvent molecules plays a key role in determining the microstructure and its characteristic domain spacing. In this study, concentration dependent structures formed by poly(styrene-b-ethylene-alt-propylene) (PS-PEP) solution in squalane are investigated using small-angle X-ray scattering. This reveals that squalane is essentially completely segregated into the PEP domains. In addition, the conformation of the PS block changes from stretched to nearly fully relaxed (i.e., Gaussian conformation) as amounts of squalane increases. NRF

  4. Virtual Collaborative Simulation Environment for Integrated Product and Process Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulli, Michael A.

    1997-01-01

    Deneb Robotics is a leader in the development of commercially available, leading edge three- dimensional simulation software tools for virtual prototyping,, simulation-based design, manufacturing process simulation, and factory floor simulation and training applications. Deneb has developed and commercially released a preliminary Virtual Collaborative Engineering (VCE) capability for Integrated Product and Process Development (IPPD). This capability allows distributed, real-time visualization and evaluation of design concepts, manufacturing processes, and total factory and enterprises in one seamless simulation environment.

  5. Block Transfer Handbook: Constructing and Negotiating Block Transfer Agreements.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finlay, Finola

    The purpose of this handbook is to provide resources for institutions or articulation committees who are engaged in the task of investigating the feasibility of block transfer agreements. Block transfer is the process whereby a block of credits is granted to students who have successfully completed a certificate, diploma, or cluster of courses…

  6. View southeast of caps for blocks for JFK; blocks are ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View southeast of caps for blocks for JFK; blocks are used to support ship when it is repositioned to paint inaccessible areas masked by original support blocks. - Naval Base Philadelphia-Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Carpentry Shop, League Island, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  7. Anesthesiology training using 3D imaging and virtual reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blezek, Daniel J.; Robb, Richard A.; Camp, Jon J.; Nauss, Lee A.

    1996-04-01

    Current training for regional nerve block procedures by anesthesiology residents requires expert supervision and the use of cadavers; both of which are relatively expensive commodities in today's cost-conscious medical environment. We are developing methods to augment and eventually replace these training procedures with real-time and realistic computer visualizations and manipulations of the anatomical structures involved in anesthesiology procedures, such as nerve plexus injections (e.g., celiac blocks). The initial work is focused on visualizations: both static images and rotational renderings. From the initial results, a coherent paradigm for virtual patient and scene representation will be developed.

  8. Mineral resources estimation based on block modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargawa, Waterman Sulistyana; Amri, Nur Ali

    2016-02-01

    The estimation in this paper uses three kinds of block models of nearest neighbor polygon, inverse distance squared and ordinary kriging. The techniques are weighting scheme which is based on the principle that block content is a linear combination of the grade data or the sample around the block being estimated. The case study in Pongkor area, here is gold-silver resource modeling that allegedly shaped of quartz vein as a hydrothermal process of epithermal type. Resources modeling includes of data entry, statistical and variography analysis of topography and geological model, the block model construction, estimation parameter, presentation model and tabulation of mineral resources. Skewed distribution, here isolated by robust semivariogram. The mineral resources classification generated in this model based on an analysis of the kriging standard deviation and number of samples which are used in the estimation of each block. Research results are used to evaluate the performance of OK and IDS estimator. Based on the visual and statistical analysis, concluded that the model of OK gives the estimation closer to the data used for modeling.

  9. The poor man's cell block

    PubMed Central

    Darlington, Ann

    2010-01-01

    The authors describe a simple method for making formalin or isopropyl alcohol vapour fixed cell blocks from fine needle aspiration cytology specimens that we refer to as ‘The Poor Man's Cell Block.’ PMID:20671053

  10. Blocking of goal-location learning based on shape.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Tim; Wilson, Stuart P; Wilson, Paul N

    2009-05-01

    Using desktop, computer-simulated virtual environments (VEs), the authors conducted 5 experiments to investigate blocking of learning about a goal location based on Shape B as a consequence of preliminary training to locate that goal using Shape A. The shapes were large 2-dimensional horizontal figures on the ground. Blocking of spatial learning was found when the initially trained Shape A was presented in the context of auxiliary shapes that were anticipated to be irrelevant to goal localization. When Shape A was initially presented in the absence of these auxiliary shapes, no evidence of blocking between shapes was apparent. The results are discussed in terms of the similarity between spatial and other forms of contingency learning, the operation of a specialized geometric module, and changes in attention as a consequence of discrimination learning.

  11. Fermion-scalar conformal blocks

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Iliesiu, Luca; Kos, Filip; Poland, David; Pufu, Silviu S.; Simmons-Duffin, David; Yacoby, Ran

    2016-04-13

    In this study, we compute the conformal blocks associated with scalar-scalar-fermionfermion 4-point functions in 3D CFTs. Together with the known scalar conformal blocks, our result completes the task of determining the so-called ‘seed blocks’ in three dimensions. In addition, conformal blocks associated with 4-point functions of operators with arbitrary spins can now be determined from these seed blocks by using known differential operators.

  12. Porous block nanofiber composite filters

    DOEpatents

    Ginley, David S.; Curtis, Calvin J.; Miedaner, Alexander; Weiss, Alan J.; Paddock, Arnold

    2016-08-09

    Porous block nano-fiber composite (110), a filtration system (10) and methods of using the same are disclosed. An exemplary porous block nano-fiber composite (110) includes a porous block (100) having one or more pores (200). The porous block nano-fiber composite (110) also includes a plurality of inorganic nano-fibers (211) formed within at least one of the pores (200).

  13. Cousins Virtual Jane and Virtual Joe, Extraordinary Virtual Helpers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blignaut, Seugnet; Nagel, Lynette

    2009-01-01

    Higher education institutions deliver web-based learning with varied success. The success rate of distributed online courses remains low. Factors such as ineffective course facilitation and insufficient communication contribute to the unfulfilled promises of web-based learning. Students consequently feel unmotivated. Instructor control and in the…

  14. CORE SATURATION BLOCKING OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Spinrad, R.J.

    1961-10-17

    A blocking oscillator which relies on core saturation regulation to control the output pulse width is described. In this arrangement an external magnetic loop is provided in which a saturable portion forms the core of a feedback transformer used with the thermionic or semi-conductor active element. A first stationary magnetic loop establishes a level of flux through the saturation portion of the loop. A second adjustable magnet moves the flux level to select a saturation point giving the desired output pulse width. (AEC)

  15. Property Blocks: Games and Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humphreys, Alan, Ed.; Dailey, Jean, Ed.

    This pamphlet describes the property blocks produced by MINNEMAST, and discusses their use in the development of thinking processes. Classification systems, including block diagrams and tree diagrams, are discussed. Sixteen classroom activities and eleven games which use the blocks are described. Suggestions to the teacher for further reading are…

  16. Building Curriculum during Block Play

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Blocks are not just for play! In this article, Nicole Andrews describes observing the interactions of three young boys enthusiastically engaged in the kindergarten block center of their classroom, using blocks in a building project that displayed their ability to use critical thinking skills, physics exploration, and the development of language…

  17. Virtual reality at work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Frederick P., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The utility of virtual reality computer graphics in telepresence applications is not hard to grasp and promises to be great. When the virtual world is entirely synthetic, as opposed to real but remote, the utility is harder to establish. Vehicle simulators for aircraft, vessels, and motor vehicles are proving their worth every day. Entertainment applications such as Disney World's StarTours are technologically elegant, good fun, and economically viable. Nevertheless, some of us have no real desire to spend our lifework serving the entertainment craze of our sick culture; we want to see this exciting technology put to work in medicine and science. The topics covered include the following: testing a force display for scientific visualization -- molecular docking; and testing a head-mounted display for scientific and medical visualization.

  18. Curating Virtual Data Collections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynnes, Chris; Leon, Amanda; Ramapriyan, Hampapuram; Tsontos, Vardis; Shie, Chung-Lin; Liu, Zhong

    2015-01-01

    NASAs Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) contains a rich set of datasets and related services throughout its many elements. As a result, locating all the EOSDIS data and related resources relevant to particular science theme can be daunting. This is largely because EOSDIS data's organizing principle is affected more by the way they are produced than around the expected end use. Virtual collections oriented around science themes can overcome this by presenting collections of data and related resources that are organized around the user's interest, not around the way the data were produced. Virtual collections consist of annotated web addresses (URLs) that point to data and related resource addresses, thus avoiding the need to copy all of the relevant data to a single place. These URL addresses can be consumed by a variety of clients, ranging from basic URL downloaders (wget, curl) and web browsers to sophisticated data analysis programs such as the Integrated Data Viewer.

  19. Virtual reality systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, David W.

    1992-01-01

    Virtual realities are a type of human-computer interface (HCI) and as such may be understood from a historical perspective. In the earliest era, the computer was a very simple, straightforward machine. Interaction was human manipulation of an inanimate object, little more than the provision of an explicit instruction set to be carried out without deviation. In short, control resided with the user. In the second era of HCI, some level of intelligence and control was imparted to the system to enable a dialogue with the user. Simple context sensitive help systems are early examples, while more sophisticated expert system designs typify this era. Control was shared more equally. In this, the third era of the HCI, the constructed system emulates a particular environment, constructed with rules and knowledge about 'reality'. Control is, in part, outside the realm of the human-computer dialogue. Virtual reality systems are discussed.

  20. Virtual nuclear weapons

    SciTech Connect

    Pilat, J.F.

    1997-08-01

    The term virtual nuclear weapons proliferation and arsenals, as opposed to actual weapons and arsenals, has entered in recent years the American lexicon of nuclear strategy, arms control, and nonproliferation. While the term seems to have an intuitive appeal, largely due to its cyberspace imagery, its current use is still vague and loose. The author believes, however, that if the term is clearly delineated, it might offer a promising approach to conceptualizing certain current problems of proliferation. The first use is in a reference to an old problem that has resurfaced recently: the problem of growing availability of weapon-usable nuclear materials in civilian nuclear programs along with materials made `excess` to defense needs by current arms reduction and dismantlement. It is argued that the availability of these vast materials, either by declared nuclear-weapon states or by technologically advanced nonweapon states, makes it possible for those states to rapidly assemble and deploy nuclear weapons. The second use has quite a different set of connotations. It is derived conceptually from the imagery of computer-generated reality. In this use, one thinks of virtual proliferation and arsenals not in terms of the physical hardware required to make the bomb but rather in terms of the knowledge/experience required to design, assemble, and deploy the arsenal. Virtual weapons are a physics reality and cannot be ignored in a world where knowledge, experience, materials, and other requirements to make nuclear weapons are widespread, and where dramatic army reductions and, in some cases, disarmament are realities. These concepts are useful in defining a continuum of virtual capabilities, ranging from those at the low end that derive from general technology diffusion and the existence of nuclear energy programs to those at the high end that involve conscious decisions to develop or maintain militarily significant nuclear-weapon capabilities.

  1. A Virtual, Shoestring Vacation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texley, Juliana

    2009-01-01

    If there is a discrepancy between the scope of your imagination and the depth of your bank account, this may be the ideal summer to stretch your horizons by diving into a good book. You can take a virtual vacation to almost any place or time by reading. You will not need to fill your gas tank or empty your pocketbook. Reading has a small carbon…

  2. Eikonalization of conformal blocks

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, A. Liam; Kaplan, Jared; Walters, Matthew T.; Wang, Junpu

    2015-09-03

    Classical field configurations such as the Coulomb potential and Schwarzschild solution are built from the t-channel exchange of many light degrees of freedom. We study the CFT analog of this phenomenon, which we term the 'eikonalization' of conformal blocks. We show that when an operator T appears in the OPE Ο(x)Ο(0), then the large spin Fock space states [TT···T] also appear in this OPE with a computable coefficient. The sum over the exchange of these Fock space states in an correlator build the classical 'T field' in the dual AdS description. In some limits the sum of all Fock space exchanges can be represented as the exponential of a single T exchange in the 4-pt correlator of O. Our results should be useful for systematizing 1/ℓ perturbation theory in general CFTs and simplifying the computation of large spin OPE coefficients. As examples we obtain the leading log ℓ dependence of Fock space conformal block coefficients, and we directly compute the OPE coefficients of the simplest ‘triple-trace’ operators.

  3. Eikonalization of conformal blocks

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fitzpatrick, A. Liam; Kaplan, Jared; Walters, Matthew T.; Wang, Junpu

    2015-09-03

    Classical field configurations such as the Coulomb potential and Schwarzschild solution are built from the t-channel exchange of many light degrees of freedom. We study the CFT analog of this phenomenon, which we term the 'eikonalization' of conformal blocks. We show that when an operator T appears in the OPE Ο(x)Ο(0), then the large spin Fock space states [TT···T]ℓ also appear in this OPE with a computable coefficient. The sum over the exchange of these Fock space states in an correlator build the classical 'T field' in the dual AdS description. In some limits the sum of all Fock spacemore » exchanges can be represented as the exponential of a single T exchange in the 4-pt correlator of O. Our results should be useful for systematizing 1/ℓ perturbation theory in general CFTs and simplifying the computation of large spin OPE coefficients. As examples we obtain the leading log ℓ dependence of Fock space conformal block coefficients, and we directly compute the OPE coefficients of the simplest ‘triple-trace’ operators.« less

  4. High efficiency virtual impactor

    DOEpatents

    Loo, Billy W.

    1981-01-01

    Environmental monitoring of atmospheric air is facilitated by a single stage virtual impactor (11) for separating an inlet flow (Q.sub.O) having particulate contaminants into a coarse particle flow (Q.sub.1) and a fine particle flow (Q.sub.2) to enable collection of such particles on different filters (19a, 19b) for separate analysis. An inlet particle acceleration nozzle (28) and coarse particle collection probe member (37) having a virtual impaction opening (41) are aligned along a single axis (13) and spaced apart to define a flow separation region (14) at which the fine particle flow (Q.sub.2) is drawn radially outward into a chamber (21) while the coarse particle flow (Q.sub.1) enters the virtual impaction opening (41). Symmetrical outlet means (47) for the chamber (21) provide flow symmetry at the separation region (14) to assure precise separation of particles about a cutpoint size and to minimize losses by wall impaction and gravitational settling. Impulse defocusing means (42) in the probe member (37) provides uniform coarse particle deposition on the filter (19a) to aid analysis. Particle losses of less than 1% for particles in the 0 to 20 micron range may be realized.

  5. The virtual clinical campus.

    PubMed

    Friedman, C P

    1996-06-01

    The increased use of community sites for the clinical training of medical students creates many challenges for educators. Among them is the need to provide students in community settings with access to the same range of educational resources-the medical literature, student colleagues, feedback, and faculty-that are customarily available at academic medical centers. One way to make this access possible is to use information technology to create a "virtual clinical campus," which would allow students to enjoy the best of both worlds: the immersion in primary care offered by the community-based setting and the knowledge-rich resources of the academic medical center, including the all-important library. With a virtual campus in place, students would be able to access most library resources, interact with their peers, ensure that they were meeting the goals of their community rotations, and participate with their colleagues in didactic sessions without having to travel. The virtual campus is technologically feasible and economically within reach. It is possible that the movement of clinical training into the community will make it imperative for all medical students to own their own computers and for medical centers to provide the infrastructure that would enable community sites to have access to a range of educational resources.

  6. The virtual articulator.

    PubMed

    Bisler, A; Bockholt, U; Kordass, B; Suchan, M; Voss, G

    2002-01-01

    The virtual articulator (VA) is intended for use as a tool for the analysis fo the complex static and dynamic occlusal relations. Its chief application is in individual diagnosis and the simulation of the mechanical articulator. As entry data, the VA requires digital, 3-dimensional representations of the jaws and patient-specific data on jaw movement. It then simulates jaw movement and provides a dynamic visualization of the occlusal contacts. If no patient-specific data are available, the modus operandi of the mechanical articulator can be simulated. Virtual reality (VR) techniques applied in computer-aided diagnosis are revolutionizing medical routine in many disciplines. Particularly in the field of dental engineering, VR combined with CAD/CAM technology has great potential in implant planning and design in terms of greater precision and shorter treatment duration. The geometry of teeth can be digitized, the implant models can be designed with specialized CAD systems, and the final implants can be manufactured with a CNC machine. In this context, the virtual articulator completes the digital manufacturing process.

  7. Virtual microscopy in virtual tumor banking.

    PubMed

    Isabelle, M; Teodorovic, I; Oosterhuis, J W; Riegman, P H J; Passioukov, A; Lejeune, S; Therasse, P; Dinjens, W N M; Lam, K H; Oomen, M H A; Spatz, A; Ratcliffe, C; Knox, K; Mager, R; Kerr, D; Pezzella, F; Van Damme, B; Van de Vijver, M; Van Boven, H; Morente, M M; Alonso, S; Kerjaschki, D; Pammer, J; López-Guerrero, J A; Llombart-Bosch, A; Carbone, A; Gloghini, A; Van Veen, E B

    2006-01-01

    Many systems have already been designed and successfully used for sharing histology images over large distances, without transfer of the original glass slides. Rapid evolution was seen when digital images could be transferred over the Internet. Nowadays, sophisticated virtual microscope systems can be acquired, with the capability to quickly scan large batches of glass slides at high magnification and compress and store the large images on disc, which subsequently can be consulted through the Internet. The images are stored on an image server, which can give simple, easy to transfer pictures to the user specifying a certain magnification on any position in the scan. This offers new opportunities in histology review, overcoming the necessity of the dynamic telepathology systems to have compatible software systems and microscopes and in addition, an adequate connection of sufficient bandwidth. Consulting the images now only requires an Internet connection and a computer with a high quality monitor. A system of complete pathology review supporting biorepositories is described, based on the implementation of this technique in the European Human Frozen Tumor Tissue Bank (TuBaFrost).

  8. Cooperative storage of shared files in a parallel computing system with dynamic block size

    DOEpatents

    Bent, John M.; Faibish, Sorin; Grider, Gary

    2015-11-10

    Improved techniques are provided for parallel writing of data to a shared object in a parallel computing system. A method is provided for storing data generated by a plurality of parallel processes to a shared object in a parallel computing system. The method is performed by at least one of the processes and comprises: dynamically determining a block size for storing the data; exchanging a determined amount of the data with at least one additional process to achieve a block of the data having the dynamically determined block size; and writing the block of the data having the dynamically determined block size to a file system. The determined block size comprises, e.g., a total amount of the data to be stored divided by the number of parallel processes. The file system comprises, for example, a log structured virtual parallel file system, such as a Parallel Log-Structured File System (PLFS).

  9. Virtual reality environment for simulating tasks with a myoelectric prosthesis: an assessment and training tool

    PubMed Central

    Lambrecht, Joris M.; Pulliam, Christopher L.; Kirsch, Robert F.

    2013-01-01

    Intuitively and efficiently controlling multiple degrees of freedom is a major hurdle in the field of upper limb prosthetics. A virtual reality myoelectric transhumeral prosthesis simulator has been developed for cost-effectively testing novel control algorithms and devices. The system acquires EMG commands and residual limb kinematics, simulates the prosthesis dynamics, and displays the combined residual limb and prosthesis movements in a virtual reality environment that includes force-based interactions with virtual objects. A virtual Box and Block Test is demonstrated. Three normally-limbed subjects performed the simulated test using a sequential and a synchronous control method. With the sequential method, subjects moved on average 6.7±1.9 blocks in 120 seconds, similar to the number of blocks transhumeral amputees are able to move with their physical prostheses during clinical evaluation. With the synchronous method, subjects moved 6.7±2.2 blocks. The virtual reality prosthesis simulator is thus a promising tool for developing and evaluating control methods, prototyping novel prostheses, and training amputees. PMID:23476108

  10. Distributed Learning Metadata Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClelland, Marilyn

    2004-01-01

    Significant economies can be achieved in distributed learning systems architected with a focus on interoperability and reuse. The key building blocks of an efficient distributed learning architecture are the use of standards and XML technologies. The goal of plug and play capability among various components of a distributed learning system…

  11. HTTR Fuel Block Simulations with SCALE

    SciTech Connect

    Ilas, Dan; Gehin, Jess C

    2010-01-01

    The SCALE code system is currently being updated to improve the methods and data to support High Temperature Gas Cooled reactor analysis. This paper presents the results of a High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) fuel block analysis with SCALE6.0, which is included as one of the sources of validation data. Good agreement is reported between continuous energy and multigroup SCALE/KENO models of the HTTR block for eigenvalue and fission density distribution. The agreement of the SCALE/KENO results with the MCNP5 results is also very good. The boundary condition is shown to have a large effect on both the calculated eigenvalue and the fission density distribution within the fuel block. In addition to the reported results, a method is proposed to alleviate the fuel mass non-conservation due to the clipping of the lattice of grains within the fuel element in the Monte Carlo continuous energy models. One of the high-temperature gas-cooled (HTGR) reactor technology options under consideration by the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project is based on the prismatic, graphite-moderated reactor design. Within this context, the capability to generate accurate three-dimensional (3-D) core power distributions is one of the main challenges for the NGNP methods development.

  12. Exploiting Virtualization and Cloud Computing in ATLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harald Barreiro Megino, Fernando; Benjamin, Doug; De, Kaushik; Gable, Ian; Hendrix, Val; Panitkin, Sergey; Paterson, Michael; De Silva, Asoka; van der Ster, Daniel; Taylor, Ryan; Vitillo, Roberto A.; Walker, Rod

    2012-12-01

    The ATLAS Computing Model was designed around the concept of grid computing; since the start of data-taking, this model has proven very successful in the federated operation of more than one hundred Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG) sites for offline data distribution, storage, processing and analysis. However, new paradigms in computing, namely virtualization and cloud computing, present improved strategies for managing and provisioning IT resources that could allow ATLAS to more flexibly adapt and scale its storage and processing workloads on varied underlying resources. In particular, ATLAS is developing a “grid-of-clouds” infrastructure in order to utilize WLCG sites that make resources available via a cloud API. This work will present the current status of the Virtualization and Cloud Computing R&D project in ATLAS Distributed Computing. First, strategies for deploying PanDA queues on cloud sites will be discussed, including the introduction of a “cloud factory” for managing cloud VM instances. Next, performance results when running on virtualized/cloud resources at CERN LxCloud, StratusLab, and elsewhere will be presented. Finally, we will present the ATLAS strategies for exploiting cloud-based storage, including remote XROOTD access to input data, management of EC2-based files, and the deployment of cloud-resident LCG storage elements.

  13. NASA Team Collaboration Pilot: Enabling NASA's Virtual Teams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prahst, Steve

    2003-01-01

    Most NASA projects and work activities are accomplished by teams of people. These teams are often geographically distributed - across NASA centers and NASA external partners, both domestic and international. NASA "virtual" teams are stressed by the challenge of getting team work done - across geographic boundaries and time zones. To get distributed work done, teams rely on established methods - travel, telephones, Video Teleconferencing (NASA VITS), and email. Time is our most critical resource - and team members are hindered by the overhead of travel and the difficulties of coordinating work across their virtual teams. Modern, Internet based team collaboration tools offer the potential to dramatically improve the ability of virtual teams to get distributed work done.

  14. Block copolymer investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yufa, Nataliya A.

    The research presented in this thesis deals with various aspects of block copolymers on the nanoscale: their behavior at a range of temperatures, their use as scaffolds, or for creation of chemically striped surfaces, as well as the behavior of metals on block copolymers under the influence of UV light, and the healing behavior of copolymers. Invented around the time of World War II, copolymers have been used for decades due to their macroscopic properties, such as their ability to be molded without vulcanization, and the fact that, unlike rubber, they can be recycled. In recent years, block copolymers (BCPs) have been used for lithography, as scaffolds for nano-objects, to create a magnetic hard drive, as well as in photonic and other applications. In this work we used primarily atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), described in Chapter II, to conduct our studies. In Chapter III we demonstrate a new and general method for positioning nanoparticles within nanoscale grooves. This technique is suitable for nanodots, nanocrystals, as well as DNA. We use AFM and TEM to demonstrate selective decoration. In Chapters IV and V we use AFM and TEM to study the structure of polymer surfaces coated with metals and self-assembled monolayers. We describe how the surfaces were created, exhibit their structure on the nanoscale, and prove that their macroscopic wetting properties have been altered compared to the original polymer structures. Finally, Chapters VI and VII report out in-situ AFM studies of BCP at high temperatures, made possible only recently with the invention of air-tight high-temperature AFM imaging cells. We locate the transition between disordered films and cylinders during initial ordering. Fluctuations of existing domains leading to domain coarsening are also described, and are shown to be consistent with reptation and curvature minimization. Chapter VII deals with the healing of PS-b-PMMA following AFM-tip lithography or

  15. Big Blocks and River Incision: A Numerical Modeling Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shobe, C. M.; Tucker, G. E.; Anderson, R. S.

    2015-12-01

    Sediment supply dynamics affect fluvial erosion in steep landscapes. Workers have explored the effects of changing sediment flux and uniform grain size on incision processes and distribution of alluvial cover. However, sediment supplied to real rivers is often highly heterogeneous in size, especially in rapidly eroding landscapes where supply processes may range from landslides to rockfall to moraine incision. We hypothesize that the pace of landscape evolution depends on the sediment size distribution supplied to rapidly eroding channels. Rivers that quickly cut steep-walled canyons may incite a negative feedback on incision by receiving an increased supply of large, immobile blocks from the canyon walls that shield significant portions of the bed from erosion. We use a 1-D numerical model that combines mass-flux continuum treatment of several grain size classes with tracking of discrete large blocks to explore fluvial response to changing grain size distribution. We compare simulations with and without a feedback between channel incision rate and the supply rate of large blocks from adjacent hillslopes. This reflects the hypothesis that slopes will be steeper and more prone to releasing large blocks when the channel at their base is eroding rapidly. Comparing model predictions with field observations shows that our models can successfully reproduce the distribution of blocks in natural channels. Results suggest that in landscapes with access to large blocks, fluvial incision may be slowed as increasing amounts of immobile material are supplied from adjacent hillslopes and canyon walls. This can act to stall knickpoint retreat in such rivers and slow the pace of landscape adjustment. The importance of channel armoring by blocks is governed by competition between two timescales: the time required for significant block cover to accumulate in the channel and the time required for blocks to abrade, fragment, or weather down to transportable sizes. Model results also

  16. Novel in situ method for locating virtual source in high-rate electron-beam evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatia, M. S.

    1994-07-01

    The concept of virtual source simplifies calculation of thickness distribution on extended substrates in high rate vacuum coating employing electron-beam heating. The height of the point (virtual source), from which vapor can be assumed to emanate in accordance with Knudsen's cosine law, to yield the experimentally obtained thickness distribution, is calculated and this establishes the position of virtual source. Such as post facto determination is cumbersome as it is valid for the prescribed material evaporating at a certain rate in a specified geometry. A change in any of these entails a fresh measurement. Experimenters who use a large number of materials and deposit at different rates therefore have to carry out a number of trials before they can locate the virtual source at the desired deposition parameters. An in situ method for obtaining virtual source position can go a long way in reducing the labor of these experiments. A novel in situ method is described to locate the virtual source.

  17. Radiation Blocking Lenses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Biomedical Optical Company of America's Eagle 475 lens absorbs 100 percent of all photowavelengths considered hazardous to eye tissue, including ultraviolet and blue light, which are considered contributors to cataract and age-related macular degeneration. The lens absorbs hazardous wavelengths, but allows a higher percentage of visually useful areas of the spectrum to pass through. Polarization blocks out irritating glint and glare and heightens visual acuity. The Eagle 475 sunglasses are the latest in a series of spinoffs that originated at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory where two scientists developed a protective, welding curtain that filtered out harmful irradiance. The result was a commercial curtain that absorbs filters and scatters light, providing protection for personnel in welding areas. Further research focused on protective industrial glasses and later on consumer products.

  18. Spintronics: Conceptual Building Blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansermet, J.-Ph.

    The purpose of this introduction to spintronics is to provide some elementary description of its conceptual building blocks. Thus, it is intended for a newcomer to the field. After recalling rudimentary descriptions of spin precession and spin relaxation, spin-dependent transport is treated within the Boltzmann formalism. This suffices to introduce key notions such as the spin asymmetry of the conductivities in the two-current model, the spin diffusion length, and spin accumulation. Two basic mechanisms of spin relaxation are then presented, one arising from spin-orbit scattering and the other from electron-magnon collisions. Finally, the action of a spin-polarized current on magnetization is presented in a thermodynamics framework. This introduces the notion of spin torque and the characteristic length scale over which the transverse spin polarization of conduction electron decays as it is injected into a magnet.

  19. Atomic Basic Blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheler, Fabian; Mitzlaff, Martin; Schröder-Preikschat, Wolfgang

    Die Entscheidung, einen zeit- bzw. ereignisgesteuerten Ansatz für ein Echtzeitsystem zu verwenden, ist schwierig und sehr weitreichend. Weitreichend vor allem deshalb, weil diese beiden Ansätze mit äußerst unterschiedlichen Kontrollflussabstraktionen verknüpft sind, die eine spätere Migration zum anderen Paradigma sehr schwer oder gar unmöglich machen. Wir schlagen daher die Verwendung einer Zwischendarstellung vor, die unabhängig von der jeweils verwendeten Kontrollflussabstraktion ist. Für diesen Zweck verwenden wir auf Basisblöcken basierende Atomic Basic Blocks (ABB) und bauen darauf ein Werkzeug, den Real-Time Systems Compiler (RTSC) auf, der die Migration zwischen zeit- und ereignisgesteuerten Systemen unterstützt.

  20. Surgery applications of virtual reality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    Virtual reality is a computer-generated technology which allows information to be displayed in a simulated, bus lifelike, environment. In this simulated 'world', users can move and interact as if they were actually a part of that world. This new technology will be useful in many different fields, including the field of surgery. Virtual reality systems can be used to teach surgical anatomy, diagnose surgical problems, plan operations, simulate and perform surgical procedures (telesurgery), and predict the outcomes of surgery. The authors of this paper describe the basic components of a virtual reality surgical system. These components include: the virtual world, the virtual tools, the anatomical model, the software platform, the host computer, the interface, and the head-coupled display. In the chapter they also review the progress towards using virtual reality for surgical training, planning, telesurgery, and predicting outcomes. Finally, the authors present a training system being developed for the practice of new procedures in abdominal surgery.

  1. The virtual environment display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgreevy, Michael W.

    1991-01-01

    Virtual environment technology is a display and control technology that can surround a person in an interactive computer generated or computer mediated virtual environment. It has evolved at NASA-Ames since 1984 to serve NASA's missions and goals. The exciting potential of this technology, sometimes called Virtual Reality, Artificial Reality, or Cyberspace, has been recognized recently by the popular media, industry, academia, and government organizations. Much research and development will be necessary to bring it to fruition.

  2. Rapid prototyping 3D virtual world interfaces within a virtual factory environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosta, Charles Paul; Krolak, Patrick D.

    1993-01-01

    On-going work into user requirements analysis using CLIPS (NASA/JSC) expert systems as an intelligent event simulator has led to research into three-dimensional (3D) interfaces. Previous work involved CLIPS and two-dimensional (2D) models. Integral to this work was the development of the University of Massachusetts Lowell parallel version of CLIPS, called PCLIPS. This allowed us to create both a Software Bus and a group problem-solving environment for expert systems development. By shifting the PCLIPS paradigm to use the VEOS messaging protocol we have merged VEOS (HlTL/Seattle) and CLIPS into a distributed virtual worlds prototyping environment (VCLIPS). VCLIPS uses the VEOS protocol layer to allow multiple experts to cooperate on a single problem. We have begun to look at the control of a virtual factory. In the virtual factory there are actors and objects as found in our Lincoln Logs Factory of the Future project. In this artificial reality architecture there are three VCLIPS entities in action. One entity is responsible for display and user events in the 3D virtual world. Another is responsible for either simulating the virtual factory or communicating with the real factory. The third is a user interface expert. The interface expert maps user input levels, within the current prototype, to control information for the factory. The interface to the virtual factory is based on a camera paradigm. The graphics subsystem generates camera views of the factory on standard X-Window displays. The camera allows for view control and object control. Control or the factory is accomplished by the user reaching into the camera views to perform object interactions. All communication between the separate CLIPS expert systems is done through VEOS.

  3. Virtual microscopy in pathology education.

    PubMed

    Dee, Fred R

    2009-08-01

    Technology for acquisition of virtual slides was developed in 1985; however, it was not until the late 1990s that desktop computers had enough processing speed to commercialize virtual microscopy and apply the technology to education. By 2000, the progressive decrease in use of traditional microscopy in medical student education had set the stage for the entry of virtual microscopy into medical schools. Since that time, it has been successfully implemented into many pathology courses in the United States and around the world, with surveys indicating that about 50% of pathology courses already have or expect to implement virtual microscopy. Over the last decade, in addition to an increasing ability to emulate traditional microscopy, virtual microscopy has allowed educators to take advantage of the accessibility, efficiency, and pedagogic versatility of the computer and the Internet. The cost of virtual microscopy in education is now quite reasonable after taking into account replacement cost for microscopes, maintenance of glass slides, and the fact that 1-dimensional microscope space can be converted to multiuse computer laboratories or research. Although the current technology for implementation of virtual microscopy in histopathology education is very good, it could be further improved upon by better low-power screen resolution and depth of field. Nevertheless, virtual microscopy is beginning to play an increasing role in continuing education, house staff education, and evaluation of competency in histopathology. As Z-axis viewing (focusing) becomes more efficient, virtual microscopy will also become integrated into education in cytology, hematology, microbiology, and urinalysis.

  4. "Virtual Feel" Capaciflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M.

    2006-01-01

    The term "virtual feel" denotes a type of capaciflector (an advanced capacitive proximity sensor) and a methodology for designing and using a sensor of this type to guide a robot in manipulating a tool (e.g., a wrench socket) into alignment with a mating fastener (e.g., a bolt head) or other electrically conductive object. A capaciflector includes at least one sensing electrode, excited with an alternating voltage, that puts out a signal indicative of the capacitance between that electrode and a proximal object.

  5. Mobile Virtual Private Networking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulkkis, Göran; Grahn, Kaj; Mårtens, Mathias; Mattsson, Jonny

    Mobile Virtual Private Networking (VPN) solutions based on the Internet Security Protocol (IPSec), Transport Layer Security/Secure Socket Layer (SSL/TLS), Secure Shell (SSH), 3G/GPRS cellular networks, Mobile IP, and the presently experimental Host Identity Protocol (HIP) are described, compared and evaluated. Mobile VPN solutions based on HIP are recommended for future networking because of superior processing efficiency and network capacity demand features. Mobile VPN implementation issues associated with the IP protocol versions IPv4 and IPv6 are also evaluated. Mobile VPN implementation experiences are presented and discussed.

  6. Virtual holographic laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, M. L.; Alieva, T.; Rodrigo, J. A.; Martínez-Matos, O.; Moreno, A.; Aliev, T.

    2007-06-01

    In this work we present a Virtual Holographic Laboratory for educational purposes. This project is edited on DVD support and it has been designed to be interactive: schemes, pictures, videos in order to clarify the theoretical description of the phenomena improving the understanding of its fundamental concepts. We believe that this project is helpful for undergraduate and graduate students in physics and engineering to obtain the solid knowledge about holography and to prepare for practical lessons on holography or partially substitute the lasts in the case of absence of appropriated technical base at a specific university level.

  7. Recent evolution of China's virtual water trade: analysis of selected crops and considerations for policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, J.; Liu, J.; Pinter, L.

    2014-04-01

    China has dramatically increased its virtual water import over recent years. Many studies have focused on the quantity of traded virtual water, but very few go into analysing geographic distribution and the properties of China's virtual water trade network. This paper provides a calculation and analysis of the crop-related virtual water trade network of China based on 27 major primary crops between 1986 and 2009. The results show that China is a net importer of virtual water from water-abundant areas of North America and South America, and a net virtual water exporter to water-stressed areas of Asia, Africa, and Europe. Virtual water import is far larger than virtual water export, and in both import and export a small number of trade partners control the supply chain. Grain crops are the major contributors to virtual water trade, and among grain crops, soybeans, mostly imported from the US, Brazil and Argentina, are the most significant. In order to mitigate water scarcity and secure the food supply, virtual water should actively be incorporated into national water management strategies. And the sources of virtual water import need to be further diversified to reduce supply chain risks and increase resilience.

  8. Improved ultrasonic standard reference blocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eitzen, D. G.; Sushinsky, G. F.; Chwirut, D. J.; Bechtoldt, C. J.; Ruff, A. W.

    1976-01-01

    A program to improve the quality, reproducibility and reliability of nondestructive testing through the development of improved ASTM-type ultrasonic reference standards is described. Reference blocks of aluminum, steel, and titanium alloys are to be considered. Equipment representing the state-of-the-art in laboratory and field ultrasonic equipment was obtained and evaluated. RF and spectral data on ten sets of ultrasonic reference blocks have been taken as part of a task to quantify the variability in response from nominally identical blocks. Techniques for residual stress, preferred orientation, and micro-structural measurements were refined and are applied to a reference block rejected by the manufacturer during fabrication in order to evaluate the effect of metallurgical condition on block response. New fabrication techniques for reference blocks are discussed and ASTM activities are summarized.

  9. Northern Hemisphere snow cover and atmospheric blocking variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GarcíA-Herrera, Ricardo; Barriopedro, David

    2006-11-01

    The interseasonal relationship between Northern Hemisphere (NH) snow cover and regional blocking patterns is explored for a 31-year data set. It is found that snow cover exerts an important influence on regional atmospheric blocking, which, in turn, modulates snow cover extent at subcontinental scales. Observational results provide strong evidence of two primary linkages in the seasonal snow cover-blocking relationship that support an interannual persistence cycle: The first one links winter blocking over the Atlantic and the subsequent spring (summer) Eurasian (North American) snow cover anomalies; the second one implies that spring (summer) Eurasian (North American) snow cover precedes an anomalous winter Atlantic blocking activity. We describe the temporal stages of the snow cover-blocking relationship in the framework of a six-step conceptual model. According to that, an enhanced Atlantic blocking activity in winter favors a later spring snow disappearance through an enhanced cold advection toward western Eurasia. The resulting snow cover anomalies partially force an opposite-sign blocking response over west and central Pacific which is sustained through spring and early summer, presumably because of the persistence of snow cover anomalies. This anomalous pattern seems to play a role in the propagation of snow cover anomalies from Eurasia in spring to the Hudson's Bay region of North America in summer. The excessive snow cover over this region induces an asymmetrical temperature distribution, which, in turn, favors blocking activity over Europe and the West Pacific. The connection between autumn and winter climates is not clear but it could be related with the ability of autumn high ATL blocking activity to determine an early snow cover appearance in October over western Eurasia. This linkage completes a snow cover-blocking cycle of interactions which identifies snow cover as a candidate for the recently observed blocking trends and a contributor to the

  10. On virtual displacement and virtual work in Lagrangian dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Subhankar; Shamanna, J.

    2006-03-01

    The confusion and ambiguity encountered by students in understanding virtual displacement and virtual work is discussed in this paper. A definition of virtual displacement is presented that allows one to express them explicitly for holonomic (velocity independent), non-holonomic (velocity dependent), scleronomous (time independent) and rheonomous (time dependent) constraints. It is observed that for holonomic, scleronomous constraints, the virtual displacements are the displacements allowed by the constraints. However, this is not so for a general class of constraints. For simple physical systems, it is shown that the work done by the constraint forces on virtual displacements is zero. This motivates Lagrange's extension of d'Alembert's principle to a system of particles in constrained motion. However, a similar zero work principle does not hold for the allowed displacements. It is also demonstrated that d'Alembert's principle of zero virtual work is necessary for the solvability of a constrained mechanical problem. We identify this special class of constraints, physically realized and solvable, as the ideal constraints. The concept of virtual displacement and the principle of zero virtual work by constraint forces are central to both Lagrange's method of undetermined multipliers and Lagrange's equations in generalized coordinates.

  11. Virtual anthropology meets biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Weber, Gerhard W; Bookstein, Fred L; Strait, David S

    2011-05-17

    A meeting in Vienna in October 2010 brought together researchers using Virtual Anthropology (VA) and Finite Element Analysis (FEA) in order to explore the benefits and problems facing a collaboration between the two fields. FEA is used to test mechanical hypotheses in functional anatomy and VA complements and augments this process by virtue of its tools for acquiring data, for segmenting and preparing virtual specimens, and for generating reconstructions and artificial forms. This represents a critical methodological advance because geometry is one of the crucial inputs of FEA and is often the variable of interest in functional anatomy. However, we currently lack tools that quantitatively relate differences in geometry to differences in stress and strain, or that evaluate the impact on FEA of variation within and between biological samples. Thus, when comparing models of different geometry, we do not currently obtain sufficiently informative answers to questions such as "How different are these models, and in what manner are they different? Are they different in some anatomical regions but not others?" New methodologies must be developed in order to maximize the potential of FEA to address questions in comparative and evolutionary biology. In this paper we review these and other important issues that were raised during our Vienna meeting.

  12. Virtual Optical Comparator

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Greg

    2008-10-20

    The Virtual Optical Comparator, VOC, was conceived as a result of the limitations of conventional optical comparators and vision systems. Piece part designs for mechanisms have started to include precision features on the face of parts that must be viewed using a reflected image rather than a profile shadow. The VOC concept uses a computer generated overlay and a digital camera to measure features on a video screen. The advantage of this system is superior edge detection compared to traditional systems. No vinyl charts are procured or inspected. The part size and expensive fixtures are no longer a concern because of the range of the X-Y table of the Virtual Optical Comparator. Product redesigns require only changes to the CAD image overlays; new vinyl charts are not required. The inspection process is more ergonomic by allowing the operator to view the part sitting at a desk rather than standing over a 30 inch screen. The procurement cost for the VOC will be less than a traditional comparator with a much smaller footprint with less maintenance and energy requirements.

  13. Virtual reality via photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahrt, John D.; Papcun, George; Childers, Randy A.; Rubin, Naama

    1996-03-01

    We wish to walk into a photograph just as Alice walked into the looking glass. From a mathematical perspective, this problem is exceedingly ill-posed (e.g. Is that a large, distant object or a small, nearby object?). A human expert can supply a large amount of a priori information that can function as mathematical constraints. The constrained problem can then be attacked with photogrammetry to obtain a great deal of quantitative information which is otherwise only qualitatively apparent. The user determines whether the object to be analyzed contains two or three vanishing points, then selects an appropriate number of points from the photon to enable the code to compute the locations of the vanishing points. Using this information and the standard photogrammetric geometric algorithms, the location of the camera, relative to the structure, is determined. The user must also enter information regarding an absolute sense of scale. As the vectors from the camera to the various points chosen from the photograph are determined, the vector components (coordinates) are handed to a virtual reality software package. Once the objects are entered, the appropriate surfaces of the 3D object are `wallpapered' with the surface from the photograph. The user is then able to move through the virtual scene. A video will demonstrate our work.

  14. Curating Virtual Data Collections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynnes, C.; Ramapriyan, H.; Leon, A.; Tsontos, V. M.; Liu, Z.; Shie, C. L.

    2015-12-01

    NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) contains a rich set of datasets and related services throughout its many elements. As a result, locating all the EOSDIS data and related resources relevant to particular science theme can be daunting. This is largely because EOSDIS data's organizing principle is affected more by the way they are produced than around the expected end use.Virtual collections oriented around science themes can overcome this by presenting collections of data and related resources that are organized around the user's interest, not around the way the data were produced. Science themes can be: Specific applications (uses) of the data, e.g., landslide prediction Geophysical events (e.g., Hurricane Sandy) A specific science research problem Virtual collections consist of annotated web addresses (URLs) that point to data and related resource addresses, thus avoiding the need to copy all of the relevant data to a single place. These URL addresses can be consumed by a variety of clients, ranging from basic URL downloaders (wget, curl) and web browsers to sophisticated data analysis programs such as the Integrated Data Viewer. Eligible resources include anything accessible via URL: data files: data file URLs data subsets: OPeNDAP, webification or Web Coverage Service URLs data visualizations: Web Map Service data search results: OpenSearch Atom response custom analysis workflows: e.g., Giovanni analysis URL

  15. Virtual Astronomical Pipelines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dave, R.; Protopapas, P.; Lehner, M.

    2007-10-01

    The sheer magnitude of databases and data rates in new surveys makes it hard to develop pipelines to enable both the analysis of data and the federation of these databases for correlation and followup. There is thus a compelling need to facilitate the creation and management of dynamic workflow pipelines that enable correlating data between separate, parallel streams; changing the workflow in response to an event; using the NVO to obtain additional needed information from databases; and modifying the observing program of a primary survey to follow-up a transient or moving object. This paper describes such a Virtual Astronomical Pipeline (VAP) system which is running in the TAOS project. The software enables components in the pipeline to react to events encapsulated in XML messages, modifying and subsequently routing these messages to multiple other components. This architecture allows for the bootstrapping of components individually in the development process and for dynamic reconfiguration of the pipeline as a response to external and internal events. The software will be extended for future work in combining the results of surveys and followups into a global virtual pipeline.

  16. When Virtual Worlds Expand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bainbridge, William Sims

    The future of a virtual world depends on whether it can grow in subjective size, cultural content, and numbers of human participants. In one form of growth, exemplified by Second Life, the scope of a world increases gradually as new sponsors pay for new territory and inhabitants create content. A very different form of growth is sudden expansion, as when World of Warcraft (WoW) added entire new continents in its Burning Crusade and Lich King expansions (Lummis and Kern 2006, 2008; Corneliussen and Rettberg 2008; Sims et al. 2008). Well-established gamelike worlds have often undergone many expansions. Both the pioneer science fiction game Anarchy Online, which was launched in 2001, and Star Wars Galaxies dating from 2003, have had three, and EVE Online also from 2003 has had nine, although smaller ones. This chapter reports research on WoW's 2008 Lich King expansion, using both quantitative and qualitative methods, in order to develop theoretical ideas of the implications of expansion for virtual worlds.

  17. Tours in Virtual Globes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treves, R.

    2009-12-01

    The most significant new feature to appear in Google Earth 5.0 in February was the tour feature, it can produce eye catching and appealing animations as was shown by the Apollo 11 Tour which shows a model of the lunar module descending to the surface of the moon. It allows users to record themselves navigating around Google Earth switching elements on and off. The use of the tour functionality goes beyond exciting animations, it has important applications as a way of; introducing users to a larger data set presented in a Virtual Globe, offering an alternative to PowerPoint as a platform to support presentations and as a quick way to produce powerful visualizations for education purposes. In this talk I will explore how best to use to tours to present a range of spatial data and examine how the Google Earth tour compares to similar functionality that is appearing in other Virtual Globes and other 3D environments such as Second Life.

  18. Virtual reality and psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Botella, Cristina; Quero, Soledad; Baños, Rosa M; Perpiñá, Conxa; García Palacios, Azucena; Riva, Giuseppe

    2004-01-01

    Virtual Reality (VR) is a new technology consisting on a graphic environment in which the user, not only has the feeling of being physically present in a virtual world, but he/she can interact with it. The first VR workstations were designed for big companies in order to create environments that simulate certain situations to train professionals. However, at this moment a great expansion of this technology is taking place in several fields, including the area of health. Especially interesting for us is the use of VR as a therapeutic tool in the treatment of psychological disorders. Compared to the traditional treatments, VR has many advantages (e.g., it is a protected environment for the patient, he/she can re-experience many times the feared situation, etc.). There are already data on the effectiveness of this technology in the treatment of different psychological disorders; here anxiety disorders, eating disorders and sexual disorders are reviewed. Finally, this chapter ends with some words about the limitations of VR and future perspectives.

  19. Bradyarrhythmias and conduction blocks.

    PubMed

    Vogler, Julia; Breithardt, Günter; Eckardt, Lars

    2012-07-01

    Bradyarrhythmias are a common clinical finding and comprise a number of rhythm disorders including sinus node dysfunction and atrioventricular conduction disturbances. Clinical presentation varies from asymptomatic electrocardiogram findings (eg, during a routine examination) to a wide range of symptoms such as heart failure symptoms, near syncope or syncope, central nervous symptoms, or nonspecific and chronic symptoms such as dizziness or fatigue. Conditions resulting in bradyarrhythmic disorders are divided into intrinsic and extrinsic conditions causing damage to the conduction system. Furthermore bradyarrhythmias can be a normal physiologic reaction under certain circumstances. A proper diagnosis including a symptom-rhythm correlation is extremely important and is generally established by noninvasive diagnostic studies (12-lead electrocardiogram, Holter electrocardiogram, exercise testing, event recorder, implantable loop recorder). Invasive electrophysiologic testing is rarely required. If reversible extrinsic causes of bradyarrhythmias such as drugs (most often beta-blockers, glycosides and/or calcium channel blockers) or underlying treatable diseases are ruled out, cardiac pacing is usually the therapy of choice in symptomatic bradyarrhythmias. In this article of the current series on arrhythmias we will review the pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment options of bradyarrhythmias, especially sinus node dysfunction and atrioventricular conduction blocks.

  20. 31 CFR 589.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 589.301 Section 589.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY UKRAINE RELATED SANCTIONS...

  1. 31 CFR 588.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 588.301 Section 588.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY WESTERN BALKANS...

  2. Block 3. Central view of Block 3 observed from the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Block 3. Central view of Block 3 observed from the west to the east. This photograph reveals the alignment of trees within the central path of the park. In addition, this photograph exposes broken bricks aligning tree beds - Skyline Park, 1500-1800 Arapaho Street, Denver, Denver County, CO

  3. 31 CFR 551.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 551.301 Section 551.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SOMALIA SANCTIONS...

  4. 31 CFR 541.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 541.301 Section 541.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ZIMBABWE SANCTIONS...

  5. 31 CFR 551.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 551.301 Section 551.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SOMALIA SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  6. 31 CFR 551.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 551.301 Section 551.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SOMALIA SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  7. 31 CFR 551.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 551.301 Section 551.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SOMALIA SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  8. 31 CFR 551.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 551.301 Section 551.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SOMALIA SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  9. 31 CFR 548.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 548.301 Section 548.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BELARUS SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  10. 31 CFR 548.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 548.301 Section 548.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BELARUS SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  11. 31 CFR 548.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 548.301 Section 548.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BELARUS SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  12. 31 CFR 548.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 548.301 Section 548.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BELARUS SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  13. 31 CFR 548.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 548.301 Section 548.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY BELARUS SANCTIONS...

  14. 31 CFR 510.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 510.301 Section 510.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NORTH KOREA SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  15. 31 CFR 510.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 510.301 Section 510.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NORTH KOREA SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  16. 31 CFR 510.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 510.301 Section 510.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NORTH KOREA SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  17. 31 CFR 510.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 510.301 Section 510.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NORTH KOREA SANCTIONS REGULATIONS...

  18. 31 CFR 545.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 545.301 Section 545.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY TALIBAN (AFGHANISTAN)...

  19. 31 CFR 594.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 594.301 Section 594.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY GLOBAL TERRORISM SANCTIONS...

  20. 31 CFR 594.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 594.301 Section 594.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY GLOBAL TERRORISM SANCTIONS...

  1. 31 CFR 594.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 594.301 Section 594.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY GLOBAL TERRORISM...

  2. 31 CFR 594.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 594.301 Section 594.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY GLOBAL TERRORISM SANCTIONS...

  3. 31 CFR 576.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 576.301 Section 576.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRAQ STABILIZATION AND INSURGENCY...

  4. 31 CFR 576.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 576.301 Section 576.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRAQ STABILIZATION AND INSURGENCY...

  5. 31 CFR 576.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 576.301 Section 576.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRAQ STABILIZATION AND INSURGENCY...

  6. 31 CFR 576.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 576.301 Section 576.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRAQ STABILIZATION AND INSURGENCY...

  7. 31 CFR 562.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 562.301 Section 562.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRANIAN HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSES...

  8. 31 CFR 562.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 562.301 Section 562.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRANIAN HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSES...

  9. 31 CFR 562.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 562.301 Section 562.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRANIAN HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSES...

  10. 31 CFR 562.301 - Blocked account; blocked property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Blocked account; blocked property. 562.301 Section 562.301 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY IRANIAN HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSES...

  11. The virtual group identification process: a virtual educational community case.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chia-Ping; Young, Mei-Lein

    2008-02-01

    Because the Internet provides an alternative forum for the social interaction of professional groups, understanding how these groups form as virtual communities (VCs) in cyberspace is crucial. In this study, we observe the social interactions of teachers belonging to the largest VC in Taiwan and analyze discourse on an important educational policy, using content analysis to ascertain how virtual group identity is established. Our primary findings show that among the seven identity categories characterizing professional virtual group identity, both alliance and kinship types of identities are the main forces behind the formation of a virtual group. In contrast, the affection, attachment, bonding, closeness, and nostalgia types of identities show minimal effect. Moreover, leadership of the virtual group plays a critical role in the group setting, and participants play a part in restoring a positive sense of self or in shaping the group identity as they encounter threats in this dynamic environment.

  12. The virtual group identification process: a virtual educational community case.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chia-Ping; Young, Mei-Lein

    2008-02-01

    Because the Internet provides an alternative forum for the social interaction of professional groups, understanding how these groups form as virtual communities (VCs) in cyberspace is crucial. In this study, we observe the social interactions of teachers belonging to the largest VC in Taiwan and analyze discourse on an important educational policy, using content analysis to ascertain how virtual group identity is established. Our primary findings show that among the seven identity categories characterizing professional virtual group identity, both alliance and kinship types of identities are the main forces behind the formation of a virtual group. In contrast, the affection, attachment, bonding, closeness, and nostalgia types of identities show minimal effect. Moreover, leadership of the virtual group plays a critical role in the group setting, and participants play a part in restoring a positive sense of self or in shaping the group identity as they encounter threats in this dynamic environment. PMID:18275318

  13. A Framework for Intelligent Virtual Training Environment: The Steps from Specification to Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouras, Christos; Triantafillou, Vassilis; Tsiatsos, Thrasyvoulos

    2002-01-01

    Discusses collaborative virtual learning environments and presents a system architecture to support such environments, defined by user needs and using state-of-the-art technologies. Includes a description of INVITE (Intelligent Distributed Virtual Training Environment), a project funded by the European Commission. (Author/LRW)

  14. Interpersonal distance in immersive virtual environments.

    PubMed

    Bailenson, Jeremy N; Blascovich, Jim; Beall, Andrew C; Loomis, Jack M

    2003-07-01

    Digital immersive virtual environment technology (IVET) enables behavioral scientists to conduct ecologically realistic experiments with near-perfect experimental control. The authors employed IVET to study the interpersonal distance maintained between participants and virtual humans. In Study 1, participants traversed a three-dimensional virtual room in which a virtual human stood. In Study 2, a virtual human approached participants. In both studies, participant gender, virtual human gender, virtual human gaze behavior, and whether virtual humans were allegedly controlled by humans (i.e., avatars) or computers (i.e., agents) were varied. Results indicated that participants maintained greater distance from virtual humans when approaching their fronts compared to their backs. In addition, participants gave more personal space to virtual agents who engaged them in mutual gaze. Moreover, when virtual humans invaded their personal space, participants moved farthest from virtual human agents. The advantages and disadvantages of IVET for the study of human behavior are discussed.

  15. Virtual Reality: The Promise of the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanier, Jaron

    1992-01-01

    Defines virtual reality and describes the equipment or clothing necessary to achieve the illusion of being in a virtual world. Recent developments with this technology and current virtual reality applications are discussed, including experiential prototyping, telepresence, and educational applications. (MES)

  16. Virtual Realities and the Future of Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcus, Stephen

    1992-01-01

    Discusses issues surrounding virtual reality and "virtual books." Suggests that those who are exploring the territory of virtual realities are already helping to expand and enrich expectations and visions for integrating technology into reading and writing. (RS)

  17. The Virtual Mission Operations Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Mike; Fox, Jeffrey

    1994-01-01

    Spacecraft management is becoming more human intensive as spacecraft become more complex and as operations costs are growing accordingly. Several automation approaches have been proposed to lower these costs. However, most of these approaches are not flexible enough in the operations processes and levels of automation that they support. This paper presents a concept called the Virtual Mission Operations Center (VMOC) that provides highly flexible support for dynamic spacecraft management processes and automation. In a VMOC, operations personnel can be shared among missions, the operations team can change personnel and their locations, and automation can be added and removed as appropriate. The VMOC employs a form of on-demand supervisory control called management by exception to free operators from having to actively monitor their system. The VMOC extends management by exception, however, so that distributed, dynamic teams can work together. The VMOC uses work-group computing concepts and groupware tools to provide a team infrastructure, and it employs user agents to allow operators to define and control system automation.

  18. Virtual Instrumentation to study galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prugniel, Ph.; Chilingarian, I.; Flores, H.; Guibert, J.; Haigron, R.; Jégouzo, I.; Royer, F.; Tajahmady, F.; Theureau, G.; Vétois, J.

    2004-12-01

    The MIGALE project builds and maintains databases and analysis tools to help studies of the evolution of galaxies between z=1 and z=0. At z=0 MIGALE offers the whole-sky multiparametric HyperLeda database and the new HIgi database (see this G. Theureau and J.-M. Martin, this conference) dedicated to HI observations. At larger distances we are developing the Disgal database discussed by H. Flores and M. Puech at this conference. MIGALE is also operating the Giraffe Archive (F. Royer, this conference) containing the reduced spectra produced by the VLT spectrograph Giraffe. These systems provide altogether a very fine multi-wavelength and multiparametric description of galaxies. The data collected and distributed are either compilations or original surveys, catalogues or pixels (spectra and images). These services offer several facilities for processing and analysing the data (on-line pipeline). This constellation of services share a common software (Pleinpot) providing some general low-level layers (access to database and to FITS data), some specialized astronomical recipes (like models to study stellar populations) and the Virtual Observatory interface required for inter-operability with other projects.

  19. Virtual cathode microwave devices: Basics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thode, L. E.; Snell, C. M.

    Unlike a conventional microwave tube, a virtual-cathode device operates above the space-charge limit where the depth of the space-charge potential can cause electron reflection. The region associated with this electron reflection is referred to as a virtual cathode. Microwaves can be generated through oscillations in the position of the virtual cathode and through the bunching of electrons trapped in a potential well between the real and virtual cathodes. These two mechanisms are competitive. There are three basic classes of virtual cathode devices: (1) reflex triode; (2) reditron and side-shoot vircator; and (3) reflex diode or vircator. The reflex diode is the highest power virtual-cathode device. For the reflex diode the energy exchange between the beam and electromagnetic wave occurs in both the axial and radial directions. In some designs the oscillating virtual-cathode frequency exceeds the reflexing-electron frequency while in other designs the reflexing-electron frequency exceeds the oscillating virtual-cathode frequency. For the flex diode, a periodic disruption in magnetic insulation can modulate the high-frequency microwave power. Overall, particle-in-cell simulation predictions and axial reflex diode experiments are in good agreement. Although frequency stability and phase locking of the reflex diode have been demonstrated, little progress has been made in efficiency enhancement.

  20. Developing Trust in Virtual Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Germain, Marie-Line

    2011-01-01

    Rapid globalization, advances in technology, flatter organizational structures, synergistic cooperation among firms, and a shift to knowledge work environments have led to the increasing use of virtual teams in organizations. Selecting, training, and socializing employees in virtual teamwork has therefore become an important human resource…

  1. Webinars at Louisiana Virtual School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Allen

    2009-01-01

    Delivering meaningful professional development, engaging students in exciting yet practical curricula, and effectively communicating with faculty and staff members are challenges in any school setting. At the Louisiana Virtual School, a state-funded virtual school run by the Louisiana Department of Education, the 6,000 students, 115 instructors,…

  2. Virtual Learning Is Becoming Reality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jancek, Richard L.

    Once a school district decides to offer students virtual classes, it has to recognize the costs associated with the implementation, the logistical needs, the staff that will be needed to assist students, and the maintenance of the technology. Adapting the philosophy of virtual education is only the beginning. The role of the traditional teacher…

  3. Learning Experience with Virtual Worlds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Virtual worlds create a new opportunity to enrich the educational experience through media-rich immersive learning. Virtual worlds have gained notoriety in games such as World of Warcraft (WoW), which has become the most successful online game ever, and in "general purpose" worlds, such as Second Life (SL), whose participation levels (more than 10…

  4. Computer Based Virtual Field Trips.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Kenneth F.; Hosticka, Alice; Schriver, Martha; Bedell, Jackie

    This paper discusses computer based virtual field trips that use technologies commonly found in public schools in the United States. The discussion focuses on the advantages of both using and creating these field trips for an instructional situation. A virtual field trip to Cumberland Island National Seashore, St. Marys, Georgia is used as a point…

  5. Virtual Enterprises and Vocational Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreber, Stefan

    2001-01-01

    Characteristics of virtual enterprises (client oriented, temporary working organizations that dissolve after solving specific problems, extensive technological applications) can be applied to vocational training. Virtual learning centers can provide web-based training intraorganizationally and interorganizationally via intranets and extranets. (SK)

  6. Virtual Learning: Possibilities and Realization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerimbayev, Nurassyl

    2016-01-01

    In the article it was important to consider two basic moments i.e., impact mode of using virtual environment at training process within one faculty of the University, directly at training quality and what outcomes can be reached therewith. The work significance consists of studying the virtual environment effect instead of traditional educational…

  7. The Power of Virtual Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rock, Marcia L.; Zigmond, Naomi P.; Gregg, Madeleine; Gable, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    Amid budget cuts in U.S. public schools, the spotlight is on how to make less effective teachers more effective--fast. The authors describe virtual coaching--in which a coach interacts electronically with a teacher as a lesson unfolds--as a promising way to help teachers with weak teaching skills. Virtual coaching uses online and mobile technology…

  8. Telemedicine, virtual reality, and surgery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormack, Percival D.; Charles, Steve

    1994-01-01

    Two types of synthetic experience are covered: virtual reality (VR) and surgery, and telemedicine. The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: geometric models; physiological sensors; surgical applications; virtual cadaver; VR surgical simulation; telesurgery; VR Surgical Trainer; abdominal surgery pilot study; advanced abdominal simulator; examples of telemedicine; and telemedicine spacebridge.

  9. Virtual Ed. Faces Sharp Criticism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quillen, Ian

    2011-01-01

    It's been a rough time for the image of K-12 virtual education. Studies in Colorado and Minnesota have suggested that full-time online students are struggling to match the achievement levels of their peers in brick-and-mortar schools. Articles in "The New York Times" questioned not only the academic results for students in virtual schools, but…

  10. Virtual Enterprise: Transforming Entrepreneurship Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borgese, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Entrepreneurship education is ripe for utilizing experiential learning methods. Experiential methods are best learned when there is constant immersion into the subject matter. One such transformative learning methodology is Virtual Enterprise (VE). Virtual Enterprise is a multi-faceted, experiential learning methodology disseminated by the City…

  11. The Geography of Virtual Questioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mon, Lorri; Bishop, Bradley Wade; McClure, Charles R.; McGilvray, Jessica; Most, Linda; Milas, Theodore Patrick; Snead, John T.

    2009-01-01

    This article explores the geography of virtual questioning by using geographic information systems to study activity within the Florida Electronic Library "Ask a Librarian" collaborative chat service. Researchers mapped participating libraries throughout the state of Florida that served as virtual "entry portals" for users as they asked questions…

  12. Virtual cathode microwave devices -- Basics

    SciTech Connect

    Thode, L.E.; Snell, C.M.

    1991-01-01

    Unlike a conventional microwave tube, a virtual-cathode device operates above the space-charge limit where the depth of the space-charge potential can cause electron reflection. The region associated with this electron reflection is referred to as a virtual cathode. Microwaves can be generated through oscillations in the position of the virtual cathode and through the bunching of electrons trapped in a potential well between the real and virtual cathodes. These two mechanisms are competitive. There are three basic classes of virtual cathode devices: (1) reflex triode; (2) reditron and side-shoot vircator; and (3) reflex diode or vircator. The reflex diode is the highest power virtual-cathode device. For the reflex diode the energy exchange between the beam and electromagnetic wave occurs in both the axial and radial directions. In some designs the oscillating-virtual-cathode frequency exceeds the reflexing-electron frequency exceeds the oscillating-virtual-cathode frequency. For the flex diode a periodic disruption in magnetic insulation can modulate the high- frequency microwave power. Overall, particle-in-cell simulation predictions and axial reflex diode experiments are in good agreement. Although frequency stability and phase locking of the reflex diode have been demonstrated, little progress has been made in efficiency enhancement. 58 refs., 11 figs.

  13. Adolescent Attitudes towards Virtual Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pleau, Andrea R.

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to examine adolescents' attitudes towards virtual schooling. Virtual schooling may be defined as any public or private organization that delivers instruction via the Internet. The rationale for this study is based on the increased number of adolescents opting to complete some or all of their secondary education through…

  14. Has your greenhouse gone virtual?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Virtual Grower is a free decision-support software program available from USDA-ARS that allows growers to build a virtual greenhouse. It was initially designed to help greenhouse growers estimate heating costs and conduct simple simulations to figure out where heat savings could be achieved. Featu...

  15. When Rural Reality Goes Virtual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Husain, Dilshad D.

    1998-01-01

    In rural towns where sparse population and few business are barriers, virtual reality may be the only way to bring work-based learning to students. A partnership between a small-town high school, the Ohio Supercomputer Center, and a high-tech business will enable students to explore the workplace using virtual reality. (JOW)

  16. Knowledge Navigation for Virtual Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gomez, Julian E.

    2004-01-01

    A virtual vehicle is a digital model of the knowledge surrounding a potentially real vehicle. Knowledge consists not only of the tangible information, such as CAD, but also what is known about the knowledge - its metadata. This paper is an overview of technologies relevant to building a virtual vehicle, and an assessment of how to bring those technologies together.

  17. The Virtual Intercultural Team Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rus, Calin

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the Virtual Intercultural Team Tool (VITT) and discusses its processes and benefits. VIIT is a virtual platform designed with the aim of assisting European project teams to improve intercultural communication and build on their cultural diversity for effective implementation of their projects. It is a process-focused tool,…

  18. Enhancing Spiritualism in Virtual World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dangwal, Kiran Lata; Singh, Shireesh Pal

    2012-01-01

    Spiritualism is one word which puts man on the highest plinth of life. Spirituality is the way we find meaning, hope, comfort and inner peace in life. Spirituality in the virtual World is generally known as Virtual Spirituality. A goldmine of wisdom from all kinds of religious and spiritual philosophies, traditions and practices can be found in…

  19. Virtual Schools. Trends and Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hadderman, Margaret

    This article looks at a rapidly growing form of distance education: virtual schools. Also known as cyber schools, these Internet-based programs enroll fewer than 50,000 students nationwide, but more and more companies are entering this market. Some examples of these virtual schools are the Willoway CyberSchool, which was founded by a former…

  20. Virtual water balance estimation in Tunisia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stambouli, Talel; Benalaya, Abdallah; Ghezal, Lamia; Ali, Chebil; Hammami, Rifka; Souissi, Asma

    2015-04-01

    The water in Tunisia is limited and unevenly distributed in the different regions, especially in arid zones. In fact, the annual rainfall average varies from less than 100 mm in the extreme South to over 1500 mm in the extreme North of the country. Currently, the conventional potential of water resources of the country is estimated about 4.84 billion m³ / year of which 2.7 billion cubic meters / year of surface water and 2.14 billion cubic meters / year of groundwater, characterizing a structural shortage for water safety in Tunisia (under 500m3/inhabitant/year). With over than 80% of water volumes have been mobilized for agriculture. The virtual water concept, defined by Allan (1997), as the amount of water needed to generate a product of both natural and artificial origin, this concept establish a similarity between product marketing and water trade. Given the influence of water in food production, virtual water studies focus generally on food products. At a global scale, the influence of these product's markets with water management was not seen. Influence has appreciated only by analyzing water-scarce countries, but at the detail level, should be increased, as most studies consider a country as a single geographical point, leading to considerable inaccuracies. The main objective of this work is the virtual water balance estimation of strategic crops in Tunisia (both irrigated and dry crops) to determine their influence on the water resources management and to establish patterns for improving it. The virtual water balance was performed basing on farmer's surveys, crop and meteorological data, irrigation management and regional statistics. Results show that the majority of farmers realize a waste of the irrigation water especially at the vegetable crops and fruit trees. Thus, a good control of the cultural package may result in lower quantities of water used by crops while ensuring good production with a suitable economic profitability. Then, the virtual water

  1. Virtual Pharmacist: A Platform for Pharmacogenomics.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ronghai; Leung, Ross Ka-Kit; Chen, Yao; Pan, Yidan; Tong, Yin; Li, Zhoufang; Ning, Luwen; Ling, Xuefeng B; He, Jiankui

    2015-01-01

    We present Virtual Pharmacist, a web-based platform that takes common types of high-throughput data, namely microarray SNP genotyping data, FASTQ and Variant Call Format (VCF) files as inputs, and reports potential drug responses in terms of efficacy, dosage and toxicity at one glance. Batch submission facilitates multivariate analysis or data mining of targeted groups. Individual analysis consists of a report that is readily comprehensible to patients and practioners who have basic knowledge in pharmacology, a table that summarizes variants and potential affected drug response according to the US Food and Drug Administration pharmacogenomic biomarker labeled drug list and PharmGKB, and visualization of a gene-drug-target network. Group analysis provides the distribution of the variants and potential affected drug response of a target group, a sample-gene variant count table, and a sample-drug count table. Our analysis of genomes from the 1000 Genome Project underlines the potentially differential drug responses among different human populations. Even within the same population, the findings from Watson's genome highlight the importance of personalized medicine. Virtual Pharmacist can be accessed freely at http://www.sustc-genome.org.cn/vp or installed as a local web server. The codes and documentation are available at the GitHub repository (https://github.com/VirtualPharmacist/vp). Administrators can download the source codes to customize access settings for further development. PMID:26496198

  2. Virtual Pharmacist: A Platform for Pharmacogenomics.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ronghai; Leung, Ross Ka-Kit; Chen, Yao; Pan, Yidan; Tong, Yin; Li, Zhoufang; Ning, Luwen; Ling, Xuefeng B; He, Jiankui

    2015-01-01

    We present Virtual Pharmacist, a web-based platform that takes common types of high-throughput data, namely microarray SNP genotyping data, FASTQ and Variant Call Format (VCF) files as inputs, and reports potential drug responses in terms of efficacy, dosage and toxicity at one glance. Batch submission facilitates multivariate analysis or data mining of targeted groups. Individual analysis consists of a report that is readily comprehensible to patients and practioners who have basic knowledge in pharmacology, a table that summarizes variants and potential affected drug response according to the US Food and Drug Administration pharmacogenomic biomarker labeled drug list and PharmGKB, and visualization of a gene-drug-target network. Group analysis provides the distribution of the variants and potential affected drug response of a target group, a sample-gene variant count table, and a sample-drug count table. Our analysis of genomes from the 1000 Genome Project underlines the potentially differential drug responses among different human populations. Even within the same population, the findings from Watson's genome highlight the importance of personalized medicine. Virtual Pharmacist can be accessed freely at http://www.sustc-genome.org.cn/vp or installed as a local web server. The codes and documentation are available at the GitHub repository (https://github.com/VirtualPharmacist/vp). Administrators can download the source codes to customize access settings for further development.

  3. Image-based panoramic virtual reality system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritchey, Kurtis J.

    1992-06-01

    An extensive family of advanced virtual reality-telepresence systems and components have been developed. The purpose of these systems and components is to facilitate recording, processing, display, and interaction with audio and video signal(s) representing a scene or subject of three-dimensions (3-D). An overview of the systems currently available for license includes: a color video camera with real-time simultaneous spherical FOV coverage; a similar camera for recording various sides of a 3-D subject; an image based system for real-time processing and distribution of said camera based images onto 3-D wireframes; resultant camcorders are generally referred to as virtual reality/telepresence 'VRT camcorders'TM; a 'VIDEOROOM'TM large theater display system in which the floor, walls, and ceiling form a continuous display about the viewer for display of said images; 'INaVISION'TM a HMD system for viewing the same said images; and interactive control devices for manipulating said 3-D image and audio signal(s). Applications, to include visual and auditory simulation, host vehicle control, remote vehicle control, video teleconferencing, and so on, are feasible applications for the above technology. Rough costs of systems and components, photographs of a prototype system, and component illustrations are provided. Future directions of R&D are presented (i.e., Project HEAVEN: Humankind Eternal-Life Artificial-Intelligence Virtual Environment Network).

  4. Virtual Pharmacist: A Platform for Pharmacogenomics

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yao; Pan, Yidan; Tong, Yin; Li, Zhoufang; Ning, Luwen; Ling, Xuefeng B.; He, Jiankui

    2015-01-01

    We present Virtual Pharmacist, a web-based platform that takes common types of high-throughput data, namely microarray SNP genotyping data, FASTQ and Variant Call Format (VCF) files as inputs, and reports potential drug responses in terms of efficacy, dosage and toxicity at one glance. Batch submission facilitates multivariate analysis or data mining of targeted groups. Individual analysis consists of a report that is readily comprehensible to patients and practioners who have basic knowledge in pharmacology, a table that summarizes variants and potential affected drug response according to the US Food and Drug Administration pharmacogenomic biomarker labeled drug list and PharmGKB, and visualization of a gene-drug-target network. Group analysis provides the distribution of the variants and potential affected drug response of a target group, a sample-gene variant count table, and a sample-drug count table. Our analysis of genomes from the 1000 Genome Project underlines the potentially differential drug responses among different human populations. Even within the same population, the findings from Watson’s genome highlight the importance of personalized medicine. Virtual Pharmacist can be accessed freely at http://www.sustc-genome.org.cn/vp or installed as a local web server. The codes and documentation are available at the GitHub repository (https://github.com/VirtualPharmacist/vp). Administrators can download the source codes to customize access settings for further development. PMID:26496198

  5. Deeply Virtual Exclusive Reactions with CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Kubarovsky, Valery

    2011-03-01

    Deeply virtual exclusive reactions offer an unique opportunity to study the structure of the nucleon at the parton level as one has access to Bjorken xB and momentum transfer to the nucleon t at the same time. Such processes can reveal much more information about the structure of the nucleon than either inclusive electroproduction or elastic form factors alone. Dedicated experiments to study Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) and Deeply VirtualMeson Production (DVMP) have been carried out in Hall B at Jefferson Lab. DVCS helicity–dependent and helicity–independent cross sections and beam spin asymmetries have been measured with CLAS, as well as cross sections and asymmetries for the p 0, h, r 0, r+, w and f for exclusive electroproduction. The data were taken in a wide kinematic range in Q2=1–4.5 GeV2, xB=0.1–0.5, and |t| up to 2 GeV2. We will discuss the interpretation of these data in terms of traditional Regge and Generalized Parton Distributions models. We view the work presented in this report as leading into the program of the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV upgrade. The increased energy and luminosity will allow us to acquire data at much higher Q2 and xB, and perform Rosenbluth L/T separations of the cross sections.

  6. Marshall Engineers Use Virtual Reality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Virtual Reality (VR) can provide cost effective methods to design and evaluate components and systems for maintenance and refurbishment operations. Marshall Spce Flight Center (MSFC) is begirning to utilize VR for design analysis in the X-34 experimental reusable space vehicle. Analysts at MSFC's Computer Applications and Virtual Environments (CAVE) used Head Mounted Displays (HMD) (pictured), spatial trackers and gesture inputs as a means to animate or inhabit a properly sized virtual human model. These models are used in a VR scenario as a way to determine functionality of space and maintenance requirements for the virtual X-34. The primary functions of the virtual X-34 mockup is to support operations development and design analysis for engine removal, the engine compartment and the aft fuselage. This capability provides general visualization support to engineers and designers at MSFC and to the System Design Freeze Review at Orbital Sciences Corporation (OSC).

  7. Virtual Environments in Scientific Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryson, Steve; Cooper, D. M.

    1994-01-01

    Virtual environment technology is a new way of approaching the interface between computers and humans. Emphasizing display and user control that conforms to the user's natural ways of perceiving and thinking about space, virtual environment technologies enhance the ability to perceive and interact with computer generated graphic information. This enhancement potentially has a major effect on the field of scientific visualization. Current examples of this technology include the Virtual Windtunnel being developed at NASA Ames Research Center. Other major institutions such as the National Center for Supercomputing Applications and SRI International are also exploring this technology. This talk will be describe several implementations of virtual environments for use in scientific visualization. Examples include the visualization of unsteady fluid flows (the virtual windtunnel), the visualization of geodesics in curved spacetime, surface manipulation, and examples developed at various laboratories.

  8. Formal modeling of virtual machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cremers, A. B.; Hibbard, T. N.

    1978-01-01

    Systematic software design can be based on the development of a 'hierarchy of virtual machines', each representing a 'level of abstraction' of the design process. The reported investigation presents the concept of 'data space' as a formal model for virtual machines. The presented model of a data space combines the notions of data type and mathematical machine to express the close interaction between data and control structures which takes place in a virtual machine. One of the main objectives of the investigation is to show that control-independent data type implementation is only of limited usefulness as an isolated tool of program development, and that the representation of data is generally dictated by the control context of a virtual machine. As a second objective, a better understanding is to be developed of virtual machine state structures than was heretofore provided by the view of the state space as a Cartesian product.

  9. Adjustable-Angle Drill Block

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallimore, F. H.

    1986-01-01

    Adjustable angular drill block accurately transfers hole patterns from mating surfaces not normal to each other. Block applicable to transfer of nonperpendicular holes in mating contoured assemblies in aircraft industry. Also useful in general manufacturing to transfer mating installation holes to irregular and angular surfaces.

  10. Block Transfer Agreement Evaluation Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bastedo, Helena

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this project is to evaluate for the British Columbia Council on Admissions and Transfer (BCCAT) the effectiveness of block transfer agreements (BTAs) in the BC Transfer System and recommend steps to be taken to improve their effectiveness. Findings of this study revealed that institutions want to expand block credit transfer;…

  11. Block copolymer adhesion promoters via ring-opening metathesis polymerization

    DOEpatents

    Kent, M.S.; Saunders, R.

    1997-02-18

    Coupling agents are disclosed based on functionalized block copolymers for bonding thermoset polymers to solid materials. These are polymers which possess at least two types of functional groups, one which is able to attach to and react with solid surfaces, and another which can react with a thermoset resin, which are incorporated as pendant groups in monomers distributed in blocks (typically two) along the backbone of the chain. The block copolymers in this invention are synthesized by living ring-opening metathesis polymerization. 18 figs.

  12. Improved ultrasonic standard reference blocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eitzen, D. G.

    1975-01-01

    A program to improve the quality, reproducibility and reliability of nondestructive testing through the development of improved ASTM-type ultrasonic reference standards is described. Reference blocks of aluminum, steel, and titanium alloys were considered. Equipment representing the state-of-the-art in laboratory and field ultrasonic equipment was obtained and evaluated. Some RF and spectral data on ten sets of ultrasonic reference blocks were taken as part of a task to quantify the variability in response from nominally identical blocks. Techniques for residual stress, preferred orientation, and microstructural measurements were refined and are applied to a reference block rejected by the manufacturer during fabrication in order to evaluate the effect of metallurgical condition on block response.

  13. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering off the neutron

    SciTech Connect

    M. Mazouz; A. Camsonne; C. Munoz Camacho; C. Ferdi; G. Gavalian; E. Kuchina; M. Amarian; K. A. Aniol; M. Beaumel; H. Benaoum; P. Bertin; M. Brossard; J.-P. Chen; E. Chudakov; B. Craver; F. Cusanno; C.W. de Jager; A. Deur; R. Feuerbach; J.-M. Fieschi; S. Frullani; M. Garcon; F. Garibaldi; O. Gayou; R. Gilman; J. Gomez; P. Gueye; P.A.M. Guichon; B. Guillon; O. Hansen; D. Hayes; D. Higinbotham; T. Holmstrom; C.E. Hyde; H. Ibrahim; R. Igarashi; X. Jiang; H.S. Jo; L.J. Kaufman; A. Kelleher; A. Kolarkar; G. Kumbartzki; G. Laveissiere; J.J. LeRose; R. Lindgren; N. Liyanage; H.-J. Lu; D.J. Margaziotis; Z.-E. Meziani; K. McCormick; R. Michaels; B. Michel; B. Moffit; P. Monaghan; S. Nanda; V. Nelyubin; M. Potokar; Y. Qiang; R.D. Ransome; J.-S. Real; B. Reitz; Y. Roblin; J. Roche; F. Sabatie; A. Saha; S. Sirca; K. Slifer; P. Solvignon; R. Subedi; V. Sulkosky; P.E. Ulmer; E. Voutier; K. Wang; L.B. Weinstein; B. Wojtsekhowski; X. Zheng; L. Zhu

    2007-12-01

    The present experiment exploits the interference between the Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) and the Bethe-Heitler processes to extract the imaginary part of DVCS amplitudes on the neutron and on the deuteron from the helicity-dependent D$({\\vec e},e'\\gamma)X$ cross section measured at $Q^2$=1.9 GeV$^2$ and $x_B$=0.36. We extract a linear combination of generalized parton distributions (GPDs) particularly sensitive to $E_q$, the least constrained GPD. A model dependent constraint on the contribution of the up and down quarks to the nucleon spin is deduced.

  14. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering off the Neutron

    SciTech Connect

    Mazouz, M.; Guillon, B.; Real, J.-S.; Voutier, E.

    2007-12-14

    The present experiment exploits the interference between the deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) and the Bethe-Heitler processes to extract the imaginary part of DVCS amplitudes on the neutron and on the deuteron from the helicity-dependent D(e-vector,e{sup '}{gamma})X cross section measured at Q{sup 2}=1.9 GeV{sup 2} and x{sub B}=0.36. We extract a linear combination of generalized parton distributions (GPDs) particularly sensitive to E{sub q}, the least constrained GPD. A model dependent constraint on the contribution of the up and down quarks to the nucleon spin is deduced.

  15. Increasing performance in KVM virtualization within a Tier-1 environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chierici, Andrea; Salomoni, Davide

    2012-12-01

    This work shows the optimizations we have been investigating and implementing at the KVM (Kernel-based Virtual Machine) virtualization layer in the INFN Tier-1 at CNAF, based on more than a year of experience in running thousands of virtual machines in a production environment used by several international collaborations. These optimizations increase the adaptability of virtualization solutions to demanding applications like those run in our institute (High-Energy Physics). We will show performance differences among different filesystems (like ext3 vs ext4) when used as KVM host local storage. We will provide guidelines for solid state disks (SSD) adoption, for deployment of SR-IOV (Single Root I/O Virtualization) enabled hardware and what is the best solution to distribute and instantiate read-only virtual machine images. This work has been driven by the project called Worker Nodes on Demand Service (WNoDeS), a framework designed to offer local, grid or cloud-based access to computing and storage resources, preserving maximum compatibility with existing computing center policies and workflows.

  16. LHCb experience with running jobs in virtual machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNab, A.; Stagni, F.; Luzzi, C.

    2015-12-01

    The LHCb experiment has been running production jobs in virtual machines since 2013 as part of its DIRAC-based infrastructure. We describe the architecture of these virtual machines and the steps taken to replicate the WLCG worker node environment expected by user and production jobs. This relies on the uCernVM system for providing root images for virtual machines. We use the CernVM-FS distributed filesystem to supply the root partition files, the LHCb software stack, and the bootstrapping scripts necessary to configure the virtual machines for us. Using this approach, we have been able to minimise the amount of contextualisation which must be provided by the virtual machine managers. We explain the process by which the virtual machine is able to receive payload jobs submitted to DIRAC by users and production managers, and how this differs from payloads executed within conventional DIRAC pilot jobs on batch queue based sites. We describe our operational experiences in running production on VM based sites managed using Vcycle/OpenStack, Vac, and HTCondor Vacuum. Finally we show how our use of these resources is monitored using Ganglia and DIRAC.

  17. Atrioventricular block after ASD closure

    PubMed Central

    Asakai, Hiroko; Weskamp, Sofia; Eastaugh, Lucas; d'Udekem, Yves; Pflaumer, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Objective Secundum atrial septal defect (ASD) is a common congenital heart defect. There is limited data on both early and late atrioventricular (AV) block post ASD closure. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence and risk factors of AV block associated with ASD closure. Methods A retrospective analysis of all patients who underwent ASD closure either with a device or surgical method at the Royal Children's Hospital Melbourne between 1996 and 2010 was performed. Baseline demographics, procedural details and follow-up data were collected from medical records. Results A total of 378 patients were identified; 242 in the device group and 136 in the surgical group. Fourteen patients (3.7%) had AV block (1 with second degree and 13 with first degree) at a median follow-up of 28 months; 11/242 (4.5%) in the device group and 3/135 (2.2%) in the surgical group (p=0.39). Six patients had new-onset AV block after ASD closure. In the device subgroup, patients with AV block at follow-up had a larger indexed device size compared with those without (22 (15–31) vs 18(7–38), p=0.02). Multivariate analysis revealed the presence of AV block either pre procedure or post procedure to be the only variables associated with late AV block. Conclusions Late AV block in patients with repaired ASD is rare and most likely independent of the technique used. In the device subgroup, the only risk factor identified to be associated with late AV block was the presence of either preprocedural or postprocedural AV block, so long-term follow-up for these patients should be provided. PMID:27540418

  18. Virtual acoustics displays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Fisher, Scott S.; Stone, Philip K.; Foster, Scott H.

    1991-01-01

    The real time acoustic display capabilities are described which were developed for the Virtual Environment Workstation (VIEW) Project at NASA-Ames. The acoustic display is capable of generating localized acoustic cues in real time over headphones. An auditory symbology, a related collection of representational auditory 'objects' or 'icons', can be designed using ACE (Auditory Cue Editor), which links both discrete and continuously varying acoustic parameters with information or events in the display. During a given display scenario, the symbology can be dynamically coordinated in real time with 3-D visual objects, speech, and gestural displays. The types of displays feasible with the system range from simple warnings and alarms to the acoustic representation of multidimensional data or events.

  19. The virtual observatory registry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demleitner, M.; Greene, G.; Le Sidaner, P.; Plante, R. L.

    2014-11-01

    In the Virtual Observatory (VO), the Registry provides the mechanism with which users and applications discover and select resources-typically, data and services-that are relevant for a particular scientific problem. Even though the VO adopted technologies in particular from the bibliographic community where available, building the Registry system involved a major standardisation effort, involving about a dozen interdependent standard texts. This paper discusses the server-side aspects of the standards and their application, as regards the functional components (registries), the resource records in both format and content, the exchange of resource records between registries (harvesting), as well as the creation and management of the identifiers used in the system based on the notion of authorities. Registry record authors, registry operators or even advanced users thus receive a big picture serving as a guideline through the body of relevant standard texts. To complete this picture, we also mention common usage patterns and open issues as appropriate.

  20. Virtual World Astrosociology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bainbridge, William Sims

    2010-01-01

    This essay introduces the opportunity for theory development and even empirical research on some aspects of astrosociology through today's online virtual worlds. The examples covered present life on other planets or in space itself, in a manner that can be experienced by the user and where the user's reactions may simulate to some degree future human behavior in real extraterrestrial environments: Tabula Rasa, Anarchy Online, Entropia Universe, EVE Online, StarCraft and World of Warcraft. Ethnographic exploration of these computerized environments raises many questions about the social science both of space exploration and of direct contact with extraterrestrials. The views expressed in this essay do not necessarily represent the views of the National Science Foundation or the United States.

  1. Automated virtual colonoscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Gordon W.; Hemler, Paul F.; Vining, David J.

    1997-05-01

    Virtual colonscopy (VC) is a minimally invasive alternative to conventional fiberoptic endoscopy for colorectal cancer screening. The VC technique involves bowel cleansing, gas distension of the colon, spiral computed tomography (CT) scanning of a patient's abdomen and pelvis, and visual analysis of multiplanar 2D and 3D images created from the spiral CT data. Despite the ability of interactive computer graphics to assist a physician in visualizing 3D models of the colon, a correct diagnosis hinges upon a physician's ability to properly identify small and sometimes subtle polyps or masses within hundreds of multiplanar and 3D images. Human visual analysis is time-consuming, tedious, and often prone to error of interpretation.We have addressed the problem of visual analysis by creating a software system that automatically highlights potential lesions in the 2D and 3D images in order to expedite a physician's interpretation of the colon data.

  2. Augmented Virtual Reality Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tully-Hanson, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Real time motion tracking hardware has for the most part been cost prohibitive for research to regularly take place until recently. With the release of the Microsoft Kinect in November 2010, researchers now have access to a device that for a few hundred dollars is capable of providing redgreenblue (RGB), depth, and skeleton data. It is also capable of tracking multiple people in real time. For its original intended purposes, i.e. gaming, being used with the Xbox 360 and eventually Xbox One, it performs quite well. However, researchers soon found that although the sensor is versatile, it has limitations in real world applications. I was brought aboard this summer by William Little in the Augmented Virtual Reality (AVR) Lab at Kennedy Space Center to find solutions to these limitations.

  3. Are Virtual Classrooms Colorblind?

    PubMed

    Killion, Cheryl M; Gallagher-Lepak, Susan; Reilly, Janet

    2015-01-01

    E-learning, increasingly employed in nursing education, has been embraced as a means to enhance options for all students, particularly those with limited educational opportunities. Although a desire to increase access for underserved students is often cited, disparities in availability, usage, and quality of e-learning persist among diverse households and student populations when compared to the general population. In this article, these issues will be examined along with reflection on the extent to which culture has been integrated into on-line design and instruction. Historical and cultural aspects, circumscribing virtual classrooms, are discussed using African Americans as an exemplar. The imperative to harness the democratizing potential of this educational format is underscored. In this article, culture will be examined in light of the significant growth in on-line nursing education over the past several decades. PMID:26428346

  4. Virtual reality and anthropology.

    PubMed

    Recheis, W; Weber, G W; Schäfer, K; Knapp, R; Seidler, H; zur Nedden, D

    1999-08-01

    Since the discovery of the Tyrolean Iceman in 1991 advanced imaging and post processing techniques were successfully applied in anthropology. Specific techniques include spiral computed tomography and 3-dimensional reconstructions including stereolithographic and fused deposition modeling of volume data sets. The Iceman's skull was the first to be reproduced using stereolithography, before this method was successfully applied in preoperative planning. With the advent of high-end graphics workstations and biomedical image processing software packages, 3-dimensional reconstructions were established as a routine tool for analyzing volume data sets. These techniques opened totally new insights in the field of physical anthropology. Computed tomography became the ideal research tool to access the internal structures of various precious fossils without damaging or even touching them. Many of the most precious specimens from the species Autralopithecus (1.8-3.5 Myears), Homo heidelbergensis (200-600 kyears) or Homo neanderthalensis (40-100 kyears) were scanned during the last 5 years. Often the fossils are filled with a stone matrix or other materials. During the postprocessing routines highly advanced algorithms were used to remove virtually these incrustations. Thus it was possible to visualize the morphological structures that lie beneath the matrix. Some specimen were partially destroyed, so the missing parts were reconstructed on computer screen in order to get estimations of the brain volume and endocranial morphology, both major fields of interest in physical anthropology. Moreover the computerized form of the data allows new descriptions of morphologic structures by the means of 'geometric morphometrics'. Some of the results may change aspects and interpretations in human evolution. The introduction of new imaging and post processing techniques created a new field of research: Virtual Anthropology.

  5. DOLIB: Distributed Object Library

    SciTech Connect

    D`Azevedo, E.F.; Romine, C.H.

    1994-10-01

    This report describes the use and implementation of DOLIB (Distributed Object Library), a library of routines that emulates global or virtual shared memory on Intel multiprocessor systems. Access to a distributed global array is through explicit calls to gather and scatter. Advantages of using DOLIB include: dynamic allocation and freeing of huge (gigabyte) distributed arrays, both C and FORTRAN callable interfaces, and the ability to mix shared-memory and message-passing programming models for ease of use and optimal performance. DOLIB is independent of language and compiler extensions and requires no special operating system support. DOLIB also supports automatic caching of read-only data for high performance. The virtual shared memory support provided in DOLIB is well suited for implementing Lagrangian particle tracking techniques. We have also used DOLIB to create DONIO (Distributed Object Network I/O Library), which obtains over a 10-fold improvement in disk I/O performance on the Intel Paragon.

  6. Teaching Mathematics to Young Children through the Use of Concrete and Virtual Manipulatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Angelo, Frank; Iliev, Nevin

    2012-01-01

    The use of manipulatives is an essential key to teaching mathematics to young children. Throughout history, different types of manipulatives have been used to aid in comprehension of mathematical concepts including quipu, abaci and pattern blocks. Today, concrete and virtual manipulatives are the tools that early childhood teachers are using in…

  7. The Virtual Tablet: Virtual Reality as a Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chronister, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    In the field of human-computer interaction, Augmented Reality (AR) and Virtual Reality (VR) have been rapidly growing areas of interest and concerted development effort thanks to both private and public research. At NASA, a number of groups have explored the possibilities afforded by AR and VR technology, among which is the IT Advanced Concepts Lab (ITACL). Within ITACL, the AVR (Augmented/Virtual Reality) Lab focuses on VR technology specifically for its use in command and control. Previous work in the AVR lab includes the Natural User Interface (NUI) project and the Virtual Control Panel (VCP) project, which created virtual three-dimensional interfaces that users could interact with while wearing a VR headset thanks to body- and hand-tracking technology. The Virtual Tablet (VT) project attempts to improve on these previous efforts by incorporating a physical surrogate which is mirrored in the virtual environment, mitigating issues with difficulty of visually determining the interface location and lack of tactile feedback discovered in the development of previous efforts. The physical surrogate takes the form of a handheld sheet of acrylic glass with several infrared-range reflective markers and a sensor package attached. Using the sensor package to track orientation and a motion-capture system to track the marker positions, a model of the surrogate is placed in the virtual environment at a position which corresponds with the real-world location relative to the user's VR Head Mounted Display (HMD). A set of control mechanisms is then projected onto the surface of the surrogate such that to the user, immersed in VR, the control interface appears to be attached to the object they are holding. The VT project was taken from an early stage where the sensor package, motion-capture system, and physical surrogate had been constructed or tested individually but not yet combined or incorporated into the virtual environment. My contribution was to combine the pieces of

  8. Domotics Project Housing Block

    PubMed Central

    Morón, Carlos; Payán, Alejandro; García, Alfonso; Bosquet, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    This document develops the study of an implementation project of a home automation system in a housing placed in the town of Galapagar, Madrid. This house, which is going to be occupied by a four-member family, consists of 67 constructed square meters distributed in lounge, kitchen, three bedrooms, bath, bathroom and terrace, this being a common arrangement in Spain. Thus, this study will allow extracting conclusions about the adequacy of the home automation in a wide percentage of housing in Spain. In this document, three house automation proposals are developed based on the requirements of the client and the different home automation levels that the Spanish House and Building Automation Association has established, besides two parallel proposals relating to the safety and the technical alarms. The mentioned proposed systems are described by means of product datasheets and descriptions, distribution plans, measurements, budgets and flow charts that describe the functioning of the system in every case. An evaluation of each system is included, based on other studies conclusions on this matter, where expected energy savings from each design, depending on the current cost of lighting, water and gas, as well as the expected economic amortization period is evaluated. PMID:27223285

  9. Domotics Project Housing Block.

    PubMed

    Morón, Carlos; Payán, Alejandro; García, Alfonso; Bosquet, Francisco

    2016-05-23

    This document develops the study of an implementation project of a home automation system in a housing placed in the town of Galapagar, Madrid. This house, which is going to be occupied by a four-member family, consists of 67 constructed square meters distributed in lounge, kitchen, three bedrooms, bath, bathroom and terrace, this being a common arrangement in Spain. Thus, this study will allow extracting conclusions about the adequacy of the home automation in a wide percentage of housing in Spain. In this document, three house automation proposals are developed based on the requirements of the client and the different home automation levels that the Spanish House and Building Automation Association has established, besides two parallel proposals relating to the safety and the technical alarms. The mentioned proposed systems are described by means of product datasheets and descriptions, distribution plans, measurements, budgets and flow charts that describe the functioning of the system in every case. An evaluation of each system is included, based on other studies conclusions on this matter, where expected energy savings from each design, depending on the current cost of lighting, water and gas, as well as the expected economic amortization period is evaluated.

  10. Domotics Project Housing Block.

    PubMed

    Morón, Carlos; Payán, Alejandro; García, Alfonso; Bosquet, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    This document develops the study of an implementation project of a home automation system in a housing placed in the town of Galapagar, Madrid. This house, which is going to be occupied by a four-member family, consists of 67 constructed square meters distributed in lounge, kitchen, three bedrooms, bath, bathroom and terrace, this being a common arrangement in Spain. Thus, this study will allow extracting conclusions about the adequacy of the home automation in a wide percentage of housing in Spain. In this document, three house automation proposals are developed based on the requirements of the client and the different home automation levels that the Spanish House and Building Automation Association has established, besides two parallel proposals relating to the safety and the technical alarms. The mentioned proposed systems are described by means of product datasheets and descriptions, distribution plans, measurements, budgets and flow charts that describe the functioning of the system in every case. An evaluation of each system is included, based on other studies conclusions on this matter, where expected energy savings from each design, depending on the current cost of lighting, water and gas, as well as the expected economic amortization period is evaluated. PMID:27223285

  11. Virtual Reality Simulation of the International Space Welding Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, James A.

    1996-01-01

    Virtual Reality (VR) is a set of breakthrough technologies that allow a human being to enter and fully experience a 3-dimensional, computer simulated environment. A true virtual reality experience meets three criteria: (1) It involves 3-dimensional computer graphics; (2) It includes real-time feedback and response to user actions; and (3) It must provide a sense of immersion. Good examples of a virtual reality simulator are the flight simulators used by all branches of the military to train pilots for combat in high performance jet fighters. The fidelity of such simulators is extremely high -- but so is the price tag, typically millions of dollars. Virtual reality teaching and training methods are manifestly effective, and we have therefore implemented a VR trainer for the International Space Welding Experiment. My role in the development of the ISWE trainer consisted of the following: (1) created texture-mapped models of the ISWE's rotating sample drum, technology block, tool stowage assembly, sliding foot restraint, and control panel; (2) developed C code for control panel button selection and rotation of the sample drum; (3) In collaboration with Tim Clark (Antares Virtual Reality Systems), developed a serial interface box for the PC and the SGI Indigo so that external control devices, similar to ones actually used on the ISWE, could be used to control virtual objects in the ISWE simulation; (4) In collaboration with Peter Wang (SFFP) and Mark Blasingame (Boeing), established the interference characteristics of the VIM 1000 head-mounted-display and tested software filters to correct the problem; (5) In collaboration with Peter Wang and Mark Blasingame, established software and procedures for interfacing the VPL DataGlove and the Polhemus 6DOF position sensors to the SGI Indigo serial ports. The majority of the ISWE modeling effort was conducted on a PC-based VR Workstation, described below.

  12. Development of visual 3D virtual environment for control software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirose, Michitaka; Myoi, Takeshi; Amari, Haruo; Inamura, Kohei; Stark, Lawrence

    1991-01-01

    Virtual environments for software visualization may enable complex programs to be created and maintained. A typical application might be for control of regional electric power systems. As these encompass broader computer networks than ever, construction of such systems becomes very difficult. Conventional text-oriented environments are useful in programming individual processors. However, they are obviously insufficient to program a large and complicated system, that includes large numbers of computers connected to each other; such programming is called 'programming in the large.' As a solution for this problem, the authors are developing a graphic programming environment wherein one can visualize complicated software in virtual 3D world. One of the major features of the environment is the 3D representation of concurrent process. 3D representation is used to supply both network-wide interprocess programming capability (capability for 'programming in the large') and real-time programming capability. The authors' idea is to fuse both the block diagram (which is useful to check relationship among large number of processes or processors) and the time chart (which is useful to check precise timing for synchronization) into a single 3D space. The 3D representation gives us a capability for direct and intuitive planning or understanding of complicated relationship among many concurrent processes. To realize the 3D representation, a technology to enable easy handling of virtual 3D object is a definite necessity. Using a stereo display system and a gesture input device (VPL DataGlove), our prototype of the virtual workstation has been implemented. The workstation can supply the 'sensation' of the virtual 3D space to a programmer. Software for the 3D programming environment is implemented on the workstation. According to preliminary assessments, a 50 percent reduction of programming effort is achieved by using the virtual 3D environment. The authors expect that the 3D

  13. Virtual Collaboration Readiness Measurement a Case Study in the Automobile Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziarati, Koorush; Khayami, Raouf; Parvinnia, Elham; Afroozi Milani, Ghazal

    In end of the last century information and communication technology caused a veritable evolution in the world of business and commerce. Globalization has changed all the commerce equations and business plans. Old companies have to change their strategies if they want to survive after this technological revolution. A new form of collaboration between the distributed and networked organizations has emerged as the "Virtual Organization" paradigm. A company can not join a virtual organization before obtaining a virtual maturity. This maturity shows the readiness of the company to begin a virtual collaboration. In this paper, based on the coherent and formal definition of virtual organizations, the criteria for measuring the readiness of companies are proposed. Our criteria are confirmed, modified or combined by using the factor analysis method on a sufficient number of virtual companies in the automobile manufacturing industry.

  14. The use of poly(styrene-block-isobutylene-block-styrene) as a microshunt to treat glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Pinchuk, Leonard; Riss, Isabelle; Batlle, Juan F; Kato, Yasushi P; Martin, John B; Arrieta, Esdras; Palmberg, Paul; Parrish, Richard K; Weber, Bruce A; Kwon, Yongmoon; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2016-06-01

    The InnFocus MicroShunt® is a minimally invasive glaucoma drainage microtube used to shunt aqueous humor from the anterior chamber of the eye to a flap formed under the conjunctiva and Tenon's capsule. The safety and clinical performance of this device approaches that of trabeculectomy with mitomycin C, the current 'gold standard' treatment for advanced glaucoma. The invention of a new biomaterial called poly(styrene-block-isobutylene-block-styrene) or 'SIBS' is the enabling factor which led to the success of this product. SIBS is ultrastable with virtually no foreign body reaction in the body, which manifests as clinically insignificant inflammation and capsule formation in the eye. The lack of capsule formation enables unobstructed flow through the 70 µm lumen tube and the achievement of controlled low intraocular pressure, which is important for the management of glaucoma. This article summarizes the integration of SIBS into a glaucoma drainage device and confirms its functionality with clinical success over a 2-year period. PMID:27047682

  15. The use of poly(styrene-block-isobutylene-block-styrene) as a microshunt to treat glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Pinchuk, Leonard; Riss, Isabelle; Batlle, Juan F.; Kato, Yasushi P.; Martin, John B.; Arrieta, Esdras; Palmberg, Paul; Parrish, Richard K.; Weber, Bruce A.; Kwon, Yongmoon; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    The InnFocus MicroShunt® is a minimally invasive glaucoma drainage microtube used to shunt aqueous humor from the anterior chamber of the eye to a flap formed under the conjunctiva and Tenon’s capsule. The safety and clinical performance of this device approaches that of trabeculectomy with mitomycin C, the current ‘gold standard’ treatment for advanced glaucoma. The invention of a new biomaterial called poly(styrene-block-isobutylene-block-styrene) or ‘SIBS’ is the enabling factor which led to the success of this product. SIBS is ultrastable with virtually no foreign body reaction in the body, which manifests as clinically insignificant inflammation and capsule formation in the eye. The lack of capsule formation enables unobstructed flow through the 70 µm lumen tube and the achievement of controlled low intraocular pressure, which is important for the management of glaucoma. This article summarizes the integration of SIBS into a glaucoma drainage device and confirms its functionality with clinical success over a 2-year period. PMID:27047682

  16. Block Curricula: A Guide to Teaching with Unit Blocks and Hollow Blocks in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Phyllis; Tiedemann, Nancy

    This curriculum guide for preschool teachers was designed for use with wooden unit and hollow blocks to foster a variety of math, science, language, and social skills. Following an introduction to the curriculum and a discussion of cooperative learning and stages of block building, the guide is divided into three parts. Part 1 of the guide, "Unit…

  17. Criminal Justice Systems. Block I: Law Enforcement. Block II: The Courts. Block III: Corrections. Block IV: Community Relations. Block V: Proficiency Skills. Block VI: Criminalistics. Student Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Div. of Vocational, Adult, and Community Education.

    This student guide together with an instructor guide comprise a set of curriculum materials on the criminal justice system. The student guide contains self-contained instructional material that students can study at their own pace most of the time. Six major subject areas or blocks, which are further broken down into several units, with some units…

  18. Criminal Justice Systems. Block I: Law Enforcement. Block II: The Courts. Block III: Corrections. Block IV: Community Relations. Block V: Proficiency Skills. Block VI: Criminalistics. Instructor Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Div. of Vocational, Adult, and Community Education.

    This instructor guide together with a student guide comprise a set of curriculum materials on the criminal justice system. The instructor guide is a resource for planning and managing individualized, competency-based instruction in six major subject areas or blocks, which are further broken down into several units with some units having several…

  19. The Tale of Two Virtual Teacher Professional Development Modules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keown, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Virtual communities of practice (VCoP) have been advocated for some time as a promising means of taking professional development to teachers in widely distributed locations. However, geography, and indeed education literature as a whole, contains very few examples where this has been achieved. This paper reports on two VCoP professional…

  20. Phases and Patterns of Group Development in Virtual Learning Teams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yoon, Seung Won; Johnson, Scott D.

    2008-01-01

    With the advancement of Internet communication technologies, distributed work groups have great potential for remote collaboration and use of collective knowledge. Adopting the Complex Adaptive System (CAS) perspective (McGrath, Arrow, & Berdhal, "Personal Soc Psychol Rev" 4 (2000) 95), which views virtual learning teams as an adaptive and…