Science.gov

Sample records for distributed family life

  1. Family Life

    MedlinePlus

    ... Family and Friends Talking About Cancer Family Life Parenting While Living With Cancer How A Child Understands ... Learn more about how to get support for parenting while living with cancer . The importance of communication ...

  2. Family Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Focuses on various aspects of mammal family life ranging from ways different species are born to how different mammals are raised. Learning activities include making butter from cream, creating birth announcements for mammals, and playing a password game on family life. (ML)

  3. Family Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1986

    1986-01-01

    Focuses on various aspects of mammal family life ranging from ways different species are born to how different mammals are raised. Learning activities include making butter from cream, creating birth announcements for mammals, and playing a password game on family life. (ML)

  4. Molecular insight into systematics, host associations, life cycles and geographic distribution of the nematode family Rhabdiasidae.

    PubMed

    Tkach, Vasyl V; Kuzmin, Yuriy; Snyder, Scott D

    2014-04-01

    Rhabdiasidae Railliet, 1915 is a globally distributed group of up to 100 known species of nematodes parasitic in amphibians and reptiles. This work presents the results of a molecular phylogenetic analysis of 36 species of Rhabdiasidae from reptiles and amphibians from six continents. New DNA sequences encompassing partial 18S rDNA, ITS1, 5.8S rDNA, ITS2 and partial 28S rDNA regions of nuclear ribosomal DNA were obtained from 27 species and pre-existing sequences for nine species were incorporated. The broad taxonomic, host and geographical coverage of the specimens allowed us to address long-standing questions in rhabdiasid systematics, evolution, geographic distribution, and patterns of host association. Our analysis demonstrated that rhabdiasids parasitic in snakes are an independent genus sister to the rest of the Rhabdiasidae, a status supported by life cycle data. Based on the combined evidence of molecular phylogeny, morphology and life cycle characteristics, a new genus Serpentirhabdias gen. nov. with the type species Serpentirhabdias elaphe (Sharpilo, 1976) comb. nov. is established. The phylogeny supports the monophyly of Entomelas Travassos, 1930, Pneumonema Johnston, 1916 and the largest genus of the family, Rhabdias Stiles and Hassall, 1905. DNA sequence comparisons demonstrate the presence of more than one species in the previously monotypic Pneumonema from Australian scincid lizards. The distribution of some morphological characters in the genus Rhabdias shows little consistency within the phylogenetic tree topology, in particular the apical structures widely used in rhabdiasid systematics. Our data suggest that some of the characters, while valuable for species differentiation, are not appropriate for differentiation among higher taxa and are of limited phylogenetic utility. Rhabdias is the only genus with a cosmopolitan distribution, but some of the lineages within Rhabdias are distributed on a single continent or a group of adjacent

  5. Home and Family Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frese, Millie K., Ed.

    1996-01-01

    The "Goldfinch" is a magazine that introduces children to different aspects of Iowa History. Each issue contains articles to provide in-depth knowledge of a topic about Iowa. The focus of this issue is homes and family life in Iowa history. Selections address what has been important to Iowa's families over time and what homes were like…

  6. Family Life Education: Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuccaro, Mary; And Others

    Designed to serve as a model and resource for teachers setting up family life education programs at the secondary level, this family life education curriculum guide presents a specific ten-session model for programs at both the high school and junior high school levels. While both programs attempt to provide a broad overview of the areas commonly…

  7. The Family & Life Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Mellie R.

    The Family and Life Education program at Aims Community College (ACC) in Colorado began in 1967 as prenatal classes taught by volunteer instructors who were registered nurses with backgrounds in maternal-child health. Currently, the program, which is co-sponsored by ACC and North Colorado Medical Center, involves a program coordinator, three staff…

  8. Family Medicine: Bridge to Life.

    PubMed

    Luz, Clare

    2016-01-01

    Reflecting on the suicide of a close friend, this essay explores what comprises, and inspires a will to live, and how those in Family Medicine can address suicide risk even in the face of debilitating or terminal illness. Research indicates that the will to live is a measurable indicator of general well-being, distinct from depression, and an important predictor of a person's motivation to "hold on to life". As such, understanding what is at the heart of a desire to live should alter clinical practice. This essay offers ideas for ways in which to create bridges for patients that could help sustain life. © Copyright 2016 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  9. Family Life and Sex Education Among Low-Income Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conley, Martha McClenny

    A sample of 218 black low-income mothers is used to investigate the mothers' perception of their need for family life and sex education for their entire family, attitude toward public school, family life and sex education, and the concept of the population crisis. This study focuses on low income families because this population has been most…

  10. Family Development and the Family Life Cycle: An Empirical Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spanier, Graham; And Others

    The concept of family life cycle has become increasingly prominent in the study of family development--the formation, maintenance, change, and dissolution of marriage and family relations. An evaluation of this concept is accomplished by examining the relationships between three possible stratification schemes: stage of the family life cycle,…

  11. Marriage and Family Life. Vocational Home Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kates, Donna

    These course materials, designed to be used with students in the 11th and 12th grades and for adult students, are intended to provide basic knowledge of family life and adult living. The one-semester home economics course focuses on basic marriage and family skills, life choices, parenthood, and family changes. The guide contains 4 sections and 10…

  12. Family Life Education for the Later Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brubaker, Timothy H.; Roberto, Karen A.

    1993-01-01

    Notes that family life education programs for older adults address issues of marriage, sexuality, retirement and family life, widowhood, intergenerational relations, and caregiving. For each of these issues, research is briefly reviewed, educational programs are discussed, and issues for future are noted. Seven guidelines for development of family…

  13. Social Class Issues in Family Life Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Robert, Jr.; Perry-Jenkins, Maureen

    1996-01-01

    Examines cultural and structural frameworks for considering social class and research evidence regarding social class differences in parenting and marriage. Reviews literature of family life education and offers recommendations about how to include social class issues in the context and delivery of family life education. (SNR)

  14. Nonverbal Poetry: Family Life-Space Diagrams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bardill, Donald R.

    2001-01-01

    Examines life-space diagrams as a form of nonverbal poetry which taps personal feelings, tells a story, and characterizes a particular life situation, forming a useful therapy technique that provides a family the opportunity to examine its internal family relationships. Offers two case studies, discusses five levels of knowing and awareness, and…

  15. Changes in American Family Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saluter, Arlene F.

    1989-01-01

    This report provides a graphic overview of recent trends in the lifestyles of Americans which suggest a movement away from "traditional" family living. The charts in this report with their limited commentary, summarize major trends and focus on families with children present. Data are also presented on other types of families, households, and…

  16. Prejudice, Mental Health and Family Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ackerman, Nathan W.

    This pamphlet explores the relationship among prejudice, mental health, and family life. Prejudice is learned behavior, initially within the family unit which sets the framework for good or bad mental health as well as for the development of positive or negative attitudes. The family also determines the degree and kind of mental health of each…

  17. Thailand Functional Literacy and Family Life Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Education, Inc., New York, NY.

    This document gives details on a current Thai project whose object is to introduce family planning concepts into adult education programs. Complementary objectives are: (1) Educate 200,000 adults through literacy/family planning programs by 1976; (2) Develop appropriate instructional materials; (3) Add and emphasize family life education in the…

  18. Family Life Education--For Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Katherine K.; MacFarlane, Ann

    1971-01-01

    Account of a family-life film-lecture series for poor farm laborers, primarily men. Some of the topics discussed were: priorities in human needs, family communications, sexuality, family planning and masculine and feminine roles. The program improved the men's ability to communicate and made them more receptive to counseling. (Authors/JB)

  19. Family Quality of Life Empowered by Family-Oriented Support

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schippers, Alice; van Boheemen, Marleen

    2009-01-01

    Professional services for persons with intellectual disabilities (ID) have begun to attach more importance to their environment. The concept of (family-related) quality of life proved to link very well with this idea and lent itself to constructing and evaluating services. One outcome was the emergence of equal partnerships between families,…

  20. The Life Cycle of the Japanese Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumagai, Fumie

    1984-01-01

    Analyzes the existing Japanese population data, focusing on changes in the timing of events in a family life cycle of Japanese women. Analysis revealed that the overall pattern of the family career of Japanese women today closely resembles that of their American and Canadian counterparts. (LLL)

  1. Family Life Education in Canadian Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deiseach, Donal

    A survey determined the extent to which Family Life Education (FLE) has been introduced into Canadian schools. FLE refers to a school program or activity aimed directly at enhancing students' understanding of personal development and family living. Results are presented in three sections: adoption of FLE by school districts, district perspectives…

  2. Copyright Law for Family Life Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Dorothy H.

    1978-01-01

    Family life writers and educators must become knowledgable about legal protections and restrictions. Definitions of copyright, guidelines for fair use of copyrighted works, and legal penalties for infringement are essential information. Selected cases indicate the legal base for the current status of copyright law relevant to family life…

  3. Family Life in Black America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Robert Joseph, Ed.; Jackson, James S., Ed.; Chatters, Linda M., Ed.

    This volume draws on data from the National Survey of Black Americans (NSBA) to explore the condition of the black family in America. The first chapter provides a general introduction, and each of the other chapters presents additional information about the NSBA as it pertains to specific subsamples of NSBA respondents. The following chapters are…

  4. Family Life in Black America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Robert Joseph, Ed.; Jackson, James S., Ed.; Chatters, Linda M., Ed.

    This volume draws on data from the National Survey of Black Americans (NSBA) to explore the condition of the black family in America. The first chapter provides a general introduction, and each of the other chapters presents additional information about the NSBA as it pertains to specific subsamples of NSBA respondents. The following chapters are…

  5. Families as Life Span Experts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brendtro, Larry K.; Mitchell, Martin L.

    2011-01-01

    Professionals dealing with challenging behavior frequently operate detached from the other relationships in the child's life. This narrow approach has been called the unilateral strategy based on the belief that the child's outside world can be ignored and behavior can be changed by administering specific corrective interventions. In contrast,…

  6. Families as Life Span Experts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brendtro, Larry K.; Mitchell, Martin L.

    2011-01-01

    Professionals dealing with challenging behavior frequently operate detached from the other relationships in the child's life. This narrow approach has been called the unilateral strategy based on the belief that the child's outside world can be ignored and behavior can be changed by administering specific corrective interventions. In contrast,…

  7. Family, money, and health: Regional differences in the determinants of life satisfaction over the life course

    PubMed Central

    Margolis, Rachel; Myrskylä, Mikko

    2013-01-01

    We examine how family, money, and health explain variation in life satisfaction over the life cycle across seven global regions using data from the World Values Survey. With a life domain approach, we study whether the importance of the life domains varies by region and age groups and whether the variation explained by each factor is due to the magnitude or prevalence of each factor. Globally, family, money, and health explain a substantial fraction of life satisfaction, increasing from 12 percent in young adulthood to 15 percent in mature adulthood. Health is the most important factor, and its importance increases with age. Income is unimportant above age 50. Remarkably, the contribution of family is small across ages. Across regions health is most important in the wealthier, and income in the poorer regions of the world. Family explains a substantial fraction of life satisfaction only in Western Europe and Anglophone countries. Findings highlight that the population-level importance of family, money, and health in explaining variation in life satisfaction across regions is mainly attributable to the individual-level life satisfaction differences between people of different statuses rather than differences in the distribution of various states such as poor health across regions. PMID:24796263

  8. Family, money, and health: regional differences in the determinants of life satisfaction over the life course.

    PubMed

    Margolis, Rachel; Myrskylä, Mikko

    2013-06-01

    We examine how family, money, and health explain variation in life satisfaction over the life cycle across seven global regions using data from the World Values Survey. With a life domain approach, we study whether the importance of the life domains varies by region and age groups and whether the variation explained by each factor is due to the magnitude or prevalence of each factor. Globally, family, money, and health explain a substantial fraction of life satisfaction, increasing from 12 percent in young adulthood to 15 percent in mature adulthood. Health is the most important factor, and its importance increases with age. Income is unimportant above age 50. Remarkably, the contribution of family is small across ages. Across regions health is most important in the wealthier, and income in the poorer regions of the world. Family explains a substantial fraction of life satisfaction only in Western Europe and Anglophone countries. Findings highlight that the population-level importance of family, money, and health in explaining variation in life satisfaction across regions is mainly attributable to the individual-level life satisfaction differences between people of different statuses rather than differences in the distribution of various states such as poor health across regions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Online discussions mirroring family life during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Kouri, Pirkko; Turunen, Hannele; Tossavainen, Kerttu; Saarikoski, Seppo

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to find out what aspects of their parenthood parents revealed, and how they expressed their thoughts concerning maternity care services on an online communication forum. The 'Information Society' offers a growing variety of health services as part of public primary health care via the internet. Little is known about the contents produced online by pregnant families, and how they reflect on both family life and maternity care services. The data for this study were obtained from online discussions between families (n=21) in Net Clinic, an internet-based service designed for public maternity care. The data included experiences of family life during pregnancy, childbirth and parenting, and was analysed by inductive content analysis. While maturing into parenthood, both women and men recognised the uniqueness of their new role and wanted to prepare for safe childbirth. Online communication in the home environment nourished new social networks among families who were expecting their first, second or third child. In addition, families reflected on maternity care services on the Net Clinic's communication forum. This provided realistic feedback to maternity care professionals. Today, the relationship between clients and professionals is inevitably changing. More online services and advocacy are needed if families are to have access to online health services. The role of professionals is diversifying from being authorities to supporting and facilitating clients' individual self-care. Based on direct client feedback, the quality of maternity care can be improved.

  10. Enhancing Family Life in the Future: A Potential for Family Therapists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sporakowski, Michael J.

    1992-01-01

    Addresses three concerns from family therapy perspective: current strengths and weaknesses of U.S. family life; challenges to family life in next decade; and family therapist's role in strengthening family life. Examines challenges and opportunities for family therapists in the future, viewing enhancement of functioning as vital mode of future…

  11. Rural School Children Picturing Family Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Lange, Naydene; Olivier, Tilla; Geldenhuys, Johanna; Mitchell, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Rurality is an active agent and central to the lived experiences of children growing up on a farm and attending a farm school. It is a key to their everyday experiences, and influences family life, schooling and their future. Previous studies elsewhere in the world have explored the notion of childhood in rural contexts, but there is a dearth of…

  12. Parent, Home, and Family Life Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Syracuse Univ., NY. ERIC Clearinghouse on Adult Education.

    This 149 item bibliography on parent, home, and family life education begins with descriptions of a number of periodicals and bibliographies, and several studies of trends in home economics education. These are followed by 27 surveys of role perception, needs, interests, and participation; 25 studies on the training of professionals and…

  13. Family Life Education Resource Unit. Single Living.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hite, Joyce

    This resource unit, a supplement to the family life education curiculum guide (see related note), was designed to help secondary education home economics teachers provide students with learning experiences related to living as a single person. The unit covers two principle topics regarding single living, each including an overall objective,…

  14. Teacher Workbook on Family Life Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Susan E.; Thornton, Carla E.

    This workbook for teachers is intended as a guide for developing a curriculum in Family Life Education for physically disabled high school students, although information on specific disabilities and sex related issues is not included except in the bibliographies. Each group of materials is followed by questions teachers can ask themselves to…

  15. Rural School Children Picturing Family Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Lange, Naydene; Olivier, Tilla; Geldenhuys, Johanna; Mitchell, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Rurality is an active agent and central to the lived experiences of children growing up on a farm and attending a farm school. It is a key to their everyday experiences, and influences family life, schooling and their future. Previous studies elsewhere in the world have explored the notion of childhood in rural contexts, but there is a dearth of…

  16. Family Life and Worker Productivity. Learning Modules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indiana Univ., Bloomington. Vocational Education Services.

    This manual includes eight learning modules about family life and worker productivity. Each module begins with the rationale and a list of objectives. Each objective is then taken up in turn, with an introductory statement and classroom activities given for each objective. Main ideas are presented in boldface type, and correlated with the learning…

  17. Sex Education and Family Life Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballou, Margaret; And Others

    Provided is a sex education and family life curriculum for blind students in grades k through 12. Curriculum units are developmentally sequenced into five levels: early childhood, middle childhood, pre-puberty, puberty, and adolescence. Sequences are organized around eight themes: self-others (to provide student objectives in the areas of body…

  18. 78 FR 38413 - American Family Life Insurance Company, et al.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-26

    ... COMMISSION American Family Life Insurance Company, et al. June 20, 2013. AGENCY: Securities and Exchange...''). Applicants: American Family Life Insurance Company (the ``Company''), American Family Variable Account I (the ``Life Account''), and American Family Variable Account II (the ``Annuity Account'') (together,...

  19. Work, family and life-course fit

    PubMed Central

    Moen, Phyllis; Kelly, Erin; Huang, Qinlei

    2008-01-01

    This study moves from “work-family” to a multi-dimensional “life-course fit” construct (employees’ cognitive assessments of resources, resource deficits, and resource demands), using a combined work-family, demands-control and ecology of the life course framing. It examined (1) impacts of job and home ecological systems on fit dimensions, and (2) whether control over work time predicted and mediated life-course fit outcomes. Using cluster analysis of survey data on a sample of 917 white-collar employees from Best Buy headquarters, we identified four job ecologies (corresponding to the job demands-job control model) and five home ecologies (theorizing an analogous home demands-home control model). Job and home ecologies predicted fit dimensions in an additive, not interactive, fashion. Employees’ work-time control predicted every life-course fit dimension and partially mediated effects of job ecologies, organizational tenure, and job category. PMID:19430546

  20. Called home: The creation of family life.

    PubMed

    Hutch, R A

    1992-09-01

    Engendering family life is a spiritual process (theosis) based on human ethological constants of gender difference and generational turnover. Recent studies on ethnicity suggest that such a process retrieves a primordial sense of the human species as a whole, "humankind." Families, especially in this broad sense, link together the living and the dead and, at their best, morally empower individuals who link their destinies to such a vision of creation and human health. Reference is made to work on human strengths and speciation by Erik Erikson and to that on maternal thinking by Sara Ruddick. A political program by which an ideology of "familism" can be made is offered.

  1. Reconceptualizing the Domain and Boundaries of Family Life Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers-Walls, Judith A.; Ballard, Sharon M.; Darling, Carol Anderson; Myers-Bowman, Karen S.

    2011-01-01

    Many scholars have defined family life education (FLE), and some have differentiated it from other family-related fields. For example, Doherty (1995) provided a definition of the boundaries between FLE and family therapy; however, we believe those criteria can be improved. We explore the professions of family life education, family therapy, and…

  2. Reconceptualizing the Domain and Boundaries of Family Life Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers-Walls, Judith A.; Ballard, Sharon M.; Darling, Carol Anderson; Myers-Bowman, Karen S.

    2011-01-01

    Many scholars have defined family life education (FLE), and some have differentiated it from other family-related fields. For example, Doherty (1995) provided a definition of the boundaries between FLE and family therapy; however, we believe those criteria can be improved. We explore the professions of family life education, family therapy, and…

  3. The lesbian family life cycle: a contextual approach.

    PubMed

    Slater, S; Mencher, J

    1991-07-01

    A recent broadening of family life cycle theory to include the various family norms deriving from ethnic differences, single parenting, divorce, and remarriage has not extended to the lesbian family experience. The need to articulate a lesbian family life cycle is underscored here with particular attention to the specific challenges and coping mechanisms of this particular family experience.

  4. Linking Family Life and Health Professionals, Volunteers, and Family Life Students in a Community Hospice Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fruit, Dorothy

    This paper describes the Portage County, Ohio community hospice program, emphasizing the linkages between family life specialists, health professionals, volunteers, and students. Hospice service is defined as a specialized, home-based program for the management of pain and other symptoms of terminal illness, with the family as the unit of care.…

  5. Effect of Individual Component Life Distribution on Engine Life Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.; Hendricks, Robert C.; Soditus, Sherry M.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of individual engine component life distributions on engine life prediction was determined. A Weibull-based life and reliability analysis of the NASA Energy Efficient Engine was conducted. The engine s life at a 95 and 99.9 percent probability of survival was determined based upon the engine manufacturer s original life calculations and assumed values of each of the component s cumulative life distributions as represented by a Weibull slope. The lives of the high-pressure turbine (HPT) disks and blades were also evaluated individually and as a system in a similar manner. Knowing the statistical cumulative distribution of each engine component with reasonable engineering certainty is a condition precedent to predicting the life and reliability of an entire engine. The life of a system at a given reliability will be less than the lowest-lived component in the system at the same reliability (probability of survival). Where Weibull slopes of all the engine components are equal, the Weibull slope had a minimal effect on engine L(sub 0.1) life prediction. However, at a probability of survival of 95 percent (L(sub 5) life), life decreased with increasing Weibull slope.

  6. 76 FR 17720 - American Family Life Insurance Company, et al.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-30

    ... COMMISSION American Family Life Insurance Company, et al. March 24, 2011. AGENCY: Securities and Exchange... Company Act of 1940, as amended (the ``1940 Act''). Applicants: American Family Life Insurance Company (the ``Company''), American Family Variable Account I (the ``Life Account''), and American...

  7. Family Life Education in Multicultural Classrooms. Practical Guidelines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbey, Nancy; And Others

    This guide presents approaches and guidelines for developing culturally appropriate and relevant family life education. It begins with a definition of culture and a look at different types of acculturation. A section on cultural relevance in family life education briefly explains the challenge of a multicultural approach in family life education…

  8. Life Satisfaction and Family Structure among Adolescents in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwan, Ying-Keung

    2008-01-01

    Relationships between family structure and perceived life satisfaction in overall life and five domains of the Brief Multidimensional Students' Life Satisfaction Scale, family life, friendships, school experience, myself, and where I live were examined among 4,502 Chinese adolescent secondary school students in Hong Kong. Bivariate analyses showed…

  9. Life Satisfaction and Family Structure among Adolescents in Hong Kong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwan, Ying-Keung

    2008-01-01

    Relationships between family structure and perceived life satisfaction in overall life and five domains of the Brief Multidimensional Students' Life Satisfaction Scale, family life, friendships, school experience, myself, and where I live were examined among 4,502 Chinese adolescent secondary school students in Hong Kong. Bivariate analyses showed…

  10. Governing multicultural populations and family life.

    PubMed

    Ali, Suki

    2014-03-01

    Shortly after coming to power in Britain, the Conservative-Liberal Democratic alliance placed family life at the heart of their political agenda, and set out their plans to reform adoption. The paper draws upon debates about the reforms and considers them in articulation with concerns about health of the nation expressed in political pronouncements on 'broken Britain' and the failures of 'state multiculturalism'. The paper considers the debates about domestic (transracial) and intercountry adoption, and uses feminist postcolonial perspectives to argue that we can only understand what are expressed as national issues within a transnational and postcolonial framework which illuminate the processes of state and institutional race-making. The paper analyses three key instances of biopower and governmentality in the adoption debates: the population, the normalizing family and the individual. The paper argues that we need to understand the reforms as part of a wider concern with the 'problem' of multicultural belonging, and that the interlocking discourses of nation, family and identities are crucial to the constitution and regulation of gendered, racialized subjects.

  11. Graphical Models via Univariate Exponential Family Distributions

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Eunho; Ravikumar, Pradeep; Allen, Genevera I.; Liu, Zhandong

    2016-01-01

    Undirected graphical models, or Markov networks, are a popular class of statistical models, used in a wide variety of applications. Popular instances of this class include Gaussian graphical models and Ising models. In many settings, however, it might not be clear which subclass of graphical models to use, particularly for non-Gaussian and non-categorical data. In this paper, we consider a general sub-class of graphical models where the node-wise conditional distributions arise from exponential families. This allows us to derive multivariate graphical model distributions from univariate exponential family distributions, such as the Poisson, negative binomial, and exponential distributions. Our key contributions include a class of M-estimators to fit these graphical model distributions; and rigorous statistical analysis showing that these M-estimators recover the true graphical model structure exactly, with high probability. We provide examples of genomic and proteomic networks learned via instances of our class of graphical models derived from Poisson and exponential distributions. PMID:27570498

  12. Professionalization of Family Life Education: Defining the Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darling, Carol A.; Fleming, Wm. Michael; Cassidy, Dawn

    2009-01-01

    An online professional practice analysis of family life educators was conducted resulting in responses from 522 Certified Family Life Educators (CFLEs) and a comparison group of 369 noncertified family practitioners. This survey included questions about the characteristics of CFLEs, their work environments, and practice-related tasks within 10…

  13. Professionalization of Family Life Education: Defining the Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darling, Carol A.; Fleming, Wm. Michael; Cassidy, Dawn

    2009-01-01

    An online professional practice analysis of family life educators was conducted resulting in responses from 522 Certified Family Life Educators (CFLEs) and a comparison group of 369 noncertified family practitioners. This survey included questions about the characteristics of CFLEs, their work environments, and practice-related tasks within 10…

  14. Balancing Work and Family Life. ERIC Digest No. 110.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerka, Sandra

    Career and vocational educators must prepare people with the attitudes and skills needed for successful integration of work and family life. Ideally, life and career planning should be taught as a unit beginning in the middle school. A life/career planning course should incorporate such topics as interdependence of individual, family, and career…

  15. The Family Life Education Needs of Midlife and Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballard, Sharon M.; Morris Michael Lane

    2003-01-01

    Using a life course perspective, reports the findings from a needs assessment for midlife and older adults regarding family life education. A sample of 264 adults aged 50 and older indicated interest in 29 family life education topics. The highest rated topics were nutrition and health, fitness and exercise, and positive aspects of aging.…

  16. Parental Stress, Family-Professional Partnerships, and Family Quality of Life: Families of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsiao, Yun-Ju

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship among the quality of life of families that have at least one child with autism spectrum disorder, parental stress level, and partnerships between the family and professionals. Also, parent perceptions of parental stress, family quality of life, and family-professional partnerships were…

  17. Parental Stress, Family-Professional Partnerships, and Family Quality of Life: Families of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsiao, Yun-Ju

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship among the quality of life of families that have at least one child with autism spectrum disorder, parental stress level, and partnerships between the family and professionals. Also, parent perceptions of parental stress, family quality of life, and family-professional partnerships were…

  18. ON THE DISTRIBUTION THEORY FOR SOME CONSTRAINED LIFE TESTING EXPERIMENTS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    RELIABILITY, *TEST METHODS, * DISTRIBUTION THEORY , MATHEMATICAL MODELS, STATISTICAL DISTRIBUTIONS, MULTIVARIATE ANALYSIS, DECISION THEORY, LIFE EXPECTANCY(SERVICE LIFE), EXPONENTIAL FUNCTIONS, THESES.

  19. A life history model of the alcoholic family.

    PubMed

    Steinglass, P

    1980-09-01

    Research and clinical interest in the alcoholic family has tended to outpace the development of family-oriented conceptual models of alcoholism. A family development perspective has been almost totally absent, despite the chronic, longitudinal nature of alcoholism. A life history model is proposed that uses the concepts of the "alcoholic system," family homeostasis, and the "family alcohol phase" as its building blocks. Chronic alcoholism tends to produce distortions in the normative family life cycle. These distortions and their clinical implications are discussed, using four case histories as illustrations of the concepts proposed. The model is also examined in the light of current research findings about the alcoholic family.

  20. Family Life in the Slave Quarters: Survival Strategies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Marie Jenkins

    2001-01-01

    Explores the family life of slaves from the perspective of the enslaved family who developed strategies to help them endure bondage. Addresses the experience of these families, focusing on topics such as the economic activities slaves participated in to improve their material conditions and the role of children within the family. (CMK)

  1. Sustaining Families: Why the Life Course Development Approach Works.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Sharon J.; McKenry, Patrick C.

    2003-01-01

    A life-course development perspective depicts stages of family development with tasks for each stage. It addresses the diversity of family relationships and illustrates how human development includes individual, generational, and historical time. (Contains 14 references.) (SK)

  2. Australian Family Research Conference Proceedings (Canberra, Australia, November 23-25, 1983). Volume VI: Family Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Institute of Family Studies, Melbourne (Australia).

    Family life is the focus of this sixth volume in a series containing the proceedings of the 1983 Australian Family Research Conference. The papers are organized under two major sections: Children and Families and Family Environments. Papers and authors included are: "Family Conflict and Child Competence" (Gay Ochiltree and Paul Amato),…

  3. South African Families Raising Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Relationship between Family Routines, Cognitive Appraisal and Family Quality of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlebusch, L.; Samuels, A. E.; Dada, S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between family routines, cognitive appraisal of the impact of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) on the family and family quality of life (FQOL) in families raising children with ASD in South Africa. Methods: A sample of 180 families of young children with ASD who were…

  4. South African Families Raising Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders: Relationship between Family Routines, Cognitive Appraisal and Family Quality of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlebusch, L.; Samuels, A. E.; Dada, S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between family routines, cognitive appraisal of the impact of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) on the family and family quality of life (FQOL) in families raising children with ASD in South Africa. Methods: A sample of 180 families of young children with ASD who were…

  5. A Family Quality of Life Study of Families with Children with Disabilities in Hawai'i

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranges, Phaedra E.

    2011-01-01

    Research indicates that families of children with disabilities are at risk for a lower quality of life than families of typically developing children, as the impact that a child with a disability has on a family's quality of life (FQOL) is both substantial and complex (Zuna, Selig, Summers, & Turnbull, 2009b; Zuna, Summers, Turnbull, Hu &…

  6. Gender and the Work-Family Interface: Exploring Differences across the Family Life Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinengo, Giuseppe; Jacob, Jenet I.; Hill, E. Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    This study examines gender differences in the work-family interface across six family life stages using a global sample of IBM employees in 79 countries (N = 41,813). Family life stage was constructed using the age of respondent and age of youngest child. Results revealed that having young children at home was the critical catalyst for gender…

  7. Gender and the Work-Family Interface: Exploring Differences across the Family Life Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinengo, Giuseppe; Jacob, Jenet I.; Hill, E. Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    This study examines gender differences in the work-family interface across six family life stages using a global sample of IBM employees in 79 countries (N = 41,813). Family life stage was constructed using the age of respondent and age of youngest child. Results revealed that having young children at home was the critical catalyst for gender…

  8. A Family Quality of Life Study of Families with Children with Disabilities in Hawai'i

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranges, Phaedra E.

    2011-01-01

    Research indicates that families of children with disabilities are at risk for a lower quality of life than families of typically developing children, as the impact that a child with a disability has on a family's quality of life (FQOL) is both substantial and complex (Zuna, Selig, Summers, & Turnbull, 2009b; Zuna, Summers, Turnbull, Hu &…

  9. A New Distribution Family for Microarray Data.

    PubMed

    Kelmansky, Diana Mabel; Ricci, Lila

    2017-02-10

    The traditional approach with microarray data has been to apply transformations that approximately normalize them, with the drawback of losing the original scale. The alternative stand point taken here is to search for models that fit the data, characterized by the presence of negative values, preserving their scale; one advantage of this strategy is that it facilitates a direct interpretation of the results. A new family of distributions named gpower-normal indexed by p∈R is introduced and it is proven that these variables become normal or truncated normal when a suitable gpower transformation is applied. Expressions are given for moments and quantiles, in terms of the truncated normal density. This new family can be used to model asymmetric data that include non-positive values, as required for microarray analysis. Moreover, it has been proven that the gpower-normal family is a special case of pseudo-dispersion models, inheriting all the good properties of these models, such as asymptotic normality for small variances. A combined maximum likelihood method is proposed to estimate the model parameters, and it is applied to microarray and contamination data. Rcodes are available from the authors upon request.

  10. Developing Online Family Life Prevention and Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Robert, Jr.; Bowers, Jill R.; Mitchell, Elissa Thomann; Curtiss, Sarah; Ebata, Aaron T.

    2012-01-01

    Although numerous online family life education programs have been developed over the past few years, there has been little discussion about best practices in the development of these programs. This article presents a framework to assist family life educators in the development and improvement of online programs from the initial problem analysis…

  11. Family Life Education: Helping Students to Know Themselves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryder, Verdene

    1975-01-01

    A course in Family Life Education entitled "Home and Family Living" is offered to male and female junior and senior students in the Houston Independent School District. The student explores his self-awareness, stages of maturity, sexuality, handling emotions, marriage roles, money management, and later life. (BP)

  12. Developing Online Family Life Prevention and Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Robert, Jr.; Bowers, Jill R.; Mitchell, Elissa Thomann; Curtiss, Sarah; Ebata, Aaron T.

    2012-01-01

    Although numerous online family life education programs have been developed over the past few years, there has been little discussion about best practices in the development of these programs. This article presents a framework to assist family life educators in the development and improvement of online programs from the initial problem analysis…

  13. Family Life Education Needs of Mentally Disabled Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Jerelyn B.; Adams, Donna U.

    1987-01-01

    Administered 50 needs statements to 134 minimally and mildly mentally disabled adolescent students to identify their family life education needs as a basis for curriculum development. Identified six clusters or groups of family life education needs: Basic Nutrition, Teenage Pregnancy, Sex Education, Developmental Tasks of Adolescents, Marriage and…

  14. Validity of the Family Quality of Life Survey-2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Adrienne; Isaacs, Barry

    2015-01-01

    Background: Family Quality of Life (FQOL) is an important construct in the Intellectual Disabilities field. Several measures exist, including one developed by an international group, the Family Quality of Life Survey-2006 (FQOLS-2006; Brown et al.2006). However, the psychometric properties of this measure have yet to be fully investigated. This…

  15. Validity of the Family Quality of Life Survey-2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Adrienne; Isaacs, Barry

    2015-01-01

    Background: Family Quality of Life (FQOL) is an important construct in the Intellectual Disabilities field. Several measures exist, including one developed by an international group, the Family Quality of Life Survey-2006 (FQOLS-2006; Brown et al.2006). However, the psychometric properties of this measure have yet to be fully investigated. This…

  16. County-Wide Direction to Family Life Education. Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stone, James C.; And Others

    This study evaluated five Family Life Education Workshops designed to prepare elementary and secondary school teachers in Contra Costa County, California, to offer instruction in family life education, with an emphasis on healthy sexuality. The 30-hour workshops were offered in spring and summer 1968, winter and summer 1969, and fall 1970.…

  17. Realizing the Promise of Family Life Education. Issue Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlitt, John J.

    In the quest to establish public programs for reducing pregnancy, childbearing, and sexually transmitted diseases among adolescents, much attention has been given to family life education as a piece of the prevention paradigm. Research has shown that family life education that includes accurate and age-appropriate information will increase young…

  18. Family Life Education Needs of Mentally Disabled Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Jerelyn B.; Adams, Donna U.

    1987-01-01

    Administered 50 needs statements to 134 minimally and mildly mentally disabled adolescent students to identify their family life education needs as a basis for curriculum development. Identified six clusters or groups of family life education needs: Basic Nutrition, Teenage Pregnancy, Sex Education, Developmental Tasks of Adolescents, Marriage and…

  19. Parenting and Family Life Skills Education: A Model Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky State Dept. of Education, Frankfort.

    In 1988, the Kentucky General Assembly enacted the Parenting and Family Life Skills Act, KRS 158.797, which requires the teaching of parenting and family life skills to pupils in Kentucky's schools. Pursuant to this Act, the Kentucky Department of Education developed the model curriculum presented in this document as a guide for local school…

  20. Juggling Higher Education Study and Family Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webber, Louise

    2017-01-01

    Women with families face particular challenges when they undertake Higher Education. Questions arise about coping with the demands of study, new family routines, and the changed identity when mother becomes student: Can I manage it all? How will my family react? Will they give me the time and support I need? The author, herself a mother and…

  1. The Life Interventions for Family Effectiveness (LIFE) Project: Preliminary Findings on Alternative School Intervention for Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Donnie W.; Mouttapa, Michele; Reiber, Chris; McCuller, William Jason; Arancibia, Ruben; Kavich, Julia A.; Nieves, Elena; Novgrod, Judith; Mai, Noemi; Bisesi, Lorrie; Sim, Tiffanie

    2007-01-01

    A non-randomized control trial was conducted to assess the feasibility and efficacy of the Life Interventions for Family Effectiveness (LIFE) project: a family-based, evidence-based comprehensive substance abuse intervention for at-risk adolescents and their families. The Matrix Adolescent Treatment Model of program delivery was utilized in the…

  2. Global Family Concerns and the Role of Family Life Education: An Ecosystemic Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darling, Carol A.; Turkki, Kaija

    2009-01-01

    We surveyed colleagues from 4 international professional organizations involved with families in order to examine global family concerns and the role of family life education from an ecosystemic perspective. Our sample represented 6 continents and 50 countries. Survey results indicated that family education and related coursework were available in…

  3. Global Family Concerns and the Role of Family Life Education: An Ecosystemic Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darling, Carol A.; Turkki, Kaija

    2009-01-01

    We surveyed colleagues from 4 international professional organizations involved with families in order to examine global family concerns and the role of family life education from an ecosystemic perspective. Our sample represented 6 continents and 50 countries. Survey results indicated that family education and related coursework were available in…

  4. Families in Later Life: A Burgeoning Research Area.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brubaker, Timothy H.

    1990-01-01

    Reviews research from 1980s focusing on families who are beyond child-rearing years. Sees later-life families as characterized by continuity and changes as they experience marriage, divorce, widowhood, remarriage, childlessness, grandparenthood, sibling relationships, and family caregiving. Suggests areas for future research focusing on…

  5. The Role of Companion Animals throughout the Family Life Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Wendy G.

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines the roles that companion animals play in the lives of American families, and discusses how those roles change as families progress through the stages of the family life cycle. It highlights the importance of pets in the lives of children and the benefits they receive from such relationships. It also presents information…

  6. Helping Families Attain a Desirable Quality of Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craig, Karen E.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses important aspects of desirable quality of life or well-being of families: household maintenance and work activities (care of house, family, clothing, food preparation, health maintenance, and home management); consumer goods satisfaction; and interaction of household members. Home economics can help families to maintain these critical…

  7. Late-Life Divorce: Its Impact on Family Rituals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pett, Marjorie A.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Examined perceived changes in specific family celebrations, traditions, important life cycle events, and day-to-day family contact that occurred for 115 adult children whose parents had divorced after long-term marriage. Found strong positive correlation between perceived disruptiveness of parental divorce and changes in family rituals,…

  8. The Role of Companion Animals throughout the Family Life Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Wendy G.

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines the roles that companion animals play in the lives of American families, and discusses how those roles change as families progress through the stages of the family life cycle. It highlights the importance of pets in the lives of children and the benefits they receive from such relationships. It also presents information…

  9. The Center for Family Life and the Sunset Park Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheffer, Ethel

    The Center of Family Life (CFL) is a private nonprofit agency. Since its creation in 1978 CFL has offered a wide range of services to children and families in Sunset Park, a low-income multi-echnic Brooklyn, New York neighborhood. All families with children under age 18 and pregnant women living in the neighborhood are eligible for services free…

  10. Family Quality of Life Following Early Identification of Deafness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Carla W.; Wegner, Jane R.; Turnbull, Ann P.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Family members' perceptions of their quality of life were examined following early identification of deafness in children. Method: A questionnaire was used to solicit ratings of satisfaction from the family members of 207 children who were deaf and younger than 6 years of age. Results: Results indicated that families were generally…

  11. Family Quality of Life Following Early Identification of Deafness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Carla W.; Wegner, Jane R.; Turnbull, Ann P.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Family members' perceptions of their quality of life were examined following early identification of deafness in children. Method: A questionnaire was used to solicit ratings of satisfaction from the family members of 207 children who were deaf and younger than 6 years of age. Results: Results indicated that families were generally…

  12. Research Needs of a Family Life Educator and Marriage Counselor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blood, Robert O.

    1976-01-01

    The author, a family life educator, reviews the research literature on marriage and family indicating the neglected areas and stressing the need for cause and effect studies. He proposes a number of research approaches to achieve the latter. Speech presented at the annual meeting of the National Council on Family Relations, Salt Lake City, Utah,…

  13. Military Families under Stress: Implications for Family Life Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drummet, Amy Reinkober; Coleman, Marilyn; Cable, Susan

    2003-01-01

    Provides a summary of the limited research on three uniquely stressful experiences of military families: relocation, separation, and reunion. Using the insights derived from this literature, identifies and discusses interventions to assist and guide military families through these unique events. (Contains 64 references.) (GCP)

  14. End-of-life family conferences: rooted in the evidence.

    PubMed

    Lautrette, Alexandre; Ciroldi, Magali; Ksibi, Hichem; Azoulay, Elie

    2006-11-01

    Critical care clinicians no longer consider family members as visitors in the intensive care unit. Family-centered care has emerged from the results of qualitative and quantitative studies evaluating the specific needs of families of patients dying in the intensive care unit. In addition, interventional studies have established that intensive and proactive communication empowers family members of dying patients, helping them to share in discussions and decisions, if they so wish. In addition to intensive communication, interventional studies have highlighted the role of nurses, social workers, and palliative care teams in reducing family burden, avoiding futile life-sustaining therapies, and providing effective comfort care. End-of-life family conferences are formal, structured meetings between intensivists and family members. Guidelines for organizing these conferences take into account the specific needs of families, including reassurance that the patient's symptoms will be adequately managed; honest clear information about the patient's condition and treatment; a willingness on the part of physicians to listen and respond to family members and to address their emotions; attention to patient preferences; clear explanations about surrogate decision making; and continuous, compassionate, and technically proficient attention to the patient's needs until death occurs. Means of improving end-of-life care have been identified in epidemiologic and interventional studies. End-of-life family conferences constitute the keystone around which excellent end-of-life care can be built.

  15. [Reciprocity between adult generations: family transfers over the life course].

    PubMed

    Brandt, Martina; Deindl, Christian; Haberkern, Klaus; Szydlik, Marc

    2008-10-01

    Intergenerational relations are characterised by reciprocal transfers and solidarity over the shared life span. Children care for their elderly parents, and parents support their adult children financially, for example, during their education or when they start their own household and family. From a life course-perspective, we analysed mutual transfers between parents and their adult children: Are transfers balanced over the life course and family-stages? Do we find patterns of direct or indirect reciprocity? Which factors facilitate exchange, and which do not? Using multinomial multilevel regression analyses based on the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE) we trace transfers of time and money between parents and adult children back to opportunity, need and family structures. Remaining differences between European countries are explained by cultural contextual structures, here: family expenditures. The exchange between generations is reciprocal, but not necessarily balanced in various phases of family life.

  16. The family life-path theory: a tool for nurses working in partnership with families.

    PubMed

    Jokinen, Pirkko

    2004-06-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the family life-path theory. The theory may offer nurses an alternative model for use in working in partnership with the family of a child with a long-term illness. It is important that nurses have a deep understanding of a family's everyday life. The better nurses know the family and the context in which it lives, the more individual advice and coping strategies that they are able to find in partnership with a family, and thus to support the family in achieving a good quality of life. The theory describes the life of a family of a child with asthma as a lifepath. The dimensions of the family's life-path are environment, the child's becoming ill, the family's view of health, their attitude towards illness, everyday routines and social network. The unpredictability of asthma, optimism about the future and normalization of life are factors that guide families towards achievement of a good quality of life for their child.

  17. Aging and Family Life: A Decade Review

    PubMed Central

    Silverstein, Merril; Giarrusso, Roseann

    2010-01-01

    In this review, we summarize and critically evaluate the major empirical, conceptual, and theoretical directions that studies of aging families have taken during the first decade of the 21st century. The field has benefited from an expanded perspective based on four overarching themes: (a) complexity in emotional relations, (b) diversity in family structures and households, (c) interdependence of family roles and functions, and (d) patterns and outcomes of caregiving. Although research on aging families has advanced theory and applied innovative statistical techniques, the literature has fallen short in fully representing diverse populations and in applying the broadest set of methodological tools available. We discuss these and other frontier areas of scholarship in light of the aging of baby boomers and their families. PMID:22930600

  18. Family violence across the life cycle.

    PubMed

    Forsdike, Kirsty; Tarzia, Laura; Hindmarsh, Elizabeth; Hegarty, Kelsey

    2014-11-01

    Family violence covers a range of abuse including child abuse and neglect, intimate partner violence and elder abuse. Each form of abuse has a significant negative impact on health and wellbeing, and patients present to general practice with varying physical and psychological issues. General practice is unique in that it often works with an entire family, which can be challenging and needs to be actively managed. This article aims to address clinical questions that general practitioners (GPs) may have in identifying and responding to patients experiencing family violence. It takes into account the different types of abuse victims experience and how to respond to perpetrators. The recommendations in this article can also apply to same-sex relationships. Managing family violence requires a whole-of-practice approach to encourage a safe environment in which families can dis-close abuse and where GPs can respond appropriately. Abuse can be inter-generational and GPs have a role in identification, management and referral.

  19. Chronic illness and family: impact of schizophrenia and Crohn's disease on the family quality of life.

    PubMed

    Loga, Slobodan; Sošić, Bojan; Kulenović, Alma Džubur; Svraka, Emira; Bosankić, Nina; Kučukalić, Abdulah; Cemalović, Omer; Hadžić, Alma

    2012-12-01

    Quality of life assessments are increasingly present in health research. Chronic and progressive illness of a family member unavoidably affects quality of life of a family as a whole. The goals of this study were to gain insight into the family burden of chronic disorders, especially possible differences in family quality of life (FQOL) in families that have members suffering from either schizophrenia or Crohn's disease, and families in which none of the members have chronic somatic or mental illness, as well as to pilot an instrument for this purpose. The sample consisted of 53 families with a member suffering from schizophrenia, 50 families with a member suffering from Crohn's disease, and 45 families with no identifiable chronic illnesses. An informant from each family underwent a structured face to face interview, using a questionnaire specially adapted from Family Quality of Life Survey, an instrument widely used to assess FQOL in families with members with disabilities, and which addresses nine areas of family life. In the domain of health, both groups of families with chronic illnesses believe they have significantly different conditions when compared to members of the Control group. In the Crohn's disease group, families had a great deal more of challenges in accessing healthcare services; and see themselves at a disadvantage when compared to both other groups in the domain of finances. Control group offered lowest rating in the domain of support from others. Overall measures of FQOL show significant variation among the three groups, Crohn's disease group offering lowest ratings, followed by families of mental health service users. Overall, FQOL seems to be lower in families that have members diagnosed with Crohn's disease than in families with members suffering from schizophrenia. Illness-specific studies are required, as well as instruments with stronger psychometric properties and studies of determinants of FQOL. Qualitative approach should be emphasised

  20. Family Care During End-of-Life Vigils.

    PubMed

    Fleming-Damon, Colleen

    2016-09-01

    An end-of-life vigil is the act of being with another toward death. A family vigil at end-of-life occurs when significant others gather by the bedside of dying individuals in the weeks, days, or hours prior to the death event. It is not unusual for nurses to be present, bear witness, and share in this human experience. This article reviews seminal and current research regarding the meaning and structure of the lived experience of vigil keeping for a dying family member, and translates research to inform nurses regarding family care during the transition at end-of-life. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Quality of Life in Food Allergy Patients and Their Families.

    PubMed

    Walkner, Madeline; Warren, Christopher; Gupta, Ruchi S

    2015-12-01

    Pediatric food allergy is a growing health problem in the United States that has been found to adversely impact the quality of life of both affected children and their caregivers. This article provides a review of how food allergy affects the quality of life of patients and their families within the domains of school, social activities, relationships, and daily life. Efforts to improve food allergy-related quality of life among caregivers are also discussed.

  2. Family Quality of Life of Chinese Families of Children with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, X.; Wang, M.; Fei, X.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The concepts of quality of life and family quality of life (FQOL) are increasingly being studied in the field of intellectual disabilities (ID) in China as important frameworks for: (1) assessing families' need for supports and services; (2) guiding organisational and service delivery system changes; and (3) evaluating quality family…

  3. Intra-family distribution in developing countries.

    PubMed

    Behrman, J R

    1994-01-01

    Intra-household allocations are important in the determination of time use, human resource investments, and intra- and inter-generation of transfers in developing countries. During the 1980s through the mid-1990s there has been substantial progress in modeling intra-household allocations despite data limitations regarding the nature of the allocation of unobserved variables and the impact of unobserved heterogeneous endowments. The economic models of intra-household allocations include the pure parental altruism models with unified preferences, and within this the wealth model, which states that parents are concerned with each child's total wealth, but are not concerned with the sources of wealth. The next model is the separable earnings-transfers (SET) model, in which the parental welfare function is separable between their children's distribution of income from labor earnings and their children's distribution of income from physical and financial transfers received from their parents. The wealth model and the SET model have implications for identifying returns to schooling as well as implications for the interpretation of schooling as child quality. Models of qualified parental altruism include the rotten kid theorem, which states that variations in parental transfers to selfish children force such children to consider their parents' interests, as each beneficiary maximizes the total family income available to the altruistic benefactor. Under the strategic bequest or exchange model the parents influence the behavior of their children by holding wealth in bequeathable form. Collective models of household behavior, which focus on decisions between husbands and wives, include Nash bargaining models of intra-household allocations, which generalize the comparative statics of a unified preference constrained maximization. The Pareto-efficient collective household models assume that allocations are Pareto-efficient without assuming any explicit solution process.

  4. Family boundary characteristics, work-family conflict and life satisfaction: A moderated mediation model.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Lin; Fan, Jinyan

    2015-10-01

    Although work-family border and boundary theory suggest individuals' boundary characteristics influence their work-family relationship, it is largely unknown how boundary flexibility and permeability mutually influence work-family conflict and subsequent employee outcomes. Moreover, the existing work-family conflict research has been mainly conducted in the United States and other Western countries. To address these gaps in the work-family literature, the present study examines a moderated mediation model regarding how family boundary characteristics may influence individuals' work-family conflict and life satisfaction with a sample of 278 Chinese full-time employees. Results showed that employees' family flexibility negatively related to their perceived work interference with family (WIF) and family interference with work (FIW), and both these two relationships were augmented by individuals' family permeability. In addition, WIF mediated the relationship between family flexibility and life satisfaction; the indirect effect of family flexibility on life satisfaction via WIF was stronger for individuals with higher family permeability. The theoretical and managerial implications of these findings are discussed.

  5. The family and work connect: A case for relationship-focused family life education

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Jane; Parthasarathy, R.

    2010-01-01

    The article presents the premises for the need to develop a relationship-focused family life education program for young adult employees. The article explores the changing trends in the Indian family unit and their impact on the workforce. The author also presents the findings from interviews with family-intervention experts and their recommendations for the contents of such a program. PMID:20808662

  6. Family Quality of Life of Turkish Families Who Have Children with Intellectual Disabilities and Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meral, Bekir Fatih; Cavkaytar, Atilla; Turnbull, Ann P.; Wang, Mian

    2013-01-01

    This study examined family quality of life (FQOL) of Turkish families who have children with intellectual disabilities (ID) and autism. To research the perceptions of FQOL and relevant predictive relationships, data were gathered from 3,009 families who have children with ID and autism. The data were collected by using a Socio-demographic Family…

  7. Family Quality of Life of Turkish Families Who Have Children with Intellectual Disabilities and Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meral, Bekir Fatih; Cavkaytar, Atilla; Turnbull, Ann P.; Wang, Mian

    2013-01-01

    This study examined family quality of life (FQOL) of Turkish families who have children with intellectual disabilities (ID) and autism. To research the perceptions of FQOL and relevant predictive relationships, data were gathered from 3,009 families who have children with ID and autism. The data were collected by using a Socio-demographic Family…

  8. Family Quality of Life of South African Families Raising Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlebusch, Liezl; Dada, Shakila; Samuels, Alecia E.

    2017-01-01

    This article describes the family quality of life among families who are raising a young child with autism spectrum disorder. Survey research was conducted with 180 families of children with autism spectrum disorder who were receiving disability-related services in the Gauteng province of South Africa. The principle measure used was the Beach…

  9. Family Quality of Life: Adaptation to Spanish Population of Several Family Support Questionnaires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balcells-Balcells, A.; Gine, C.; Guardia-Olmos, J.; Summers, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The concept of family quality of life has emerged as a decisive construct in the last decades to improve the capabilities of families and to assess the outcomes of the services and supports they get. The goal of this research is to adapt three instruments to the Spanish population: the "Beach Center Family Quality of Life…

  10. Family Quality of Life of Australian Families with a Member with an Intellectual/Developmental Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rillotta, F.; Kirby, N.; Shearer, J.; Nettelbeck, T.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Family quality of life (FQOL) is a recent concept in intellectual/developmental disability research. Outcomes for the family are important to the provision of services because families, rather than institutions, are increasingly considered the primary support unit. This article presents Australian findings using the international…

  11. Family Quality of Life: Adaptation to Spanish Population of Several Family Support Questionnaires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balcells-Balcells, A.; Gine, C.; Guardia-Olmos, J.; Summers, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The concept of family quality of life has emerged as a decisive construct in the last decades to improve the capabilities of families and to assess the outcomes of the services and supports they get. The goal of this research is to adapt three instruments to the Spanish population: the "Beach Center Family Quality of Life…

  12. Family Quality of Life from the Perspectives of Individual Family Members: A Korean-American Family and Deafness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Joo Young; Turnbull, Ann

    2013-01-01

    Beginning in the mid-to-late 1980s, the focus on individual quality of life expanded to family quality of life (FQOL) in the field of intellectual disabilities. However, few studies examined FQOL for families who have children with hearing loss. Furthermore, most studies focused on mothers' perceptions of FQOL. The purpose of this study is to…

  13. The Family Life Cycle and Spouses' Time in Housework.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rexroat, Cynthia; Shehan, Constance

    1987-01-01

    Analyzed the housework time of 1,618 White couples. Found that the salience of work and family roles in the family life cycle affected the respective amounts of time that spouses allocated to household labor. Women spent less time in housework before and after childbearing stages, and husbands spent more time in domestic labor during periods of…

  14. Professional Support for Families in Difficult Life Situations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zakirova, Venera G.; Gaysina, Guzel I.; Raykova, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Relevance of the problem stated in the article is determined by the presence of a significant number of families in difficult life situations who need in professional support and socio-psychological assistance. The article aims to substantiate the effectiveness of the structural-functional model of professional supporting for families in difficult…

  15. The American Family: Its Impact on Quality of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cromwell, Ronald E.; Bartz, Karen W.

    1977-01-01

    This expanded position paper prepared by a committee of the Adult Education Association of the U.S. focuses on three areas: (1) Need for renewed effort by adult educators to "educate" families, (2) development of a philosophy of adult family life education, and (3) a variety of possible program emphases. (JT)

  16. Homework for Parents and Teens. Family Life Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbey-Harris, Nancy

    This document presents techniques for family counselors to use in their existing family life education programs to incorporate parent-children communication into those programs. Twenty-four assignments, divided into junior and senior high age levels, are included as an adjunct to classroom programs which provide structured, at-home activities to…

  17. Life Journey through Autism: A Guide for Military Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Katie C.; Clemens, Erin M.; Gilbert, Marilyn; McBreen, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Autism presents parents and families with many challenges under normal circumstances. Autism in a military family magnifies many of those challenges and adds a few more that are unique to the demands of military life and service, further complicating an already complex neurobiological disorder. Military sources indicate that more than 13,000…

  18. Family LIfe Education Curriculum: Grade 7 through Grade 9 Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cumberland County Schools, Fayetteville, NC.

    This document presents a curriculum unit in family life education for students in grades 7 through 9 that encompasses learning about human sexuality, interpersonal relationships, and roles within the family. The unit is designed to attain the following goals: (1) to help students gain a detailed knowledge of the anatomy, physiology, and uniqueness…

  19. Family LIfe Education Curriculum: Grade 7 through Grade 9 Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cumberland County Schools, Fayetteville, NC.

    This document presents a curriculum unit in family life education for students in grades 7 through 9 that encompasses learning about human sexuality, interpersonal relationships, and roles within the family. The unit is designed to attain the following goals: (1) to help students gain a detailed knowledge of the anatomy, physiology, and uniqueness…

  20. Accommodating family life: mentoring future female faculty members.

    PubMed

    Lodish, Harvey F

    2015-03-01

    The demands of family life are crucial factors in successfully retaining women in science. Retention efforts should focus on creating a family-friendly environment within the laboratory and the institute. Based on my own experiences, I suggest ways to attract top young scientists and support their development into leading researchers.

  1. Family Life, Literature and Films: An Annotated Bibliography. 1974 Supplement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Council on Family Relations, Minneapolis.

    As a supplement to the 1972 edition of the Family Life Bibliography, this selected bibliography contains descriptive annotations of literature, films, records, tapes, and other teaching aids related to marriage, parenthood, family and individual relationships, and kindered topics. The materials are divided into the following general areas: (1)…

  2. Family Life Education Grade 9. Optional Health Unit. Interim Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manitoba Dept. of Education, Winnipeg.

    This family life instructional unit is organized around four themes: (1) the importance of families; (2) human growth and development; (3) dilemmas and issues; and (4) promoting positive lifestyle practices. Lessons in the dilemmas and issues section include more in-depth information on subjects such as marriage and issues related to sexuality and…

  3. Family Needs and Family Quality of Life for Taiwanese Families of Children with Intellectual Disability and Developmental Delay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiu, Chun-Yu

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation consists of four related chapters including an introductory overview of all four chapters, a report on family needs, a report on family quality of life, and a summary of implications for the conceptual framework. Chapter 1, the introductory overview, presents background information of Taiwan and describes the family quality of…

  4. Family Life Education through Teen Theatre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burdyshaw, Cynthia; Fowler, Marilyn

    This paper describes how to create a teenage theatre project and explains why such a project is effective in educating teenagers. New Image Teen Theatre is a project which has combined peer education and improvisational theater since 1981 to reach teenagers with accurate family planning information, encourage communication, and promote responsible…

  5. Individual and Family Life. Teacher's Instructional Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This instructional guide for a one-half-credit technical course for grades 10-12 focuses on personal development, interpersonal relationships, effective individual and family functioning, and career preparation. Introductory materials consist of a course description; overview of course design; facilities, equipment, and resources; and a section on…

  6. Aging and Family Life: A Decade Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverstein, Merril; Giarrusso, Roseann

    2010-01-01

    In this review, we summarize and critically evaluate the major empirical, conceptual, and theoretical directions that studies of aging families have taken during the first decade of the 21st century. The field has benefited from an expanded perspective based on four overarching themes: (a) complexity in emotional relations, (b) diversity in family…

  7. Aging and Family Life: A Decade Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverstein, Merril; Giarrusso, Roseann

    2010-01-01

    In this review, we summarize and critically evaluate the major empirical, conceptual, and theoretical directions that studies of aging families have taken during the first decade of the 21st century. The field has benefited from an expanded perspective based on four overarching themes: (a) complexity in emotional relations, (b) diversity in family…

  8. New Strategies for Improving Rural Family Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coombs, Philip H.

    Presented in capsule form for the convenience of busy policy makers, planners, and program managers, this booklet summarizes major findings of a three-year study on practical aspects of rural development, with particular emphasis on ways of alleviating extreme poverty among disadvantaged rural families. Using case studies from Bangladesh, India,…

  9. Family Life Education through Teen Theatre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burdyshaw, Cynthia; Fowler, Marilyn

    This paper describes how to create a teenage theatre project and explains why such a project is effective in educating teenagers. New Image Teen Theatre is a project which has combined peer education and improvisational theater since 1981 to reach teenagers with accurate family planning information, encourage communication, and promote responsible…

  10. Gaming and Territorial Negotiations in Family Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aarsand, Pal Andre; Aronsson, Karin

    2009-01-01

    This article examines territorial negotiations concerning gaming, drawing on video recordings of gaming practices in middle-class families. It explores how private vs public gaming space was co-construed by children and parents in front of the screen as well as through conversations about games. Game equipment was generally located in public…

  11. A sudden, life-threatening medical crisis: the family's perspective.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Joyce S

    2006-01-01

    Each year millions of Americans are hospitalized suddenly with critical injuries or life-threatening medical emergencies. The families of these patients begin a roller coaster ride characterized by terrified waiting and lack of control. All the while, they are uncertain whether their loved one will survive until the ride is over. This is their story. Phenomenologic interviews with 6 family members identified 10 theme clusters that describe the experience. Specific implications for the nursing care of these families are discussed.

  12. Life Skills Literacy: An Intervention Model to Alleviate Family Poverty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Lee N.; Carswell, Andrew T.; Palmer, Lance; Sweaney, Annie L.; Mullis, Rebecca M.; Leonas, Karen K.; Moss, Joan Koonce; Mauldin, Teresa

    2005-01-01

    Life Skills Literacy (LSL) is a multidisciplinary intervention model that helps families living with limited resources (including poverty) achieve sustainable well-being. This model, based on ecological theory and a readiness for change framework, prepares people to learn from the program and teaches necessary life skills. The LSL project…

  13. Life Skills Literacy: An Intervention Model to Alleviate Family Poverty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Lee N.; Carswell, Andrew T.; Palmer, Lance; Sweaney, Annie L.; Mullis, Rebecca M.; Leonas, Karen K.; Moss, Joan Koonce; Mauldin, Teresa

    2005-01-01

    Life Skills Literacy (LSL) is a multidisciplinary intervention model that helps families living with limited resources (including poverty) achieve sustainable well-being. This model, based on ecological theory and a readiness for change framework, prepares people to learn from the program and teaches necessary life skills. The LSL project…

  14. Doing the right thing with families during critical life events.

    PubMed

    Milton, Constance L

    2010-04-01

    With complex medical technology readily available for life-sustaining situations, making critical healthcare decisions has never been more arduous. Individuals, families, and communities face difficult circumstances, while all-at-once attempting to make decisions that are ethically considered to be doing the right thing. What should the nurse do and how ought the nurse be with others during these moments of potentially divisive situations for families. This article begins a discussion of the ethical complexities for doing what is right in the midst of critical life events through the lens of the humanbecoming family model.

  15. Family health in everyday life: a qualitative study on well-being in families with children.

    PubMed

    Astedt-Kurki, P; Hopia, H; Vuori, A

    1999-03-01

    This article describes the subjective health views of young Finnish families with children. The data were collected in unstructured focused interviews with 19 families, most of whom were interviewed twice. Set within a phenomenological-hermeneutic framework, the study applies a qualitative method in order to uncover the meanings attached by the families to different facets of their everyday life. Health is an integral part of the everyday life of families with children, comprising various dimensions of experienced well-being and unwell-being, security and different life-habits. Social networks are crucial to family health: they can either strengthen or undermine experienced health. Professionals working with families in the health care system need to have at least a basic knowledge of the different dimensions of family health: this helps to identify and understand the individual ways in which families work to promote their health and well-being. This knowledge of family health is also important for research purposes. Health care professionals also need to know more about how families cope with their everyday problems and about how client families can be supported. More research is needed on the concepts of family health and on how those concepts are applied to practice in different health care sectors and in education.

  16. [Quality of life and family functioning in schizophrenia patients].

    PubMed

    Caqueo Urízar, Alejandra; Lemos Giráldez, Serafín

    2008-11-01

    Quality of life and family functioning of patients with schizophrenia are described. A sample of 49 schizophrenic patients and their 70 relatives, treated at the Mental Health Services of Arica, Chile, were included in the study. The Quality of Life Questionnaire of Sevilla (CSCV), the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12) and the Family Function Questionnaire (APGAR) were used to assess the patients, the last one also administered to their caregivers. Contrary to the results found in researches done in developed countries, the patients of this sample indicated suitable levels of quality of life, to a great extent, related to the perception of their family functioning. This confirms the importance of the family as social network of emotional support. Nevertheless, perceived family functioning is different in patients and their caregivers. Higher scores were obtained in caregivers who participated in a family psychoeducational program. The conclusion reached was that there are differences in the levels of quality of life perceived by patients of developed countries and those of developing countries, being higher in the latter ones, despite limitations in economic, sanitary and community resources. Future research should study why the variables that explain these levels of quality of life differ.

  17. Family sense of coherence and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Ngai, Fei-Wan; Ngu, Siew-Fei

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between family sense of coherence, social support, stress, quality of life and depressive symptoms among Chinese pregnant women. A cross-sectional design was used. A convenience sample of 267 Chinese pregnant women was recruited at the antenatal clinic and completed the Family Sense of Coherence Scale, Medical Outcomes Study Social Support Survey, Social Readjustment Rating Scale, Medical Outcome Study Short Form 12-Item Health Survey and General Health Questionnaire. Path analysis was employed. Family sense of coherence and social support had a direct impact on the mental health component of quality of life and depressive symptoms during pregnancy. Family sense of coherence also mediated the effect of stress on quality of life and depressive symptoms. The study provides evidence that family sense of coherence and social support play a significant role in promoting quality of life and reducing depressive symptoms during the transition to motherhood. Culturally competent healthcare should be developed to strengthen women's family sense of coherence and foster social support to combat the stress of new motherhood, thereby promoting quality of life during that period of their lives.

  18. Expressed attitudes of adolescents toward marriage and family life.

    PubMed

    Martin, Paige D; Specter, Gerald; Martin, Don; Martin, Maggie

    2003-01-01

    In the U.S., modifications in family structure and in attitudes concerning marriage and family life have been numerous. Areas such as sexual behavior and alternative living arrangements have become highly varied and nontraditional compared to past generations. This study examined the attitudes of adolescents toward aspects of marriage and family life. The majority of adolescents expressed negative attitudes toward divorce and viewed marriage as a lifelong commitment. While only about a third of the adolescents expressed positive attitudes toward premarital sex, a majority indicated they would engage in sexual intercourse before marriage, or already have. Interestingly, about half of the adolescents held positive attitudes toward cohabitation. Lastly, the adolescents demonstrated a growing acceptance of premarital counseling and psychoeducational interventions regarding marriage and family life.

  19. Family quality of life of Chinese families of children with intellectual disabilities.

    PubMed

    Hu, X; Wang, M; Fei, X

    2012-01-01

    The concepts of quality of life and family quality of life (FQOL) are increasingly being studied in the field of intellectual disabilities (ID) in China as important frameworks for: (1) assessing families' need for supports and services; (2) guiding organisational and service delivery system changes; and (3) evaluating quality family outcomes. The present study focused on exploring the perceptions of Chinese families who have a child with an ID regarding FQOL as well as examining the factor structure of FQOL concept from Chinese families. The Chinese version of the Family Quality of Life Scale was used to survey Chinese families living in the urban and suburban areas of Beijing who have a child with ID. A total of 442 families participated in this study. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to test the factor structure of FQOL. Multivariate analysis was also used to examine group differences among families in terms of family demographic variables. A five-factor structure of the FQOL construct was found in the Chinese sample, suggesting a similar factor structure found from US families in the literature. Different living conditions (e.g. housing and transportation) tended to affect significantly families' satisfaction ratings of their FQOL. It is also found that family income and severity of disability of the child are predictors of families' satisfaction ratings of FQOL. The preliminary findings of this study suggest a cross-cultural factor structure comparability of FQOL between samples in the USA and China. Results call for further examination of the family-centred service and support as a mediator on the interactive relationship between family characteristics, family needs and FQOL outcomes. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Family Life Quality and Emotional Quality of Life in Chinese Adolescents with and without Economic Disadvantage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shek, Daniel T. L.; Lee, T. Y.

    2007-01-01

    Chinese secondary school students (N = 2758) responded to measures of perceived family life quality (parenting quality and parent-child relational quality) and emotional quality of life (hopelessness, mastery, life satisfaction and self-esteem). Parenting quality included different aspects of parental behavioral control (parental knowledge,…

  1. Family Functions' Distribution in Men and Women Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kasimova, Ramilya Sh.; Biktagirova, Gulnara F.

    2016-01-01

    Creating a happy family with a favorable psychological climate is important both for the individual and the society as a whole. One of the factors, that influence the creation of a welfare family, is the content of the spouses' concepts of the family, its functions and their possible distribution. The main purpose of this article is to identify…

  2. Marriage As A Stage In The Family Life Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Bader, Edward L.

    1985-01-01

    The life cycle of a family goes through well recognized developmental stages, each of which causes some disruption. At certain stages, preventive intervention by the family physician would be most fruitful. The transition to marriage is a case in point. Knowing the tasks of this stage can help the family physician anticipate any problems, particularly ones which may affect health. Research into the effects of education for marriage has shown that such education helps couples resolve conflicts constructively. Research is now focusing on the next stage of family development: the birth of the first child. PMID:21274173

  3. Three Families in Search of a Director: Study of Life of Multi-Family Treatment Group of Three Schizophrenic Families of Diametrically Opposed Life Styles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pellman, Renee; Platt, Rhoda

    This clinical study describes a pilot experience of Multi-Family Treatment Groups (MFTG) as a treatment modality. The group leaders were two family therapists. Three intact families with completely different life styles, all chronically malfunctioning, and with previously unsuccessful treatment were chosen at random from the Clinic intake. The…

  4. Power-law distribution of family names in Japanese societies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyazima, Sasuke; Lee, Youngki; Nagamine, Tomomasa; Miyajima, Hiroaki

    2000-04-01

    We study the frequency distribution of family names. From a common data base, we count the number of people who share the same family name. This is the size of the family. We find that (i) the total number of different family names in a society scales as a power law of the population, (ii) the total number of family names of the same size decreases as the size increases with a power law and (iii) the relation between size and rank of a family name also shows a power law. These scaling properties are found to be consistent for five different regional communities in Japan.

  5. The long-term experience of family life after stroke.

    PubMed

    Kitzmüller, Gabriele; Asplund, Kenneth; Häggström, Terttu

    2012-02-01

    Stroke is a life-threatening and disabling illness known to have a significant impact on families. The purpose of this study was to illuminate the long-term experience of family life after stroke of stroke survivors and their spouses and children, particularly regarding marital and parent-child relationships. Thirty-seven narrative interviews were conducted with stroke survivors and their spouses and adult children who were minors at onset of the illness. A qualitative approach inspired by Gadamer's hermeneutic and van Manen's phenomenological understanding of lived experience was used. The analysis revealed four themes: the family as a lifebuoy, absent presence, broken foundations, and finding a new marital path. Lack of communication and altered roles and relationships endangered marital equilibrium and parent-child relationships after stroke. This study highlighted the need for professional family support as families were unprepared for the life changes that occurred. Nurses and other healthcare workers should examine family relationships and communication patterns and view the family as a unit composed of unique persons with different needs. Further research on the experiences of stroke survivors' children seems urgent.

  6. Family Voices: Life for Family Carers of People with Intellectual Disabilities in Ireland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chadwick, Darren D.; Mannan, Hasheem; Garcia Iriarte, Edurne; McConkey, Roy; O'Brien, Patricia; Finlay, Frieda; Lawlor, Anne; Harrington, Gerry

    2013-01-01

    Background: Families in Ireland remain the main providers of support for people with Intellectual disabilities, and the aim of this study was to map their life experiences whilst involving their family members as co-researchers. Materials and Method: This qualitative, participatory study involved 10 focus groups attended by 70 parents and siblings…

  7. Family Quality of Life for Families in Early Intervention in Spain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mas, Joana M.; Baqués, Natasha; Balcells-Balcells, Anna; Dalmau, Mariona; Giné, Climent; Gràcia, Marta; Vilaseca, Rosa

    2016-01-01

    Early intervention (EI) has been shown to be an essential resource for meeting the needs and priorities of children with intellectual and developmental disability and their families. The objective of this study was to examine (a) the perceived quality of life of families attending EI centers in Spain and (b) its relationship with characteristics…

  8. Family Quality of Life for Families in Early Intervention in Spain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mas, Joana M.; Baqués, Natasha; Balcells-Balcells, Anna; Dalmau, Mariona; Giné, Climent; Gràcia, Marta; Vilaseca, Rosa

    2016-01-01

    Early intervention (EI) has been shown to be an essential resource for meeting the needs and priorities of children with intellectual and developmental disability and their families. The objective of this study was to examine (a) the perceived quality of life of families attending EI centers in Spain and (b) its relationship with characteristics…

  9. 2010 Military Family Life Project (MFLP) - Couples: Tabulations of Responses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-31

    care home, preschool , after-school program)? Number of child care arrangements 2010 Military Family Life Project: Couples DMDC 119 67. [Ask if...officials contributing to the development of this survey included Cathy Flynn and Yuko Whitestone (Military Community and Family Policy). DMDC’s Survey...Design, Analysis & Operations Branch, under the guidance of Paul Rosenfeld, Branch Chief, is responsible for the development of questionnaires used

  10. Family and sexual life in people with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Mameniškienė, Rūta; Guk, Jevgenija; Jatužis, Dalius

    2017-01-01

    Having epilepsy is much more than having seizures. Epilepsy can have a severe negative effect on quality of life, affecting social relationships, academic achievement, housing, employment, and the ability to live and function independently. We undertook a cross-sectional study in a tertiary epilepsy center in Lithuania, aiming to assess the influence of epilepsy and aspects relating to epilepsy (employment, stigma, anxiety) on patients and their families, and to estimate their quality of family life and sexual functioning. We asked patients to complete a questionnaire about their socio-demographic situation, their seizure types and antiepileptic medications, and their quality of family and sexual life. Our results confirmed that epilepsy seriously influences family life. One third of our patients are lonely and half are childless. Epilepsy leads to difficulty in finding a job, especially for men, and unemployment affects their status in the family. People with epilepsy are uncomfortable interacting with those of the opposite sex and tend to conceal their medical condition from their partner. One third have sexual dysfunction, yet only a quarter of them seek professional help. There is a clear need to improve self-confidence and to reduce social stigma in people with epilepsy, and to encourage them to discuss their problems with specialists. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Family Life and Developmental Idealism in Yazd, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Abbasi-Shavazi, Mohammad Jalal; Askari-Nodoushan, Abbas

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND This paper is motivated by the theory that developmental idealism has been disseminated globally and has become an international force for family and demographic change. Developmental idealism is a set of cultural beliefs and values about development and how development relates to family and demographic behavior. It holds that modern societies are causal forces producing modern families, that modern families help to produce modern societies, and that modern family change is to be expected. OBJECTIVE We examine the extent to which developmental idealism has been disseminated in Iran. We also investigate predictors of the dissemination of developmental idealism. METHODS We use survey data collected in 2007 from a sample of women in Yazd, a city in Iran. We examine the distribution of developmental idealism in the sample and the multivariate predictors of developmental idealism. RESULTS We find considerable support for the expectation that many elements of developmental idealism have been widely disseminated. Statistically significant majorities associate development with particular family attributes, believe that development causes change in families, believe that fertility reductions and age-at-marriage increases help foster development, and perceive family trends in Iran headed toward modernity. As predicted, parental education, respondent education, and income affect adherence to developmental idealism. CONCLUSIONS Developmental idealism has been widely disseminated in Yazd, Iran and is related to social and demographic factors in predicted ways. COMMENTS Although our data come from only one city, we expect that developmental idealism has been widely distributed in Iran, with important implications for family and demographic behavior. PMID:22942772

  12. Family Life and Developmental Idealism in Yazd, Iran.

    PubMed

    Abbasi-Shavazi, Mohammad Jalal; Askari-Nodoushan, Abbas

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This paper is motivated by the theory that developmental idealism has been disseminated globally and has become an international force for family and demographic change. Developmental idealism is a set of cultural beliefs and values about development and how development relates to family and demographic behavior. It holds that modern societies are causal forces producing modern families, that modern families help to produce modern societies, and that modern family change is to be expected. OBJECTIVE: We examine the extent to which developmental idealism has been disseminated in Iran. We also investigate predictors of the dissemination of developmental idealism. METHODS: We use survey data collected in 2007 from a sample of women in Yazd, a city in Iran. We examine the distribution of developmental idealism in the sample and the multivariate predictors of developmental idealism. RESULTS: We find considerable support for the expectation that many elements of developmental idealism have been widely disseminated. Statistically significant majorities associate development with particular family attributes, believe that development causes change in families, believe that fertility reductions and age-at-marriage increases help foster development, and perceive family trends in Iran headed toward modernity. As predicted, parental education, respondent education, and income affect adherence to developmental idealism. CONCLUSIONS: Developmental idealism has been widely disseminated in Yazd, Iran and is related to social and demographic factors in predicted ways. COMMENTS: Although our data come from only one city, we expect that developmental idealism has been widely distributed in Iran, with important implications for family and demographic behavior.

  13. Family Life in an Anti-Family Setting: A Critique of Marriage and Divorce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldberg, Roslyn; Kohen, Janet

    1976-01-01

    The failure of family life is traced to its complex dependence on the capitalist corporate order and the particular sex-based division of labor that is a product of that order. Particular emphasis is given to the woman's special responsibility for the emotional life of her spouse and children. (Author)

  14. Cancer Communication and Family Caregiver Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Wittenberg, Elaine; Borneman, Tami; Koczywas, Marianna; Del Ferraro, Catherine; Ferrell, Betty

    2017-01-01

    Family caregivers have enormous communication responsibilities tied to caregiving, such as sharing the patient’s medical history with providers, relaying diagnosis and prognosis to other family members, and making decisions about care with the patient. While caregiver stress and burden has been widely documented in the caregiving literature, little is known about how communication burden, real or perceived communication challenges, impacts caregiver quality of life. In family caregiving, the City of Hope (COH) Quality of Life model proposes that the caregiving experience is reciprocal to the patient experience, impacting physical, social, psychological, and spiritual quality of life. We used data from a pilot study testing a communication coaching call intervention with family caregivers of lung cancer patients to analyze caregiver reported communication burden and quality of life. We found variances in each quality of life domain, suggesting that caregiver interventions should range from self-care skill building for physical care to psycho-educational interventions that support caregiver coping and communication skill building. These findings demonstrate the importance of caregiver assessment and attention to communication burden in quality cancer care. PMID:28257110

  15. Satisfaction With Life, Coping, and Spirituality Among Urban Families.

    PubMed

    Doolittle, Benjamin; Courtney, Malachi; Jasien, Joan

    2015-10-01

    Urban families face many challenges that affect life satisfaction, including low income, limited access to resources, and unstable neighborhoods. To investigate life satisfaction and identify potential mediators: neighborhood stability, emotional coping strategies, religion, and spirituality. A convenience sample of families presenting to an urban primary care clinic for routine care filled out an anonymous, voluntary survey that included demographic data, the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS), the Spiritual Inventory and Beliefs Scale, and an emotional coping inventory. 127 individuals filled out the survey. Life satisfaction was high (21.3 ± 9). Families in the lowest quartile of the SWLS were 4.5 times as likely to have a child with a chronic medical illness. SWLS correlated with strategy planning (r = 0.24, P < .01), external practices of religion (r = 0.23, P < .01), and humility (r = 0.18, P < .05). Encouraging patients' involvement in religion and certain coping strategies, especially among those families coping with children with special health care needs, may improve life satisfaction. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Impact of Deafness on Family Life: A Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Jackson C.; Turnbull, A.

    2004-01-01

    The presence of deafness in a family has the potential to affect all areas of family life. An understanding of the impact on family life is critical to addressing all components of the family system in early intervention. This review synthesizes the literature on deafness as it relates to four domains of family quality of life, including family…

  17. Development and Examination of a Family Triadic Measure to Examine Quality of Life Family Congruence in Nursing Home Residents and Two Family Members.

    PubMed

    Aalgaard Kelly, Gina

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The overall purpose of this study was to propose and test a conceptual model and apply family analyses methods to understand quality of life family congruence in the nursing home setting. Method: Secondary data for this study were from a larger study, titled Measurement, Indicators and Improvement of the Quality of Life (QOL) in Nursing Homes. Research literature, family systems theory and human ecological assumptions, fostered the conceptual model empirically testing quality of life family congruence. Results: The study results supported a model examining nursing home residents and two family members on quality of life family congruence. Specifically, family intergenerational dynamic factors, resident personal and social-psychological factors, and nursing home family input factors were examined to identify differences in quality of life family congruence among triad families. Discussion: Formal family involvement and resident cognitive functioning were found as the two most influential factors to quality of life family congruence (QOLFC).

  18. Development and Examination of a Family Triadic Measure to Examine Quality of Life Family Congruence in Nursing Home Residents and Two Family Members

    PubMed Central

    Aalgaard Kelly, Gina

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The overall purpose of this study was to propose and test a conceptual model and apply family analyses methods to understand quality of life family congruence in the nursing home setting. Method: Secondary data for this study were from a larger study, titled Measurement, Indicators and Improvement of the Quality of Life (QOL) in Nursing Homes. Research literature, family systems theory and human ecological assumptions, fostered the conceptual model empirically testing quality of life family congruence. Results: The study results supported a model examining nursing home residents and two family members on quality of life family congruence. Specifically, family intergenerational dynamic factors, resident personal and social-psychological factors, and nursing home family input factors were examined to identify differences in quality of life family congruence among triad families. Discussion: Formal family involvement and resident cognitive functioning were found as the two most influential factors to quality of life family congruence (QOLFC). PMID:28138474

  19. Concurrent Validity of the International Family Quality of Life Survey.

    PubMed

    Samuel, Preethy S; Pociask, Fredrick D; DiZazzo-Miller, Rosanne; Carrellas, Ann; LeRoy, Barbara W

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of the social construct of Family Quality of Life (FQOL) is a parsimonious alternative to the current approach of measuring familial outcomes using a battery of tools related to individual-level outcomes. The purpose of this study was to examine the internal consistency and concurrent validity of the International FQOL Survey (FQOLS-2006), using cross-sectional data collected from 65 family caregivers of children with developmental disabilities. It shows a moderate correlation between the total FQOL scores of the FQOLS-2006 and the Beach Center's FQOL scale. The validity of five FQOLS-2006 domains was supported by the correlations between conceptually related domains.

  20. Family (Dis)Advantage and Life Course Expectations*

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Monica Kirkpatrick; Hitlin, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Optimistic assessments of life chances can positively influence life outcomes, but conflicting theories suggest these assessments either reflect structural privilege or develop as a result of childhood hardship. In addition, competing hypotheses suggest that these assessments may matter differently depending on who holds them. We examine whether family socioeconomic status shapes adolescents’ expectations about how successful their lives will turn out. We distinguish generalized life expectations (GLE), capturing anticipated success in life across multiple domains, from intergenerational comparative expectations (ICE), which register expectations about improvement relative to observed success within the respondent’s family lineage. We find that adolescents from higher socioeconomic status families are simultaneously more optimistic about their likely success in life (GLE) but less likely to anticipate relative improvement in life success across generations (ICE). Holding high GLE in combination with low ICE predicted doing better in adulthood across a range of health, attainment, and well-being outcomes, though in most cases high GLE, regardless of ICE, was the key. These beneficial patterns are, for the most part, at least as beneficial for socioeconomically disadvantaged youth as they are for advantaged youth. PMID:28408766

  1. Family (Dis)Advantage and Life Course Expectations.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Monica Kirkpatrick; Hitlin, Steven

    2017-03-01

    Optimistic assessments of life chances can positively influence life outcomes, but conflicting theories suggest these assessments either reflect structural privilege or develop as a result of childhood hardship. In addition, competing hypotheses suggest that these assessments may matter differently depending on who holds them. We examine whether family socioeconomic status shapes adolescents' expectations about how successful their lives will turn out. We distinguish generalized life expectations (GLE), capturing anticipated success in life across multiple domains, from intergenerational comparative expectations (ICE), which register expectations about improvement relative to observed success within the respondent's family lineage. We find that adolescents from higher socioeconomic status families are simultaneously more optimistic about their likely success in life (GLE) but less likely to anticipate relative improvement in life success across generations (ICE). Holding high GLE in combination with low ICE predicted doing better in adulthood across a range of health, attainment, and well-being outcomes, though in most cases high GLE, regardless of ICE, was the key. These beneficial patterns are, for the most part, at least as beneficial for socioeconomically disadvantaged youth as they are for advantaged youth.

  2. Delimiting family in syntheses of research on childhood chronic conditions and family life.

    PubMed

    Knafl, Kathleen; Leeman, Jennifer; Havill, Nancy; Crandell, Jamie; Sandelowski, Margarete

    2015-03-01

    Synthesis of family research presents unique challenges to investigators who must delimit what will be included as a family study in the proposed review. In this paper, the authors discuss the conceptual and pragmatic challenges of conducting systematic reviews of the literature on the intersection between family life and childhood chronic conditions. A proposed framework for delimiting the family domain of interest is presented. The framework addresses both topical salience and level of relevance and provides direction to future researchers, with the goal of supporting the overall quality of family research synthesis efforts. For users of synthesis studies, knowledge of how investigators conceptualize the boundaries of family research is important contextual information for understanding the limits and applicability of the results. © 2014 Family Process Institute.

  3. Factors associated with work, social life and family life disability in bipolar disorder patients.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Rojas, Luis; Jurado, Dolores; Gurpegui, Manuel

    2011-04-30

    We analyzed the presence of work, social life and family life disability in 108 outpatients with a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV (DSM-IV) diagnosis of bipolar disorder and their association with previous course-of-illness variables and current psychopathology. Work disability was pragmatically defined as being on a disability pension or in the process of obtaining it; social life or family life disability was defined by a score ≥ 7 in the respective subscales of the Sheehan Disability Scale. At least one type of disability (for work, social life or family life) affected 52-54% of the patients; and two types, 37%. By logistic regression and multiple linear regression analyses we determined the variables independently associated with each type of disability: 1) Work disability was significantly associated with previous repeated manic episodes, three or more hospitalizations, with current depressive symptoms and inversely with the educational attainment. 2) Social life disability significantly increased with the number of hospitalizations and was associated with previous repeated depressive episodes and current depressive symptoms. In alternative models, nicotine dependence and lack of social support were significantly associated with work and social life disability respectively. And 3) family life disability significantly increased with number of hospitalizations, CAGE questionnaire score and age; and was associated with previous repeated manic episodes and current depressive symptoms. In conclusion, previous course-of-illness variables, particularly a high number of manic episodes, and current psychopathology - as indicated by the presence of nicotine dependence or depressive symptoms - may be indicators of disability; previous manic episodes appear to affect disability at work or at family life whereas previous depressive episodes seem to be related with social life disability.

  4. Web-Based Family Life Education: Spotlight on User Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doty, Jennifer; Doty, Matthew; Dwrokin, Jodi

    2011-01-01

    Family Life Education (FLE) websites can benefit from the field of user experience, which makes technology easy to use. A heuristic evaluation of five FLE sites was performed using Neilson's heuristics, guidelines for making sites user friendly. Greater site complexity resulted in more potential user problems. Sites most frequently had problems…

  5. Quality of Family Life and Mortality in Seventeenth Century Dublin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    Inquiry into the quality of family life in seventeenth century Dublin is an attempt to understand conditions in the second largest city in the British Isles; further, the era was one of convulsions in the body politic, social, and religious. The Scottish James I and VI (1556 1625) determined that the Irish province closest to Scotland, Ulster,…

  6. Family Life Education--A Perspective on the Educator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satir, Virginia M.

    1975-01-01

    This article discusses the need for education about family life, who should teach it and the kinds of information that should be taught. The author feels that parents need to be taught to raise their children to be loving and to accept differences among people. (EJT)

  7. Family Life Education. Grade 7. An Optional Health Education Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manitoba Dept. of Education and Training, Winnipeg.

    The Family Life Education optional unit of the Manitoba (Canada) Health Education curriculum reflects the current emphasis in health education on preventive medicine, total well-being, and the assumption of individual responsibility for health. The unit as a whole consists of four components: an overview and three grade level guides designed for…

  8. Family Life Education. Resource Units for Seventh and Eighth Grades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruckstuhl, Mary; Hulme, Marylin A., Ed.

    Designed for teachers and school districts wishing to include family life education in the curriculum, this teaching guide presents a program for seventh and eighth graders which includes material on biological development, emotional issues, values, and sex fairness. The guide begins with an introduction dealing with the need for such programs,…

  9. Boyhood and Fatherhood: Narratives about a Future Family Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallden, Gunilla

    1998-01-01

    Analyzed narratives about future family life and themselves as fathers written by 13- to 14-year-old boys in suburban and rural Swedish communities to examine adolescent construction of self-identity. Found that their writing connected to fellowship, equality, and knowledge transmission. The father role in the narratives gave boys access to adult…

  10. Family Life Education for Young Adolescents. A Quasi-Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herz, Elicia J.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    The impact of the Family Life Education Program for disadvantaged inner-city minority students (grades seven and eight) was investigated. Compared to the control group, program participants displayed improved knowledge about contraception, reproductive physiology, and adolescent pregnancy outcomes. Implications for school-based sex education…

  11. Associations among Family Structure, Demographics, and Adolescent Perceived Life Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zullig, Keith J.; Valois, Robert F.; Huebner, E. Scott; Drane, J. Wanzer

    2005-01-01

    Relationships between perceived life satisfaction and family structure were examined among 5,021 public high school adolescents using the self-report CDC Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS). Adjusted multiple logistic regression analyses and multivariate models (via SUDAAN) constructed separately, revealed significant race by gender effects. Living…

  12. A Family Account of Autism: Life with Jean-Paul.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donnelly, Julie A.; Bovee, Jean-Paul; Donnelly, Sylvia Jane; Donnelly, Lisa Kathleen; Donnelly, Joad Roy; Donnelly, Michael Fain; Walter, Alice Stephens; Callaghan, Molly Ray

    2000-01-01

    This article recounts the experiences of a family with a son with autism. Jean-Paul's two sisters, his brother, cousin, grandmother, father, and mother contribute their perspectives. Jean-Paul also speaks for himself. This account traces his life from his early childhood to independent adulthood. (Author/CR)

  13. Family Quality of Life: Moving from Measurement to Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuna, Nina I.; Turnbull, Ann; Summers, Jean Ann

    2009-01-01

    Noting the absence of sound theoretical underpinnings for family quality of life (FQoL) research and work, the authors note that, to guide FQoL practice, research findings must be schematically organized so as to enable practitioners to implement empirical findings effectively. One way to meet this goal is to introduce a theoretical model that…

  14. Family Life Education--A Perspective on the Educator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satir, Virginia M.

    1975-01-01

    This article discusses the need for education about family life, who should teach it and the kinds of information that should be taught. The author feels that parents need to be taught to raise their children to be loving and to accept differences among people. (EJT)

  15. Cultural Pride: Curriculum Unit. Latino Family Life Education Curriculum Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matiella, Ana Consuelo

    This family life education teaching unit comprises 11 lessons whose primary purpose is to help Latino students, grades 5 through 8, identify cultural pride as a source of self-esteem. Student activities include the following: (1) describe how being part of a cultural group contributes to a sense of uniqueness; (2) identify cultural similarities…

  16. The Years of Uncertainty: Eighth Grade Family Life Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carson, Mary, Ed.; And Others

    The family life sex education unit for eighth graders, "The Years of Uncertainty," consists of a series of daily lesson plans that span a 29-day period of one-hour class sessions. Topics covered are: problem solving, knowledge and attitudes, male and female reproductive systems, conception, pregnancy, birth, birth defects, venereal…

  17. Marital Cohesiveness and Family Life Transitions: A Social Exchange Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabatelli, Ronald M.; And Others

    This paper examines the impact of individual and family life transitions on marital relationships from a social exchange perspective. The first section of the paper reviews and integrates several social exchange perspectives, derived from both sociological and social psychological traditions, in particular the works of Thibaut and Kelly (1959),…

  18. Quality of Family Life and Mortality in Seventeenth Century Dublin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    Inquiry into the quality of family life in seventeenth century Dublin is an attempt to understand conditions in the second largest city in the British Isles; further, the era was one of convulsions in the body politic, social, and religious. The Scottish James I and VI (1556 1625) determined that the Irish province closest to Scotland, Ulster,…

  19. Cultural Pride: Curriculum Unit. Latino Family Life Education Curriculum Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matiella, Ana Consuelo

    This family life education teaching unit comprises 11 lessons whose primary purpose is to help Latino students, grades 5 through 8, identify cultural pride as a source of self-esteem. Student activities include the following: (1) describe how being part of a cultural group contributes to a sense of uniqueness; (2) identify cultural similarities…

  20. Family Quality of Life: Moving from Measurement to Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuna, Nina I.; Turnbull, Ann; Summers, Jean Ann

    2009-01-01

    Noting the absence of sound theoretical underpinnings for family quality of life (FQoL) research and work, the authors note that, to guide FQoL practice, research findings must be schematically organized so as to enable practitioners to implement empirical findings effectively. One way to meet this goal is to introduce a theoretical model that…

  1. Family Life Education. Grade 5. An Optional Health Education Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manitoba Dept. of Education and Training, Winnipeg.

    The Family Life Education optional unit of the Manitoba (Canada) Health Education curriculum reflects the current emphasis in health education on preventive medicine, total well-being, and the assumption of individual responsibility for health. The unit as a whole consists of four components: an overview and three grade level guides designed for…

  2. Family Life Education. Grade 7. An Optional Health Education Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manitoba Dept. of Education and Training, Winnipeg.

    The Family Life Education optional unit of the Manitoba (Canada) Health Education curriculum reflects the current emphasis in health education on preventive medicine, total well-being, and the assumption of individual responsibility for health. The unit as a whole consists of four components: an overview and three grade level guides designed for…

  3. Family Life Education: Grades Kindergarten Through Twelve. Recommended Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bachelor, Evelyn

    This guide contains a recommended, articulated series of instructional aids for grades kindergarten through 12 in family life education. Course content and curriculum materials for all grades are presented. Grouped under the heading of "Community Relations" are: (1) materials on parent education, public information, and community support; (2)…

  4. Expressed Attitudes of Adolescents toward Marriage and Family Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Paige D.; Specter, Gerald; Martin, Don; Martin, Maggie

    2003-01-01

    Study examined attitudes of adolescents toward aspects of marriage and family life. The majority expressed negative attitudes toward divorce and viewed marriage as a lifelong commitment. While about one third expressed positive attitudes toward premarital sex, a majority indicated they would engage or had engaged in sex. The adolescents…

  5. Child Development, Early Childhood Education and Family Life: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reardon, Beverly, Comp.

    This bibliographical listing of approximately 2500 books on child development, early childhood education and family life was compiled as a resource for parents and students. Books are listed alphabetically by author and are grouped according to the following categories: child development; observation of children; adolescence; language…

  6. Families and Drugs: A Life-Span Research Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glynn, Thomas J.

    The study of human development and behavior from a life-span perspective is an area of growing interest, and the family is a natural laboratory for this study. Research in the area of drug abuse demonstrates that drug use is not limited to any one population segment or age group, but is pervasive across population subgroups. More and more evidence…

  7. Work and Family Life. Ohio's Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    Developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives in Ohio, this document is a comprehensive and verified competency profile for work and family life courses. The list contains units (with and without subunits), competencies, and competency builders that…

  8. Child Development, Early Childhood Education and Family Life: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reardon, Beverly, Comp.

    This bibliographical listing of approximately 2500 books on child development, early childhood education and family life was compiled as a resource for parents and students. Books are listed alphabetically by author and are grouped according to the following categories: child development; observation of children; adolescence; language…

  9. Family Size and Mother-Child Relations in Later Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uhlenberg, Peter; Cooney, Teresa M.

    1990-01-01

    Examined effects of family size on mother-child relationships in later life. Subjects were taken from national probability sample which included adults aged 35-55 (n=3,083) who had a living mother and women aged 60-79 (n=1,101) with at least one living child. Found generally positive relationship between number of siblings and favorable…

  10. Nontraditional Males: Familial Background, Life Satisfaction, and Personality Characteristics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenwasser, Shirley Miller; Patterson, William

    Research indicates that the family roles of men are slowly changing, with a small minority of those sampled having primary childcare/household duties. To examine the background, life satisfaction, motives, and personality traits of such men, 16 married, male adults, whose wives were employed outside the home, and who had over 50% of the…

  11. Family Life Education. Grade 9. An Optional Health Education Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manitoba Dept. of Education and Training, Winnipeg.

    The Family Life Education optional unit of the Manitoba (Canada) Health Education curriculum reflects the current emphasis in health education on preventive medicine, total well-being, and the assumption of individual responsibility for health. The unit as a whole consists of four components: an overview and three grade level guides designed for…

  12. Web-Based Family Life Education: Spotlight on User Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doty, Jennifer; Doty, Matthew; Dwrokin, Jodi

    2011-01-01

    Family Life Education (FLE) websites can benefit from the field of user experience, which makes technology easy to use. A heuristic evaluation of five FLE sites was performed using Neilson's heuristics, guidelines for making sites user friendly. Greater site complexity resulted in more potential user problems. Sites most frequently had problems…

  13. Law and the Family Life Cycle: An Innovative Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergen, M. Betsy; Litz, Charles

    1977-01-01

    An innovative educational program with an interdisciplinary approach combining legal aspects, and development factors, is described from its inception. The program was a result of the joint efforts of members of the Kansas Bar Association, teachers, family life educators and interested citizens. (Author)

  14. Allowing Family to be Family: End-of-Life Care in Veterans Affairs Medical Foster Homes.

    PubMed

    Manheim, Chelsea E; Haverhals, Leah M; Jones, Jacqueline; Levy, Cari R

    2016-01-01

    The Medical Foster Home program is a unique long-term care program coordinated by the Veterans Health Administration. The program pairs Veterans with private, 24-hour a day community-based caregivers who often care for Veterans until the end of life. This qualitative study explored the experiences of care coordination for Medical Foster Home Veterans at the end of life with eight Veterans' family members, five Medical Foster Home caregivers, and seven Veterans Health Administration Home-Based Primary Care team members. A case study, qualitative content analysis identified these themes addressing care coordination and impact of the Medical Foster Home model on those involved: (a) Medical Foster Home program supports Veterans' families; (b) Medical Foster Home program supports the caregiver as family; (c) Veterans' needs are met socially and culturally at the end of life; and (d) the changing needs of Veterans, families, and caregivers at Veterans' end of life are addressed. Insights into how to best support Medical Foster Home caregivers caring for Veterans at the end of life were gained including the need for more and better respite options and how caregivers are compensated in the month of the Veteran's death, as well as suggestions to navigate end-of-life care coordination with multiple stakeholders involved.

  15. Delimiting Family in Syntheses of Research on Childhood Chronic Conditions and Family Life

    PubMed Central

    KNAFL, KATHLEEN; LEEMAN, JENNIFER; HAVILL, NANCY; CRANDELL, JAMIE; SANDELOWSKI, MARGARETE

    2015-01-01

    Synthesis of family research presents unique challenges to investigators who must delimit what will be included as a family study in the proposed review. In this paper, the authors discuss the conceptual and pragmatic challenges of conducting systematic reviews of the literature on the intersection between family life and childhood chronic conditions. A proposed framework for delimiting the family domain of interest is presented. The framework addresses both topical salience and level of relevance and provides direction to future researchers, with the goal of supporting the overall quality of family research synthesis efforts. For users of synthesis studies, knowledge of how investigators conceptualize the boundaries of family research is important contextual information for understanding the limits and applicability of the results. PMID:25264114

  16. Personality Factors in the Long Life Family Study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To evaluate personality profiles of Long Life Family Study participants relative to population norms and offspring of centenarians from the New England Centenarian Study. Method. Personality domains of agreeableness, conscientiousness, extraversion, neuroticism, and openness were assessed with the NEO Five-Factor Inventory in 4,937 participants from the Long Life Family Study (mean age 70 years). A linear mixed model of age and gender was implemented adjusting for other covariates. Results. A significant age trend was found in all five personality domains. On average, the offspring generation of long-lived families scored low in neuroticism, high in extraversion, and within average values for the other three domains. Older participants tended to score higher in neuroticism and lower in the other domains compared with younger participants, but the estimated scores generally remained within average population values. No significant differences were found between long-lived family members and their spouses. Discussion. Personality factors and more specifically low neuroticism and high extraversion may be important for achieving extreme old age. In addition, personality scores of family members were not significantly different from those of their spouses, suggesting that environmental factors may play a significant role in addition to genetic factors. PMID:23275497

  17. Comparative Analysis of RNA Families Reveals Distinct Repertoires for Each Domain of Life

    PubMed Central

    Hoeppner, Marc P.; Gardner, Paul P.; Poole, Anthony M.

    2012-01-01

    The RNA world hypothesis, that RNA genomes and catalysts preceded DNA genomes and genetically-encoded protein catalysts, has been central to models for the early evolution of life on Earth. A key part of such models is continuity between the earliest stages in the evolution of life and the RNA repertoires of extant lineages. Some assessments seem consistent with a diverse RNA world, yet direct continuity between modern RNAs and an RNA world has not been demonstrated for the majority of RNA families, and, anecdotally, many RNA functions appear restricted in their distribution. Despite much discussion of the possible antiquity of RNA families, no systematic analyses of RNA family distribution have been performed. To chart the broad evolutionary history of known RNA families, we performed comparative genomic analysis of over 3 million RNA annotations spanning 1446 families from the Rfam 10 database. We report that 99% of known RNA families are restricted to a single domain of life, revealing discrete repertoires for each domain. For the 1% of RNA families/clans present in more than one domain, over half show evidence of horizontal gene transfer (HGT), and the rest show a vertical trace, indicating the presence of a complex protein synthesis machinery in the Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA) and consistent with the evolutionary history of the most ancient protein-coding genes. However, with limited interdomain transfer and few RNA families exhibiting demonstrable antiquity as predicted under RNA world continuity, our results indicate that the majority of modern cellular RNA repertoires have primarily evolved in a domain-specific manner. PMID:23133357

  18. Comparative analysis of RNA families reveals distinct repertoires for each domain of life.

    PubMed

    Hoeppner, Marc P; Gardner, Paul P; Poole, Anthony M

    2012-01-01

    The RNA world hypothesis, that RNA genomes and catalysts preceded DNA genomes and genetically-encoded protein catalysts, has been central to models for the early evolution of life on Earth. A key part of such models is continuity between the earliest stages in the evolution of life and the RNA repertoires of extant lineages. Some assessments seem consistent with a diverse RNA world, yet direct continuity between modern RNAs and an RNA world has not been demonstrated for the majority of RNA families, and, anecdotally, many RNA functions appear restricted in their distribution. Despite much discussion of the possible antiquity of RNA families, no systematic analyses of RNA family distribution have been performed. To chart the broad evolutionary history of known RNA families, we performed comparative genomic analysis of over 3 million RNA annotations spanning 1446 families from the Rfam 10 database. We report that 99% of known RNA families are restricted to a single domain of life, revealing discrete repertoires for each domain. For the 1% of RNA families/clans present in more than one domain, over half show evidence of horizontal gene transfer (HGT), and the rest show a vertical trace, indicating the presence of a complex protein synthesis machinery in the Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA) and consistent with the evolutionary history of the most ancient protein-coding genes. However, with limited interdomain transfer and few RNA families exhibiting demonstrable antiquity as predicted under RNA world continuity, our results indicate that the majority of modern cellular RNA repertoires have primarily evolved in a domain-specific manner.

  19. Life-span distributions of supermarket products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Hiromichi; Watanabe, Tsutomu; Takayasu, Misako

    2010-04-01

    We have analyzed the lifetime distributions of more than 0.7 million products sold across approximately 400 Japanese supermarkets. The distributions are well approximated by an exponential function for products with lifetimes longer than 1000 days, implying that the manufacturers' decisions about whether to continue production are purely random. However, the distributions tend to deviate from an exponential distribution for products with lifetimes shorter than 1000 days. Specifically, the distributions for food products exhibit a quicker decay in a short time scale, suggesting the existence of competing products during the initial stages of the product lifecycle. On the other hand, the distributions for toiletry products exhibit a slower decay in a short time scale.

  20. Relationships between quality of life and family function in caregiver

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There are caregivers who see their quality of life (QoL) impaired due to the demands of their caregiving tasks, while others manage to adapt and overcome the crises successfully. The influence of the family function in the main caregiver's situation has not been the subject of much evaluation. The aim of this study is to analyse the relationship between the functionality of the family and the QoL of caregivers of dependent relatives. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study including 153 caregivers. Setting: Two health centers in the city of Salamanca(Spain). Caregiver variables analysed: demographic characteristics, care recipient features; family functionality (Family APGAR-Q) and QoL (Ruiz-Baca-Q) perceived by the caregiver. Five multiple regressions are performed considering global QoL and each of the four QoL dimensions as dependent variables. The Canonical Correspondence Analysis (CCA) was used to study the influence of the family function questionnaire on QoL. Results Family function is the only one of the variables evaluated that presented an association both with global QoL and with each of the four individual dimensions (p < 0.05). Using the CCA, we found that the physical and mental well-being dimensions are the ones which present a closer relationship with family functionality, while social support is the quality dimension that is least influenced by the Family APGAR-Q. Conclusion We find an association between family functionality and the caregiver's QoL. This relation holds for both the global measure of QoL and each of its four individual dimensions. PMID:21496270

  1. Family voices: life for family carers of people with intellectual disabilities in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, Darren D; Mannan, Hasheem; Garcia Iriarte, Edurne; McConkey, Roy; O'Brien, Patricia; Finlay, Frieda; Lawlor, Anne; Harrington, Gerry

    2013-03-01

    Families in Ireland remain the main providers of support for people with Intellectual disabilities, and the aim of this study was to map their life experiences whilst involving their family members as co-researchers. This qualitative, participatory study involved 10 focus groups attended by 70 parents and siblings of people with intellectual disabilities. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Caring for a family member with intellectual disabilities was found to be a dynamic and adaptive process. The well-being of the family and the challenges they face throughout their lives was the central theme identified. This was affected by: the availability of appropriate supports for families and having to advocate for them, communication and relationships with services and professionals, the availability of information and attitudes towards disability and governmental support. Strategies are suggested as to how services can better support family carers in Ireland in their role. These include families being provided with flexible and timely support for families at critical times; being offered services, support, entitlements and information without having to fight for them; knowing that their family member with intellectual disabilities is well cared for, listened to and provided with opportunities to develop and be part of the community; and carers being shown respect, listened to and involved in decisions. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Family quality of life of Australian families with a member with an intellectual/developmental disability.

    PubMed

    Rillotta, F; Kirby, N; Shearer, J; Nettelbeck, T

    2012-01-01

    Family quality of life (FQOL) is a recent concept in intellectual/developmental disability research. Outcomes for the family are important to the provision of services because families, rather than institutions, are increasingly considered the primary support unit. This article presents Australian findings using the international Family Quality of Life Survey: Main Caregivers of People with Intellectual or Developmental Disabilities (FQOLS-2006). Forty-two South Australian main caregivers of people with an intellectual/developmental disability were interviewed using the FQOLS-2006. The FQOL domains assessed were Health of the Family, Financial Well-being, Family Relationships, Support from Other People, Support from Disability-Related Services, Influence of Values, Careers, Leisure and Recreation, and Community Interaction. Domains were measured in terms of Importance, Opportunities, Attainment, Initiative, Stability and Satisfaction. The FQOLS-2006 asked about the family's practical and emotional Support from Other People together, whereas the current study separated the constructs of practical and emotional support. Questions pertaining to FQOL in the past were also added, in order to gain a broader picture of present FQOL. Results indicated that families considered all the FQOL domains to be important. However, Health, Family Relationships and Financial Well-being were regarded as slightly more important than Practical and Emotional Support from Others. The attainment of Family Relationships, Health, Values, and Leisure and Recreation were rated as quite a bit, but Practical Support from Other People was only rated as a little. Families were generally satisfied with all FQOL domains, but they were satisfied with their Family Relationships and they were neither satisfied or dissatisfied with their Financial Well-being. Results also indicated that there was a need to distinguish between the provision of practical and emotional support from others, because the

  3. Communication with Family and Friends across the Life Course

    PubMed Central

    David-Barrett, Tamas; Kertesz, Janos; Rotkirch, Anna; Ghosh, Asim; Bhattacharya, Kunal; Monsivais, Daniel; Kaski, Kimmo

    2016-01-01

    Each stage of the human life course is characterised by a distinctive pattern of social relations. We study how the intensity and importance of the closest social contacts vary across the life course, using a large database of mobile communication from a European country. We first determine the most likely social relationship type from these mobile phone records by relating the age and gender of the caller and recipient to the frequency, length, and direction of calls. We then show how communication patterns between parents and children, romantic partner, and friends vary across the six main stages of the adult family life course. Young adulthood is dominated by a gradual shift of call activity from parents to close friends, and then to a romantic partner, culminating in the period of early family formation during which the focus is on the romantic partner. During middle adulthood call patterns suggest a high dependence on the parents of the ego, who, presumably often provide alloparental care, while at this stage female same-gender friendship also peaks. During post-reproductive adulthood, individuals and especially women balance close social contacts among three generations. The age of grandparenthood brings the children entering adulthood and family formation into the focus, and is associated with a realignment of close social contacts especially among women, while the old age is dominated by dependence on their children. PMID:27893748

  4. Communication with Family and Friends across the Life Course.

    PubMed

    David-Barrett, Tamas; Kertesz, Janos; Rotkirch, Anna; Ghosh, Asim; Bhattacharya, Kunal; Monsivais, Daniel; Kaski, Kimmo

    2016-01-01

    Each stage of the human life course is characterised by a distinctive pattern of social relations. We study how the intensity and importance of the closest social contacts vary across the life course, using a large database of mobile communication from a European country. We first determine the most likely social relationship type from these mobile phone records by relating the age and gender of the caller and recipient to the frequency, length, and direction of calls. We then show how communication patterns between parents and children, romantic partner, and friends vary across the six main stages of the adult family life course. Young adulthood is dominated by a gradual shift of call activity from parents to close friends, and then to a romantic partner, culminating in the period of early family formation during which the focus is on the romantic partner. During middle adulthood call patterns suggest a high dependence on the parents of the ego, who, presumably often provide alloparental care, while at this stage female same-gender friendship also peaks. During post-reproductive adulthood, individuals and especially women balance close social contacts among three generations. The age of grandparenthood brings the children entering adulthood and family formation into the focus, and is associated with a realignment of close social contacts especially among women, while the old age is dominated by dependence on their children.

  5. Family quality of life among families of children with atopic dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Hae Ji; Hwang, Seonyeong; Ahn, Youngmee; Lim, Dae Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Background Atopic dermatitis (AD) may cause emotional distress and impairs the quality of life (QoL) in children and their families. Objective We examined family QoL of children with AD and explored associated factors such as disease severity and psychosocial factors among parents of children with AD. Methods Study participants were 78 children (1 month to 16 years old) diagnosed with AD and their parents visiting an outpatient clinic of the Department of Pediatrics in Inha University Hospital. Data were collected using structured questionnaires and medical record review. Parents completed the Dermatitis Family Impact questionnaire (DFI), the Positive Affect and Negative Affect Schedule, the Satisfaction with Life Scale, and the Korean Parenting Stress Index. For children aged below 6-year-old, parents were asked to complete the Infants' Dermatologic Quality of Life. SCOring Atopic Dermatitis (SCORAD), Children's Dermatology Life Quality Index, and the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory version 4.0 Generic Core Scale were also completed. Results The mean age of parents and children were 37.4 ± 5.3 years and 65.1 ± 45.7 months, respectively. Among them, 87.2% of parents were mothers and 60.3% of children were boys. The mean score of DFI was 11.2 ± 6.0. The mean SCORAD score was 28.3 ± 16.1. Family who experienced strong negative emotionality had a 3.8 times higher probability of experiencing a lower QoL than parents who did not (odds ratio [OR], 3.82; p = 0.041). Family of children with higher severity of AD had a 6.6 times (OR, 6.55; p = 0.018) higher probability of experiencing a low family QoL than their less-severe counterparts. Families of girls with AD had a lower QoL (OR, 8.40; p = 0.003) than families of boys. Conclusion Family QoL among parents of children with AD was low and associated with parent’s psychosocial characteristics as well as disease severity of the children. Considering parental involvement in AD management for children, emotional

  6. Influence of residency training on personal stress and impairment in family life: analysis of related factors.

    PubMed

    Ríos, A; Sánchez Gascón, F; Martínez Lage, J F; Guerrero, M

    2006-01-01

    This cross-sectional study was designed to assess the level of stress among residents and stress-related impairment of family life. A 41-item anonymous questionnaire was designed to determine the level of stress and its effects on the residents' family as well as factors associated with stress during residency training in a tertiary-care hospital accredited with official resident training 'Medicos Internos Residentes' in Murcia, Spain. Questionnaires were distributed in sealed nominal envelopes during February and March 2002 to 227 eligible residents. Of the 227 residents, 175 (77%) completed and returned the questionnaires. Forty-two percent of residents recognized that residency training caused an important level of stress and 21% felt that stress interfered with family relationships. Both factors were significantly associated. Feelings of being unsatisfied with supervision of care and achievement of training objectives as well as low satisfaction with residency training and poor assessment of the hospital were significant stressors. Impairment in family life was significantly dependent on degree of satisfaction with residency training and evaluation of the hospital. The data showed that residency training generated stress and impaired family life. These were closely associated with perception of being unsatisfied with the residency training and evaluation. Copyright 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Quality of Life of Patients with Cancer: A Determinant of the Quality of Life of Their Family Caregivers.

    PubMed

    Padmaja, Gadiraju; Vanlalhruaii, C; Rana, Suvashisa; Tiamongla; Kopparty, Swarajya

    2017-09-01

    Cancer disrupts the quality of life of both the patients and their family caregivers. This study attempted to explore the relationship between the quality of life of cancer patients and their family caregivers and to examine whether the quality of life, age, and gender of the patients contributed to the quality of life of their family caregivers. This correlational study involved 206 pairs of participants consisting of cancer patients and their corresponding family caregivers. The European Organization for the Treatment and Research of Quality of Life Questionnaire C-30 (version 3) was administered on the patients and the Caregiver Quality of Life-Cancer was administered on their family caregivers. The result revealed that social functioning, appetite loss, physical functioning, and gender of the patients contributed significantly to the quality of life of their family caregivers. Implications, shortcomings, and future directions were discussed.

  8. Preparation for Mid-Life Challenges: The Role of Family Life Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fruit, Dorothy

    This paper describes a pilot program developed to discover the concerns of the middle-aged and to begin education, training, and group sharing about this phase of the family life cycle. A brief literature review examining particular concerns of middle-aged adults is presented, and the question of whether middle age is a time of crisis or…

  9. Family Life and School Life: A Necessary Partnership for Children. Spotlight: Montessori Potpourri.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loeffler, Margaret Howard

    2001-01-01

    Discusses five Montessori insights about children's development as they relate to family and school life: independence and autonomy, community and socialization, interest in culture and morality, preadolescents' apprenticeship for adulthood, and adult acceptance of the evidence of change. Notes that underlying dynamics of home and school are alike…

  10. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of a Family Quality of Life Scale for Families of Kindergarten Children without Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zuna, Nina I.; Selig, James P.; Summers, Jean Ann; Turnbull, Ann P.

    2009-01-01

    Recently, within the field of special education, attention has been accorded to the conceptualization and measurement of family outcomes. The Family Quality of Life (FQOL) Scale is an instrument that can be used to measure family outcomes for families who have children with disabilities, and it has been demonstrated to have psychometric validity.…

  11. Family Life Education in the English-speaking Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Epps, R P; Corona, E; Kodagoda, N; Simonen, M

    1986-01-01

    Unique experience has accumulated in the English-speaking Caribbean in the field of family life education for youth. Although birth rates are relatively low, the increase in adolescent pregnancy and births is becoming more visible. Mother-centered homes are frequent, and support from the father is often lacking. A series of family life education (FLE) programs funded by the United National Fund for Population Activities is aimed at providing help to the various groups in the Caribbean in an acceptable and non-threatening manner. These out-of-school FLE techniques include several approaches: integration of the proposed program into an already established place (a factory, youth center, or community center); education in human growth, food and nutrition, environmental health, mental health, safety and first-aid, dental health and human relations, including human sexuality, rights and responsibilities, and decision making; and the use of specially trained personnel who understand the conditions of the particular community. In some countries adolescent pregnancy is viewed as a problem. In others it may not be so considered. It is vital for the staff and community leaders to review proposals for the FLE program and bring into the centers all subjects that are free of controversy. Family planning, contraceptive delivery and even human sexuality may be acceptable subjects in some quarters, and not in others. Efforts must be continued to find innovative approaches to assure that the benefits of these learning activities continue to be provided, and expanded in response to growing acceptance.

  12. The Distributional and Cost Implications of Negative Expected Family Contributions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelchen, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Eligibility for many federal, state, and institutional financial aid programs is determined by the expected family contribution (EFC) from the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), which functions as a tool to ration scarce aid dollars. The lowest possible EFC under current rules is zero, but this obscures a wider distribution of…

  13. Volume and mass distribution in selected asteroid families

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Włodarczyk, I.; Leliwa-Kopystyński, J.

    2014-10-01

    The main focus of this paper is calculation of the diameters of asteroids belonging to five families (Vesta, Eos, Eunomia, Koronis, and Themis). To do that, we used the HCM algorithm applied for a data set containing 292,003 numbered asteroids, and a numerical procedure for choosing the crucial parameter of the HCM, called "the cutting velocity" vcut. It was established with a precision as high as 1 m s-1. Thereafter, we used the WISE (Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer) catalog to set a range of albedo for the largest members of each family considered. The albedo data were supported by the data concerning color classification (SDSS MOC4). The asteroids with albedo out of this range were classified as interlopers and were therefore disqualified as family members. Sizes were calculated for the asteroids with albedo within the acceptable range. For the other asteroids (those chosen by means of the HCM, but with albedo not listed in the WISE), the value of albedo of the largest member of the family was adopted. Results are given in a set of figures showing the families on the planes (a, e), (a, i), (e, i). Diameters and volumes of the asteroids that are the individual members of a family were calculated on the basis of their known or assumed albedo and on their absolute magnitude. Volumes of the parent bodies of the families were found on the basis of the cumulative volume distribution of these families. We also studied the secular resonances of the family members. We have shown that the locations of members of the considered asteroid families are related to the lines of secular resonances z1, z2, and z3 with Saturn.

  14. Distribution and Phylogenetic Analysis of Family 19 Chitinases in Actinobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kawase, Tomokazu; Saito, Akihiro; Sato, Toshiya; Kanai, Ryo; Fujii, Takeshi; Nikaidou, Naoki; Miyashita, Kiyotaka; Watanabe, Takeshi

    2004-01-01

    In organisms other than higher plants, family 19 chitinase was first discovered in Streptomyces griseus HUT6037, and later, the general occurrence of this enzyme in Streptomyces species was demonstrated. In the present study, the distribution of family 19 chitinases in the class Actinobacteria and the phylogenetic relationship of Actinobacteria family 19 chitinases with family 19 chitinases of other organisms were investigated. Forty-nine strains were chosen to cover almost all the suborders of the class Actinobacteria, and chitinase production was examined. Of the 49 strains, 22 formed cleared zones on agar plates containing colloidal chitin and thus appeared to produce chitinases. These 22 chitinase-positive strains were subjected to Southern hybridization analysis by using a labeled DNA fragment corresponding to the catalytic domain of ChiC, and the presence of genes similar to chiC of S. griseus HUT6037 in at least 13 strains was suggested by the results. PCR amplification and sequencing of the DNA fragments corresponding to the major part of the catalytic domains of the family 19 chitinase genes confirmed the presence of family 19 chitinase genes in these 13 strains. The strains possessing family 19 chitinase genes belong to 6 of the 10 suborders in the order Actinomycetales, which account for the greatest part of the Actinobacteria. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that there is a close evolutionary relationship between family 19 chitinases found in Actinobacteria and plant class IV chitinases. The general occurrence of family 19 chitinase genes in Streptomycineae and the high sequence similarity among the genes found in Actinobacteria suggest that the family 19 chitinase gene was first acquired by an ancestor of the Streptomycineae and spread among the Actinobacteria through horizontal gene transfer. PMID:14766598

  15. Parents' struggles to rebuild family life after Hurricane Andrew.

    PubMed

    Coffman, S

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to gain a deeper understanding of the meaning of parents' everyday experiences after a major natural disaster. In-depth interviews were conducted with 13 parents who lived in the hurricane-damaged area. The essence of being a parent emerged as "struggling to rebuild family life." The struggles were superimposed on top of ongoing issues such as divorce and job responsibilities. Parents described feelings of being thankful to be alive, being overwhelmed, being limited by environmental aftereffects, being responsible for children, balancing needs and roles, constantly changing amidst uncertainty, and finding meaning in the disaster. Study findings support the need for nursing interventions that address family needs, support strengths, and involve parents as active decision makers.

  16. Parameter induction in continuous univariate distributions: Well-established G families.

    PubMed

    Tahir, Muhammad H; Nadarajah, Saralees

    2015-01-01

    The art of parameter(s) induction to the baseline distribution has received a great deal of attention in recent years. The induction of one or more additional shape parameter(s) to the baseline distribution makes the distribution more flexible especially for studying the tail properties. This parameter(s) induction also proved helpful in improving the goodness-of-fit of the proposed generalized family of distributions. There exist many generalized (or generated) G families of continuous univariate distributions since 1985. In this paper, the well-established and widely-accepted G families of distributions like the exponentiated family, Marshall-Olkin extended family, beta-generated family, McDonald-generalized family, Kumaraswamy-generalized family and exponentiated generalized family are discussed. We provide lists of contributed literature on these well-established G families of distributions. Some extended forms of the Marshall-Olkin extended family and Kumaraswamy-generalized family of distributions are proposed.

  17. Whose Job Is It? Everyday Routines and Quality of Life in Latino and Non-Latino Families of Children with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holloway, Susan D.; Domínguez-Pareto, Irenka; Cohen, Shana R.; Kuppermann, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that families construct daily routines that enable the household to function smoothly and promote family quality of life. However, we know little about how activities are distributed between parents caring for a child with an intellectual disability (ID), particularly in Latino families. To address this gap, we…

  18. Whose Job Is It? Everyday Routines and Quality of Life in Latino and Non-Latino Families of Children with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holloway, Susan D.; Domínguez-Pareto, Irenka; Cohen, Shana R.; Kuppermann, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that families construct daily routines that enable the household to function smoothly and promote family quality of life. However, we know little about how activities are distributed between parents caring for a child with an intellectual disability (ID), particularly in Latino families. To address this gap, we…

  19. Intergenerational Similarity of Religiosity Over the Family Life Course.

    PubMed

    Min, Joohong; Silverstein, Merril; Gruenewald, Tara L

    2017-01-01

    Research consistently shows that parents influence children's religiosity. However, few studies acknowledge that there is within-group variation in the intergenerational transmission of religiosity. In this article, we examine whether and how congruence in religiosity between generations changes over the family life course and identifies unique parent-child trajectory classes. We used eight waves of data from the Longitudinal Study of Generations, including 1,084 parent-child dyads beginning in 1971 when the children were adolescents and young adults, followed up to 2005. Growth mixture models (GMM) were tested. GMM revealed four temporal patterns: stable similar, child weakens, child strengthens, and child returns. Results showed that children who were married were more likely to be members of the child-returns class than members of the stable-similar class. Results are discussed in terms of the utility of the separation-individuation process and the life-course framework for understanding intergenerational differences and their stability over time.

  20. The Family Life Cycle: Some Suggestions for Recycling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Harold; Feldman, Margaret

    1975-01-01

    The lifetime family, the family of ego, is distinguished from the lineage family which is the family lasting through time over generations. Use of the term lifetime family career and lineage family cycle is suggested. The family career is used to describe the participation of a person in the family. (Author)

  1. Familial susceptibility to severe respiratory infection in early life.

    PubMed

    Goetghebuer, Tessa; Kwiatkowski, Dominic; Thomson, Anne; Hull, Jeremy

    2004-10-01

    Lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI) are common in the first year of life and are mostly caused by viruses. Severity of LRTI in infants is associated with early-life environmental factors. Genetic association studies also suggest a role of heredity in susceptibility to acute bronchiolitis. We designed a case control study to further investigate relative importance of familial influences in risk of LRTI in early childhood compared to environmental factors. From a hospital database, we selected 1,308 children (436 cases; 872 controls) living in Oxfordshire. Cases were children under age 5 years admitted to hospital with LRTI. Parental history and other exposures were recorded in cases and controls by postal questionnaire. Maternal history of asthma increased the risk of severe LRTI in the first year of life, independent of subsequent asthma in a child. History of maternal bronchiolitis also increased the risk of infant LRTI. These results further support the possibility that genetic factors play an important role in susceptibility to severe viral respiratory infections in early life, and suggest that this effect may be independent of subsequent childhood asthma.

  2. Generation of Finite Life Distributional Goodman Diagrams for Reliability Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kececioglu, D.; Guerrieri, W. N.

    1971-01-01

    The methodology of developing finite life distributional Goodman diagrams and surfaces is described for presenting allowable combinations of alternating stress and mean stress to the design engineer. The combined stress condition is that of an alternating bending stress and a constant shear stress. The finite life Goodman diagrams and surfaces are created from strength distributions developed at various ratios of alternating to mean stress at particular cycle life values. The conclusions indicate that the Von Mises-Hencky ellipse, for cycle life values above 1000 cycles, is an adequate model of the finite life Goodman diagram. In addition, suggestions are made which reduce the number of experimental data points required in a fatigue data acquisition program.

  3. Pregnant families' discussions on the Net--from virtual connections toward real-life community.

    PubMed

    Kouri, Pirkko; Turunen, Hannele; Tossavainen, Kerttu; Saarikoski, Seppo

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this research was to analyze conversations between expectant families (N = 21) in Net Clinic, an Internet-based service designed for patients using public maternity care. The online conversations, shared opinions about experiences of pregnancy, and family life constituted the data for content analysis. The families developed a sense of virtual community, which gradually evolved into a real-life community, by discovering the similarity of their life situations and by giving parent-to-parent support for everyday life events. As a view of daily family life, Net Clinic offers maternity care professionals a deeper understanding of how to enhance safer pregnancy, birth, and growth of the family.

  4. Spanish Family Quality of Life Scales: Under and over 18 Years Old

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gine, Climent; Vilaseca, Rosa; Gracia, Marta; Mora, Joaquin; Orcasitas, Jose Ramon; Simon, Cecilia; Torrecillas, Ana Maria; Beltran, Francesc S.; Dalmau, Mariona; Pro, Maria Teresa; Balcells-Balcells, Anna; Mas, Joana Maria; Adam-Alcocer, Ana Luisa; Simo-Pinatella, David

    2013-01-01

    Background: Researchers, professionals, and families have shown increasing concern with the family quality of life (FQoL) of people with intellectual disability (ID) and their families. The goals of this research were (a) to explore how Spanish families understand FQoL by developing 2 different measurement tools for families with a member with ID…

  5. The Impact of Family Life Events and Changes on the Health of a Chronically Ill Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Joan M.; McCubbin, Hamilton I.

    1983-01-01

    Examined the relationship between family stress and changes in health of a child with cystic fibrosis. Data from parents (N=100) and clinic records revealed that a decline in pulmonary functioning was associated with family life changes, especially in family development and relationships, family management and decisions, and family finances.…

  6. The Impact of Family Life Events and Changes on the Health of a Chronically Ill Child.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patterson, Joan M.; McCubbin, Hamilton I.

    1983-01-01

    Examined the relationship between family stress and changes in health of a child with cystic fibrosis. Data from parents (N=100) and clinic records revealed that a decline in pulmonary functioning was associated with family life changes, especially in family development and relationships, family management and decisions, and family finances.…

  7. Spanish Family Quality of Life Scales: Under and over 18 Years Old

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gine, Climent; Vilaseca, Rosa; Gracia, Marta; Mora, Joaquin; Orcasitas, Jose Ramon; Simon, Cecilia; Torrecillas, Ana Maria; Beltran, Francesc S.; Dalmau, Mariona; Pro, Maria Teresa; Balcells-Balcells, Anna; Mas, Joana Maria; Adam-Alcocer, Ana Luisa; Simo-Pinatella, David

    2013-01-01

    Background: Researchers, professionals, and families have shown increasing concern with the family quality of life (FQoL) of people with intellectual disability (ID) and their families. The goals of this research were (a) to explore how Spanish families understand FQoL by developing 2 different measurement tools for families with a member with ID…

  8. Diabetes mellitus patients' family caregivers' subjective quality of life.

    PubMed Central

    Awadalla, Abdel W.; Ohaeri, Jude U.; Al-Awadi, Shafika A.; Tawfiq, Adel M.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the subjective quality of life (QOL) of family caregivers of Sudanese type-1 and type-2 diabetic outpatients, using the WHO 26-item QOL instrument, compared with a general population sample; and to examine the factors associated with caregiver QOL. METHOD: Responses of caregivers of 105 outpatients with type-1 diabetes and 135 with type-2 diabetes were compared with 139 general population subjects. RESULTS: Caregivers were satisfied with the content of items related to general social supports. Type-1 caregivers had significantly lower QOL scores than type-2 caregivers and the general population. Parents and siblings had lowest scores compared with other family groups. Caregivers scored higher than patients. Patients' age and duration of illness, and caregivers' education, marital status and state of health were positively associated with caregiver QOL. Caregivers' QOL was predicted by their appraisal of patients' QOL. CONCLUSIONS: Caregivers who were sick, younger, single, less educated and caring for patients with more recent illness appeared relatively vulnerable. Clinicians should be interested in the dynamics of the family caregiving situation--as it impacts QOL--and in promoting caregiver awareness of diabetes in order to enhance the caregiving role, quality of care and QOL. PMID:16749648

  9. Relationship between family quality of life and day occupations of young people with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Foley, Kitty-Rose; Girdler, Sonya; Downs, Jenny; Jacoby, Peter; Bourke, Jenny; Lennox, Nick; Einfeld, Stewart; Llewellyn, Gwynnyth; Parmenter, Trevor R; Leonard, Helen

    2014-09-01

    To explore relationships between family quality of life, day occupations and activities of daily living (ADL) of young persons with Down syndrome. Data were collected from 150 families with a young person with Down syndrome aged 16-30 years participating in the Down syndrome "Needs Opinions Wishes" database. Data described the young person's characteristics (including functional abilities, behaviour and day occupations) and family characteristics (including income, family and community supports and quality of life). Compared to families of young people attending open employment, families of young people participating in sheltered employment tended to report poorer family quality of life, after adjusting for personal characteristics, behaviour and income (coeff -6.78, 95 % CI -14.38, 0.81). Family supports reduced this relationship (coeff -6.00, 95 % CI -12.76, 0.76). Families of young people with greater functioning in ADL reported better family quality of life regardless of personal and environmental factors (coeff 0.45, 95 % CI 0.05, 0.85) and inclusion of family factors such as family supports reduced this association (coeff 0.29, 95 % CI -0.10, 0.67). Participation of young people with Down syndrome in open employment may positively influence family quality of life. Services that facilitate functioning in ADL and assist the families in accessing suitable family supports have the potential to positively influence family quality of life.

  10. Prospective association between negative life events and initiation of sexual intercourse: the influence of family structure and family income.

    PubMed

    Cheney, Marshall K; Oman, Roy F; Vesely, Sara K; Aspy, Cheryl B; Tolma, Eleni L; John, Robert

    2015-03-01

    We examined the prospective association between negative life events and time to initiation of sexual intercourse and the influence of family structure and family income on this association. We followed up a randomly selected sample (n=649) of ethnically diverse parents and their children aged 12 to 17 years over a 5-year period. We conducted Cox proportional hazards regression analysis to examine the relation between negative life events and time to initiation of sexual intercourse. Family structure and family income were assessed as confounders. Negative life events were significant predictors of time to initiation of sexual intercourse in adolescents. After controlling for demographic variables, youths reporting 1 negative life event had a hazard of initiation of sexual intercourse 1.40 times greater and youths reporting 2 or more negative life events had a hazard of initiation of sexual intercourse 1.61 times greater compared with youths reporting no negative life events. Family structure and family income were not significant confounders of the relation between initiation of sexual intercourse and negative life events. Interventions to prevent initiation of sexual intercourse should focus on youths with recent negative life events, regardless of family income and structure.

  11. Prospective Association Between Negative Life Events and Initiation of Sexual Intercourse: The Influence of Family Structure and Family Income

    PubMed Central

    Oman, Roy F.; Vesely, Sara K.; Aspy, Cheryl B.; Tolma, Eleni L.; John, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the prospective association between negative life events and time to initiation of sexual intercourse and the influence of family structure and family income on this association. Methods. We followed up a randomly selected sample (n = 649) of ethnically diverse parents and their children aged 12 to 17 years over a 5-year period. We conducted Cox proportional hazards regression analysis to examine the relation between negative life events and time to initiation of sexual intercourse. Family structure and family income were assessed as confounders. Results. Negative life events were significant predictors of time to initiation of sexual intercourse in adolescents. After controlling for demographic variables, youths reporting 1 negative life event had a hazard of initiation of sexual intercourse 1.40 times greater and youths reporting 2 or more negative life events had a hazard of initiation of sexual intercourse 1.61 times greater compared with youths reporting no negative life events. Family structure and family income were not significant confounders of the relation between initiation of sexual intercourse and negative life events. Conclusions. Interventions to prevent initiation of sexual intercourse should focus on youths with recent negative life events, regardless of family income and structure. PMID:25602885

  12. Test-retest reliability of Family L.I.F.E. (Looking Into Family Experiences): an occupation-based assessment.

    PubMed

    Honaker, DeLana; Rosello, Stacy Sue; Candler, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. We examined the test-retest reliability of Family L.I.F.E. (Looking Into Family Experiences) for consistency in identifying occupations desired by families with a child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and we compared the perceived efficiency, effectiveness, and satisfaction ratings of those occupations for the families. METHOD. Family L.I.F.E. was administered initially and 1 wk later via interview to 13 families with a child with ASD. RESULTS. Ninety-two percent of the families identified the same occupations as important at test and retest. Wilcoxon signed-rank test indicated no change in the families' perceived efficiency and effectiveness of those occupations, and Spearman's correlations indicated strong relationships. A decrease in satisfaction was noted. CONCLUSION. For families with a child with ASD, desired family occupations and efficiency and effectiveness ratings are likely to remain consistent and are highly linked on retest using Family L.I.F.E. At second interview using this instrument, families with a child with ASD may report decreased satisfaction in desired family occupations. Copyright © 2012 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  13. Maximum likelihood estimation for life distributions with competing failure modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidik, S. M.

    1979-01-01

    Systems which are placed on test at time zero, function for a period and die at some random time were studied. Failure may be due to one of several causes or modes. The parameters of the life distribution may depend upon the levels of various stress variables the item is subject to. Maximum likelihood estimation methods are discussed. Specific methods are reported for the smallest extreme-value distributions of life. Monte-Carlo results indicate the methods to be promising. Under appropriate conditions, the location parameters are nearly unbiased, the scale parameter is slight biased, and the asymptotic covariances are rapidly approached.

  14. Education for Family Life: A Survey of Available Programs and Their Evaluation. Occasional Paper Number 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eastman, Moira

    In reviewing the literature related to education for family life, this discussion focuses on three main areas: the need for such education, trends in the development of family life education programs, and the results of evaluations of a wide range of programs. Evidence was found concerning (1) the key role families play in their members'…

  15. Diversity and distribution of CYP gene family in Bactrian camel.

    PubMed

    Hasi, Surong; Yao, Jirimutu; Yu, Siriguleng; Tian, Yanan

    2017-09-12

    Cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes belong to a superfamily of monooxygenases which are phase I enzymes responsible for the first pass metabolism of about 90% of drugs in animals. However, these enzymes are often polymorphic and metabolism of the same drug in different species or different individuals is influenced by genetic and non-genetic factors. Bactrian camels are capable of survival in harsh living environments, being able to consume diets that are often toxic to other mammals and can tolerate extreme water and food deprivation. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the Bactrian camel's special metabolic pathways and unique detoxification capabilities are attributable to particularities of the CYP gene family. The Bactrian camel's whole genome sequencing data were systemically analyzed and annotated, and then, CYP gene family was searched from the whole protein database and compared with CYP gene families of cattle, horse, chicken, and human. The total of 63 CYP gene copies were found in Bactrian camel's whole genome and were classified into 17 families and 38 subfamilies. Among them, 9 multi-gene families were found, and CYP2, CYP3, and CPY4 have 27, 6, and 7 subfamilies, accounting for 43, 10, and 11% in camel CYP gene, respectively. In comparison with cattle, chicken, horse, and human, the distribution of CYP gene subfamilies in camel is different, with more CYP2J and CYP3A copies in the Bactrian camel, which may contribute to the Bactrian camel's specific biological characteristics and metabolic pathways. Comparing to the cow, horse, chicken, and human CYP genes, the distribution of CYP gene subfamilies is distinct in the Bactrian camel. The higher copy number of CYP2J gene and CYP3A gene in Bactrian camel may be the important factors contributing to the distinct biological characteristics and metabolic pathways of Bactrian camels for adaptation to the harsh environments.

  16. Adult Roles & Responsibilities. Home Economics Family Life Course. Grades 11-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utah State Office of Education, Salt Lake City.

    This curriculum guide provides materials for developing a home economics family life course to assist students in improving the quality of individual and family life. The course contains 12 units that cover the following topics: self-awareness, wheel of life, dating, mate selection, engagement, marriage, money management, parenting, crisis…

  17. Families, social life, and well-being at older ages.

    PubMed

    Waite, Linda; Das, Aniruddha

    2010-01-01

    As people age, many aspects of their lives tend to change, including the constellation of people with whom they are connected, their social context, their families, and their health--changes that are often interrelated. Wave I of the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project (NSHAP) has yielded rich information on intimate ties, especially dyads and families, and on social connections generally. Combined with extensive biological and other health measures, NSHAP enables researchers to address key questions on health and aging. We begin with recent findings on intimate dyads, then move to social participation, and finally to elder mistreatment. Among dyads, we find that whereas sexual activity drops sharply with age for both women and men, gender differences in partner loss as well as psychosocial and normative pressures constrain women's sex more than men's. However, surviving partnerships tend to be emotionally and physically satisfying and are marked by relatively frequent sex. In contrast to sex, nonsexual intimacy is highly prevalent at older ages, especially among women. Older adults are also socially resilient--adapting to the loss of social ties by increasing involvement with community and kin networks. Despite these social assets, older adults remain vulnerable to mistreatment. Overall, these findings yield a mixed picture of gender-differentiated vulnerabilities balanced by proactive adaptation and maintenance of social and dyadic assets.

  18. Using the family covenant in planning end-of-life care: obligations and promises of patients, families, and physicians.

    PubMed

    Doukas, David J; Hardwig, John

    2003-08-01

    Physicians and families need to interact more meaningfully to clarify the values and preferences at stake in advance care planning. The current use of advance directives fails to respect patient autonomy. This paper proposes using the family covenant as a preventive ethics process designed to improve end-of-life planning by incorporating other family members--as agreed to by the patient and those family members--into the medical care dialogue. The family covenant formulates advance directives in conversation with family members and with the assistance of a physician, thereby making advance directives more acceptable to the family, and more intelligible to other physicians. It adds the moral force of a promise to the obligation of respecting a patient's preferences about end-of-life care. These negotiations between patient, family, and physician, from early planning phases through implementation, should greatly reduce the incidence of family disagreements on what the patient would have wanted. The family covenant ensures advance directive discussions within the family, promotes and respects the autonomy of other family members, and might even spur others in the family to complete advance directives through additional covenants. The family covenant holds the potential to transform moral quagmires into meaningful moral conversation.

  19. Mining association language patterns using a distributional semantic model for negative life event classification.

    PubMed

    Yu, Liang-Chih; Chan, Chien-Lung; Lin, Chao-Cheng; Lin, I-Chun

    2011-08-01

    Negative life events, such as the death of a family member, an argument with a spouse or the loss of a job, play an important role in triggering depressive episodes. Therefore, it is worthwhile to develop psychiatric services that can automatically identify such events. This study describes the use of association language patterns, i.e., meaningful combinations of words (e.g., ), as features to classify sentences with negative life events into predefined categories (e.g., Family, Love, Work). This study proposes a framework that combines a supervised data mining algorithm and an unsupervised distributional semantic model to discover association language patterns. The data mining algorithm, called association rule mining, was used to generate a set of seed patterns by incrementally associating frequently co-occurring words from a small corpus of sentences labeled with negative life events. The distributional semantic model was then used to discover more patterns similar to the seed patterns from a large, unlabeled web corpus. The experimental results showed that association language patterns were significant features for negative life event classification. Additionally, the unsupervised distributional semantic model was not only able to improve the level of performance but also to reduce the reliance of the classification process on the availability of a large, labeled corpus. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Family quality of life in families affected by HIV: the perspective of HIV-positive mothers.

    PubMed

    Blais, Martin; Fernet, Mylène; Proulx-Boucher, Karène; Lapointe, Normand; Samson, Johanne; Otis, Joanne; Racicot, Caroline; Rodrigue, Carl; Lebouché, Bertrand

    2014-01-01

    The HIV infection of a family member can impact family quality of life (FQoL). The objectives of this study are to (1) describe patterns of FQoL among mothers living with HIV (MLHIV) and (2) identify key factors associated with FQoL in families affected by HIV. Recruitment took place in HIV-specialized clinics and community organizations. A 100 MLHIV and 67 of their children participated in this study. Mothers were on average 40.8 years old and reported having an average of two dependent children at home (M = 2.1, SD = 1.0). Participating children were 16.2 years old, on average. Half of the children were boys (50.8%). More than half were aware of their mother's positive HIV status (68.2%) and 19.7% were diagnosed with HIV. All HIV-positive children were aware of their status. A latent profile analysis was performed on the five continuous indicators of FQoL, and three main profiles of self-reported FQoL among MLHIV were established: high FQoL (33%), moderate FQoL (58%), and low FQoL (9%). Among the mothers' characteristics, education, physical functioning, social support, and resilience increased FQoL, while anxiety and irritability decreased FQoL. Among the children's characteristics, resilience followed the FQoL profile. A trend was observed toward children's greater awareness of the mother's HIV status in high and low FQoL profiles. Additionally, irritability tended to be higher within the lower FQoL profile. FQoL profiles can be used to identify families needing special care, particularly for family interventions with both parents and children. Other relevant indicators must be studied (e.g., closeness and support between family members, availability and accessibility of care, family structure, father-child relationships, and medical condition of the mother) and longitudinal research conducted to estimate the direction of causality between FQoL profile and individual family member characteristics.

  1. Child and spouse replacement mechanisms: a life cycle perspective on family composition in Peru.

    PubMed

    Tienda, M

    1980-01-01

    The author assesses the patterns of family extension in Peru by examining variations in family composition over the family life cycle. The amount and type of extension among Peruvian families at successive stages of family development are examined. The relative importance of general overlap and of child and spouse replacement mechanisms as processes that help to ensure the viability of residential family units is studied. The empirical analysis is based on a 1970-1971 survey of a national sample of Peruvian households

  2. The Quantitative Measurement of Family Quality of Life: A Review of Available Instruments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, X.; Summers, J. A.; Turnbull, A.; Zuna, N.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Family quality of life (FQOL) has emerged as an important outcome of service delivery for individuals with disabilities and their families. The purpose of this review was to explore the disparity of scale development approaches between families with children with disabilities and families from other populations and identify strengths…

  3. Tandem repeat distribution of gene transcripts in three plant families

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Tandem repeats (microsatellites or SSRs) are molecular markers with great potential for plant genetic studies. Modern strategies include the transfer of these markers among widely studied and orphan species. In silico analyses allow for studying distribution patterns of microsatellites and predicting which motifs would be more amenable to interspecies transfer. Transcribed sequences (Unigene) from ten species of three plant families were surveyed for the occurrence of micro and minisatellites. Transcripts from different species displayed different rates of tandem repeat occurrence, ranging from 1.47% to 11.28%. Both similar and different patterns were found within and among plant families. The results also indicate a lack of association between genome size and tandem repeat fractions in expressed regions. The conservation of motifs among species and its implication on genome evolution and dynamics are discussed. PMID:21637460

  4. How Military Families Respond Before, During and After Deployment: Findings from the RAND Deployment Life Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-01

    deployments as the most stressful aspect of military life . How Military Families Function Before, During, and After Deployment Findings from the...RAND Deployment Life Study By the Numbers 2700 military families studied 9 surveys per family member before, during, and after deployment 5 study...preparing for deployment (developing an emergency financial plan or buying life insurance), the higher their parenting satisfaction after deployment

  5. Remarks on the generalized Tukey's lambda family of distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, H.; Bowman, K.O.; Shenton, L.R.

    1980-01-01

    The family of curves generated by the mapping of the uniform density F/sup -1/(lambda) = ..cap alpha.. + ..beta..(lambda/sup ..gamma..delta/ - (1-lambda)/sup ..gamma../)/..gamma.., 0 < lambda < 1, is considered. Primary interest is the application of the above density to approximating theoretical distribution functions of test statistics such as S.D., skewness, and kurtosis under non-normality. Moments are straight forward to evaluate in terms of gamma functions, or polygamma functions in special cases. 1 figure, 8 tables. (RWR)

  6. An initial look at the quality of life of Malaysian families that include children with disabilities.

    PubMed

    Clark, M; Brown, R; Karrapaya, R

    2012-01-01

    While there is a growing body of literature in the quality of life of families that include children with disabilities, the majority of research has been conducted in western countries. The present study provides an initial exploration of the quality of life of Malaysian families that include children with developmental/intellectual disabilities. Dynamics characterising Malaysian society are described as developments in social policy and service delivery that support persons with disabilities and their families. Questionnaire data were collected using the Family Quality of Life Survey - Short Version. Members of 52 families that included one or two children with disabilities were interviewed. Their responses provided their perceptions within six dimensions of family quality of life across the nine life domains assessed. Findings showed a consistent pattern of relatively strong perceived 'importance' ratings in each of life domains as compared to mean ratings for other family quality of life dimensions. Some dimensions of family quality of life, in particular 'opportunities', 'initiative' and 'attainment', demonstrated particularly strong associations with each other. Overall means of satisfaction with and attainment of family quality of life as well as global evaluations of quality of life and satisfaction all demonstrated significant associations, although each of these correlations accounted for less than 50% of the common variance. The importance rating can be viewed as a determining factor in terms of quality of life, and it played a critical role in supporting attainment of, and satisfaction with, family quality of life, assuming opportunities, initiative and stability are adequate. The need for a broader sample including families that were not receiving services was noted. Future research questions based on the results of the current study and some of the dynamics impacting Malaysian society are also suggested. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Intellectual

  7. Quality of life and adjustment in youths with asthma: the contributions of family rituals and the family environment.

    PubMed

    Santos, Susana; Crespo, Carla; Silva, Neuza; Canavarro, Maria Cristina

    2012-12-01

    This cross-sectional study explored the relationships among family ritual meaning, cohesion, conflict, and health-related quality of life (both specific to chronic health conditions and in general), and the emotional and behavioral problems reported by youths with asthma. Participants included 149 Portuguese children and adolescents between the ages of 8 and 18 who had been diagnosed with asthma and attended outpatient services at three public hospitals. The results showed that stronger family ritual meaning predicted a more positive family environment (i.e., higher cohesion levels and lower conflict levels), better health-related quality of life, and fewer emotional and behavior problems in youths. Furthermore, family cohesion and conflict mediated the links between family ritual meaning and health-related quality of life, and emotional and behavioral problems. These results did not change after controlling for participant age, gender, and asthma severity. The findings of this study suggest that family ritual meaning contributes to the adaptation of youths with asthma via its positive association with the family environment. The implications for multicontextual interventions with families are briefly discussed with regard to the positive role of family rituals and of their potential as a modifiable factor in families with increased health challenges.

  8. Work and Family Life. Phase 1. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lein, Laura; And Others

    This is the first of a series of working papers and reports on aspects of modern American families. It investigates the issues and problems facing families with preschool children, when both of the parents are employed. The composite portrait of family styles within a sample of 14 young families begins with a project history. The literature is…

  9. Immigrant Families over the Life Course: Research Directions and Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Rebecca L.; Glick, Jennifer E.; Bures, Regina M.

    2009-01-01

    Family researchers and policy makers are giving increasing attention to the consequences of immigration for families. Immigration affects the lives of family members who migrate as well as those who remain behind and has important consequences for family formation, kinship ties, living arrangements, and children's outcomes. We present a selective…

  10. La Familia: Curriculum Unit. Latino Family Life Education Curriculum Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matiella, Ana Consuelo

    This teaching guide comprises eight lessons designed to enhance the self-esteem of Latino students, grades 5 through 8, through the exploration of family, family traditions and values, and the affirmation of family strengths. Student objectives include the following: (1) define family; (2) describe similarities and differences among Latino…

  11. Work-family life courses and metabolic markers in mid-life: evidence from the British National Child Development Study

    PubMed Central

    McMunn, Anne; Lacey, Rebecca E; Kumari, Meena; Worts, Diana; McDonough, Peggy; Sacker, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous studies have found generally better health among those who combine employment and family responsibilities; however, most research excludes men, and relies on subjective measures of health and information on work and family activities from only 1 or 2 time points in the life course. This study investigated associations between work-family life course types (LCTs) and markers of metabolic risk in a British birth cohort study. Methods Multichannel sequence analysis was used to generate work-family LCTs, combining annual information on work, partnership and parenthood between 16 and 42 years for men and women in the British National Child Development Study (NCDS, followed since their birth in 1958). Associations between work-family LCTs and metabolic risk factors in mid-life (age 44–45) were tested using multivariate linear regression in multiply imputed data. Results Life courses characterised by earlier transitions into parenthood were associated with significantly increased metabolic risk, regardless of attachment to paid work or marital stability over the life course. These associations were only partially attenuated by educational qualifications, early life circumstances and adult mediators. The positive association between weak labour markets ties and metabolic risk was weaker than might be expected from previous studies. Associations between work-family LCTs and metabolic risk factors did not differ significantly by gender. Conclusions Earlier transitions to parenthood are linked to metabolic risk in mid-life. PMID:26659761

  12. A New Distribution Family for Microarray Data †

    PubMed Central

    Kelmansky, Diana Mabel; Ricci, Lila

    2017-01-01

    The traditional approach with microarray data has been to apply transformations that approximately normalize them, with the drawback of losing the original scale. The alternative standpoint taken here is to search for models that fit the data, characterized by the presence of negative values, preserving their scale; one advantage of this strategy is that it facilitates a direct interpretation of the results. A new family of distributions named gpower-normal indexed by p∈R is introduced and it is proven that these variables become normal or truncated normal when a suitable gpower transformation is applied. Expressions are given for moments and quantiles, in terms of the truncated normal density. This new family can be used to model asymmetric data that include non-positive values, as required for microarray analysis. Moreover, it has been proven that the gpower-normal family is a special case of pseudo-dispersion models, inheriting all the good properties of these models, such as asymptotic normality for small variances. A combined maximum likelihood method is proposed to estimate the model parameters, and it is applied to microarray and contamination data. R codes are available from the authors upon request. PMID:28208652

  13. Hepatic expression and cellular distribution of the glucose transporter family

    PubMed Central

    Karim, Sumera; Adams, David H; Lalor, Patricia F

    2012-01-01

    Glucose and other carbohydrates are transported into cells using members of a family of integral membrane glucose transporter (GLUT) molecules. To date 14 members of this family, also called the solute carrier 2A proteins have been identified which are divided on the basis of transport characteristics and sequence similarities into several families (Classes 1 to 3). The expression of these different receptor subtypes varies between different species, tissues and cellular subtypes and each has differential sensitivities to stimuli such as insulin. The liver is a contributor to metabolic carbohydrate homeostasis and is a major site for synthesis, storage and redistribution of carbohydrates. Situations in which the balance of glucose homeostasis is upset such as diabetes or the metabolic syndrome can lead metabolic disturbances that drive chronic organ damage and failure, confirming the importance of understanding the molecular regulation of hepatic glucose homeostasis. There is a considerable literature describing the expression and function of receptors that regulate glucose uptake and release by hepatocytes, the most import cells in glucose regulation and glycogen storage. However there is less appreciation of the roles of GLUTs expressed by non parenchymal cell types within the liver, all of which require carbohydrate to function. A better understanding of the detailed cellular distribution of GLUTs in human liver tissue may shed light on mechanisms underlying disease pathogenesis. This review summarises the available literature on hepatocellular expression of GLUTs in health and disease and highlights areas where further investigation is required. PMID:23239915

  14. The Size Distribution of Jupiter-Family Comet Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weissman, Paul R.; Snodgrass, C.; Fitzsimmons, A.; Lowry, S. C.

    2009-09-01

    We present an updated size distribution for the nuclei of Jupiter-Family Comets, based on observations of nuclei at large heliocentric distances. The data set used includes our own recently published work and that of others published since the comprehensive review by Lamy et al. (2004, in Comets II), in addition to older measurements from the refereed literature that were included in that compilation. We apply a new approach to make a rigorous assessment of the uncertainty on the size distribution power law slope, taking into account all unknown factors and sources of uncertainty. We include: 1) the uncertainty on the original photometry; 2) the difference between the measured effective radius from snap-shot observations and the mean effective radius for observations at unknown rotational phase of a nucleus with unknown pole orientation and axial ratio; 3) the unknown solar phase function; and 4) the unknown albedo. We use a Monte Carlo technique to look at how the size distribution changes when allowing individual size measurements to vary within these uncertainties. We find the cumulative size distribution can be fit by a power law, N( > r) r^{-a}, where r is the radius and the slope, a = 1.86 ± 0.15. This work was funded in part by the NASA Planetary Astronomy Program and was performed in part at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory under contract with NASA.

  15. Exercise, pain, perceived family support, and quality of life in Korean patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hyun-Ja; Lee, Myeong Soo; Lim, Hyun-Suk

    2005-02-01

    Relations of habitual exercise and pain, perceived family support, and the quality of life in patients with functional class II for ankylosing spondylitis were explored. In a cross-sectional study perceived pain, family support, and quality of life were compared for 30 patients (23 women and 7 men whose mean age was 28.3 yr.+/-8.6 yr.) practicing exercise regularly and for 38 sedentary patients (31 women and 7 men whose mean age was 27.2+/-6.7 yr.). Exercising patients reported significantly lower pain, greater perceived family support, and increased quality of life than their sedentary peers. Pain ratings were significantly negatively correlated with the quality of life in both groups (r = -.26 in exercisers and r = -.50 in sedentary patients) and control group's perceived family support was significantly correlated .44 with quality of life. These results encourage further study of the associations of habitual exercise with perceived pain, family support, and quality of life.

  16. Living with schizophrenia: Health-related quality of life among primary family caregivers.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Chiu-Yueh; Lee, Chun-Te; Lu, Huei-Lan; Tsai, Yun-Fang

    2017-09-07

    To examine influencing factors of health-related quality of life in primary family caregivers of people with schizophrenia receiving inpatient psychiatric rehabilitation services. Families, particularly primary family caregivers, have become more important than ever in mental health care. Yet, research on health-related quality of life among primarily family caregivers is limited. A correlational study design was used. A convenience sample of 122 primary family caregivers participated in the study. Data were analysed with descriptive statistics, Pearson's product-moment correlation, t test, one-way analysis of variance and a hierarchical multiple regression analysis. Primary family caregivers who were parents, older, less educated, and had a lower monthly household income, increased affiliate stigma and decreased quality of family-centred care experienced poor health-related quality of life. Particularly, monthly household income, affiliate stigma and quality of family-centred care appeared to be the most critical determinants of health-related quality of life. Efforts to enhance satisfaction of life should focus on reducing affiliate stigma as well as increasing monthly household income and strengthening the quality of family-centred care. Findings may assist in the development of culturally integrated rehabilitation programmes to decrease affiliate stigma and increase family engagement as a means of promoting quality of life for primary family caregivers living with people who have schizophrenia. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. The relationship between religion, illness and death in life histories of family members of children with life-threatening diseases.

    PubMed

    Bousso, Regina Szylit; Serafim, Taís de Souza; Misko, Maira Deguer

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study aimed to get to know the relationship between the experiences of families of children with a life-threatening disease and their religion, illness and life histories. The methodological framework was based on Oral History. The data were collected through interviews and the participants were nine families from six different religions who had lived the experience of having a child with a life-threatening disease. The interviews, held with one or two family members, were transcribed, textualized and, through their analysis, the Vital Tone was elaborated, representing the moral synthesis of each narrative. Three dimensions of spirituality were related to illness and death in their life histories: a Higher Being with a healing power; Development and Maintenance of a Connection with God and Faith Encouraging Optimism. The narratives demonstrated the family's search to attribute meanings to their experiences, based on their religious beliefs.

  18. Quality of life, treatment adherence, and locus of control: multiple family groups for chronic medical illnesses.

    PubMed

    López-Larrosa, Silvia

    2013-12-01

    The Multiple Family Groups (MFGs) approach for patients with a chronic medical illness and their families is a structured psychoeducational program that unfolds in six weekly 90-minute sessions. In the MFGs, patients and family members explore new ways to balance illness and nonillness priorities in family life (Steinglass, 1998; Steinglass, 2000 Cuadernos de Terapia Familiar, 44-45, 11; Steinglass, Ostroff, & Steinglass, 2011 Family Process, 50, 393).

  19. The Effect of Providing Life Support on Nurses' Decision Making Regarding Life Support for Themselves and Family Members in Japan.

    PubMed

    Shaku, Fumio; Tsutsumi, Madoka

    2016-12-01

    Decision making in terminal illness has recently received increased attention. In Japan, patients and their families typically make decisions without understanding either the severity of illness or the efficacy of life-supporting treatments at the end of life. Japanese culture traditionally directs the family to make decisions for the patient. This descriptive study examined the influence of the experiences of 391 Japanese nurses caring for dying patients and family members and how that experience changed their decision making for themselves and their family members. The results were mixed but generally supported the idea that the more experience nurses have in caring for the dying, the less likely they would choose to institute lifesupport measures for themselves and family members. The results have implications for discussions on end-of-life care. © The Author(s) 2016.

  20. Map of Life - A Dashboard for Monitoring Planetary Species Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jetz, W.

    2016-12-01

    Geographic information about biodiversity is vital for understanding the many services nature provides and their potential changes, yet remains unreliable and often insufficient. By integrating a wide range of knowledge about species distributions and their dynamics over time, Map of Life supports global biodiversity education, monitoring, research and decision-making. Built on a scalable web platform geared for large biodiversity and environmental data, Map of Life endeavors provides species range information globally and species lists for any area. With data and technology provided by NASA and Google Earth Engine, tools under development use remote sensing-based environmental layers to enable on-the-fly predictions of species distributions, range changes, and early warning signals for threatened species. The ultimate vision is a globally connected, collaborative knowledge- and tool-base for regional and local biodiversity decision-making, education, monitoring, and projection. For currently available tools, more information and to follow progress, go to MOL.org.

  1. The Association between Adolescent Life Satisfaction, Family Structure, Family Affluence and Gender Differences in Parent-Child Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Kate Ann; Dallago, Lorenza; Currie, Candace

    2012-01-01

    The study sought to examine young people's life satisfaction in the context of the family environment, using data from the 2006 HBSC: WHO-collaborative Study in Scotland (N = 5,126). Multilevel linear regression analyses were carried out for 11-, 13- and 15-year old boys and girls, with outcome measure ridit-transformed life satisfaction. The…

  2. The Association between Adolescent Life Satisfaction, Family Structure, Family Affluence and Gender Differences in Parent-Child Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Kate Ann; Dallago, Lorenza; Currie, Candace

    2012-01-01

    The study sought to examine young people's life satisfaction in the context of the family environment, using data from the 2006 HBSC: WHO-collaborative Study in Scotland (N = 5,126). Multilevel linear regression analyses were carried out for 11-, 13- and 15-year old boys and girls, with outcome measure ridit-transformed life satisfaction. The…

  3. Life history, diversity and distribution: A study of Japanese pteridophytes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guo, Q.; Kato, Masako; Ricklefs, R.E.

    2003-01-01

    Many studies address the relationships between diversity or distribution and attributes of the physical environment. However, how these relationships are connected to variation in life history is poorly understood. This is particularly true in the case of pteridophytes. Japanese ferns and their allies comprise one of the best-known pteridophyte floras in the world. We analyzed ca 600 species of Japanese pteridophytes for which there is detailed information on distribution, reproduction, and chromosome number. Species richness was greatest in groups with a single reproductive mode (sexual, followed by apogamous), but distribution was greatest in species groups with multiple reproductive modes: sexual plus either sterile (irregular in meiosis) or apogamous. Geographical ranges varied greatly among species with small chromosome numbers but were uniformly small among species having high chromosome numbers. Seasonally green (mostly summer green) species had significantly larger distribution ranges than evergreen species. Endemic species had higher proportions of apogamy and sterility than non-endemic species. Seasonally green species had significantly larger distributional ranges, and a smaller proportion of species with apogamous reproduction, than evergreen species. There was no clear relationship between distribution and spore size, either among endemic species, non-endemic species, or all species combined. There was no relationship between spore size and chromosome number when all species were combined. However, positive relationships were detected within three of the nine largest genera, suggesting potential phylogenetic effects. We concluded that habitat availability, rather than dispersability, may be the limiting factor for the distribution of pteridophytes in Japan.

  4. Relationships among the perceived health status, family support and life satisfaction of older Korean adults.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sook-Young; Sok, Sohyune R

    2012-08-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the perceived health status, family support and life satisfaction of older Korean adults and the relationships among them. This study was designed to be a descriptive correlation study using questionnaire. Subjects were 246 older people who were over 65 years of age in Seoul and Daegu metropolitan city, Korea. Measures were the Cornell Medical Index-Simple Korean Form to measure the perceived health status, the Family Support Instrument to measure the family support and the Standard Life Satisfaction Instrument for Korean people to measure the life satisfaction. Perceived health state was worse as average 3.3, family support was good as average 3.4 and life satisfaction was low as average 3.1. There were statistically significant positive correlations among perceived health state, family support and life satisfaction and between family support and life satisfaction. The predictors of life satisfaction in elderly were family support, age, monthly allowance and perceived health state. These factors explained 37.5% of the total variance. The major influencing factor was family support. This cross-sectional study provides preliminary evidence that to develop nursing strategy to increase family support of older Korean adults is needed.

  5. 40 CFR 91.120 - Compliance with Family Emission Limits over useful life.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... over useful life. 91.120 Section 91.120 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Standards and Certification Provisions § 91.120 Compliance with Family Emission Limits over useful life. (a...)(1) The engine Family Emission Limits (FELs) apply to the emissions of engines for their useful lives...

  6. 40 CFR 91.120 - Compliance with Family Emission Limits over useful life.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... over useful life. 91.120 Section 91.120 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Standards and Certification Provisions § 91.120 Compliance with Family Emission Limits over useful life. (a...)(1) The engine Family Emission Limits (FELs) apply to the emissions of engines for their useful lives...

  7. 40 CFR 91.120 - Compliance with Family Emission Limits over useful life.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... over useful life. 91.120 Section 91.120 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Standards and Certification Provisions § 91.120 Compliance with Family Emission Limits over useful life. (a...)(1) The engine Family Emission Limits (FELs) apply to the emissions of engines for their useful lives...

  8. High School Work and Family Life ITAC [Integrated Technical & Academic Competencies] for Career-Focused Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This document contains a guide to implementing the Ohio Work and Family Life ITAC (Integrated Technical and Academic Competencies), which connects to the Ohio Model Competency-Based Program documents in arts, foreign languages, language arts, mathematics, science, and social studies, as well as the Core ITAC document. The Work and Family Life ITAC…

  9. Work, Family and Life-Course Fit: Does Control over Work Time Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moen, Phyllis; Kelly, Erin; Huang, Qinlei

    2008-01-01

    This study moves from "work-family" to a multi-dimensional "life-course fit" construct (employees' cognitive assessments of resources, resource deficits, and resource demands), using a combined work-family, demands-control and ecology of the life course framing. It examined (1) impacts of job and home ecological systems on fit dimensions, and (2)…

  10. Family Quality of Life: Adult School Children with Intellectual Disabilities in Bosnia and Herzegovina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svraka, E.; Loga, S.; Brown, I.

    2011-01-01

    Aims: This study endeavours to provide initial data on quality of life for families with adult children who have intellectual disabilities (ID) in the Canton of Sarajevo. Methods: The principal measure used was the "Family Quality of life Survey 2006-main caregivers of people with intellectual or developmental disabilities." The sample…

  11. From "Work-Family" to "Work-Life": Broadening Our Conceptualization and Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeney, Jessica; Boyd, Elizabeth M.; Sinha, Ruchi; Westring, Alyssa F.; Ryan, Ann Marie

    2013-01-01

    Despite frequent reference to "work-life" issues in the organizational literature, little theoretical or empirical attention has been paid to nonwork areas beyond family. The purpose of the research described here is to move beyond work-family conflict to a broader conceptualization and measurement of work interference with life. A measure of work…

  12. From "Work-Family" to "Work-Life": Broadening Our Conceptualization and Measurement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keeney, Jessica; Boyd, Elizabeth M.; Sinha, Ruchi; Westring, Alyssa F.; Ryan, Ann Marie

    2013-01-01

    Despite frequent reference to "work-life" issues in the organizational literature, little theoretical or empirical attention has been paid to nonwork areas beyond family. The purpose of the research described here is to move beyond work-family conflict to a broader conceptualization and measurement of work interference with life. A measure of work…

  13. An Initial Look at the Quality of Life of Malaysian Families That Include Children with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, M.; Brown, R.; Karrapaya, R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: While there is a growing body of literature in the quality of life of families that include children with disabilities, the majority of research has been conducted in western countries. The present study provides an initial exploration of the quality of life of Malaysian families that include children with developmental/intellectual…

  14. Grandmothers Raising Grandchildren with Disabilities: Sources of Support and Family Quality of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kresak, Karen E.; Gallagher, Peggy A.; Kelley, Susan J.

    2014-01-01

    Sources of support and quality of life of 50 grandmother-headed families raising grandchildren with and without disabilities were examined. Comparative analyses revealed significant differences between grandmothers raising grandchildren with and without disabilities in regard to sources of support and family quality of life. Informal support was…

  15. Family Quality of Life: Adult School Children with Intellectual Disabilities in Bosnia and Herzegovina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svraka, E.; Loga, S.; Brown, I.

    2011-01-01

    Aims: This study endeavours to provide initial data on quality of life for families with adult children who have intellectual disabilities (ID) in the Canton of Sarajevo. Methods: The principal measure used was the "Family Quality of life Survey 2006-main caregivers of people with intellectual or developmental disabilities." The sample…

  16. An Initial Look at the Quality of Life of Malaysian Families That Include Children with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, M.; Brown, R.; Karrapaya, R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: While there is a growing body of literature in the quality of life of families that include children with disabilities, the majority of research has been conducted in western countries. The present study provides an initial exploration of the quality of life of Malaysian families that include children with developmental/intellectual…

  17. Grandmothers Raising Grandchildren with Disabilities: Sources of Support and Family Quality of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kresak, Karen E.; Gallagher, Peggy A.; Kelley, Susan J.

    2014-01-01

    Sources of support and quality of life of 50 grandmother-headed families raising grandchildren with and without disabilities were examined. Comparative analyses revealed significant differences between grandmothers raising grandchildren with and without disabilities in regard to sources of support and family quality of life. Informal support was…

  18. Attitudes toward Family Life Education: A Survey of Israeli Arab Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oz, Sheri

    1991-01-01

    Investigated Israeli Arab teachers' attitudes toward inclusion of family life education program in schools, possible subject areas for instruction, and parent involvement. Results indicated high degree of support for family life education and narrow range of subject areas considered appropriate for Arab classes. Parent involvement was considered…

  19. The Implementation of Family Life Education in New Jersey Public Schools. A Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flamer, Mary Guess; Dougherty, John

    This report summarizes information about Family Life Education (FLE) as mandated by the New Jersey Board of Education. The information is taken from a variety of sources and three principal concerns of the state board are analyzed: (1) the status of implementation of family life education; (2) local district perceptions of training needs; and (3)…

  20. Work, Family and Life-Course Fit: Does Control over Work Time Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moen, Phyllis; Kelly, Erin; Huang, Qinlei

    2008-01-01

    This study moves from "work-family" to a multi-dimensional "life-course fit" construct (employees' cognitive assessments of resources, resource deficits, and resource demands), using a combined work-family, demands-control and ecology of the life course framing. It examined (1) impacts of job and home ecological systems on fit dimensions, and (2)…

  1. The Relation between Work-Family Balance and Quality of Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenhaus, Jeffrey H.; Collins, Karen M.; Shaw, Jason D.

    2003-01-01

    The relationship between work-family balance and quality of life was assessed for 353 accounting professionals. Those who spent more time on family than work experienced higher quality of life than balanced individuals, who experienced higher quality than those who spent more time on work. Findings were similar for level of involvement balance and…

  2. Familia Ludens: Reinforcing the Leisure Component in Family Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orthner, Dennis K.

    1975-01-01

    Leisure is examined as a normal and potentially vital component in the contemporary family. Consideration is given to the interplay between work and leisure and the means by which leisure facilitates companionship and family interaction. (Author)

  3. The European Portuguese WHOQOL-OLD module and the new facet Family/Family life: reliability and validity studies.

    PubMed

    Vilar, Manuela; Sousa, Liliana B; Simões, Mário R

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the psychometric properties of the European Portuguese version of the World Health Organization Quality of Life-Older Adults Module (WHOQOL-OLD). The European Portuguese WHOQOL-OLD includes a new identified facet, Family/Family life. A convenience sample of older adults was recruited (N = 921). The assessment protocol included demographics, self-perceived health, depressive symptoms (GDS-30), cognitive function (ACE-R), daily life activities (IAFAI), health status (SF-12) and QoL (WHOQOL-Bref, EUROHIS-QOL-8 and WHOQOL-OLD). The internal consistency was excellent for the total 24-item WHOQOL-OLD original version and also for the final 28-item European Portuguese WHOQOL-OLD version. The test-retest reliability for total scores was good. The construct validity of the European Portuguese WHOQOL-OLD was supported in the correlation matrix analysis. The results indicated good convergent/divergent validity. The WHOQOL-OLD scores differentiated groups of older adults who were healthy/unhealthy and without/mild/severe depressive symptoms. The new facet, Family/Family life, presented evidence of good reliability and validity parameters. Comparatively to international studies, the European Portuguese WHOQOL-OLD version showed similar and/or better psychometric properties. The new facet, Family/Family life, introduces cross-cultural specificity to the study of QoL of older adults and generally improves the psychometric robustness of the WHOQOL-OLD.

  4. Family Life: Literature and Films. An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Council on Family Relations, Minneapolis.

    This annotated bibliography was prepared by the Minnesota Council on Family Relations and provides useful past as well as current and innovative materials about marriage and family living. The numerous books, pamphlets, periodical articles, and audio-visual materials are organized under three major sections: (1) The American Family: Theoretical,…

  5. Families as Nurturing Systems: Support across the Life Span.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unger, Donald G., Ed.; Powell, Douglas R., Ed.

    This volume seeks to refine and extend knowledge about approaches to supporting the caregiving roles of families. The chapters in the volume describe and appraise new directions in family support. After an introduction, the two parts of the volume address "New Directions for Family Resource and Support Programs" (six chapters) and…

  6. Promoting School and Life Success through Early Childhood Family Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swick, Kevin J.

    2009-01-01

    Early childhood family literacy programs have great potential to positively influence children and families. This article presents the core values and key components of high quality early childhood family literacy programs. The benefits and cost effectiveness of these programs are also discussed.

  7. Promoting School and Life Success through Early Childhood Family Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swick, Kevin J.

    2009-01-01

    Early childhood family literacy programs have great potential to positively influence children and families. This article presents the core values and key components of high quality early childhood family literacy programs. The benefits and cost effectiveness of these programs are also discussed.

  8. La Familia: Student Workbook. Latino Family Life Education Curriculum Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matiella, Ana Consuelo

    This workbook comprises eight lessons designed to enhance the self-esteem of Latino students, grades 5 through 8, through the exploration of family, family traditions and values, and the affirmation of family strengths. Each lesson begins with an illustration that reflects the content of the lesson and an introductory page. Each introductory page…

  9. [The phenomenon of families who are involved in decision making about life support withdrawal in family members].

    PubMed

    Oberholster, M; Gmeiner, A; Poggenpoel, M

    1998-12-01

    The overall objective of this study was to explore and describe the phenomenon of families who are involved in deciding about withdrawal of life-support treatment of a family member. A phenomenon analysis was undertaken in two phases. During the first phase, secondary analysis of primary data was done on the family used in Burger's study (1996: 1-175) and was followed up by phenomenological interviews with families used as member checking from the same circumstances and according to the same criteria that Burger (1996: 1-185) used in her study. Data were analysed in collaboration with an independent coder. The family used as member checking in this study is also used as data control. A literature control was conducted as part of data control. The themes that were identified included were: physical and bodily experiences of families; defence mechanisms used by families to cope with grief; emotional experiences of families; need of knowledge/perceptions/outlook on life/internal conflict/feelings of guilt/ability to make decisions/respect of patient wishes/the effect of time and prior experiences; support needed by an given to families; spiritual and supernatural experiences/hope/acceptance/ability to 'let go' of the patient. In phase two, guidelines were described for psychiatric nurse specialists to mobilise resources for families to promote, maintain and restore their mental health as an integral part of health.

  10. Home care nurses' provision of support to families of the elderly at the end of life.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Yuko; Yamamoto-Mitani, Noriko; Ueno, Mari; Takemori, Shiho; Kashiwagi, Masayo; Sato, Izumi; Miyata, Noa; Kimata, Mari; Fukahori, Hiroki; Yamada, Masako

    2011-02-01

    In this article we describe our study of assistance for family decisions and caregiving by Japanese home care nurses to families of elderly relatives at the end of life. The participants were 31 nurses who had been evaluated as providing good end-of-life care. We carried out semistructured interviews concerning the practice of family support in two cases (cancer and noncancer). We conducted a qualitative analysis using the constant comparative approach and derived several categories inductively. Home care nurses are responsible for (a) estimating the possibility of dying at home, (b) visualizing what is coming and what can be done, (c) proposing where and how the family can say goodbye, (d) building family consensus, (e) coordinating resources, and (f) offering psychological support for end-of-life care. End-of-life family care by home care nurses is a process in which multiple components of care are provided with changing content as death approaches.

  11. Improvements in staff quality of work life and family satisfaction following the move to single-family room NICU design.

    PubMed

    Watson, Jo; DeLand, Marion; Gibbins, Sharyn; MacMillan York, Elizabeth; Robson, Kate

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether there were differences in staff quality of work life and parent satisfaction when a neonatal intensive care unit moved from an open-bay design to a single-room model of care. This descriptive study measured staff quality of work life and family satisfaction before and at 2 time periods after the relocation of a perinatal centre and the introduction of single-family room care. Differences in work life quality and satisfaction were determined using 2-sample t-tests. There were improvements in staff quality of work life and family satisfaction at both time periods following the move. Lessons learned may be of value to other units considering such a move. A neonatal intensive care unit designed to contribute to parental and staff well-being is a model to be considered for future neonatal designs.

  12. Work Life and Family Life Collide: Online Support for New Fathers.

    PubMed

    Salzmann-Erikson, Martin

    2016-11-18

    The purpose of this investigation was to analyze online discussions about parental leave in relation to the work lives and private lives of new fathers. A netnographic study of nearly 100 discussion threads from a freely accessible online forum for fathers was conducted. Data were coded, sorted, and categorized by qualitative similarities and differences. The results of the study indicate that new fathers seek Internet forums to discuss work-related topics. Parental leave can provoke worries and anxiety related to management and co-worker attitudes which can create concern that they should be back at work. The results are presented in two categories: (a) attitudes expressed by employers and colleagues and (b) leaving work but longing to be back. The phenomenon of parental leave for fathers is more complex than simply "for" or "against" attitudes. Fathers can use Internet forums to discuss their experiences, fears, and anxiety and provide reasonable accommodations for both work and family life.

  13. Services and Supports, Partnership, and Family Quality of Life: Focus on Deaf-Blindness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyzar, Kathleen B.; Brady, Sara E.; Summers, Jean Ann; Haines, Shana J.; Turnbull, Ann P.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined the moderating effects of partnership on the relationship between services and supports adequacy and family quality of life (FQOL) for families of children with deaf-blindness ages birth to 21. A social-ecological approach enabled examining the impact of disability on the family system. A survey, consisting of…

  14. Promoting Family Awareness and Intergenerational Exchange: An Informal Life-History Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Katherine R.

    1987-01-01

    Describes an informal program for promoting family awareness and facilitating intergenerational exchange through the use of a modified life-history method. Provides two exercises: the Family Geneology Exercise and the Family Recollections Exercise. Also provides discussion questions and suggestions for gathering further information about family…

  15. Impacts of Poverty on Quality of Life in Families of Children with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, JiYeon; Turnbull, Ann P.; Turnbull, H. Rutherford, III

    2002-01-01

    This article examines the impact of poverty on the quality of life in families of children with disabilities. A literature review found a variety of effects of poverty on the five dimensions of family, including health (e.g., hunger, limited health care access), productivity, physical environment, emotional well-being, and family interaction.…

  16. Quality of Life from the Point of View of Latin American Families: A Participative Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aznar, A. S.; Castanon, D. G.

    2005-01-01

    Background: To date, little research has focused on what factors constitute a quality of life (QOL) among Latin American families with a member who is intellectually disabled. Method: Total 180 Latin American families cooperated in a participative research project. During 18 months, the families and a team exchanged information about their QOL by…

  17. Family Experiences During the Dying Process After Withdrawal of Life-Sustaining Therapy.

    PubMed

    Wiegand, Debra L

    2016-01-01

    Life-sustaining therapy is commonly withdrawn in intensive care units, yet little is known about the perceptions of families when a critically ill patient dies after life-sustaining therapy is withdrawn. The purpose of this investigation was to understand the experience of families when a family member had an unexpected life-threatening illness or injury and who died after life-sustaining therapy was withdrawn. This investigation used a hermeneutic phenomenological approach. Interviews were conducted with family members after the patient's death. All interviews were transcribed with units of meaning and clusters, and then categories inductively determined. Methodological rigor was established. A purposive sample of family members was recruited into the study from 3 intensive care units. Twenty-two family members participated in the study. Six categories evolved from the analysis: preparing for the dying process, the dying environment, perceptions of patient comfort, the death vigil, essential aspects of care, and together as a family. Families described the death vigil as extremely difficult. Family members described several aspects of care as very meaningful to them during the dying process. Families described how important it was for the family to be together as a family during the dying process.

  18. Services and Supports, Partnership, and Family Quality of Life: Focus on Deaf-Blindness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyzar, Kathleen B.; Brady, Sara E.; Summers, Jean Ann; Haines, Shana J.; Turnbull, Ann P.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined the moderating effects of partnership on the relationship between services and supports adequacy and family quality of life (FQOL) for families of children with deaf-blindness ages birth to 21. A social-ecological approach enabled examining the impact of disability on the family system. A survey, consisting of…

  19. The 1993 Indonesian Family Life Survey: Appendix B, Community-Facility Questionnaires and Interviewer Manual. Revised.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-04-01

    Labor and Population Program RAND Demographic Institute Faculty of Economics, University of Indonesia The 1993 Indonesian Family Life Survey... Indonesia (LD-FEUI) conducts research and training in the fields of demography, economics, and public policy, with an emphasis on population issues...TEL: 310.393.0411 FAX: 310.393.4818 Ill - PREFACE The 1993 Indonesia Family Life Survey (IFLS) provides data at the individual and family level

  20. Verbal communication of families with cancer patients at end of life: A questionnaire survey with bereaved family members.

    PubMed

    Nakazato, Kazuhiro; Shiozaki, Mariko; Hirai, Kei; Morita, Tatsuya; Tatara, Ryuhei; Ichihara, Kaori; Sato, Shinichi; Simizu, Megumi; Tsuneto, Satoru; Shima, Yasuo; Miyasita, Mitsunori

    2017-06-21

    To clarify the verbal communication of feelings between families and patients in Japanese palliative care units from the perspective of bereaved family members by examining (1) proportions of families' and patients' verbalization of six feelings (gratitude, love, seeking forgiveness, giving forgiveness, wishes after death, and continuing bonds), (2) recognition of receiving these feelings through verbalization from the family's perspective, and (3) the specific attitudes of family members that influence their verbalizations. In 2010, a cross-sectional survey was conducted with 968 bereaved families of cancer patients in palliative care units across Japan. Five hundred thirty-seven responses were analyzed. (1) "Gratitude" was verbalized most often (families: 47%; patients: 61%), and "expressing forgiveness" least often (families: 16%; patients: 11%). (2) Even if the words were not used, 81.2% to 88.2% of families answered that they had received the patient's feelings, and 71.8% to 85.4% of families felt the patient had received their feelings. (3) Multiple logistic regression analyses indicated that the strongest attitudes determining verbalizing were "not wanting to say farewell without conveying feelings," "a daily basis of expressing," and "heart-to-heart communication" (ishin-denshin). For both families and patients, verbalizing feelings was difficult. Our results showed that families' and patients' verbalizing and receiving of feelings must be aligned to understand their communication at the end of life in Japan. Future research is needed to verify how attitude helps promote or inhibit verbalization. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Meaning in Life, Emotion-Oriented Coping, Generalized Self-Efficacy, and Family Cohesion as Predictors of Family Satisfaction among Mothers of Children with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lightsey, Owen Richard, Jr.; Sweeney, James

    2008-01-01

    The authors tested whether self-efficacy, coping styles, family cohesion, and meaning in life predicted family satisfaction among 64 mothers of children with disabilities. They also examined whether meaning in life mediated the relationship between cohesion and family satisfaction or served as a resource whose effects on family satisfaction were…

  2. Digital inequalities of family life information seeking and family well-being among Chinese adults in Hong Kong: a population survey.

    PubMed

    Wang, Man Ping; Wang, Xin; Viswanath, Kasisomayajula; Wan, Alice; Lam, Tai Hing; Chan, Sophia S

    2014-10-03

    Inequalities in Internet use and health information seeking are well documented, but less is known about information for family life activities. We investigated the social determinants of online family life information seeking behaviors and its associations with family well-being among Chinese adults in Hong Kong. A probability-based telephone survey was conducted in 2012 to record family life information seeking behaviors, including frequency of seeking and paying attention to family life information, levels of trust, and perceived usefulness of family life information. Family well-being was assessed using 3 single items on perceived family harmony, happiness, and health, with higher scores indicating greater well-being. Adjusted odds ratios for family life information seeking behaviors by socioeconomic characteristics and lifestyle behaviors, and adjusted beta coefficients for family well-being by family life information seeking behaviors were calculated. Of 1537 respondents, 57.57% (855/1537) had ever and 26.45% (407/1537) sought monthly family life information through the Internet. Lower educational attainment and household income, smoking, and physical inactivity were associated with less frequent seeking and paying attention (all P<.05). Greater perceived family health was associated with more frequent attention (adjusted β=.32, 95% CI.11-.52), greater levels of trust (adjusted β=.28, 95% CI .07-.48), and perceived usefulness (adjusted β=.23, 95% CI .01-.45) of family life information. Frequent attention and higher level of trust were also associated with greater family harmony (adjusted β=.22, 95% CI .002-.41) and happiness (adjusted β=.23, 95% CI .003-.42), respectively. This is the first study investigating family life information seeking behaviors and suggested inequalities of online family life information seeking behaviors. The association between family life information seeking behavior and family well-being needs to be confirmed in prospective

  3. CLCAs - a family of metalloproteases of intriguing phylogenetic distribution and with cases of substituted catalytic sites.

    PubMed

    Lenart, Anna; Dudkiewicz, Małgorzata; Grynberg, Marcin; Pawłowski, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    The zinc-dependent metalloproteases with His-Glu-x-x-His (HExxH) active site motif, zincins, are a broad group of proteins involved in many metabolic and regulatory functions, and found in all forms of life. Human genome contains more than 100 genes encoding proteins with known zincin-like domains. A survey of all proteins containing the HExxH motif shows that approximately 52% of HExxH occurrences fall within known protein structural domains (as defined in the Pfam database). Domain families with majority of members possessing a conserved HExxH motif include, not surprisingly, many known and putative metalloproteases. Furthermore, several HExxH-containing protein domains thus identified can be confidently predicted to be putative peptidases of zincin fold. Thus, we predict zincin-like fold for eight uncharacterised Pfam families. Besides the domains with the HExxH motif strictly conserved, and those with sporadic occurrences, intermediate families are identified that contain some members with a conserved HExxH motif, but also many homologues with substitutions at the conserved positions. Such substitutions can be evolutionarily conserved and non-random, yet functional roles of these inactive zincins are not known. The CLCAs are a novel zincin-like protease family with many cases of substituted active sites. We show that this allegedly metazoan family has a number of bacterial and archaeal members. An extremely patchy phylogenetic distribution of CLCAs in prokaryotes and their conserved protein domain composition strongly suggests an evolutionary scenario of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) from multicellular eukaryotes to bacteria, providing an example of eukaryote-derived xenologues in bacterial genomes. Additionally, in a protein family identified here as closely homologous to CLCA, the CLCA_X (CLCA-like) family, a number of proteins is found in phages and plasmids, supporting the HGT scenario.

  4. CLCAs - A Family of Metalloproteases of Intriguing Phylogenetic Distribution and with Cases of Substituted Catalytic Sites

    PubMed Central

    Lenart, Anna; Dudkiewicz, Małgorzata; Grynberg, Marcin; Pawłowski, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    The zinc-dependent metalloproteases with His-Glu-x-x-His (HExxH) active site motif, zincins, are a broad group of proteins involved in many metabolic and regulatory functions, and found in all forms of life. Human genome contains more than 100 genes encoding proteins with known zincin-like domains. A survey of all proteins containing the HExxH motif shows that approximately 52% of HExxH occurrences fall within known protein structural domains (as defined in the Pfam database). Domain families with majority of members possessing a conserved HExxH motif include, not surprisingly, many known and putative metalloproteases. Furthermore, several HExxH-containing protein domains thus identified can be confidently predicted to be putative peptidases of zincin fold. Thus, we predict zincin-like fold for eight uncharacterised Pfam families. Besides the domains with the HExxH motif strictly conserved, and those with sporadic occurrences, intermediate families are identified that contain some members with a conserved HExxH motif, but also many homologues with substitutions at the conserved positions. Such substitutions can be evolutionarily conserved and non-random, yet functional roles of these inactive zincins are not known. The CLCAs are a novel zincin-like protease family with many cases of substituted active sites. We show that this allegedly metazoan family has a number of bacterial and archaeal members. An extremely patchy phylogenetic distribution of CLCAs in prokaryotes and their conserved protein domain composition strongly suggests an evolutionary scenario of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) from multicellular eukaryotes to bacteria, providing an example of eukaryote-derived xenologues in bacterial genomes. Additionally, in a protein family identified here as closely homologous to CLCA, the CLCA_X (CLCA-like) family, a number of proteins is found in phages and plasmids, supporting the HGT scenario. PMID:23671590

  5. Life Satisfaction of University Students in Relation to Family and Food in a Developing Country

    PubMed Central

    Schnettler, Berta; Miranda-Zapata, Edgardo; Grunert, Klaus G.; Lobos, Germán; Denegri, Marianela; Hueche, Clementina; Poblete, Héctor

    2017-01-01

    Life satisfaction and satisfaction with food-related life (SWFoL) are associated with healthy eating habits, family interaction around eating and family support. The present study evaluates the relationship between SWFoL and satisfaction with family life (SWFaL), and their relationship with life satisfaction in university students. We identify the relationship of two different types of family support and student SWFaL and explore a moderator effect of gender. A questionnaire was applied to a non-probabilistic sample of 370 students of both genders (mean age 21 years) in Chile, including Satisfaction with Life Scale, SWFoL scale, SWFaL scale, and the Family Resources Scale. Using structural equation modeling, we found that students’ life satisfaction was related to SWFaL and food-related life. A high positive relationship was identified between intangible family support and students’ SWFaL, which would have a mediating role between intangible support and life satisfaction. Using multi-group analysis, a moderator effect of gender was not found. These findings suggest that improving SWFoL, SWFaL and intangible family support is important for both female and male students. PMID:28932203

  6. Life Satisfaction of University Students in Relation to Family and Food in a Developing Country.

    PubMed

    Schnettler, Berta; Miranda-Zapata, Edgardo; Grunert, Klaus G; Lobos, Germán; Denegri, Marianela; Hueche, Clementina; Poblete, Héctor

    2017-01-01

    Life satisfaction and satisfaction with food-related life (SWFoL) are associated with healthy eating habits, family interaction around eating and family support. The present study evaluates the relationship between SWFoL and satisfaction with family life (SWFaL), and their relationship with life satisfaction in university students. We identify the relationship of two different types of family support and student SWFaL and explore a moderator effect of gender. A questionnaire was applied to a non-probabilistic sample of 370 students of both genders (mean age 21 years) in Chile, including Satisfaction with Life Scale, SWFoL scale, SWFaL scale, and the Family Resources Scale. Using structural equation modeling, we found that students' life satisfaction was related to SWFaL and food-related life. A high positive relationship was identified between intangible family support and students' SWFaL, which would have a mediating role between intangible support and life satisfaction. Using multi-group analysis, a moderator effect of gender was not found. These findings suggest that improving SWFoL, SWFaL and intangible family support is important for both female and male students.

  7. Life cycle assessment of overhead and underground primary power distribution.

    PubMed

    Bumby, Sarah; Druzhinina, Ekaterina; Feraldi, Rebe; Werthmann, Danae; Geyer, Roland; Sahl, Jack

    2010-07-15

    Electrical power can be distributed in overhead or underground systems, both of which generate a variety of environmental impacts at all stages of their life cycles. While there is considerable literature discussing the trade-offs between both systems in terms of aesthetics, safety, cost, and reliability, environmental assessments are relatively rare and limited to power cable production and end-of-life management. This paper assesses environmental impacts from overhead and underground medium voltage power distribution systems as they are currently built and managed by Southern California Edison (SCE). It uses process-based life cycle assessment (LCA) according to ISO 14044 (2006) and SCE-specific primary data to the extent possible. Potential environmental impacts have been calculated using a wide range of midpoint indicators, and robustness of the results has been investigated through sensitivity analysis of the most uncertain and potentially significant parameters. The studied underground system has higher environmental impacts in all indicators and for all parameter values, mostly due to its higher material intensity. For both systems and all indicators the majority of impact occurs during cable production. Promising strategies for impact reduction are thus cable failure rate reduction for overhead and cable lifetime extension for underground systems.

  8. Impact of Ego-resilience and Family Function on Quality of Life in Childhood Leukemia Survivors

    PubMed Central

    CHO, Ok-Hee; YOO, Yang-Sook; HWANG, Kyung-Hye

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study aimed to examine the impact of ego-resilience and family function on quality of life in childhood leukemia survivors. Methods: This study targeted 100 pediatric leukemia survivors, who visited the Pediatric Hemato-Oncology Center in South Korea from Aug to Dec 2011. A structured questionnaire of ego-resilience, family function and quality of life used to collect data through direct interview with the pediatric patients and their parents. The correlation between the study variables analyzed using the Pearson’s correlation coefficient, and the impact on quality of life analyzed using a stepwise multiple regression. Results: Ego-resilience (r = 0.69, P<0.001) and family function (r =0.46, P< 0.001) had a positive correlation with quality of life and all the sub-categories of quality of life. Ego-resilience was a major factor affecting quality of life in childhood leukemia survivors, with an explanatory power of 48%. The explanatory power for quality of life increased to 53% when age and family function were included. Conclusion: Ego-resilience, age, and family function affect quality of life in childhood leukemia survivors. Hence, strategies are required to construct age-matched programs to improve quality of life, in order to help restore the necessary ego-resilience and to strengthen family function in childhood leukemia survivors. PMID:28032062

  9. Impact of Ego-resilience and Family Function on Quality of Life in Childhood Leukemia Survivors.

    PubMed

    Cho, Ok-Hee; Yoo, Yang-Sook; Hwang, Kyung-Hye

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to examine the impact of ego-resilience and family function on quality of life in childhood leukemia survivors. This study targeted 100 pediatric leukemia survivors, who visited the Pediatric Hemato-Oncology Center in South Korea from Aug to Dec 2011. A structured questionnaire of ego-resilience, family function and quality of life used to collect data through direct interview with the pediatric patients and their parents. The correlation between the study variables analyzed using the Pearson's correlation coefficient, and the impact on quality of life analyzed using a stepwise multiple regression. Ego-resilience (r = 0.69, P<0.001) and family function (r =0.46, P< 0.001) had a positive correlation with quality of life and all the sub-categories of quality of life. Ego-resilience was a major factor affecting quality of life in childhood leukemia survivors, with an explanatory power of 48%. The explanatory power for quality of life increased to 53% when age and family function were included. Ego-resilience, age, and family function affect quality of life in childhood leukemia survivors. Hence, strategies are required to construct age-matched programs to improve quality of life, in order to help restore the necessary ego-resilience and to strengthen family function in childhood leukemia survivors.

  10. Job Satisfaction in Dual-Career Women at Three Family Life Cycle Stages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cron, Elyce A.

    2001-01-01

    Dual-career women (n=197) completed assessments of career attitudes, dyadic adjustment, and family adaptability and cohesion. Cohesion in the early life-cycle and adaptability in the late life-cycle were significant predictors of job satisfaction. Satisfaction increased as each life-cycle stage progressed. (Contains 25 references.) (SK)

  11. Coming home revisited: family life and military deployment.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Steven L; Smith, Donald G

    2012-07-01

    The war in Iraq and Afghanistan has involved the deployment of hundreds of thousands of American soldiers, many of whom are married and have children. The experience of one military family living through a deployment in Iraq in 2011 is discussed and interpreted in light of Parse's humanbecoming family model. The model provides a useful way for nurses, and others, to understand families, in a way that honors their values and struggles in an everchanging and unpredictable world. Included is a brief discussion on how communication technologies are changing the experience of military deployment for families.

  12. Toward a definition of family resilience: integrating life-span and family perspectives.

    PubMed

    Hawley, D R; DeHaan, L

    1996-09-01

    Family resilience is a relatively new construct that describes how families adapt to stress and bounce back from adversity. Literature pertaining to resilience as a family-level variable is reviewed. An overview of the developmental psychopathology literature dealing with individual resilience is also provided. Implications for extending the study of family resilience drawn from research on individual resilience are discussed and a definition of family resilience is proposed.

  13. [Adoptive parents' satisfaction with the adoption experience and with its impact on family life].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Sandoval, Yolanda

    2011-11-01

    In this study, we discuss the relevance of adoptive families' satisfaction in the assessment of adoption processes. The effects of adoption on a sample group of 272 adoptive families are analyzed. Most families show high levels of satisfaction as to: their decision to adopt, the features of their adopted children and how adoption has affected them as individuals and as a family. Statistical analyses show that these families can have different satisfaction levels depending on certain features of the adoptees, of the adoptive families or of their educational style. Life satisfaction of the adoptees is also related to how their adoptive parents evaluate the adoption.

  14. Work and Family Life: Middle School Content Competencies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Career-Technical and Adult Education.

    This document, which lists the middle school content competencies for the Work and Family Studies curriculum within Family and Consumer Sciences in Ohio, is intended to help middle school students develop self-responsibility and competence dealing with the practical problems of early adolescence. (Career awareness and career choice options are…

  15. Everyday Life in Distance Education: One Family's Home Schooling Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Nicole C.

    2006-01-01

    This article offers a narrative portrait of one family enrolled in a school of distance education in Queensland, Australia. Most of the families own or manage sheep and/or beef grazing properties, and their children receive their education by correspondence papers and daily UHF radio lessons. The students complete their school work at home with a…

  16. Life Support: A System of Care for Military Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    This article examines the issue of separation and its impact on military families, including on infants and toddlers. Deployments and unaccompanied tours of duty (temporary assignments and 12-24 month assignments, both without family members, respectively) take military personnel away from their loved ones for extended periods of time. …

  17. A Comparison of Two Works on Black Family Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Patricia Hill

    1989-01-01

    Compares and critiques Daniel Patrick Moynihan's 1965 labor report, "The Negro Family: The Case for National Action," and the televised version of it, Bill Moyer's special report "The Vanishing Family: Crisis in Black America." Discusses how gender, class, and race shape a group's status in society. (JS)

  18. Life Support: A System of Care for Military Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    This article examines the issue of separation and its impact on military families, including on infants and toddlers. Deployments and unaccompanied tours of duty (temporary assignments and 12-24 month assignments, both without family members, respectively) take military personnel away from their loved ones for extended periods of time. …

  19. Variations in Mexican-American Family Life: A Review Synthesis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Michael V.

    A review of the published empirical literature on families in the several areas of concentrated Mexican American settlement (primarily California, Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Texas, and various cities in the Midwest) is presented in this paper. Objective is to provide a frame of reference on the sociology of Mexican American families.…

  20. Everyday Life in Distance Education: One Family's Home Schooling Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Nicole C.

    2006-01-01

    This article offers a narrative portrait of one family enrolled in a school of distance education in Queensland, Australia. Most of the families own or manage sheep and/or beef grazing properties, and their children receive their education by correspondence papers and daily UHF radio lessons. The students complete their school work at home with a…

  1. Family Life, Literature and Films: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Council on Family Relations, Minneapolis.

    This revised selected bibliography offers descriptive annotations of literature, films, records, tapes, and other teaching aids related to marriage, parenthood, family relationships, and kindered topics. The material is divided into the following general areas: (1) theoretical, historical, and cross cultural perspectives on the family; (2)…

  2. An empirical Bayes approach for the Poisson life distribution.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canavos, G. C.

    1973-01-01

    A smooth empirical Bayes estimator is derived for the intensity parameter (hazard rate) in the Poisson distribution as used in life testing. The reliability function is also estimated either by using the empirical Bayes estimate of the parameter, or by obtaining the expectation of the reliability function. The behavior of the empirical Bayes procedure is studied through Monte Carlo simulation in which estimates of mean-squared errors of the empirical Bayes estimators are compared with those of conventional estimators such as minimum variance unbiased or maximum likelihood. Results indicate a significant reduction in mean-squared error of the empirical Bayes estimators over the conventional variety.

  3. Problem solving in relation to resources in everyday life in families of children with disabilities: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ylvén, Regina; Granlund, Mats; Persson, Carina

    2012-06-01

    Problem solving is recognized as a skill, helping families of children with disabilities to manage problems in everyday life. Family problem-solving skills may therefore be seen as an important outcome of a child and youth habilitation service. The aim of this pilot feasibility study was to examine the design of a future web-based questionnaire study focusing on problem-solving patterns in relation to resources in families of children with disabilities. The descriptive statistical analyses built on data from 13 families and findings showed an overall satisfactory score distribution for three of the included instruments, whereas two instruments showed floor effects in one third of the items. Findings indicated design problems with data collection related to adapting questionnaires to a web-based survey format and to problems with the stop function that was added. Implementing the main study using web-based surveys needs critical considerations according to the choice of the web tool and the recruitment process.

  4. Correlates and Predictors of Conflict at the End of Life Among Families Enrolled in Hospice.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Betty J; Boelk, Amy Z

    2015-08-01

    Despite the palliative care mandate to view family as the unit of care, and the high prevalence and detrimental consequences of conflict at the end of life, little research has been conducted with hospice families to understand what contributes to family conflict. Using a recently generated explanatory matrix of family conflict at the end of life, this study sought to identify the correlates and predictors of family conflict. As part of a larger mixed methods cross-sectional study, a 100-item survey was administered to 161 hospice family caregivers enrolled in a Medicare/Medicaid certified non-profit hospice organization located in the Midwest U.S. Although overall levels of conflict were relatively low, 57% of hospice caregivers reported experiencing some family conflict at the end of life. Contextual variables associated with family conflict included a history of family conflict, female gender, younger caregiver age, presence of children in the home, and less advance care planning discussions. Significant main effects in the prediction of family conflict in the final hierarchical multiple regression model included prior family conflict, caregiver age, caregiver gender, advance care planning discussions, family "coming out of the woodwork," communication constraints, and family members asserting control. The model explained 59% of the variance in family conflict. Results support the multidimensional theoretical model of family conflict specifying the importance of the family context, key conditions that set the stage for conflict, and essential contributing factors. Implications for routine assessment and screening to identify families at risk and recommendations for future research are highlighted. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The end of life and the family: hospice patients' views on dying as relational.

    PubMed

    Broom, Alex; Kirby, Emma

    2013-05-01

    The end of life is a highly emotive and critical period in the life course and families often play a central role during this time. Despite significant sociological work on dying as a relational experience, there has been little exploration of the significance of contemporary family structures and relations. In this article, drawing on the accounts of twenty hospice in-patients, we explore how the end of life (in this case within an in-patient unit) is mediated by family dynamics and expectations. Participants' accounts reveal a range of interpersonal experiences, including: pressures and strains on families and patients; differentiation in family responses to and involvement in the dying process; and tensions between individual and family preferences/desires. We argue that family dynamics strongly influence individual experiences near death and that the focus on individual preferences and the management of disease in palliative care contexts must be augmented with sophisticated and nuanced understandings of the family context. We suggest that sociological conceptual explanations of shifts in social and family life, such as individualisation and ontological security, may also help us better understand the ways families approach and respond to the dying process. © 2012 The Authors. Sociology of Health & Illness © 2012 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Family Rituals and Quality of Life in Children With Cancer and Their Parents: The Role of Family Cohesion and Hope.

    PubMed

    Santos, Susana; Crespo, Carla; Canavarro, M Cristina; Kazak, Anne E

    2015-08-01

    Family rituals are associated with adaptive functioning in pediatric illness, including quality of life (QoL). This article explores the role of family cohesion and hope as mediators of this association in children with cancer and their parents. Portuguese children with cancer (N = 389), on- and off-treatment, and one of their parents completed self-report measures. Structural equation modeling was used to examine direct and indirect links between family rituals and QoL. When children and parents reported higher levels of family rituals, they also reported more family cohesion and hope, which were linked to better QoL. At the dyadic level, children's QoL was related to parents' family rituals through the child's family cohesion. This model was valid across child's age-group, treatment status, and socioeconomic status. Family rituals are important in promoting QoL in pediatric cancer via family cohesion and hope individually and via family cohesion in terms of parent-child interactions. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Family Rituals and Quality of Life in Children With Cancer and Their Parents: The Role of Family Cohesion and Hope

    PubMed Central

    Crespo, Carla; Canavarro, M. Cristina; Kazak, Anne E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Family rituals are associated with adaptive functioning in pediatric illness, including quality of life (QoL). This article explores the role of family cohesion and hope as mediators of this association in children with cancer and their parents. Methods Portuguese children with cancer (N = 389), on- and off-treatment, and one of their parents completed self-report measures. Structural equation modeling was used to examine direct and indirect links between family rituals and QoL. Results When children and parents reported higher levels of family rituals, they also reported more family cohesion and hope, which were linked to better QoL. At the dyadic level, children’s QoL was related to parents’ family rituals through the child’s family cohesion. This model was valid across child’s age-group, treatment status, and socioeconomic status. Conclusions Family rituals are important in promoting QoL in pediatric cancer via family cohesion and hope individually and via family cohesion in terms of parent–child interactions. PMID:25775914

  8. Work-family enrichment among dual-earner couples: can work improve our family life?

    PubMed

    Dunn, Marianne G; O'Brien, Karen M

    2013-10-01

    The extent to which resources generated at work and positive affect were associated with enrichment in the family domain among 107 dual-earner couples was investigated. Grounded in work-family enrichment theory (Greenhaus & Powell, 2006), this study examined the indirect effect of workplace organizational support on family satisfaction through positive affect at work. Organizational support for work-family management was associated with positive affect at work for both women and men, and positive affect at work was related to family satisfaction for women. One interpersonal effect emerged: women's positive affect at work was associated with family satisfaction for men. Implications for theory, practice, research, and workplace policy are discussed.

  9. Mid-Life Divorce Counseling. Family Psychology and Counseling Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Lita Linzer, Ed.

    At mid-life, almost every marriage undergoes a crisis, but most people are looking for a way to get through this crisis, and not for a way out of the marriage. This monograph examines the basic issues surrounding mid-life divorce. Several different perspectives are represented in this collection of articles as various clinicians discuss the…

  10. [Adolescent pregnancy from a family perspective: sharing projects of life and care].

    PubMed

    Silva, Lucía; Tonete, Vera Lúcia Pamplona

    2006-01-01

    This qualitative study aimed to apprehend the meaning of adolescents' pregnancy for their families, using semistructured interviews and collective subject discourse. Adolescent pregnancy is represented as a problem to be faced with family support. The families worry and are mobilized to solve adversities. Besides the shock about the news, impotence as to pregnancy prevention, conformism, happiness and improvement in family relationships due to the baby's arrival, participants evidenced frustration due to the interruption/change in the family life project in terms of the adolescent being pregnant without a stable relationship with the child's father. In valuing the family perspective on adolescent pregnancy, professional care to pregnant adolescents and their families can be delivered in partnership with the family and social context, making it easier to cope with conflicts and recognizing the family as an active subject in this process.

  11. Substantial Life Extension and the Fair Distribution of Healthspans.

    PubMed

    Wareham, Christopher S

    2016-10-01

    One of the strongest objections to the development and use of substantially life-extending interventions is that they would exacerbate existing unjust disparities of healthy lifespans between rich and poor members of society. In both popular opinion and ethical theory, this consequence is sometimes thought to justify a ban on life-prolonging technologies. However, the practical and ethical drawbacks of banning receive little attention, and the viability of alternative policies is seldom considered. Moreover, where ethicists do propose alternatives, there is scant effort to consider their merits in light of developing world priorities. In response to these shortcomings, I distinguish four policy options and, on the basis of a plausible intuition about fairness, evaluate their implications for a fair distribution of healthy lifespans. I claim that even in developing nations it would be fairest to favor policies that promote equal access to at least one promising category of substantially life-extending intervention: calorie restriction mimetics. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press, on behalf of the Journal of Medicine and Philosophy Inc. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Family members' informal roles in end-of-life decision making in adult intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Jill R; Schmitt, Madeline; Baggs, Judith Gedney; Norton, Sally A; Dombeck, Mary T; Sellers, Craig R

    2012-01-01

    To support the process of effective family decision making, it is important to recognize and understand informal roles that various family members may play in the end-of-life decision-making process. To describe some informal roles consistently enacted by family members involved in the process of end-of-life decision making in intensive care units. Ethnographic study. Data were collected via participant observation with field notes and semistructured interviews on 4 intensive care units in an academic health center in the mid-Atlantic United States from 2001 to 2004. The units studied were a medical, a surgical, a burn and trauma, and a cardiovascular intensive care unit. Health care clinicians, patients, and family members. Informal roles for family members consistently observed were primary caregiver, primary decision maker, family spokesperson, out-of-towner, patient's wishes expert, protector, vulnerable member, and health care expert. The identified informal roles were part of families' decision-making processes, and each role was part of a potentially complicated family dynamic for end-of-life decision making within the family system and between the family and health care domains. These informal roles reflect the diverse responses to demands for family decision making in what is usually a novel and stressful situation. Identification and description of these informal roles of family members can help clinicians recognize and understand the functions of these roles in families' decision making at the end of life and guide development of strategies to support and facilitate increased effectiveness of family discussions and decision-making processes.

  13. 2011 Military Family Life Project (MFLP): Tabulations of Responses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-30

    Social Support Index. Measures an individual’s reliance on friends for emotional support and for increasing self - esteem ... self - esteem . Percent Responding Mean Max ME Average Social Support MEMBER DEMOGRAPHICS Total DoD 97 ±1 3.7 ±0.1 Army 97 ±1 3.7 ±0.1...for increasing self - esteem ), Family Community Connection (Q56h, j, k, o, and r; measures an individual’s belief that community members and family

  14. Exploring the Literacy Practices of Refugee Families Enrolled in a Book Distribution Program and an Intergenerational Family Literacy Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Sunita; Sylvia, Monica R.; Ridzi, Frank

    2015-01-01

    This ethnographic study presents findings of the literacy practices of Burmese refugee families and their interaction with a book distribution program paired with an intergenerational family literacy program. The project was organized at the level of Bronfenbrenner's exosystem (in "Ecology of human development". Cambridge, Harvard…

  15. Exploring the Literacy Practices of Refugee Families Enrolled in a Book Distribution Program and an Intergenerational Family Literacy Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Sunita; Sylvia, Monica R.; Ridzi, Frank

    2015-01-01

    This ethnographic study presents findings of the literacy practices of Burmese refugee families and their interaction with a book distribution program paired with an intergenerational family literacy program. The project was organized at the level of Bronfenbrenner's exosystem (in "Ecology of human development". Cambridge, Harvard…

  16. Hospice family members’ perceptions and experiences with end-of-life care in the nursing home

    PubMed Central

    Washington, Karla; Kruse, Robin L.; Albright, David L; Lewis, Alexandria; Demiris, George

    2014-01-01

    Objective Despite the fact that more than 25% of Americans die in nursing homes, end-of-life care has consistently been found to be less than adequate in this setting. Even for those residents on hospice, end-of-life care has been found to be problematic. This study had two research questions; 1) How do family members of hospice nursing home residents differ in their anxiety, depression, quality of life, social networks, perceptions of pain medication, and health compared to family members of community dwelling hospice patients? 2) What are family members’ perceptions of and experiences with end-of-life care in the nursing home setting? Methods This study is a secondary mixed methods analysis of interviews with family members of hospice nursing home residents and a comparative statistical analysis of standard outcome measures between family members of hospice patients in the nursing home and family member of hospice patients residing in the community. Results Outcome measures for family members of nursing home residents were compared (n=176) with family members of community dwelling hospice patients (n=267). The family members of nursing home residents reported higher quality of life however, levels of anxiety, depression, perceptions of pain medicine, and health were similar for hospice family members in the nursing home and in the community. Lending an understanding to the stress for hospice family members of nursing home residents concerns were found with collaboration between the nursing home and the hospice, nursing home care that did not meet family expectations, communication problems, and resident care concerns including pain management. Some family members reported positive end-of-life care experiences in the nursing home setting. Conclusion These interviews identify a multitude of barriers to quality end-of-life care in the nursing home setting, and demonstrate that support for family members is an essential part of quality end-of-life care for

  17. Types of support to families of children with disabilities and their influence on family quality of life.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Clarissa Altina Cunha de; Paz-Lourido, Berta; Gelabert, Sebastià Verger

    2016-10-01

    Different types of supports to families are among the aspects that contribute to family quality of life. This study aims to identify the types of supports that families of children with disabilities, users of early intervention services, consider relevant and how public administration influences the quality of this support. This is a qualitative study based on a critical social paradigm. Sixteen mothers and four fathers were interviewed and their contributions were analyzed using discourse analysis. The importance of family support and networks of parents of children with disabilities were highlighted. The role of the supports by health professionals is also crucial and, therefore, cuts in public health and social services have exacerbated the inequity in health. In practice this is highlighted in relation to those who can and the ones who cannot afford additional services. Other approaches in the support to families are suggested.

  18. Taxonomy of Family Life Styles: III. Replication with Families with Severely Mentally Retarded Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mink, Iris Tan; And Others

    1988-01-01

    The home environment and behavior of 97 families with severely mentally retarded children was examined in order to determine the presence of family types. Five unique family clusters were identified: cohesive, control-oriented, responsive-to-child, moral-religious-oriented, and achievement-oriented. (Author/DB)

  19. Determinants of Change in Stroke-Specific Quality of Life After Distributed Constraint-Induced Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yan-Hua; Wu, Ching-Yi; Hsieh, Yu-Wei; Snow, Wilaiwan M.; Wang, Tien-Ni

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. We identified the predictive factors of change in quality of life (QOL) after a distributed form of constraint-induced therapy (dCIT) among stroke survivors. METHOD. Seventy-four participants were treated with dCIT. We identified eight potential determinants of change: age, gender, side of lesion, time since stroke, cognitive status, motor impairment of the upper extremity, activities of daily living (ADLs), and instrumental ADLs (IADLs). The Stroke-Specific Quality of Life Scale (SS–QOL) was used to assess QOL. RESULTS. Right-sided lesion and onset >17 mo earlier determined greater improvement in the SS–QOL Energy domain. Onset >10 mo earlier, poorer IADL performance, and age >68 yr predicted improvement in the Family Role, Mobility, and Mood domains, respectively. CONCLUSION. Side of lesion, time since stroke, IADL performance, and age were the most important determinants of QOL in patients receiving stroke motor rehabilitation. PMID:23245783

  20. The size frequency distribution of dormant Jupiter family comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitman, Kathryn; Morbidelli, Alessandro; Jedicke, Robert

    2006-07-01

    We estimate the total number and the slope of the size-frequency distribution (SFD) of dormant Jupiter family comets (JFCs) by fitting a one-parameter model to the known population. We first select 61 near-Earth objects (NEOs) that are likely to be dormant JFCs because their orbits are dynamically coupled to Jupiter [Bottke, W.F., Morbidelli, A., Jedicke, R., Petit, J., Levison, H.F., Michel, P., Metcalfe, T.S., 2002a. Icarus 156, 399-433]. Then, from the numerical simulations of Levison and Duncan [1997. Icarus 127, 13-32], we construct an orbit distribution model for JFCs in the NEO orbital element space. We assume an orbit-independent SFD for all JFCs, the slope of which is our unique free parameter. Finally, we compute observational biases for dormant JFCs using a calibrated NEO survey simulator [Jedicke, R., Morbidelli, A., Spahr, T., Petit, J., Bottke, W.F., 2003. Icarus 161, 17-33]. By fitting the biased model to the data, we estimate that there are ˜75 dormant JFCs with H<18 in the NEO region and that the slope of their cumulative SFD is -1.5±0.3. Our slope for the SFD of dormant JFCs is very close to that of active JFCs as determined by Weissman and Lowry [2003. Lunar Planet. Sci. 34. Abstract 2003]. Thus, we argue that when JFCs fade they are likely to become dormant rather than to disrupt and that the fate of faded comets is size-independent. Our results imply that the size distribution of the JFC progenitors—the scattered disk trans-neptunian population—either (i) has a similar and shallow SFD or ( i) is slightly steeper and physical processes acting on the comets in a size-dependent manner creates the shallower active comet SFD. Our measured slope, typical of collisionally evolved populations with a size-dependent impact strength [Benz, W., Asphaug, E., 1999. Icarus 142, 5-20], suggests that scattered disk bodies reached collisional equilibrium inside the protoplanetary disk prior to their removal from the planetary region.

  1. Assessment of the Quality of Life in Families with Children Who Have Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities in Slovenia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cagran, B.; Schmidt, M.; Brown, I.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Research was conducted, within the framework of the International Family Quality of Life Project, on the quality of life of families with a member who has a disability. We concentrated on the nine specific domains that the family life measure used, and recorded data from five of its six measurement dimensions: "Importance,…

  2. Assessment of the Quality of Life in Families with Children Who Have Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities in Slovenia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cagran, B.; Schmidt, M.; Brown, I.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Research was conducted, within the framework of the International Family Quality of Life Project, on the quality of life of families with a member who has a disability. We concentrated on the nine specific domains that the family life measure used, and recorded data from five of its six measurement dimensions: "Importance,…

  3. Distribution of Candida albicans genotypes among family members

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, S. K.; Stevens, D. A.; Mishra, S. K.; Feroze, F.; Pierson, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    Thirty-three families (71 subjects) were screened for the presence of Candida albicans in mouthwash or stool specimens; 12 families (28 subjects) were culture-positive for this yeast. An enrichment procedure provided a twofold increase in the recovery of C. albicans from mouthwash specimens. Nine of the twelve culture-positive families had two positive members each, two families had three positive members each, and one family had four positive members. Genetic profiles were obtained by three methods: pulsed-field gel electrophoresis; restriction endonuclease analysis, and random amplification of polymorphic DNA analysis. DNA fingerprinting of C. albicans isolated from one body site three consecutive times revealed that each of the 12 families carried a distinct genotype. No two families shared the same strain, and two or more members of a family commonly shared the same strain. Intrafamily genotypic identity (i.e., each member within the family harbored the same strain) was demonstrated in six families. Genotypes of isolates from husband and wife differed from one another in five families. All three methods were satisfactory in determining genotypes; however, we concluded that restriction endonuclease analysis provided adequate resolving power.

  4. Bone Health for Life: Health Information Basics for You and Your Family

    MedlinePlus

    ... supported by your browser. Home Bone Basics Bone Health for Life: Health Information Basics for You and Your Family Publication ... Print-Friendly Page July 2014 Why Does Bone Health Matter? Our bones support us and allow us ...

  5. Confirmatory Factor Analysis of a Family Quality of Life Scale for Taiwanese Families of Children with Intellectual Disability/Developmental Delay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiu, Chun-Yu; Seo, Hyojeong; Turnbull, Ann P.; Summer, Jean Ann

    2017-01-01

    The Beach Center Family Quality of Life Scale is an internationally validated instrument for measuring family outcomes. To revise the scale for better alignment with the Family Quality of Life theory, the authors excluded non-outcome items in this revision. In this study, we examined reliability and validity of the revised scale (i.e., the FQoL…

  6. Family Quality of Life in 25 Belgian Families: Quantitative and Qualitative Exploration of Social and Professional Support Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steel, R.; Poppe, L.; Vandevelde, S.; Van Hove, G.; Claes, C.

    2011-01-01

    Background: This article reports on the results of a study conducted in Belgium on family quality of life situated within a larger project focusing on the development of support strategies for young and adolescent siblings of persons with intellectual disabilities. The objectives of this article are twofold: (1) to present the results of the…

  7. Family Quality of Life in 25 Belgian Families: Quantitative and Qualitative Exploration of Social and Professional Support Domains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steel, R.; Poppe, L.; Vandevelde, S.; Van Hove, G.; Claes, C.

    2011-01-01

    Background: This article reports on the results of a study conducted in Belgium on family quality of life situated within a larger project focusing on the development of support strategies for young and adolescent siblings of persons with intellectual disabilities. The objectives of this article are twofold: (1) to present the results of the…

  8. Family Life Education Curriculum Guide (Personal and Family Relationships). Basic Unit, Advanced Unit, and Semester Course. Draft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanna, Mattie; And Others

    The family life education guide, part of a consumer and homemaking education unit, was developed in a 3-week curriculum workshop at Winthrop College in June 1972. The identified objectives and learning experiences have been developed with basic reference to developmental tasks, needs, interests, capacities, and prior learning experiences of…

  9. Prosocial family processes and the quality of life of persons with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Jan S; Knudsen, Kraig J; Aschbrenner, Kelly A

    2006-12-01

    Research on the family's contribution to the quality of life of persons with serious mental illness has largely focused on negative family interactions associated with poorer client outcomes. The purpose of this naturalistic study of aging mothers and adults with schizophrenia was to investigate prosocial family processes that potentially enhance, rather than detract from, the life satisfaction of persons with serious mental illness. The data were drawn from a longitudinal study of aging parents caring for a son or daughter with schizophrenia. This report is based on 122 mother-adult child dyads who participated in the third wave of the study. Mothers completed an in-home interview and questionnaire that included measures of the quality of the relationship between the mother and adult child, maternal warmth, and maternal praise of the adult child. The adult with schizophrenia completed a life satisfaction questionnaire. The adults with schizophrenia had higher life satisfaction when their mothers expressed greater warmth and praise of their son or daughter with schizophrenia and when their mothers reported the quality of their relationship as being close and mutually supportive. Past research has emphasized changing families, most typically by lowering expressed emotion, with little emphasis on the families' strengths, in particular, prosocial family processes that may enhance the life satisfaction of their loved one. As a recovery orientation focuses on the strengths of adults with mental illness, it also should focus equally on the supportive presence of families in the lives of clients.

  10. The Relation of Marital Adjustment and Family Functions With Quality of Life in Women

    PubMed Central

    Basharpoor, Sajjad; Sheykholeslami, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Given the immense importance of marital relationships in the quality of life, this research was conducted in order to investigate the relationships between marital adjustment and family functions with quality of life in women. The design of the current study was correlational. Seven hundred and thirty women were selected randomly among all women living in the province of Western Azerbaijan (Iran) and participated in this study. The sample responded to the Family Assessment Device, Dyadic Adjustment scale and Quality of Life questionnaire, individually in their homes. Collected data were analyzed by Pearson’s correlation and multiple regression tests. The results showed that all dimensions of family functions and dyadic adjustment were positively correlated with quality of life in women. Results of multiple regression also revealed that 33 percent of total quality of life can be explained by family functions and 24 percent of this variable can be explained by dyadic adjustment. Our study demonstrated that women’s quality of life was affected by family functions and marital adjustment in family. PMID:27247668

  11. Life Stress and Family History for Depression: The Moderating Role of Past Depressive Episodes

    PubMed Central

    Monroe, Scott M.; Slavich, George M.; Gotlib, Ian H.

    2014-01-01

    Three of the most consistently reported and powerful predictors of depression are a recent major life event, a positive family history for depression, and a personal history of past depressive episodes. Little research, however, has evaluated the inter-relations among these predictors in depressed samples. Such information is descriptively valuable and potentially etiologically informative. In the present article we summarize the existing literature and test four predictions in a sample of 62 clinically depressed individuals: (1) participants who experienced a major life event prior to onset would be less likely than participants who did not experience a major life event to have a positive family history for depression; (2) participants with a recent major life event would have fewer lifetime episodes of depression than would participants without; (3) participants with a positive family history for depression would have more lifetime episodes of depression than would participants with a negative family history for depression; and (4) we would obtain a 3-way interaction in which participants with a positive family history and without a major life event would have the most lifetime episodes, whereas participants with a negative family history and a major life event would have the fewest lifetime episodes. The first three predictions were confirmed, and the fourth prediction partially confirmed. These novel findings begin to elucidate the complex relations among these three prominent risk factors for depression, and point to avenues of research that may help illuminate the origins of depressive episodes. PMID:24308926

  12. Life stress and family history for depression: the moderating role of past depressive episodes.

    PubMed

    Monroe, Scott M; Slavich, George M; Gotlib, Ian H

    2014-02-01

    Three of the most consistently reported and powerful predictors of depression are a recent major life event, a positive family history for depression, and a personal history of past depressive episodes. Little research, however, has evaluated the inter-relations among these predictors in depressed samples. Such information is descriptively valuable and potentially etiologically informative. In the present article we summarize the existing literature and test four predictions in a sample of 62 clinically depressed individuals: (1) participants who experienced a major life event prior to onset would be less likely than participants who did not experience a major life event to have a positive family history for depression; (2) participants with a recent major life event would have fewer lifetime episodes of depression than would participants without; (3) participants with a positive family history for depression would have more lifetime episodes of depression than would participants with a negative family history for depression; and (4) we would obtain a 3-way interaction in which participants with a positive family history and without a major life event would have the most lifetime episodes, whereas participants with a negative family history and a major life event would have the fewest lifetime episodes. The first three predictions were confirmed, and the fourth prediction partially confirmed. These novel findings begin to elucidate the complex relations among these three prominent risk factors for depression, and point to avenues of research that may help illuminate the origins of depressive episodes.

  13. Containing acute childhood illness within family life: a substantive grounded theory.

    PubMed

    Neill, Sarah J

    2010-12-01

    Acute childhood illness is a universal experience for children and families. This paper presents the central process of a Glaserian grounded theory study which explored family management of acute childhood illness at home. Twenty-nine interviews were conducted with 15 families of children 0-9 years of age. Constant comparative analysis generated the substantive grounded theory 'Containing acute childhood illness within family life'. This informal social rule was identified from families' persistent desire to do the right thing, for their child and in the eyes of others in social life. Families perceived that they were expected to contain illnesses which are defined as minor and to seek medical help for 'real' illnesses. Considerable uncertainty was evident around defining the illness and the legitimacy of seeking medical help. Their concern with the latter indicates doctors' role as moral agents for parents' behaviour, directing the containment of acute childhood illness.

  14. Family income and young adolescents' perceived social position: associations with self-esteem and life satisfaction in the UK Millennium Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Bannink, Rienke; Pearce, Anna; Hope, Steven

    2016-10-01

    Self-esteem and life satisfaction are important aspects of positive mental health in young people, and both are socially distributed. However, the majority of evidence is based on socioeconomic characteristics of the family. As children enter adolescence and gain independence, perceptions of their own social position are likely to influence mental health. Using data on 11-year-olds from the UK Millennium Cohort Study, we investigated associations of both family income and young adolescents' perception of their social position with self-esteem and life satisfaction. We hypothesised that there would be differences in the impact of perceived social position on positive mental health when investigating the full scale scoring distribution or the bottom of the distribution. Therefore, we estimated proportional odds for having greater positive mental health (across the distribution of scores) and ORs for poor outcomes (lowest 10% scores). The likelihood of greater self-esteem and life satisfaction increased with income; similarly, the risk of having poor self-esteem and life satisfaction increased as income decreased. Young adolescents who perceived their family as poorer than their friends (instead of about the same) were less likely to have greater self-esteem and life satisfaction and were more likely to have poor outcomes. Young adolescents who perceived their family as richer were more likely to have poor self-esteem, but were not less likely to have greater self-esteem. For life satisfaction, young adolescents who perceived their families as richer were less likely to have greater and more likely to have poor life satisfaction. Policies to redistribute income in families with children are likely to benefit the mental health of young people. However, it is also important to consider the impact of social comparison on young people's mental health as they enter adolescence. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted

  15. Family income and young adolescents’ perceived social position: associations with self-esteem and life satisfaction in the UK Millennium Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Bannink, Rienke; Pearce, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Background Self-esteem and life satisfaction are important aspects of positive mental health in young people, and both are socially distributed. However, the majority of evidence is based on socioeconomic characteristics of the family. As children enter adolescence and gain independence, perceptions of their own social position are likely to influence mental health. Design and objectives Using data on 11-year-olds from the UK Millennium Cohort Study, we investigated associations of both family income and young adolescents’ perception of their social position with self-esteem and life satisfaction. We hypothesised that there would be differences in the impact of perceived social position on positive mental health when investigating the full scale scoring distribution or the bottom of the distribution. Therefore, we estimated proportional odds for having greater positive mental health (across the distribution of scores) and ORs for poor outcomes (lowest 10% scores). Results The likelihood of greater self-esteem and life satisfaction increased with income; similarly, the risk of having poor self-esteem and life satisfaction increased as income decreased. Young adolescents who perceived their family as poorer than their friends (instead of about the same) were less likely to have greater self-esteem and life satisfaction and were more likely to have poor outcomes. Young adolescents who perceived their family as richer were more likely to have poor self-esteem, but were not less likely to have greater self-esteem. For life satisfaction, young adolescents who perceived their families as richer were less likely to have greater and more likely to have poor life satisfaction. Conclusions Policies to redistribute income in families with children are likely to benefit the mental health of young people. However, it is also important to consider the impact of social comparison on young people's mental health as they enter adolescence. PMID:26957529

  16. Life history traits to predict biogeographic species distributions in bivalves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montalto, V.; Rinaldi, A.; Sarà, G.

    2015-10-01

    Organismal fecundity ( F) and its relationship with body size (BS) are key factors in predicting species distribution under current and future scenarios of global change. A functional trait-based dynamic energy budget (FT-DEB) is proposed as a mechanistic approach to predict the variation of F and BS as function of environmental correlates using two marine bivalves as model species ( Mytilus galloprovincialis and Brachidontes pharaonis). Validation proof of model skill (i.e., degree of correspondence between model predictions and field observations) and stationarity (i.e., ability of a model generated from data collected at one place/time to predict processes at another place/time) was provided to test model performance in predicting the bivalve distribution throughout the 22 sites in the Central Mediterranean Sea under local conditions of food density and body temperature. Model skill and stationarity were tested through the estimate of commission (i.e., proportion of species' absences predicted present) and omission (i.e., proportion of presences predicted absent) errors of predictions by comparing mechanistic predicted vs. observed F and BS values throughout the study area extrapolated by lab experiments and literature search. The resulting relationship was reliable for both species, and body size and fecundity were highly correlated in M. galloprovincialis compared to B. pharaonis; FT-DEB showed correct predictions of presence in more than 75 % of sites, and the regression between BS predicted vs. observed was highly significant in both species. Whilst recognising the importance of biotic interactions in shaping the distribution of species, our FT-DEB approach provided reliable quantitative estimates of where our species had sufficient F to support local populations or suggesting reproductive failure. Mechanistically, estimating F and BS as key traits of species life history can also be addressed within a broader, scale-dependent context that surpasses the

  17. Life history traits to predict biogeographic species distributions in bivalves.

    PubMed

    Montalto, V; Rinaldi, A; Sarà, G

    2015-10-01

    Organismal fecundity (F) and its relationship with body size (BS) are key factors in predicting species distribution under current and future scenarios of global change. A functional trait-based dynamic energy budget (FT-DEB) is proposed as a mechanistic approach to predict the variation of F and BS as function of environmental correlates using two marine bivalves as model species (Mytilus galloprovincialis and Brachidontes pharaonis). Validation proof of model skill (i.e., degree of correspondence between model predictions and field observations) and stationarity (i.e., ability of a model generated from data collected at one place/time to predict processes at another place/time) was provided to test model performance in predicting the bivalve distribution throughout the 22 sites in the Central Mediterranean Sea under local conditions of food density and body temperature. Model skill and stationarity were tested through the estimate of commission (i.e., proportion of species' absences predicted present) and omission (i.e., proportion of presences predicted absent) errors of predictions by comparing mechanistic predicted vs. observed F and BS values throughout the study area extrapolated by lab experiments and literature search. The resulting relationship was reliable for both species, and body size and fecundity were highly correlated in M. galloprovincialis compared to B. pharaonis; FT-DEB showed correct predictions of presence in more than 75 % of sites, and the regression between BS predicted vs. observed was highly significant in both species. Whilst recognising the importance of biotic interactions in shaping the distribution of species, our FT-DEB approach provided reliable quantitative estimates of where our species had sufficient F to support local populations or suggesting reproductive failure. Mechanistically, estimating F and BS as key traits of species life history can also be addressed within a broader, scale-dependent context that surpasses the

  18. Integration Processes of a Romanian Group in a Huelva Village through Family Life Stories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Díaz-Reales, Antonia-María; Aguaded-Gómez, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the integration of Romanian immigrants in Lucena del Puerto (Huelva, Spain) through the life stories of two families of Romanian origin. The experiences of the groups presented in this study were analyzed. Both families were in the town for work, to grow and harvest strawberries. We observed a contrast between idealistic views…

  19. The Family Life Cycle and Critical Transitions: Utilizing Cinematherapy to Facilitate Understanding and Increase Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballard, Mary B.

    2012-01-01

    Transitioning successfully from one stage of development to the next in the family life cycle requires the accomplishment of certain developmental tasks. Couples and families who fail to accomplish these tasks often become "stuck" and unable to move forward. This impasse frequently leads to heightened stress reactions and crippled channels of…

  20. African American Family Life: Ecological and Cultural Diversity. Duke Series in Child Development and Public Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLoyd, Vonnie C., Ed.; Hill, Nancy E., Ed.; Dodge, Kenneth A., Ed.

    2005-01-01

    This volume brings together leading experts from different disciplines to offer new perspectives on contemporary African American families. A wealth of knowledge is presented on the heterogeneity of Black family life today; the challenges and opportunities facing parents, children, and communities; and the impact on health and development of key…

  1. Family Matters: Dyadic Agreement in End-of-Life Medical Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmid, Bettina; Allen, Rebecca S.; Haley, Philip P.; DeCoster, Jamie

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: We examined race/ethnicity and cultural context within hypothetical end-of-life medical decision scenarios and its influence on patient-proxy agreement. Design and Methods: Family dyads consisting of an older adult and 1 family member, typically an adult child, responded to questions regarding the older adult's preferences for…

  2. Influences on Marital Satisfaction during the Middle Stages of the Family Life Cycle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinberg, Laurence; Silverberg, Susan B.

    1987-01-01

    Examined influence of adolescent development, parent-adolescent relationship, and psychological characteristics of midlife adults on marital satisfaction during transitional period of the family life cycle between childhood and adolescence. Marital satisfaction during the family's adolescent years was negatively influenced by distance in the…

  3. Health-Related Quality of Life in the Family Caregivers of Stroke Survivors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Yangkun

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this cross-sectional study was to identify the factors associated with health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of family caregivers of Chinese stroke patients. One hundred and twenty-three stroke patients consecutively admitted to a stroke clinic and their 123 family caregivers were recruited. The caregivers' HRQOLs were assessed…

  4. Relationships between the Sociodemographic and Family Characteristics, Street Life Experiences and the Hopelessness of Street Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duyan, Veli

    2005-01-01

    Throughout its history, street children have been a major concern of Turkish society and have lately been uppermost on social workers agenda. This study examines the relationships between sociodemographic and family characteristics, family relations, street life experiences and the hopelessness of street children. The study focuses on a population…

  5. Family Life: Literature and Films. An Annotated Bibliography. Supplement to Fourth Revision.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitzer, Ronald L., Ed.

    This supplement to the fourth edition of "Family Life Literature and Films: An Annotated Bibliography" includes materials produced since the publication of the fourth edition (see AC 012 492). The materials are listed under nine topic headings, as follows: I. The American Family: Theoretical, Historical, and Subcultural Perspectives; II. Human…

  6. The Family Life Cycle and Critical Transitions: Utilizing Cinematherapy to Facilitate Understanding and Increase Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ballard, Mary B.

    2012-01-01

    Transitioning successfully from one stage of development to the next in the family life cycle requires the accomplishment of certain developmental tasks. Couples and families who fail to accomplish these tasks often become "stuck" and unable to move forward. This impasse frequently leads to heightened stress reactions and crippled channels of…

  7. Strengths and Weaknesses in the Family Life of Black South Africans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viljoen, Sylvia

    This study examined the quality and characteristics of black families in South Africa. The research focused on three areas: values and norms regarding marriage and family life, the deterioration of traditional and parental authority, and parenting skills. The fieldwork was done during the years 1988-1990 and consisted mostly of group interviews…

  8. Family Matters: Dyadic Agreement in End-of-Life Medical Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmid, Bettina; Allen, Rebecca S.; Haley, Philip P.; DeCoster, Jamie

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: We examined race/ethnicity and cultural context within hypothetical end-of-life medical decision scenarios and its influence on patient-proxy agreement. Design and Methods: Family dyads consisting of an older adult and 1 family member, typically an adult child, responded to questions regarding the older adult's preferences for…

  9. Relationships between the Sociodemographic and Family Characteristics, Street Life Experiences and the Hopelessness of Street Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duyan, Veli

    2005-01-01

    Throughout its history, street children have been a major concern of Turkish society and have lately been uppermost on social workers agenda. This study examines the relationships between sociodemographic and family characteristics, family relations, street life experiences and the hopelessness of street children. The study focuses on a population…

  10. African American Family Life: Ecological and Cultural Diversity. Duke Series in Child Development and Public Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLoyd, Vonnie C., Ed.; Hill, Nancy E., Ed.; Dodge, Kenneth A., Ed.

    2005-01-01

    This volume brings together leading experts from different disciplines to offer new perspectives on contemporary African American families. A wealth of knowledge is presented on the heterogeneity of Black family life today; the challenges and opportunities facing parents, children, and communities; and the impact on health and development of key…

  11. The Quality of Life of Family Caregivers of Adults with Intellectual Disabilities in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chou, Yueh-Ching; Lin, Li-Chan; Chang, Ai-Ling; Schalock, Robert L.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Taiwanese family carers of people with intellectual disabilities not only suffer from long-term stress but also need to cope with social difficulties. The aim of this study is to evaluate the quality of life (QOL) among family carers of people with intellectual disabilities. Materials and methods: A census interview survey was…

  12. Health-Related Quality of Life in the Family Caregivers of Stroke Survivors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Yangkun

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this cross-sectional study was to identify the factors associated with health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of family caregivers of Chinese stroke patients. One hundred and twenty-three stroke patients consecutively admitted to a stroke clinic and their 123 family caregivers were recruited. The caregivers' HRQOLs were assessed…

  13. Health disparities in mid-to-late life: the role of earlier life family and neighborhood socioeconomic conditions.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Rucker C; Schoeni, Robert F; Rogowski, Jeannette A

    2012-02-01

    The relationship between neighborhoods of residence in young adulthood and health in mid-to-late life in the United States are examined using the 1968-2005 waves of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID). The sample consists of persons who were aged 20-30 in 1968 and are followed for a period of 38 years (N=2730). Four-level hierarchical random effects models of self-assessed general health status as a function of individual, family, and neighborhood factors are estimated. Using the original sampling design of the PSID, we analyze adult health trajectories of married couples and neighbors followed from young adulthood through elderly ages to assess the magnitudes of the possible causal effects of family and neighborhood characteristics in young adulthood on health in mid-to-late life. Estimates suggest disparities in neighborhood conditions in young adulthood account for one-quarter of the variation in mid-to-late life health. Living in poor neighborhoods during young adulthood is strongly associated with negative health outcomes in later-life. This result is robust even in the presence of a reasonably large amount of potential unobservable individual and family factors that may significantly affect both neighborhood of residence and subsequent health status. Racial differences in health status in mid-to-late life are also associated with family and neighborhood socioeconomic conditions earlier in life. Three quarters of the black-white gap in health status at ages over 55 can be accounted for by differences in childhood socioeconomic status and neighborhood and family factors in young adulthood. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Health Disparities in Mid-to-Late Life: The Role of Earlier Life Family and Neighborhood Socioeconomic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Rucker C.; Schoeni, Robert F.; Rogowski, Jeannette A.

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between neighborhoods of residence in young adulthood and health in mid to late life in the United States are examined using the 1968-2005 waves of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID). The sample consists of persons who were aged 20-30 in 1968 and are followed for a period of 38 years (N=2,730). Four-level hierarchical random effects models of self-assessed general health status as a function of individual, family, and neighborhood factors are estimated. Using the original sampling design of the PSID, we analyze adult health trajectories of married couples and neighbors followed from young adulthood through elderly ages to assess the magnitudes of the possible causal effects of family and neighborhood characteristics in young adulthood on health in mid to late life. Estimates suggest disparities in neighborhood conditions in young adulthood account for one-quarter of the variation in mid-to-late-life health. Living in poor neighborhoods during young adulthood is strongly associated with negative health outcomes in later life. This result is robust even in the presence of a reasonably large amount of potential unobservable individual and family factors that may significantly affect both neighborhood of residence and subsequent health status. Racial differences in health status in mid to late life are also associated with family and neighborhood socioeconomic conditions earlier in life. Three quarters of the black-white gap in health status at ages over 55 can be accounted for by differences in childhood socioeconomic status and neighborhood and family factors in young adulthood. PMID:22212443

  15. Free space quantum key distribution: Towards a real life application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weier, H.; Schmitt-Manderbach, T.; Regner, N.; Kurtsiefer, Ch.; Weinfurter, H.

    2006-08-01

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) [1] is the first method of quantum information science that will find its way into our everyday life. It employs fundamental laws of quantum physics to ensure provably secure symmetric key generation between two parties. The key can then be used to encrypt and decrypt sensitive data with unconditional security. Here, we report on a free space QKD implementation using strongly attenuated laser pulses over a distance of 480 m. It is designed to work continuously without human interaction. Until now, it produces quantum keys unattended at night for more than 12 hours with a sifted key rate of more than 50 kbit/s and a quantum bit error rate between 3% and 5%.

  16. Using Family Photographs to Explore Life Cycle Changes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerace, Laina M.

    1989-01-01

    The author introduced discussions about family photographs as a clinical technique with depressed clients. During therapy, clients were encouraged to discuss the photos in an open-ended manner. Methods and themes elicited by photo-interview are presented. Comments on the clinical application of phototherapy are included. (CH)

  17. A Teacher's Point of View on Family Life (Sex) Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gawlinski, Judy R.

    2007-01-01

    As a Family and Consumer Science educator at Union City High School in Union City, Pennsylvania, I have heard and seen a great deal. I have been teaching for 24 years at this rural Pennsylvania Middle/High School where teen pregnancy has always been a problem. Teaching students abstinence as the only method of birth control has been a major…

  18. Conflict in Families and Friendships of Later Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Celia B.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Elderly adults (N=55) described situations provoking anger in relationships. Parental anger revolved around adult children's failure to adhere to family rules, accept parental control, and live up to role expectations. Filial anger was related to parental failure to provide assistance and accept child's autonomy. Anger between peers was related to…

  19. Putting Math Into Family Life: What's Possible for Working Parents?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kliman, Marlene; Mokros, Jan; Parkes, Alana

    A set of parent-child math activities designed to help busy, working parents do math with their children as part of everyday situations such as cleaning up and making dinner included basic steps, variations, and information on working with children were developed for families with elementary grades children aged approximately 5 to 11 and…

  20. A Teacher's Point of View on Family Life (Sex) Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gawlinski, Judy R.

    2007-01-01

    As a Family and Consumer Science educator at Union City High School in Union City, Pennsylvania, I have heard and seen a great deal. I have been teaching for 24 years at this rural Pennsylvania Middle/High School where teen pregnancy has always been a problem. Teaching students abstinence as the only method of birth control has been a major…

  1. The Family of Later Life: A Decade Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Troll, Lillian E.

    1971-01-01

    The authors's concern is the delineation of family developmental processes from the time the children leave home to the time of their parents old age and also the investigation of qualitative aspects of kinship interaction and as different kinds of kinship ties, obligation, value consensus, generational transmission and conflict, and adult…

  2. Effects of Occupational Shift on Family Life Style. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, Aline M.

    The report describes a research project which investigated the impact of change on new employees, their families, and the community when a new type of industry locates in a small semi-rural Louisiana community. The subjects of the research were 218 women (144 black and 74 white) employed in the new clothing manufacturing industry and in three…

  3. Taxonomy of Family Life Styles: I. Homes with TMR Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mink, Iris Tan; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Cluster analysis of social environment variables for 115 families with children (average age 12 years) in trainable mentally retarded classes revealed five distinctive patterns: cohesive; harmonious; control oriented, somewhat unharmonious; low disclosure, unharmonious; child oriented, expressive; and disadvantaged, low morale. Comparisons and…

  4. Family Background and Early Life Course Transitions in Kinshasa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tambashe, B. Oleko; Shapiro, David

    1996-01-01

    Examines the impact of a woman's family background on transitions to sexual activity, marriage, and motherhood. Documents how parental education, parental survival status, and other factors are important in the transition to adult roles. Findings suggest that increases in educational levels should contribute to delays in these transitions and…

  5. Conflict in Families and Friendships of Later Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Celia B.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Elderly adults (N=55) described situations provoking anger in relationships. Parental anger revolved around adult children's failure to adhere to family rules, accept parental control, and live up to role expectations. Filial anger was related to parental failure to provide assistance and accept child's autonomy. Anger between peers was related to…

  6. Childhood Family, Ethnicity, and Drug Use over the Life Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cubbins, Lisa A.; Klepinger, Daniel H.

    2007-01-01

    Using multiply imputed data from 5 waves of the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (N = 8,294), we investigated whether childhood family characteristics and childhood religious affiliation explain ethnic differences in marijuana and cocaine use in the last year. None of the childhood factors explained ethnic differences in drug use, though…

  7. Making Ethics a Habit in Your Family Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terkel, Susan Neiburg

    1993-01-01

    Suggests family activities related to moral values: (1) instilling the giving habit; (2) using stories and games to trigger moral reflection; (3) encouraging earth ethics; (4) developing the moral opinion habit; (5) making moral reminders part of the home decor; (6) using every opportunity to teach; and (7) sharing holidays with others. (GLR)

  8. Comparison Between Family Function Dimensions and Quality of Life Among Amphetamine Addicts and Non- Addicts

    PubMed Central

    Eshagh Afkari, Mohammad; Ghasemi, Afsaneh; Shojaeizadeh, Davoud; Tol, Azar; Rahimi Foroshani, Abass; Taghdisi, Mohammad Hossein

    2013-01-01

    Background One of the most important factors in drug abuse and drug avoidance is family and its function. Objectives This study aimed to compare family function and quality of life dimensions among Amphetamine addicts and non-addicts. Materials and Methods The current study is a case-control, which assessed 95 Iranian addicts and 95 non-addicts. Sampling method in the addicts group was random clustering. The non-addicts were selected from accompanied addicts in other centers with respect to the demographic characteristics. The instruments were Family Assessment and Quality of Life (SF-36) scales. SPSS software version 11.5 was used for statistical analysis and Pearson’s correlation coefficient, stepwise regression analysis, and independent samples t-test were conducted. Results The study revealed that some disorders in family function dimensions were higher in the addicts compared to non-addicts. Addicts have a quality of life lower than non-addicts (P < 0.05). There was a relationship between different dimensions of family function and the quality of life in both the addicts and non-addicts (P < 0.05). Regression analysis showed that roles dimensions and family function could roughly account for 17% of the changes in the addicts’ quality of life while in the non-addicts, behavioral control dimension of family function could account for roughly 17% of the changes in their quality of life. Conclusions Regarding the study findings, there was a significant difference between family function dimensions and quality of life among addicts and non-addicts. PMID:24083013

  9. Family Decisionmaking Over the Life Cycle: Some Implications for Estimating the Effects of Income Maintenance Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, James P.

    The standard one-period labor supply model that economists have used is in some ways an inadequate tool to evaluate a Family Assistance Plan (FAP). The principal difficulty is that an FAP will have important interperiod or life cycle effects. The pure life cycle model, an extension of the work of Becker and Ghez, is derived here without reference…

  10. Life Satisfaction among Children in Different Family Structures: A Comparative Study of 36 Western Societies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bjarnason, Thoroddur; Bendtsen, Pernille; Arnarsson, Arsaell M.; Borup, Ina; Iannotti, Ronald J.; Lofstedt, Petra; Haapasalo, Ilona; Niclasen, Birgit

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines differences in life satisfaction among children in different family structures in 36 western, industrialised countries (n = 184 496). Children living with both biological parents reported higher levels of life satisfaction than children living with a single parent or parent-step-parent. Children in joint physical custody…

  11. Perceived Family Support, Acculturation, and Life Satisfaction in Mexican American Youth: A Mixed-Methods Exploration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Lisa M.; Lopez, Shane J.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe a mixed-methods study designed to explore perceived family support, acculturation, and life satisfaction among 266 Mexican American adolescents. Specifically, the authors conducted a thematic analysis of open-ended responses to a question about life satisfaction to understand participants' perceptions of…

  12. Life Satisfaction among Children in Different Family Structures: A Comparative Study of 36 Western Societies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bjarnason, Thoroddur; Bendtsen, Pernille; Arnarsson, Arsaell M.; Borup, Ina; Iannotti, Ronald J.; Lofstedt, Petra; Haapasalo, Ilona; Niclasen, Birgit

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines differences in life satisfaction among children in different family structures in 36 western, industrialised countries (n = 184 496). Children living with both biological parents reported higher levels of life satisfaction than children living with a single parent or parent-step-parent. Children in joint physical custody…

  13. The Role of Character Strengths and Family Importance on Mexican American College Students' Life Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vela, Javier C.; Sparrow, Gregory Scott; Ikonomopoulos, James; Gonzalez, Stacey L.; Rodriguez, Basilio

    2017-01-01

    We examined how character strengths and family importance influenced Mexican American college students' life satisfaction. Using multiple regression analysis, findings indicated that optimism, grit, and gratitude were significant predictors of life satisfaction. We provide a discussion regarding the importance of these findings as well as…

  14. Family, Close Relatives, Friends: Life Satisfaction among Older People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sener, Arzu; Oztop, Hulya; Dogan, Nuri; Guven, Seval

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the influence of socioeconomic (age, education, marital status, income, and health) and demographic variables and the quantity and quality of relationships with adult children, grandchildren, siblings and friends on life satisfaction of the elderly. Participants were 200 persons older than 60 years of age. Hierarchical…

  15. Family, Close Relatives, Friends: Life Satisfaction among Older People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sener, Arzu; Oztop, Hulya; Dogan, Nuri; Guven, Seval

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the influence of socioeconomic (age, education, marital status, income, and health) and demographic variables and the quantity and quality of relationships with adult children, grandchildren, siblings and friends on life satisfaction of the elderly. Participants were 200 persons older than 60 years of age. Hierarchical…

  16. Early Life Family Conflict, Social Interactions, and Carotid Artery Intima-Media Thickness in Adulthood.

    PubMed

    John-Henderson, Neha A; Kamarck, Thomas W; Muldoon, Matthew F; Manuck, Stephen B

    2016-04-01

    Conflict in early life family environments is known to affect psychosocial functioning and coping styles into adulthood and is reported to negatively affect access to psychosocial resources that are critical to the management of stress. However, it remains unknown whether early life family conflict similarly affects subclinical cardiovascular disease (CVD) in adulthood. We predicted that family conflict in early life would be associated with greater mean intima-media thickness (IMT), a subclinical marker of CVD risk, in adulthood. Data were collected in a community sample of 503 adults (47.4 % male, mean [standard deviation] age = 42.8 [7.3] years). Associations between family conflict in early life with IMT (assessed using B-mode ultrasound) in adulthood were examined using regression analysis. We also tested for indirect effects of early life family conflict on mean IMT through ecological momentary assessment reports of social interactions, diversity of social roles, and perceived social support. Linear regression analyses adjusted for demographics and physiological risk factors showed conflict in early life associated with greater mean IMT (β = 0.08, t(447) = 2.13, p = .034, R = 0.46). Early life conflict was significantly related to diversity of social roles, perceived social support, and ecological momentary assessment reports of pleasant and social conflict interactions. Significant indirect effects of early life conflict on mean IMT were observed through fewer pleasant social interactions and more frequent social conflict interactions in adulthood (β = 0.001 [95% confidence interval = 0.0001-0.0014] and β = 0.001 [95% confidence interval = 0.0002-0.0015], respectively). These findings provide initial evidence that family conflict in early life heightens CVD risk in adulthood, in part by shaping the quality of adulthood social interactions.

  17. Early life family conflict, Social interactions and Carotid Artery Intima-Media Thickness in Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    John-Henderson, Neha A.; Kamarck, Thomas W.; Muldoon, Matthew F.; Manuck, Stephen B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Conflict in early life family environments is known to affect psychosocial functioning and coping styles into adulthood and is reported to negatively affect access to psychosocial resources that are critical to the management of stress. However, it remains unknown whether early life family conflict similarly affects subclinical cardiovascular disease (CVD) in adulthood. We predicted that family conflict in early life would be associated with greater mean Intima-Media thickness (IMT), a subclinical marker of CVD risk, in adulthood. Methods Data were collected in a community sample of 503 adults (47.4 % male, mean age: 42.8 years [SD=7.3]). Associations between family conflict in early life with IMT (assessed using B-mode ultrasound) in adulthood were examined using regression analysis. We also tested for indirect effects of early life family conflict on mean IMT through ecological momentary assessment (EMA) reports of social interactions, diversity of social roles, and perceived social support. Results Linear regression analyses adjusted for demographics and physiological risk factors showed conflict in early life associated with greater mean IMT (β=0.08, t(447)=2.13, p=0.034, R2=0.46). Early life conflict was significantly related to diversity of social roles, perceived social support, and EMA reports of pleasant and social conflict interactions. Significant indirect effects of early life conflict on mean IMT were observed through fewer pleasant social interactions and more frequent social conflict interactions in adulthood (β = 0.001, 95% CI, 0.0001–0.0014 and β=0.001, 95% CI, 0.0002–0.0015, respectively). Conclusions These findings provide initial evidence that family conflict in early life heightens CVD risk in adulthood, in part by shaping the quality of adulthood social interactions. PMID:26809109

  18. Determining the familial risk distribution of colorectal cancer: a data mining approach.

    PubMed

    Chau, Rowena; Jenkins, Mark A; Buchanan, Daniel D; Ait Ouakrim, Driss; Giles, Graham G; Casey, Graham; Gallinger, Steven; Haile, Robert W; Le Marchand, Loic; Newcomb, Polly A; Lindor, Noralane M; Hopper, John L; Win, Aung Ko

    2016-04-01

    This study was aimed to characterize the distribution of colorectal cancer risk using family history of cancers by data mining. Family histories for 10,066 colorectal cancer cases recruited to population cancer registries of the Colon Cancer Family Registry were analyzed using a data mining framework. A novel index was developed to quantify familial cancer aggregation. Artificial neural network was used to identify distinct categories of familial risk. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) and corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of colorectal cancer were calculated for each category. We identified five major, and 66 minor categories of familial risk for developing colorectal cancer. The distribution the major risk categories were: (1) 7% of families (SIR = 7.11; 95% CI 6.65-7.59) had a strong family history of colorectal cancer; (2) 13% of families (SIR = 2.94; 95% CI 2.78-3.10) had a moderate family history of colorectal cancer; (3) 11% of families (SIR = 1.23; 95% CI 1.12-1.36) had a strong family history of breast cancer and a weak family history of colorectal cancer; (4) 9 % of families (SIR = 1.06; 95 % CI 0.96-1.18) had strong family history of prostate cancer and weak family history of colorectal cancer; and (5) 60% of families (SIR = 0.61; 95% CI 0.57-0.65) had a weak family history of all cancers. There is a wide variation of colorectal cancer risk that can be categorized by family history of cancer, with a strong gradient of colorectal cancer risk between the highest and lowest risk categories. The risk of colorectal cancer for people with the highest risk category of family history (7% of the population) was 12-times that for people in the lowest risk category (60%) of the population. Data mining was proven an effective approach for gaining insight into the underlying cancer aggregation patterns and for categorizing familial risk of colorectal cancer.

  19. 2010 Military Family Life Project (MFLP): Tabulations of Response

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-28

    CHILD DEMOGRAPHICS Male 100 ±1 1 13 26 24 19 17 ± 2 8.4 ±0.2 Female 100 ±1 1 13 26 25 18 17 ± 2 8.4 ±0.2 Less Than 6 Years Old ...2.0 36 to 40 Years Old 100 ±1 22 5 72 ± 2 78.0 ±2.0 More Than 40 Years Old 100 ±1 22 4 74 ± 2 78.0 ±2.0 FAMILY STATUS With Child (ren) 100 ±1... Years Old 100 ±1 9 ± 2 FAMILY STATUS With Child (ren) 100 ±1 13 ±1 Without Child (ren) 100

  20. The beneficial effect on family life in treating borderline personality.

    PubMed

    Gerull, Friederike; Meares, Russell; Stevenson, Janine; Korner, Anthony; Newman, Louise

    2008-01-01

    The harmful effect of borderline patients on their families is an important but relatively neglected aspect of outcome studies. This study concerns changes in perceived quality of relationships with partners and children of 24 patients suffering Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) after 12 months of treatment with the Conversational Model (CM). They were compared to 21 parents with BPD receiving "Treatment as Usual" (TAU) from their referring clinicians for the same period. Both groups developed naturalistically giving the study a quasi-experimental design. The Social Adjustment Scale (SAS-SR) was administered on intake and again after 12 months. The subscales dealing with relationships with children, with partners and with the family unit were scored and compared between groups. It was found that the perceived relationships with children and partners improved significantly for the CM group but not for the TAU group.

  1. Family Literacy: Community & Family Life Materials. A Guide to Recent and Recommended Books.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Martha A.; And Others

    The books in this family literacy guide are listed alphabetically by title in each of three sections. The author, publisher, copyright date, reading level, type of book, number of pages, International Standard Book Number, price, and annotation comprise each entry. The topic of the family contains 11 titles: "Angry Feelings"; "Beginning with…

  2. 2012 Military Family Life Project (MFLP): Tabulations of Responses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-31

    Telephonic/Web-based counseling? l. Gym /fitness center? m. Services to help with managing money while apart? n. Military spouse support group? o...development of this survey included Cathy Flynn and Yuko Whitestone (Military Community and Family Policy). DMDC’s Survey Design, Analysis & Operations ...Lead of Survey Operations , is responsible for the survey database construction and archiving. The lead operations analyst on this survey was Amy

  3. Stressful life events, family support and successful ageing in the Biafran War generation.

    PubMed

    Chukwuorji, JohnBosco Chika; Nwoke, Mary Basil; Ebere, Magnus Okechukwu

    2017-01-01

    Although the developing countries contribute substantially to the population of the elderly, little is known about ageing in populous countries like Nigeria, particularly the Biafran War generation (BWG). Some of those who witnessed the Biafran War (also known as Nigerian Civil War) as children are well into late adulthood, while the majority of this pre-war/wartime cohort who are in their golden years will enter into later life in less than a decade from now. The aim of the present research was to examine the role of stressful life events and family support in successful ageing of the BWG. Data were collected using a self-administered survey completed by 453 members of the BWG who were ≥45 years. The survey included measures such as the Successful Ageing Inventory, Life Events Inventory, and family support subscale of Family Dynamics Scale. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were conducted to test the hypotheses of the study. The three dimensions of stressful life events (health events, interpersonal events and work-related/financial events) had moderate negative relationships with successful ageing. Family support was moderately and positively associated with successful ageing. For the moderation hypotheses, family support was a significant moderator of only the relationship between work-related stressful life events and successful ageing, especially for the <65 years subgroup. Growing old can be a very positive experience for both the individual and the society. Family support provides social protection for older people, in the face of difficult socio-economic circumstances.

  4. Relation between a career and family life for English hospital consultants: qualitative, semistructured interview study

    PubMed Central

    Dumelow, Carol; Littlejohns, Peter; Griffiths, Sîan

    2000-01-01

    Objective To explore the relation between work and family life among hospital consultants and their attitude towards the choices and constraints that influence this relation. Design Qualitative study of consultants' experiences and views based on tape recorded semistructured interviews. Setting Former South Thames health region in southeast England. Participants 202 male and female NHS hospital consultants aged between 40 to 50 years representing all hospital medical specialties. Results Three types of relation between work and family life (career dominant, segregated, and accommodating) were identified among hospital consultants. Most consultants had a segregated relation, although female consultants were more likely than male consultants to have a career dominant or an accommodating relation. Many male consultants and some female consultants expressed considerable dissatisfaction with the balance between their career and family life. A factor influencing this dissatisfaction was the perceived lack of choice to spend time on their personal or family life, because of the working practices and attitudes within hospital culture, if they wanted a successful career. Conclusions Consultants are currently fitting in with the profession rather than the profession adapting to enable doctors to have fulfilling professional and personal lives. Current government policies to increase the medical workforce and promote family friendly policies in the NHS ought to take account of the need for a fundamental change in hospital culture to enable doctors to be more involved in their personal or family life without detriment to their career progress. PMID:10827044

  5. The Relationship of Family Satisfaction to Satisfaction with the Military Way of Life Among Soldiers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-01

    expanded rcogjnition by military le-dership of the interdependence among quality of life is-ues, family well -being and satisfaction , job productivity...rw L FKI, COPY Technical Report 864 The Relationship of Family Satisfaction to Satisfaction with the Military Way of Life Among Soldiers Gary L...to Satisfaction with the Military Way of Life Among Soldiers 12. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S, DU-teu, GayL Sý~Iof2~ a o nivo=rsitv of North Carolina at Chiapel

  6. Universality of bereavement life review for spirituality and depression in bereaved families.

    PubMed

    Ando, Michiyo; Sakaguchi, Yukihiro; Shiihara, Yasufumi; Izuhara, Kumi

    2014-05-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of the Bereavement Life Review on depression and spiritual well-being of bereaved families in a setting that does not specialize in palliative care. The participants were 20 bereaved family members who underwent the Bereavement Life Review over 2 sessions in 2 weeks. Beck Depression Inventory Second Edition scores significantly decreased from 14.4 ± 9.2 to 11.6 ± 7.4 (t = 2.15, P = .045) and Functional Assessment Chronic Illness Therapy-Spiritual scores increased from 24.3 ± 10.1 to 25.9 ± 11 (t = -1.0, P = .341) from pre- to postintervention. These results show that the Bereavement Life Review can decrease depression and improve spiritual well-being of bereaved families after the death of a family member in a setting without specialized palliative care. The results also suggest the universality of this therapy.

  7. The family context of autism spectrum disorders: influence on the behavioral phenotype and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Smith, Leann E; Greenberg, Jan S; Mailick, Marsha R

    2014-01-01

    This article reports the findings from a longitudinal program of research examining the bidirectional influences of the family environment on the behavioral phenotype of autism, and describes a newly developed family psychoeducation program, titled Transitioning Together, designed to reduce family stress, address behavior problems, and improve the overall quality of life of adolescents with autism and their families. A case study is presented that illustrates how Transitioning Together helps reduce family stress and improve the overall quality of the family environment. The article concludes with a discussion of directions for future research on best practices in working with families of children, adolescents, and adults with autism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Communication Matters: Exploring the Intersection of Family and Practitioner End of Life Communication

    PubMed Central

    Omilion-Hodges, Leah M.; Swords, Nathan M.

    2017-01-01

    After establishing a baseline understanding of some of the factors that influence and shape family end of life communication, empirical research centered on the communication tendencies of nationally-recognized palliative care clinicians is presented. Because death is no longer confined to the bedroom and individuals are increasingly turning to hospitals and health care institutes to assist with end of life, the role of palliative care practitioners is vital. To that end, common communication-rooted issues that may transpire among various medical personnel are explored. Focus on a shared underlying tension—care vs. cure—links the findings between family and palliative care clinician communication regarding end of life. Practical communication solutions and suggestions are offered to facilitate productive and mindful end of life communication between and among family members and health care practitioners. PMID:28335501

  9. Communication Matters: Exploring the Intersection of Family and Practitioner End of Life Communication.

    PubMed

    Omilion-Hodges, Leah M; Swords, Nathan M

    2017-03-19

    After establishing a baseline understanding of some of the factors that influence and shape family end of life communication, empirical research centered on the communication tendencies of nationally-recognized palliative care clinicians is presented. Because death is no longer confined to the bedroom and individuals are increasingly turning to hospitals and health care institutes to assist with end of life, the role of palliative care practitioners is vital. To that end, common communication-rooted issues that may transpire among various medical personnel are explored. Focus on a shared underlying tension-care vs. cure-links the findings between family and palliative care clinician communication regarding end of life. Practical communication solutions and suggestions are offered to facilitate productive and mindful end of life communication between and among family members and health care practitioners.

  10. Volume and mass distribution in selected families of asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wlodarczyk, I.; Leliwa-Kopystynski, J.

    2014-07-01

    Members of five asteroid families (Vesta, Eos, Eunomia, Koronis, and Themis) were identified using the Hierarchical Clustering Method (HCM) for a data set containing 292,003 numbered asteroids. The influence of the choice of the best value of the parameter v_{cut} that controls the distances of asteroids in the proper elements space a, e, i was investigated with a step as small as 1 m/s. Results are given in a set of figures showing the families on the planes (a, e), (a, i), (e, i). Another form for the presentation of results is related to the secular resonances in the asteroids' motion with the giant planets, mostly with Saturn. Relations among asteroid radius, albedo, and absolute magnitude allow us to calculate the volumes of individual members of an asteroid family. After summation, the volumes of the parent bodies of the families were found. This paper presents the possibility and the first results of using a combined method for asteroid family identifications based on the following items: (i) Parameter v_{cut} is established with precision as high as 1 m/s; (ii) the albedo (if available) of the potential members is considered for approving or rejecting the family membership; (iii) a color classification is used for the same purpose as well. Searching for the most reliable parameter values for the family populations was performed by means of a consecutive application of the HCM with increasing parameter v_{cut}. The results are illustrated in the figure. Increasing v_{cut} in steps as small as 1 m/s allowed to observe the computational strength of the HCM: the critical value of the parameter v_{cut} (see the breaking-points of the plots in the figure) separates the assemblage of potential family members from 'an ocean' of background asteroids that are not related to the family. The critical values of v_{cut} vary from 57 m/s for the Vesta family to 92 m/s for the Eos family. If the parameter v_{cut} surpasses its critical value, the number of HCM

  11. Neurocognitive and Family Functioning and Quality of Life Among Young Adult Survivors of Childhood Brain Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Hocking, Matthew C.; Hobbie, Wendy L.; Deatrick, Janet A.; Lucas, Matthew S.; Szabo, Margo M.; Volpe, Ellen M.; Barakat, Lamia P.

    2012-01-01

    Many childhood brain tumor survivors experience significant neurocognitive late effects across multiple domains that negatively affect quality of life. A theoretical model of survivorship suggests that family functioning and survivor neurocognitive functioning interact to affect survivor and family outcomes. This paper reviews the types of neurocognitive late effects experienced by survivors of pediatric brain tumors. Quantitative and qualitative data from three case reports of young adult survivors and their mothers are analyzed according to the theoretical model and presented in this paper to illustrate the importance of key factors presented in the model. The influence of age at brain tumor diagnosis, family functioning, and family adaptation to illness on survivor quality of life and family outcomes are highlighted. Future directions for research and clinical care for this vulnerable group of survivors are discussed. PMID:21722062

  12. Living ordinary family life with an allergic child-the mother's perspective.

    PubMed

    Alanne, Soili; Laitinen, Kirsi; Paavilainen, Eija

    2014-01-01

    Ecocultural theory considering family as an entity may serve as a new point of view instead of "impact of disease"-perspective. Aims were to reveal ecocultural themes and activities of daily routines in the treatment of a child's food allergy and eczema. Interviews (N=24) were held with mothers with allergic children aged 12 months and mothers repeat interviews at 24 months. The theme; "living an ordinary family life", was implemented across the family activities of routines essential for treating the child's allergy. New or altered treatment regimens can be tailored to families on the basis of existing activities.

  13. Family communication and decision making at the end of life: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Cara L

    2015-06-01

    Patients and families coping with a terminal illness are faced with a number of decisions over the course of their disease. The role that family communication plays in the process of decision making is an important one. The objectives for this review are to examine the current state of empirical literature on the relationship between family communication and decision making about end-of-life care, to identify gaps, and to discuss implications for policy, practice, and future research. Articles were identified using systematic keyword searches within the following relevant databases: Academic Search Complete, CINAHL Plus, Communications and Mass Media Complete, ERIC, PsychINFO, MEDLINE, SocINDEX, and ProQuest. The three bodies of relevant literature that emerged during this review include: (1) the importance of family communication at the end of life (EoL); (2) family decision making at the EoL; and (3) the interrelationship of communication (both within the family and with healthcare professionals) and decision making at the EoL. While the literature highlights the role of communication between medical professionals and the patient or family members, there is very little focus on the process of how family communication among the family members themselves contributes to decision making at the end of life. Barriers to end-of-life care are important considerations for helping patients to access timely and appropriate services. Understanding the pertinent role of family communication as it relates to the decision for EoL care is the first step in working to provide another avenue for overcoming these barriers.

  14. A Feminist Perspective on the Relationship between Family Life and School Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnot, Madeline

    1984-01-01

    The way in which the separation of family and work is reinforced and the way the distinction between male and female spheres is legitimated are analyzed within three different relationships: between schools and the economy, schooling and work, and the family and school. (Author/GC)

  15. A novel healthy blood pressure phenotype in the Long Life Family Study.

    PubMed

    Marron, Megan M; Singh, Jatinder; Boudreau, Robert M; Christensen, Kaare; Cosentino, Stephanie; Feitosa, Mary F; Minster, Ryan L; Perls, Thomas; Schupf, Nicole; Sebastiani, Paola; Ukraintseva, Svetlana; Wojczynski, Mary K; Newman, Anne B

    2017-08-23

    Hypertension tends to run in families and has both genetic and environmental determinants. We assessed the hypothesis that a novel healthy blood pressure (BP) phenotype is also familial and sought to identify its associated factors. We developed a healthy BP phenotype in the Long Life Family Study, a cohort of two-generation families selected for longevity. Participants from the offspring generation (n = 2211, ages 32-88) were classified as having healthy BP if their age-adjusted and sex-adjusted SBP z-score was between -1.5 and -0.5. Offspring on antihypertensive medications were classified as not having healthy BP. Families with at least two offspring (n = 419 families) were defined as meeting the healthy BP phenotype if at least two and at least 50% of their offspring had healthy BP. Among 2211 offspring, 476 (21.5%) met the healthy BP phenotype. When examining the 419 families, only 44 (10.5%) families met the criteria for the healthy BP phenotype. Both offspring and probands from families with healthy BP performed better on neuropsychological tests that place demands on complex attention and executive function when compared with offspring and probands from remaining families. Among families with the healthy BP phenotype compared with families without, a higher proportion of offspring met the American Heart Association definition of ideal cardiovascular health (10.8 versus 3.8%, respectively; driven by BP, smoking status, and BMI components). In this cohort of familial longevity, few families had a novel healthy BP phenotype in multiple members. Families with this healthy BP phenotype may represent a specific pathway to familial longevity.

  16. Cross-trait familial resemblance for resting blood pressure and body composition and fat distribution: The HERITAGE family study.

    PubMed

    An, Ping; Rice, Treva; Gagnon, Jacques; Leon, Arthur S.; Skinner, James S.; Wilmore, Jack H.; Bouchard, Claude; Rao, D.C.

    2000-01-01

    Cross-trait familial resemblance between resting blood pressure (BP) and body composition and fat distribution was examined in 98 Caucasian families participating in the HERITAGE Family Study by using a multivariate familial correlation model assessing both intraindividual and interindividual cross-trait correlations. The 520 family members were sedentary at baseline examination, and both resting systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) BP were cross-analyzed with each of the following 10 indications of body composition and fat distribution: percent body fat (%BF), abdominal visceral fat (AVF), body mass index (BMI), fat-free mass (FFM), fat mass (FM), sum of eight skinfolds (SF), total abdominal fat (TAF), ratio of trunk-to-extremity skinfolds (TER), waist circumference (WAIST), ratio of waist-to-hip circumferences (WHR). Five of the variables were also corrected for fat mass (AVFf, TAFf, TERf, WAISTf, WHRf) to index these measures independent of total degree of adiposity. In general, the results suggested strictly intraindividual cross-trait resemblance, with occasional spouse cross-trait resemblance, but few or no sibling or parent-offspring cross-trait correlations. This pattern is largely consistent with nongenetic specific environmental determinants for the BP-body composition and fat distribution covariation, with possibly some common environmental influence between spouses and negligible genetic effects. The only findings suggesting any familial cross-trait resemblance were significant sibling correlations for DBP-FFM and DBP-WHR, although the parent-offspring correlation was not significant. These findings suggest that the observed BP-body composition and fat distribution cross-trait correlations in these sedentary families are probably not due to multifactorial effects such as polygenic and/or common familial environmental effects. Whether or not other factors such as nonadditive effects are involved warrants further investigation using other methods. Am. J

  17. Reconstructing the Brothers Grimm: new tales for step-family life.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, A C

    1999-01-01

    Step-families are situated within the sociopolitical context of family change and are examined as a prototype of the "post-modern" family. This essay looks at the cultural construction of step-family life and proposes a model for collaboratively reconstructing stories that liberate step-relationships from the legacy of the Brothers Grimm, deconstructing the stories of failure, insufficiency, and neglect. Building on narrative and social constructionist ways of thinking about families, the concept of side-shadowing (a hermeneutic approach from literary/historical criticism) is introduced to elucidate how therapists can help family members discover ways of thinking, feeling, and behaving that are both more personally satisfying and more congruent with the changed context of family life. Two therapeutic challenges are high-lighted: reconceptualizing what it means to be a step-family and coming to terms with differential attachment in relationships while working with step-families. The essay ends with a fairy tale for the 21st century.

  18. Examining family meetings at end of life: The model of practice in a hospice inpatient unit.

    PubMed

    Meeker, Mary Ann; Waldrop, Deborah P; Seo, Jin Young

    2015-10-01

    Our purpose was to rigorously examine the nature of family meetings as conducted in an inpatient hospice care unit in order to generate an inductive theoretical model. In this two-phase project, we first interviewed eight members of the interdisciplinary care team who participated in multiple family meetings each week. Interview questions explored why and how they conducted family meetings. Using an observation template created from these interview data, we subsequently conducted ethnographic observations during family meetings. Using the methods of grounded theory, our findings were synthesized into a theoretical model depicting the structure and process of formal family meetings within this setting. The core of the family meeting was characterized by cognitive and affective elements aimed at supporting the family and facilitating quality care by clarifying the past, easing the present, and protecting the future. This inductive model was subsequently found to be highly aligned with a sense of coherence, an important influence on coping, and adaptation to the stress of a life-limiting illness. Provider communication with family members is particularly critical during advanced illness and end-of-life care. The National Consensus Project clinical practice guidelines for quality palliative care list regular family meetings among the recommended practices for excellent communication during end-of-life care, but do not provide specific guidance on how and when to provide such meetings. Our findings provide a theoretical model that can inform the design of a family meeting to address family members' needs for meaningful and contextualized information, validation of their important contributions to care, and preparation for the patient's death.

  19. Selection Bias in Family Reports on End of Life with Dementia in Nursing Homes

    PubMed Central

    Deliens, Luc; Ribbe, Miel W.; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, Bregje D.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background : Selective participation in retrospective studies of families recruited after the patient's death may threaten generalizability of reports on end-of-life experiences. Objectives To assess possible selection bias in retrospective study of dementia at the end of life using family reports. Methods Two physician teams covering six nursing home facilities in the Netherlands reported on 117 of 119 consecutive decedents within two weeks after death unaware of after-death family participation in the study. They reported on characteristics; treatment and care; overall patient outcomes such as comfort, nursing care, and outcomes; and their own perspectives on the experience. We compared results between decedents with and without family participation. Results The family response rate was 55%. There were no significant differences based on participation versus nonparticipation in demographics and other nursing home resident characteristics, treatment and care, or overall resident outcome. However, among participating families, physicians perceived higher-quality aspects of nursing care and outcome, better consensus between staff and family on treatment, and a more peaceful death. Participation was less likely with involvement of a new family member in the last month. Conclusions Families may be more likely to participate in research with more harmonious teamwork in end-of-life caregiving. Where family participation is an enrollment criterion, comparing demographics alone may not capture possible selection bias, especially in more subjective measures. Selection bias toward more positive experiences, which may include the physician's and probably also the family's experiences, should be considered if representativeness is aimed for. Future work should address selection bias in other palliative settings and countries, and with prospective recruitment. PMID:23153076

  20. Music therapy in pediatric palliative care: family-centered care to enhance quality of life.

    PubMed

    Lindenfelser, Kathryn J; Hense, Cherry; McFerran, Katrina

    2012-05-01

    Research into the value of music therapy in pediatric palliative care (PPC) has identified quality of life as one area of improvement for families caring for a child in the terminal stages of a life-threatening illness. This small-scale investigation collected data in a multisite, international study including Minnesota, USA, and Melbourne, Australia. An exploratory mixed method design used the qualitative data collected through interviews with parents to interpret results from the PedsQL Family Impact Module of overall parental quality of life. Parents described music therapy as resulting in physical improvements of their child by providing comfort and stimulation. They also valued the positive experiences shared by the family in music therapy sessions that were strength oriented and family centered. This highlighted the physical and communication scales within the PedsQL Family Impact Module, where minimal improvements were achieved in contrast to some strong results suggesting diminished quality of life in cognitive and daily activity domains. Despite the significant challenges faced by parents during this difficult time, parents described many positive experiences in music therapy, and the overall score for half of the parents in the study did not diminish. The value of music therapy as a service that addresses the family-centered agenda of PPC is endorsed by this study.

  1. Food neophobia, life satisfaction and family eating habits in university students.

    PubMed

    Schnettler, Berta; Höger, Yesli; Orellana, Ligia; Miranda, Horacio; Lobos, Germán; Sepúlveda, José; Sanchez, Mercedes; Miranda-Zapata, Edgardo; Denegri, Marianela; Grunert, Klaus G; Salinas-Oñate, Natalia

    2017-04-03

    The aim of this study was to categorize university students based on their association between food neophobia and levels of subjective well-being, in general and in the food domain, and their perception of their family's eating habits. A survey was conducted among 372 university students from southern Chile. The questionnaire included the Food Neophobia Scale (FNS), Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS), Satisfaction with Food-related Life (SWFL), Health-related Quality of Life Index (HRQOL-4), and Family Eating Habits Questionnaire (FEHQ). Three student types were distinguished by cluster analysis: Group 1 (26.9%) had the highest scores on the FNS, SWLS and SWFL. Group 2 (40.8%) had a high score on the FNS but the lowest scores on the SWLS and SWFL. Group 3 (32.3%) had the lowest FNS score and high scores on the SWLS and SWFL. Group 2 stood out in having a low score on the FEHQ's component for cohesiveness of family eating. These results suggest that both neophobic and non-neophobic students have positive levels of satisfaction with life and food-related life, and that satisfaction among neophobic students is related to family eating patterns, especially cohesiveness in family eating.

  2. The quantitative measurement of family quality of life: a review of available instruments.

    PubMed

    Hu, X; Summers, J A; Turnbull, A; Zuna, N

    2011-12-01

    Family quality of life (FQOL) has emerged as an important outcome of service delivery for individuals with disabilities and their families. The purpose of this review was to explore the disparity of scale development approaches between families with children with disabilities and families from other populations and identify strengths to serve as a source of recommendations to improve the measurements of FQOL in the disability field. We conducted a keyword search of 25 databases. Sixteen measurement tools on FQOL, family well-being and family satisfaction currently used in the disability field, healthcare field and general family studies published in journals from 1980 to 2009 were included in the analysis. Three themes emerged from the detailed analysis and comparisons of the instruments: (1) description of the primary purpose and theoretical basis; (2) identification of the tool's respondents, domains, response formats and scoring strategies to assess family systems; and (3) summarisation of available psychometric information. As family researchers continue their mission to conceptualise and theorise about FQOL, they should also promote the refinement of FQOL measurements and consider the implications from family instruments used in the healthcare and general family fields from the following aspects: (1) domains of FQOL; (2) units of analysis; (3) response format; (4) scoring choice; and (5) psychometric evaluation. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Parental Stress, Socioeconomic Status, Satisfaction with Services, and Family Quality of Life among Parents of Children Receiving Special Education Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundy, Heather F.

    2011-01-01

    Family quality of life (FQOL) refers to the degree to which families of individuals with disabilities are able to meet their basic needs, enjoy time together, and pursue leisure interests and activities (Park et al., 2003). Researchers have identified barriers that families of individuals with disabilities encounter as they pursue a life of…

  4. Augmentative and Alternative Communication Practice in the Pursuit of Family Quality of Life: A Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saito, Yumiko; Turnbull, Ann

    2007-01-01

    Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) practice may have both positive and negative impacts on quality of life (QOL) of children with AAC as well as their entire family. Thirteen studies were reviewed to analyze family outcomes and perspectives on AAC practice by using a family quality of life (FQOL) framework comprised of five…

  5. Parental Stress, Socioeconomic Status, Satisfaction with Services, and Family Quality of Life among Parents of Children Receiving Special Education Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundy, Heather F.

    2011-01-01

    Family quality of life (FQOL) refers to the degree to which families of individuals with disabilities are able to meet their basic needs, enjoy time together, and pursue leisure interests and activities (Park et al., 2003). Researchers have identified barriers that families of individuals with disabilities encounter as they pursue a life of…

  6. [Social and family factors associated with quality of life in children in schools from Piura, Peru].

    PubMed

    Solano, Fiorela E; Vilela-Estrada, Martin A; Meza-Liviapoma, Jessica; Araujo-Chumacero, Mary M; Vilela-Estrada, Ana L; Mejia, Christian R

    2017-04-01

    To determine the socio-familial factors associated with quality of life within the family in children of schools in Piura, Peru. A cross-sectional study in a convenience sample of children between 3 to 6 years in schools in the city of Piura, Perú. The quality of life was measured by the HOME test, with data adjusted to the Machover and Koppitz test, and were also associated with other social and family variables. P values were obtained by generalised linear models, adjusting for the residence of each subject. Of the 431 respondents, 64% (275) were male. The median age was 4 years old. A poor quality of life was observed in 50% of children. Traits of violence (p < .001) and aggression (p < .001) were associated to higher frequencies of poor quality of life, adjusted for shyness, dependence, and immaturity. The perception of parent’s love (p = .005), living with both parents (p < .001), playing with someone at home (p = .036), the person with whom plays most is the mother (p = .003) or both parents (p = .004) were associated with the quality of life in the survey. A large percentage of children who had a poor quality of life was found. The social and family protective factors were to live with both parents, and the demonstration of affection between both parents and play with both.

  7. Turbulent life: the experiences of the family members of patients suffering from depression.

    PubMed

    Radfar, M; Ahmadi, F; Fallahi Khoshknab, M

    2014-04-01

    Families of patients suffering from depression have an important role in provision of care to the patients, which also may impose a great amount of stress on them. The purpose of this study was to explore and describe the experiences of the family members of patients suffering from depression on the impact of provision of care to the patients. A qualitative design using a content analysis approach was used to gather and analyse data. Unstructured interviews were conducted with 26 family members of patients suffering from depression chosen using purposeful sampling. During data analysis, 'turbulent life' was developed as the main theme along with five other categories including: 'penetration of the illness in the family', 'daily life's hardship', 'too much attention to the patient', 'delay in the acceptation of the illness' and 'concern about the patient's current and future conditions'. Each category consisted of several subcategories. It is concluded that the psychological, physical and financial factors imposed on families result in 'turbulent life'. Nurses can reduce the burden of providing care to patients suffering from depression through improving the knowledge of family members about how to communicate with patients and increase emotional supportive resources to the patients and their family members.

  8. Links between Autism Spectrum Disorder Diagnostic Status and Family Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    McKechanie, Andrew G.; Moffat, Vivien J.; Johnstone, Eve C.; Fletcher-Watson, Sue

    2017-01-01

    Quality of life is often relatively lowered in families of children with additional needs, and this may be particularly the case where additional needs are accompanied by an autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Here we explore the effects of diagnostic status specifically, comparing families with children with an ASD diagnosis with others who a) have additional needs but no signs of ASD; and b) have additional needs and signs of ASD but no diagnosis. Mothers (n = 76) of children with additional needs completed standardised questionnaires about quality of life, stress, service provision, child behaviour and presence and severity of ASD traits. In addition, a group of mothers of typically developing young people (n = 17) completed standardised questionnaires on individual and family quality of life and on the behaviour of their son or daughter. Mothers of typically developing young people had significantly higher individual and family quality of life scores than each of the three other groups. Increased severity of ASD was associated with increased maternal stress, which in turn was associated with decreased family and maternal quality of life. The group reporting the lowest quality of life and the highest stress were the mothers of individuals with signs of ASD but no diagnosis. This pattern did not seem to be explained by lack of access to services, or rates of intellectual disability or challenging behaviour in this sub-group. The finding that poor quality of life and high stress was most apparent in the sub-group of mothers with children who had signs of ASD but did not have a diagnosis of ASD suggests that an interesting topic for further investigation is whether receipt of a diagnosis itself can positively influence quality of life and levels of maternal stress. PMID:28368363

  9. Altruism within the Family: A Comparison of Father and Mother Using Life Happiness and Life Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ong, Qiyan; Ho, Kong Weng; Ho, Kong Chong

    2013-01-01

    Studies on intra-household allocation of resources show that exogenous increase in mothers' income has larger effect on children's outcomes than the same increase in fathers' income, suggesting gender differences may exist in parents' altruism towards their children. Using self-reported life happiness and life satisfaction, we investigate the…

  10. Quality of life in adult patients with epilepsy and their family members.

    PubMed

    Mahrer-Imhof, Romy; Jaggi, Sabina; Bonomo, Armanda; Hediger, Hannele; Eggenschwiler, Priska; Krämer, Günther; Oberholzer, Erich

    2013-03-01

    Epilepsy is not only a neurological disorder but may also have negative psychosocial consequences on people with epilepsy (PWE) and their relatives. Epilepsy has a major impact on quality of life (QoL) in PWE and family members. However, less is known about the impact of family support and family functioning on quality of life for PWE and family members and their interaction. Therefore, the study aimed to investigate factors that influence QoL in hospitalized adult patients with epilepsy and their relatives. An explorative cross-sectional study has been conducted in a tertiary clinic in Switzerland. Hospitalized adult patients with epilepsy and their relatives were enrolled in the study. Subjective QoL as well as family support and family functioning were measured with patients and family members. Patients and their relatives assessed the patients' support need and their satisfaction with the care provided. In addition, patients were administered a disease-related HRQoL measure (QoLIED-36, Version 2). Backward stepwise multivariate linear regression analysis was used to explain variances in patients and relatives' subjective QoL. One hundred and four dyads of patient and family member participated. Subjective QoL in patients and family members differed significantly, as did satisfaction with care delivery. In both groups family support contributed significantly to QoL. In the models 40% of the variance in QoL in patients and relatives could be explained. While the quality of life of the family members was affected by the patients' knowledge about the disease and the reason for their current hospitalization, patient QoL scores had no influence on the QoL of family members. The patients' QoL, however, depended significantly on the QoL of the family members. Interventions should address both PWE and family members and focus on the self-care improvement of PWE and the well-being and coping of family members. A patient-centred approach needs to include both the PWE and

  11. Involvement of PCH family proteins in cytokinesis and actin distribution.

    PubMed

    Lippincott, J; Li, R

    2000-04-15

    Pombe Cdc15 homology (PCH) proteins constitute an extensive protein family whose members have been found in diverse eukaryotic organisms. These proteins are characterized by the presence of several conserved sequence and structural motifs. Recent studies in yeast and mammalian cultured cells have implicated these proteins in actin-based processes, in particular, cytokinesis. Here we review the recent findings on the in vivo localization, function, and binding partners of PCH family members. We also provide new microscopy data regarding the in vivo dynamics of a budding yeast PCH protein involved in cytokinesis.

  12. Predictors of family caregivers' burden and quality of life when providing care for a family member with schizophrenia in the People's Republic of China.

    PubMed

    Li, Jufang; Lambert, Clinton E; Lambert, Vickie A

    2007-09-01

    Limited research has been undertaken regarding family caregivers' burden and quality of life (QOL) when providing care for a family member with schizophrenia in the People's Republic of China. This study examined the following in Chinese families caring for a member with schizophrenia: (i) the level of family caregivers' burden and QOL; (ii) the relationships among the demographic characteristics of family caregivers, the demographic characteristics of family members with schizophrenia, and family caregivers' burden and QOL; and (iii) the best predictors of family caregivers' burden and QOL. The findings suggest that family caregivers suffer a high level of burden when caring for a family member with schizophrenia. Numerous significant correlations were found among the variables. The best predictor of family caregivers' burden was found to be their level of education, while the best predictors of family caregivers' QOL were physical health and household income.

  13. Jobs in Marketing and Distribution. Job Family Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Research Associates, Inc., Chicago, IL.

    The booklet describes jobs in marketing and distribution in the following chapter classifications: product development, marketing products and property, salesworkers unlimited, selling intangibles (ideas and services), purchasing and distribution, and management and marketing services. For each occupation duties are outlined and working conditions…

  14. Jobs in Marketing and Distribution. Job Family Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Research Associates, Inc., Chicago, IL.

    The booklet describes jobs in marketing and distribution in the following chapter classifications: product development, marketing products and property, salesworkers unlimited, selling intangibles (ideas and services), purchasing and distribution, and management and marketing services. For each occupation duties are outlined and working conditions…

  15. Health-related quality of life profiles among family caregivers of patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Lua, Pei Lin; Bakar, Zanariah Abu

    2011-01-01

    This cross-sectional study aims to determine and compare health-related quality of life profiles of schizophrenia family caregivers on the basis of their sociodemographic characteristics. Thirty outpatient family caregivers completed the generic 36-Item Short Form Health Survey instrument (male = 53.5%; mean age = 51 years; married = 76.7%). The highest mean score was reported for social functioning while role limitation-emotional was rated the worst. Significantly better health-related quality of life profiles were demonstrated by caregivers who were male, younger than 50 years, adequately educated, employed, and without health problems and were receiving monthly income. Understanding of on health-related quality of life matters for family caregivers is crucial to improve the quality of care for schizophrenia patients.

  16. "Don't lock me out": life-story interviews of family business owners facing succession.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Alexandra; Breunlin, Douglas; Panattoni, Katherine; Gustafson, Mara; Ransburg, David; Ryan, Carol; Hammerman, Thomas; Terrien, Jean

    2011-06-01

    This qualitative study used a grounded theory methodology to analyze life-story interviews obtained from 10 family business owners regarding their experiences in their businesses with the goal of understanding the complexities of family business succession. The grounded theory that emerged from this study is best understood as a potential web of constraints that can bear on the succession process. Coding of these interviews revealed four key influences, which seem to have the potential to facilitate or constrain the family business owner's approach to succession. Influence 1, "The business within," captures intrapsychic dynamics of differentiation and control. Influence 2, "The marriage," addresses how traditional gender roles shape succession. Influence 3, "The adult children," examines the role of having a natural (accidental, organic, passively groomed) successor. Influence 4, "The vision of retirement," captures the impact of owners' notions of life post-succession. Family therapists frequently encounter family systems in which the family business is facing succession. Even if succession is not the presenting problem, and even if the business owner is in the indirect (rather than direct) system, this research reminds clinicians of the importance of the family's story about the family business. Therefore, clinical implications and recommendations are included.

  17. New defective models based on the Kumaraswamy family of distributions with application to cancer data sets.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Ricardo; Nadarajah, Saralees; Tomazella, Vera; Louzada, Francisco; Eudes, Amanda

    2017-08-01

    An alternative to the standard mixture model is proposed for modeling data containing cured elements or a cure fraction. This approach is based on the use of defective distributions to estimate the cure fraction as a function of the estimated parameters. In the literature there are just two of these distributions: the Gompertz and the inverse Gaussian. Here, we propose two new defective distributions: the Kumaraswamy Gompertz and Kumaraswamy inverse Gaussian distributions, extensions of the Gompertz and inverse Gaussian distributions under the Kumaraswamy family of distributions. We show in fact that if a distribution is defective, then its extension under the Kumaraswamy family is defective too. We consider maximum likelihood estimation of the extensions and check its finite sample performance. We use three real cancer data sets to show that the new defective distributions offer better fits than baseline distributions.

  18. Review: the development of family quality of life concepts and measures.

    PubMed

    Samuel, P S; Rillotta, F; Brown, I

    2012-01-01

    Historically, intervention programmes in intellectual and developmental disabilities have targeted the individual's special needs independent of the family and environmental context. This trend has been changing over the past two decades. This paper presents a literature review on changing trends in family support and the development of family quality of life (FQOL) and intellectual disability from a construct to a theory. The evolution of research in quality of life from the perspective of the individual with the disability to the family is described. A description of the development of FQOL measures is included, specifically an introduction and comparison of the two leading comprehensive initiatives on measuring FQOL - international FQOL project and the FQOL initiative of the Beach Center on Disability, in the USA. This paper provides the conceptual background and context to the other papers presented in this special issue, which focus on FQOL measurement in specific contexts.

  19. [Emotional distress and quality of life in people with diabetes and their families].

    PubMed

    Beléndez Vázquez, Marina; Lorente Armendáriz, Iñaki; Maderuelo Labrador, Mercedes

    2015-01-01

    The daily experience of living with diabetes can adversely affect the quality of life of people with diabetes and their families. We present the results for Spain of the DAWN2 study related to quality of life and wellbeing of patients and their families. The DAWN2 study is an observational, cross-sectional study. In the present study, we used the Spanish sample of patients (N=502) and their relatives (N=123). A total of 13.9% of patients were at risk of possible depression while 50.0% of people with diabetes and 45.5% of family members reported a high level of diabetes-related emotional stress. People with diabetes experience high levels of stress and the psychosocial impact of diabetes also affects family members. Copyright © 2014 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. Motives for residential mobility in later life: post-move perspectives of elders and family members.

    PubMed

    Sergeant, Julie F; Ekerdt, David J

    2008-01-01

    This qualitative study delineates motives for residential mobility, describes dynamics between the elder and family members during the move decision process, and locates the move decision within ecological layers of the aging context. Interviews were conducted with 30 individuals and couples (ages 60-87) who experienced a community-based move within the past year, and with 14 extended family members. Reasons for moving (from perspectives of both elders who moved and their family members) were grouped into four themes and eleven issues that influenced the move decision. These themes parallel the ecological context of individual health and functioning, beliefs and attitudes, physical environment, and social pressures. Late-life mobility is a significant life transition that is the outcome of an ongoing appraisal and reappraisal of housing fit with individual functioning, needs, and aspirations. Family members are an integral part of these decision and residential mobility processes.

  1. Family Life Cycle Transitions and the Onset of Eating Disorders: A Retrospective Grounded Theory Approach

    PubMed Central

    Berge, Jerica M.; Loth, Katie; Hanson, Carrie; Croll, Jillian; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2011-01-01

    Aims and Objective The aim of this retrospective qualitative study is to understand how transitions in the family life cycle and responses to these events may relate to the onset of eating disorders in an attempt to generate new theoretical insights and inform future research in the area of eating disorder prevention. Background Little is known about the contextual factors that occur throughout the family life cycle that may be risk factors for the development of eating disorders. Design and Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 27 individuals of varied ages (age range =17–64; Median = 27; SD 13.7) currently receiving treatment for eating disorders in an outpatient clinic specialising in eating disorder treatment. Data were analysed using grounded theory methods. Results Six themes were identified as family life cycle transitional events that preceded the onset of participants’ eating disorders: (a) School Transitions, (b) Death of a Family Member, (c) Relationship Changes, (d) Home and Job Transitions (e) Illness/Hospitalisation and (f) Abuse, Sexual Assault, or Incest. Conclusions Results indicated that transitional events in the family life cycle followed by a lack of needed support during these transitions may precipitate the onset of eating disorders. Thus, future research should use these findings to inform the creation of interventions that reduce the intensity of the stress brought about by these transitional periods and increase the adaptability and coping skills of individuals and family members to prevent eating disorders. Relevance to Clinical Practice Nurses and other healthcare professionals should be aware of the importance of transitional events occurring in the family life cycle of adolescents and young adults. Helping parents to be aware and supportive of difficult transitional events may be more important than trying to solve or fix the problem. PMID:21749510

  2. Latino Families in the United States. A Resourcebook for Family Life Education = Las Familias Latinas en los Estados Unidos. Recursos para la Capacitacion Familiar.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrade, Sally J., Ed.

    The primary objectives of this resource book are to increase family life educators' knowledge and understanding of Latinos and to encourage advocacy by Latinos for appropriate family life programs in their communities. English and Spanish versions of the same text are included. There are six chapters. Chapter 1 outlines the book's objectives and…

  3. Families and Futures. A Resource for Developing Home and Family Life Education Programs. Revised Working Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Office of the State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Olympia.

    This curriculum guide was designed to help teachers in strengthening the ability of students from middle school through grade 12 to recognize complex problems, examine competing points of view, and engage in dialogue leading to practical solutions for issues that affect individuals and families and ultimately the world. The course integrates the…

  4. The Facts of Life--A Guide for Teens and Their Families. Family Communication Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Planned Parenthood Federation of America, Inc., 2008

    2008-01-01

    This book is a guide for teens and their families. The following topics are discussed: (1) All of Us Are Sexual; (2) Our Sexual Bodies; (3) As Boys Become Men; (4) As Girls Become Women; (5) How Pregnancy Happens; (6) Expressing Ourselves Sexually; (7) Protecting Ourselves Sexually; (8) Notes for Parents; and (9) Helpful Hints for Parents.

  5. The Facts of Life--A Guide for Teens and Their Families. Family Communication Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Planned Parenthood Federation of America, Inc., 2008

    2008-01-01

    This book is a guide for teens and their families. The following topics are discussed: (1) All of Us Are Sexual; (2) Our Sexual Bodies; (3) As Boys Become Men; (4) As Girls Become Women; (5) How Pregnancy Happens; (6) Expressing Ourselves Sexually; (7) Protecting Ourselves Sexually; (8) Notes for Parents; and (9) Helpful Hints for Parents.

  6. Living the academic life: A model for work-family conflict.

    PubMed

    Beigi, Mina; Shirmohammadi, Melika; Kim, Sehoon

    2015-01-01

    Work-family conflict (WFC) is an inter-role conflict, which suggests that fulfilling expectations of family roles makes it difficult to satisfy expectations of work roles, and vice versa. Living an academic life includes balancing multiple work demands and family responsibilities, which may generate WFC for many faculty members. Researchers have emphasized the need for further studies of how faculty integrate work and family demands. This study explores WFC among Iranian faculty. We examine relationships among work hours, time spent with family, work-interference with family (WIF), family-interference with work (FIW), and job satisfaction. Faculty members from 25 Iranian public universities completed a questionnaire. Structural equation modeling was used to test hypotheses in a single model. Findings suggest a positive relationship between faculty weekly work hours and WIF, and between time spent with family and FIW. WIF correlated negatively with job satisfaction, and work hours correlated positively with job satisfaction. Time spent with family and FIW had no influence on job satisfaction, and spouse employment moderated the relationship between WIF and job satisfaction. Findings have implications for human resources and organizational development professionals seeking insight into how faculty members and other knowledge workers experience work-family interrelationships.

  7. The Deployment Life Study: Longitudinal Analysis of Military Families Across the Deployment Cycle

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-01

    including the following: • the quality of marital and parental relationships • the psychological, behavioral, and physical health of family members...importance and the rates of mental health problems in this population are relatively high, the perceptions of any single family member may be...Affect Schedule PCL PTSD Check List PedsQL Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory PHQ Patient Health Questionnaire PHQ-A Patient Health Questionnaire

  8. The Size Distribution of Jupiter-Family Cometary Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, Paul R.; Lowry, Stephen C.

    2003-01-01

    Introduction: We are continuing our program to determine the size distribution of cometary nuclei. We have compiled a catalog of 105 measurements of 57 cometary nuclei, drawn from the general literature, from our own program of CCD photometry of distant cometary nuclei (Lowry and Weissman), and from unpublished observations by colleagues. We model the cumulative size distribution of the nuclei as a power law. Previous determinations of the size distribution slope do not agree. Fernandez et al. found a slope of alpha = 2.65+/-0.25 whereas Lowry et al. and Weissman and Lowry each found a slope of alpha = 1.60+/-0.10.

  9. The Size Distribution of Jupiter-Family Cometary Nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, Paul R.; Lowry, Stephen C.

    2003-01-01

    Introduction: We are continuing our program to determine the size distribution of cometary nuclei. We have compiled a catalog of 105 measurements of 57 cometary nuclei, drawn from the general literature, from our own program of CCD photometry of distant cometary nuclei (Lowry and Weissman), and from unpublished observations by colleagues. We model the cumulative size distribution of the nuclei as a power law. Previous determinations of the size distribution slope do not agree. Fernandez et al. found a slope of alpha = 2.65+/-0.25 whereas Lowry et al. and Weissman and Lowry each found a slope of alpha = 1.60+/-0.10.

  10. Family-focused children's end of life care in hospital and at home.

    PubMed

    Parker, Helen; Farrell, Mairead; Ryder, Allison; Fernley, Karen; Cox, Chantel; Farasat, Helen; Hewitt-Taylor, Jaqui

    2014-07-01

    An increasing number of children and young people require end of life care, and providing them and their families with optimum support at this time is crucial. This article describes how nurses working with children and families in home, hospital and community settings used the principles of practice development methodology to develop end of life care provision and follow-up bereavement support. It outlines the 'ways of knowing' that informed developments and how parents' priorities were kept central to the process. Finally, it discusses how the approach taken to practice development reflected the value of compassion in nursing practice.

  11. Work, family and life-course fit: Does control over work time matter?

    PubMed

    Moen, Phyllis; Kelly, Erin; Huang, Qinlei

    2008-12-01

    This study moves from "work-family" to a multi-dimensional "life-course fit" construct (employees' cognitive assessments of resources, resource deficits, and resource demands), using a combined work-family, demands-control and ecology of the life course framing. It examined (1) impacts of job and home ecological systems on fit dimensions, and (2) whether control over work time predicted and mediated life-course fit outcomes. Using cluster analysis of survey data on a sample of 917 white-collar employees from Best Buy headquarters, we identified four job ecologies (corresponding to the job demands-job control model) and five home ecologies (theorizing an analogous home demands-home control model). Job and home ecologies predicted fit dimensions in an additive, not interactive, fashion. Employees' work-time control predicted every life-course fit dimension and partially mediated effects of job ecologies, organizational tenure, and job category.

  12. Factors influencing life satisfaction of Korean older adults living with family.

    PubMed

    Sok, Sohyune R

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the factors influencing life satisfaction of Korean older adults living with family. Participants included 267 adults age 65 and older who met eligibility criteria. Analyses showed that the prediction model of the life satisfaction of older adults who are living with their family was significant (F=24.429, p<0.001). The value of the adjusted R(2) was 0.306, which corresponds to the explanatory power of 30.6%. The factor found to have the greatest influence on these adults' life satisfaction was depression (beta=0.090), monthly pocket money (beta=0.060), and age (beta=0.040). It is possible that older adults' life satisfaction increases when they are provided with nursing interventions and are able to effectively manage their health. Nursing interventions must strive to improve their self-esteem and address their depression.

  13. A study on family communication pattern and parenting styles with quality of life in adolescent.

    PubMed

    Sanavi, Fariba Shahhraki; Baghbanian, Abdolvahab; Shovey, Mehdi Faraji; Ansari-Moghaddam, Alireza

    2013-11-01

    To investigate the relationship between parenting styles and family communication patterns with adolescent's quality of life. The cross-sectional study was carried out on 439 randomly selected adolescents in the city of Zahedan, Iran, from January to July 2011.The subjects were asked to complete the KIDSCREEN-52 health-related quality of life questionnaire, while their parents were asked to complete the Diana Brinder's Test to show their parenting styles. SPSS 15 was used to analyse data. Most parents had 'authoritative' parenting style (n = 380; 86.6%). Pluralistic (n = 170; 38.7%) and consensual (n = 152; 34.6%) patterns were the most frequent styles of communication in families. Data suggested a significant relationship between parenting style and some dimensions of quality of life, including physical well-being, psychological well-being, social support and peers, and autonomy (p < 0.05). There was also a significant relationship between family communication patterns and parent relation and home life (p < 0.001) as well as autonomy (p < 0.006). Families play a critical role in increasing adolescents' health-related quality-of-life. Effort should be made to address problems facing parents while raising their children.

  14. Work-family interface from a life and career stage perspective: the role of demands and resources.

    PubMed

    Demerouti, Evangelia; Peeters, Maria C W; van der Heijden, Beatrice I J M

    2012-01-01

    Work-family conflict and enrichment are experiences that occur daily and have substantial consequences for employees, their families, and the organizations that employ them. The aim of the current review is to make a link between life and career stage, work and family conditions, and the work-family interface. The basic proposition is that life stages partly determine career development, and consequently the specific working conditions (job demands and job resources) and family conditions (family demands and family resources) that individuals are exposed to. As a result, the specific demands and resources in the work and family domains determine to what extent individuals experience that work and family are conflicting or enriching life domains. In this review we suggest that individuals in early adulthood will experience high inter-role conflict and low facilitation due to high demands and low resources in both life domains, while individuals in late adulthood will experience the opposite pattern; that is, low conflict and high facilitation due to low demands and high resources in both domains. Individuals in middle adulthood will experience high work-family conflict but also high family-work facilitation due to the presence of high job demands and resources in both life domains. Integrating life and career stage perspectives and the experience of work-family interface is of notable practical utility because it provides a mechanism to make more informed decisions about the relative need for and corresponding benefits of work-family programs.

  15. Value attainment: an explanation for the negative effects of work-family conflict on job and life satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Perrewé, P L; Hochwarter, W A; Kiewitz, C

    1999-10-01

    Perceptions of work interfering with family life and family issues interfering with work are examined as 2 distinct constructs representing work-family conflict. Experienced work-family conflict is argued to reduce one's value attainment which, in turn, lowers both job and life satisfaction. This study examines value attainment as a mediating variable in the work-family conflict and satisfaction relationship. Responses from 270 hotel managers indicate that value attainment either partially or fully mediates the relationship between work interference with family and family interference with work and both job and life satisfaction. Value attainment is argued to be a meaningful explanatory variable for the negative relationship between work-family conflict and job-life satisfaction.

  16. National Council on Family Relations. Pre-Conference Workshop: "Quality of Family Life in the Military." Proceedings Report (Greensboro, North Carolina, 1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orthner, Dennis K., Ed.; Chandler, Barbara A., Ed.

    These proceedings of a pre-conference workshop on the quality of family life in the military begin with an overview and the texts of the introduction to the workshop. Three presentations providing an orientation to military family programs and policies are included. Enrichment and support needs of military families and research needs of military…

  17. The Family Context of Autism Spectrum Disorders: Influence on the Behavioral Phenotype and Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Leann E.; Greenberg, Jan; Mailick, Marsha R.

    2013-01-01

    Synopsis In this review, we report the findings from our longitudinal program of research examining the bidirectional influences of the family environment on the behavioral phenotype of autism, and describe a newly developed family psychoeducation program, titled Transitioning Together, designed to reduce family stress, address behavior problems, and improve the overall quality of life of adolescents with autism and their families. In our search for characteristics of the family environment that influence the behavioral phenotype of adolescents and adults with autism, we focus on both positive dimensions of family life, such as warmth and positive remarks that may promote adaptive behavior in individuals with autism, as well as negative dimensions, such as high levels of criticism that may result in an escalation of behavior problems. We find that high levels of maternal warmth and positive remarks are associated with the abatement of behavior problems over time, while high levels of maternal criticism are associated with increasing levels of behavior problems in adolescents and adults with autism. These patterns of relationships have been replicated in a longitudinal study of families of children and adolescents with fragile X syndrome, and are consistent with other studies examining the impact of the family on the behavior of children with developmental disabilities. These findings suggest that the family environment is an important target for interventions not only to reduce family stress but also to improve the behavioral functioning of children, adolescents or adults with ASD. Building upon a well-developed intervention for families of individuals with psychiatric conditions, we report on the development of Transitioning Together, a psychoeducation program targeted to families with adolescents with autism who are approaching high school exit, a difficult transition stage for individuals with autism that is often marked by negative changes in behavior problems

  18. Geographical distribution of Slovenian BRCA1/2 families according to family origin: implications for genetic screening.

    PubMed

    Krajc, M; Zadnik, V; Novaković, S; Stegel, V; Teugels, E; Bešič, N; Hočevar, M; Vakselj, A; De Grève, J; Zgajnar, J

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of the geographical distribution of highly recurrent mutations may be useful for efficient screening in cancer families. Since the cloning of the BRCA1/2 genes, it is known that the wide spectrum of deleterious mutations shows high ethnic and geographic heterogeneity. In this study, we have tested probands from 582 breast/ovarian cancer families and positioned all 156 BRCA1/2 families on the map according to the family origin. We observed that high-risk families with the same recurrent mutation present a typical geographical distribution and that different recurrent mutations may show different distribution patterns. We then evaluated the genetic screening implications of this heterogeneous prevalence of the most recurrent mutations found [300T>G(c.181T>G), 1806C>T(c.1687C>T), 969ins7(c.844_850dupTCATTAC), 5382insC(c.5266dupC), 235G>A(c.116G>A) in BRCA1 and IVS16-2A>G(c.7806-2A>G) in BRCA2]. On the basis of these results, specific testing procedures for new incident cases may be offered according to their family origins and, according to the information regarding clusters revealed in this study, the individuals (especially those at low risk), originating from regions with clusters, might be screened preferentially for cluster mutations and analysis may be simplified according to the family origin. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. The cosmos of the Paris apartment: working-class family life in the nineteenth century.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Eliza

    2011-01-01

    Drawing on Bachelard's notion of “cosmicity” this article investigates the living conditions of Parisian working-class families in the second half of the nineteenth century. Nineteenth-century social critics claimed that the lack of privacy in urban apartments made decent family life impossible. However, evidence from judicial dossiers concerning attentat à la pudeur (intimate assault against children) illuminates the lived experience of children and their families in Paris apartments. Rather than a sharp divide between public and private, children experienced their apartment homes as the core of a social and spatial world under the surveillance of parents, neighbors, and other children.

  20. Evolution of life cycle, colony morphology, and host specificity in the family Hydractiniidae (Hydrozoa, Cnidaria).

    PubMed

    Miglietta, Maria Pia; Cunningham, Clifford W

    2012-12-01

    Biased transitions are common throughout the tree of life. The class hydrozoa is no exception, having lost the feeding medusa stage at least 70 times. The family hydractiniidae includes one lineage with pelagic medusae (Podocoryna) and several without (e.g., Hydractinia). The benthic colony stage also varies widely in host specificity and in colony form. The five-gene phylogeny presented here requires multiple transitions between character states for medusae, host specificity, and colony phenotype. Significant phylogenetic correlations exist between medusoid form, colony morphology, and host specificity. Species with nonfeeding medusae are usually specialized on a single host type, and reticulate colonies are correlated with nonmotile hosts. The history of feeding medusae is less certain. Podocoryna is nested within five lineages lacking medusae. This requires either repeated losses of medusae, or the remarkable re-evolution of a feeding medusa after at least 150 million years. Traditional ancestral reconstruction favors medusa regain, but a likelihood framework testing biased transitions cannot distinguish between multiple losses versus regain. A hypothesis of multiple losses of feeding medusae requires transient selection pressure favoring such a loss. Populations of species with feeding medusae are always locally rare and lack of feeding medusae does not result in restricted species distribution around the world. © 2012 The Author(s). Evolution© 2012 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  1. Quality of Life, Family Support, and Comorbidities in Institutionalized Elders With and Without Symptoms of Depression.

    PubMed

    de Araújo, Aurigena Antunes; Rebouças Barbosa, Rosa Angélica Silveira; de Menezes, Marília Stefani Souza; de Medeiros, Ingrid Iana Fernandes; de Araújo, Raimundo Fernandes; de Medeiros, Caroline Addison Carvalho Xavier

    2016-06-01

    The institutionalization of elders can decrease the health status and quality of life in this population. The aim of this study was to analyze the socio-demographic, quality of life, family support, and comorbidities variables in institutionalized elders with and without symptoms of depression. This was a cross-sectional study in institutions for long permanence for the elderly in the State of Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil. Two institutionalized elderly groups were compared (138 elders: 69 with and 69 without depressive symptoms). The instruments used were: mini-mental state examination, geriatric depression scale in the reduced version, socio-demographic questionnaire, quality of life (World Health Organization Quality of Life abbreviated-WHOQOL-bref), and inventory of perception of family support. Elders with depressive symptoms had inferior quality of life than those without depressive symptoms. Other factors that negatively influenced the quality of life in this population include: low economic conditions, occurrence of comorbidities, and deficient family assistance. These results have important implications in the decision making process with regard to strategies for improving the health status of institutionalized elders.

  2. Life stress, maternal optimism, and adolescent competence in single mother, African American families.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Zoe E; Larsen-Rife, Dannelle; Conger, Rand D; Widaman, Keith F; Cutrona, Carolyn E

    2010-08-01

    Although research demonstrates many negative family outcomes associated with single-parent households, little is known about processes that lead to positive outcomes for these families. Using 3 waves of longitudinal data, we examined how maternal dispositional optimism and life stressors are associated with parenting and child outcomes in 394 single mother African American families. Confirming prior research, we found that mothers' childhood adversities, current economic pressure, and internalizing problems were associated with lower levels of maternal warmth and child management and with lower child school competence. Extending previous studies, we found that maternal optimism was a positive resource, predicting lower levels of maternal internalizing symptoms and higher levels of effective child management and moderating the impact of economic stress on maternal internalizing problems. These findings highlight the need for further investigation of processes and resources that promote positive outcomes for African American mother-headed families and single mother families in general.

  3. The interaction of family background and personal education on depressive symptoms in later life.

    PubMed

    Schaan, Barbara

    2014-02-01

    This study assesses the interaction between personal education and family background during childhood on depressive symptoms in later life by applying Ross & Mirowsky's resource substitution and structural amplification theory of health and education. OLS regression models are estimated using data from the "Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe" (SHARE), which covers information on current social and health status as well as retrospective life histories from 20,716 respondents aged 50 or older from thirteen European countries. Higher education helps to overcome the negative consequences of a poor family background. Since people from poor families are less likely to attain higher educational levels, they lack exactly the resource they need in order to overcome the negative consequences their non-prosperous background has on depressive symptoms. Thus, low family background and low personal education amplify each other. Examining the processes described by theory of resource substitution and structural amplification over different age groups from midlife to old-age suggests that the moderating effect of education remains constant over age among people coming from a poor family background. However, there is some evidence for a decrease with age in the buffering effect of a well-off family background on depressive symptoms among the low educated group. Furthermore, the educational gap in depression diverges with age among individuals originating from a well-off family background. Taken together the results cautiously allude to the conclusion that three processes - cumulative (dis-)advantage, age-as-leveler, and persistent inequalities - might take place.

  4. [Life style, family history and personal pathology in relation to arterial hypertension in students of the Medical Faculty of UNAM].

    PubMed

    Güemez Sandoval, J C; Moreno Altamirano, L; Kuri Morales, P; Argote Roumagnere, A; Alba Leonel, A; Méndez Vargas, R; Ramos Velázquez, E

    1990-01-01

    Arterial hypertension (HA) is a public health problem, 15 to 30% of adults in our country suffer it. There are different facts that influence its outcome. Among young people the main factors are: alcoholism, smoking tobacco, overweight, diabetes, family history, sedentarism and psychological aspects. The main object of this study, was to detect the risk factor for the development of HA in the students of the University. For this search 489 sophomore students class at the Medical School of the University of Mexico (UNAM), between 17 and 24 years old, were studied. Our results showed that positive family history was more prevalent among females. Among males life-style factors were more significant, the main factor was sedentarism, whereas lesser factor was overweight. The prevalence of HA was higher for diastolic hypertension than for systolic. We concluded there are many risk factors that influence the development of HA, which are distributed in a different way according to gender preventive measures are recommended.

  5. Family's difficulty scale in end-of-life home care: a new measure of the family's difficulties in caring for patients with cancer at the end of life at home from bereaved family's perspective.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Yoko; Miyashita, Mitsunori; Sato, Kazuki; Ozawa, Taketoshi

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a tool to measure the family's difficulties in caring for cancer patients at the end of life at home: Family's Difficulty Scale in end-of-life home care (FDS). The draft of the FDS was derived from a pilot interview survey and literature reviews. The questionnaires were sent to 395 bereaved family caregivers whose family members were patients with terminal cancer receiving home service. We obtained 306 responses (response rate, 81%). Factor analysis resulted in 29 items and 8 factors: Burden of Care, Concerns about Home Care Doctor, Balance of Work and Care, Patient's Pain and Condition, Concerns about Visiting Nurse, Concerns about Home Care Service, Relationship between Family Caregivers and their Families, and Funeral Preparations. The cumulative rate of contribution was 71.8%. Cronbach coefficient α for the FDS was 0.73-0.75; the intraclass correlation coefficient in the test-retest examination was 0.75-0.85. Evidence for construct validity was confirmed by convergent and divergent validity. Concurrent validity was confirmed by significant correlations between identified factors and concurrent measures. The validity and reliability of this new instrument were confirmed. This scale should help home care providers to assess and focus on family difficulties and provide individualized care for the family who cares for a patient with terminal cancer at home.

  6. Family quality of life among families with a child who has a severe neurodevelopmental disability: Impact of family and child socio-demographic factors.

    PubMed

    Schertz, Mitchell; Karni-Visel, Yael; Tamir, Ada; Genizi, Jacob; Roth, Dana

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to examine family quality of life (FQOL) of Northern Israeli families having a child with a severe neurodevelopmental disability and its relation to socio-demographics. The cohort included caregivers of 70 children ages (mean ± standard deviation) 5.36 ± 3.53 years. Families were two-parent (85.7%), lived in the periphery (67.1%) and included Jews (60%), Muslims (18.6%), Druze (14.3%) and Christians (7.1%). Religiosity included: secular (38.6%), traditional (31.4%), religious (30%). Children's diagnosis included autistic spectrum disorder (41.4%), intellectual disability (21.4%), cerebral palsy (17.1%), genetic syndromes (17.1%) and sensorineural hearing loss (2.9%). Degree of support (1-minimal,5-greatest) required by the child was 3.67 ± 1.28 for physical and 3.49 ± 1.36 for communication. Primary caregivers completed the FQOL Survey. Domain scores were highest for family relations and lowest for financial well-being. Dimension scores were highest for importance and lowest for opportunities. Overall FQOL approximated average. Jewish families and residents of a major urban area reported higher and more religious families reported lower overall FQOL. Regression analysis found ethnicity contributing to overall FQOL and domain scores with residence contributing to support from services. Ethnicity and child dependence contributed to dimension scores. Northern Israeli families having a child with a severe neurodevelopmental disability report average FQOL scores. However, family and child dependence characteristics affect FQOL scores. Professionals working with these families should consider FQOL information when making recommendations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Exploring quality of life in families of children living with and without a severe food allergy.

    PubMed

    Valentine, Althea Z; Knibb, Rebecca C

    2011-10-01

    This study aimed to explore the impact of food allergy on quality of life in children with food allergy and their primary caregivers, compared to a healthy non-food allergy comparison group. Food allergy children (n=34) and control children (n=15), aged 8-12, and their respective primary caregivers (n=30/n=13), completed generic quality of life scales (PedsQL™ and WHOQOLBREF) and were asked to take photographs and keep a diary about factors that they believed enhanced and/or limited their quality of life, over a one-week period. Questionnaire analysis showed that parents of children with food allergy had significantly lower quality of life in the social relationships domain and lower overall quality of life than the comparison parents. In contrast, children with food allergy had similar or higher quality of life scores compared to comparison children. Content analysis of photograph and diary data identified ten themes that influenced both child and parental quality of life. It was concluded that although food allergy influenced quality of life for some children, their parent's quality of life was hindered to a greater extent. The variability in findings highlights the importance of assessing quality of life in individual families, considering both children with allergies and their primary caregivers.

  8. How Family Status and Social Security Claiming Options Shape Optimal Life Cycle Portfolios.

    PubMed

    Hubener, Andreas; Maurer, Raimond; Mitchell, Olivia S

    2016-04-01

    We show how optimal household decisions regarding work, retirement, saving, portfolio allocations, and life insurance are shaped by the complex financial options embedded in U.S. Social Security rules and uncertain family transitions. Our life cycle model predicts sharp consumption drops on retirement, an age-62 peak in claiming rates, and earlier claiming by wives versus husbands and single women. Moreover, life insurance is mainly purchased on men's lives. Our model, which takes Social Security rules seriously, generates wealth and retirement outcomes that are more consistent with the data, in contrast to earlier and less realistic models.

  9. How Family Status and Social Security Claiming Options Shape Optimal Life Cycle Portfolios

    PubMed Central

    Hubener, Andreas; Maurer, Raimond; Mitchell, Olivia S.

    2017-01-01

    We show how optimal household decisions regarding work, retirement, saving, portfolio allocations, and life insurance are shaped by the complex financial options embedded in U.S. Social Security rules and uncertain family transitions. Our life cycle model predicts sharp consumption drops on retirement, an age-62 peak in claiming rates, and earlier claiming by wives versus husbands and single women. Moreover, life insurance is mainly purchased on men’s lives. Our model, which takes Social Security rules seriously, generates wealth and retirement outcomes that are more consistent with the data, in contrast to earlier and less realistic models. PMID:28659659

  10. Investigation of relationship between social capital and quality of life in female headed families

    PubMed Central

    Rimaz, Shahnaz; Dastoorpoor, Maryam; Vesali, Samira; Saiepour, Narges; Nedjat, Saharnaz; Sadeghi, Masoumeh; Merghati Khoei, Effat

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although most studies on female-headed families focus on women's access to social support, the associations between social capital and quality of life in these families are unclear in many societies (such as Iran). This study aimed to determine the associations between social capital and quality of life in Iranian female headed families. Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed on 152 female-headed households supported by Tehran Municipality, district 9 from April 2011 to July 2012. Convenience sampling was employed. Data were collected using demographic questionnaire, the Iranian version of World Health Organization Quality of Life, and the Word Bank Social Capital. Descriptive and multiple regression methods were used to analyze the data. Results: The mean±SD age of participants was 50.8±13.8 years. Findings revealed that in quality of life, the domains of environment health and social relation received the lowest (9.87 ± 2.41) and the highest (12.61 ±3.43) scores respectively; and with respect to social capital, membership in groups and social trust had the least (19.61 ± 17.11) and the most (51.04 ± 17.37) scores, respectively. The multiple regression model revealed a significant positive association between total score of the quality of life and the total score for the social capital (p< 0.001). Conclusion: Findings suggest that quality of life of female-headed families and social capital domains are strongly related. This means that by improving the social capital, women’s life can also be improved. PMID:26793661

  11. Early Childhood Education Teachers: Life History, Life Course, and the Problem of Family-Work Balance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullough, Robert V., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to the wider education literature, rather little is known about the lives of early childhood education (ECE) teachers and the impact of those lives on their practice. Drawing on surveys completed by Head Start assistant and lead teachers, teacher lifelines, and interviews, and through the lens of life-course theory, the author portrays…

  12. Early Childhood Education Teachers: Life History, Life Course, and the Problem of Family-Work Balance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullough, Robert V., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to the wider education literature, rather little is known about the lives of early childhood education (ECE) teachers and the impact of those lives on their practice. Drawing on surveys completed by Head Start assistant and lead teachers, teacher lifelines, and interviews, and through the lens of life-course theory, the author portrays…

  13. This Harlem life: black families and everyday life in the 1920s and 1930s.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Stephen; White, Shane; Garton, Stephen; White, Graham

    2010-01-01

    This article uses Probation Department files to reconstruct the lives of five ordinary residents of Harlem. It highlights what that black metropolis offered those outside the political and cultural elite, who have dominated historical scholarship, showing how ordinary blacks negotiated the challenges of life in northern neighborhoods, and drew on institutions and organizations, to establish and sustain new lives. We offer the kind of individualized perspective on everyday life that other scholars have provided for high culture, but which does not exist for other realms of existence in Harlem, even in early twentieth century sociological studies of black life. Where scholars seeking to distinguish the neighborhood from a slum have pointed to the prevailing pride and self-confidence of its residents, this article directs attention to more immediate, concrete supports that sustained and enriched life in Harlem. Relationships with spouses, children, siblings and cousins sustained individuals faced with the social reality of living in overcrowded, deteriorating, disease infested housing, subject to the racism of white police, politicians and employers; so too did friendships made in nightclubs, speakeasies, dances and movie theatres, and membership of churches, fraternal organizations, social clubs, and sports clubs and teams.

  14. "I Am-We Are": Personal and Social Pathways to Further Study, Work and Family Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bornholt, L. J.; Maras, P. M.; Robinson, R. A.

    2009-01-01

    This project explores the apparent layers in motivation for young people's plans in order to extend Pathways Theory. We bring together personal, relational and group motivation to explain the planned pathways to study, work and family life. Location was an Australian town, close to the national socio-economic average, to control broad social…

  15. Action Plan for Communicating and Marketing the Work and Family Life Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, James S.; Hunady, Ronald J.

    This information packet is designed to help Ohio's high school and middle/junior high school teachers develop a plan to communicate and market the state's work and family life program to various constituencies (students, parents, guidance counselors, school boards, and the general public). Discussed first are the rationale for and intended results…

  16. Husbands' and Wives' Perceptions of Marital Fairness across the Family Life Cycle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Candida C.

    1990-01-01

    Evaluated marital fairness, or subjective balance between spouses' gains and losses, by surveying 134 married Australians representing 5 family life cycle phases. Findings showed husbands felt more equitably treated both initially and after children's departure than during phases with children in home, wives showed little variation with phase, and…

  17. Family Forest Owner Characteristics Shaped by Life Cycle, Cohort, and Period Effects

    Treesearch

    Sarah M. Butler; Brett J. Butler; Marla Markowski-Lindsay

    2017-01-01

    Understanding differences and similarities among family forest owners is important in the context of forest land conservation. This study assesses similarities and differences in landowners by analyzing life cycle effects, cohort differences, and period-specific events that shape people's attitudes and behaviors towards their forestland over time. Using data...

  18. The Impact of Japanese Corporate Transnationalism on Men's Involvement in Family Life and Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yasuike, Akiko

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the ways in which Japanese corporate transnationalism affects husbands' involvement in family life and marital relationships primarily from a perspective of wives. It is based on interviews with 22 Japanese wives and 4 husbands. Studies of Japanese corporate transnationalism treat men as mere supervisors to local workers or…

  19. Relationships between Parental Attachment, Work and Family Roles, and Life Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perrone, Kristin M.; Webb, L. Kay; Jackson, Z. Vance

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between parental attachment and satisfaction with work and family roles, as well as the relationship of these variables to life satisfaction. Results from a multiple regression analysis indicated that satisfaction with work and marriage, but not parenting satisfaction or parental…

  20. Policy Statement and General Guidelines on Family Life and Sex Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Board of Education, Springfield.

    This guide is a statement of policy and guidelines on family life and sex education devised by the Illinois State Board of Education to aid local boards of education, school administrators, and community groups in developing and implementing new programs or extending existing programs. A statement of policy including purpose, programs, and…

  1. Sexuality and Family Life Education: An Annotated Bibliography of Curricula for Sale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallingby, Leigh

    1985-01-01

    This document contains an annotated bibliography of sexuality and family life education curricula which are available for sale. The curricula are listed without evaluation and, because of topic overlap, specific content areas covered in each curriculum are not listed in the annotations. It is noted, however, that topics often covered include…

  2. Real-Life Spatial Skills, Handedness, and Family History of Handedness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ecuyer-Dab, I.; Tremblay, T.; Joanette, Y.; Passini, R.

    2005-01-01

    According to Annett (1985), pronounced left hemisphere lateralization for language abilities in women, as in female absolute right-handers, limits their right hemisphere capacity and spatial abilities. This study examines the degree of handedness and the family history of non-right-handedness with respect to real-life spatial abilities in women.…

  3. [Individual neonatal end-of-life care and family-centred bereavement support].

    PubMed

    Garten, L; von der Hude, K; Rösner, B; Klapp, C; Bührer, C

    2013-06-01

    Neonatal end-of-life care and family-centred bereavement support in perinatal medicine are a multiprofessional challenge directed to the dying newborn and the parents as well as to the care-givers. Clinical experience shows that many aspects of individual neonatal end-of-life care and family-centred bereavement support are not well known to the health-care providers. This is especially true for a standardised quality management and the components of bereavement support offered to parents. An interdisciplinary concept for an individual neonatal end-of-life care and famlily-centred bereavement support has been developed at the Center of Perinatal Medicine at the Charité, Berlin. The concept aims for two main aspects: (1) meeting the individual medical, psychological, emotional and spiritual needs of the dying newborn, the parents and family, and (2) facilitating standardised and process-orientated preparation, evaluation and reflexion of every case of end-of-life care. In this article some recommendations for implementing a basic care concept for families and their dying newborns are presented.

  4. An Evaluation Of Family Life Education At David Thompson Secondary School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leslie, Susan

    The Family Life Education program at David Thompson Secondary School is a one semester course dealing with human sexuality. Given to eleventh grade students the course is directed at helping students understand the emotional and social dimensions of their sexuality. Because the emphasis in the course was on feeling, not fact, this evaluation of…

  5. Family Resiliency, Uncertainty, Optimism, and the Quality of Life of Individuals with HIV/AIDS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frain, Michael P.; Berven, Norman L.; Chan, Fong; Tschopp, Molly K.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to contribute to the understanding of quality of life as it is experienced by a community-based, nonclinical sample of individuals with HIV/AIDS by applying family resiliency theory and cognitive appraisal concepts of uncertainty and optimism. Through the use of a Web-based survey, 125 individuals with HIV/AIDS…

  6. Testing the Factor Structure of the Family Quality of Life Survey--2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isaacs, B.; Wang, M.; Samuel, P.; Ajuwon, P.; Baum, N.; Edwards, M.; Rillotta, F.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Although the Family Quality of Life Survey--2006 (FQOLS-2006) is being used in research, there is little evidence to support its hypothesised domain structure. The purpose of this study was to test the domain structure of the survey using confirmatory factor analysis. Method: Samples from Australia, Canada, Nigeria and the USA were…

  7. Infertility: Towards an Awareness of a Need among Family Life Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Nancy L.; Christopher, F. Scott

    1984-01-01

    Discusses emotional problems related to infertility investigation and treatment. Reviews causes and treatment of infertility, coping patterns, and the role of counselors and family life educators in easing the crises of infertility and facilitating successful resolution of associated emotional problems. (JAC)

  8. Work-Life Compendium, 2001: 150 Canadian Statistics on Work, Family & Well-Being.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Karen L.; Lero, Donna S.; Rooney, Jennifer A.

    The issue of integrating work and family responsibilities has been the subject of federal, provincial, and territorial policy planning and several task forces in Canada. This report plus executive summary, designed to inform the dialogue and stimulate continued discussion, brings together a wide variety of work-life facts and figures related to…

  9. Testing the Factor Structure of the Family Quality of Life Survey--2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isaacs, B.; Wang, M.; Samuel, P.; Ajuwon, P.; Baum, N.; Edwards, M.; Rillotta, F.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Although the Family Quality of Life Survey--2006 (FQOLS-2006) is being used in research, there is little evidence to support its hypothesised domain structure. The purpose of this study was to test the domain structure of the survey using confirmatory factor analysis. Method: Samples from Australia, Canada, Nigeria and the USA were…

  10. Husbands' and Wives' Perceptions of Marital Fairness across the Family Life Cycle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Candida C.

    1990-01-01

    Evaluated marital fairness, or subjective balance between spouses' gains and losses, by surveying 134 married Australians representing 5 family life cycle phases. Findings showed husbands felt more equitably treated both initially and after children's departure than during phases with children in home, wives showed little variation with phase, and…

  11. Infertility: Towards an Awareness of a Need among Family Life Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Nancy L.; Christopher, F. Scott

    1984-01-01

    Discusses emotional problems related to infertility investigation and treatment. Reviews causes and treatment of infertility, coping patterns, and the role of counselors and family life educators in easing the crises of infertility and facilitating successful resolution of associated emotional problems. (JAC)

  12. Family Socioeconomic Status and Student Adaptation to School Life: Looking beyond Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carvalho, Renato G.; Novo, Rosa F.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: In this quantitative, cross-sectional study we analyse the relationship between family socioeconomic status (SES) and students' adaptation to school life, as expressed through several indicators of achievement, integration (adaptation to transitions, behaviour problems, risk behaviours, interpersonal difficulties, participation in…

  13. Relationships between Parental Attachment, Work and Family Roles, and Life Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perrone, Kristin M.; Webb, L. Kay; Jackson, Z. Vance

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between parental attachment and satisfaction with work and family roles, as well as the relationship of these variables to life satisfaction. Results from a multiple regression analysis indicated that satisfaction with work and marriage, but not parenting satisfaction or parental…

  14. Real Life Calls for Real Books: Literature to Help Children Cope with Family Stressors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Sherron Killingsworth; Crawford, Patricia A.

    2008-01-01

    This article provides a rationale and related practical suggestions for using literature as a support system for social-emotional development as children cope with the stresses, anxieties, and feelings of loss that can occur in family life. The authors discusses types of books, how to choose them, and how teachers can use authentic literature to…

  15. Sexuality and Family Life Education: An Annotated Bibliography of Curricula for Sale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallingby, Leigh

    1985-01-01

    This document contains an annotated bibliography of sexuality and family life education curricula which are available for sale. The curricula are listed without evaluation and, because of topic overlap, specific content areas covered in each curriculum are not listed in the annotations. It is noted, however, that topics often covered include…

  16. Scaling up Sexuality Education in Senegal: Integrating Family Life Education into the National Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chau, Katie; Traoré Seck, Aminata; Chandra-Mouli, Venkatraman; Svanemyr, Joar

    2016-01-01

    In Senegal, school-based sexuality education has evolved over 20 years from family life education (FLE) pilot projects into cross-curricular subjects located within the national curriculum of primary and secondary schools. We conducted a literature review and semi-structured interviews to gather information regarding the scale and nature of FLE…

  17. The Adolescent with Down's Syndrome: Life for the Teenager and for the Family.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckley, Sue; Sacks, Ben

    The book presents the results of a survey of the daily life and attitudes of 90 English families with an adolescent with Down Syndrome (DS). The first chapter reviews the typical development of DS children. Chapter 2 provides demographic data including schooling (94% attended schools for children with severe learning difficulties), residence (83%…

  18. Life Course Stage in Young Adulthood and Intergenerational Congruence in Family Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bucx, Freek; Raaijmakers, Quinten; van Wel, Frits

    2010-01-01

    We investigated how intergenerational congruence in family-related attitudes depends on life course stage in young adulthood. Recent data from the Netherlands Kinship Panel Study were used; the present sample included 2,041 dyads of young adults and their parents. Findings are discussed in terms of the elasticity in intergenerational attitude…

  19. The Integration of Social Science and Literary Materials: An Approach to Teaching Urban Family Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Wynetta Devore; Schlesinger, Elfriede G.

    1977-01-01

    A course designed to enhance human behavior and social environment content dealing with urban family life is described. The use of sociological and literary material by white and minority team teachers reduces tension generated by examination of material that is close to student experience. (Author/LBH)

  20. Family Perspectives on End-of-Life Care Experiences in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wetle, Terrie; Shield, Renee; Teno, Joan; Miller, Susan C.; Welch, Lisa

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to expand knowledge regarding end-of-life care received in nursing homes through the use of narrative interviews with family members close to the decedents. Design and Methods: We conducted follow-up qualitative interviews with 54 respondents who had participated in an earlier national survey of 1,578…