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Sample records for disturbed immune response

  1. Human disturbance alters endocrine and immune responses in the Galapagos marine iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus).

    PubMed

    French, Susannah S; DeNardo, Dale F; Greives, Timothy J; Strand, Christine R; Demas, Gregory E

    2010-11-01

    Anthropogenic disturbance is a relevant and widespread facilitator of environmental change and there is clear evidence that it impacts natural populations. While population-level responses to major anthropogenic changes have been well studied, individual physiological responses to mild disturbance can be equally critical to the long-term survival of a species, yet they remain largely unexamined. The current study investigated the impact of seemingly low-level anthropogenic disturbance (ecotourism) on stress responsiveness and specific fitness-related immune measures in different breeding stages of the marine iguana (Amblyrhynchus cristatus). Specifically, we found stress-induced elevations in plasma corticosterone among tourist-exposed populations relative to undisturbed populations. We also found changes in multiple immunological responses associated with stress-related effects of human disturbance, including bacterial killing ability, cutaneous wound healing, and hemolytic complement activity, and the responses varied according to reproductive state. By identifying health-related consequences of human disturbance, this study provides critical insight into the conservation of a well-known species that has a very distinct ecology. The study also broadens the foundation of knowledge needed to understand the global significance of various levels of human disturbance. PMID:20708010

  2. Immune response

    MedlinePlus

    Innate immunity; Humoral immunity; Cellular immunity; Immunity; Inflammatory response; Acquired (adaptive) immunity ... and usually does not react against them. INNATE IMMUNITY Innate, or nonspecific, immunity is the defense system ...

  3. Immune response

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells. T cells are responsible for cell-mediated immunity. This type of immunity becomes deficient in persons with HIV, the virus ... blood. B lymphocytes provide the body with humoral immunity as they circulate in the fluids in search ...

  4. [THE CHANGES OF THE INTERRELATIONS OF THE PINEAL GLAND AND THE ORGANS OF THE IMMUNE SYSTEM IN RATS IN RESPONSE TO MELATONIN ADMINISTRATION IN LIGHT REGIME DISTURBANCES].

    PubMed

    Litvinenko, G I; Gritzyk, O B; Mel'nikova, Ye V; Avrorov, P A; Tenditnik, M V; Shurlygina, A V; Trufakin, V A

    2015-01-01

    In this work the correlation analysis was applied to detect the integrated response of the pineal gland (PG) and immunocompetent organs of male Wistar rats in response to administration of melatonin (MT) in light regime disturbances. Animals were kept for 14 days under natural or continuous light (CL). Then for 7 days they received the injections of either 0.9% solution of sodium chloride or MT, after which the rats were decapitated and the mass of their body, PG, thymus and spleen was determined. The lymphocyte subpopulations of the thymus and spleen were studied by flow cytometry. The amount of lipofuscin in PG was assessed by the intensity of autofluorescence in organ frozen sections in 560-600 nm wavelength range. It was found that under the influence of MT, the number of intraorgan correlations in the immune system increased, regardless of the light regime. In animals on CL treated with MT, the number of interorgan connections was reduced, while negative correlations appeared between PG lipofuscin content and cellular composition of the spleen. The synchronizing and adaptogenic effects of MT were most pronounced under conditions of CL.

  5. Immune Responses in Neonates

    PubMed Central

    Basha, Saleem; Surendran, Naveen; Pichichero, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Neonates have little immunological memory and a developing immune system, which increases their vulnerability to infectious agents. Recent advances in understanding of neonatal immunity indicate that both innate and adaptive responses are dependent on precursor frequency of lymphocytes, antigenic dose and mode of exposure. Studies in neonatal mouse models and human umbilical cord blood cells demonstrate the capability of neonatal immune cells to produce immune responses similar to adults in some aspects but not others. This review focuses mainly on the developmental and functional mechanisms of the human neonatal immune system. In particular, the mechanism of innate and adaptive immunity and the role of neutrophils, antigen presenting cells, differences in subclasses of T lymphocytes (Th1, Th2, Tregs) and B cells are discussed. In addition, we have included the recent developments in neonatal mouse immune system. Understanding neonatal immunity is essential to development of therapeutic vaccines to combat newly emerging infectious agents. PMID:25088080

  6. IMMUNE RESPONSES IN VITRO

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Carl W.; Solliday, Susan M.; Asofsky, Richard

    1972-01-01

    Suppression of Ig class-specific PFC responses by class-specific antibody to mouse immunoglobulin was studied in cultures of spleen cells from immunized mice. In contrast to cultures from normal mice where anti-µ suppressed responses in all Ig classes, anti-µ had progressively less suppressive effect on γ1 and γ2 responses in cultures from immunized mice with time after immunization. This was most pronounced at 10 days after immunization when anti-µ suppressed γM and γA responses, but had no or slight effect on γ1 or γ2 responses which were still suppressed with anti-γ1 and anti-γ2. These changes in precursor cell susceptibility to anti-µ were antigen specific. PMID:4536707

  7. Monitoring response to disturbance in dynamic rangelands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arid and semi-arid rangelands worldwide provide important ecosystem services and see a diversity of land uses. To maintain the health of these lands, it is necessary to monitor rangeland conditions in response to management and disturbance. Spatial patterns from disturbance are superimposed on patte...

  8. Sequential Immune Responses: The Weapons of Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Charles D.; Ley, Klaus; Buchmann, Kurt; Canton, Johnathan

    2016-01-01

    Sequential immune responses (SIR) is a new model that describes what ‘immunity’ means in higher animals. Existing models, such as self/nonself discrimination or danger, focus on how immune responses are initiated. However, initiation is not protection. SIR describes the actual immune responses that provide protection. SIR resulted from a comprehensive analysis of the evolution of immune systems that revealed that several very different types of host innate responses occur (and at different tempos) which together provide host protection. SIR1 uses rapidly activated enzymes like the NADPH oxidases and is present in all animal cells. SIR2 is mediated by the first ‘immune’ cells: macrophage-like cells. SIR3 evolved in animals like invertebrates and provides enhanced protection through advanced macrophage recognition and killing of pathogens and through other innate immune cells such as neutrophils. Finally, in vertebrates, macrophages developed SIR4: the ability to present antigens to T cells. Though much slower than SIR1–3, adaptive responses provide a unique new protection for higher vertebrates. Importantly, newer SIR responses were added on top of older, evolutionarily conserved functions to provide ‘layers’ of host protection. SIR transcends existing models by elucidating the different weapons of immunity that provide host protection in higher animals. PMID:25871013

  9. Human immune responses in cryptosporidiosis

    PubMed Central

    Borad, Anoli; Ward, Honorine

    2010-01-01

    Immune responses play a critical role in protection from, and resolution of, cryptosporidiosis. However, the nature of these responses, particularly in humans, is not completely understood. Both innate and adaptive immune responses are important. Innate immune responses may be mediated by Toll-like receptor pathways, antimicrobial peptides, prostaglandins, mannose-binding lectin, cytokines and chemokines. Cell-mediated responses, particularly those involving CD4+ T cells and IFN-γ play a dominant role. Mucosal antibody responses may also be involved. Proteins mediating attachment and invasion may serve as putative protective antigens. Further knowledge of human immune responses in cryptosporidiosis is essential in order to develop targeted prophylactic and therapeutic interventions. This review focuses on recent advances and future prospects in the understanding of human immune responses to Cryptosporidium infection. PMID:20210556

  10. Ubiquitin signaling in immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hongbo; Sun, Shao-Cong

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitination has emerged as a crucial mechanism that regulates signal transduction in diverse biological processes, including different aspects of immune functions. Ubiquitination regulates pattern-recognition receptor signaling that mediates both innate immune responses and dendritic cell maturation required for initiation of adaptive immune responses. Ubiquitination also regulates the development, activation, and differentiation of T cells, thereby maintaining efficient adaptive immune responses to pathogens and immunological tolerance to self-tissues. Like phosphorylation, ubiquitination is a reversible reaction tightly controlled by the opposing actions of ubiquitin ligases and deubiquitinases. Deregulated ubiquitination events are associated with immunological disorders, including autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. PMID:27012466

  11. Cellular immune responses to HIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMichael, Andrew J.; Rowland-Jones, Sarah L.

    2001-04-01

    The cellular immune response to the human immunodeficiency virus, mediated by T lymphocytes, seems strong but fails to control the infection completely. In most virus infections, T cells either eliminate the virus or suppress it indefinitely as a harmless, persisting infection. But the human immunodeficiency virus undermines this control by infecting key immune cells, thereby impairing the response of both the infected CD4+ T cells and the uninfected CD8+ T cells. The failure of the latter to function efficiently facilitates the escape of virus from immune control and the collapse of the whole immune system.

  12. Response of Ionosphere to the Tropospheric disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurya, A. K.; Dube, A.; Singh, R.; Cohen, M.

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present work is to find out response of the ionosphere to the various cases of tropical cyclones. The main process involved is suggested through Atmospheric Gravity waves (AGWs) originating from strong convective systems, propagating upward upto the ionospheric heights and perturbing ionospheric parameters (Bishop et al., 2006). We have used ground and satellite data to extract cyclone induced perturbations at different ionospheric heights along with the various parameters of AGWs during cyclones and associated thunderstorm. The initial results suggest that there is increase in total electron content of the ionosphere with wave like signatures in ionosphere. The satellite observation in optical band shows presence of concentric gravity wave pattern associated with troposphere disturbances with horizontal wavelength of ~50-200km and periods ranging from hours to days. The ground based Very Low Frequency (VLF) measurement shows fluctuations in VLF navigational transmitter signal passing over the region of disturbance. The lightning data from GLD360 lightning network shows intense activity associated with cyclones and increase in lightning peak current and energy during main phase of cyclones which seems to be sufficient enough to derive ionospheric disturbances in the ionosphere. This multi-instrument analysis provide detail information of the three dimensional structure of cyclone and their effect at different altitudes of the ionosphere in the Indian subcontinent.

  13. Leptin Regulation of Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Naylor, Caitlin; Petri, William A

    2016-02-01

    Leptin is a regulatory hormone with multiple roles in the immune system. We favor the concept that leptin signaling 'licenses' various immune cells to engage in immune responses and/or to differentiate. Leptin is an inflammatory molecule that is capable of activating both adaptive and innate immunity. It can also 'enhance' immune functions, including inflammatory cytokine production in macrophages, granulocyte chemotaxis, and increased Th17 proliferation. Leptin can also 'inhibit' cells; CD4(+) T cells are inhibited from differentiating into regulatory T cells in the presence of elevated leptin, while NK cells can exhibit impaired cytotoxicity under the same circumstances. Consequently, understanding the effect of leptin signaling is important to appreciate various aspects of immune dysregulation observed in malnutrition, obesity, and autoimmunity.

  14. Regulation of the immune response

    PubMed Central

    Chan, P. L.; Sinclair, N. R. StC.

    1973-01-01

    Intact IgG antibody can terminate established immune responses, whereas F(ab′)2 antibody cannot do so. The difference between the two antibodies appears to be qualitative. F(ab′)2 antibody, but not pepsin-digested normal serum, can interfere with the suppression and termination of immune responses induced by intact IgG antibody. These results are discussed in terms of the tripartite inactivation model. PMID:4576780

  15. Forest response and recovery following disturbance (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schafer, K. V.; Clark, K. L.; Renninger, H. J.; Carlo, N.; Medvigy, D.

    2013-12-01

    Forest management and global climate change may modulate forest responses to disturbances such as drought, insect infestation or windthrow. Forest responses to drought and gypsy moth defoliation measured from 2005 to present in an oak/pine ecosystem in the Atlantic Coastal Plain (New Jersey Pinelands) show a relative conservatism of water use but longer lasting effects on carbon balance. While post-defoliation transpiration and evapotranspiration were similar to pre-defoliation levels, post-defoliation carbon fluxes have not returned to pre-disturbance levels even after five years of recovery due to a 25% reduction in basal area following tree mortality. Defoliation frequency also affects recovery with modeled carbon fluxes under various defoliation scenarios, showing pronounced reduction in productivity under frequent defoliation, but no effect if defoliation occurs at a rate of less than 15 years. Despite a relatively consistent seasonal water use through various disturbances, defoliation and drought affect water use differently. For example, canopy transpiration (EC) after defoliation and subsequent re-sprouting, was reduced by 25% compared to pre-defoliation levels, even though only half of the leaf area was replaced. However under severe drought conditions in 2006 and 2010, EC was only reduced by 8% and 18% respectively. Therefore, prolonged drought had a lesser effect on EC than reduced foliage or episodic defoliation, suggesting these trees have access to deeper soil moisture. These data also suggest that defoliation may make trees more sensitive to drought as evidenced by the higher reduction of Ec in 2010 compared to 2006 (pre-defoliation). Differential physiological responses of the various oak species as well as pitch pine may also create a species shift in an ecosystem that is also prone to fire. In this ecosystem, Quercus prinus showed consistently lower stomatal conductance, photosynthesis and maximum carboxylation rate compared to Quercus velutina

  16. Immune responses to improving welfare.

    PubMed

    Berghman, L R

    2016-09-01

    The relationship between animal welfare and the immune status of an animal has a complex nature. Indeed, the intuitive notion that "increased vigilance of the immune system is by definition better" because it is expected to better keep the animal healthy, does not hold up under scrutiny. This is mostly due to the fact that the immune system consists of 2 distinct branches, the innate and the adaptive immune system. While they are intimately intertwined and synergistic in the living organism, they are profoundly different in their costs, both in terms of performance and wellbeing. In contrast to the adaptive immune system, the action of the innate immune system has a high metabolic cost as well as undesirable behavioral consequences. When a pathogen breaches the first line of defense (often a mucosal barrier), that organism's molecular signature is recognized by resident macrophages. The macrophages respond by releasing a cocktail of pro-inflammatory cytokines (including interleukin-1 and -6) that signal the brain via multiple pathways (humoral as well as neural) of the ongoing peripheral innate immune response. The behavioral response to the release of proinflammatory cytokines, known as "sickness behavior," includes nearly all the behavioral aspects that are symptomatic for clinical depression in humans. Hence, undesired innate immune activity, such as chronic inflammation, needs to be avoided by the industry. From an immunological standpoint, one of the most pressing poultry industry needs is the refinement of our current veterinary vaccine arsenal. The response to a vaccine, especially to a live attenuated vaccine, is often a combination of innate and adaptive immune activities, and the desired immunogenicity comes at the price of high reactogenicity. The morbidity, albeit limited and transient, caused by live vaccines against respiratory diseases and coccidiosis are good examples. Thankfully, the advent of various post-genomics technologies, such as DNA

  17. The response of avian feeding guilds to tropical forest disturbance.

    PubMed

    Gray, Michael A; Baldauf, Sandra L; Mayhew, Peter J; Hill, Jane K

    2007-02-01

    Anthropogenic habitat disturbance is a major threat to tropical forests and understanding the ecological consequences of this disturbance is crucial for the conservation of biodiversity. There have been many attempts to determine the ecological traits associated with bird species' vulnerability to disturbance, but no attempt has been made to synthesize these studies to show consensus. We analyzed data from 57 published studies (covering 1214 bird species) that investigated the response of tropical bird assemblages to moderate forest disturbance (e.g., selective logging). Our results show that the mean abundance of species from six commonly reported feeding guilds responded differently to disturbance and that species' ecological traits (body size, local population size, and geographic range size) and evolutionary relationships may influence responses in some guilds. Granivore abundance increased significantly and insectivore and frugivore abundance decreased significantly following disturbance. These general conclusions were robust to the effects of ecological traits and phylogeny. Responses of carnivores, nectarivores, and omnivores were less clear, but analyses that accounted for phylogeny indicated that these guilds declined following disturbance. In contrast to the other guilds, the reported responses of carnivores and nectarivores differed among regions (Asia vs. Neotropics) and were influenced by the sampling protocols used in different studies (e.g., time since disturbance), which may explain the difficulty in detecting general responses to disturbance in these guilds. Overall, general patterns governed the responses of species to habitat disturbance, and the differential responses of guilds suggested that disturbance affects trophic organization and thus ecosystem functioning.

  18. Dynamic Metabolism in Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hommrani, Mazen; Chakraborty, Paramita; Chatterjee, Shilpak; Mehrotra, Shikhar

    2016-01-01

    Cell, the basic unit of life depends for its survival on nutrients and thereby energy to perform its physiological function. Cells of lymphoid and myeloid origin are key in evoking an immune response against “self” or “non-self” antigens. The thymus derived lymphoid cells called T cells are a heterogenous group with distinct phenotypic and molecular signatures that have been shown to respond against an infection (bacterial, viral, protozoan) or cancer. Recent studies have unearthed the key differences in energy metabolism between the various T cell subsets, natural killer cells, dendritic cells, macrophages and myeloid derived suppressor cells. While a number of groups are dwelling into the nuances of the metabolism and its role in immune response at various strata, this review focuses on dynamic state of metabolism that is operational within various cellular compartments that interact to mount an effective immune response to alleviate disease state.

  19. Immune response to fungal infections.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Jose L; Garcia, Marta E

    2008-09-15

    The immune mechanisms of defence against fungal infections are numerous, and range from protective mechanisms that were present early in evolution (innate immunity) to sophisticated adaptive mechanisms that are induced specifically during infection and disease (adaptive immunity). The first-line innate mechanism is the presence of physical barriers in the form of skin and mucous membranes, which is complemented by cell membranes, cellular receptors and humoral factors. There has been a debate about the relative contribution of humoral and cellular immunity to host defence against fungal infections. For a long time it was considered that cell-mediated immunity (CMI) was important, but humoral immunity had little or no role. However, it is accepted now that CMI is the main mechanism of defence, but that certain types of antibody response are protective. In general, Th1-type CMI is required for clearance of a fungal infection, while Th2 immunity usually results in susceptibility to infection. Aspergillosis, which is a disease caused by the fungus Aspergillus, has been the subject of many studies, including details of the immune response. Attempts to relate aspergillosis to some form of immunosuppression in animals, as is the case with humans, have not been successful to date. The defence against Aspergillus is based on recognition of the pathogen, a rapidly deployed and highly effective innate effector phase, and a delayed but robust adaptive effector phase. Candida albicans, part of the normal microbial flora associated with mucous surfaces, can be present as congenital candidiasis or as acquired defects of cell-mediated immunity. Resistance to this yeast is associated with Th1 CMI, whereas Th2 immunity is associated with susceptibility to systemic infection. Dermatophytes produce skin alterations in humans and other animals, and the essential role of the CMI response is to destroy the fungi and produce an immunoprotective status against re-infection. The resolution

  20. Immune responses in space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, G.

    1998-01-01

    Space flight has been shown to have profound effects on immunological parameters of humans, monkeys and rodents. These studies have been carried out by a number of different laboratories. Among the parameters affected are leukocyte blastogenesis, natural killer cell activity, leukocyte subset distribution, cytokine production - including interferons and interleukins, and macrophage maturation and activity. These changes start to occur only after a few days space flight, and some changes continue throughout long-term space flight. Antibody responses have received only very limited study, and total antibody levels have been shown to be increased after long-term space flight. Several factors could be involved in inducing these changes. These factors could include microgravity, lack of load-bearing, stress, acceleration forces, and radiation. The mechanism(s) for space flight-induced changes in immune responses remain(s) to be established. Certainly, there can be direct effects of microgravity, or other factors, on cells that play a fundamental role in immune responses. However, it is now clear that there are interactions between the immune system and other physiological systems that could play a major role. For example, changes occurring in calcium use in the musculoskeletal system induced by microgravity or lack of use could have great impact on the immune system. Most of the changes in immune responses have been observed using samples taken immediately after return from space flight. However, there have been two recent studies that have used in-flight testing. Delayed-type hypersensitivity responses to common recall antigens of astronauts and cosmonauts have been shown to be decreased when tested during space flights. Additionally, natural killer cell and blastogenic activities are inhibited in samples taken from rats during space flight. Therefore, it is now clear that events occurring during space flight itself can affect immune responses. The biological

  1. Regulation of the immune response

    PubMed Central

    Chan, P. L.; Sinclair, N. R. StC.

    1971-01-01

    Pepsin digested, F(ab')2 antibody has less ability to inhibit an antibody response than has intact IgG antibody, when the antibodies were given one day after antigen. F(ab')2 antibody has to be given with antigen to attain maximal suppression, while IgG antibody, administered after antigen, is still highly immunosuppressive. The IgG antibody was able to terminate established immune responses, whereas F(ab')2 antibody could not do so. We interpret these findings to indicate that F(ab')2 antibody suppresses immune responses by simple masking of antigen, whereas IgG antibody alters the immune response through a further activity which takes place after antibody has combined with antigen. This further activity involves the Fc portion of antibody. Two alterations in immune mechanism are suggested: (1) increased destruction of antigen and (2) inactivation of the antibody forming cell precursor population by antigen—antibody complexes. This latter possibility is considered in detail. The tripartite inactivation model has been constructed to explain the presently known observations concerning immunosuppression by antibody and to make a prediction which has been verified. A further prediction concerning the affinities of antibodies produced under IgG or F(ab')2 antibody-mediated immunosuppression is put forward. Thymus-bone marrow cell synergism does not give a simple thymus cell dose-response relationship but a multi-phasic relationship where the response increases once the dose of thymus cells is decreased to a sufficiently low level. Such a dose-response relationship is not explainable in terms of the usual mechanisms proposed for thymus-bone marrow cell interaction and this deviation from a simple dose-response relationship is interpreted in terms of the proposed function of thymus-derived cells in controlling antibody feedback regulation. PMID:4943149

  2. Immune responses to improving welfare

    PubMed Central

    Berghman, L. R.

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between animal welfare and the immune status of an animal has a complex nature. Indeed, the intuitive notion that “increased vigilance of the immune system is by definition better” because it is expected to better keep the animal healthy, does not hold up under scrutiny. This is mostly due to the fact that the immune system consists of 2 distinct branches, the innate and the adaptive immune system. While they are intimately intertwined and synergistic in the living organism, they are profoundly different in their costs, both in terms of performance and wellbeing. In contrast to the adaptive immune system, the action of the innate immune system has a high metabolic cost as well as undesirable behavioral consequences. When a pathogen breaches the first line of defense (often a mucosal barrier), that organism's molecular signature is recognized by resident macrophages. The macrophages respond by releasing a cocktail of pro-inflammatory cytokines (including interleukin-1 and -6) that signal the brain via multiple pathways (humoral as well as neural) of the ongoing peripheral innate immune response. The behavioral response to the release of proinflammatory cytokines, known as “sickness behavior,” includes nearly all the behavioral aspects that are symptomatic for clinical depression in humans. Hence, undesired innate immune activity, such as chronic inflammation, needs to be avoided by the industry. From an immunological standpoint, one of the most pressing poultry industry needs is the refinement of our current veterinary vaccine arsenal. The response to a vaccine, especially to a live attenuated vaccine, is often a combination of innate and adaptive immune activities, and the desired immunogenicity comes at the price of high reactogenicity. The morbidity, albeit limited and transient, caused by live vaccines against respiratory diseases and coccidiosis are good examples. Thankfully, the advent of various post-genomics technologies, such as DNA

  3. Immune Responses in Hookworm Infections

    PubMed Central

    Loukas, Alex; Prociv, Paul

    2001-01-01

    Hookworms infect perhaps one-fifth of the entire human population, yet little is known about their interaction with our immune system. The two major species are Necator americanus, which is adapted to tropical conditions, and Ancylostoma duodenale, which predominates in more temperate zones. While having many common features, they also differ in several key aspects of their biology. Host immune responses are triggered by larval invasion of the skin, larval migration through the circulation and lungs, and worm establishment in the intestine, where adult worms feed on blood and mucosa while injecting various molecules that facilitate feeding and modulate host protective responses. Despite repeated exposure, protective immunity does not seem to develop in humans, so that infections occur in all age groups (depending on exposure patterns) and tend to be prolonged. Responses to both larval and adult worms have a characteristic T-helper type 2 profile, with activated mast cells in the gut mucosa, elevated levels of circulating immunoglobulin E, and eosinoophilia in the peripheral blood and local tissues, features also characteristic of type I hypersensitivity reactions. The longevity of adult hookworms is determined probably more by parasite genetics than by host immunity. However, many of the proteins released by the parasites seem to have immunomodulatory activity, presumably for self-protection. Advances in molecular biotechnology enable the identification and characterization of increasing numbers of these parasite molecules and should enhance our detailed understanding of the protective and pathogenetic mechanisms in hookworm infections. PMID:11585781

  4. Surviving Sepsis: Taming a Deadly Immune Response

    MedlinePlus

    ... disclaimer . Subscribe Surviving Sepsis Taming a Deadly Immune Response Many people have never heard of sepsis, or ... tract infection) and then a powerful and harmful response by your body’s own immune system . “With sepsis, ...

  5. Immune responses to resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Freidenreich, Daniel J; Volek, Jeff S

    2012-01-01

    Resistance exercise induces changes in leukocyte redistribution, phenotypical surface expression and leukocyte functionality. Several factors have been shown to alter the temporal pattern and/or magnitude of response including manipulation of acute program variables, the aging process, and nutritional supplementation. Rest period length and load can modify the temporal pattern and/or magnitude of leukocytosis post exercise. Aging diminishes both the duration and magnitude of the post exercise leukocytosis and reduces leukocyte functionality. The few studies that assessed the effects of nutritional supplements (e.g., carbohydrate, whey protein, caffeine) peri-resistance exercise showed minimal effects on leukocyte responses. Sex differences exist in the timing and magnitude of leukocyte infiltration into skeletal muscle. The immune response to resistance exercise is only a small part of the recovery paradigm. A better understanding of how acute program variables and other factors such as aging, sex and nutritional supplementation affect the immune response to resistance exercise is important in the context of improving recovery, performance and health.

  6. EVOLUTION OF THE IMMUNE RESPONSE

    PubMed Central

    Papermaster, Ben W.; Condie, Richard M.; Finstad, Joanne; Good, Robert A.

    1964-01-01

    1. The California hagfish, Eptatretus stoutii, seems to be completely lacking in adaptive immunity: it forms no detectable circulating antibody despite intensive stimulation with a range of antigens; it does not show reactivity to old tuberculin following sensitization with BCG; and gives no evidence of homograft immunity. 2. Studies on the sea lamprey, Petromyzon marinus, have been limited to the response to bacteriophage T2 and hemocyanin in small groups of spawning animals. They suggest that the lamprey may have a low degree of immunologic reactivity. 3. One holostean, the bowfin (Amia calva) and the guitarfish (Rhinobatos productus), an elasmobranch, showed a low level of primary response to phage and hemocyanin. The response is slow and antibody levels low. Both the bowfin and the guitarfish showed a vigorous secondary response to phage, but neither showed much enhancement of reactivity to hemocyanin in the secondary response. The bowfin formed precipitating antibody to hemocyanin, but the guitarfish did not. Both hemagglutinating and precipitating antibody to hemocyanin were also observed in the primary response of the black bass. 4. The bowfin was successfully sensitized to Ascaris antigen, and lesions of the delayed type developed after challenge at varying intervals following sensitization. 5. The horned shark (Heterodontus franciscii) regularly cleared hemocyanin from the circulation after both primary and secondary antigenic stimulation, and regularly formed hemagglutinating antibody, but not precipitating antibody, after both primary and secondary stimulation with this antigen. These animals regularly cleared bacteriophage from the circulation after both the primary and secondary stimulation with bacteriophage T2. Significant but small amounts of antibody were produced in a few animals in the primary response, and larger amounts in the responding animals after secondary antigenic stimulation. 6. Studies by starch gel and immunoelectrophoresis show that

  7. Tilapia show immunization response against Ich

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study compares the immune response of Nile tilapia and red tilapia against parasite Ichthyophthirius multifiliis (Ich) using a cohabitation challenge model. Both Nile and red tilapia showed strong immune response post immunization with live Ich theronts by IP injection or immersion. Blood serum...

  8. Linking geology, climate and disturbance response in California mountain environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tague, C.; Garcia, E.; Chen, X.; Heckman, C.

    2014-12-01

    Fire, drought and insect related forest mortality are abrupt disturbances that can result in substantial loss of ecosystem biomass with consequences for both water quality and water quantity. The short-term magnitude of these responses depend strongly on the meteorology in the year following disturbance. Intermediate and long-term impacts, however, depend on post-disturbance recovery rates and potential species change, that may reflect longer-term climate drivers. In mountain environments, underlying geology shape both of these responses, through topographic influences on climate and through geologic controls on water storage and lateral redistribution. We use RHESSys, a coupled eco-hydrologic model, to quantify potential across site variation in responses to disturbance for several transects along in California mountains. At within watershed scales, we also look at how hydrologic responses to vegetation loss are influenced by subsurface geologic controls and contrast estimated disturbance effects as a function of different assumption of subsurface storage capacity and connectivity. Results highlight the tight coupling between geology and climate that influence hydrologic responses to disturbance.

  9. Immune response during space flight.

    PubMed

    Criswell-Hudak, B S

    1991-01-01

    The health status of an astronaut prior to and following space flight has been a prime concern of NASA throughout the Apollo series of lunar landings, Skylab, Apollo-Soyuz Test Projects (ASTP), and the new Spacelab-Shuttle missions. Both humoral and cellular immunity has been studied using classical clinical procedures. Serum proteins show fluctuations that can be explained with adaptation to flight. Conversely, cellular immune responses of lymphocytes appear to be depressed in both in vivo as well as in vitro. If this depression in vivo and in vitro is a result of the same cause, then man's adaptation to outer space living will present interesting challenges in the future. Since the cause may be due to reduced gravity, perhaps the designs of the experiments for space flight will offer insights at the cellular levels that will facilitate development of mechanisms for adaptation. Further, if the aging process is viewed as an adaptational concept or model and not as a disease process then perhaps space flight could very easily interact to supply some information on our biological time clocks. PMID:1915698

  10. A model of channel response in disturbed alluvial channels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simon, A.

    1989-01-01

    Dredging and straightening of alluvial channels between 1959 and 1978 in West Tennessee caused a series of morphologic changes along modified reaches and tributary streams. Degradation occurred for 10 to 15 years at sites upstream of the area of maximum disturbance and lowered bed-levels by as much as 6.1 m. Following degradation, reaches upstream of the area of maximum disturbance experienced a secondary aggradation phase in response to excessive incision and gradient reduction. -from Author

  11. Regulation of the immune response

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, N. R. St C.; Lees, R. K.; Chan, P. L.; Khan, R. H.

    1970-01-01

    The ability of F(ab′)2 antibody preparations to suppress an immune response is much less than that of intact 7S antibody. The activity possessed by F(ab′)2 preparations withstood repurification procedures, hence contamination with intact 7S antibody is unlikely. Daily or thrice daily injections of antibody did not make equal the suppressive activities of F(ab′)2 and intact antibody, indicating that rapid excretion of F(ab′)2 antibody is not the sole factor involved in the difference in immunosuppressive potency between intact 7S and F(ab′)2 antibody. Some possibilities for distinct differences in the mechanism of the immuno-suppressive action of F(ab′)2 and 7S antibodies are raised and discussed. PMID:4922025

  12. Medium term ecohydrological response of peatland bryophytes to canopy disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Rhoswen; Kettridge, Nick; Krause, Stefan; Devito, Kevin; Granath, Gustaf; Petrone, Richard; Mandoza, Carl; Waddington, James Micheal

    2016-04-01

    Canopy disturbance in northern forested peatlands is widespread. Canopy changes impact the ecohydrological function of moss and peat, which provide the principal carbon store within these carbon rich ecosystems. Different mosses have contrasting contributions to carbon and water fluxes (e.g. Sphagnum fuscum and Pleurozium schreberi) and are strongly influenced by canopy cover. As a result, changes in canopy cover lead to long-term shifts in species composition and associated ecohydrological function. Despite this, the medium-term response to such disturbance, the associated lag in this transition to a new ecohydrological and biogeochemical regime, is not understood. Here we investigate this medium term ecohydrological response to canopy removal using a randomised plot design within a north Albertan peatland. We show no significant ecohydrological change in treatment plots four years after canopy removal. Notably, Pleurozium schreberi and Sphagnum fuscum remained within respective plots post treatment and there was no significant difference in plot resistance to evapotranspiration or carbon exchange. Our results show that canopy removal alone has little impact on bryophyte ecohydrology in the short/medium term. This resistance to disturbance contrasts strongly with dramatic short-term changes observed within mineral soils suggesting that concurrent shifts in the large scale hydrology induced within such disturbances are necessary to cause rapid ecohydrological transitions. Understanding this lagged response is critical to determine the decadal response of carbon and water fluxes in response to disturbance and the rate at which important medium term ecohydrological feedbacks are invoked.

  13. Spaceflight and immune responses of Rhesus monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1994-01-01

    Evidence from both human and rodent studies indicates that alterations in immunological parameters occur after space flight. The objective of this project is to determine the effects of space flight on immune responses of Rhesus monkeys. The expected significance of the work is a determination of the range of immunological functions of the Rhesus monkey, a primate similar in many ways to man, affected by space flight. Changes in immune responses that could yield alterations in resistance to infection may be determined as well as the duration of alterations in immune responses. Additional information on the nature of cellular interactions for the generation of immune responses may also be obtained.

  14. Laparoscopic surgery and the systemic immune response.

    PubMed Central

    Vittimberga, F J; Foley, D P; Meyers, W C; Callery, M P

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors review studies relating to the immune responses evoked by laparoscopic surgery. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: Laparoscopic surgery has gained rapid acceptance based on clinical grounds. Patients benefit from faster recovery, decreased pain, and quicker return to normal activities. Only more recently have attempts been made to identify the metabolic and immune responses that may underlie this clinical success. The immune responses to laparoscopy are now being evaluated in relation to the present knowledge of immune responses to traditional laparotomy and surgery in general. METHODS: A review of the published literature of the immune and metabolic responses to laparoscopy was performed. Laparoscopic surgery is compared with the traditional laparotomy on the basis of local and systemic immune responses and patterns of tumor growth. The impact of pneumoperitoneum and insufflation gases on the immune response is also reviewed. CONCLUSIONS: The systemic immune responses for surgery in general may not apply to laparoscopic surgery. The body's response to laparoscopy is one of lesser immune activation as opposed to immunosuppression. PMID:9527054

  15. Noninvasive imaging of immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Rashidian, Mohammad; Keliher, Edmund J.; Bilate, Angelina M.; Duarte, Joao N.; Wojtkiewicz, Gregory R.; Jacobsen, Johanne Tracey; Cragnolini, Juanjo; Swee, Lee Kim; Victora, Gabriel D.; Weissleder, Ralph; Ploegh, Hidde L.

    2015-01-01

    At their margins, tumors often contain neutrophils, dendritic cells, and activated macrophages, which express class II MHC and CD11b products. The interplay between stromal cells, tumor cells, and migratory cells such as lymphocytes creates opportunities for noninvasive imaging of immune responses. We developed alpaca-derived antibody fragments specific for mouse class II MHC and CD11b products, expressed on the surface of a variety of myeloid cells. We validated these reagents by flow cytometry and two-photon microscopy to obtain images at cellular resolution. To enable noninvasive imaging of the targeted cell populations, we developed a method to site-specifically label VHHs [the variable domain (VH) of a camelid heavy-chain only antibody] with 18F or 64Cu. Radiolabeled VHHs rapidly cleared the circulation (t1/2 ≈ 20 min) and clearly visualized lymphoid organs. We used VHHs to explore the possibility of imaging inflammation in both xenogeneic and syngeneic tumor models, which resulted in detection of tumors with remarkable specificity. We also imaged the infiltration of myeloid cells upon injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant. Both anti-class II MHC and anti-CD11b VHHs detected inflammation with excellent specificity. Given the ease of manufacture and labeling of VHHs, we believe that this method could transform the manner in which antitumor responses and/or infectious events may be tracked. PMID:25902531

  16. Hypothalamic neurohormones and immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Quintanar, J. Luis; Guzmán-Soto, Irene

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive examination of the current literature describing the neural-immune interactions, with emphasis on the most recent findings of the effects of neurohormones on immune system. Particularly, the role of hypothalamic hormones such as Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). In the past few years, interest has been raised in extrapituitary actions of these neurohormones due to their receptors have been found in many non-pituitary tissues. Also, the receptors are present in immune cells, suggesting an autocrine or paracrine role within the immune system. In general, these neurohormones have been reported to exert immunomodulatory effects on cell proliferation, immune mediators release and cell function. The implications of these findings in understanding the network of hypothalamic neuropeptides and immune system are discussed. PMID:23964208

  17. Lichen Persistence and Recovery in Response to Varied Volcanic Disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, P.; Wheeler, T. B.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanic eruptions produce many ecological disturbances that structure vegetation. While lichens are sensitive to disturbances, little is known about their responses to volcanic disturbances, except for colonization of lava. We examined lichen community responses through time to different disturbances produced by the May 1, 2008 eruption of Volcan Chaiten in south-central Chile. Pre-eruption vegetation near the volcano was old-growth Valdivian temperate rainforest dominated by closed-canopy Nothofagus sp... In 2012, we installed thirteen 1-acre plots across volcanic disturbance zones on which a time-constrained search was done for all macrolichen species, each of which was assigned an approximate log10 categorical abundance. We also installed a 0.2 m2 quadrat on two representative trees per plot for repeat photography of lichen cover. We remeasured at least one plot per disturbance zone in 2014 and re-photographed tree quadrats in 2013 and 2014. We then analyzed species composition and abundance differences among disturbance zones. In 2012, the blast (pyroclastic density flow), scorch (standing scorched forest at the edge of the blast) and deep tephra (>10 cm) zones had the lowest lichen species richness (5-13 species), followed by reference (unimpacted) and shallow (<10 cm) tephra (17-20 species). Gravel rain (preexisting rock ejected by eruption initiation), gravel rain + pumice and flooded forests (fluvially reworked volcanic material entrained by heavy rains) were species-rich (25-42 species). In 2014, the blast and deep tephra had regained 2-3 times the number of lichen species since 2012 while the light tephra and reference were essentially unchanged. Gravel rain, gravel rain + pumice and flooded forest plots all had about the same number of species in 2014 as 2012. Lichen colonization and growth in tree quadrats varied widely, from very little colonization in the blast to prolific colonization in the gravel rain + pumice zone. Lichen's varied responses to

  18. Nonlinear responses of mesospheric emission layers to wave disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, Alexey

    2016-09-01

    Model-based investigations of the wave-induced responses of O(1S), O2(b,0-0) and OH(8-3) emissions have been performed. A series of digital experiments performed using the one-dimensional simulation model proposed by Liu and Swenson (2003) demonstrated that, in addition to the variable component, the wave disturbance of airglow emissions has a constant component. This component is the enhancement/depletion of the background emission intensity of an emission layer. To interpret its appearance, the simplest analytical model of airglow disturbance due to a gravity wave has been constructed. This model indicates that enhancement/depletion of the background emission intensity is a nonlinear airglow response to a wave disturbance. Its magnitude depends quadratically on the wave amplitude and can reach a few dozen percent relative to the value of the zenith brightness of the unperturbed OH(8-3)/O(1S) emission layer.

  19. Frequency response of slot coating flow to gap disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Semi; Nam, Jaewook

    2016-03-01

    Slot coating is a common method of manufacturing films such as optical films, adhesive tapes, etc. It is a pre-metered method: the final wet film thickness is set by the flow rate and the web speed, and independent of other operating parameters and coating liquid properties. Therefore, it is ideal for precise film thickness control. To produce uniform film, the coating flow needs to be steady-state, two-dimensional, and stable. In the slot coating process, however, there are always some small-scale disturbances generated by rotating process units, such as pumps, rolls, etc., and they usually have periodicity. These disturbances cause a non-uniformity of the moving web direction and could spoil the film quality. Therefore, the sensitivity analysis of coating flow under the periodic disturbances is important. Among all disturbances, a change of coating gap, i.e. the distance between the die lip and the moving substrate, is known to the most dangerous disturbance. This type of disturbance is usually called the gap oscillation, and caused by the substrate thickness variations, mechanical vibration of the coating die or roll, and roll run outs. Here, we analyze the effect of fluid properties, operating conditions and die configurations on response of slot coating flow to gap disturbances. In this study, we use Galerkin/finite element method to solve transient Navier-Stokes equation under periodic disturbance. We define the amplification factor as an indicator of film non-uniformity and analyze the effect of different parameters by comparing the factor. In particular, we use Carreau-Yasuda model to describe shear-thinning property of xanthan gum solution and compare with Newtonian fluid.

  20. REGULATION OF THE IMMUNE RESPONSE

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, Nicholas R. StC.

    1969-01-01

    The ability of 7S and F(ab')2 antibody fragments to suppress priming with low doses of antigen was compared. The 7S preparation was approximately 100–1000 times more potent than the F(ab')2 preparation when the agglutinin titers of the two preparations were the same. The presence of any ability to suppress priming in the F(ab')2 preparation may reflect an inherent capacity of the F(ab')2 antibody or contamination with small amounts of 7S antibody. The difference between 7S and F(ab')2 antibody in ability to suppress priming is attributed to the lack of the Fc portion on the F(ab')2 antibody. The Fc portion may be needed to prevent rapid excretion of antibody from the body, to induce rapid phagocytosis of antigen-antibody complexes with consequent breakdown and elimination of antigen, or to inactivate or suppress the antigen-sensitive cells from reacting to antigenic determinants. More detailed studies will permit a better assessment of the importance of these three possible regulatory roles of the Fc portion of the immunoglobulin in the immune response. PMID:5305714

  1. Probiotics and lung immune responses.

    PubMed

    Forsythe, Paul

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the potential for microbe-based therapeutic approaches to asthma and respiratory infection. However, to date, clinical trials of probiotics in the treatment of respiratory disease have met with limited success. It is becoming clear that to identify the true therapeutic potential of microbes we must move away from a purely empirical approach to clinical trials and adopt knowledge-based selection of candidate probiotics strains, dose, and means of administration. Animal models have played a key role in the identification of mechanisms underlying the immunomodulatory capacity of specific bacteria. Microbe-induced changes in dendritic cell phenotype and function appear key to orchestrating the multiple pathways, involving inter alia, T cells, natural killer cells, and alveolar macrophages, associated with the protective effect of probiotics. Moving forward, the development of knowledge-based strategies for microbe-based therapeutics in respiratory disease will be aided by greater understanding of how specific bacterial structural motifs activate unique combinations of pattern recognition receptors on dendritic cells and thus direct desired immune responses.

  2. Brainstem Auditory Evoked Response in Children with Central Language Disturbance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piggott, Leonard R.; Anderson, Theodora

    1983-01-01

    Two groups of 10 children between the ages of 94 and 165 months were paired for age (wthin 6 months) and sex and were compared for Brainstem Auditory Evoked Response patterns. One child in each pair showed evidence of central language disturbance as determined by neuropsychological testing. The other did not. All had normal hearing and IQs of 80…

  3. Protective host immune responses to Salmonella infection.

    PubMed

    Pham, Oanh H; McSorley, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovars Typhi and Paratyphi are the causative agents of human typhoid fever. Current typhoid vaccines are ineffective and are not widely used in endemic areas. Greater understanding of host-pathogen interactions during Salmonella infection should facilitate the development of improved vaccines to combat typhoid and nontyphoidal Salmonellosis. This review will focus on our current understanding of Salmonella pathogenesis and the major host immune components that participate in immunity to Salmonella infection. In addition, recent findings regarding host immune mechanisms in response to Salmonella infection will be also discussed, providing a new perspective on the utility of improved tools to study the immune response to Salmonella infections.

  4. Multi-taxa trait and functional responses to physical disturbance.

    PubMed

    Pedley, Scott M; Dolman, Paul M

    2014-11-01

    Examining assemblage trait responses to environmental stressors extends our understanding beyond patterns of taxonomic diversity and composition, with results potentially transferable among bioregions. But the degree to which trait responses may be generalized across taxonomic groups remains incompletely understood. We compared trait responses among carabids, spiders and plants to an experimentally manipulated gradient of physical disturbance, replicated in open habitats within a forested landscape. Recolonization of recently disturbed habitats is expected to favour species with traits that promote greater dispersal ability, independent of taxa. We specifically predicted that physical disturbance would increase the representation of carabids with smaller body size, wings or wing dimorphism, spiders able to disperse aerially, and plants with therophyte life-history and wind-dispersed seed. We sampled 197 arthropod species (14,738 individuals) and 164 species of plant. The strength of association between each trait and the disturbance intensity was quantified by correlating matrices of species by traits, species abundance by sites and sites by environment, with significance assessed by comparison with a null model. Responses of biological traits varied among taxa but could be consistently interpreted in terms of dispersal ability. Trait shifts for carabid and plant assemblages were as predicted and correspond to those observed in other disturbance regimes. Assemblages after disturbance comprised smaller and winged carabids, and smaller plants with wind-dispersed seed, consistent with selection for species with better dispersal ability. In contrast, aerial dispersal did not appear important in spider recolonization, instead terrestrial dispersal ability was suggested by the increased abundance of larger-bodied and cursorial species. However, larger spider body size was also associated with an active-hunting strategy, also favoured in the post-disturbance environment

  5. The immune response and antibacterial therapy.

    PubMed

    Anuforom, Olachi; Wallace, Graham R; Piddock, Laura V

    2015-04-01

    The host's immune defence mechanisms are indispensable factors in surviving bacterial infections. However, in many circumstances, the immune system alone is inadequate. Since the 1940s, the use of antibacterial therapy has saved millions of lives, improving the span and quality of life of individuals. Unfortunately, we are now facing an era where antibacterial agents are threatened by resistance. In addition to targeting bacteria, some antibacterial agents affect various aspects of the immune response to infection. Since many antibacterial drugs are failing in efficacy due to resistance, it has been strongly suggested that any synergy between these drugs and the immune response be exploited in the treatment of bacterial infections. This review explores the influence of antibacterial therapy on the immune response and new approaches that could exploit this interaction for the treatment of bacterial infections.

  6. Idiosyncratic responses of Amazonian birds to primary forest disturbance.

    PubMed

    Moura, Nárgila G; Lees, Alexander C; Aleixo, Alexandre; Barlow, Jos; Berenguer, Erika; Ferreira, Joice; Mac Nally, Ralph; Thomson, James R; Gardner, Toby A

    2016-03-01

    As humans continue to alter tropical landscapes across the world, it is important to understand what environmental factors help determine the persistence of biodiversity in modified ecosystems. Studies on well-known taxonomic groups can offer critical insights as to the fate of biodiversity in these modified systems. Here we investigated species-specific responses of 44 forest-associated bird species with different behavioural traits to forest disturbance in 171 transects distributed across 31 landscapes in two regions of the eastern Brazilian Amazon. We investigated patterns of species occurrence in primary forests varyingly disturbed by selective-logging and fire and examined the relative importance of local, landscape and historical environmental variables in determining species occurrences. Within undisturbed and disturbed primary forest transects, we found that distance to forest edge and the biomass of large trees were the most important predictors driving the occurrence of individual species. However, we also found considerable variation in species responses to different environmental variables as well as inter-regional variation in the responses of the same species to the same environmental variables. We advocate the utility of using species-level analyses to complement community-wide responses in order to uncover highly variable and species-specific responses to environmental change that remain so poorly understood.

  7. Cellular immune response in intraventricular experimental neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Moura, Vania B L; Lima, Sarah B; Matos-Silva, Hidelberto; Vinaud, Marina C; Loyola, Patricia R A N; Lino, Ruy S

    2016-03-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is considered a neglected parasitic infection of the human central nervous system. Its pathogenesis is due to the host immune response, stage of evolution and location of the parasite. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in situ and systemic immune response through cytokines dosage (IL-4, IL-10, IL-17 and IFN-γ) as well as the local inflammatory response of the experimental NCC with Taenia crassiceps. The in situ and systemic cellular and inflammatory immune response were evaluated through the cytokines quantification at 7, 30, 60 and 90 days after inoculation and histopathological analysis. All cysticerci were found within the cerebral ventricles. There was a discrete intensity of inflammatory cells of mixed immune profile, polymorphonuclear and mononuclear cells, at the beginning of the infection and predominance of mononuclear cells at the end. The systemic immune response showed a significant increase in all the analysed cytokines and predominance of the Th2 immune profile cytokines at the end of the infection. These results indicate that the location of the cysticerci may lead to ventriculomegaly. The acute phase of the infection showed a mixed Th1/Th17 profile accompanied by high levels of IL-10 while the late phase showed a Th2 immune profile. PMID:26626017

  8. Cellular immune response in intraventricular experimental neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Moura, Vania B L; Lima, Sarah B; Matos-Silva, Hidelberto; Vinaud, Marina C; Loyola, Patricia R A N; Lino, Ruy S

    2016-03-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is considered a neglected parasitic infection of the human central nervous system. Its pathogenesis is due to the host immune response, stage of evolution and location of the parasite. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in situ and systemic immune response through cytokines dosage (IL-4, IL-10, IL-17 and IFN-γ) as well as the local inflammatory response of the experimental NCC with Taenia crassiceps. The in situ and systemic cellular and inflammatory immune response were evaluated through the cytokines quantification at 7, 30, 60 and 90 days after inoculation and histopathological analysis. All cysticerci were found within the cerebral ventricles. There was a discrete intensity of inflammatory cells of mixed immune profile, polymorphonuclear and mononuclear cells, at the beginning of the infection and predominance of mononuclear cells at the end. The systemic immune response showed a significant increase in all the analysed cytokines and predominance of the Th2 immune profile cytokines at the end of the infection. These results indicate that the location of the cysticerci may lead to ventriculomegaly. The acute phase of the infection showed a mixed Th1/Th17 profile accompanied by high levels of IL-10 while the late phase showed a Th2 immune profile.

  9. Gene expression profiling of anticancer immune responses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ena; Panelli, Monica C; Monsurró, Vladia; Marincola, Francesco M

    2004-06-01

    Anticancer immune responses can be enhanced by immune manipulation, however, the biological mechanism responsible for these immune responses remains largely unexplained. Conventional immunology researchers have extensively studied specific interactions between immune and cancer cells, and additional investigations have identified co-factors that may enhance the effectiveness of such interactions. As the molecular understanding of individual interactions increases, it is becoming apparent that no single mechanism can explain the phenomenon of tumor rejection. The contribution of several components of the innate and adaptive immune response is likely to be required for successful tumor rejection. These components may be variably recruited and activated by molecules with immune modulatory properties being produced by tumor and bystander cells within the tumor micro-environment. Such complexity can only be appreciated and solved by high-throughput tools capable of providing a global view of biological processes as they occur. This review will present selected examples of how high-throughput gene expression profiling may contribute to the understanding of anticancer immune responses. As reviews on technological aspects of the genomic analysis of cancer are already available, this review will provide a speculative discussion about their potential usefulness.

  10. Plant Immune Responses: Aphids Strike Back.

    PubMed

    Reymond, Philippe; Calandra, Thierry

    2015-07-20

    To survive and complete their life cycle, herbivorous insects face the difficult challenge of coping with the arsenal of plant defences. A new study reports that aphids secrete evolutionarily conserved cytokines in their saliva to suppress host immune responses.

  11. The immune response to resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Simonson, S R

    2001-08-01

    The immune response to exercise has received increased attention in the last decade. Most of this attention has focused on aerobic exercise (AEX), whereas the effect of resistance exercise (REX) has received comparatively little notice. Resistance exercise and AEX have different physiologic impacts; perhaps this also applies to the immune system. The purpose of this review was to determine a consensus from the REX immune studies that have been completed. This is complicated by the multitude of immune parameters, the varying methods used to assess them, and the paucity of studies performed. Thus, it is difficult to make a blanket statement. There is a REX-induced leukocytosis. Resistance conditioning (RCO) does not alter this response or affect the resting immune system. From these data, it appears that neither REX nor RCO demonstrates a significant impact on peripheral immunosurveillance. PMID:11710669

  12. Oxidative stress and immune disturbance after long-term exposure to bisphenol A in juvenile common carp (Cyprinus carpio).

    PubMed

    Qiu, Wenhui; Chen, Jingsi; Li, Yijie; Chen, Zhong; Jiang, Lihui; Yang, Ming; Wu, Minghong

    2016-08-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a well-known endocrine disrupting chemical (EDC), ubiquitous in the aquatic environment, which poses an ecotoxicological risk to the health of aquatic organisms. However, the immunotoxic effects of its long-term exposure on fish have received limited attention. We examined a number of typical immune-related parameters and oxidative stress indices in the liver and blood serum of the red common carp (Cyprinus carpio), following a 30-day exposure to five different concentrations of BPA (0.1, 1, 10, 100, and 1000μg/L). A significant increase in the hepato somatic index was observed in fish upon exposure to 1000µg/L BPA, which correlated strongly with the accumulated BPA concentrations in fish bile. Induced oxidative stress was also apparent in the exposed fish liver, based on the enhanced levels of lipid peroxidation and inhibited activities of catalase, superoxide dismutase, and glutathione peroxidase. Serum lysozyme and C-reaction protein levels increased at low concentrations of exposure; however, they were significantly suppressed upon exposure to high concentrations. A significant increase was observed in the levels of immunoglobulin M, complement component 3, and alkaline phosphatase, in both fish liver and serum at low doses of 0.1 and 1μg/L. This suggests that long-term exposure to environmentally relevant concentrations of BPA (even as low as 0.1μg/L) could significantly disturb the immune response of fish. Moreover, RXRα expression in the liver was significantly altered upon BPA exposure and the trend underlying this change correlated closely with those of the most immune-related parameters, implying the involvement of the PPARγ/RXRα signaling pathway in regulating the immune response of fish upon long-term BPA exposure. In short, our results demonstrate the susceptibility of fish immune system to long-term BPA exposure. Therefore, the immunotoxicity of EDCs in aquatic organisms should not have been underestimated. PMID:27088622

  13. Cellular immune response experiment MA-031

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Criswell, B. S.

    1976-01-01

    Significant changes in phytohemagglutinin (PHA) lymphocytic responsiveness occurred in the cellular immune response of three astronauts during the 9 day flight of the Apollo Soyuz Test Project. Parameters studied were white blood cell concentrations, lymphocyte numbers, B- and T-lymphocyte distributions in peripheral blood, and lymphocyte responsiveness to PHA, pokeweed mitogen, Concanavalin A, and influenza virus antigen.

  14. Functional response of ungulate browsers in disturbed eastern hemlock forests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Destefano, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Ungulate browsing in predator depleted North American landscapes is believed to be causing widespread tree recruitment failures. However, canopy disturbances and variations in ungulate densities are sources of heterogeneity that can buffer ecosystems against herbivory. Relatively little is known about the functional response (the rate of consumption in relation to food availability) of ungulates in eastern temperate forests, and therefore how “top down” control of vegetation may vary with disturbance type, intensity, and timing. This knowledge gap is relevant in the Northeastern United States today with the recent arrival of hemlock woolly adelgid (HWA; Adelges tsugae) that is killing eastern hemlocks (Tsuga canadensis) and initiating salvage logging as a management response. We used an existing experiment in central New England begun in 2005, which simulated severe adelgid infestation and intensive logging of intact hemlock forest, to examine the functional response of combined moose (Alces americanus) and white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) foraging in two different time periods after disturbance (3 and 7 years). We predicted that browsing impacts would be linear or accelerating (Type I or Type III response) in year 3 when regenerating stem densities were relatively low and decelerating (Type II response) in year 7 when stem densities increased. We sampled and compared woody regeneration and browsing among logged and simulated insect attack treatments and two intact controls (hemlock and hardwood forest) in 2008 and again in 2012. We then used AIC model selection to compare the three major functional response models (Types I, II, and III) of ungulate browsing in relation to forage density. We also examined relative use of the different stand types by comparing pellet group density and remote camera images. In 2008, total and proportional browse consumption increased with stem density, and peaked in logged plots, revealing a Type I response. In 2012

  15. Immune Response to Biologic Scaffold Materials

    PubMed Central

    Badylak, Stephen F.; Gilbert, Thomas W.

    2008-01-01

    Biologic scaffold materials composed of mammalian extracellular matrix are commonly used in regenerative medicine and in surgical procedures for the reconstruction of numerous tissue and organs. These biologic materials are typically allogeneic or xenogeneic in origin and are derived from tissues such as small intestine, urinary bladder, dermis, and pericardium. The innate and acquired host immune response to these biologic materials and the effect of the immune response upon downstream remodeling events has been largely unexplored. Variables that affect the host response include manufacturing processes, the rate of scaffold degradation, and the presence of cross species antigens. This manuscript provides an overview of studies that have evaluated the immune response to biologic scaffold materials and variables that affect this response. PMID:18083531

  16. Host innate immune responses to sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Wiersinga, Willem Joost; Leopold, Stije J; Cranendonk, Duncan R; van der Poll, Tom

    2014-01-01

    The immune response to sepsis can be seen as a pattern recognition receptor-mediated dysregulation of the immune system following pathogen invasion in which a careful balance between inflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses is vital. Invasive infection triggers both pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory host responses, the magnitude of which depends on multiple factors, including pathogen virulence, site of infection, host genetics, and comorbidities. Toll-like receptors, the inflammasomes, and other pattern recognition receptors initiate the immune response after recognition of danger signals derived from microorganisms, so-called pathogen-associated molecular patterns or derived from the host, so-called danger-associated molecular patterns. Further dissection of the role of host–pathogen interactions, the cytokine response, the coagulation cascade, and their multidirectional interactions in sepsis should lead toward the development of new therapeutic strategies in sepsis. PMID:23774844

  17. Immune Responses and Lassa Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Russier, Marion; Pannetier, Delphine; Baize, Sylvain

    2012-01-01

    Lassa fever is a hemorrhagic fever endemic to West Africa and caused by Lassa virus, an Old World arenavirus. It may be fatal, but most patients recover from acute disease and some experience asymptomatic infection. The immune mechanisms associated with these different outcomes have not yet been fully elucidated, but considerable progress has recently been made, through the use of in vitro human models and nonhuman primates, the only relevant animal model that mimics the pathophysiology and immune responses induced in patients. We discuss here the roles of the various components of the innate and adaptive immune systems in Lassa virus infection and in the control of viral replication and pathogenesis. PMID:23202504

  18. Cytomegalovirus infection improves immune responses to influenza

    PubMed Central

    Furman, David; Jojic, Vladimir; Sharma, Shalini; Shen-Orr, Shai; Angel, Cesar J Lopez; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Kidd, Brian; Maecker, Holden T; Concannon, Patrick; Dekker, Cornelia L; Thomas, Paul G; Davis, Mark M

    2015-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a beta-herpes virus present in a latent form in most people worldwide. In immunosuppressed individuals, CMV can reactivate and cause serious clinical complications, but the effect of the latent state on healthy people remains elusive. We undertook a systems approach to understand the differences between seropositive and negative subjects and measured hundreds of immune system components from blood samples including cytokines and chemokines, immune cell phenotyping, gene expression, ex vivo cell responses to cytokine stimuli and the antibody response to seasonal influenza vaccination. As expected, we found decreased responses to vaccination and an overall down-regulation of immune components in aged individuals regardless of CMV serostatus. In contrast, CMV-infected young adults exhibited an overall up-regulation of immune components including enhanced antibody responses to influenza vaccination, increased CD8+ T cell sensitivity, and elevated levels of circulating IFN-γ compared to uninfected individuals. Experiments with young mice infected with murine CMV also showed significant protection from an influenza virus challenge compared with uninfected animals, although this effect declined with time. These data show that CMV and its murine equivalent can have a beneficial effect on the immune response of young, healthy individuals, which may explain the continued coexistence of CMV and mammals throughout their evolution. PMID:25834109

  19. PASSIVE ANTIBODY AND THE IMMUNE RESPONSE

    PubMed Central

    McBride, Raymond A.; Schierman, Louis W.

    1971-01-01

    The isoimmune response of fowl inoculated with RBC coated with antibody was investigated. Anti-B antiserum from a single animal was used to coat different donor type RBC. With each donor type RBC the immune response to the coated determinants is suppressed. Enhancement of the immune response to noncoated determinants occurs when they are products of an allelic gene or belong to a different blood group system. Coating some B antigen determinants suppresses the response to noncoated determinants of the same antigen, i.e., determinants which are products of the same B gene. Varying the quantity of passive antibody revealed that the degree of suppression and the degree of enhancement are negatively correlated. These findings support the concept that antibody-coated determinants function as carrier for noncoated determinants, provided a certain physical association exists between them. A further interpretation of these studies is that in certain situations an antibody to one antigen may interfere with events which lead to an immune response to a different antigen. The possibility, that the protection afforded by ABO incompatibility against Rh isoimmunization is because of a similar phenomenon, is discussed. A hypothesis is presented which states that where the immune response to certain antigens behaves as a dominantly inherited trait, and is associated with histocompatibility type, the nonresponder animals possess an antibody (perhaps cell bound) which interferes with the response to determinants for which it does not have specificity. Responders are assumed to lack this antibody because it has specificity for their major histocompatibility antigens. PMID:4106486

  20. Cell-Mediated Immune Responses in Paraneoplastic Neurological Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Zaborowski, Mikolaj Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS) are disorders of the nervous system that are associated with remote effects of malignancy. PNS are considered to have an autoimmune pathology. It has been suggested that immune antitumor responses are the origin of improved outcome in PNS. We describe cell-mediated immune responses in PNS and their potential contributions to antitumor reactions. Experimental and neuropathological studies have revealed infiltrates in nervous tissue and disturbances in lymphocyte populations in both cerebrospinal fluid and peripheral blood. A predominance of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) over T helper cells has been observed. CTLs can be specifically aggressive against antigens shared by tumors and nervous tissue. Based on genetic studies, a common clonal origin of lymphocytes from blood, tumor, and nervous tissue is suggested. Suppressive regulatory T (Treg) lymphocytes are dysfunctional. Simultaneously, in tumor tissue, more intense cell-mediated immune responses are observed, which often coincide with a less aggressive course of neoplastic disease. An increased titer of onconeural antibodies is also related to better prognoses in patients without PNS. The evaluation of onconeural and neuronal surface antibodies was recommended in current guidelines. The link between PNS emergence and antitumor responses may result from more active CTLs and less functional Treg lymphocytes. PMID:24575143

  1. Radiation triggering immune response and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Hekim, Nezih; Cetin, Zafer; Nikitaki, Zacharenia; Cort, Aysegul; Saygili, Eyup Ilker

    2015-11-28

    Radiation therapy (RT) is a well-established but still under optimization branch of Cancer Therapy (CT). RT uses electromagnetic waves or charged particles in order to kill malignant cells, by accumulating the energy onto these cells. The issue at stake for RT, as well as for any other Cancer Therapy technique, is always to kill only cancer cells, without affecting the surrounding healthy ones. This perspective of CT is usually described under the terms "specificity" and "selectivity". Specificity and selectivity are the ideal goal, but the ideal is never entirely achieved. Thus, in addition to killing healthy cells, changes and effects are observed in the immune system after irradiation. In this review, we mainly focus on the effects of ionizing radiation on the immune system and its components like bone marrow. Additionally, we are interested in the effects and benefits of low-dose ionizing radiation on the hematopoiesis and immune response. Low dose radiation has been shown to induce biological responses like inflammatory responses, innate immune system activation and DNA repair (adaptive response). This review reveals the fact that there are many unanswered questions regarding the role of radiation as either an immune-activating (low dose) or immunosuppressive (high dose) agent.

  2. Antimicrobial peptides in innate immune responses.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Ole E; Borregaard, Niels; Cole, Alexander M

    2008-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are ancient effector molecules in the innate immune response of eukaryotes. These peptides are important for the antimicrobial efficacy of phagocytes and for the innate immune response mounted by epithelia of humans and other mammals. AMPs are generated either by de novo synthesis or by proteolytic cleavage from antimicrobially inactive proproteins. Studies of human diseases and animal studies have given important clues to the in vivo role of AMPs. It is now evident that dysregulation of the generation of AMPs in innate immune responses plays a role in certain diseases like Crohn's disease and atopic dermatitis. AMPs are attractive candidates for development of novel antibiotics due to their in vivo activity profile and some peptides may serve as templates for further drug development.

  3. Redox regulation of the immune response.

    PubMed

    Gostner, Johanna M; Becker, Kathrin; Fuchs, Dietmar; Sucher, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS-RNS) and other redox active molecules fulfill key functions in immunity. Beside the initiation of cytocidal reactions within the pathogen defense strategy, redox reactions trigger and shape the immune response and are further involved in termination and initialization of cellular restorative processes. Regulatory mechanisms provided by redox-activated signaling events guarantee the correct spatial and temporal proceeding of immunological processes, and continued imbalances in redox homeostasis lead to crucial failures of control mechanisms, thus promoting the development of pathological conditions. Interferon-gamma is the most potent inducer of ROS-RNS formation in target cells like macrophages. Immune-regulatory pathways such as tryptophan breakdown via indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase and neopterin production by GTP-cyclohydrolase-I are initiated during T helper cell type 1 (Th1-type) immune response concomitant to the production of ROS-RNS by immunocompetent cells. Therefore, increased neopterin production and tryptophan breakdown is representative of an activated cellular immune system and can be used for the in vivo and in vitro monitoring of oxidative stress. In parallel, the activation of the redox-sensitive transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B is a central element in immunity leading to cell type and stimulus-specific expression of responsive genes. Furthermore, T cell activation and proliferation are strongly dependent on the redox potential of the extracellular microenvironment. T cell commitment to Th1, Th2, regulatory T cell, and other phenotypes appears to crucially depend on the activation of redox-sensitive signaling cascades, where oxidative conditions support Th1 development while 'antioxidative' stress leads to a shift to allergic Th2-type immune responses.

  4. Immune response from a resource allocation perspective

    PubMed Central

    Rauw, Wendy M.

    2012-01-01

    The immune system is a life history trait that can be expected to trade off against other life history traits. Whether or not a trait is considered to be a life history trait has consequences for the expectation on how it responds to natural selection and evolution; in addition, it may have consequences for the outcome of artificial selection when it is included in the breeding objective. The immune system involved in pathogen resistance comprises multiple mechanisms that define a host's defensive capacity. Immune resistance involves employing mechanisms that either prevent pathogens from invading or eliminate the pathogens when they do invade. On the other hand, tolerance involves limiting the damage that is caused by the infection. Both tolerance and resistance traits require (re)allocation of resources and carry physiological costs. Examples of trade-offs between immune function and growth, reproduction and stress response are provided in this review, in addition to consequences of selection for increased production on immune function and vice versa. Reaction norms are used to deal with questions of immune resistance vs. tolerance to pathogens that relate host health to infection intensity. In essence, selection for immune tolerance in livestock is a particular case of selection for animal robustness. Since breeding goals that include robustness traits are required in the implementation of more sustainable agricultural production systems, it is of interest to investigate whether immune tolerance is a robustness trait that is positively correlated with overall animal robustness. Considerably more research is needed to estimate the shapes of the cost functions of different immune strategies, and investigate trade-offs and cross-over benefits of selection for disease resistance and/or disease tolerance in livestock production. PMID:23413205

  5. Coral community response to bleaching on a highly disturbed reef

    PubMed Central

    Guest, J. R.; Low, J.; Tun, K.; Wilson, B.; Ng, C.; Raingeard, D.; Ulstrup, K. E.; Tanzil, J. T. I.; Todd, P. A.; Toh, T. C.; McDougald, D.; Chou, L. M.; Steinberg, P. D.

    2016-01-01

    While many studies of coral bleaching report on broad, regional scale responses, fewer examine variation in susceptibility among coral taxa and changes in community structure, before, during and after bleaching on individual reefs. Here we report in detail on the response to bleaching by a coral community on a highly disturbed reef site south of mainland Singapore before, during and after a major thermal anomaly in 2010. To estimate the capacity for resistance to thermal stress, we report on: a) overall bleaching severity during and after the event, b) differences in bleaching susceptibility among taxa during the event, and c) changes in coral community structure one year before and after bleaching. Approximately two thirds of colonies bleached, however, post-bleaching recovery was quite rapid and, importantly, coral taxa that are usually highly susceptible were relatively unaffected. Although total coral cover declined, there was no significant change in coral taxonomic community structure before and after bleaching. Several factors may have contributed to the overall high resistance of corals at this site including Symbiodinium affiliation, turbidity and heterotrophy. Our results suggest that, despite experiencing chronic anthropogenic disturbances, turbid shallow reef communities may be remarkably resilient to acute thermal stress. PMID:26876092

  6. Coral community response to bleaching on a highly disturbed reef.

    PubMed

    Guest, J R; Low, J; Tun, K; Wilson, B; Ng, C; Raingeard, D; Ulstrup, K E; Tanzil, J T I; Todd, P A; Toh, T C; McDougald, D; Chou, L M; Steinberg, P D

    2016-02-15

    While many studies of coral bleaching report on broad, regional scale responses, fewer examine variation in susceptibility among coral taxa and changes in community structure, before, during and after bleaching on individual reefs. Here we report in detail on the response to bleaching by a coral community on a highly disturbed reef site south of mainland Singapore before, during and after a major thermal anomaly in 2010. To estimate the capacity for resistance to thermal stress, we report on: a) overall bleaching severity during and after the event, b) differences in bleaching susceptibility among taxa during the event, and c) changes in coral community structure one year before and after bleaching. Approximately two thirds of colonies bleached, however, post-bleaching recovery was quite rapid and, importantly, coral taxa that are usually highly susceptible were relatively unaffected. Although total coral cover declined, there was no significant change in coral taxonomic community structure before and after bleaching. Several factors may have contributed to the overall high resistance of corals at this site including Symbiodinium affiliation, turbidity and heterotrophy. Our results suggest that, despite experiencing chronic anthropogenic disturbances, turbid shallow reef communities may be remarkably resilient to acute thermal stress.

  7. Coral community response to bleaching on a highly disturbed reef.

    PubMed

    Guest, J R; Low, J; Tun, K; Wilson, B; Ng, C; Raingeard, D; Ulstrup, K E; Tanzil, J T I; Todd, P A; Toh, T C; McDougald, D; Chou, L M; Steinberg, P D

    2016-01-01

    While many studies of coral bleaching report on broad, regional scale responses, fewer examine variation in susceptibility among coral taxa and changes in community structure, before, during and after bleaching on individual reefs. Here we report in detail on the response to bleaching by a coral community on a highly disturbed reef site south of mainland Singapore before, during and after a major thermal anomaly in 2010. To estimate the capacity for resistance to thermal stress, we report on: a) overall bleaching severity during and after the event, b) differences in bleaching susceptibility among taxa during the event, and c) changes in coral community structure one year before and after bleaching. Approximately two thirds of colonies bleached, however, post-bleaching recovery was quite rapid and, importantly, coral taxa that are usually highly susceptible were relatively unaffected. Although total coral cover declined, there was no significant change in coral taxonomic community structure before and after bleaching. Several factors may have contributed to the overall high resistance of corals at this site including Symbiodinium affiliation, turbidity and heterotrophy. Our results suggest that, despite experiencing chronic anthropogenic disturbances, turbid shallow reef communities may be remarkably resilient to acute thermal stress. PMID:26876092

  8. Adaptive immune responses to Candida albicans infection.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Jonathan P; Moyes, David L

    2015-01-01

    Fungal infections are becoming increasingly prevalent in the human population and contribute to morbidity and mortality in healthy and immunocompromised individuals respectively. Candida albicans is the most commonly encountered fungal pathogen of humans, and is frequently found on the mucosal surfaces of the body. Host defense against C. albicans is dependent upon a finely tuned implementation of innate and adaptive immune responses, enabling the host to neutralise the invading fungus. Central to this protection are the adaptive Th1 and Th17 cellular responses, which are considered paramount to successful immune defense against C. albicans infections, and enable tissue homeostasis to be maintained in the presence of colonising fungi. This review will highlight the recent advances in our understanding of adaptive immunity to Candida albicans infections.

  9. Immune Response in Mussels To Environmental Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pryor, Stephen C.; Facher, Evan

    1997-01-01

    Describes the use of mussels in measuring the extent of chemical contamination and its variation in different coastal regions. Presents an experiment to introduce students to immune response and the effects of environmental pollution on marine organisms. Contains 14 references. (JRH)

  10. [Modulation of immune response by bacterial lipopolysaccharides].

    PubMed

    Aldapa-Vega, Gustavo; Pastelín-Palacios, Rodolfo; Isibasi, Armando; Moreno-Eutimio, Mario A; López-Macías, Constantino

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a molecule that is profusely found on the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and is also a potent stimulator of the immune response. As the main molecule on the bacterial surface, is also the most biologically active. The immune response of the host is activated by the recognition of LPS through Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and this receptor-ligand interaction is closely linked to LPS structure. Microorganisms have evolved systems to control the expression and structure of LPS, producing structural variants that are used for modulating the host immune responses during infection. Examples of this include Helicobacter pylori, Francisella tularensis, Chlamydia trachomatis and Salmonella spp. High concentrations of LPS can cause fever, increased heart rate and lead to septic shock and death. However, at relatively low concentrations some LPS are highly active immunomodulators, which can induce non-specific resistance to invading microorganisms. The elucidation of the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the recognition of LPS and its structural variants has been fundamental to understand inflammation and is currently a pivotal field of research to understand the innate immune response, inflammation, the complex host-pathogen relationship and has important implications for the rational development of new immunomodulators and adjuvants. PMID:27560917

  11. [Modulation of immune response by bacterial lipopolysaccharides].

    PubMed

    Aldapa-Vega, Gustavo; Pastelín-Palacios, Rodolfo; Isibasi, Armando; Moreno-Eutimio, Mario A; López-Macías, Constantino

    2016-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a molecule that is profusely found on the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and is also a potent stimulator of the immune response. As the main molecule on the bacterial surface, is also the most biologically active. The immune response of the host is activated by the recognition of LPS through Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and this receptor-ligand interaction is closely linked to LPS structure. Microorganisms have evolved systems to control the expression and structure of LPS, producing structural variants that are used for modulating the host immune responses during infection. Examples of this include Helicobacter pylori, Francisella tularensis, Chlamydia trachomatis and Salmonella spp. High concentrations of LPS can cause fever, increased heart rate and lead to septic shock and death. However, at relatively low concentrations some LPS are highly active immunomodulators, which can induce non-specific resistance to invading microorganisms. The elucidation of the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the recognition of LPS and its structural variants has been fundamental to understand inflammation and is currently a pivotal field of research to understand the innate immune response, inflammation, the complex host-pathogen relationship and has important implications for the rational development of new immunomodulators and adjuvants.

  12. Vesicle trafficking in plant immune responses.

    PubMed

    Robatzek, Silke

    2007-01-01

    In plants, perception of pathogen-associated molecular patterns at the surface is the first line of defence in cellular immunity. This review summarizes recent evidence of the involvement of vesicle trafficking in the plant's immune response against pathogens. I first discuss aspects of ligand-stimulated receptor endocytosis. The best-characterized pattern-recognition receptor (PRR), FLS2, is a transmembrane leucine-rich repeat receptor kinase that recognizes bacterial flagellin. FLS2 was recently shown to undergo internalization upon activation with its cognate ligand. An animal PRR, TLR4 that mediates perception of bacterial-derived lipopolysaccharides, similarly exhibits ligand-stimulated endocytosis. The second focus is N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor adaptor protein receptor (SNARE)-mediated immunity involving syntaxins and their cognate partners. One of the genes involved in basal immunity in Arabidopsis, PEN1, encodes a syntaxin that focally accumulates at fungal penetration sites, raising the possibility that induced exocytosis is important for active defence. Pathogen-triggered endocytic and exocytic processes have to be balanced to ensure host cell homeostasis. Thus, understanding how phytopathogens have evolved strategies to exploit host cell vesicle trafficking to manipulate immune responses is currently an area of intense study. PMID:17081192

  13. Innate Immune Sensing and Response to Influenza

    PubMed Central

    Pulendran, Bali; Maddur, Mohan S.

    2015-01-01

    Influenza viruses pose a substantial threat to human and animal health worldwide. Recent studies in mouse models have revealed an indispensable role for the innate immune system in defense against influenza virus. Recognition of the virus by innate immune receptors in a multitude of cell types activates intricate signaling networks, functioning to restrict viral replication. Downstream effector mechanisms include activation of innate immune cells and, induction and regulation of adaptive immunity. However, uncontrolled innate responses are associated with exaggerated disease, especially in pandemic influenza virus infection. Despite advances in the understanding of innate response to influenza in the mouse model, there is a large knowledge gap in humans, particularly in immunocom-promised groups such as infants and the elderly. We propose here, the need for further studies in humans to decipher the role of innate immunity to influenza virus, particularly at the site of infection. These studies will complement the existing work in mice and facilitate the quest to design improved vaccines and therapeutic strategies against influenza. PMID:25078919

  14. ANTIGEN RECOGNITION AND THE IMMUNE RESPONSE

    PubMed Central

    Bush, Maurice E.; Alkan, Sefik S.; Nitecki, Danute E.; Goodman, Joel W.

    1972-01-01

    L-Tyrosine-p-azobenzenearsonate (RAT) induces cellular immunity without humoral antibody in guinea pigs. Asymmetric bifunctional antigens composed of one RAT moiety and one dinitrophenyl (DNP) group separated by flexible spacers induce anti-RAT cellular immunity and an anti-DNP humoral response. Symmetrical bifunctional antigens of similar design but comprised of two RAT determinants induce cellular immunity without demonstrable anti-RAT antibody. However, when the flexible spacer is replaced by a rigid decaproline chain, humoral anti-RAT responses are provoked. Since RAT contains both electropositive (azo) and electronegative (arsonate) centers, the failure of bifunctional RAT compounds with flexible spacers to induce humoral immunity might be ascribed either to intramolecular stacking, which compromises their bifunctional character, or to interaction of both determinants with receptors on the same cell surface, which would fail to satisfy the requirement for cooperation. In order to distinguish between these alternatives, symmetrical bifunctional antigens composed of two L-tyrosine-p-azophenyltrimethylammonium (TAT) determinants separated by flexible or rigid spacers were synthesized. TAT is immunogenic and does not cross-react with RAT. Furthermore, it contains only electropositive centers and consequently bifunctional molecules do not undergo intramolecular stacking. Immunization with either flexibly or rigidly spaced bifunctional TAT antigens raised anti-TAT antibody. These results conclusively demonstrate that "self-help," cooperation between bone marrow-derived and thymus-derived lymphocytes of identical or similar specificity, can occur, provided the determinants on the antigen are prevented from associating with each other. PMID:4118413

  15. [Response of Sediment Micro Environment and Micro Interface to Physical Disturbance Intensity Under the Disturbance of Chironomus plumosus].

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiao-dan; Li, Yong; Li, Da-peng; Wang, Ren; Deng, Meng; Huang, Yong

    2015-05-01

    The response of sediment micro environment and micro intertace to physical disturbance intensity under the physical and Chironomus plumosus disturbance was investigated by means of sediment Rhizon samplers and Unisense micro sensor system. The sediment and overlying water were taken from Meiliang bay of Taihu Lake. The results showed that the OPD reached up to 12.1 mm under the high intensity (240 r · min(-1)), while it was higher than 3. 8. mm under low intensity (60 r · min(-1)). The TOE, the difference of TOE and DOE, OPD, ORP and the difference of DO spatial distribution were all positively correlated with the physical disturbance intensity. The increasing magnitude and range of pH as well as the decreasing magnitude and range of ferrous followed the same response tendency. Within the 0-6 cm sediment, the water content and porosity as well as the microbial activity at the same depth increased with the increase of physical disturbance intensity. In addition, the degree of response of the above parameters to the physical disturbance intensity was weakened with the increase of sediment depth. It was suggested that Chironomus plumosus dug more and deeper galleries under high intensity physical disturbance. Therefore, the sediment micro environment and micro interface were transformed in the vertical direction of the sediment. PMID:26314108

  16. Clinical iron deficiency disturbs normal human responses to hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Frise, Matthew C.; Cheng, Hung-Yuan; Nickol, Annabel H.; Curtis, M. Kate; Pollard, Karen A.; Roberts, David J.; Ratcliffe, Peter J.; Dorrington, Keith L.; Robbins, Peter A.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Iron bioavailability has been identified as a factor that influences cellular hypoxia sensing, putatively via an action on the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway. We therefore hypothesized that clinical iron deficiency would disturb integrated human responses to hypoxia. METHODS. We performed a prospective, controlled, observational study of the effects of iron status on hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. Individuals with absolute iron deficiency (ID) and an iron-replete (IR) control group were exposed to two 6-hour periods of isocapnic hypoxia. The second hypoxic exposure was preceded by i.v. infusion of iron. Pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) was serially assessed with Doppler echocardiography. RESULTS. Thirteen ID individuals completed the study and were age- and sex-matched with controls. PASP did not differ by group or study day before each hypoxic exposure. During the first 6-hour hypoxic exposure, the rise in PASP was 6.2 mmHg greater in the ID group (absolute rises 16.1 and 10.7 mmHg, respectively; 95% CI for difference, 2.7–9.7 mmHg, P = 0.001). Intravenous iron attenuated the PASP rise in both groups; however, the effect was greater in ID participants than in controls (absolute reductions 11.1 and 6.8 mmHg, respectively; 95% CI for difference in change, –8.3 to –0.3 mmHg, P = 0.035). Serum erythropoietin responses to hypoxia also differed between groups. CONCLUSION. Clinical iron deficiency disturbs normal responses to hypoxia, as evidenced by exaggerated hypoxic pulmonary hypertension that is reversed by subsequent iron administration. Disturbed hypoxia sensing and signaling provides a mechanism through which iron deficiency may be detrimental to human health. TRIAL REGISTRATION. ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT01847352). FUNDING. M.C. Frise is the recipient of a British Heart Foundation Clinical Research Training Fellowship (FS/14/48/30828). K.L. Dorrington is supported by the Dunhill Medical Trust (R178/1110). D.J. Roberts was

  17. Humoral immune responses in foetal sheep.

    PubMed Central

    Fahey, K J; Morris, B

    1978-01-01

    A total of fifty-two foetal sheep between 49 and 126 days gestation were injected with polymeric and monomeric flagellin, dinitrophenylated monomeric flagellin, chicken red blood cells, ovalbumin, ferritin, chicken gamma-globulin and the somatic antigens of Salmonella typhimurium in a variety of combinations. Immune responses were followed in these animals by taking serial blood samples from them through indwelling vascular cannulae and measuring the circulating titres of antibody. Of the antigens tested, ferritin induced immune responses in the youngest foetuses. A short time later in gestation, the majority of foetuses responded to chicken red blood cells, polymeric flagellin, monomeric flagellin and dinitrophenylated monomeric flagellin. Only older foetuses responded regularly to chicken gamma-globulin and ovalbumin. However, antibodies to all these antigens were first detected over the relatively short period of development between 64 and 82 days gestation and this made it difficult to define any precise order in the development of immune responsiveness. Of the antigens tested only the somatic antigens of S. typhimurium failed to induce a primary antibody response during foetal life. The character and magnitude of the antibody responses in foetuses changed throughout in utero development. Both the total amount of antibody produced and the duration of the response increased with foetal age. Foetuses younger than 87 days gestation did not synthesize 2-mercaptoethanol resistant antibodies or IgG1 immunoglobulin to any of the antigens tested, whereas most foetuses older than this regularly did so. PMID:711249

  18. CELLS INVOLVED IN THE IMMUNE RESPONSE

    PubMed Central

    Daguillard, Fritz; Richter, Maxwell

    1970-01-01

    There exists in the rabbit a population of lymphocytes carrying immunoglobulin-like receptors on their surface. These receptors interact with antigen and with anti-immunoglobulin antibodies and appear to mediate the recognition process leading to the humoral immune response. There exists in the rabbit a second population of lymphocytes capable of reacting with phytohemagglutinin. This population of lymphocytes is different from the one capable of reacting with soluble protein antigens or anti-immunoglobulin antiserum and is probably involved in the mediation of cellular immunity. PMID:5308064

  19. Multiscale modeling of mucosal immune responses

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Computational modeling techniques are playing increasingly important roles in advancing a systems-level mechanistic understanding of biological processes. Computer simulations guide and underpin experimental and clinical efforts. This study presents ENteric Immune Simulator (ENISI), a multiscale modeling tool for modeling the mucosal immune responses. ENISI's modeling environment can simulate in silico experiments from molecular signaling pathways to tissue level events such as tissue lesion formation. ENISI's architecture integrates multiple modeling technologies including ABM (agent-based modeling), ODE (ordinary differential equations), SDE (stochastic modeling equations), and PDE (partial differential equations). This paper focuses on the implementation and developmental challenges of ENISI. A multiscale model of mucosal immune responses during colonic inflammation, including CD4+ T cell differentiation and tissue level cell-cell interactions was developed to illustrate the capabilities, power and scope of ENISI MSM. Background Computational techniques are becoming increasingly powerful and modeling tools for biological systems are of greater needs. Biological systems are inherently multiscale, from molecules to tissues and from nano-seconds to a lifespan of several years or decades. ENISI MSM integrates multiple modeling technologies to understand immunological processes from signaling pathways within cells to lesion formation at the tissue level. This paper examines and summarizes the technical details of ENISI, from its initial version to its latest cutting-edge implementation. Implementation Object-oriented programming approach is adopted to develop a suite of tools based on ENISI. Multiple modeling technologies are integrated to visualize tissues, cells as well as proteins; furthermore, performance matching between the scales is addressed. Conclusion We used ENISI MSM for developing predictive multiscale models of the mucosal immune system during gut

  20. CELLS INVOLVED IN THE IMMUNE RESPONSE

    PubMed Central

    Daguillard, Fritz; Richter, Maxwell

    1969-01-01

    Cells of the different lymphoid organs in the normal adult rabbit were investigated for their capacity to respond in vitro to a number of stimuli, such as phytohemagglutinin (PHA), anti-rabbit immunoglobulin antiserum (GARIG) and allogeneic and xenogeneic lymphoid cells, and for their capacity to adsorb radioactively-labeled anti-immunoglobulin antiserum. The bone marrow cells responded minimally to PHA, GARIG, and the allogeneic and xenogeneic stimuli. The thymus cells were unable to respond to stimulation with GARIG although they responded to the other stimuli. The cells of the other lymphoid organs tested responded to all the mitogenic agents, to varying degrees. On the basis of the results presented and the findings of other investigators, it is concluded that: 1. The response of the cells to GARIG indicates a potential capacity to mediate humoral immunity and requires the presence of immunoglobulin or immunoglobulin-like recognition sites on the cell surface. 2. The response of the cells to PHA and allogeneic and xenogeneic cells indicates a potential capacity to mediate cellular immunity and does not necessitate the presence of immunoglobulin-recognition sites on the cell surface. 3. The thymus in the normal adult rabbit consists of cells capable of mediating cellular immunity only. 4. The other lymphoid organs appear to possess cells capable of mediating humoral and cellular immunity. PMID:5307485

  1. Humoral innate immune response and disease

    PubMed Central

    Shishido, Stephanie N.; Varahan, Sriram; Yuan, Kai; Li, Xiangdong; Fleming, Sherry D.

    2012-01-01

    The humoral innate immune response consists of multiple components, including the naturally occurring antibodies (NAb), pentraxins and the complement and contact cascades. As soluble, plasma components, these innate proteins provide key elements in the prevention and control of disease. However, pathogens and cells with altered self proteins utilize multiple humoral components to evade destruction and promote pathogy. Many studies have examined the relationship between humoral immunity and autoimmune disorders. This review focuses on the interactions between the humoral components and their role in promoting the pathogenesis of bacterial and viral infections and chronic diseases such as atherosclerosis and cancer. Understanding the beneficial and detrimental aspects of the individual components and the interactions between proteins which regulate the innate and adaptive response will provide therapeutic targets for subsequent studies. PMID:22771788

  2. Evolutionary responses of innate Immunity to adaptive immunity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Innate immunity is present in all metazoans, whereas the evolutionarily more novel adaptive immunity is limited to jawed fishes and their descendants (gnathostomes). We observe that the organisms that possess adaptive immunity lack diversity in their innate pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), rais...

  3. A meta-analysis of soil microbial biomass responses to forest disturbances

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Sandra R.; Treseder, Kathleen K.

    2013-01-01

    Climate warming is likely to increase the frequency and severity of forest disturbances, with uncertain consequences for soil microbial communities and their contribution to ecosystem C dynamics. To address this uncertainty, we conducted a meta-analysis of 139 published soil microbial responses to forest disturbances. These disturbances included abiotic (fire, harvesting, storm) and biotic (insect, pathogen) disturbances. We hypothesized that soil microbial biomass would decline following forest disturbances, but that abiotic disturbances would elicit greater reductions in microbial biomass than biotic disturbances. In support of this hypothesis, across all published studies, disturbances reduced soil microbial biomass by an average of 29.4%. However, microbial responses differed between abiotic and biotic disturbances. Microbial responses were significantly negative following fires, harvest, and storms (48.7, 19.1, and 41.7% reductions in microbial biomass, respectively). In contrast, changes in soil microbial biomass following insect infestation and pathogen-induced tree mortality were non-significant, although biotic disturbances were poorly represented in the literature. When measured separately, fungal and bacterial responses to disturbances mirrored the response of the microbial community as a whole. Changes in microbial abundance following disturbance were significantly positively correlated with changes in microbial respiration. We propose that the differential effect of abiotic and biotic disturbances on microbial biomass may be attributable to differences in soil disruption and organic C removal from forests among disturbance types. Altogether, these results suggest that abiotic forest disturbances may significantly decrease soil microbial abundance, with corresponding consequences for microbial respiration. Further studies are needed on the effect of biotic disturbances on forest soil microbial communities and soil C dynamics. PMID:23801985

  4. The roles of exercise-induced immune system disturbances in the pathology of heat stroke : the dual pathway model of heat stroke.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chin Leong; Mackinnon, Laurel T

    2006-01-01

    Heat stroke is a life-threatening condition that can be fatal if not appropriately managed. Although heat stroke has been recognised as a medical condition for centuries, a universally accepted definition of heat stroke is lacking and the pathology of heat stroke is not fully understood. Information derived from autopsy reports and the clinical presentation of patients with heat stroke indicates that hyperthermia, septicaemia, central nervous system impairment and cardiovascular failure play important roles in the pathology of heat stroke. The current models of heat stroke advocate that heat stroke is triggered by hyperthermia but is driven by endotoxaemia. Endotoxaemia triggers the systemic inflammatory response, which can lead to systemic coagulation and haemorrhage, necrosis, cell death and multi-organ failure. However, the current heat stroke models cannot fully explain the discrepancies in high core temperature (Tc) as a trigger of heat stroke within and between individuals. Research on the concept of critical Tc as a limitation to endurance exercise implies that a high Tc may function as a signal to trigger the protective mechanisms against heat stroke. Athletes undergoing a period of intense training are subjected to a variety of immune and gastrointestinal (GI) disturbances. The immune disturbances include the suppression of immune cells and their functions, suppression of cell-mediated immunity, translocation of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), suppression of anti-LPS antibodies, increased macrophage activity due to muscle tissue damage, and increased concentration of circulating inflammatory and pyrogenic cytokines. Common symptoms of exercise-induced GI disturbances include diarrhoea, vomiting, gastrointestinal bleeding, and cramps, which may increase gut-related LPS translocation. This article discusses the current evidence that supports the argument that these exercise-induced immune and GI disturbances may contribute to the development of endotoxaemia and

  5. Staphylococcal manipulation of host immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Thammavongsa, Vilasack; Kim, Hwan Keun; Missiakas, Dominique; Schneewind, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, a bacterial commensal of the human nares and skin, is a frequent cause of soft tissue and bloodstream infections. A hallmark of staphylococcal infections is their frequent recurrence, even when treated with antibiotics and surgical intervention, which demonstrates the bacterium’s ability to manipulate innate and adaptive immune responses. In this Review, we highlight how S. aureus virulence factors inhibit complement activation, block and destroy phagocytic cells and modify host B and T cell responses, and we discuss how these insights might be useful for the development of novel therapies against infections with antibiotic resistant strains such as methicillin-resistant S. aureus. PMID:26272408

  6. Ubiquitination in the Antiviral Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Meredith E.; Gack, Michaela U.

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitination has long been known to regulate fundamental cellular processes through the induction of proteasomal degradation of target proteins. More recently, ‘atypical’ nondegradative types of polyubiquitin chains have been appreciated as important regulatory moieties by modulating the activity or subcellular localization of key signaling proteins. Intriguingly, many of these non-degradative types of ubiquitination regulate the innate sensing pathways initiated by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), ultimately coordinating an effective antiviral immune response. Here we discuss recent advances in understanding the functional roles of degradative and atypical types of ubiquitination in innate immunity to viral infections, with a specific focus on the signaling pathways triggered by RIG-I-like receptors, Toll-like receptors, and the intracellular viral DNA sensor cGAS. PMID:25753787

  7. Hydrological and geochemical response and recovery in disturbed Arctic ecosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This progress report is a funding, extension request to continue the database work for the Hydrological and Geochemical Response and Recovery in Disturbed Arctic Ecosystems Program. Throughout the period from 1985 to 1992 the Department of Energy supported research on the hydrology and geochemistry of the headwater basin of Imnavait Creek has focused on the quantification of the input from atmospheric sources of biologically significant and other related chemical variables; the transport of these variables in surface and subsurface flow and their efflux from the basin; and the development of geochemical budgets. The acquisition of multi-year data sets (the longest and most detailed sets in the Arctic) have made it possible to define seasonal ranges and amplitudes; determine spatial and temporal relationships within the different flow compartments; to begin to model the pathways and rates of movement through and across different landscape units. The length of record has also made it possible to examine the quantity and influence of local and extra-regional additions.

  8. Spaceflight and Development of Immune Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1996-01-01

    Evidence from both human and rodent studies has indicated that alterations in immunological parameters occur after space flight. The number of flight experiments has been small, and the full breadth of immunological alterations occurring after space flight remains to be established. Among the major effects on immune responses after space flight that have been reported are: alterations in lymphocyte blastogenesis and natural killer cell activity, alterations in production of cytokines, changes in leukocyte sub-population distribution, and decreases in the ability of bone marrow cells to respond to colony stimulating factors. Changes have been reported in immunological parameters of both humans and rodents. The significance of these alterations in relation to resistance to infection remains to be established. The objective of the studies contained in this project was to determine the effects of space flight on immune responses of pregnant rats and their offspring. The hypothesis was that space flight and the attendant period of microgravity will result in alteration of immunological parameters of both the pregnant rats as well as their offspring carried in utero during the flight. The parameters tested included: production of cytokines, composition of leukocyte sub- populations, response of bone marrow/liver cells to granulocyte/monocyte colony stimulating factor, and leukocyte blastogenesis. Changes in immune responses that could yield alterations in resistance to infection were determined. This yielded useful information for planning studies that could contribute to crew health. Additional information that could eventually prove useful to determine the potential for establishment of a permanent colony in space was obtained.

  9. Response of High Subsonic Jet to Nonaxisymmetric Disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayliss, A.; Maestrello, L.

    1997-01-01

    A model of sound generated in a high subsonic (Mach 0.9) circular jet is solved numerically in cylindrical coordinates for nonaxisymmetric disturbances. The jet is excited by transient mass injection by a finite duration pulse via a modulated ring source. The nonaxisymmetric solution is computed for long times after the initial disturbance has exited the computational domain. The long time behavior of the jet is dominated by vorticity and pressure disturbances generated at the nozzle lip and growing as they convect down-stream in the jet. These disturbances generate sound as they propagate. The primary non-axisymmetric effect that we simulate is that of a flapping mode where regions of high and low pressure alternate on opposite sides of the jet. The predominant feature of this mode is the appearance of relatively large deviations of the pressure from the ambient pressure on opposite sides of the jet and the convection of these regions downstream. We illustrate flow field, near field and far field data. Important nonaxisymmetric characteristics of the near and flow field disturbances include roughly periodic pressure elevations and depressions at opposite values of the azimuthal angle psi. These correspond to pressure disturbances propagating in the axial direction. The azimuthal velocity exhibits a sinusoidal dependence on psi with similar roughly periodic disturbances. For every azimuthal angle psi, the jet radiation peaks about 30 deg. from the jet axis, however there is now a pronounced dependence of the far field radiation pattern on psi.

  10. Immune response associated with nonmelanoma skin cancer.

    PubMed

    Strickland, F M; Kripke, M L

    1997-10-01

    It is now clear that UV radiation causes nonmelanoma skin cancer in at least two ways: by causing permanent changes in the genetic code and by preventing immunologic recognition of mutant cells. These are interacting rather than separate mechanisms. Damage to DNA results in disregulation of cellular proliferation and initiates immune suppression by stimulating the production of suppressive cytokines. These cytokines contribute to the loss of immunosurveillance. Ultraviolet radiation has both local and systemic immunosuppressive effects. Locally, it depletes and alters antigen-presenting LC at the site of UV irradiation. Systemic suppression results when Ts cells are induced, by altered LC, by inflammatory macrophages that enter the skin following UV irradiation, or by the action of cytokines. Damage to DNA appears to be one of the triggering events in inducing systemic immunosuppression via the release of immunosuppressive cytokines and mediators. Immunologic approaches to treating skin cancers so far have concentrated on nonspecifically stimulating immune cells that infiltrate these tumors, but induction of specific immune responses against these tumors with antitumor vaccines has received little attention as yet. Preventive measures include sun avoidance and the use of sunscreens to prevent DNA damage by UV light. Future strategies may employ means to reverse UV-induced immunosuppression by using anti-inflammatory agents, biologicals that accelerate DNA repair or prevent the generation of immunosuppressive cytokines, and specific immunotherapy with tumor antigens. New approaches for studying the immunology of human skin cancers are needed to accelerate progress in this field.

  11. Nedocromil sodium and the immune response.

    PubMed

    Ciprandi, G; Buscaglia, S; Albano, M; Bertolini, C; Truffelli, T; Catrullo, A; Scordamaglia, A; Canonica, G W

    1993-01-01

    Chromones are frequently employed in the treatment of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and asthma. Following our recent investigations concerning the influence of some antiallergic drugs, such as cromoglycate sodium, steroids, oxatomide and ketotifen (H1 antihistamines), and theophylline, on the immune response, in the present study we analyzed the in vitro effects of a new chromone derivative, nedocromil, on the immune response. To this end, the proliferation of peripheral mononuclear cells (PMNCs) induced by mitogen (PHA) and by CD3, CD2 or CD28 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) has been studied. Since the effects of nedocromil on immunological parameters are achieved at 10(-7) mol/l, in the experiments herein reported the drug was tested in the cultures at concentrations of 10(-8), 10(-7) and 10(-6) mol/l. Furthermore, the effect of nedocromil was evaluated on the surface expression of the following markers expressed by PMNCs upon activation: ICAM-1 (CD54), LFA-1 and alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (alpha 1-AGP). The results of the present investigation showed no effect of nedocromil on these immunological parameters. These data acquire clinical relevance when related to previous reports showing a depression of the immunological response exerted by other compounds, such as ketotifen, theophylline and steroids.

  12. Immune Response of Amebiasis and Immune Evasion by Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    Nakada-Tsukui, Kumiko; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is a protozoan parasite and the causative agent of amebiasis. It is estimated approximately 1% of humans are infected with E. histolytica, resulting in an estimate of 100,000 deaths annually. Clinical manifestations of amebic infection range widely from asymptomatic to severe symptoms, including dysentery and extra-intestinal abscesses. Like other infectious diseases, it is assumed that only ~20% of infected individuals develop symptoms, and genetic factors of both the parasite and humans as well as the environmental factors, e.g., microbiota, determine outcome of infection. There are multiple essential steps in amebic infection: degradation of and invasion into the mucosal layer, adherence to the intestinal epithelium, invasion into the tissues, and dissemination to other organs. While the mechanisms of invasion and destruction of the host tissues by the amebae during infection have been elucidated at the molecular levels, it remains largely uncharacterized how the parasite survive in the host by evading and attacking host immune system. Recently, the strategies for immune evasion by the parasite have been unraveled, including immunomodulation to suppress IFN-γ production, elimination of immune cells and soluble immune mediators, and metabolic alterations against reactive oxygen and nitrogen species to fend off the attack from immune system. In this review, we summarized the latest knowledge on immune reaction and immune evasion during amebiasis. PMID:27242782

  13. Immune Response of Amebiasis and Immune Evasion by Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Nakada-Tsukui, Kumiko; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is a protozoan parasite and the causative agent of amebiasis. It is estimated approximately 1% of humans are infected with E. histolytica, resulting in an estimate of 100,000 deaths annually. Clinical manifestations of amebic infection range widely from asymptomatic to severe symptoms, including dysentery and extra-intestinal abscesses. Like other infectious diseases, it is assumed that only ~20% of infected individuals develop symptoms, and genetic factors of both the parasite and humans as well as the environmental factors, e.g., microbiota, determine outcome of infection. There are multiple essential steps in amebic infection: degradation of and invasion into the mucosal layer, adherence to the intestinal epithelium, invasion into the tissues, and dissemination to other organs. While the mechanisms of invasion and destruction of the host tissues by the amebae during infection have been elucidated at the molecular levels, it remains largely uncharacterized how the parasite survive in the host by evading and attacking host immune system. Recently, the strategies for immune evasion by the parasite have been unraveled, including immunomodulation to suppress IFN-γ production, elimination of immune cells and soluble immune mediators, and metabolic alterations against reactive oxygen and nitrogen species to fend off the attack from immune system. In this review, we summarized the latest knowledge on immune reaction and immune evasion during amebiasis. PMID:27242782

  14. Erosion response of a disturbed sagebrush steppe hillslope

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goff, B.F.; Bent, G.C.; Hart, G.E.

    1993-01-01

    Land management activities that disrupt surface vegetation cover pose a serious threat to the long-term stability of buried-waste sites located within the semiarid sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt.) steppe region of the northwestern USA. In this study, we evaluated the erosion response of a sagebrush hillslope subjected to three vegetation cover treatments: natural (undisturbed), bare (plant canopy and litter cover removed), and clipped (canopy removed). A rotating boom rainfall simulator was used to apply rain at 60 or 120 mm/h intensities to runoff plots (3.0 m by 10.7 m) with dry, wet, and very wet antecedent moisture conditions, and during two late and one early summer seasons. Supplemental overland flow was added at the upper end of each plot to simulate increased slope length during very wet runs. Maximum soil loss rates on the natural, clipped, and bare treatments were, respectively, 1, 5, and 216 mg/m2 per s during the 60 mm/h rainfall intensity, and 13, 79, and 1473 mg/m2 per s during the 120 mm/h rainfall intensity. Cumulative soil loss was typically 100 to 1000 times greater on the bare treatment than on the natural or clipped treatments. Increases in simulated slope length produced a near linear increase in soil loss from the bare treatment plots (about 0.02 g/m2 per s soil loss per m of slope length) until 30 m, after which the effect of slope length declined. Surface crust development and mound-intermound microtopography played important roles in governing soil detachment and transport on the hillslope. Despite high rainfall intensity and surface runoff rates, rill erosion was negligible on both the undisturbed and disturbed portions of the hillslope.

  15. Precision Immunization: NASA Studies Immune Response to Flu Vaccine

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Human Research Program Twins Study investigator Emmanuel Mignot, M.D., Ph.D, known for discovering the cause of narcolepsy is related to the immune system, is studying twin astronauts Scott an...

  16. Work stress and innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Boscolo, P; Di Gioacchino, M; Reale, M; Muraro, R; Di Giampaolo, L

    2011-01-01

    Several reports highlight the relationship between blood NK cytotoxic activity and life style. Easy life style, including physical activity, healthy dietary habits as well as good mental health are characterized by an efficient immune response. Life style is related to the type of occupational activity since work has a central part in life either as source of income or contributing to represent the social identity. Not only occupational stress, but also job loss or insecurity are thus considered serious stressful situations, inducing emotional disorders which may affect both neuroendocrine and immune systems; reduced reactivity to mitogens and/or decreased blood NK cytotoxic activity was reported in unemployed workers or in those with a high perception of job insecurity and/or job stress. Although genetic factors have a key role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disorders, occupational stress (as in night shifts) was reported associated to an increased incidence of autoimmune disorders. Monitoring blood NK response may thus be included in the health programs as an indirect index of stressful job and/or poor lifestyle.

  17. Neuroendocrine and immune system responses with spaceflights.

    PubMed

    Tipton, C M; Greenleaf, J E; Jackson, C G

    1996-08-01

    Despite the fact that the first human was in space during 1961 and individuals have existed in a microgravity environment for more than a year, there are limited spaceflight data available on the responses of the neuroendocrine and immune systems. Because of mutual interactions between these respective integrative systems, it is inappropriate to assume that the responses of one have no impact on functions of the other. Blood and plasma volume consistently decrease with spaceflight; hence, blood endocrine and immune constituents will be modified by both gravitational and measurement influences. The majority of the in-flight data relates to endocrine responses that influence fluids and electrolytes during the first month in space. Adrenocorticotropin (ACTH), aldosterone, and anti-diuretic hormone (ADH) appear to be elevated with little change in the atrial natriuretic peptides (ANP). Flight results longer than 60 d show increased ADH variability with elevations in angiotensin and cortisol. Although post-flight results are influenced by reentry and recovery events, ACTH and ADH appear to be consistently elevated with variable results being reported for the other hormones. Limited in-flight data on insulin and growth hormone levels suggest they are not elevated to counteract the loss in muscle mass. Post-flight results from short- and long-term flights indicate that thyroxine and insulin are increased while growth hormone exhibits minimal change. In-flight parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels are variable for several weeks after which they remain elevated. Post-flight PTH was increased on missions that lasted either 7 or 237 d, whereas calcitonin concentrations were increased after 1 wk but decreased after longer flights. Leukocytes are elevated in flights of various durations because of an increase in neutrophils. The majority of post-flights data indicates immunoglobulin concentrations are not significantly changed from pre-flight measurements. However, the numbers of T

  18. Neuroendocrine and Immune System Responses with Spaceflights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tipton, Charles M.; Greenleaf, John E.; Jackson, Catherine G. R.

    1996-01-01

    Despite the fact that the first human was in space during 1961 and individuals have existed in a microgravity environment for more than a year, there are limited spaceflight data available on the responses of the neuroendocrine and immune systems. Because of mutual interactions between these respective integrative systems, it is inappropriate to assume that the responses of one have no impact on functions of the other. Blood and plasma volume consistently decrease with spaceflight; hence, blood endocrine and immune constituents will be modified by both gravitational and measurement influences. The majority of the in-flight data relates to endocrine responses that influence fluids and electrolytes during the first month in space. Adrenocorticotropin (ACTH), aldo-sterone. and anti-diuretic hormone (ADH) appear to be elevated with little change in the atrial natriuretic peptides (ANP). Flight results longer than 60 d show increased ADH variability with elevations in angiotensin and cortisol. Although post-flight results are influenced by reentry and recovery events, ACTH and ADH appear to be consistently elevated with variable results being reported for the other hormones. Limited in-flight data on insulin and growth hormone levels suggest they are not elevated to counteract the loss in muscle mass. Post-flight results from short- and long-term flights indicate that thyroxine and insulin are increased while growth hormone exhibits minimal change. In-flight parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels are variable for several weeks after which they remain elevated. Post-flight PTH was increased on missions that lasted either 7 or 237 d, whereas calcitonin concentrations were increased after 1 wk but decreased after longer flights. Leukocytes are elevated in flights of various durations because of an increase in neutrophils. The majority of post-flight data indicates immunoglobulin concentrations are not significantly changed from pre-flight measurements. However, the numbers of T

  19. Impact of nutrition on immune function and the inflammatory response

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The review utilizes data on three micronutrients (vitamin A, zinc and iron), anthropometrically defined undernutrition (stunting, wasting and underweight) and obesity to evaluate the effect on immune function, recovery of immune function in response to nutritional interventions, related health outco...

  20. Convergent structural responses of tropical forests to diverse disturbance regimes.

    PubMed

    Kellner, James R; Asner, Gregory P

    2009-09-01

    Size frequency distributions of canopy gaps are a hallmark of forest dynamics. But it remains unknown whether legacies of forest disturbance are influencing vertical size structure of landscapes, or space-filling in the canopy volume. We used data from LiDAR remote sensing to quantify distributions of canopy height and sizes of 434,501 canopy gaps in five tropical rain forest landscapes in Costa Rica and Hawaii. The sites represented a wide range of variation in structure and natural disturbance history, from canopy gap dynamics in lowland Costa Rica and Hawaii, to stages and types of stand-level dieback on upland Mauna Kea and Kohala volcanoes. Large differences in vertical canopy structure characterized these five tropical rain forest landscapes, some of which were related to known disturbance events. Although there were quantitative differences in the values of scaling exponents within and among sites, size frequency distributions of canopy gaps followed power laws at all sites and in all canopy height classes. Scaling relationships in gap size at different heights in the canopy were qualitatively similar at all sites, revealing a remarkable similarity despite clearly defined differences in species composition and modes of prevailing disturbance. These findings indicate that power-law gap-size frequency distributions are ubiquitous features of these five tropical rain forest landscapes, and suggest that mechanisms of forest disturbance may be secondary to other processes in determining vertical and horizontal size structure in canopies. PMID:19614757

  1. Convergent structural responses of tropical forests to diverse disturbance regimes.

    PubMed

    Kellner, James R; Asner, Gregory P

    2009-09-01

    Size frequency distributions of canopy gaps are a hallmark of forest dynamics. But it remains unknown whether legacies of forest disturbance are influencing vertical size structure of landscapes, or space-filling in the canopy volume. We used data from LiDAR remote sensing to quantify distributions of canopy height and sizes of 434,501 canopy gaps in five tropical rain forest landscapes in Costa Rica and Hawaii. The sites represented a wide range of variation in structure and natural disturbance history, from canopy gap dynamics in lowland Costa Rica and Hawaii, to stages and types of stand-level dieback on upland Mauna Kea and Kohala volcanoes. Large differences in vertical canopy structure characterized these five tropical rain forest landscapes, some of which were related to known disturbance events. Although there were quantitative differences in the values of scaling exponents within and among sites, size frequency distributions of canopy gaps followed power laws at all sites and in all canopy height classes. Scaling relationships in gap size at different heights in the canopy were qualitatively similar at all sites, revealing a remarkable similarity despite clearly defined differences in species composition and modes of prevailing disturbance. These findings indicate that power-law gap-size frequency distributions are ubiquitous features of these five tropical rain forest landscapes, and suggest that mechanisms of forest disturbance may be secondary to other processes in determining vertical and horizontal size structure in canopies.

  2. Realtime Prediction in Disturbed Landscapes: Identifying Highest Priority Disturbance Characteristics Impacting Streamflow Response in a CONUS-Scale Operational Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugger, A. L.; Gochis, D. J.; Yu, W.; McCreight, J. L.; Barlage, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    The "next generation" of hydrologic prediction systems - targeting unified, process-based, real-time prediction of the total water cycle - bring with them an increased need for real-time land surface characterization. Climatologically-derived estimates may perform well under stationary conditions, however disturbance can significantly alter hydrologic behavior and may be poorly represented by mean historical conditions. Fortunately, remote sensing and on-the-ground observation networks are collecting snapshots of these land characteristics over an increasing fraction of the globe. Given the computing constraints of operating a large-domain, real-time prediction system, to take advantage of these data streams we need a way to prioritize which landscape characteristics are most important to hydrologic prediction post-disturbance. To address this need, we setup a model experiment over the contiguous US using the community WRF-Hydro system with the NoahMP land surface model to assess the value of incorporating various aspects of disturbed landscapes into a real-time streamflow prediction model. WRF-Hydro will serve as the initial operational model for the US National Weather Service's new national water prediction effort, so use of WRF-Hydro allows us to leverage both an existing CONUS-scale model implementation and a short research-to-operations path. We first identify USGS GAGES-II basins that experienced more than 25% forest loss between 2000 and 2013. Based on basin disturbance type, geophysical setting, and climate regime, we formulate a conceptual model of which "disturbed" landscape characteristics we expect to dominate streamflow response. We test our conceptual model using WRF-Hydro by modeling a baseline (no disturbance) case, and then bringing in empirically-derived model state shifts representing key disturbance characteristics (e.g., leaf area index, rooting depth, overland roughness, surface detention). For each state update and each basin, we quantify

  3. Realtime Prediction in Disturbed Landscapes: Identifying Highest Priority Disturbance Characteristics Impacting Streamflow Response in a CONUS-Scale Operational Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugger, A. L.; Gochis, D. J.; Yu, W.; McCreight, J. L.; Barlage, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    The "next generation" of hydrologic prediction systems - targeting unified, process-based, real-time prediction of the total water cycle - bring with them an increased need for real-time land surface characterization. Climatologically-derived estimates may perform well under stationary conditions, however disturbance can significantly alter hydrologic behavior and may be poorly represented by mean historical conditions. Fortunately, remote sensing and on-the-ground observation networks are collecting snapshots of these land characteristics over an increasing fraction of the globe. Given the computing constraints of operating a large-domain, real-time prediction system, to take advantage of these data streams we need a way to prioritize which landscape characteristics are most important to hydrologic prediction post-disturbance. To address this need, we setup a model experiment over the contiguous US using the community WRF-Hydro system with the NoahMP land surface model to assess the value of incorporating various aspects of disturbed landscapes into a real-time streamflow prediction model. WRF-Hydro will serve as the initial operational model for the US National Weather Service's new national water prediction effort, so use of WRF-Hydro allows us to leverage both an existing CONUS-scale model implementation and a short research-to-operations path. We first identify USGS GAGES-II basins that experienced more than 25% forest loss between 2000 and 2013. Based on basin disturbance type, geophysical setting, and climate regime, we formulate a conceptual model of which "disturbed" landscape characteristics we expect to dominate streamflow response. We test our conceptual model using WRF-Hydro by modeling a baseline (no disturbance) case, and then bringing in empirically-derived model state shifts representing key disturbance characteristics (e.g., leaf area index, rooting depth, overland roughness, surface detention). For each state update and each basin, we quantify

  4. Learned helplessness and immunization: sensitivity to response-reinforcer independence in immunized rats.

    PubMed

    Warren, D A; Rosellini, R A; Plonsky, M; DeCola, J P

    1985-10-01

    In experiments 1 and 2, we examined the learned helplessness and immunization effects using a test in which appetitive responding was extinguished by delivering noncontingent reinforcers. Contrary to learned helplessness theory, "immunized" animals showed performance virtually identical to that of animals exposed only to inescapable shock, and different from nonshocked controls. Experiment 2 suggests that the helplessness effect and the lack of immunization are not due to direct response suppression resulting from shock. In Experiment 3, where the immunization effect was assessed by measuring the acquisition of a response to obtain food when there was a positive response-reinforcer contingency, immunization was observed. These results cannot be explained on the basis of proactive interference, but suggest that animals exposed to the immunization procedure acquire an expectancy of response-reinforcer independence during inescapable shock. Thus, immunization effects may reflect the differential expression of expectancies, rather than their differential acquisition as learned helplessness theory postulates.

  5. Molecular immune response of channel catfish immunized with live theronts of Ichthyophthirius multifiliis.

    PubMed

    Xu, De-Hai; Zhang, Qi-Zhong; Shoemaker, Craig A; Zhang, Dunhua; Moreira, Gabriel S A

    2016-07-01

    The parasite Ichthyophthirius multifiliis (Ich) has been reported in various freshwater fishes worldwide and results in severe losses to both food and aquarium fish production. The fish surviving natural infections or immunized with live theronts develop strong specific and non-specific immune responses. Little is known about how these immune genes are induced or how they interact and lead to specific immunity against Ichthyophthirius multifiliis in channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus. This study evaluated the differential expression of immune-related genes, including immunoglobulin, immune cell receptor, cytokine, complement factor and toll-like receptors in head kidney from channel catfish at different time points after immunization with live theronts of I. multifiliis. The immunized fish showed significantly higher anti-Ich antibody expressed as immobilization titer and ELISA titer than those of control fish. The vast majority of immunized fish (95%) survived theront challenge. Expression of IgM and IgD heavy chain genes exhibited a rapid increase from 4 hour (h4) to 2 days (d2) post immunization. Expression of immune cell receptor genes (CD4, CD8-α, MHC I, MHC II β, TcR-α, and TcR-β) showed up-regulation from h4 to d6 post immunization, indicating that different immune cells were actively involved in cellular immune response. Cytokine gene expression (IL-1βa, IL-1βb, IFN-γ and TNF-α) increased rapidly at h4 post immunization and were at an up-regulated level until d2 compared to the bovine serum albumin control. Expression of complement factor and toll-like receptor genes exhibited a rapid increase from h4 to d2 post immunization. Results of this study demonstrated differential expression of genes involved in the specific or non-specific immune response post immunization and that the vaccination against Ich resulted in protection against infection by I. multifiliis.

  6. Extracellular Adenosine Mediates a Systemic Metabolic Switch during Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Bajgar, Adam; Kucerova, Katerina; Jonatova, Lucie; Tomcala, Ales; Schneedorferova, Ivana; Okrouhlik, Jan; Dolezal, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    Immune defense is energetically costly, and thus an effective response requires metabolic adaptation of the organism to reallocate energy from storage, growth, and development towards the immune system. We employ the natural infection of Drosophila with a parasitoid wasp to study energy regulation during immune response. To combat the invasion, the host must produce specialized immune cells (lamellocytes) that destroy the parasitoid egg. We show that a significant portion of nutrients are allocated to differentiating lamellocytes when they would otherwise be used for development. This systemic metabolic switch is mediated by extracellular adenosine released from immune cells. The switch is crucial for an effective immune response. Preventing adenosine transport from immune cells or blocking adenosine receptor precludes the metabolic switch and the deceleration of development, dramatically reducing host resistance. Adenosine thus serves as a signal that the “selfish” immune cells send during infection to secure more energy at the expense of other tissues. PMID:25915062

  7. The immune response and its therapeutic modulation in bronchiectasis.

    PubMed

    Daheshia, Massoud; Prahl, James D; Carmichael, Jacob J; Parrish, John S; Seda, Gilbert

    2012-01-01

    Bronchiectasis (BC) is a chronic pulmonary disease with tremendous morbidity and significant mortality. As pathogen infection has been advocated as a triggering insult in the development of BC, a central role for the immune response in this process seems obvious. Inflammatory cells are present in both the airways as well as the lung parenchyma, and multiple mediators of immune cells including proteases and cytokines or their humoral products are increased locally or in the periphery. Interestingly, a defect in the immune system or suppression of immune response during conditions such as immunodeficiency may well predispose one to the devastating effects of BC. Thus, the outcome of an active immune response as detrimental or protective in the pathogenesis of BC may be dependent on the state of the patient's immunity, the severity of infection, and the magnitude of immune response. Here we reassess the function of the innate and acquired immunity in BC, the major sites of immune response, and the nature of the bioactive mediators. Furthermore, the potential link(s) between an ongoing immune response and structural alterations accompanying the disease and the success of therapies that can modulate the nature and extent of immune response in BC are elaborated upon.

  8. The immune response to resistive breathing.

    PubMed

    Vassilakopoulos, T; Roussos, C; Zakynthinos, S

    2004-12-01

    Resistive breathing is an "immune challenge" for the body, initiating an inflammatory response consisting of an elevation of plasma cytokines, and the recruitment and activation of lymphocyte subpopulations. These cytokines do not originate from monocytes, but are, instead, produced within the diaphragm, secondary to the increased muscle activation. Oxidative stress is a major stimulus for the cytokine induction, secondary to resistive breathing. The production of cytokines within the diaphragm may be mediating the diaphragm muscle fibre injury that occurs with strenuous contractions, or contributing towards the expected repair process. These cytokines may also compromise diaphragmatic contractility or contribute towards the development of muscle cachexia. They may also have systemic effects, mobilising glucose from the liver and free fatty acid from the adipose tissue to the strenuously working respiratory muscles. At the same time, they stimulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, leading to production of adrenocorticotropin and beta-endorphins. The adrenocorticotropin response may represent an attempt of the organism to reduce the injury occurring in the respiratory muscles via the production of glucocorticoids and the induction of the acute phase-response proteins. The beta-endorphin response would decrease the activation of the respiratory muscles and change the pattern of breathing, which becomes more rapid and shallow, possibly in an attempt to reduce and/or prevent further injury to the respiratory muscles. PMID:15572550

  9. Human immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Havlir, D V; Wallis, R S; Boom, W H; Daniel, T M; Chervenak, K; Ellner, J J

    1991-01-01

    Little is known about the immunodominant or protective antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in humans. Cell-mediated immunity is necessary for protection, and healthy tuberculin-positive individuals are relatively resistant to exogenous reinfection. We compared the targets of the cell-mediated immune response in healthy tuberculin-positive individuals to those of tuberculosis patients and tuberculin-negative persons. By using T-cell Western blotting (immunoblotting) of nitrocellulose-bound M. tuberculosis culture filtrate, peaks of T-cell blastogenic activity were identified in the healthy tuberculin reactors at 30, 37, 44, 57, 64, 71 and 88 kDa. Three of these fractions (30, 64, and 71 kDa) coincided with previously characterized proteins: antigen 6/alpha antigen, HSP60, and HSP70, respectively. The blastogenic responses to purified M. tuberculosis antigen 6/alpha antigen and BCG HSP60 were assessed. When cultured with purified antigen 6/alpha antigen, lymphocytes of healthy tuberculin reactors demonstrated greater [3H]thymidine incorporation than either healthy tuberculin-negative controls or tuberculous patients (8,113 +/- 1,939 delta cpm versus 645 +/- 425 delta cpm and 1,019 +/- 710 delta cpm, respectively; P less than 0.01). Healthy reactors also responded to HSP60, although to a lesser degree than antigen 6/alpha antigen (4,276 +/- 1,095 delta cpm; P less than 0.05). Partially purified HSP70 bound to nitrocellulose paper elicited a significant lymphocyte blastogenic response in two of six of the tuberculous patients but in none of the eight healthy tuberculin reactors. Lymphocytes of none of five tuberculin-negative controls responded to recombinant antigens at 14 or 19 kDa or to HSP70. Antibody reactivity generally was inversely correlated with blastogenic response: tuberculous sera had high titer antibody to M. tuberculosis culture filtrate in a range from 35 to 180 kDa. This is the first systematic evaluation of the human response to a panel of native

  10. Nanomaterial Induced Immune Responses and Cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ashraf; Suhail, Mohd; Mathew, Shilu; Shah, Muhammad Ali; Harakeh, Steve M; Ahmad, Sultan; Kazmi, Zulqarnain; Alhamdan, Mohammed Abdul Rahman; Chaudhary, Adeel; Damanhouri, Ghazi Abdullah; Qadri, Ishtiaq

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials are utilized in a wide array of end user products such as pharmaceuticals, electronics, clothes and cosmetic products. Due to its size (< 100 nm), nanoparticles have the propensity to enter through the airway and skin, making its path perilous with the potential to cause damages of varying severity. Once within the body, these particles have unconstrained access to different tissues and organs including the brain, liver, and kidney. As a result, nanomaterials may cause the perturbation of the immune system eliciting an inflammatory response and cytotoxicity. This potential role is dependent on many factors such as the characteristics of the nanomaterials, presence or absence of diseases, and genetic predisposition. Cobalt and nickel nanoparticles, for example, were shown to have inflammogenic properties, while silver nanoparticles were shown to reduce allergic inflammation. Just as asbestos fibers, carbon nanotubes were shown to cause lungs damage. Some nanomaterials were shown, based on animal studies, to result in cell damage, leading to the formation of pre-cancerous lesions. This review highlights the impact of nanomaterials on immune system and its effect on human health with toxicity consideration. It recommends the development of suitable animal models to study the toxicity and bio-clearance of nanomaterials and propose safety guidelines.

  11. Local Immune Response in Helicobacter pylori Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kivrak Salim, Derya; Sahin, Mehmet; Köksoy, Sadi; Adanir, Haydar; Süleymanlar, Inci

    2016-01-01

    Abstract There have been few studies concerning the cytokine profiles in gastric mucosa of Helicobacter pylori–infected patients with normal mucosa, chronic gastritis, and gastric carcinoma (GAC). In the present study, we aimed to elucidate the genomic expression levels and immune pathological roles of cytokines—interferon (IFN)-γ, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-4, IL-6, IL-10, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β, IL-17A, IL-32—in H pylori–infected patients with normal gastric mucosa (NGM; control), chronic active gastritis (CAG), and GAC. Genomic expression levels of these cytokines were assayed by real-time PCR analysis in gastric biopsy specimens obtained from 93 patients. We found that the genomic expression levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-10, IL-17A mRNA were increased in the CAG group and those of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-10, IL-17A, TGF-β mRNA were increased in the GAC group with reference to H pylori–infected NGM group. This study is on the interest of cytokine profiles in gastric mucosa among individuals with normal, gastritis, or GAC. Our findings suggest that the immune response of gastric mucosa to infection of H pylori differs from patient to patient. For individual therapy, levels of genomic expression of IL-6 or other cytokines may be tracked in patients. PMID:27196487

  12. Nanomaterial Induced Immune Responses and Cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ashraf; Suhail, Mohd; Mathew, Shilu; Shah, Muhammad Ali; Harakeh, Steve M; Ahmad, Sultan; Kazmi, Zulqarnain; Alhamdan, Mohammed Abdul Rahman; Chaudhary, Adeel; Damanhouri, Ghazi Abdullah; Qadri, Ishtiaq

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials are utilized in a wide array of end user products such as pharmaceuticals, electronics, clothes and cosmetic products. Due to its size (< 100 nm), nanoparticles have the propensity to enter through the airway and skin, making its path perilous with the potential to cause damages of varying severity. Once within the body, these particles have unconstrained access to different tissues and organs including the brain, liver, and kidney. As a result, nanomaterials may cause the perturbation of the immune system eliciting an inflammatory response and cytotoxicity. This potential role is dependent on many factors such as the characteristics of the nanomaterials, presence or absence of diseases, and genetic predisposition. Cobalt and nickel nanoparticles, for example, were shown to have inflammogenic properties, while silver nanoparticles were shown to reduce allergic inflammation. Just as asbestos fibers, carbon nanotubes were shown to cause lungs damage. Some nanomaterials were shown, based on animal studies, to result in cell damage, leading to the formation of pre-cancerous lesions. This review highlights the impact of nanomaterials on immune system and its effect on human health with toxicity consideration. It recommends the development of suitable animal models to study the toxicity and bio-clearance of nanomaterials and propose safety guidelines. PMID:27398432

  13. Sensing immune responses with customized peptide microarrays.

    PubMed

    Schirwitz, Christopher; Loeffler, Felix F; Felgenhauer, Thomas; Stadler, Volker; Breitling, Frank; Bischoff, F Ralf

    2012-12-01

    The intent to solve biological and biomedical questions in high-throughput led to an immense interest in microarray technologies. Nowadays, DNA microarrays are routinely used to screen for oligonucleotide interactions within a large variety of potential interaction partners. To study interactions on the protein level with the same efficiency, protein and peptide microarrays offer similar advantages, but their production is more demanding. A new technology to produce peptide microarrays with a laser printer provides access to affordable and highly complex peptide microarrays. Such a peptide microarray can contain up to 775 peptide spots per cm², whereby the position of each peptide spot and, thus, the amino acid sequence of the corresponding peptide, is exactly known. Compared to other techniques, such as the SPOT synthesis, more features per cm² at lower costs can be synthesized which paves the way for laser printed peptide microarrays to take on roles as efficient and affordable biomedical sensors. Here, we describe the laser printer-based synthesis of peptide microarrays and focus on an application involving the blood sera of tetanus immunized individuals, indicating the potential of peptide arrays to sense immune responses.

  14. Neuroendocrine-immune interactions and responses to exercise.

    PubMed

    Fragala, Maren S; Kraemer, William J; Denegar, Craig R; Maresh, Carl M; Mastro, Andrea M; Volek, Jeff S

    2011-08-01

    This article reviews the interaction between the neuroendocrine and immune systems in response to exercise stress, considering gender differences. The body's response to exercise stress is a system-wide effort coordinated by the integration between the immune and the neuroendocrine systems. Although considered distinct systems, increasing evidence supports the close communication between them. Like any stressor, the body's response to exercise triggers a systematic series of neuroendocrine and immune events directed at bringing the system back to a state of homeostasis. Physical exercise presents a unique physiological stress where the neuroendocrine and immune systems contribute to accommodating the increase in physiological demands. These systems of the body also adapt to chronic overload, or exercise training. Such adaptations alleviate the magnitude of subsequent stress or minimize the exercise challenge to within homeostatic limits. This adaptive capacity of collaborating systems resembles the acquired, or adaptive, branch of the immune system, characterized by the memory capacity of the cells involved. Specific to the adaptive immune response, once a specific antigen is encountered, memory cells, or lymphocytes, mount a response that reduces the magnitude of the immune response to subsequent encounters of the same stress. In each case, the endocrine response to physical exercise and the adaptive branch of the immune system share the ability to adapt to a stressful encounter. Moreover, each of these systemic responses to stress is influenced by gender. In both the neuroendocrine responses to exercise and the adaptive (B lymphocyte) immune response, gender differences have been attributed to the 'protective' effects of estrogens. Thus, this review will create a paradigm to explain the neuroendocrine communication with leukocytes during exercise by reviewing (i) endocrine and immune interactions; (ii) endocrine and immune systems response to physiological stress

  15. Disentangling the relationship between tumor genetic programs and immune responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Bedognetti, Davide; Hendrickx, Wouter; Ceccarelli, Michele; Miller, Lance D; Seliger, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    Correlative studies in humans have demonstrated that an active immune microenvironment characterized by the presence of a T-helper 1 immune response typifies a tumor phenotype associated with better outcome and increased responsiveness to immune manipulation. This phenotype also signifies the counter activation of immune-regulatory mechanisms. Variables modulating the development of an effective anti-tumor immune response are increasingly scrutinized as potential therapeutic targets. Genetic alterations of cancer cells that functionally influence intratumoral immune response include mutational load, specific mutations of genes involved in oncogenic pathways and copy number aberrations involving chemokine and cytokine genes. Inhibiting oncogenic pathways that prevent the development of the immune-favorable cancer phenotype may complement modern immunotherapeutic approaches.

  16. Disentangling the relationship between tumor genetic programs and immune responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Bedognetti, Davide; Hendrickx, Wouter; Ceccarelli, Michele; Miller, Lance D; Seliger, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    Correlative studies in humans have demonstrated that an active immune microenvironment characterized by the presence of a T-helper 1 immune response typifies a tumor phenotype associated with better outcome and increased responsiveness to immune manipulation. This phenotype also signifies the counter activation of immune-regulatory mechanisms. Variables modulating the development of an effective anti-tumor immune response are increasingly scrutinized as potential therapeutic targets. Genetic alterations of cancer cells that functionally influence intratumoral immune response include mutational load, specific mutations of genes involved in oncogenic pathways and copy number aberrations involving chemokine and cytokine genes. Inhibiting oncogenic pathways that prevent the development of the immune-favorable cancer phenotype may complement modern immunotherapeutic approaches. PMID:26967649

  17. Essential oil of clove (Eugenia caryophyllata) augments the humoral immune response but decreases cell mediated immunity.

    PubMed

    Halder, Sumita; Mehta, Ashish K; Mediratta, Pramod K; Sharma, Krishna K

    2011-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to explore the effect of the essential oil isolated from the buds of Eugenia caryophyllata on some immunological parameters. Humoral immunity was assessed by measuring the hemagglutination titre to sheep red blood cells and delayed type hypersensitivity was assessed by measuring foot pad thickness. Clove oil administration produced a significant increase in the primary as well as secondary humoral immune response. In addition, it also produced a significant decrease in foot pad thickness compared with the control group. Thus, these results suggest that clove oil can modulate the immune response by augmenting humoral immunity and decreasing cell mediated immunity.

  18. Essential oil of clove (Eugenia caryophyllata) augments the humoral immune response but decreases cell mediated immunity.

    PubMed

    Halder, Sumita; Mehta, Ashish K; Mediratta, Pramod K; Sharma, Krishna K

    2011-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to explore the effect of the essential oil isolated from the buds of Eugenia caryophyllata on some immunological parameters. Humoral immunity was assessed by measuring the hemagglutination titre to sheep red blood cells and delayed type hypersensitivity was assessed by measuring foot pad thickness. Clove oil administration produced a significant increase in the primary as well as secondary humoral immune response. In addition, it also produced a significant decrease in foot pad thickness compared with the control group. Thus, these results suggest that clove oil can modulate the immune response by augmenting humoral immunity and decreasing cell mediated immunity. PMID:21796701

  19. The effect of doxycycline treatment on the postvaccinal immune response in pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Pomorska-Mól, Małgorzata Kwit, Krzysztof; Markowska-Daniel, Iwona; Pejsak, Zygmunt

    2014-07-01

    The effect of a seven-day antibiotic therapy with doxycycline was investigated on the postvaccinal humoral and cellular immune response in pigs. The selected parameters of non-specific immunity were also studied. Fifty pigs were used (control not vaccinated (C, n = 10), control vaccinated (CV, n = 20), and experimental — received doxycycline (DOXY, n = 20)). For vaccination live-attenuated vaccine against pseudorabies (PR) was used. From day − 1 to day 5 pigs from DOXY group received doxycycline orally with drinking water, at the recommended dose. Pigs from DOXY and CV groups were vaccinated at 8 and 10 weeks of age. The results of the present study showed that cell-mediated postvaccinal immune response can be modulated by oral treatment with doxycycline. Significantly lower values of stimulation index were observed after PRV restimulation in doxycycline-treated pigs. Moreover, in the DOXY group a significant decrease in IFN-γ production after PRV restimulation was noted. The significantly lower number of CD4+CD8 + cells was also observed in doxy-treated, vaccinated pigs, 2 weeks after final vaccination. Simultaneously, specific humoral response was not disturbed. This study demonstrated the importance of defining the immune modulatory activity of doxycycline because it may alter the immune responses to vaccines. The exact mechanism of T-cell response suppression by doxycycline remains to be elucidated, however the influence of doxycycline on the secretion of various cytokines, including IFN-γ, may be considered as a possible cause. The present observations should prompt further studies on the practical significance of such phenomena in terms of clinical implications. - Highlights: • We examine the postvaccinal immune response in pigs treated with doxycycline. • Doxycycline negatively influenced the specific proliferation after recall stimulation. • Doxycycline negatively influenced secretion of IFN-γ after recall stimulation. • The lower number of

  20. Population-expression models of immune response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stromberg, Sean P.; Antia, Rustom; Nemenman, Ilya

    2013-06-01

    The immune response to a pathogen has two basic features. The first is the expansion of a few pathogen-specific cells to form a population large enough to control the pathogen. The second is the process of differentiation of cells from an initial naive phenotype to an effector phenotype which controls the pathogen, and subsequently to a memory phenotype that is maintained and responsible for long-term protection. The expansion and the differentiation have been considered largely independently. Changes in cell populations are typically described using ecologically based ordinary differential equation models. In contrast, differentiation of single cells is studied within systems biology and is frequently modeled by considering changes in gene and protein expression in individual cells. Recent advances in experimental systems biology make available for the first time data to allow the coupling of population and high dimensional expression data of immune cells during infections. Here we describe and develop population-expression models which integrate these two processes into systems biology on the multicellular level. When translated into mathematical equations, these models result in non-conservative, non-local advection-diffusion equations. We describe situations where the population-expression approach can make correct inference from data while previous modeling approaches based on common simplifying assumptions would fail. We also explore how model reduction techniques can be used to build population-expression models, minimizing the complexity of the model while keeping the essential features of the system. While we consider problems in immunology in this paper, we expect population-expression models to be more broadly applicable.

  1. A model of immunity to Burkholderia pseudomallei: unique responses following immunization and acute lethal infection.

    PubMed

    Ulett, Glen C; Labrooy, Justin T; Currie, Bart J; Barnes, Jodie L; Ketheesan, Natkunam

    2005-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei, the etiological agent of melioidosis, causes significant mortality in endemic regions, but little is known regarding the immune mechanisms required for successful protective immunity. To establish a model of immunization that could be used to study this we screened a library of B. pseudomallei strains for immunogenicity in mice. BALB/c mice were immunized with test strains, and 2 weeks later were given a lethal challenge (LC) of virulent B. pseudomallei. Among 49 strains tested, a single strain, CL04, exhibited strong immunoprotective capacity. Interestingly, CL04 had been cultured from a patient with chronic colonization of B. pseudomallei, which is a rare phenomenon. Mice immunized with 0.1 x LD50 (5 x 10(3) CFU) of CL04 had significantly better survival and lower bacterial loads after LC compared to naïve controls. Dose-response analysis demonstrated more robust immunity after higher immunizing doses, and bacterial inactivation by gamma irradiation diminished the protective effect, indicating a requirement for viable organism for immunity. CL04-induced immunity was demonstrated both in B. pseudomallei-susceptible BALB/c and -resistant C57BL/6 mice. We investigated the gene profile of CL04-induced immunity by analyzing responses to immunization using cDNA microarray. Unique responses involving granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), the proapoptotic regulator Bad and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK5) were detected in immunized mice, but these responses were absent in naïve-LC mice. Further, responses differed between mouse strains, indicating dependence on host genetic background. This model will be useful in identifying elements of the immune response required for successful adaptive immunity against B. pseudomallei.

  2. Responses of temperate forest productivity to insect and pathogen disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flower, C. E.; Gonzalez-Meler, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Climate forcing factors have been documented to directly (e.g. CO2 fertilization) or indirectly (e.g. temperature and vapor pressure deficit) affect net primary productivity (NPP) of forests. Climate variations can also affect the vulnerability of forests to pests and pathogens, causing diffuse or widespread mortality. The introduction of novel pests is causing rapid mortality of targeted species with undetermined effects on forest productivity: NPP could decrease or increase depending on the severity (proportion of basal area impacted) and species diversity. We attempted to document the impact of diffuse mortality caused by insect outbreaks on North American temperate forests through synthesis of literature. Despite the large number of studies (>500) only a few (12) documented NPP in a systematic manner. The magnitude of insect and pathogen disturbance was larger in western than eastern forests due to the redundancy and functional diversity of temperate deciduous and mixed deciduous forests. Recovery from disturbance was more rapid from diffuse short duration defoliation events relative to the long lasting impacts of wood boring insects. Forest resilience may decrease as insect disturbance increases, particularly with generalist invasive pests that target a variety of species. We conclude that these biotic interactions, particularly when caused by invasive pests, impose biological forcing to forest NPP at similar magnitude and time scales than climate forcing.

  3. Responses of temperate forest productivity to insect and pathogen disturbances.

    PubMed

    Flower, Charles E; Gonzalez-Meler, Miquel A

    2015-01-01

    Pest and pathogen disturbances are ubiquitous across forest ecosystems, impacting their species composition, structure, and function. Whereas severe abiotic disturbances (e.g., clear-cutting and fire) largely reset successional trajectories, pest and pathogen disturbances cause diffuse mortality, driving forests into nonanalogous system states. Biotic perturbations that disrupt forest carbon dynamics either reduce or enhance net primary production (NPP) and carbon storage, depending on pathogen type. Relative to defoliators, wood borers and invasive pests have the largest negative impact on NPP and the longest recovery time. Forest diversity is an important contributing factor to productivity: NPP is neutral, marginally enhanced, or reduced in high-diversity stands in which a small portion of the canopy is affected (temperate deciduous or mixed forests) but very negative in low-diversity stands in which a large portion of the canopy is affected (western US forests). Pests and pathogens reduce forest structural and functional redundancy, affecting their resilience to future climate change or new outbreaks. Therefore, pests and pathogens can be considered biotic forcing agents capable of causing consequences of similar magnitude to climate forcing factors. PMID:25580836

  4. Responses of temperate forest productivity to insect and pathogen disturbances.

    PubMed

    Flower, Charles E; Gonzalez-Meler, Miquel A

    2015-01-01

    Pest and pathogen disturbances are ubiquitous across forest ecosystems, impacting their species composition, structure, and function. Whereas severe abiotic disturbances (e.g., clear-cutting and fire) largely reset successional trajectories, pest and pathogen disturbances cause diffuse mortality, driving forests into nonanalogous system states. Biotic perturbations that disrupt forest carbon dynamics either reduce or enhance net primary production (NPP) and carbon storage, depending on pathogen type. Relative to defoliators, wood borers and invasive pests have the largest negative impact on NPP and the longest recovery time. Forest diversity is an important contributing factor to productivity: NPP is neutral, marginally enhanced, or reduced in high-diversity stands in which a small portion of the canopy is affected (temperate deciduous or mixed forests) but very negative in low-diversity stands in which a large portion of the canopy is affected (western US forests). Pests and pathogens reduce forest structural and functional redundancy, affecting their resilience to future climate change or new outbreaks. Therefore, pests and pathogens can be considered biotic forcing agents capable of causing consequences of similar magnitude to climate forcing factors.

  5. Response of a Hypersonic Boundary Layer to Freestream Pulse Acoustic Disturbance

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhenqing; Tang, Xiaojun; Lv, Hongqing

    2014-01-01

    The response of hypersonic boundary layer over a blunt wedge to freestream pulse acoustic disturbance was investigated. The stability characteristics of boundary layer for freestream pulse wave and continuous wave were analyzed comparatively. Results show that freestream pulse disturbance changes the thermal conductivity characteristics of boundary layer. For pulse wave, the number of main disturbance clusters decreases and the frequency band narrows along streamwise. There are competition and disturbance energy transfer among different modes in boundary layer. The dominant mode of boundary layer has an inhibitory action on other modes. Under continuous wave, the disturbance modes are mainly distributed near fundamental and harmonic frequencies, while under pulse wave, the disturbance modes are widely distributed in different modes. For both pulse and continuous waves, most of disturbance modes slide into a lower-growth or decay state in downstream, which is tending towards stability. The amplitude of disturbance modes in boundary layer under continuous wave is considerably larger than pulse wave. The growth rate for the former is also considerably larger than the later the disturbance modes with higher growth are mainly distributed near fundamental and harmonic frequencies for the former, while the disturbance modes are widely distributed in different frequencies for the latter. PMID:24737993

  6. Response of a hypersonic boundary layer to freestream pulse acoustic disturbance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenqing; Tang, Xiaojun; Lv, Hongqing

    2014-01-01

    The response of hypersonic boundary layer over a blunt wedge to freestream pulse acoustic disturbance was investigated. The stability characteristics of boundary layer for freestream pulse wave and continuous wave were analyzed comparatively. Results show that freestream pulse disturbance changes the thermal conductivity characteristics of boundary layer. For pulse wave, the number of main disturbance clusters decreases and the frequency band narrows along streamwise. There are competition and disturbance energy transfer among different modes in boundary layer. The dominant mode of boundary layer has an inhibitory action on other modes. Under continuous wave, the disturbance modes are mainly distributed near fundamental and harmonic frequencies, while under pulse wave, the disturbance modes are widely distributed in different modes. For both pulse and continuous waves, most of disturbance modes slide into a lower-growth or decay state in downstream, which is tending towards stability. The amplitude of disturbance modes in boundary layer under continuous wave is considerably larger than pulse wave. The growth rate for the former is also considerably larger than the later the disturbance modes with higher growth are mainly distributed near fundamental and harmonic frequencies for the former, while the disturbance modes are widely distributed in different frequencies for the latter.

  7. Response of a hypersonic boundary layer to freestream pulse acoustic disturbance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenqing; Tang, Xiaojun; Lv, Hongqing

    2014-01-01

    The response of hypersonic boundary layer over a blunt wedge to freestream pulse acoustic disturbance was investigated. The stability characteristics of boundary layer for freestream pulse wave and continuous wave were analyzed comparatively. Results show that freestream pulse disturbance changes the thermal conductivity characteristics of boundary layer. For pulse wave, the number of main disturbance clusters decreases and the frequency band narrows along streamwise. There are competition and disturbance energy transfer among different modes in boundary layer. The dominant mode of boundary layer has an inhibitory action on other modes. Under continuous wave, the disturbance modes are mainly distributed near fundamental and harmonic frequencies, while under pulse wave, the disturbance modes are widely distributed in different modes. For both pulse and continuous waves, most of disturbance modes slide into a lower-growth or decay state in downstream, which is tending towards stability. The amplitude of disturbance modes in boundary layer under continuous wave is considerably larger than pulse wave. The growth rate for the former is also considerably larger than the later the disturbance modes with higher growth are mainly distributed near fundamental and harmonic frequencies for the former, while the disturbance modes are widely distributed in different frequencies for the latter. PMID:24737993

  8. Disturbance-specific social responses in long-finned pilot whales, Globicephala melas.

    PubMed

    Visser, Fleur; Curé, Charlotte; Kvadsheim, Petter H; Lam, Frans-Peter A; Tyack, Peter L; Miller, Patrick J O

    2016-01-01

    Social interactions among animals can influence their response to disturbance. We investigated responses of long-finned pilot whales to killer whale sound playbacks and two anthropogenic sources of disturbance: tagging effort and naval sonar exposure. The acoustic scene and diving behaviour of tagged individuals were recorded along with the social behaviour of their groups. All three disturbance types resulted in larger group sizes, increasing social cohesion during disturbance. However, the nature and magnitude of other responses differed between disturbance types. Tagging effort resulted in a clear increase in synchrony and a tendency to reduce surface logging and to become silent (21% of cases), whereas pilot whales increased surface resting during sonar exposure. Killer whale sounds elicited increased calling rates and the aggregation of multiple groups, which approached the sound source together. This behaviour appears to represent a mobbing response, a likely adaptive social defence against predators or competitors. All observed response-tactics would reduce risk of loss of group coordination, suggesting that, in social pilot whales, this could drive behavioural responses to disturbance. However, the behavioural means used to achieve social coordination depends upon other considerations, which are disturbance-specific. PMID:27353529

  9. Disturbance-specific social responses in long-finned pilot whales, Globicephala melas.

    PubMed

    Visser, Fleur; Curé, Charlotte; Kvadsheim, Petter H; Lam, Frans-Peter A; Tyack, Peter L; Miller, Patrick J O

    2016-06-29

    Social interactions among animals can influence their response to disturbance. We investigated responses of long-finned pilot whales to killer whale sound playbacks and two anthropogenic sources of disturbance: tagging effort and naval sonar exposure. The acoustic scene and diving behaviour of tagged individuals were recorded along with the social behaviour of their groups. All three disturbance types resulted in larger group sizes, increasing social cohesion during disturbance. However, the nature and magnitude of other responses differed between disturbance types. Tagging effort resulted in a clear increase in synchrony and a tendency to reduce surface logging and to become silent (21% of cases), whereas pilot whales increased surface resting during sonar exposure. Killer whale sounds elicited increased calling rates and the aggregation of multiple groups, which approached the sound source together. This behaviour appears to represent a mobbing response, a likely adaptive social defence against predators or competitors. All observed response-tactics would reduce risk of loss of group coordination, suggesting that, in social pilot whales, this could drive behavioural responses to disturbance. However, the behavioural means used to achieve social coordination depends upon other considerations, which are disturbance-specific.

  10. Disturbance-specific social responses in long-finned pilot whales, Globicephala melas

    PubMed Central

    Visser, Fleur; Curé, Charlotte; Kvadsheim, Petter H.; Lam, Frans-Peter A.; Tyack, Peter L.; Miller, Patrick J. O.

    2016-01-01

    Social interactions among animals can influence their response to disturbance. We investigated responses of long-finned pilot whales to killer whale sound playbacks and two anthropogenic sources of disturbance: tagging effort and naval sonar exposure. The acoustic scene and diving behaviour of tagged individuals were recorded along with the social behaviour of their groups. All three disturbance types resulted in larger group sizes, increasing social cohesion during disturbance. However, the nature and magnitude of other responses differed between disturbance types. Tagging effort resulted in a clear increase in synchrony and a tendency to reduce surface logging and to become silent (21% of cases), whereas pilot whales increased surface resting during sonar exposure. Killer whale sounds elicited increased calling rates and the aggregation of multiple groups, which approached the sound source together. This behaviour appears to represent a mobbing response, a likely adaptive social defence against predators or competitors. All observed response-tactics would reduce risk of loss of group coordination, suggesting that, in social pilot whales, this could drive behavioural responses to disturbance. However, the behavioural means used to achieve social coordination depends upon other considerations, which are disturbance-specific. PMID:27353529

  11. Opioid peptides and innate immune response in mollusc.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong-Wu

    2008-01-01

    The nervous and the immune systems can exchange information through opioid peptides. Furthermore, some opioid peptides can function as endogenous messengers of the immune system, and participate in an important part in the regulation of the various components of the immune response. Since the capacity of immunocytes to release and respond to opioid neuropeptide messengers is not restricted to mammalian organisms, recent studies have indicated that invertebrate models have been particularly useful to understand the mechanisms of the immune response. Moreover, the immunocytes of molluscs resemble cells of the vertebrate monocyte/macrophage lineage and are activated by similar substances, which control the main immune responses, i.e. phagocytosis, chemotaxis, and cytotoxicity. Recently, Mytilus edulis has been the subject of recent studies to determine whether the relationship between the immune and nervous systems seen in vertebrates also exists in invertebrates. The focus of this review is to describe how the opioid peptides participate in immune processes in molluscs.

  12. Lentiviral infection, immune response peptides and sleep.

    PubMed

    Darko, D F; Mitler, M M; Henriksen, S J

    1995-01-01

    The aberrant sleep documented in subjects with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is uniquely important because of the contribution this poor quality sleep makes to the fatigue, disability, and eventual unemployment that befalls these patients. Especially given this importance in clinical care, the research on the prominent sleep changes described in HIV infection remains modest in quantity. The chronic asymptomatic stage of HIV infection is associated with the most intriguing and singular sleep structure changes. Especially robust is the increase in slow wave sleep, particularly in latter portions of the sleep period. This finding is rare in other primary or secondary sleep disorders. The sleep structure alterations are among the most replicable of several pathophysiological sequelae in the brain associated with early HIV infection. It is unlikely that these sleep architecture changes are psychosocial in etiology, and they occur before medical pathology is evident. They are not associated with stress, anxiety, or depression. Evidence is accumulating to support a role for the somnogenic immune peptides tumor necrosis factor (TNF)alpha and interleukin (IL-1 beta) in the sleep changes and fatigue commonly seen in HIV infection. These peptides are elevated in the blood of HIV-infected individuals, and are somnogenic in clinical use and animal models. The peripheral production of these peptides may also have a role in the regulation of normal sleep physiology. The lentivirus family contains both HIV and the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV). The use of the FIV model of HIV infection may provide a way to further investigate the mechanism of a neurotropic, neurotoxic virus initiating the immune acute phase response and affecting sleep. Neurotropic lentivirus infection is a microbiological probe facilitating neuroimmune investigation. PMID:7795894

  13. Spaceflight and immune responses of rhesus monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Morton, Darla S.; Swiggett, Jeanene P.; Hakenewerth, Anne M.; Fowler, Nina A.

    1995-01-01

    The effects of restraint on immunological parameters was determined in an 18 day ARRT (adult rhesus restraint test). The monkeys were restrained for 18 days in the experimental station for the orbiting primate (ESOP), the chair of choice for Space Shuttle experiments. Several immunological parameters were determined using peripheral blood, bone marrow, and lymph node specimens from the monkeys. The parameters included: response of bone marrow cells to GM-CSF (granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor), leukocyte subset distribution, and production of IFN-a (interferon-alpha) and IFN-gamma (interferon-gamma). The only parameter changed after 18 days of restraint was the percentage of CD8+ T cells. No other immunological parameters showed changes due to restraint. Handling and changes in housing prior to the restraint period did apparently result in some restraint-independent immunological changes. Handling must be kept to a minimum and the animals allowed time to recover prior to flight. All experiments must be carefully controlled. Restraint does not appear to be a major issue regarding the effects of space flight on immune responses.

  14. Spaceflight and Immune Responses of Rhesus Monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    1997-01-01

    In the grant period, we perfected techniques for determination of interleukin production and leukocyte subset analysis of rhesus monkeys. These results are outlined in detail in publication number 2, appended to this report. Additionally, we participated in the ARRT restraint test to determine if restraint conditions for flight in the Space Shuttle could contribute to any effects of space flight on immune responses. All immunological parameters listed in the methods section were tested. Evaluation of the data suggests that the restraint conditions had minimal effects on the results observed, but handling of the monkeys could have had some effect. These results are outlined in detail in manuscript number 3, appended to this report. Additionally, to help us develop our rhesus monkey immunology studies, we carried out preliminary studies in mice to determine the effects of stressors on immunological parameters. We were able to show that there were gender-based differences in the response of immunological parameters to a stressor. These results are outlined in detail in manuscript number 4, appended to this report.

  15. Evidence of bacterioplankton community adaptation in response to long-term mariculture disturbance

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Jinbo; Chen, Heping; Hu, Changju; Ye, Xiansen; Kong, Dingjiang; Zhang, Demin

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the underlying mechanisms that shape the temporal dynamics of a microbial community has important implications for predicting the trajectory of an ecosystem’s response to anthropogenic disturbances. Here, we evaluated the seasonal dynamics of bacterioplankton community composition (BCC) following more than three decades of mariculture disturbance in Xiangshan Bay. Clear seasonal succession and site (fish farm and control site) separation of the BCC were observed, which were primarily shaped by temperature, dissolved oxygen and sampling time. However, the sensitive bacterial families consistently changed in relative abundance in response to mariculture disturbance, regardless of the season. Temporal changes in the BCC followed the time-decay for similarity relationship at both sites. Notably, mariculture disturbance significantly (P < 0.001) flattened the temporal turnover but intensified bacterial species-to-species interactions. The decrease in bacterial temporal turnover under long-term mariculture disturbance was coupled with a consistent increase in the percentage of deterministic processes that constrained bacterial assembly based on a null model analysis. The results demonstrate that the BCC is sensitive to mariculture disturbance; however, a bacterioplankton community could adapt to a long-term disturbance via attenuating temporal turnover and intensifying species-species interactions. These findings expand our current understanding of microbial assembly in response to long-term anthropogenic disturbances. PMID:26471739

  16. Disturbance of the immune system by electromagnetic fields-A potentially underlying cause for cellular damage and tissue repair reduction which could lead to disease and impairment.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Olle

    2009-08-01

    A number of papers dealing with the effects of modern, man-made electromagnetic fields (EMFs) on the immune system are summarized in the present review. EMFs disturb immune function through stimulation of various allergic and inflammatory responses, as well as effects on tissue repair processes. Such disturbances increase the risks for various diseases, including cancer. These and the EMF effects on other biological processes (e.g. DNA damage, neurological effects, etc.) are now widely reported to occur at exposure levels significantly below most current national and international safety limits. Obviously, biologically based exposure standards are needed to prevent disruption of normal body processes and potential adverse health effects of chronic exposure. Based on this review, as well as the reviews in the recent Bioinitiative Report [http://www.bioinitiative.org/] [C.F. Blackman, M. Blank, M. Kundi, C. Sage, D.O. Carpenter, Z. Davanipour, D. Gee, L. Hardell, O. Johansson, H. Lai, K.H. Mild, A. Sage, E.L. Sobel, Z. Xu, G. Chen, The Bioinitiative Report-A Rationale for a Biologically-based Public Exposure Standard for Electromagnetic Fields (ELF and RF), 2007)], it must be concluded that the existing public safety limits are inadequate to protect public health, and that new public safety limits, as well as limits on further deployment of untested technologies, are warranted.

  17. Regional Immune Response to Immunization with Escherichia coli O157:H7-Derived Intimin in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Boland, Kathryn G.; Hayles, Andrea N.; Miller, Claire B.; Kerr, Tovah; Brown, Wendy C.

    2013-01-01

    Escherichia coli O157:H7 is an enteric pathogen of animals and humans that can result in deadly sequelae. Cattle are asymptomatic carriers and shedders of the bacteria and serve as an important reservoir of human infection. E. coli O157:H7 colonizes the gastrointestinal tract, most frequently at the rectoanal junction mucosa in cattle. Vaccination is a potentially highly effective means of decreasing cattle colonization and shedding and thereby decreasing human infections. Currently available vaccines are administered subcutaneously or intramuscularly, and immune responses have been evaluated solely by systemic immunoglobulin responses. This study evaluated local and systemic lymphoproliferative responses in addition to immunoglobulin responses following subcutaneous or mucosal (rectal) immunization with E. coli O157:H7 outer membrane protein intimin over three trials. In all three trials, significant local and systemic lymphoproliferative responses (P < 0.05) occurred following immunization in the majority of animals, as well as significant immunoglobulin responses (P < 0.001) in all animals. Surprisingly, local responses in the mesorectal lymph nodes were very similar between the subcutaneous and mucosal immunization groups. Moreover, the responses in mesorectal lymph nodes appeared targeted rather than generalized, as minimal or no significant responses were observed in the associated prescapular lymph nodes of subcutaneously immunized animals. The results indicate that both subcutaneous and mucosal immunizations are effective methods of inducing immune responses against E. coli O157:H7 in cattle. PMID:23408521

  18. Effect of antipyretic analgesics on immune responses to vaccination.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Ezzeldin; Moody, M Anthony; Walter, Emmanuel B

    2016-09-01

    While antipyretic analgesics are widely used to ameliorate vaccine adverse reactions, their use has been associated with blunted vaccine immune responses. Our objective was to review literature evaluating the effect of antipyretic analgesics on vaccine immune responses and to highlight potential underlying mechanisms. Observational studies reporting on antipyretic use around the time of immunization concluded that their use did not affect antibody responses. Only few randomized clinical trials demonstrated blunted antibody response of unknown clinical significance. This effect has only been noted following primary vaccination with novel antigens and disappears following booster immunization. The mechanism by which antipyretic analgesics reduce antibody response remains unclear and not fully explained by COX enzyme inhibition. Recent work has focused on the involvement of nuclear and subcellular signaling pathways. More detailed immunological investigations and a systems biology approach are needed to precisely define the impact and mechanism of antipyretic effects on vaccine immune responses. PMID:27246296

  19. Maternal antibodies and infant immune responses to vaccines.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Kathryn M

    2015-11-25

    Infants are born with immature immune systems, making it difficult for them to effectively respond to the infectious pathogens encountered shortly after birth. Maternal antibody is actively transported across the placenta and serves to provide protection to the newborn during the first weeks to months of life. However, maternal antibody has been shown repeatedly to inhibit the immune responses of young children to vaccines. The mechanisms for this inhibition are presented and the impact on ultimate immune responses is discussed.

  20. A framework to assess biogeochemical response to ecosystem disturbance using nutrient partitioning ratios

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kranabetter, J. Marty; McLauchlan, Kendra K.; Enders, Sara K.; Fraterrigo, Jennifer M.; Higuera, Philip E.; Morris, Jesse L.; Rastetter, Edward B.; Barnes, Rebecca; Buma, Brian; Gavin, Daniel G.; Gerhart, Laci M.; Gillson, Lindsey; Hietz, Peter; Mack, Michelle C.; McNeil, Brenden; Perakis, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Disturbances affect almost all terrestrial ecosystems, but it has been difficult to identify general principles regarding these influences. To improve our understanding of the long-term consequences of disturbance on terrestrial ecosystems, we present a conceptual framework that analyzes disturbances by their biogeochemical impacts. We posit that the ratio of soil and plant nutrient stocks in mature ecosystems represents a characteristic site property. Focusing on nitrogen (N), we hypothesize that this partitioning ratio (soil N: plant N) will undergo a predictable trajectory after disturbance. We investigate the nature of this partitioning ratio with three approaches: (1) nutrient stock data from forested ecosystems in North America, (2) a process-based ecosystem model, and (3) conceptual shifts in site nutrient availability with altered disturbance frequency. Partitioning ratios could be applied to a variety of ecosystems and successional states, allowing for improved temporal scaling of disturbance events. The generally short-term empirical evidence for recovery trajectories of nutrient stocks and partitioning ratios suggests two areas for future research. First, we need to recognize and quantify how disturbance effects can be accreting or depleting, depending on whether their net effect is to increase or decrease ecosystem nutrient stocks. Second, we need to test how altered disturbance frequencies from the present state may be constructive or destructive in their effects on biogeochemical cycling and nutrient availability. Long-term studies, with repeated sampling of soils and vegetation, will be essential in further developing this framework of biogeochemical response to disturbance.

  1. Simulation of the low latitude ionosphere response to disturbed winds and electric fields: Brazilian region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batista, Inez S.; Souza, Jonas; Bailey, Graham; Bravo, Manuel

    2016-07-01

    Modeling the ionosphere during disturbed periods is one of the most challenging tasks due to the complexity of the phenomena that affect the electric fields and the thermosphere environment as whole. It is well known that depending on the direction of the interplanetary magnetic field disturbance electric fields (undershielding or overshielding) can penetrate from high to low latitudes causing significant disturbances in the electron density distribution and in the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) development. Besides that, the large amount of energy deposited in the polar region during disturbed periods will be responsible for the generation of disturbed winds that will flow towards the equator where they produce a disturbance dynamo which also affects the EIA density distribution. The TIDs and TADs are also sources of disturbances that propagate at high velocity reaching the equator 2-3 hours after the beginning of the magnetic storm. In this work we use the Sheffield University Plasmasphere-Ionosphere Model at INPE (SUPIM-INPE), to simulate the drastic effects that were observed at the low latitude ionosphere in the Brazilian region during a very intense magnetic storm event. A few models are tested for the disturbed electric field and wind. The simulation results showed that the observations are better explained when considering a traveling waveform disturbance propagating from north to south at a velocity equal to 200 m/s.

  2. Highly variable functional response of microbial communities to experimental temperature disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanek, Wolfgang; Mooshammer, Maria; Hofhansl, Florian; Frank, Alexander H.; Leitner, Sonja; Schnecker, Jörg; Wild, Birgit; Watzka, Margarete; Keiblinger, Katharina M.; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie; Richter, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Climate change is expected to alter the frequency and intensity of climate excursions, such as heat, drought and freeze-thaw events, requiring a thorough mechanistic understanding of the response of microbially-mediated nutrient cycling processes to such transient but severe disturbances. Here, we investigated the resistance and resilience of major gross processes of microbial carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) cycling, determined by isotope pool dilution assays, as well as potential enzyme activities in decomposing beech litter to two contrasting temperature disturbances (freeze-thaw and heat treatment for 9 days) in four different litter types. Microbial processes were substantially altered by the temperature disturbances but both the magnitude and direction of the disturbance effect varied among them. Phosphorus processes and hydrolytic enzyme activities showed lowest resistance as well as resilience, whereas N processes were more resistant and C processes intermediate. In general, responses of microbial processes were mainly consistent across disturbances but partially dependent on litter-specific microbial communities. The transient disturbances affected the relative availability of essential nutrients through a decoupling of microbial C, N and P cycling processes. Understanding the underlying mechanisms through which a decoupling of the supply of these elements as a result of microbial responses to environmental disturbances occurs will help to better predicting ecosystem responses to global change.

  3. Innate immune response development in nestling tree swallows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stambaugh, T.; Houdek, B.J.; Lombardo, M.P.; Thorpe, P.A.; Caldwell, Hahn D.

    2011-01-01

    We tracked the development of innate immunity in nestling Tree Swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) and compared it to that of adults using blood drawn from nestlings during days 6, 12, and 18 of the ???20-day nestling period and from adults. Innate immunity was characterized using an in vitro assay of the ability of whole blood to kill Escherichia coli. The ability of whole blood to kill E. coli increased as nestlings matured. Neither this component of innate immunity nor right wing chord length on day18 were as developed as in adults indicating that development of the innate immune system and growth both continued after fledging. Narrow sense heritability analyses suggest that females with strong immune responses produced nestlings with strong immune responses. These data suggest nestling Tree Swallows allocated sufficient energy to support rapid growth to enable fledging by day 18, but that further development of innate immunity occurred post-fledging. ?? 2011 by the Wilson Ornithological Society.

  4. Monitoring the immune response using real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Stordeur, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Induction of an immune response to a particular antigen is the basis of vaccination. This has been done for years to prevent infectious diseases, and has the potential for the treatment of cancer. The immune response is nowadays more precisely modulated rather than simply induced, like in case of immunotherapy of allergic diseases. Likewise, autoimmune diseases are associated with an inappropriate immune response, and many efforts are made for specifically inhibiting this unwanted response. A possible line of attack is the induction of an antigen-specific immune tolerance, which also has a use in the field of transplantation, where allogeneic responses are deleterious for the graft. In all of these fields of fundamental and clinical medicine, the modulation of immune response requires the assistance of laboratory tests, among which real-time PCR appears more and more helpful. This chapter describes a protocol to quantify immune-related mRNAs using reverse transcription-real-time PCR. The transcripts can be quantified in cultured cells or in cultured whole blood, after an incubation period in the presence of the antigen to which the immune response is analyzed. This is the typical approach to evaluate the efficacy of a vaccine. The transcripts can also be quantified directly in the biological sample, giving information about the in vivo immune status of the individual. The techniques to achieve these different methods are described, and are illustrated by the analysis of the response against the toxoid tetanus antigen.

  5. Linear ubiquitination signals in adaptive immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Fumiyo

    2015-01-01

    Summary Ubiquitin can form eight different linkage types of chains using the intrinsic Met 1 residue or one of the seven intrinsic Lys residues. Each linkage-type of ubiquitin chain has a distinct three-dimensional topology, functioning as a tag to attract specific signaling molecules, which are so-called ubiquitin readers, and regulates various biological functions. Ubiquitin chains linked via Met 1 in a head-to-tail manner are called linear ubiquitin chains. Linear ubiquitination plays an important role in the regulation of cellular signaling, including the best-characterized Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) -induced canonical nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) pathway. Linear ubiquitin chains are specifically generated by an E3 ligase complex called the linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC) and hydrolyzed by a deubiquitinase (DUB) called ovarian tumor (OTU) DUB with linear linkage specificity (OTULIN). LUBAC linearly ubiquitinates critical molecules in the TNF pathway, such as NEMO and RIPK1. The linear ubiquitin chains are then recognized by the ubiquitin readers, including NEMO, which control the TNF pathway. Accumulating evidence indicates an importance of the LUBAC complex in the regulation of apoptosis, development, and inflammation in mice. In this article, I focus on the role of linear ubiquitin chains in adaptive immune responses with an emphasis on the TNF-induced signaling pathways. PMID:26085218

  6. Probiotics and the immune response to vaccines.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, Thomas T; Bell, Iona

    2010-08-01

    Probiotics are bacteria, but sometimes fungi, which when taken by the oral route may give some health benefits. The most compelling evidence for beneficial effects of probiotics is in the prevention and reduction in the duration of symptoms related to gut infectious disease. There is also evidence to show that some specific probiotics are beneficial in Clostridium difficile diarrhoea in the elderly. As further and better controlled clinical studies have appeared, some specific probiotics also appear to have beneficial effects in perhaps preventing and reducing the duration of symptoms due to acquired upper respiratory tract infections. In an attempt to explain these effects, attention has turned to the effects of some specific probiotics on the immune system. There is evidence that some specific probiotics can alter monocyte and natural killer cell function in the blood. Evidence is also accumulating that taking some specific probiotics can boost antibody responses to oral and systemically administered vaccines. The effect when shown is modest and is not always seen in different studies to all vaccines, but there is enough of a trend to make the area worthy of further investigation, particularly to tease out the mechanisms involved.

  7. Modeling the ionospheric response to traveling atmospheric disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauske, R.; Prölss, G. W.

    1997-07-01

    Anomalous increases of the ionization density at middle latitudes (positive ionospheric storms) are often a prominent feature of upper atmospheric storms. One of their possible causes are traveling atmospheric disturbances (TADs) which propagate from polar to equatorial latitudes, carrying along equatorward-directed meridional winds. At middle latitudes, these winds cause an increase in the height of the F2 layer which in turn will lead to an enhancement of the ionization density. Using a simple description of a TAD and an ionospheric model, we are able to reproduce the basic properties of such perturbations. We also attempt to simulate an actually observed storm period. Rough agreement is obtained when the wind speed is derived from the height of the F2-layer peak. A more detailed simulation of the initial phase of the storm requires a more refined TAD model with time-dependent height gradients in the wind field.

  8. The anticancer immune response: indispensable for therapeutic success?

    PubMed Central

    Zitvogel, Laurence; Apetoh, Lionel; Ghiringhelli, François; André, Fabrice; Tesniere, Antoine; Kroemer, Guido

    2008-01-01

    Although the impact of tumor immunology on the clinical management of most cancers is still negligible, there is increasing evidence that anticancer immune responses may contribute to the control of cancer after conventional chemotherapy. Thus, radiotherapy and some chemotherapeutic agents, in particular anthracyclines, can induce specific immune responses that result either in immunogenic cancer cell death or in immunostimulatory side effects. This anticancer immune response then helps to eliminate residual cancer cells (those that fail to be killed by chemotherapy) or maintains micrometastases in a stage of dormancy. Based on these premises, in this Review we address the question, How may it be possible to ameliorate conventional therapies by stimulating the anticancer immune response? Moreover, we discuss the rationale of clinical trials to evaluate and eventually increase the contribution of antitumor immune responses to the therapeutic management of neoplasia. PMID:18523649

  9. Immune response, not immune maintenance, is energetically costly in wild white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus).

    PubMed

    Derting, Terry L; Compton, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    Understanding the cost of immune function is essential for more accurate characterization of energy budgets of animals and better understanding of the role of immunity in the evolution of life-history strategies. We examined the energetic cost of maintaining a normally functioning immune system and mounting a mild immune response in wild male white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus). To evaluate the cost of maintaining immunocompetence, we compared resting and daily metabolic rates (RMR; DMR) and masses of body organs of mice whose immune systems were suppressed by cyclophosphamide with those of control mice. To evaluate the cost of mounting an immune response, we measured RMR, DMR, and organ masses in mice whose humoral and cell-mediated immune responses had been stimulated by injections of sheep red blood cells and phytohemagglutinin, respectively. Immunosuppression resulted in a significant reduction in circulating leukocytes, by 225%, but no significant effect on metabolic rates or organ masses. Immunochallenged animals showed no significant differences in metabolic rates compared with control animals but did exhibit significantly smaller dry masses of the small intestine and testes, by 74% and 22%, respectively. We concluded that the cost of maintaining the immune system was minimal. In contrast, there was a significant energetic cost of mounting an immune response that, depending on its magnitude, can be met through reductions in energy allocation to other physiological systems.

  10. Mechanisms of nutrient modulation of the immune response.

    PubMed

    Cunningham-Rundles, Susanna; McNeeley, David F; Moon, Aeri

    2005-06-01

    Lack of adequate macronutrients or selected micronutrients, especially zinc, selenium, iron, and the antioxidant vitamins, can lead to clinically significant immune deficiency and infections in children. Undernutrition in critical periods of gestation and neonatal maturation and during weaning impairs the development and differentiation of a normal immune system. Infections are both more frequent and more often become chronic in the malnourished child. Recent identification of genetic mechanisms is revealing critical pathways in the gastrointestinal immune response. New studies show that the development of tolerance, control of inflammation, and response to normal mucosal flora are interrelated and linked to specific immune mechanisms. Nutrients act as antioxidants and as cofactors at the level of cytokine regulation. Protein calorie malnutrition and zinc deficiency activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Increased circulating levels of glucocorticoids cause thymic atrophy and affect hematopoiesis. Chronic undernutrition and micronutrient deficiency compromise cytokine response and affect immune cell trafficking. The combination of chronic undernutrition and infection further weakens the immune response, leading to altered immune cell populations and a generalized increase in inflammatory mediators. Obesity caused by excess nutrition or excess storage of fats relative to energy expenditure is a form of malnutrition that is increasingly seen in children. Leptin is emerging as a cytokine-like immune regulator that has complex effects in both overnutrition and in the inflammatory response in malnutrition. Because the immune system is immature at birth, malnutrition in childhood might have long-term effects on health.

  11. Biomimetic and synthetic interfaces to tune immune responses (Review)

    PubMed Central

    Garapaty, Anusha; Champion, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    Organisms depend upon complex intercellular communication to initiate, maintain, or suppress immune responses during infection or disease. Communication occurs not only between different types of immune cells, but also between immune cells and nonimmune cells or pathogenic entities. It can occur directly at the cell–cell contact interface, or indirectly through secreted signals that bind cell surface molecules. Though secreted signals can be soluble, they can also be particulate in nature and direct communication at the cell–particle interface. Secreted extracellular vesicles are an example of native particulate communication, while viruses are examples of foreign particulates. Inspired by communication at natural immunological interfaces, biomimetic materials and designer molecules have been developed to mimic and direct the type of immune response. This review describes the ways in which native, biomimetic, and designer materials can mediate immune responses. Examples include extracellular vesicles, particles that mimic immune cells or pathogens, and hybrid designer molecules with multiple signaling functions, engineered to target and bind immune cell surface molecules. Interactions between these materials and immune cells are leading to increased understanding of natural immune communication and function, as well as development of immune therapeutics for the treatment of infection, cancer, and autoimmune disease. PMID:26178262

  12. Sexual dimorphism in immunity: improving our understanding of vaccine immune responses in men.

    PubMed

    Furman, David

    2015-03-01

    Weaker immune responses are often observed in males compared to females. Since female hormones have proinflammatory properties and androgens have potent immunomodulatory effects, this sexual dimorphism in the immune response seems to be hormone dependent. Despite our current knowledge about the effect of sex hormones on immune cells, definition of the factors driving the sex differences in immunoclinical outcomes, such as the diminished response to infection and vaccination observed in men or the higher rates of autoimmunity observed in females, remains elusive. Recently, systems approaches to immune function have started to suggest a way toward establishing this connection. Such studies promise to improve our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the sexual dimorphism observed in the human immune system.

  13. Species-specific transpiration responses to intermediate disturbance in a northern hardwood forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matheny, Ashley M.; Bohrer, Gil; Vogel, Christoph S.; Morin, Timothy H.; He, Lingli; Frasson, Renato Prata de Moraes; Mirfenderesgi, Golnazalsadat; Schäfer, Karina V. R.; Gough, Christopher M.; Ivanov, Valeriy Y.; Curtis, Peter S.

    2014-12-01

    Intermediate disturbances shape forest structure and composition, which may in turn alter carbon, nitrogen, and water cycling. We used a large-scale experiment in a forest in northern lower Michigan where we prescribed an intermediate disturbance by stem girdling all canopy-dominant early successional trees to simulate an accelerated age-related senescence associated with natural succession. Using 3 years of eddy covariance and sap flux measurements in the disturbed area and an adjacent control plot, we analyzed disturbance-induced changes to plot level and species-specific transpiration and stomatal conductance. We found transpiration to be ~15% lower in disturbed plots than in unmanipulated control plots. However, species-specific responses to changes in microclimate varied. While red oak and white pine showed increases in stomatal conductance during postdisturbance (62.5 and 132.2%, respectively), red maple reduced stomatal conductance by 36.8%. We used the hysteresis between sap flux and vapor pressure deficit to quantify diurnal hydraulic stress incurred by each species in both plots. Red oak, a ring porous anisohydric species, demonstrated the largest mean relative hysteresis, while red maple, bigtooth aspen, and paper birch, all diffuse porous species, had the lowest relative hysteresis. We employed the Penman-Monteith model for LE to demonstrate that these species-specific responses to disturbance are not well captured using current modeling strategies and that accounting for changes to leaf area index and plot microclimate are insufficient to fully describe the effects of disturbance on transpiration.

  14. The X-files in immunity: sex-based differences predispose immune responses.

    PubMed

    Fish, Eleanor N

    2008-09-01

    Despite accumulating evidence in support of sex-based differences in innate and adaptive immune responses, in the susceptibility to infectious diseases and in the prevalence of autoimmune diseases, health research and clinical practice do not address these distinctions, and most research studies of immune responses do not stratify by sex. X-linked genes, hormones and societal context are among the many factors that contribute to disparate immune responses in males and females. It is crucial to address sex-based differences in disease pathogenesis and in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of therapeutic medications to provide optimal disease management for both sexes.

  15. Innate and adaptive immune responses in neurodegeneration and repair.

    PubMed

    Amor, Sandra; Woodroofe, M Nicola

    2014-03-01

    Emerging evidence suggests important roles of the innate and adaptive immune responses in the central nervous system (CNS) in neurodegenerative diseases. In this special review issue, five leading researchers discuss the evidence for the beneficial as well as the detrimental impact of the immune system in the CNS in disorders including Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis and CNS injury. Several common pathological mechanisms emerge indicating that these pathways could provide important targets for manipulating the immune reposes in neurodegenerative disorders. The articles highlight the role of the traditional resident immune cell of the CNS - the microglia - as well as the role of other glia astrocytes and oligodendrocytes in immune responses and their interplay with other immune cells including, mast cells, T cells and B cells. Future research should lead to new discoveries which highlight targets for therapeutic interventions which may be applicable to a range of neurodegenerative diseases.

  16. Immune adjuvants in early life: targeting the innate immune system to overcome impaired adaptive response.

    PubMed

    de Brito, Cyro Alves; Goldoni, Adriana Letícia; Sato, Maria Notomi

    2009-09-01

    The neonatal phase is a transitory period characterized by an absence of memory cells, favoring a slow adaptive response prone to tolerance effects and the development of Th2-type responses. However, when appropriately stimulated, neonates may achieve an immune response comparable with adult counterparts. One strategy to stimulate the immunological response of neonates or children in early infancy has been to explore natural or synthetic ligands of cell receptors to stimulate innate immunity. The use of adjuvants for activating different cell receptors may be the key to enhancing neonatal adaptive immunity. This review highlights recent advances in the emerging field of molecular adjuvants of innate immune response and their implications for the development of immunotherapies, with particular focus on the neonatal period.

  17. Transcriptional analysis of the innate immune response using the avian innate immunity microarray

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The avian innate immunity microarray (AIIM) is a genomics tool designed to study the transcriptional activity of the avian immune response (Cytogenet. Genome Res. 117:139-145, 2007). It is an avian cDNA microarray representing 4,959 avian genes spotted in triplicate. The AIIM contains 25 avian int...

  18. Immune Response in Thyroid Cancer: Widening the Boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Laura Sterian

    2014-01-01

    The association between thyroid cancer and thyroid inflammation has been repeatedly reported and highly debated in the literature. In fact, both molecular and epidemiological data suggest that these diseases are closely related and this association reinforces that the immune system is important for thyroid cancer progression. Innate immunity is the first line of defensive response. Unlike innate immune responses, adaptive responses are highly specific to the particular antigen that induced them. Both branches of the immune system may interact in antitumor immune response. Major effector cells of the immune system that directly target thyroid cancer cells include dendritic cells, macrophages, polymorphonuclear leukocytes, mast cells, and lymphocytes. A mixture of immune cells may infiltrate thyroid cancer microenvironment and the balance of protumor and antitumor activity of these cells may be associated with prognosis. Herein, we describe some evidences that immune response may be important for thyroid cancer progression and may help us identify more aggressive tumors, sparing the vast majority of patients from costly unnecessary invasive procedures. The future trend in thyroid cancer is an individualized therapy. PMID:25328756

  19. Cell-mediated immune responses to COPV early proteins.

    PubMed

    Jain, Suchitra; Moore, Richard A; Anderson, Davina M; Gough, Gerald W; Stanley, Margaret A

    Cell-mediated immunity plays a key role in the regression of papillomavirus-induced warts and intra-epithelial lesions but the target antigens that induce this response are not clear. Canine oral papillomavirus (COPV) infection of the oral cavity in dogs is a well-characterized model of mucosal papillomavirus infection that permits analysis of the immune events during the infectious cycle. In this study we show that during the COPV infectious cycle, systemic T cell responses to peptides of several early proteins particularly the E2 protein, as assayed by delayed type hypersensitivity, lymphoproliferation and IFN-gamma ELISPOT, can be detected. The maximal response occurs in a narrow time window that coincides with maximal viral DNA replication and wart regression: thereafter, systemic T cell responses to early proteins decline quite rapidly. Vaccination using particle-mediated immunotherapeutic delivery (PMID) of codon-modified COPV E2 and E1 genes induces strong antigen-specific cell-mediated immune responses in the vaccinated animals. These data show that therapeutic immunization by PMID with codon-modified E2 is completely effective, that to E1 is partially protective, that this correlates with the intensity of antigen-specific cell-mediated immune responses and, further, they emphasize the importance of these responses and the route of immunization in the generation of protective immunity. PMID:16949120

  20. Innate immune responses in raccoons after raccoon rabies virus infection.

    PubMed

    Srithayakumar, Vythegi; Sribalachandran, Hariharan; Rosatte, Rick; Nadin-Davis, Susan A; Kyle, Christopher J

    2014-01-01

    Zoonotic wildlife diseases pose significant health risks not only to their primary vectors but also to humans and domestic animals. Rabies is a lethal encephalitis caused by rabies virus (RV). This RNA virus can infect a range of terrestrial mammals but each viral variant persists in a particular reservoir host. Active management of these host vectors is needed to minimize the negative impacts of this disease, and an understanding of the immune response to RV infection aids strategies for host vaccination. Current knowledge of immune responses to RV infection comes primarily from rodent models in which an innate immune response triggers activation of several genes and signalling pathways. It is unclear, however, how well rodent models represent the immune response of natural hosts. This study investigates the innate immune response of a primary host, the raccoon, to a peripheral challenge using the raccoon rabies virus (RRV). The extent and temporal course of this response during RRV infection was analysed using genes predicted to be upregulated during infection (IFNs; IFN regulatory factors; IL-6; Toll like receptor-3; TNF receptor). We found that RRV activated components of the innate immune system, with changes in levels of transcripts correlated with presence of viral RNA. Our results suggest that natural reservoirs of rabies may not mimic the immune response triggered in rodent models, highlighting the need for further studies of infection in primary hosts.

  1. Soil Response to Aeolian Disturbance in West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heindel, R. C.; Culler, L. E.; Chipman, J. W.; Virginia, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    Arctic soils are a critical ecological resource, yet are increasingly vulnerable to global change. In the Kangerlussuaq region of West Greenland, aeolian disturbance is the greatest threat to soil stability, with strong katabatic winds eroding vegetation and soil down to the underlying glacial till or bedrock. Little is known about what controls the distribution and rate of the aeolian erosion, which initially results in a state change from tundra to a deflated and nearly unvegetated ground. It is unclear if vegetation can eventually reestablish after erosion occurs, potentially aided by the biological soil crust (BSC) that develops within the eroded areas, or if this soil loss is an irreversible change in vegetation and soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling. Our analysis of high-resolution satellite imagery shows that across the entire study region, deflated ground covers 22% of the terrestrial landscape. Aeolian erosion occurs more frequently closer to the Greenland Ice Sheet and on S-facing slopes. Using lichenometry, we estimate that erosional fronts move across the landscape at rates of 2.5 cm yr-1, leaving unproductive ground in their wake. The onset of widespread aeolian erosion occurred roughly 700-1000 years ago, pointing toward regional cooling and aridity as the drivers behind erosion. Finally, we consider whether the BSCs can improve soil quality enough to allow for full vegetation regrowth. Preliminary results show that while the BSCs fix atmospheric N and increase C storage, the rate of soil quality recovery is extremely slow. Understanding the thresholds between vegetated tundra and eroded ground is critical for predicting how the Kangerlussuaq landscape will respond to anticipated changes in climate and ice sheet dynamics.

  2. Chemical Tools To Monitor and Manipulate Adaptive Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Doran, Todd M; Sarkar, Mohosin; Kodadek, Thomas

    2016-05-18

    Methods to monitor and manipulate the immune system are of enormous clinical interest. For example, the development of vaccines represents one of the earliest and greatest accomplishments of the biomedical research enterprise. More recently, drugs capable of "reawakening" the immune system to cancer have generated enormous excitement. But, much remains to be done. All drugs available today that manipulate the immune system cannot distinguish between "good" and "bad" immune responses and thus drive general and systemic immune suppression or activation. Indeed, with the notable exception of vaccines, our ability to monitor and manipulate antigen-specific immune responses is in its infancy. Achieving this finer level of control would be highly desirable. For example, it might allow the pharmacological editing of pathogenic immune responses without restricting the ability of the immune system to defend against infection. On the diagnostic side, a method to comprehensively monitor the circulating, antigen-specific antibody population could provide a treasure trove of clinically useful biomarkers, since many diseases expose the immune system to characteristic molecules that are deemed foreign and elicit the production of antibodies against them. This Perspective will discuss the state-of-the-art of this area with a focus on what we consider seminal opportunities for the chemistry community to contribute to this important field.

  3. Proteasome function shapes innate and adaptive immune responses.

    PubMed

    Kammerl, Ilona E; Meiners, Silke

    2016-08-01

    The proteasome system degrades more than 80% of intracellular proteins into small peptides. Accordingly, the proteasome is involved in many essential cellular functions, such as protein quality control, transcription, immune responses, cell signaling, and apoptosis. Moreover, degradation products are loaded onto major histocompatibility class I molecules to communicate the intracellular protein composition to the immune system. The standard 20S proteasome core complex contains three distinct catalytic active sites that are exchanged upon stimulation with inflammatory cytokines to form the so-called immunoproteasome. Immunoproteasomes are constitutively expressed in immune cells and have different proteolytic activities compared with standard proteasomes. They are rapidly induced in parenchymal cells upon intracellular pathogen infection and are crucial for priming effective CD8(+) T-cell-mediated immune responses against infected cells. Beyond shaping these adaptive immune reactions, immunoproteasomes also regulate the function of immune cells by degradation of inflammatory and immune mediators. Accordingly, they emerge as novel regulators of innate immune responses. The recently unraveled impairment of immunoproteasome function by environmental challenges and by genetic variations of immunoproteasome genes might represent a currently underestimated risk factor for the development and progression of lung diseases. In particular, immunoproteasome dysfunction will dampen resolution of infections, thereby promoting exacerbations, may foster autoimmunity in chronic lung diseases, and possibly contributes to immune evasion of tumor cells. Novel pharmacological tools, such as site-specific inhibitors of the immunoproteasome, as well as activity-based probes, however, hold promises as innovative therapeutic drugs for respiratory diseases and biomarker profiling, respectively. PMID:27343191

  4. Proteasome function shapes innate and adaptive immune responses.

    PubMed

    Kammerl, Ilona E; Meiners, Silke

    2016-08-01

    The proteasome system degrades more than 80% of intracellular proteins into small peptides. Accordingly, the proteasome is involved in many essential cellular functions, such as protein quality control, transcription, immune responses, cell signaling, and apoptosis. Moreover, degradation products are loaded onto major histocompatibility class I molecules to communicate the intracellular protein composition to the immune system. The standard 20S proteasome core complex contains three distinct catalytic active sites that are exchanged upon stimulation with inflammatory cytokines to form the so-called immunoproteasome. Immunoproteasomes are constitutively expressed in immune cells and have different proteolytic activities compared with standard proteasomes. They are rapidly induced in parenchymal cells upon intracellular pathogen infection and are crucial for priming effective CD8(+) T-cell-mediated immune responses against infected cells. Beyond shaping these adaptive immune reactions, immunoproteasomes also regulate the function of immune cells by degradation of inflammatory and immune mediators. Accordingly, they emerge as novel regulators of innate immune responses. The recently unraveled impairment of immunoproteasome function by environmental challenges and by genetic variations of immunoproteasome genes might represent a currently underestimated risk factor for the development and progression of lung diseases. In particular, immunoproteasome dysfunction will dampen resolution of infections, thereby promoting exacerbations, may foster autoimmunity in chronic lung diseases, and possibly contributes to immune evasion of tumor cells. Novel pharmacological tools, such as site-specific inhibitors of the immunoproteasome, as well as activity-based probes, however, hold promises as innovative therapeutic drugs for respiratory diseases and biomarker profiling, respectively.

  5. Advantages of Extracellular Ubiquitin in Modulation of Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    T and B lymphocytes play a central role in protecting the human body from infectious pathogens but occasionally they can escape immune tolerance, become activated, and induce autoimmune diseases. All deregulated cellular processes are associated with improper functioning of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) in eukaryotic cells. The role of ubiquitin in regulation of immune responses and in autoimmune diseases is only beginning to emerge. Ubiquitin is found in intra- and extracellular fluids and is involved in regulation of numerous cellular processes. Extracellular ubiquitin ascribed a role in lymphocyte differentiation. It regulates differentiation and maturation of hematopoietic cell lines. Ubiquitination is involved in initiation, propagation, and termination of immune responses. Disrupted ubiquitination can lead to autoimmunity. Recent observations showed that it can suppress immune response and prevent inflammation. Exogenous ubiquitin may provide good potential as a new tool for targeted therapy for immune mediated disorders of various etiologies. PMID:27642236

  6. Advantages of Extracellular Ubiquitin in Modulation of Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    T and B lymphocytes play a central role in protecting the human body from infectious pathogens but occasionally they can escape immune tolerance, become activated, and induce autoimmune diseases. All deregulated cellular processes are associated with improper functioning of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) in eukaryotic cells. The role of ubiquitin in regulation of immune responses and in autoimmune diseases is only beginning to emerge. Ubiquitin is found in intra- and extracellular fluids and is involved in regulation of numerous cellular processes. Extracellular ubiquitin ascribed a role in lymphocyte differentiation. It regulates differentiation and maturation of hematopoietic cell lines. Ubiquitination is involved in initiation, propagation, and termination of immune responses. Disrupted ubiquitination can lead to autoimmunity. Recent observations showed that it can suppress immune response and prevent inflammation. Exogenous ubiquitin may provide good potential as a new tool for targeted therapy for immune mediated disorders of various etiologies.

  7. Advantages of Extracellular Ubiquitin in Modulation of Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Sujashvili, Rusudan

    2016-01-01

    T and B lymphocytes play a central role in protecting the human body from infectious pathogens but occasionally they can escape immune tolerance, become activated, and induce autoimmune diseases. All deregulated cellular processes are associated with improper functioning of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) in eukaryotic cells. The role of ubiquitin in regulation of immune responses and in autoimmune diseases is only beginning to emerge. Ubiquitin is found in intra- and extracellular fluids and is involved in regulation of numerous cellular processes. Extracellular ubiquitin ascribed a role in lymphocyte differentiation. It regulates differentiation and maturation of hematopoietic cell lines. Ubiquitination is involved in initiation, propagation, and termination of immune responses. Disrupted ubiquitination can lead to autoimmunity. Recent observations showed that it can suppress immune response and prevent inflammation. Exogenous ubiquitin may provide good potential as a new tool for targeted therapy for immune mediated disorders of various etiologies. PMID:27642236

  8. Global analysis of the immune response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Leonardo C.; Dickman, Ronald; Bernardes, Américo T.

    2008-10-01

    The immune system may be seen as a complex system, characterized using tools developed in the study of such systems, for example, surface roughness and its associated Hurst exponent. We analyze densitometric (Panama blot) profiles of immune reactivity, to classify individuals into groups with similar roughness statistics. We focus on a population of individuals living in a region in which malaria endemic, as well as a control group from a disease-free region. Our analysis groups individuals according to the presence, or absence, of malaria symptoms and number of malaria manifestations. Applied to the Panama blot data, our method proves more effective at discriminating between groups than principal-components analysis or super-paramagnetic clustering. Our findings provide evidence that some phenomena observed in the immune system can be only understood from a global point of view. We observe similar tendencies between experimental immune profiles and those of artificial profiles, obtained from an immune network model. The statistical entropy of the experimental profiles is found to exhibit variations similar to those observed in the Hurst exponent.

  9. Apoptosis and other immune biomarkers predict influenza vaccine responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Furman, David; Jojic, Vladimir; Kidd, Brian; Shen-Orr, Shai; Price, Jordan; Jarrell, Justin; Tse, Tiffany; Huang, Huang; Lund, Peder; Maecker, Holden T; Utz, Paul J; Dekker, Cornelia L; Koller, Daphne; Davis, Mark M

    2013-01-01

    Despite the importance of the immune system in many diseases, there are currently no objective benchmarks of immunological health. In an effort to identifying such markers, we used influenza vaccination in 30 young (20-30 years) and 59 older subjects (60 to >89 years) as models for strong and weak immune responses, respectively, and assayed their serological responses to influenza strains as well as a wide variety of other parameters, including gene expression, antibodies to hemagglutinin peptides, serum cytokines, cell subset phenotypes and in vitro cytokine stimulation. Using machine learning, we identified nine variables that predict the antibody response with 84% accuracy. Two of these variables are involved in apoptosis, which positively associated with the response to vaccination and was confirmed to be a contributor to vaccine responsiveness in mice. The identification of these biomarkers provides new insights into what immune features may be most important for immune health. PMID:23591775

  10. Subversion of the Immune Response by Rabies Virus.

    PubMed

    Scott, Terence P; Nel, Louis H

    2016-01-01

    Rabies has affected mankind for several centuries and is one of the oldest known zoonoses. It is peculiar how little is known regarding the means by which rabies virus (RABV) evades the immune response and kills its host. This review investigates the complex interplay between RABV and the immune system, including the various means by which RABV evades, or advantageously utilizes, the host immune response in order to ensure successful replication and spread to another host. Different factors that influence immune responses-including age, sex, cerebral lateralization and temperature-are discussed, with specific reference to RABV and the effects on host morbidity and mortality. We also investigate the role of apoptosis and discuss whether it is a detrimental or beneficial mechanism of the host's response to infection. The various RABV proteins and their roles in immune evasion are examined in depth with reference to important domains and the downstream effects of these interactions. Lastly, an overview of the means by which RABV evades important immune responses is provided. The research discussed in this review will be important in determining the roles of the immune response during RABV infections as well as to highlight important therapeutic target regions and potential strategies for rabies treatment. PMID:27548204

  11. Subversion of the Immune Response by Rabies Virus.

    PubMed

    Scott, Terence P; Nel, Louis H

    2016-08-19

    Rabies has affected mankind for several centuries and is one of the oldest known zoonoses. It is peculiar how little is known regarding the means by which rabies virus (RABV) evades the immune response and kills its host. This review investigates the complex interplay between RABV and the immune system, including the various means by which RABV evades, or advantageously utilizes, the host immune response in order to ensure successful replication and spread to another host. Different factors that influence immune responses-including age, sex, cerebral lateralization and temperature-are discussed, with specific reference to RABV and the effects on host morbidity and mortality. We also investigate the role of apoptosis and discuss whether it is a detrimental or beneficial mechanism of the host's response to infection. The various RABV proteins and their roles in immune evasion are examined in depth with reference to important domains and the downstream effects of these interactions. Lastly, an overview of the means by which RABV evades important immune responses is provided. The research discussed in this review will be important in determining the roles of the immune response during RABV infections as well as to highlight important therapeutic target regions and potential strategies for rabies treatment.

  12. Tissue engineering tools for modulation of the immune response

    PubMed Central

    Boehler, Ryan M.; Graham, John G.; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2012-01-01

    Tissue engineering scaffolds have emerged as a powerful tool within regenerative medicine. These materials are being designed to create environments that promote regeneration through a combination of: (i) scaffold architecture, (ii) the use of scaffolds as vehicles for transplanting progenitor cells, and/or (iii) localized delivery of inductive factors or genes encoding for these inductive factors. This review describes the techniques associated with each of these components. Additionally, the immune response is increasingly recognized as a factor influencing regeneration. The immune reaction to an implant begins with an acute response to the injury and innate recognition of foreign materials, with the subsequent chronic immune response involving specific recognition of antigens (e.g., transplanted cells) by the adaptive immune response, which can eventually lead to rejection of the implant. Thus, we also describe the impact of each component on the immune response, and strategies (e.g., material design, anti-inflammatory cytokine delivery, and immune cell recruitment/transplantation) to modulate, yet not eliminate, the local immune response in order to promote regeneration, which represents another important tool for regenerative medicine. PMID:21988690

  13. Paradoxical acclimation responses in the thermal performance of insect immunity.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Laura V; Heinrichs, David E; Sinclair, Brent J

    2016-05-01

    Winter is accompanied by multiple stressors, and the interactions between cold and pathogen stress potentially determine the overwintering success of insects. Thus, it is necessary to explore the thermal performance of the insect immune system. We cold-acclimated spring field crickets, Gryllus veletis, to 6 °C for 7 days and measured the thermal performance of potential (lysozyme and phenoloxidase activity) and realised (bacterial clearance and melanisation) immune responses. Cold acclimation decreased the critical thermal minimum from -0.5 ± 0.25 to -2.1 ± 0.18 °C, and chill coma recovery time after 72 h at -2 °C from 16.8 ± 4.9 to 5.2 ± 2.0 min. Measures of both potential and realised immunity followed a typical thermal performance curve, decreasing with decreasing temperature. However, cold acclimation further decreased realised immunity at low, but not high, temperatures; effectively, immune activity became paradoxically specialised to higher temperatures. Thus, cold acclimation induced mismatched thermal responses between locomotor and immune systems, as well as within the immune system itself. We conclude that cold acclimation in insects appears to preferentially improve cold tolerance over whole-animal immune performance at low temperatures, and that the differential thermal performance of physiological responses to multiple pressures must be considered when predicting ectotherms' response to climate change. PMID:26846428

  14. Superficial Immunity: Antimicrobial Responses Are More Than Skin Deep.

    PubMed

    Mack, Madison R; Kim, Brian S

    2016-07-19

    The skin barrier is essential for host defense, but how the skin provides protection when the barrier is breached is not well understood. In this issue of Immunity, Gallo and colleagues report that keratinocytes integrate signals from antimicrobial peptides via MAVS signaling to amplify their antiviral immune response. PMID:27438760

  15. Gingival wound healing: an essential response disturbed by aging?

    PubMed

    Smith, P C; Cáceres, M; Martínez, C; Oyarzún, A; Martínez, J

    2015-03-01

    Gingival wound healing comprises a series of sequential responses that allow the closure of breaches in the masticatory mucosa. This process is of critical importance to prevent the invasion of microbes or other agents into tissues, avoiding the establishment of a chronic infection. Wound healing may also play an important role during cell and tissue reaction to long-term injury, as it may occur during inflammatory responses and cancer. Recent experimental data have shown that gingival wound healing is severely affected by the aging process. These defects may alter distinct phases of the wound-healing process, including epithelial migration, granulation tissue formation, and tissue remodeling. The cellular and molecular defects that may explain these deficiencies include several biological responses such as an increased inflammatory response, altered integrin signaling, reduced growth factor activity, decreased cell proliferation, diminished angiogenesis, reduced collagen synthesis, augmented collagen remodeling, and deterioration of the proliferative and differentiation potential of stem cells. In this review, we explore the cellular and molecular basis of these defects and their possible clinical implications.

  16. Action of tizanidine on responses of forearm flexors and extensors to torque disturbances.

    PubMed Central

    Mackel, R; Brink, E E; Nakajima, Y

    1984-01-01

    The effects of tizanidine on the electromyographic responses of forearm flexors and extensors to torque disturbances were studied in normal subjects. Tizanidine had a strong depressive action on all the reflex responses, and on muscle background activity. It is concluded that the action on reflexes is not specific, but secondary to decreased spinal cord excitability. PMID:6502168

  17. [Adaptive immune response of people living near chemically hazardous object].

    PubMed

    Petlenko, S V; Ivanov, M B; Goverdovskiĭ, Iu B; Bogdanova, E G; Golubkov, A V

    2011-10-01

    The article presents data dynamics of adaptive immune responses of people for a long time living in adverse environmental conditions caused by pollution of the environment by industrial toxic waste. It is shown that in the process of adaptation to adverse environmental factors, changes in the immune system are in the phase fluctuations of immunological parameters that are accompanied by changes in the structure of immunodependent pathology. Most sensitive to prolonged exposure to toxic compounds are the cellular mechanisms of immune protection. Violations of the structural and quantitative and functional parameters of the link of the immune system are leading to the formation of immunopathological processes.

  18. Zinc and inflammatory/immune response in aging.

    PubMed

    Vasto, Sonya; Mocchegiani, Eugenio; Malavolta, Marco; Cuppari, Irene; Listì, Florinda; Nuzzo, Domenico; Ditta, Vito; Candore, Giuseppina; Caruso, Calogero

    2007-04-01

    Life-long antigenic burden determines a condition of chronic inflammation, with increased lymphocyte activation and proinflammatory cytokine production. A large number of studies have documented changes in zinc metabolism in experimental animal models of acute and chronic inflammation and in human chronic inflammatory conditions. In particular, modification of zinc plasma concentration, as well as intracellular disturbance of antioxidant intracellular pathways, has been found in aging and in some age-related diseases. Zinc deficiency is diffused in aged individuals in order to avoid meat and other high zinc content foods due to fear of cholesterol. Rather, they increase the consumption of refined wheat products that lack zinc and other critical nutrients as a consequence of the refining process. On the other hand, plasma zinc concentration is influenced by proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6 and TNF-alpha) and by metallothioneins (MT) homeostasis, which is in turn affected by proinflammatory cytokines. MT increase in aging and chronic inflammation allowing a continuous sequestration of intracellular zinc with subsequent low zinc ion availability against stressor agents and inflammation. This phenomenon leads to an impaired inflammatory/immune response in the elderly. A major target of zinc is NF-kappaB, a transcription factor critical for the expression of proinflammatory cytokines whose production is regulated by extra- and intracellular activating and inhibiting factors interacting with the regulatory elements on cytokine genes. Effects of zinc on translocation of NF-kappaB have been attributed to the suppression of phosphorylation and degradation of the inhibitory proteins (A20) that normally sequester it in the cytoplasm. Moreover, this factor and A20 are regulated by specific genes involved in inflammation and by intracellular zinc ion availability. So, it is not so surprising that zinc deficiency is constantly observed in chronic inflammation, such as in old

  19. Zinc and inflammatory/immune response in aging.

    PubMed

    Vasto, Sonya; Mocchegiani, Eugenio; Malavolta, Marco; Cuppari, Irene; Listì, Florinda; Nuzzo, Domenico; Ditta, Vito; Candore, Giuseppina; Caruso, Calogero

    2007-04-01

    Life-long antigenic burden determines a condition of chronic inflammation, with increased lymphocyte activation and proinflammatory cytokine production. A large number of studies have documented changes in zinc metabolism in experimental animal models of acute and chronic inflammation and in human chronic inflammatory conditions. In particular, modification of zinc plasma concentration, as well as intracellular disturbance of antioxidant intracellular pathways, has been found in aging and in some age-related diseases. Zinc deficiency is diffused in aged individuals in order to avoid meat and other high zinc content foods due to fear of cholesterol. Rather, they increase the consumption of refined wheat products that lack zinc and other critical nutrients as a consequence of the refining process. On the other hand, plasma zinc concentration is influenced by proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6 and TNF-alpha) and by metallothioneins (MT) homeostasis, which is in turn affected by proinflammatory cytokines. MT increase in aging and chronic inflammation allowing a continuous sequestration of intracellular zinc with subsequent low zinc ion availability against stressor agents and inflammation. This phenomenon leads to an impaired inflammatory/immune response in the elderly. A major target of zinc is NF-kappaB, a transcription factor critical for the expression of proinflammatory cytokines whose production is regulated by extra- and intracellular activating and inhibiting factors interacting with the regulatory elements on cytokine genes. Effects of zinc on translocation of NF-kappaB have been attributed to the suppression of phosphorylation and degradation of the inhibitory proteins (A20) that normally sequester it in the cytoplasm. Moreover, this factor and A20 are regulated by specific genes involved in inflammation and by intracellular zinc ion availability. So, it is not so surprising that zinc deficiency is constantly observed in chronic inflammation, such as in old

  20. Interactions between negative energy balance, metabolic diseases, uterine health and immune response in transition dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Giulia; Irons, Pete C; Webb, Edward C; Chapwanya, Aspinas

    2014-01-30

    The biological cycles of milk production and reproduction determine dairying profitability thus making management decisions dynamic and time-dependent. Diseases also negatively impact on net earnings of a dairy enterprise. Transition cows in particular face the challenge of negative energy balance (NEB) and/or disproportional energy metabolism (fatty liver, ketosis, subacute, acute ruminal acidosis); disturbed mineral utilization (milk fever, sub-clinical hypocalcemia); and perturbed immune function (retained placenta, metritis, mastitis). Consequently NEB and reduced dry matter intake are aggravated. The combined effects of all these challenges are reduced fertility and milk production resulting in diminishing profits. Risk factors such as NEB, inflammation and impairment of the immune response are highly cause-and-effect related. Thus, managing cows during the transition period should be geared toward reducing NEB or feeding specially formulated diets to improve immunity. Given that all cows experience a reduced feed intake and body condition, infection and inflammation of the uterus after calving, there is a need for further research on the immunology of transition dairy cows. Integrative approaches at the molecular, cellular and animal level may unravel the complex interactions between disturbed metabolism and immune function that predispose cows to periparturient diseases.

  1. Taenia solium: immune response against oral or systemic immunization with purified recombinant calreticulin in mice.

    PubMed

    Fonseca-Coronado, Salvador; Ruiz-Tovar, Karina; Pérez-Tapia, Mayra; Mendlovic, Fela; Flisser, Ana

    2011-01-01

    Recombinant functional Taenia solium calreticulin (rTsCRT) confers different degrees of protection in the experimental model of intestinal taeniosis in hamsters. The aim of this study was to evaluate the immune response induced after oral or systemic immunization with an electroeluted rTsCRT in BALB/c mice. Oral immunization elicited high fecal IgA and the production of IL-4 and IL-5 by mesenteric lymph node cells after in vitro stimulation with rTSCRT, indicating a Th2 response. Mice subcutaneously immunized produced high amounts of serum IgG, being IgG1 (Th2-related) the predominant isotype, while in vitro stimulated spleen cells synthesized IL-4, IL-5 and also IFN-γ, indicating a mixed Th1/Th2 cellular response after systemic immunization. Our data show that purified rTsCRT induces polarized Th2 responses after oral immunization of mice, a common characteristic of protective immunity against helminths and, consequently, a desirable hallmark in the search for a vaccine.

  2. Subversion of the Immune Response by Rabies Virus

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Terence P.; Nel, Louis H.

    2016-01-01

    Rabies has affected mankind for several centuries and is one of the oldest known zoonoses. It is peculiar how little is known regarding the means by which rabies virus (RABV) evades the immune response and kills its host. This review investigates the complex interplay between RABV and the immune system, including the various means by which RABV evades, or advantageously utilizes, the host immune response in order to ensure successful replication and spread to another host. Different factors that influence immune responses—including age, sex, cerebral lateralization and temperature—are discussed, with specific reference to RABV and the effects on host morbidity and mortality. We also investigate the role of apoptosis and discuss whether it is a detrimental or beneficial mechanism of the host’s response to infection. The various RABV proteins and their roles in immune evasion are examined in depth with reference to important domains and the downstream effects of these interactions. Lastly, an overview of the means by which RABV evades important immune responses is provided. The research discussed in this review will be important in determining the roles of the immune response during RABV infections as well as to highlight important therapeutic target regions and potential strategies for rabies treatment. PMID:27548204

  3. Regulation of Immune Responses by mTOR

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Jonathan D.; Pollizzi, Kristen N.; Heikamp, Emily B.; Horton, Maureen R.

    2013-01-01

    mTOR is an evolutionarily conserved serine/threonine kinase that plays a central role in integrating environmental cues in the form of growth factors, amino acids, and energy. In the study of the immune system, mTOR is emerging as a critical regulator of immune function because of its role in sensing and integrating cues from the immune microenvironment. With the greater appreciation of cellular metabolism as an important regulator of immune cell function, mTOR is proving to be a vital link between immune function and metabolism. In this review, we discuss the ability of mTOR to direct the adaptive immune response. Specifically, we focus on the role of mTOR in promoting differentiation, activation, and function in T cells, B cells, and antigen-presenting cells. PMID:22136167

  4. Response diversity can increase ecological resilience to disturbance in coral reefs.

    PubMed

    Baskett, Marissa L; Fabina, Nicholas S; Gross, Kevin

    2014-08-01

    Community-level resilience depends on the interaction between multiple populations that vary in individual responses to disturbance. For example, in tropical reefs, some corals can survive higher stress (resistance) while others exhibit faster recovery (engineering resilience) following disturbances such as thermal stress. While each type will negatively affect the other through competition, each might also benefit the other by reducing the potential for an additional competitor such as macroalgae to invade after a disturbance. To determine how community composition affects ecological resilience, we modeled coral-macroalgae interactions given either a resistant coral, a resilient coral, or both together. Having both coral types (i.e., response diversity) can lead to observable enhanced ecological resilience if (1) the resilient coral is not a superior competitor and (2) disturbance levels are high enough such that the resilient coral would collapse when considered alone. This enhanced resilience occurs through competitor-enabled rescue where each coral increases the potential for the other to recover from disturbance through external recruitment, such that both corals benefit from the presence of each other in terms of total cover and resilience. Therefore, conservation management aimed at protecting resilience under global change requires consideration of both diversity and connectivity between sites experiencing differential disturbance. PMID:25058289

  5. Response diversity can increase ecological resilience to disturbance in coral reefs.

    PubMed

    Baskett, Marissa L; Fabina, Nicholas S; Gross, Kevin

    2014-08-01

    Community-level resilience depends on the interaction between multiple populations that vary in individual responses to disturbance. For example, in tropical reefs, some corals can survive higher stress (resistance) while others exhibit faster recovery (engineering resilience) following disturbances such as thermal stress. While each type will negatively affect the other through competition, each might also benefit the other by reducing the potential for an additional competitor such as macroalgae to invade after a disturbance. To determine how community composition affects ecological resilience, we modeled coral-macroalgae interactions given either a resistant coral, a resilient coral, or both together. Having both coral types (i.e., response diversity) can lead to observable enhanced ecological resilience if (1) the resilient coral is not a superior competitor and (2) disturbance levels are high enough such that the resilient coral would collapse when considered alone. This enhanced resilience occurs through competitor-enabled rescue where each coral increases the potential for the other to recover from disturbance through external recruitment, such that both corals benefit from the presence of each other in terms of total cover and resilience. Therefore, conservation management aimed at protecting resilience under global change requires consideration of both diversity and connectivity between sites experiencing differential disturbance.

  6. Aberrant immune responses in arsenical skin cancers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chih-Hung; Liao, Wei-Ting; Yu, Hsin-Su

    2011-09-01

    Arsenic is a well-known human carcinogen. It also impairs immune functions and activation in many aspects. However, only a small portion of arsenic-exposed population develops skin abnormalities, including Bowen's disease and skin cancers. Differential immune activation among the individuals might account for the different susceptibilities. In patients with arsenic-induced Bowen's disease, there is a selective CD4 T-cell apoptosis through tumor necrosis factor-alpha pathway, decrease in macrophage differentiation and phagocytosis, reduced Langerhans cell numbers and dendrites, altered regulatory T-cell distribution, and other immune alterations. Several lines of evidence from mouse and fish studies also confirmed the potent and multifaceted effects of arsenic in the immune system. The molecular bases of immunosuppression by arsenic in lymphocytes may include chromosomal and DNA abnormalities, decreased T-cell receptor activation, and the cellular status of oxidation and methylation. This article also reviews the causative and differential role of selective CD4 cell apoptosis and the carcinogenesis of arsenic-induced Bowen's disease.

  7. Endocrine Factors Modulating Immune Responses in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Anne; Costa, Serban-Dan; Zenclussen, Ana Claudia

    2014-01-01

    How the semi-allogeneic fetus is tolerated by the maternal immune system remains a fascinating phenomenon. Despite extensive research activity in this field, the mechanisms underlying fetal tolerance are still not well understood. However, there are growing evidences that immune–immune interactions as well as immune–endocrine interactions build up a complex network of immune regulation that ensures fetal survival within the maternal uterus. In the present review, we aim to summarize emerging research data from our and other laboratories on immune modulating properties of pregnancy hormones with a special focus on progesterone, estradiol, and human chorionic gonadotropin. These pregnancy hormones are critically involved in the successful establishment, maintenance, and termination of pregnancy. They suppress detrimental maternal alloresponses while promoting tolerance pathways. This includes the reduction of the antigen-presenting capacity of dendritic cells (DCs), monocytes, and macrophages as well as the blockage of natural killer cells, T and B cells. Pregnancy hormones also support the proliferation of pregnancy supporting uterine killer cells, retain tolerogenic DCs, and efficiently induce regulatory T (Treg) cells. Furthermore, they are involved in the recruitment of mast cells and Treg cells into the fetal–maternal interface contributing to a local accumulation of pregnancy-protective cells. These findings highlight the importance of endocrine factors for the tolerance induction during pregnancy and encourage further research in the field. PMID:24847324

  8. Forest response and recovery following disturbance in upland forests of the Atlantic Coastal Plain

    PubMed Central

    Schäfer, Karina V. R.; Renninger, Heidi J.; Carlo, Nicholas J.; Vanderklein, Dirk W.

    2014-01-01

    Carbon and water cycling of forests contribute significantly to the Earth's overall biogeochemical cycling and may be affected by disturbance and climate change. As a larger body of research becomes available about leaf-level, ecosystem and regional scale effects of disturbances on forest ecosystems, a more mechanistic understanding is developing which can improve modeling efforts. Here, we summarize some of the major effects of physical and biogenic disturbances, such as drought, prescribed fire, and insect defoliation, on leaf and ecosystem-scale physiological responses as well as impacts on carbon and water cycling in an Atlantic Coastal Plain upland oak/pine and upland pine forest. During drought, stomatal conductance and canopy stomatal conductance were reduced, however, defoliation increased conductance on both leaf-level and canopy scale. Furthermore, after prescribed fire, leaf-level stomatal conductance was unchanged for pines but decreased for oaks, while canopy stomatal conductance decreased temporarily, but then rebounded the following growing season, thus exhibiting transient responses. This study suggests that forest response to disturbance varies from the leaf to ecosystem level as well as species level and thus, these differential responses interplay to determine the fate of forest structure and functioning post disturbance. PMID:25018759

  9. Virus-like nanostructures for tuning immune response

    PubMed Central

    Mammadov, Rashad; Cinar, Goksu; Gunduz, Nuray; Goktas, Melis; Kayhan, Handan; Tohumeken, Sehmus; Topal, Ahmet E.; Orujalipoor, Ilghar; Delibasi, Tuncay; Dana, Aykutlu; Ide, Semra; Tekinay, Ayse B.; Guler, Mustafa O.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic vaccines utilize viral signatures to trigger immune responses. Although the immune responses raised against the biochemical signatures of viruses are well characterized, the mechanism of how they affect immune response in the context of physical signatures is not well studied. In this work, we investigated the ability of zero- and one-dimensional self-assembled peptide nanostructures carrying unmethylated CpG motifs (signature of viral DNA) for tuning immune response. These nanostructures represent the two most common viral shapes, spheres and rods. The nanofibrous structures were found to direct immune response towards Th1 phenotype, which is responsible for acting against intracellular pathogens such as viruses, to a greater extent than nanospheres and CpG ODN alone. In addition, nanofibers exhibited enhanced uptake into dendritic cells compared to nanospheres or the ODN itself. The chemical stability of the ODN against nuclease-mediated degradation was also observed to be enhanced when complexed with the peptide nanostructures. In vivo studies showed that nanofibers promoted antigen-specific IgG production over 10-fold better than CpG ODN alone. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report showing the modulation of the nature of an immune response through the shape of the carrier system. PMID:26577983

  10. Virus-like nanostructures for tuning immune response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mammadov, Rashad; Cinar, Goksu; Gunduz, Nuray; Goktas, Melis; Kayhan, Handan; Tohumeken, Sehmus; Topal, Ahmet E.; Orujalipoor, Ilghar; Delibasi, Tuncay; Dana, Aykutlu; Ide, Semra; Tekinay, Ayse B.; Guler, Mustafa O.

    2015-11-01

    Synthetic vaccines utilize viral signatures to trigger immune responses. Although the immune responses raised against the biochemical signatures of viruses are well characterized, the mechanism of how they affect immune response in the context of physical signatures is not well studied. In this work, we investigated the ability of zero- and one-dimensional self-assembled peptide nanostructures carrying unmethylated CpG motifs (signature of viral DNA) for tuning immune response. These nanostructures represent the two most common viral shapes, spheres and rods. The nanofibrous structures were found to direct immune response towards Th1 phenotype, which is responsible for acting against intracellular pathogens such as viruses, to a greater extent than nanospheres and CpG ODN alone. In addition, nanofibers exhibited enhanced uptake into dendritic cells compared to nanospheres or the ODN itself. The chemical stability of the ODN against nuclease-mediated degradation was also observed to be enhanced when complexed with the peptide nanostructures. In vivo studies showed that nanofibers promoted antigen-specific IgG production over 10-fold better than CpG ODN alone. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report showing the modulation of the nature of an immune response through the shape of the carrier system.

  11. Plant response strategies to stress and disturbance: the case of aquatic plants.

    PubMed

    Trémolières, Michèle

    2004-12-01

    The environmental factors controlling the establishment and development of plants in different ecosystems are of two types, stress and disturbance. The effects of stress or disturbance on aquatic systems are discussed in relation to the following questions: Can we predict the state and rate of recolonization after a disturbance? What are the strategies of recolonization developed by plants? How high is the resilience of a disturbed system? Two theories, the intermediate disturbance hypothesis, and the patch dynamics concept proposed to predict the composition, structure and dynamics of plants due to physical-chemical factors, were tested on two scales, that of communities and that of species, within two alluvial floodplains (the Rhine and the Rhone systems in France). With regard to the change of community on a larger scale (i.e. the whole network of the cut-off channels in the floodplain), large gradients of connection and disturbance induce high diversities within communities. Moreover, the highest flood disturbance induces a higher species richness and the occurrence of a particular species. The change in species is analysed using biological traits (morphological, reproductive or physiological). In the floodplain of the river Rhone, the response of plants corresponds well to theory, i.e. that habitats with an intermediate disturbance are richer than more or less disturbed habitats. So we can predict, through the biological traits, the functioning of a habitat. The last remaining question is that of the resilience of the system, which can be discussed in terms of species competition and the risk of biological invasion after an opening of habitat.

  12. Measuring Immune Responses to recombinant AAV Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Martino, Ashley T.; Herzog, Roland W.; Anegon, Ignacio; Adjali, Oumeya

    2013-01-01

    Following AAV-based gene transfer, the occurrence of adaptive immune responses specific to the vector or the transgene product is a major roadblock to successful clinical translation. These responses include antibodies against the AAV capsid, which can be neutralizing and therefore prevent the ability to repeatedly administer the vector, and CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes, which can eliminate transduced cells. In addition, humans may have both humoral and cellular pre-existing immunity, as a result from natural infection with parent virus or related serotypes. The need for assays to detect and measure these anti-capsid immune responses in humans and in experimental animals is profound. Here, ELISPOT, immunocapture (ELISA), and neutralization assays are explained and provided in detail. Furthermore, such techniques can readily be adapted to monitor and quantify immune responses against therapeutic transgene products encoded by the vector genome. PMID:22034034

  13. DNA Damage Response and Immune Defense: Links and Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Nakad, Rania; Schumacher, Björn

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage plays a causal role in numerous human pathologies including cancer, premature aging, and chronic inflammatory conditions. In response to genotoxic insults, the DNA damage response (DDR) orchestrates DNA damage checkpoint activation and facilitates the removal of DNA lesions. The DDR can also arouse the immune system by for example inducing the expression of antimicrobial peptides as well as ligands for receptors found on immune cells. The activation of immune signaling is triggered by different components of the DDR including DNA damage sensors, transducer kinases, and effectors. In this review, we describe recent advances on the understanding of the role of DDR in activating immune signaling. We highlight evidence gained into (i) which molecular and cellular pathways of DDR activate immune signaling, (ii) how DNA damage drives chronic inflammation, and (iii) how chronic inflammation causes DNA damage and pathology in humans. PMID:27555866

  14. Glassy Dynamics in the Adaptive Immune Response Prevents Autoimmune Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jun; Earl, David J.; Deem, Michael W.

    2005-09-01

    The immune system normally protects the human host against death by infection. However, when an immune response is mistakenly directed at self-antigens, autoimmune disease can occur. We describe a model of protein evolution to simulate the dynamics of the adaptive immune response to antigens. Computer simulations of the dynamics of antibody evolution show that different evolutionary mechanisms, namely, gene segment swapping and point mutation, lead to different evolved antibody binding affinities. Although a combination of gene segment swapping and point mutation can yield a greater affinity to a specific antigen than point mutation alone, the antibodies so evolved are highly cross reactive and would cause autoimmune disease, and this is not the chosen dynamics of the immune system. We suggest that in the immune system’s search for antibodies, a balance has evolved between binding affinity and specificity.

  15. DNA Damage Response and Immune Defense: Links and Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Nakad, Rania; Schumacher, Björn

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage plays a causal role in numerous human pathologies including cancer, premature aging, and chronic inflammatory conditions. In response to genotoxic insults, the DNA damage response (DDR) orchestrates DNA damage checkpoint activation and facilitates the removal of DNA lesions. The DDR can also arouse the immune system by for example inducing the expression of antimicrobial peptides as well as ligands for receptors found on immune cells. The activation of immune signaling is triggered by different components of the DDR including DNA damage sensors, transducer kinases, and effectors. In this review, we describe recent advances on the understanding of the role of DDR in activating immune signaling. We highlight evidence gained into (i) which molecular and cellular pathways of DDR activate immune signaling, (ii) how DNA damage drives chronic inflammation, and (iii) how chronic inflammation causes DNA damage and pathology in humans. PMID:27555866

  16. Immunostimulant Adjuvant Patch Enhances Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses to DNA Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Mkrtichyan, Mikayel; Ghochikyan, Anahit; Movsesyan, Nina; Karapetyan, Adrine; Begoyan, Gayane; Yu, Jianmei; Glenn, Gregory M.; Ross, Ted M.; Agadjanyan, Michael G.; Cribbs, David H.

    2008-01-01

    The focus of this report is on the development of an improved DNA immunization protocol, which takes advantage of the strengths of DNA immunization, as well as those associated with adjuvant delivered by transcutaneous immunostimulatory (IS) patches. Because transcutaneous delivery of adjuvants to the skin at the vaccination site has been shown to amplify the immune response to protein antigens, we hypothesized that the same IS patch when placed on the skin at the site of DNA injection could further enhance the immune response to a DNA influenza vaccine. We have combined an influenza DNA vaccine, hemagglutinin fused with three copies of complement C3d, to enhance uptake and antigen presentation, with an IS patch containing heat-labile enterotoxin from Escherichia coli. Coadministration of a potent adjuvant in IS patches placed on the skin at the site of DNA vaccination dramatically amplifies anti-influenza antibody immune response. Supplementing DNA vaccines with IS patches may be a particularly valuable strategy because DNA vaccines can be rapidly modified in response to mutations in pathogens, and individuals with compromised immune systems such as transplant patients and the elderly will benefit from the enhanced antibody response induced by the IS patches. PMID:17961074

  17. Intraspleen DNA inoculation elicits protective cellular immune responses.

    PubMed

    Cano, A; Fragoso, G; Gevorkian, G; Terrazas, L I; Petrossian, P; Govezensky, T; Sciutto, E; Manoutcharian, K

    2001-04-01

    DNA immunization or inoculation is a recent vaccination method that induces both humoral and cellular immune responses in a range of hosts. Independent of the route or site of vaccination, the transfer of antigen-presenting cells (APC) or antigens into lymphoid organs is necessary. The aim of this investigation was to test whether intraspleen (i.s.) DNA inoculation is capable of inducing a protective immune response. We immunized mice by a single i.s. injection of a DNA construct expressing the immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy-chain variable domain (VH) in which the complementarity-determining regions (CDR) had been replaced by a Taenia crassiceps T-cell epitope. In these mice, immune responses and protective effects elicited by the vaccine were measured. We have shown here for the first time that i.s. DNA inoculation can induce protective cellular immune responses and activate CD8(+) T cells. Also, Ig V(H) appeared to be the minimal delivery unit of "antigenized" Ig capable of inducing T-cell activation in a lymphoid organ. The strategy of introducing T-cell epitopes into the molecular context of the V(H) domain in combination with i.s. DNA immunization could have important implications and applications for human immunotherapy.

  18. Modeling the interactions between pathogenic bacteria, bacteriophage and immune response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Chung Yin (Joey); Weitz, Joshua S.

    The prevalence of antibiotic-resistant strains of pathogenic bacteria has led to renewed interest in the use of bacteriophage (phage), or virus that infects bacteria, as a therapeutic agent against bacterial infections. However, little is known about the theoretical mechanism by which phage therapy may work. In particular, interactions between the bacteria, the phage and the host immune response crucially influences the outcome of the therapy. Few models of phage therapy have incorporated all these three components, and existing models suffer from unrealistic assumptions such as unbounded growth of the immune response. We propose a model of phage therapy with an emphasis on nonlinear feedback arising from interactions with bacteria and the immune response. Our model shows a synergistic effect between the phage and the immune response which underlies a possible mechanism for phage to catalyze the elimination of bacteria even when neither the immune response nor phage could do so alone. We study the significance of this effect for different parameters of infection and immune response, and discuss its implications for phage therapy.

  19. Source-based subjective responses to sleep disturbance from transportation noise.

    PubMed

    Douglas, O; Murphy, E

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing evidence to suggest that the use of subjective responses to questions concerning night-time environmental noise exposure is a robust method of assessing sleep disturbance from road traffic noise. However, there have only been a few studies exploring this issue in a real world context beyond controlled laboratory settings. This paper presents results from such a study. It utilises 208 household questionnaire surveys to assess subjective responses to levels of night-time sleep disturbance and annoyance from four different residential sites. Each residential site is characterised by a dominant noise source - road, light rail, and aircraft - and these sites are compared to a control site that is relatively free from transportation noise. The results demonstrate the inadequacy of continuous equivalent noise level measures as indicators of night-time disturbance. Furthermore, they suggest that the use of these measures alone is likely to result in inaccurate appraisals of night-time sleep disturbance from transportation noise. Ultimately, the research implies that measurement data should be used in conjunction with subjective response data to accurately gauge the level of night-time disturbance from transportation noise. PMID:27164553

  20. Protective immune responses to fungal infections.

    PubMed

    Rivera, A

    2014-09-01

    The incidence of fungal infections has been on the rise over several decades. Fungal infections threaten animals, plants and humans alike and are thus of significant concern to scientists across disciplines. Over the last decade, significant advances on fungal immunology have lead to a better understanding of important mechanisms of host protection against fungi. In this article, I review recent advances of relevant mechanisms of immune-mediated protection to fungal infections.

  1. Ontogeny of Intestinal Epithelial Innate Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Hornef, Mathias W.; Fulde, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that processes during postnatal development might significantly influence the establishment of mucosal host-microbial homeostasis. Developmental and adaptive immunological processes but also environmental and microbial exposure early after birth might thus affect disease susceptibility and health during adult life. The present review aims at summarizing the current understanding of the intestinal epithelial innate immune system and its developmental and adaptive changes after birth. PMID:25346729

  2. (Hydrological and geochemical response and recovery in disturbed arctic ecosystems)

    SciTech Connect

    Everett, K.R.

    1990-08-31

    Ionic concentration of snow prior to meltoff in 1990 as in previous years ranged widely from point to point within the basin. Overland flow began on May 12 and was monitored at closely-spaced time intervals for discharge volume and ionic concentrations to better define this relationship in non-channelized flow. Ionic concentration in both watertrack flow and in Imnavait Creek were closely monitored during meltoff. During the post melt period daily sampling was maintained in watertrack 7 and Imnavait Creek. Rainfall collection and analysis on an eight day schedule was maintained as in previous years. Soil solution composition was monitored on an event basis in conjunction with a similar schedule of precipitation sampling to determine relationships between precipitation and near surface and overland flow. Composition of deeper soil solution was also monitored and sampled for {sup 18}O analyses to determine the age structure of water contributed by the active layer to stream and watertracks. A pilot experiment employing salt tracers was conducted across landscape units to determine rates and pathways of soil solution movement in response to individual rain events. Nutrient addition in rime and fog were also recorded to add detail to the input side of the balance equation.

  3. Characterization of host immune responses in Ebola virus infections.

    PubMed

    Wong, Gary; Kobinger, Gary P; Qiu, Xiangguo

    2014-06-01

    Ebola causes highly lethal hemorrhagic fever in humans with no licensed countermeasures. Its virulence can be attributed to several immunoevasion mechanisms: an early inhibition of innate immunity started by the downregulation of type I interferon, epitope masking and subversion of the adaptive humoural immunity by secreting a truncated form of the viral glycoprotein. Deficiencies in specific and non-specific antiviral responses result in unrestricted viral replication and dissemination in the host, causing death typically within 10 days after the appearance of symptoms. This review summarizes the host immune response to Ebola infection, and highlights the short- and long-term immune responses crucial for protection, which holds implications for the design of future vaccines and therapeutics. PMID:24742338

  4. Autophagy-associated immune responses and cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yinghua; Han, Weidong; Lou, Fang; Fei, Weiqiang; Liu, Shuiping; Jing, Zhao; Sui, Xinbing

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved catabolic process by which cellular components are sequestered into a double-membrane vesicle and delivered to the lysosome for terminal degradation and recycling. Accumulating evidence suggests that autophagy plays a critical role in cell survival, senescence and homeostasis, and its dysregulation is associated with a variety of diseases including cancer, cardiovascular disease, neurodegeneration. Recent studies show that autophagy is also an important regulator of cell immune response. However, the mechanism by which autophagy regulates tumor immune responses remains elusive. In this review, we will describe the role of autophagy in immune regulation and summarize the possible molecular mechanisms that are currently well documented in the ability of autophagy to control cell immune response. In addition, the scientific and clinical hurdles regarding the potential role of autophagy in cancer immunotherapy will be discussed. PMID:26788909

  5. Cryptosporidiosis: host immune responses and the prospects for effective immunotherapies.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Vincent

    2011-11-01

    Cryptosporidium spp. that develop in intestinal epithelial cells are responsible for the diarrhoeal disease cryptosporidiosis, which is common in humans of all ages and in neonatal livestock. Following infection, parasite reproduction increases for a number of days before it is blunted and then impeded by innate and adaptive immune responses. Immunocompromised hosts often cannot establish strong immunity and develop chronic infections that can lead to death. Few drugs consistently inhibit parasite reproduction in the host, and chemotherapy might be ineffective in immunodeficient hosts. Future options for prevention or treatment of cryptosporidiosis might include vaccines or recombinant immunological molecules, but this will probably require a better understanding of both the mucosal immune system and intestinal immune responses to the parasite.

  6. Autophagy-associated immune responses and cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hongming; Chen, Liuxi; Xu, Yinghua; Han, Weidong; Lou, Fang; Fei, Weiqiang; Liu, Shuiping; Jing, Zhao; Sui, Xinbing

    2016-04-19

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved catabolic process by which cellular components are sequestered into a double-membrane vesicle and delivered to the lysosome for terminal degradation and recycling. Accumulating evidence suggests that autophagy plays a critical role in cell survival, senescence and homeostasis, and its dysregulation is associated with a variety of diseases including cancer, cardiovascular disease, neurodegeneration. Recent studies show that autophagy is also an important regulator of cell immune response. However, the mechanism by which autophagy regulates tumor immune responses remains elusive. In this review, we will describe the role of autophagy in immune regulation and summarize the possible molecular mechanisms that are currently well documented in the ability of autophagy to control cell immune response. In addition, the scientific and clinical hurdles regarding the potential role of autophagy in cancer immunotherapy will be discussed.

  7. Characterization of host immune responses in Ebola virus infections.

    PubMed

    Wong, Gary; Kobinger, Gary P; Qiu, Xiangguo

    2014-06-01

    Ebola causes highly lethal hemorrhagic fever in humans with no licensed countermeasures. Its virulence can be attributed to several immunoevasion mechanisms: an early inhibition of innate immunity started by the downregulation of type I interferon, epitope masking and subversion of the adaptive humoural immunity by secreting a truncated form of the viral glycoprotein. Deficiencies in specific and non-specific antiviral responses result in unrestricted viral replication and dissemination in the host, causing death typically within 10 days after the appearance of symptoms. This review summarizes the host immune response to Ebola infection, and highlights the short- and long-term immune responses crucial for protection, which holds implications for the design of future vaccines and therapeutics.

  8. Charon Mediates Immune Deficiency-Driven PARP-1-Dependent Immune Responses in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yingbiao; Thomas, Colin; Tulin, Nikita; Lodhi, Niraj; Boamah, Ernest; Kolenko, Vladimir; Tulin, Alexei V

    2016-09-15

    Regulation of NF-κB nuclear translocation and stability is central to mounting an effective innate immune response. In this article, we describe a novel molecular mechanism controlling NF-κB-dependent innate immune response. We show that a previously unknown protein, termed as Charon, functions as a regulator of antibacterial and antifungal immune defense in Drosophila Charon is an ankyrin repeat-containing protein that mediates poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1)-dependent transcriptional responses downstream of the innate immune pathway. Our results demonstrate that Charon interacts with the NF-κB ortholog Relish inside perinuclear particles and delivers active Relish to PARP-1-bearing promoters, thus triggering NF-κB/PARP-1-dependent transcription of antimicrobial peptides. Ablating the expression of Charon prevents Relish from targeting promoters of antimicrobial genes and effectively suppresses the innate immune transcriptional response. Taken together, these results implicate Charon as an essential mediator of PARP-1-dependent transcription in the innate immune pathway. Thus, to our knowledge, our results are the first to describe the molecular mechanism regulating translocation of the NF-κB subunit from cytoplasm to chromatin. PMID:27527593

  9. Charon Mediates Immune Deficiency-Driven PARP-1-Dependent Immune Responses in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yingbiao; Thomas, Colin; Tulin, Nikita; Lodhi, Niraj; Boamah, Ernest; Kolenko, Vladimir; Tulin, Alexei V

    2016-09-15

    Regulation of NF-κB nuclear translocation and stability is central to mounting an effective innate immune response. In this article, we describe a novel molecular mechanism controlling NF-κB-dependent innate immune response. We show that a previously unknown protein, termed as Charon, functions as a regulator of antibacterial and antifungal immune defense in Drosophila Charon is an ankyrin repeat-containing protein that mediates poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1)-dependent transcriptional responses downstream of the innate immune pathway. Our results demonstrate that Charon interacts with the NF-κB ortholog Relish inside perinuclear particles and delivers active Relish to PARP-1-bearing promoters, thus triggering NF-κB/PARP-1-dependent transcription of antimicrobial peptides. Ablating the expression of Charon prevents Relish from targeting promoters of antimicrobial genes and effectively suppresses the innate immune transcriptional response. Taken together, these results implicate Charon as an essential mediator of PARP-1-dependent transcription in the innate immune pathway. Thus, to our knowledge, our results are the first to describe the molecular mechanism regulating translocation of the NF-κB subunit from cytoplasm to chromatin.

  10. Receptivity and Forced Response to Acoustic Disturbances in High-Speed Boundary Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balakumar, P.; King, Rudolph A.; Chou, Amanda; Owens, Lewis R.; Kegerise, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Supersonic boundary-layer receptivity to freestream acoustic disturbances is investigated by solving the Navier-Stokes equations for Mach 3.5 flow over a sharp flat plate and a 7-deg half-angle cone. The freestream disturbances are generated from a wavy wall placed at the nozzle wall. The freestream acoustic disturbances radiated by the wavy wall are obtained by solving the linearized Euler equations. The results for the flat plate show that instability modes are generated at all the incident angles ranging from zero to highly oblique. However, the receptivity coefficient decreases by about 20 times when the incident angle increases from zero to a highly oblique angle of 68 degrees. The results for the cone show that no instability modes are generated when the acoustic disturbances impinge the cone obliquely. The results show that the perturbations generated inside the boundary layer by the acoustic disturbances are the response of the boundary layer to the external forcing. The amplitude of the forced disturbances inside the boundary layer are about 2.5 times larger than the incoming field for zero azimuthal wavenumber and they are about 1.5 times for large azimuthal wavenumbers.

  11. Hepatitis C patients on maintenance hemodialysis show complex immune disturbances in the peripheral blood.

    PubMed

    Shiina, Masaaki; Kobayashi, Koju; Hiroishi, Kazumasa; Imawari, Michio

    2013-10-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is prevalent in patients with maintenance hemodialysis (HD). Although HCV affects the survival rate, antiviral treatment for HD patients is limited. Since impaired innate immunity has been proposed both in hepatitis C and in HD, we compared the immunologic features in periphery between these patients and controls. Thirty subjects were divided into four groups on the basis of HD and HCV infection. In peripheral blood mononuclear cells, NK subsets and their activation status were analyzed by flow cytometry. Cytokine productions were measured both in the culture supernatant and at the single cell level. In HCV-infected HD patients, CD56(dim) NK subset was decreased (13.1±3.7%, p=0.015) but had upregulated CD69 expression (10.4±4.2%, p=0.032) compared to the other groups. LPS effectively induced neither interferon (IFN)-γ nor tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in NK cells of both HCV-infected and -uninfected HD patients, while TNF-α-producing monocytes were increased in HCV-infected HD patients as compared to the uninfected. These findings indicate that chronic HCV infection affects innate immunity independently of HD.

  12. A cognitive computational model inspired by the immune system response.

    PubMed

    Abdo Abd Al-Hady, Mohamed; Badr, Amr Ahmed; Mostafa, Mostafa Abd Al-Azim

    2014-01-01

    The immune system has a cognitive ability to differentiate between healthy and unhealthy cells. The immune system response (ISR) is stimulated by a disorder in the temporary fuzzy state that is oscillating between the healthy and unhealthy states. However, modeling the immune system is an enormous challenge; the paper introduces an extensive summary of how the immune system response functions, as an overview of a complex topic, to present the immune system as a cognitive intelligent agent. The homogeneity and perfection of the natural immune system have been always standing out as the sought-after model we attempted to imitate while building our proposed model of cognitive architecture. The paper divides the ISR into four logical phases: setting a computational architectural diagram for each phase, proceeding from functional perspectives (input, process, and output), and their consequences. The proposed architecture components are defined by matching biological operations with computational functions and hence with the framework of the paper. On the other hand, the architecture focuses on the interoperability of main theoretical immunological perspectives (classic, cognitive, and danger theory), as related to computer science terminologies. The paper presents a descriptive model of immune system, to figure out the nature of response, deemed to be intrinsic for building a hybrid computational model based on a cognitive intelligent agent perspective and inspired by the natural biology. To that end, this paper highlights the ISR phases as applied to a case study on hepatitis C virus, meanwhile illustrating our proposed architecture perspective.

  13. Modeling Systems-Level Regulation of Host Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Thakar, Juilee; Pilione, Mylisa; Kirimanjeswara, Girish; Harvill, Eric T; Albert, Réka

    2007-01-01

    Many pathogens are able to manipulate the signaling pathways responsible for the generation of host immune responses. Here we examine and model a respiratory infection system in which disruption of host immune functions or of bacterial factors changes the dynamics of the infection. We synthesize the network of interactions between host immune components and two closely related bacteria in the genus Bordetellae. We incorporate existing experimental information on the timing of immune regulatory events into a discrete dynamic model, and verify the model by comparing the effects of simulated disruptions to the experimental outcome of knockout mutations. Our model indicates that the infection time course of both Bordetellae can be separated into three distinct phases based on the most active immune processes. We compare and discuss the effect of the species-specific virulence factors on disrupting the immune response during their infection of naive, antibody-treated, diseased, or convalescent hosts. Our model offers predictions regarding cytokine regulation, key immune components, and clearance of secondary infections; we experimentally validate two of these predictions. This type of modeling provides new insights into the virulence, pathogenesis, and host adaptation of disease-causing microorganisms and allows systems-level analysis that is not always possible using traditional methods. PMID:17559300

  14. A Cognitive Computational Model Inspired by the Immune System Response

    PubMed Central

    Abdo Abd Al-Hady, Mohamed; Badr, Amr Ahmed; Mostafa, Mostafa Abd Al-Azim

    2014-01-01

    The immune system has a cognitive ability to differentiate between healthy and unhealthy cells. The immune system response (ISR) is stimulated by a disorder in the temporary fuzzy state that is oscillating between the healthy and unhealthy states. However, modeling the immune system is an enormous challenge; the paper introduces an extensive summary of how the immune system response functions, as an overview of a complex topic, to present the immune system as a cognitive intelligent agent. The homogeneity and perfection of the natural immune system have been always standing out as the sought-after model we attempted to imitate while building our proposed model of cognitive architecture. The paper divides the ISR into four logical phases: setting a computational architectural diagram for each phase, proceeding from functional perspectives (input, process, and output), and their consequences. The proposed architecture components are defined by matching biological operations with computational functions and hence with the framework of the paper. On the other hand, the architecture focuses on the interoperability of main theoretical immunological perspectives (classic, cognitive, and danger theory), as related to computer science terminologies. The paper presents a descriptive model of immune system, to figure out the nature of response, deemed to be intrinsic for building a hybrid computational model based on a cognitive intelligent agent perspective and inspired by the natural biology. To that end, this paper highlights the ISR phases as applied to a case study on hepatitis C virus, meanwhile illustrating our proposed architecture perspective. PMID:25003131

  15. Plant hydraulic controls over ecosystem responses to climate-enhanced disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, D. S.; Ewers, B. E.; Reed, D. E.; Pendall, E.; McDowell, N. G.

    2012-12-01

    Climate-enhanced disturbances such as drought and insect infestation range in severity, contributing minor to severe stress to forests including forest mortality. While neither form of disturbance has been unambiguously implicated as a mechanism of mortality, both induce changes in water, carbon, and nutrient cycling that are key to understanding forest ecosystem response to, and recovery from, disturbance. Each disturbance type has different biophysical, ecohydrological, and biogeochemical signatures that potentially complicate interpretation and development of theory. Plant hydraulic function is arguably a unifying control over these responses to disturbance because it regulates stomatal conductance, leaf biochemistry, carbon (C) uptake and utilization, and nutrient cycling. We demonstrated this idea by focusing on water and C, including non-structural (NSC), resources, and nitrogen (N) uptake across a spectrum of forest ecosystems (e.g., northern temperate mixed forests, lodgepole pine forests in the Rocky Mountains, and pinon pine - juniper woodlands in New Mexico) using the Terrestrial Regional Ecosystem Exchange Simulator (TREES). TREES is grounded in the biophysics of water movement through soil and plants, respectively via hydraulic conductivity of the soil and cavitation of xylem. It combines this dynamic plant hydraulic conductance with canopy biochemical controls over photosynthesis, and the dynamics of structural and non-structural carbon through a carbon budget that responds to plant hydraulic status. As such, the model can be used to develop testable hypotheses on a multitude of disturbance and recovery responses including xylem dysfunction, stomatal and non-stomatal controls on photosynthesis and carbon allocation, respiration, and allocation to defense compounds. For each of the ecosystems we constrained and evaluated the model with allometry, sap flux and/or eddy covariance data, leaf gas exchange measurements, and vulnerability to cavitation data

  16. The coral immune response facilitates protection against microbes during tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    van de Water, Jeroen A J M; Ainsworth, Tracy D; Leggat, William; Bourne, David G; Willis, Bette L; van Oppen, Madeleine J H

    2015-07-01

    Increasing physical damage on coral reefs from predation, storms and anthropogenic disturbances highlights the need to understand the impact of injury on the coral immune system. In this study, we examined the regulation of the coral immune response over 10 days following physical trauma artificially inflicted on in situ colonies of the coral Acropora aspera, simultaneously with bacterial colonization of the lesions. Corals responded to injury by increasing the expression of immune system-related genes involved in the Toll-like and NOD-like receptor signalling pathways and the lectin-complement system in three phases (<2, 4 and 10 days post-injury). Phenoloxidase activity was also significantly upregulated in two phases (<3 and 10 days post-injury), as were levels of non-fluorescent chromoprotein. In addition, green fluorescent protein expression was upregulated in response to injury from 4 days post-injury, while cyan fluorescent protein expression was reduced. No shifts in the composition of coral-associated bacterial communities were evident following injury based on 16S rRNA gene amplicon pyrosequencing. Bacteria-specific fluorescence in situ hybridization also showed no evidence of bacterial colonization of the wound or regenerating tissues. Coral tissues showed near-complete regeneration of lesions within 10 days. This study demonstrates that corals exhibit immune responses that support rapid recovery following physical injury, maintain coral microbial homeostasis and prevent bacterial infestation that may compromise coral fitness.

  17. Methylglyoxal modulates immune responses: relevance to diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Price, Claire L; Hassi, Hafid O S Al; English, Nicholas R; Blakemore, Alexandra I F; Stagg, Andrew J; Knight, Stella C

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Increased methylglyoxal (MG) concentrations and formation of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) are major pathways of glycaemic damage in diabetes, leading to vascular and neuronal complications. Diabetes patients also suffer increased susceptibility to many common infections, the underlying causes of which remain elusive. We hypothesized that immune glycation damage may account for this increased susceptibility. We previously showed that the reaction mixture (RM) for MG glycation of peptide blocks up regulation of CD83 in myeloid cells and inhibits primary stimulation of T cells. Here, we continue to investigate immune glycation damage, assessing surface and intracellular cytokine protein expression by flow cytometry, T-cell proliferation using a carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester assay, and mRNA levels by RT-PCR. We show that the immunomodulatory component of this RM was MG itself, with MG alone causing equivalent block of CD83 and loss of primary stimulation. Block of CD83 expression could be reversed by MG scavenger N-acetyl cysteine. Further, MG within RM inhibited stimulated production of interleukin (IL)-10 protein from myeloid cells plus interferon (IFN)-γ and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α from T cells. Loss of IL-10 and IFN-γ was confirmed by RT-PCR analysis of mRNA, while TNF-α message was raised. Loss of TNF-α protein was also shown by ELISA of culture supernatants. In addition, MG reduced major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I expression on the surface of myeloid cells and increased their propensity to apoptose. We conclude that MG is a potent suppressor of myeloid and T-cell immune function and may be a major player in diabetes-associated susceptibility to infection. PMID:19538479

  18. Immune allergic response in Asperger syndrome.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, Elizabeth S; Pinto-Mariz, Fernanda; Bastos-Pinto, Sandra; Pontes, Adailton T; Prado, Evandro A; deAzevedo, Leonardo C

    2009-11-30

    Asperger's syndrome is a subgroup of autism characterized by social deficits without language delay, and high cognitive performance. The biological nature of autism is still unknown but there are controversial evidence associating an immune imbalance and autism. Clinical findings, including atopic family history, serum IgE levels as well as cutaneous tests showed that incidence of atopy was higher in the Asperger group compared to the healthy controls. These findings suggest that atopy is frequent in this subgroup of autism implying that allergic inflammation might be an important feature in Asperger syndrome.

  19. Humoral immune responses in Rana catesbiana frogs and tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Pross, S H; Rowlands, D T

    1976-07-01

    Rana catesbiana adult frogs and tadpoles were immunized with the bacteriophage F2, 0X-174, and T4 and the haptens 2,4 dinitrophenyl (DNP) and fluorescein (FTC). The haptens were conjugated with bovine serum albumin (BSA), bovine gamma globulin (BGG), or horsehoe crab hemocyanin (Hycn). Sera were obtained from immunized animals at invervals up to six months after immunization. The antibody activities were measured by bacteriophage neutralization techniques. Sucrose density gradients were used to separate the antibody classes. Both adults and tadpoles responded to each of the antigens tested. High molecular weight antibodies were predominant in both groups of animals. Low molecular weight antibody activity was not found in adults until nine weeks post immunization but, thereafter, this fraction increased throughout the immune response. Low molecular weight antibodies could also be identified in serum of tadpoles, but only under certain conditions. PMID:59790

  20. Exploring local immune responses to vaccines using efferent lymphatic cannulation.

    PubMed

    Mahakapuge, Thilini An; Every, Alison L; Scheerlinck, Jean-Pierre Y

    2015-04-01

    The early stages of the induction of a primary immune response to a vaccine can shape the overall quality of the immune memory generated and hence affect the success of the vaccine. This early interaction between a vaccine and the immune system occurs first at the site of vaccination and can be explored using afferent cannulation. Subsequently, the vaccine and adjuvant activates the local draining lymph node. These interactions can be studied in real time in vivo using efferent lymphatic duct cannulation in large animal models and are the subject of this review. Depending on how the vaccine is delivered, the draining lymph nodes of different organs can be accessed, facilitating the testing of tissue-specific vaccinations. The efferent lymphatic cannulation model provides an avenue to study the effect of both adjuvants and antigen on the local immune system, and hence opens a pathway toward developing more effective ways of inducing immunity.

  1. Modulation of Primary Immune Response by Different Vaccine Adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Ciabattini, Annalisa; Pettini, Elena; Fiorino, Fabio; Pastore, Gabiria; Andersen, Peter; Pozzi, Gianni; Medaglini, Donata

    2016-01-01

    Adjuvants contribute to enhancing and shaping the vaccine immune response through different modes of action. Here early biomarkers of adjuvanticity after primary immunization were investigated using four different adjuvants combined with the chimeric tuberculosis vaccine antigen H56. C57BL/6 mice were immunized by the subcutaneous route with different vaccine formulations, and the modulation of primary CD4+ T cell and B cell responses was assessed within draining lymph nodes, blood, and spleen, 7 and 12 days after priming. Vaccine formulations containing the liposome system CAF01 or a squalene-based oil-in-water emulsion (o/w squalene), but not aluminum hydroxide (alum) or CpG ODN 1826, elicited a significant primary antigen-specific CD4+ T cell response compared to antigen alone, 7 days after immunization. The effector function of activated CD4+ T cells was skewed toward a Th1/Th17 response by CAF01, while a Th1/Th2 response was elicited by o/w squalene. Differentiation of B cells in short-lived plasma cells, and subsequent early H56-specific IgG secretion, was observed in mice immunized with o/w squalene or CpG adjuvants. Tested adjuvants promoted the germinal center reaction with different magnitude. These results show that the immunological activity of different adjuvants can be characterized by profiling early immunization biomarkers after primary immunization. These data and this approach could give an important contribution to the rational development of heterologous prime–boost vaccine immunization protocols. PMID:27781036

  2. Modulation of Innate Immune Responses via Covalently Linked TLR Agonists

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We present the synthesis of novel adjuvants for vaccine development using multivalent scaffolds and bioconjugation chemistry to spatially manipulate Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists. TLRs are primary receptors for activation of the innate immune system during vaccination. Vaccines that contain a combination of small and macromolecule TLR agonists elicit more directed immune responses and prolong responses against foreign pathogens. In addition, immune activation is enhanced upon stimulation of two distinct TLRs. Here, we synthesized combinations of TLR agonists as spatially defined tri- and di-agonists to understand how specific TLR agonist combinations contribute to the overall immune response. We covalently conjugated three TLR agonists (TLR4, 7, and 9) to a small molecule core to probe the spatial arrangement of the agonists. Treating immune cells with the linked agonists increased activation of the transcription factor NF-κB and enhanced and directed immune related cytokine production and gene expression beyond cells treated with an unconjugated mixture of the same three agonists. The use of TLR signaling inhibitors and knockout studies confirmed that the tri-agonist molecule activated multiple signaling pathways leading to the observed higher activity. To validate that the TLR4, 7, and 9 agonist combination would activate the immune response to a greater extent, we performed in vivo studies using a vaccinia vaccination model. Mice vaccinated with the linked TLR agonists showed an increase in antibody depth and breadth compared to mice vaccinated with the unconjugated mixture. These studies demonstrate how activation of multiple TLRs through chemically and spatially defined organization assists in guiding immune responses, providing the potential to use chemical tools to design and develop more effective vaccines. PMID:26640818

  3. Immunomodulator-Based Enhancement of Anti Smallpox Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Osmarie; Miranda, Eric; Ramírez, Maite; Santos, Saritza; Rivera, Carlos; Vázquez, Luis; Sánchez, Tomás; Tremblay, Raymond L.; Ríos-Olivares, Eddy; Otero, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Background The current live vaccinia virus vaccine used in the prevention of smallpox is contraindicated for millions of immune-compromised individuals. Although vaccination with the current smallpox vaccine produces protective immunity, it might result in mild to serious health complications for some vaccinees. Thus, there is a critical need for the production of a safe virus-free vaccine against smallpox that is available to everyone. For that reason, we investigated the impact of imiquimod and resiquimod (Toll-like receptors agonists), and the codon-usage optimization of the vaccinia virus A27L gene in the enhancement of the immune response, with intent of producing a safe, virus-free DNA vaccine coding for the A27 vaccinia virus protein. Methods We analyzed the cellular-immune response by measuring the IFN-γ production of splenocytes by ELISPOT, the humoral-immune responses measuring total IgG and IgG2a/IgG1 ratios by ELISA, and the TH1 and TH2 cytokine profiles by ELISA, in mice immunized with our vaccine formulation. Results The proposed vaccine formulation enhanced the A27L vaccine-mediated production of IFN-γ on mouse spleens, and increased the humoral immunity with a TH1-biased response. Also, our vaccine induced a TH1 cytokine milieu, which is important against viral infections. Conclusion These results support the efforts to find a new mechanism to enhance an immune response against smallpox, through the implementation of a safe, virus-free DNA vaccination platform. PMID:25875833

  4. Nano-microparticles as immune adjuvants: correlating particle sizes and the resultant immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Oyewumi, Moses O; Kumar, Amit; Cui, Zhengrong

    2010-01-01

    The development of novel immune adjuvants is emerging as a significant area of vaccine delivery based on the continued necessity to amplify immune responses to a wide array of new antigens that are poorly immunogenic. This article specifically focuses on the application of nanoparticles and microparticles as vaccine adjuvants. Many investigators are in agreement that the size of the particles is crucial to their adjuvant activities. However, reports on correlating the size of particle-based adjuvants and the resultant immune responses have been conflicting, with investigators on both sides of the fence with impressive data in support of the effectiveness of particles with small sizes (submicron) over those with larger sizes (micron) and vice versa, while other investigators reported data that showed submicron- and micron-sized particles are effective to the same degree as immune adjuvants. We have generated a list of biological, immunological and, more importantly, vaccine formulation parameters that may have contributed to the inconsistency from different studies and made recommendations on future studies attempting to correlate the size of particulate adjuvants and the immune responses induced. The information gathered could lead to strategies to optimize the performance of nano-microparticles as immune adjuvants. PMID:20822351

  5. Trachoma: Protective and Pathogenic Ocular Immune Responses to Chlamydia trachomatis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Victor H.; Holland, Martin J.; Burton, Matthew J.

    2013-01-01

    Trachoma, caused by Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct), is the leading infectious blinding disease worldwide. Chronic conjunctival inflammation develops in childhood and leads to eyelid scarring and blindness in adulthood. The immune response to Ct provides only partial protection against re-infection, which can be frequent. Moreover, the immune response is central to the development of scarring pathology, leading to loss of vision. Here we review the current literature on both protective and pathological immune responses in trachoma. The resolution of Ct infection in animal models is IFNγ-dependent, involving Th1 cells, but whether this is the case in human ocular infection still needs to be confirmed. An increasing number of studies indicate that innate immune responses arising from the epithelium and other innate immune cells, along with changes in matrix metalloproteinase activity, are important in the development of tissue damage and scarring. Current trachoma control measures, which are centred on repeated mass antibiotic treatment of populations, are logistically challenging and have the potential to drive antimicrobial resistance. A trachoma vaccine would offer significant advantages. However, limited understanding of the mechanisms of both protective immunity and immunopathology to Ct remain barriers to vaccine development. PMID:23457650

  6. Transgenerational effects enhance specific immune response in a wild passerine

    PubMed Central

    Soriguer, Ramon C.; Figuerola, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Vertebrate mothers transfer diverse compounds to developing embryos that can affect their development and final phenotype (i.e., maternal effects). However, the way such effects modulate offspring phenotype, in particular their immunity, remains unclear. To test the impact of maternal effects on offspring development, we treated wild breeding house sparrows (Passer domesticus) in Sevilla, SE Spain with Newcastle disease virus (NDV) vaccine. Female parents were vaccinated when caring for first broods, eliciting a specific immune response to NDV. The immune response to the same vaccine, and to the PHA inflammatory test were measured in 11-day-old chicks from their following brood. Vaccinated chicks from vaccinated mothers developed a stronger specific response that was related to maternal NDV antibody concentration while rearing their chicks. The chicks’ carotenoid concentration and total antioxidant capacity in blood were negatively related to NDV antibody concentration, whereas no relation with PHA response was found. Specific NDV antibodies could not be detected in 11-day-old control chicks from vaccinated mothers, implying that maternally transmitted antibodies are not directly involved but may promote offspring specific immunity through a priming effect, while other immunity components remain unaffected. Maternally transmitted antibodies in the house sparrow are short-lived, depend on maternal circulation levels and enhance pre-fledging chick specific immunity when exposed to the same pathogens as the mothers. PMID:27069782

  7. Transgenerational effects enhance specific immune response in a wild passerine.

    PubMed

    Broggi, Juli; Soriguer, Ramon C; Figuerola, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Vertebrate mothers transfer diverse compounds to developing embryos that can affect their development and final phenotype (i.e., maternal effects). However, the way such effects modulate offspring phenotype, in particular their immunity, remains unclear. To test the impact of maternal effects on offspring development, we treated wild breeding house sparrows (Passer domesticus) in Sevilla, SE Spain with Newcastle disease virus (NDV) vaccine. Female parents were vaccinated when caring for first broods, eliciting a specific immune response to NDV. The immune response to the same vaccine, and to the PHA inflammatory test were measured in 11-day-old chicks from their following brood. Vaccinated chicks from vaccinated mothers developed a stronger specific response that was related to maternal NDV antibody concentration while rearing their chicks. The chicks' carotenoid concentration and total antioxidant capacity in blood were negatively related to NDV antibody concentration, whereas no relation with PHA response was found. Specific NDV antibodies could not be detected in 11-day-old control chicks from vaccinated mothers, implying that maternally transmitted antibodies are not directly involved but may promote offspring specific immunity through a priming effect, while other immunity components remain unaffected. Maternally transmitted antibodies in the house sparrow are short-lived, depend on maternal circulation levels and enhance pre-fledging chick specific immunity when exposed to the same pathogens as the mothers. PMID:27069782

  8. Immune responses and immune-related gene expression profile in orange-spotted grouper after immunization with Cryptocaryon irritans vaccine.

    PubMed

    Dan, Xue-Ming; Zhang, Tuan-Wei; Li, Yan-Wei; Li, An-Xing

    2013-03-01

    In order to elucidate the immune-protective mechanisms of inactivated Cryptocaryon irritans vaccine, different doses of C. irritans theronts were used to immunize orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides). We measured serum immobilization titer, blood leukocyte respiratory burst activity, serum alternative complement activity, and serum lysozyme activity weekly. In addition, the expression levels of immune-related genes such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), major histocompatibility complexes I and II (MHC I and II), and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) were determined in spleen and gills. The results showed that the immobilization titer, respiratory burst activity, and alternative complement activity of immunized fish were significantly increased, and the levels of the last two immune parameters in the high-dose vaccine group were significantly higher than in the low-dose vaccine group. Serum lysozyme activity in the high-dose vaccine group was significantly higher than in the PBS control group. Vaccination also regulated host immune-related gene expression. For example, at 2- and 3- weeks post immunization, IL-1β expression in the high-dose vaccine group spleen was significantly increased. At 4-weeks post immunization, the fish were challenged with a lethal dose of parasite, and the survival rates of high-dose vaccine group, low-dose vaccine group, PBS control group, and adjuvant control group were 80%, 40%, 0%, and 10% respectively. These results demonstrate that inactivated C. irritans vaccination improves specific and nonspecific immune responses in fish, enhancing their anti-parasite ability. These effects are vaccine antigen dose-dependent.

  9. Specific immune responses in changed gaseous environments.

    PubMed

    Konstantinova, I V; Lebedev, K A; Zemskov, V M; Zazhirey, V D; Ganina, V I

    1971-01-01

    The capacity of lymphoid cells to participate in immunity reactions was evaluated by blast transformation of lymphocytes under the influence of phytohemagglutinin. Blast transformation was measured by cytologic analysis and autoradiographic investigation of the rate of RNA synthesis in cells (tritiated uridin used as label). An analysis of the material taken from the three test subjects during the year-long experiment showed that various situations affected significantly the blast transformation level of lymphocytes. The reaction was substantially reduced 10 days after a simulated emergency situation which involved a change in the atmosphere, increase of physical load, etc. The level of blast transformation increased 1.5 to 2 months after the simulation, exceeding the average value, then to be normalized. Atmospheric variations appear to be one of the factors that may change the activity of lymphoid cells. A parallel experiment was performed in which three subjects lived 10 days in a hyperoxic enclosed environment (53% O2). They showed a considerable intensification of blast transformation (by 2.2-2.6 times) and pronounced activation of the RNA synthesis. Investigations give evidence that a long-term enclosure exerts an effect on the reactivity of the systems involved in the development of basic immune reactions.

  10. Modulation of immune response in experimental Chagas disease

    PubMed Central

    Basso, Beatriz

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi (T. cruzi), the etiological agent of Chagas disease, affects nearly 18 million people in Latin America and 90 million are at risk of infection. The parasite presents two stages of medical importance in the host, the amastigote, intracellular replicating form, and the extracellular trypomastigote, the infective form. Thus infection by T. cruzi induces a complex immune response that involves effectors and regulatory mechanisms. That is why control of the infection requires a strong humoral and cellular immune response; hence, the outcome of host-parasite interaction in the early stages of infection is extremely important. A critical event during this period of the infection is innate immune response, in which the macrophage’s role is vital. Thus, after being phagocytized, the parasite is able to develop intracellularly; however, during later periods, these cells induce its elimination by means of toxic metabolites. In turn, as the infection progresses, adaptive immune response mechanisms are triggered through the TH1 and TH2 responses. Finally, T. cruzi, like other protozoa such as Leishmania and Toxoplasma, have numerous evasive mechanisms to the immune response that make it possible to spread around the host. In our Laboratory we have developed a vaccination model in mice with Trypanosoma rangeli, nonpathogenic to humans, which modulates the immune response to infection by T. cruzi, thus protecting them. Vaccinated animals showed an important innate response (modulation of NO and other metabolites, cytokines, activation of macrophages), a strong adaptive cellular response and significant increase in specific antibodies. The modulation caused early elimination of the parasites, low parasitaemia, the absence of histological lesions and high survival rates. Even though progress has been made in the knowledge of some of these mechanisms, new studies must be conducted which could target further prophylactic and therapeutic trials against T. cruzi

  11. Functional genomic analysis of the Drosophila immune response.

    PubMed

    Valanne, Susanna

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster has been widely used as a model organism for over a century now, and also as an immunological research model for over 20 years. With the emergence of RNA interference (RNAi) in Drosophila as a robust tool to silence genes of interest, large-scale or genome-wide functional analysis has become a popular way of studying the Drosophila immune response in cell culture. Drosophila immunity is composed of cellular and humoral immunity mechanisms, and especially the systemic, humoral response pathways have been extensively dissected using the functional genomic approach. Although most components of the main immune pathways had already been found using traditional genetic screening techniques, important findings including pathway components, positive and negative regulators and modifiers have been made with RNAi screening. Additionally, RNAi screening has produced new information on host-pathogen interactions related to the pathogenesis of many microbial species. PMID:23707784

  12. [Bone marrow stromal damage mediated by immune response activity].

    PubMed

    Vojinović, J; Kamenov, B; Najman, S; Branković, Lj; Dimitrijević, H

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this work was to estimate influence of activated immune response on hematopoiesis in vitro, using the experimental model of BCG immunized BALB/c mice and in patients with chronic immunoactivation: long-lasting infections, autoimmunity or malignancy. We correlated changes in long term bone marrow cultures (Dexter) and NBT reduction with appearance of anemia in patients and experimental model of immunization by BCG. Increased spontaneous NBT reduction pointed out role of macrophage activation in bone marrow stroma damage. Long-term bone marrow cultures showed reduced number of hematopoietic cells, with predomination of fibroblasts and loss of fat cells. This results correlated with anemia and leucocytosis with stimulated myelopoiesis in peripheral blood. Activation of immune response, or acting of any agent that directly changes extracellular matrix and cellularity of bone marrow, may result in microenviroment bone marrow damage that modify hematopoiesis.

  13. Autophagy as a Stress Response Pathway in the Immune System.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Abhisek; Eissa, N Tony

    2015-01-01

    Macroautophagy, hereafter, referred to as autophagy, has long been regarded as a housekeeping pathway involved in intracellular degradation and energy recycling. These housekeeping and homeostatic functions are especially important during cellular stress, such as periods of nutrient deprivation. However, importance of autophagy extends far beyond its degradative functions. Recent evidence shows that autophagy plays an essential role in development, organization and functions of the immune system, and defects in autophagy lead to several diseases, including cancer and autoimmunity. In the immune system, autophagy is important in regulation of the innate and adaptive immune responses. This review focuses on the roles of autophagy in the adaptive immune system. We first introduce the autophagy pathway and provide a brief description of the major molecular players involved in autophagy. We then discuss the importance of autophagy as a stress integrator mechanism and provide relevant examples of this role of autophagy in adaptive immune cells. Then we proceed to describe how autophagy regulates development, activation and functions of different adaptive immune cells. In these contexts, we mention both degradative and non-degradative roles of autophagy, and illustrate their importance. We also discuss role of autophagy in antigen presenting cells, which play critical roles in the activation of adaptive immune cells. Further, we describe how autophagy regulates functions of different adaptive immune cells during infection, inflammation and autoimmunity.

  14. The immune response against Candida spp. and Sporothrix schenckii.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Álvarez, José A; Pérez-García, Luis A; Flores-Carreón, Arturo; Mora-Montes, Héctor M

    2014-01-01

    Candida albicans is the main causative agent of systemic candidiasis, a condition with high mortality rates. The study of the interaction between C. albicans and immune system components has been thoroughly studied and nowadays there is a model for the anti-C. albicans immune response; however, little is known about the sensing of other pathogenic species of the Candida genus. Sporothrix schenckii is the causative agent of sporotrichosis, a subcutaneous mycosis, and thus far there is limited information about its interaction with the immune system. In this paper, we review the most recent information about the immune sensing of species from genus Candida and S. schenckii. Thoroughly searches in scientific journal databases were performed, looking for papers addressing either Candida- or Sporothrix-immune system interactions. There is a significant advance in the knowledge of non-C. albicans species of Candida and Sporothrix immune sensing; however, there are still relevant points to address, such as the specific contribution of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) for sensing by different immune cells and the immune receptors involved in such interactions. This manuscript is part of the series of works presented at the "V International Workshop: Molecular genetic approaches to the study of human pathogenic fungi" (Oaxaca, Mexico, 2012).

  15. Modeling the T cell immune response: a fascinating challenge

    PubMed Central

    Morel, Penelope A; Faeder, James R; Hawse, William F; Miskov-Zivanov, Natasa

    2014-01-01

    The immune system is designed to protect the organism from infection and to repair damaged tissue. An effective response requires recognition of the threat, the appropriate effector mechanism to clear the pathogen and a return to homeostasis with minimal damage to self-tissues. T cells play a central role in orchestrating the immune response at all stages of the response and have been the subject of intense study by both experimental immunologists and modelers. This review examines some of the more critical questions in T cell biology and describes the latest attempts to address those questions using approaches that combine mathematical modeling and experiments. PMID:25155903

  16. Harnessing DNA-induced immune responses for improving cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Herrada, Andrés A; Rojas-Colonelli, Nicole; González-Figueroa, Paula; Roco, Jonathan; Oyarce, César; Ligtenberg, Maarten A; Lladser, Alvaro

    2012-11-01

    DNA vaccines have emerged as an attractive strategy to promote protective cellular and humoral immunity against the encoded antigen. DNA vaccines are easy to generate, inexpensive to produce and purify at large-scale, highly stable and safe. In addition, plasmids used for DNA vaccines act as powerful "danger signals" by stimulating several DNA-sensing innate immune receptors that promote the induction of protective adaptive immunity. The induction of tumor-specific immune responses represents a major challenge for DNA vaccines because most of tumor-associated antigens are normal non-mutated self-antigens. As a consequence, induction of potentially self-reactive T cell responses against such poorly immunogenic antigens is controlled by mechanisms of central and peripheral tolerance as well as tumor-induced immunosuppression. Although several DNA vaccines against cancer have reached clinical testing, disappointing results have been observed. Therefore, the development of new adjuvants that strongly stimulate the induction of antitumor T cell immunity and counteract immune-suppressive regulation is an attractive approach to enhance the potency of DNA vaccines and overcome tumor-associated tolerance. Understanding the DNA-sensing signaling pathways of innate immunity that mediate the induction of T cell responses elicited by DNA vaccines represents a unique opportunity to develop novel adjuvants that enhance vaccine potency. The advance of DNA adjuvants needs to be complemented with the development of potent delivery systems, in order to step toward successful clinical application. Here, we briefly discuss recent evidence showing how to harness DNA-induced immune response to improve the potency of cancer vaccines and counteract tumor-associated tolerance.

  17. SUMO-Enriched Proteome for Drosophila Innate Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Handu, Mithila; Kaduskar, Bhagyashree; Ravindranathan, Ramya; Soory, Amarendranath; Giri, Ritika; Elango, Vijay Barathi; Gowda, Harsha; Ratnaparkhi, Girish S.

    2015-01-01

    Small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) modification modulates the expression of defense genes in Drosophila, activated by the Toll/nuclear factor-κB and immune-deficient/nuclear factor-κB signaling networks. We have, however, limited understanding of the SUMO-modulated regulation of the immune response and lack information on SUMO targets in the immune system. In this study, we measured the changes to the SUMO proteome in S2 cells in response to a lipopolysaccharide challenge and identified 1619 unique proteins in SUMO-enriched lysates. A confident set of 710 proteins represents the immune-induced SUMO proteome and analysis suggests that specific protein domains, cellular pathways, and protein complexes respond to immune stress. A small subset of the confident set was validated by in-bacto SUMOylation and shown to be bona-fide SUMO targets. These include components of immune signaling pathways such as Caspar, Jra, Kay, cdc42, p38b, 14-3-3ε, as well as cellular proteins with diverse functions, many being components of protein complexes, such as prosß4, Rps10b, SmD3, Tango7, and Aats-arg. Caspar, a human FAF1 ortholog that negatively regulates immune-deficient signaling, is SUMOylated at K551 and responds to treatment with lipopolysaccharide in cultured cells. Our study is one of the first to describe SUMO proteome for the Drosophila immune response. Our data and analysis provide a global framework for the understanding of SUMO modification in the host response to pathogens. PMID:26290570

  18. Harnessing DNA-induced immune responses for improving cancer vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Herrada, Andrés A.; Rojas-Colonelli, Nicole; González-Figueroa, Paula; Roco, Jonathan; Oyarce, César; Ligtenberg, Maarten A.; Lladser, Alvaro

    2012-01-01

    DNA vaccines have emerged as an attractive strategy to promote protective cellular and humoral immunity against the encoded antigen. DNA vaccines are easy to generate, inexpensive to produce and purify at large-scale, highly stable and safe. In addition, plasmids used for DNA vaccines act as powerful “danger signals” by stimulating several DNA-sensing innate immune receptors that promote the induction of protective adaptive immunity. The induction of tumor-specific immune responses represents a major challenge for DNA vaccines because most of tumor-associated antigens are normal non-mutated self-antigens. As a consequence, induction of potentially self-reactive T cell responses against such poorly immunogenic antigens is controlled by mechanisms of central and peripheral tolerance as well as tumor-induced immunosuppression. Although several DNA vaccines against cancer have reached clinical testing, disappointing results have been observed. Therefore, the development of new adjuvants that strongly stimulate the induction of antitumor T cell immunity and counteract immune-suppressive regulation is an attractive approach to enhance the potency of DNA vaccines and overcome tumor-associated tolerance. Understanding the DNA-sensing signaling pathways of innate immunity that mediate the induction of T cell responses elicited by DNA vaccines represents a unique opportunity to develop novel adjuvants that enhance vaccine potency. The advance of DNA adjuvants needs to be complemented with the development of potent delivery systems, in order to step toward successful clinical application. Here, we briefly discuss recent evidence showing how to harness DNA-induced immune response to improve the potency of cancer vaccines and counteract tumor-associated tolerance. PMID:23111166

  19. How Neutrophils Shape Adaptive Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Leliefeld, Pieter H. C.; Koenderman, Leo; Pillay, Janesh

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils are classically considered as cells pivotal for the first line of defense against invading pathogens. In recent years, evidence has accumulated that they are also important in the orchestration of adaptive immunity. Neutrophils rapidly migrate in high numbers to sites of inflammation (e.g., infection, tissue damage, and cancer) and are subsequently able to migrate to draining lymph nodes (LNs). Both at the site of inflammation as well as in the LNs, neutrophils can engage with lymphocytes and antigen-presenting cells. This crosstalk occurs either directly via cell–cell contact or via mediators, such as proteases, cytokines, and radical oxygen species. In this review, we will discuss the current knowledge regarding locations and mechanisms of interaction between neutrophils and lymphocytes in the context of homeostasis and various pathological conditions. In addition, we will highlight the complexity of the microenvironment that is involved in the generation of suppressive or stimulatory neutrophil phenotypes. PMID:26441976

  20. How Neutrophils Shape Adaptive Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Leliefeld, Pieter H C; Koenderman, Leo; Pillay, Janesh

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils are classically considered as cells pivotal for the first line of defense against invading pathogens. In recent years, evidence has accumulated that they are also important in the orchestration of adaptive immunity. Neutrophils rapidly migrate in high numbers to sites of inflammation (e.g., infection, tissue damage, and cancer) and are subsequently able to migrate to draining lymph nodes (LNs). Both at the site of inflammation as well as in the LNs, neutrophils can engage with lymphocytes and antigen-presenting cells. This crosstalk occurs either directly via cell-cell contact or via mediators, such as proteases, cytokines, and radical oxygen species. In this review, we will discuss the current knowledge regarding locations and mechanisms of interaction between neutrophils and lymphocytes in the context of homeostasis and various pathological conditions. In addition, we will highlight the complexity of the microenvironment that is involved in the generation of suppressive or stimulatory neutrophil phenotypes. PMID:26441976

  1. Arginine and citrulline and the immune response in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Wijnands, Karolina A P; Castermans, Tessy M R; Hommen, Merel P J; Meesters, Dennis M; Poeze, Martijn

    2015-02-18

    Arginine, a semi-essential amino acid is an important initiator of the immune response. Arginine serves as a precursor in several metabolic pathways in different organs. In the immune response, arginine metabolism and availability is determined by the nitric oxide synthases and the arginase enzymes, which convert arginine into nitric oxide (NO) and ornithine, respectively. Limitations in arginine availability during inflammatory conditions regulate macrophages and T-lymfocyte activation. Furthermore, over the past years more evidence has been gathered which showed that arginine and citrulline deficiencies may underlie the detrimental outcome of inflammatory conditions, such as sepsis and endotoxemia. Not only does the immune response contribute to the arginine deficiency, also the impaired arginine de novo synthesis in the kidney has a key role in the eventual observed arginine deficiency. The complex interplay between the immune response and the arginine-NO metabolism is further underscored by recent data of our group. In this review we give an overview of physiological arginine and citrulline metabolism and we address the experimental and clinical studies in which the arginine-citrulline NO pathway plays an essential role in the immune response, as initiator and therapeutic target.

  2. Arginine and Citrulline and the Immune Response in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Wijnands, Karolina A.P.; Castermans, Tessy M.R.; Hommen, Merel P.J.; Meesters, Dennis M.; Poeze, Martijn

    2015-01-01

    Arginine, a semi-essential amino acid is an important initiator of the immune response. Arginine serves as a precursor in several metabolic pathways in different organs. In the immune response, arginine metabolism and availability is determined by the nitric oxide synthases and the arginase enzymes, which convert arginine into nitric oxide (NO) and ornithine, respectively. Limitations in arginine availability during inflammatory conditions regulate macrophages and T-lymfocyte activation. Furthermore, over the past years more evidence has been gathered which showed that arginine and citrulline deficiencies may underlie the detrimental outcome of inflammatory conditions, such as sepsis and endotoxemia. Not only does the immune response contribute to the arginine deficiency, also the impaired arginine de novo synthesis in the kidney has a key role in the eventual observed arginine deficiency. The complex interplay between the immune response and the arginine-NO metabolism is further underscored by recent data of our group. In this review we give an overview of physiological arginine and citrulline metabolism and we address the experimental and clinical studies in which the arginine-citrulline NO pathway plays an essential role in the immune response, as initiator and therapeutic target. PMID:25699985

  3. Modulation of immune responses in stress by Yoga.

    PubMed

    Arora, Sarika; Bhattacharjee, Jayashree

    2008-07-01

    Stress is a constant factor in today's fastpaced life that can jeopardize our health if left unchecked. It is only in the last half century that the role of stress in every ailment from the common cold to AIDS has been emphasized, and the mechanisms involved in this process have been studied. Stress influences the immune response presumably through the activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal axis, hypothalamic pituitary-gonadal axis, and the sympathetic-adrenal-medullary system. Various neurotransmitters, neuropeptides, hormones, and cytokines mediate these complex bidirectional interactions between the central nervous system (CNS) and the immune system. The effects of stress on the immune responses result in alterations in the number of immune cells and cytokine dysregulation. Various stress management strategies such as meditation, yoga, hypnosis, and muscle relaxation have been shown to reduce the psychological and physiological effects of stress in cancers and HIV infection. This review aims to discuss the effect of stress on the immune system and examine how relaxation techniques such as Yoga and meditation could regulate the cytokine levels and hence, the immune responses during stress.

  4. Specific and nonspecific aspects of humoral immune response in leprosy.

    PubMed

    Kirsztajn, G M; Nishida, S K; Silva, M S; Lombardi, C; Ajzen, H; Pereira, A B

    1994-01-01

    1. We have studied some generic and specific aspects of the humoral immune response in 96 patients with leprosy (29 paucibacillary and 67 multibacillary individuals). We determined serum immunoglobulins (IgM, IgG and IgA), CH50, C1q, C3 and C4, circulating immune complexes (CIC), C-reactive protein (CRP), rheumatoid factor (RF) and antinuclear antibodies. No specific pattern of general humoral immune changes could be observed. 2. The specific immune response was studied by the detection of specific IgM anti-M. leprae antibodies. An immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) and an ELISA were compared for clinical effectiveness. IRMA showed greater sensitivity for the serodiagnosis of leprosy as compared to ELISA (88.1% vs 58.2% for multibacillary patients and 20.7% vs 10.3% for paucibacillary leprosy patients). Specificity was 96% for IRMA and 97% for ELISA. 3. Our results indicate that nonspecific changes in the humoral immune response are of little value in assessing leprosy patients and that immune assays for the detection of specific anti-M. leprae antibodies may be of value in the diagnosis, study and follow-up of these patients. PMID:8173529

  5. Selection for avian immune response: a commercial breeding company challenge.

    PubMed

    Fulton, J E

    2004-04-01

    Selection for immune function in the commercial breeding environment is a challenging proposition for commercial breeding companies. Immune response is only one of many traits that are under intensive selection, thus selection pressure needs to be carefully balanced across multiple traits. The selection environment (single bird cages, biosecure facilities, controlled environment) is a very different environment than the commercial production facilities (multiple bird cages, potential disease exposure, variable environment) in which birds are to produce. The testing of individual birds is difficult, time consuming, and expensive. It is essential that the results of any tests be relevant to actual disease or environmental challenge in the commercial environment. The use of genetic markers as indicators of immune function is being explored by breeding companies. Use of genetic markers would eliminate many of the limitations in enhancing immune function currently encountered by commercial breeding companies. Information on genetic markers would allow selection to proceed without subjecting breeding stock to disease conditions and could be done before production traits are measured. These markers could be candidate genes with known interaction or involvement with disease pathology or DNA markers that are closely linked to genetic regions that influence the immune response. The current major limitation to this approach is the paucity of mapped chicken immune response genes and the limited number of DNA markers mapped on the chicken genome. These limitations should be eliminated once the chicken genome is sequenced.

  6. Characterization of the immune response of domestic fowl following immunization with proteins extracted from Dermanyssus gallinae.

    PubMed

    Harrington, David; Din, Hatem Mohi El; Guy, Jonathan; Robinson, Karen; Sparagano, Olivier

    2009-03-23

    Dermanyssus gallinae is the most significant ectoparasite of European poultry egg laying production systems due to high costs of control and associated production losses as well as adverse effects on bird welfare. In this study, soluble proteins were extracted from unfed D. gallinae (DGE) using a urea-based detergent and ultra-filtration, passed through a 0.22 microm filter and blended aseptically with adjuvant. One group of laying hens was immunized with DGE and adjuvant (Montanide ISA 50 V) whilst another group (Control) received physiological saline and adjuvant. All birds were immunized on two occasions, 21 days apart. Antibody response to immunization was determined by ELISA and western blotting using immunoglobulins (Igs) extracted from egg yolk. DGE immunization of hens resulted in a significant (P<0.05) IgY response compared to controls, although there was no significant difference in IgM response between treatments. A number of proteins were identified by western blotting using IgY antibodies from DGE immunized birds, most prominently at 40 and 230kDa. Analysis of proteins from approximately corresponding bands on SDS-PAGE confirmed the identity of tropomyosin, whilst other proteins showed high sequence homology with myosin and actin from other arachnid and insect species. Immunization of hens with DGE resulted in a 50.6% increase in mite mortality (P<0.001) 17h after feeding when tested by an in vitro mite feeding model. Data in this study demonstrate that somatic antigens from D. gallinae can be used to stimulate a protective immune response in laying hens. Further work is needed to identify other proteins of interest that could confer higher protection against D. gallinae, as well as optimization of the vaccination and in vitro testing protocol.

  7. Immune responses in multiple myeloma: role of the natural immune surveillance and potential of immunotherapies.

    PubMed

    Guillerey, Camille; Nakamura, Kyohei; Vuckovic, Slavica; Hill, Geoffrey R; Smyth, Mark J

    2016-04-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a tumor of terminally differentiated B cells that arises in the bone marrow. Immune interactions appear as key determinants of MM progression. While myeloid cells foster myeloma-promoting inflammation, Natural Killer cells and T lymphocytes mediate protective anti-myeloma responses. The profound immune deregulation occurring in MM patients may be involved in the transition from a premalignant to a malignant stage of the disease. In the last decades, the advent of stem cell transplantation and new therapeutic agents including proteasome inhibitors and immunoregulatory drugs has dramatically improved patient outcomes, suggesting potentially key roles for innate and adaptive immunity in disease control. Nevertheless, MM remains largely incurable for the vast majority of patients. A better understanding of the complex interplay between myeloma cells and their immune environment should pave the way for designing better immunotherapies with the potential of very long term disease control. Here, we review the immunological microenvironment in myeloma. We discuss the role of naturally arising anti-myeloma immune responses and their potential corruption in MM patients. Finally, we detail the numerous promising immune-targeting strategies approved or in clinical trials for the treatment of MM. PMID:26801219

  8. Immune responses in multiple myeloma: role of the natural immune surveillance and potential of immunotherapies.

    PubMed

    Guillerey, Camille; Nakamura, Kyohei; Vuckovic, Slavica; Hill, Geoffrey R; Smyth, Mark J

    2016-04-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a tumor of terminally differentiated B cells that arises in the bone marrow. Immune interactions appear as key determinants of MM progression. While myeloid cells foster myeloma-promoting inflammation, Natural Killer cells and T lymphocytes mediate protective anti-myeloma responses. The profound immune deregulation occurring in MM patients may be involved in the transition from a premalignant to a malignant stage of the disease. In the last decades, the advent of stem cell transplantation and new therapeutic agents including proteasome inhibitors and immunoregulatory drugs has dramatically improved patient outcomes, suggesting potentially key roles for innate and adaptive immunity in disease control. Nevertheless, MM remains largely incurable for the vast majority of patients. A better understanding of the complex interplay between myeloma cells and their immune environment should pave the way for designing better immunotherapies with the potential of very long term disease control. Here, we review the immunological microenvironment in myeloma. We discuss the role of naturally arising anti-myeloma immune responses and their potential corruption in MM patients. Finally, we detail the numerous promising immune-targeting strategies approved or in clinical trials for the treatment of MM.

  9. The Ionospheric Responses to the Lower-atmosphere Disturbances Associated with Typhoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Sai-Guan; Xiao, Zuo; Shi, Jian-Kui; Zhang, Dong-He; Hao, Yong-Qiang

    2016-04-01

    The coupling between ionosphere and lower atmosphere is one of the important subjects in the space physics. A large number studies have shown that there is a close relation between the ionosphere and lower-atmosphere disturbances which can be caused by severe weather activities. Typhoon is one of the important sources in the lower-atmosphere. By the use of the continuous HF Doppler shift observation data in time, a study of ionospheric response to typhoon has been carried out. The results of analyses showed that the significant wave-like disturbances (in general, medium scale acoustic-gravity waves (AGWs)) appeared firstly and always formed the medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) in the ionosphere; Then these TIDs showed quite clear periodicity and their periods varied with time and gradually grew longer; After sunset, the wave-like disturbances with large magnitudes often excited the mid-latitude Spread-F; And the sunrise-like phenomena often appear in non-sunrise time during the period the typhoon exists, and so on. This study has important scientific significance for the further studying of the coupling between ionosphere and the disturbances of lower-atmosphere.

  10. Productivity, mortality, and response to disturbance of nesting Swainson's hawks on the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect

    Poole, L.D.; Marr, N.V.; McCorquodale, S.M.

    1988-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to characterize Swainson's hawk (Buteo swainson) use of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site and to evaluate the potential for engineering and other human activities on the Hanford Site to negatively affect the nesting Swainson's hawk population. Activities associated with the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) were used as the primary external stimuli in studying hawk responses to potential human disturbance. Parked and moving vehicles were the most common disturbance sources observed in Swainson's hawk territories. Hawks appeared to be sensitive to disturbance from pedestrians and slow-moving vehicles near nests. Novel stimuli were much more likely to evoke strong responses than were recurring events. Adult hawks reacted more frequently and vigorously than did juveniles. When disturbed, adult hawks usually flew toward the location of the disturbance; juvenile hawks usually flew away from disturbances. Human activity associated with BWIP may have had negative on one pair of nesting Swainson's hawks and may have precluded the use of an additional traditional nesting territory. Negative impacts to nesting Swainson's hawks from human activity could be minimized by confining activities to the non-nesting period or to distances greater than 2.2 km from nest sites. Tree groves and elevated perches, including utility poles, across the Hanford Site are probably critical to the success of nesting Swainson's hawks. Potential mitigation strategies associated with energy research and development activities on the Hanford Site could include provisions for maintenance and establishment of drought-tolerant trees and native vegetation. 22 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Forest response to increased disturbance in the Central Amazon and comparison to Western Amazonian forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holm, J. A.; Chambers, J. Q.; Collins, W.; Higuchi, N.

    2014-12-01

    Uncertainties surrounding vegetation response to increased disturbance rates associated with climate change remains a major global change issue for Amazon forests. Additionally, turnover rates in the Western Amazon are doubled compared to the Central Amazon, and notable gradients currently exist in specific wood density and aboveground biomass (AGB). This study investigates the extent to which the variation in disturbance regimes contributes to these regional gradients. To address these issues, we evaluated disturbance-recovery processes under scenarios of increased disturbance rates in a Central Amazon forest using first ZELIG-TROP, a dynamic vegetation gap model which we calibrated using long-term inventory data, and second using the Community Land Model (CLM), a global land surface model. Upon doubling the mortality rate in the Central Amazon to mirror the disturbance regime in the Western Amazon of ~2% mortality, the two regions continued to differ in multiple forest processes. With the inclusion of elevated natural disturbances, at steady-state, AGB significantly decreased by 41.9% with no significant difference between modeled AGB and empirical AGB from the western Amazon datasets (104 vs. 107 Mg C ha-1). However, different processes were responsible for the reductions in AGB between the models and empirical dataset. The empirical dataset suggests that a decrease in wood density drives the reduction in AGB. While decreased stand basal area was the driver of AGB loss in ZELIG-TROP, and decreased leaf area index (LAI) was the driver in CLM, two forest attributes that do not significantly vary across the Amazon Basin. Further comparisons found that stem density, specific wood density, and growth rates differed between the two Amazonian regions. This suggests that: 1) the variability between regions cannot be entirely explained by the variability in disturbance regime, but rather potentially sensitive to intrinsic environmental factors; or 2) the models are not

  12. Water Table and Soil Gas Emission Responses to Disturbance in Northern Forested Wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pypker, T. G.; Van Grinsven, M. J.; Bolton, N. W.; Shannon, J.; Davis, J.; Wagenbrenner, J. W.; Sebestyen, S. D.; Kolka, R. K.

    2014-12-01

    Exotic pest infestations are increasingly common throughout North American forests. In forested wetlands, disturbance events may alter nutrient, carbon, and hydrologic pathways. Recently, ash (Fraxinus spp.) forests in North Central and Eastern North America have been exposed to the exotic emerald ash borer (EAB) (Burprestidae: Agrilus planipennis), and the rapid and extensive expansion of EAB populations since 2001 may soon eliminate most existing ash stands. Limited research has focused on post-establishment ecosystem impacts of an EAB disturbance, and to our knowledge, there are no studies that have evaluated the coupled response of black ash (Fraxinus nigra) wetland water tables, soil temperatures, and soil gas emissions to an EAB infestation. We present preliminary results that detail those responses to a simulated EAB disturbance. Water table position, soil temperature, and soil gas emissions (CO2 and CH4) were monitored in nine black ash wetlands in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan for three years, including one year of pre-treatment and two years of post-treatment data-collection. An EAB disturbance was simulated by girdling (Girdle) or felling (Clearcut) all black ash trees with diameters of 2.5 cm or greater within the wetland, and each treatment was applied to three sites. The results indicate that wetland water tables were insensitive to treatment effects, soil temperatures were significantly higher in the Clearcut treatment, soil gas flux was significantly higher in the Clearcut treatment, and the rate of soil gas flux was strongly regulated by water table position and temperature. No significant treatment effects were detected in the Girdle treatment during the first post-treatment year. Because water tables were insensitive to treatment, we concluded that water tables did not independently generate a soil gas flux response despite their strong regulatory influence. Furthermore, we concluded that the response of soil temperature to disturbance was

  13. Adverse environmental conditions influence age-related innate immune responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    May, Linda; van den Biggelaar, Anita HJ; van Bodegom, David; Meij, Hans J; de Craen, Anton JM; Amankwa, Joseph; Frölich, Marijke; Kuningas, Maris; Westendorp, Rudi GJ

    2009-01-01

    Background- The innate immune system plays an important role in the recognition and induction of protective responses against infectious pathogens, whilst there is increasing evidence for a role in mediating chronic inflammatory diseases at older age. Despite indications that environmental conditions can influence the senescence process of the adaptive immune system, it is not known whether the same holds true for the innate immune system. Therefore we studied whether age-related innate immune responses are similar or differ between populations living under very diverse environmental conditions. Methods- We compared cross-sectional age-related changes in ex vivo innate cytokine responses in a population living under affluent conditions in the Netherlands (age 20–68 years old, n = 304) and a population living under adverse environmental conditions in Ghana (age 23–95 years old, n = 562). Results- We found a significant decrease in LPS-induced Interleukin (IL)-10 and Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) production with age in the Dutch population. In Ghana a similar age-related decline in IL-10 responses to LPS, as well as to zymosan, or LPS plus zymosan, was observed. TNF production, however, did not show an age-associated decline, but increased significantly with age in response to co-stimulation with LPS and zymosan. Conclusion- We conclude that the decline in innate cytokine responses is an intrinsic ageing phenomenon, while pathogen exposure and/or selective survival drive pro-inflammatory responses under adverse living conditions. PMID:19480711

  14. A basic mathematical model of the immune response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, H.; Zaenker, K. S.; an der Heiden, U.

    1995-03-01

    Interaction of the immune system with a target population of, e.g., bacteria, viruses, antigens, or tumor cells must be considered as a dynamic process. We describe this process by a system of two ordinary differential equations. Although the model is strongly idealized it demonstrates how the combination of a few proposed nonlinear interaction rules between the immune system and its targets are able to generate a considerable variety of different kinds of immune responses, many of which are observed both experimentally and clinically. In particular, solutions of the model equations correspond to states described by immunologists as ``virgin state,'' ``immune state'' and ``state of tolerance.'' The model successfully replicates the so-called primary and secondary response. Moreover, it predicts the existence of a threshold level for the amount of pathogen germs or of transplanted tumor cells below which the host is able to eliminate the infectious organism or to reject the tumor graft. We also find a long time coexistence of targets and immune competent cells including damped and undamped oscillations of both. Plausibly the model explains that if the number of transformed cells or pathogens exeeds definable values (poor antigenicity, high reproduction rate) the immune system fails to keep the disease under control. On the other hand, the model predicts apparently paradoxical situations including an increased chance of target survival despite enhanced immune activity or therapeutically achieved target reduction. A further obviously paradoxical behavior consists of a positive effect for the patient up to a complete cure by adding an additional target challenge where the benefit of the additional targets depends strongly on the time point and on their amount. Under periodically pulsed stimulation the model may show a chaotic time behavior of both target growth and immune response.

  15. A basic mathematical model of the immune response.

    PubMed

    Mayer, H.; Zaenker, K. S.; An Der Heiden, U.

    1995-03-01

    Interaction of the immune system with a target population of, e.g., bacteria, viruses, antigens, or tumor cells must be considered as a dynamic process. We describe this process by a system of two ordinary differential equations. Although the model is strongly idealized it demonstrates how the combination of a few proposed nonlinear interaction rules between the immune system and its targets are able to generate a considerable variety of different kinds of immune responses, many of which are observed both experimentally and clinically. In particular, solutions of the model equations correspond to states described by immunologists as "virgin state," "immune state" and "state of tolerance." The model successfully replicates the so-called primary and secondary response. Moreover, it predicts the existence of a threshold level for the amount of pathogen germs or of transplanted tumor cells below which the host is able to eliminate the infectious organism or to reject the tumor graft. We also find a long time coexistence of targets and immune competent cells including damped and undamped oscillations of both. Plausibly the model explains that if the number of transformed cells or pathogens exeeds definable values (poor antigenicity, high reproduction rate) the immune system fails to keep the disease under control. On the other hand, the model predicts apparently paradoxical situations including an increased chance of target survival despite enhanced immune activity or therapeutically achieved target reduction. A further obviously paradoxical behavior consists of a positive effect for the patient up to a complete cure by adding an additional target challenge where the benefit of the additional targets depends strongly on the time point and on their amount. Under periodically pulsed stimulation the model may show a chaotic time behavior of both target growth and immune response. (c) 1995 American Institute of Physics. PMID:12780168

  16. Immune responses of ducks infected with duck Tembusu virus.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Wang, Yao; Li, Rong; Liu, Jiyuan; Zhang, Jinzhou; Cai, Yumei; Liu, Sidang; Chai, Tongjie; Wei, Liangmeng

    2015-01-01

    Duck Tembusu virus (DTMUV) can cause serious disease in ducks, characterized by reduced egg production. Although the virus has been isolated and detection methods developed, the host immune responses to DTMUV infection are unclear. Therefore, we systematically examined the expression of immune-related genes and the viral distribution in DTMUV-infected ducks, using quantitative real-time PCR. Our results show that DTMUV replicates quickly in many tissues early in infection, with the highest viral titers in the spleen 1 day after infection. Rig-1, Mda5, and Tlr3 are involved in the host immune response to DTMUV, and the expression of proinflammatory cytokines (Il-1β, -2, -6, Cxcl8) and antiviral proteins (Mx, Oas, etc.) are also upregulated early in infection. The expression of Il-6 increased most significantly in the tissues tested. The upregulation of Mhc-I was observed in the brain and spleen, but the expression of Mhc-II was upregulated in the brain and downregulated in the spleen. The expression of the interferons was also upregulated to different degrees in the spleen but that of the brain was various. Our study suggests that DTMUV replicates rapidly in various tissues and that the host immune responses are activated early in infection. However, the overexpression of cytokines may damage the host. These results extend our understanding of the immune responses of ducks to DTMUV infection, and provide insight into the pathogenesis of DTMUV attributable to host factors.

  17. Bacterial Outer Membrane Vesicles Induce Plant Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Bahar, Ofir; Mordukhovich, Gideon; Luu, Dee Dee; Schwessinger, Benjamin; Daudi, Arsalan; Jehle, Anna Kristina; Felix, Georg; Ronald, Pamela C

    2016-05-01

    Gram-negative bacteria continuously pinch off portions of their outer membrane, releasing membrane vesicles. These outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are involved in multiple processes including cell-to-cell communication, biofilm formation, stress tolerance, horizontal gene transfer, and virulence. OMVs are also known modulators of the mammalian immune response. Despite the well-documented role of OMVs in mammalian-bacterial communication, their interaction with plants is not well studied. To examine whether OMVs of plant pathogens modulate the plant immune response, we purified OMVs from four different plant pathogens and used them to treat Arabidopsis thaliana. OMVs rapidly induced a reactive oxygen species burst, medium alkalinization, and defense gene expression in A. thaliana leaf discs, cell cultures, and seedlings, respectively. Western blot analysis revealed that EF-Tu is present in OMVs and that it serves as an elicitor of the plant immune response in this form. Our results further show that the immune coreceptors BAK1 and SOBIR1 mediate OMV perception and response. Taken together, our results demonstrate that plants can detect and respond to OMV-associated molecules by activation of their immune system, revealing a new facet of plant-bacterial interactions. PMID:26926999

  18. Probiotics, antibiotics and the immune responses to vaccines.

    PubMed

    Praharaj, Ira; John, Sushil M; Bandyopadhyay, Rini; Kang, Gagandeep

    2015-06-19

    Orally delivered vaccines have been shown to perform poorly in developing countries. There are marked differences in the structure and the luminal environment of the gut in developing countries resulting in changes in immune and barrier function. Recent studies using newly developed technology and analytic methods have made it increasingly clear that the intestinal microbiota activate a multitude of pathways that control innate and adaptive immunity in the gut. Several hypotheses have been proposed for the underperformance of oral vaccines in developing countries, and modulation of the intestinal microbiota is now being tested in human clinical trials. Supplementation with specific strains of probiotics has been shown to have modulatory effects on intestinal and systemic immune responses in animal models and forms the basis for human studies with vaccines. However, most studies published so far that have evaluated the immune response to vaccines in children and adults have been small and results have varied by age, antigen, type of antibody response and probiotic strain. Use of anthelminthic drugs in children has been shown to possibly increase immunogenicity following oral cholera vaccination, lending further support to the rationale for modulation of the immune response to oral vaccination through the intestinal microbiome.

  19. Bacterial Outer Membrane Vesicles Induce Plant Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Bahar, Ofir; Mordukhovich, Gideon; Luu, Dee Dee; Schwessinger, Benjamin; Daudi, Arsalan; Jehle, Anna Kristina; Felix, Georg; Ronald, Pamela C

    2016-05-01

    Gram-negative bacteria continuously pinch off portions of their outer membrane, releasing membrane vesicles. These outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) are involved in multiple processes including cell-to-cell communication, biofilm formation, stress tolerance, horizontal gene transfer, and virulence. OMVs are also known modulators of the mammalian immune response. Despite the well-documented role of OMVs in mammalian-bacterial communication, their interaction with plants is not well studied. To examine whether OMVs of plant pathogens modulate the plant immune response, we purified OMVs from four different plant pathogens and used them to treat Arabidopsis thaliana. OMVs rapidly induced a reactive oxygen species burst, medium alkalinization, and defense gene expression in A. thaliana leaf discs, cell cultures, and seedlings, respectively. Western blot analysis revealed that EF-Tu is present in OMVs and that it serves as an elicitor of the plant immune response in this form. Our results further show that the immune coreceptors BAK1 and SOBIR1 mediate OMV perception and response. Taken together, our results demonstrate that plants can detect and respond to OMV-associated molecules by activation of their immune system, revealing a new facet of plant-bacterial interactions.

  20. Probiotics, antibiotics and the immune responses to vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Praharaj, Ira; John, Sushil M.; Bandyopadhyay, Rini; Kang, Gagandeep

    2015-01-01

    Orally delivered vaccines have been shown to perform poorly in developing countries. There are marked differences in the structure and the luminal environment of the gut in developing countries resulting in changes in immune and barrier function. Recent studies using newly developed technology and analytic methods have made it increasingly clear that the intestinal microbiota activate a multitude of pathways that control innate and adaptive immunity in the gut. Several hypotheses have been proposed for the underperformance of oral vaccines in developing countries, and modulation of the intestinal microbiota is now being tested in human clinical trials. Supplementation with specific strains of probiotics has been shown to have modulatory effects on intestinal and systemic immune responses in animal models and forms the basis for human studies with vaccines. However, most studies published so far that have evaluated the immune response to vaccines in children and adults have been small and results have varied by age, antigen, type of antibody response and probiotic strain. Use of anthelminthic drugs in children has been shown to possibly increase immunogenicity following oral cholera vaccination, lending further support to the rationale for modulation of the immune response to oral vaccination through the intestinal microbiome. PMID:25964456

  1. Monitoring of riparian vegetation response to flood disturbances using terrestrial photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Džubáková, K.; Molnar, P.; Schindler, K.; Trizna, M.

    2015-01-01

    Flood disturbance is one of the major factors impacting riparian vegetation on river floodplains. In this study we use a high-resolution ground-based camera system with near-infrared sensitivity to quantify the immediate response of riparian vegetation in an Alpine, gravel bed, braided river to flood disturbance with the use of vegetation indices. Five large floods with return periods between 1.4 and 20.1 years in the period 2008-2011 in the Maggia River were analysed to evaluate patterns of vegetation response in three distinct floodplain units (main bar, secondary bar, transitional zone) and to compare the sensitivity of seven broadband vegetation indices. The results show both a negative (damage) and positive (enhancement) response of vegetation within 1 week following the floods, with a selective impact determined by pre-flood vegetation vigour, geomorphological setting and intensity of the flood forcing. The spatial distribution of vegetation damage provides a coherent picture of floodplain response in the three floodplain units. The vegetation indices tested in a riverine environment with highly variable surface wetness, high gravel reflectance, and extensive water-soil-vegetation contact zones differ in the direction of predicted change and its spatial distribution in the range 0.7-35.8%. We conclude that vegetation response to flood disturbance may be effectively monitored by terrestrial photography with near-infrared sensitivity, with potential for long-term assessment in river management and restoration projects.

  2. Microgravity and immune responsiveness: implications for space travel.

    PubMed

    Borchers, Andrea T; Keen, Carl L; Gershwin, M Eric

    2002-10-01

    To date, several hundred cosmonauts and astronauts have flown in space, yet knowledge about the adaptation of their immune system to space flight is rather limited. It is evident that a variety of immune parameters are changed during and after space flight, but the magnitude and pattern of these changes can differ dramatically between missions and even between crew members on the same mission. A literature search was conducted involving a total of 335 papers published between 1972 and 2002 that dealt with the key words immune response, microgravity and astronauts/cosmonauts, isolation, gravity, and human health. The data from multiple studies suggested that major discrepancies in outcome are due to methodologic differences. However, the data also suggested major factors that affect and modulate the immune response during space travel. In part at least, these discrepancies can be attributed to methodologic differences. In addition, a variety of other features, in particular the types and extent of stressors encountered during space missions, are likely to contribute to the variability of immune responses during and after space flight. That stress plays an important role in the effects of space flight on immunologic parameters is suggested by the frequent findings that stress hormones are upregulated during and after space flight. Unfortunately, however, the existing data on hormonal parameters are almost as varied as those on immunologic changes, and correlations between the two datasets have only rarely been attempted. The functional implications of space flight-induced alterations in immune response largely remain to be elucidated, but the data suggest that long-term travel will be associated with the development of immune-compromised hosts.

  3. Acute psychological stress induces short-term variable immune response.

    PubMed

    Breen, Michael S; Beliakova-Bethell, Nadejda; Mujica-Parodi, Lilianne R; Carlson, Joshua M; Ensign, Wayne Y; Woelk, Christopher H; Rana, Brinda K

    2016-03-01

    In spite of advances in understanding the cross-talk between the peripheral immune system and the brain, the molecular mechanisms underlying the rapid adaptation of the immune system to an acute psychological stressor remain largely unknown. Conventional approaches to classify molecular factors mediating these responses have targeted relatively few biological measurements or explored cross-sectional study designs, and therefore have restricted characterization of stress-immune interactions. This exploratory study analyzed transcriptional profiles and flow cytometric data of peripheral blood leukocytes with physiological (endocrine, autonomic) measurements collected throughout the sequence of events leading up to, during, and after short-term exposure to physical danger in humans. Immediate immunomodulation to acute psychological stress was defined as a short-term selective up-regulation of natural killer (NK) cell-associated cytotoxic and IL-12 mediated signaling genes that correlated with increased cortisol, catecholamines and NK cells into the periphery. In parallel, we observed down-regulation of innate immune toll-like receptor genes and genes of the MyD88-dependent signaling pathway. Correcting gene expression for an influx of NK cells revealed a molecular signature specific to the adrenal cortex. Subsequently, focusing analyses on discrete groups of coordinately expressed genes (modules) throughout the time-series revealed immune stress responses in modules associated to immune/defense response, response to wounding, cytokine production, TCR signaling and NK cell cytotoxicity which differed between males and females. These results offer a spring-board for future research towards improved treatment of stress-related disease including the impact of stress on cardiovascular and autoimmune disorders, and identifies an immune mechanism by which vulnerabilities to these diseases may be gender-specific.

  4. Acute psychological stress induces short-term variable immune response.

    PubMed

    Breen, Michael S; Beliakova-Bethell, Nadejda; Mujica-Parodi, Lilianne R; Carlson, Joshua M; Ensign, Wayne Y; Woelk, Christopher H; Rana, Brinda K

    2016-03-01

    In spite of advances in understanding the cross-talk between the peripheral immune system and the brain, the molecular mechanisms underlying the rapid adaptation of the immune system to an acute psychological stressor remain largely unknown. Conventional approaches to classify molecular factors mediating these responses have targeted relatively few biological measurements or explored cross-sectional study designs, and therefore have restricted characterization of stress-immune interactions. This exploratory study analyzed transcriptional profiles and flow cytometric data of peripheral blood leukocytes with physiological (endocrine, autonomic) measurements collected throughout the sequence of events leading up to, during, and after short-term exposure to physical danger in humans. Immediate immunomodulation to acute psychological stress was defined as a short-term selective up-regulation of natural killer (NK) cell-associated cytotoxic and IL-12 mediated signaling genes that correlated with increased cortisol, catecholamines and NK cells into the periphery. In parallel, we observed down-regulation of innate immune toll-like receptor genes and genes of the MyD88-dependent signaling pathway. Correcting gene expression for an influx of NK cells revealed a molecular signature specific to the adrenal cortex. Subsequently, focusing analyses on discrete groups of coordinately expressed genes (modules) throughout the time-series revealed immune stress responses in modules associated to immune/defense response, response to wounding, cytokine production, TCR signaling and NK cell cytotoxicity which differed between males and females. These results offer a spring-board for future research towards improved treatment of stress-related disease including the impact of stress on cardiovascular and autoimmune disorders, and identifies an immune mechanism by which vulnerabilities to these diseases may be gender-specific. PMID:26476140

  5. Escaping Deleterious Immune Response in Their Hosts: Lessons from Trypanosomatids.

    PubMed

    Geiger, Anne; Bossard, Géraldine; Sereno, Denis; Pissarra, Joana; Lemesre, Jean-Loup; Vincendeau, Philippe; Holzmuller, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The Trypanosomatidae family includes the genera Trypanosoma and Leishmania, protozoan parasites displaying complex digenetic life cycles requiring a vertebrate host and an insect vector. Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, Trypanosoma cruzi, and Leishmania spp. are important human pathogens causing human African trypanosomiasis (HAT or sleeping sickness), Chagas' disease, and various clinical forms of Leishmaniasis, respectively. They are transmitted to humans by tsetse flies, triatomine bugs, or sandflies, and affect millions of people worldwide. In humans, extracellular African trypanosomes (T. brucei) evade the hosts' immune defenses, allowing their transmission to the next host, via the tsetse vector. By contrast, T. cruzi and Leishmania sp. have developed a complex intracellular lifestyle, also preventing several mechanisms to circumvent the host's immune response. This review seeks to set out the immune evasion strategies developed by the different trypanosomatids resulting from parasite-host interactions and will focus on: clinical and epidemiological importance of diseases; life cycles: parasites-hosts-vectors; innate immunity: key steps for trypanosomatids in invading hosts; deregulation of antigen-presenting cells; disruption of efficient specific immunity; and the immune responses used for parasite proliferation. PMID:27303406

  6. Mitochondrial DNA in the regulation of innate immune responses.

    PubMed

    Fang, Chunju; Wei, Xiawei; Wei, Yuquan

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrion is known as the energy factory of the cell, which is also a unique mammalian organelle and considered to be evolved from aerobic prokaryotes more than a billion years ago. Mitochondrial DNA, similar to that of its bacterial ancestor’s, consists of a circular loop and contains significant number of unmethylated DNA as CpG islands. The innate immune system plays an important role in the mammalian immune response. Recent research has demonstrated that mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) activates several innate immune pathways involving TLR9, NLRP3 and STING signaling, which contributes to the signaling platforms and results in effector responses. In addition to facilitating antibacterial immunity and regulating antiviral signaling, mounting evidence suggests that mtDNA contributes to inflammatory diseases following cellular damage and stress. Therefore, in addition to its well-appreciated roles in cellular metabolism and energy production,mtDNA appears to function as a key member in the innate immune system. Here, we highlight the emerging roles of mtDNA in innate immunity. PMID:26498951

  7. Escaping Deleterious Immune Response in Their Hosts: Lessons from Trypanosomatids

    PubMed Central

    Geiger, Anne; Bossard, Géraldine; Sereno, Denis; Pissarra, Joana; Lemesre, Jean-Loup; Vincendeau, Philippe; Holzmuller, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    The Trypanosomatidae family includes the genera Trypanosoma and Leishmania, protozoan parasites displaying complex digenetic life cycles requiring a vertebrate host and an insect vector. Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, Trypanosoma cruzi, and Leishmania spp. are important human pathogens causing human African trypanosomiasis (HAT or sleeping sickness), Chagas’ disease, and various clinical forms of Leishmaniasis, respectively. They are transmitted to humans by tsetse flies, triatomine bugs, or sandflies, and affect millions of people worldwide. In humans, extracellular African trypanosomes (T. brucei) evade the hosts’ immune defenses, allowing their transmission to the next host, via the tsetse vector. By contrast, T. cruzi and Leishmania sp. have developed a complex intracellular lifestyle, also preventing several mechanisms to circumvent the host’s immune response. This review seeks to set out the immune evasion strategies developed by the different trypanosomatids resulting from parasite–host interactions and will focus on: clinical and epidemiological importance of diseases; life cycles: parasites–hosts–vectors; innate immunity: key steps for trypanosomatids in invading hosts; deregulation of antigen-presenting cells; disruption of efficient specific immunity; and the immune responses used for parasite proliferation. PMID:27303406

  8. Immunosuppressive activity of tilmicosin on the immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Guan, Shuang; Song, Yu; Guo, Weixiao; Chu, Xiao; Zhang, Xiaozhe; Wang, Dacheng; Lu, Jing; Deng, Xuming

    2011-06-01

    Tilmicosin, a semi-synthetic macrolide antibiotic that is only used in the veterinary clinic, was evaluated for its immunosuppressive activity on the immune responses to ovalbumin (OVA) in mice. Tilmicosin suppressed concanavalin A (Con A)- and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated splenocyte proliferation in vitro. BALB/c mice were immunized subcutaneously with OVA on day 1 and 4. Beginning on the day of boosting immunization, the mice were administered intraperitoneally with tilmicosin at a single dose of 10, 30, and 90 mg/kg for 10 consecutive days. On day 14, blood samples were collected for measuring specific total-immunoglobulin G (total-IgG), IgG1, IgG2b, and splenocytes were harvested for determining lymphocyte proliferation and interleukin-2 (IL-2), interferon-γ (IFN-γ), IL-4 production. The results demonstrated that tilmicosin could significantly suppress Con A-induced splenocyte proliferation in a dose-dependent manner, decrease LPS-and OVA-induced splenocyte proliferation only at high concentration, produced less IL-2, IL-4, and IFN-γ as compared to the control in the OVA-immunized mice. Moreover, the OVA-specific IgG, IgG1, and IgG2b levels in the OVA-immunized mice were reduced by tilmicosin. These results suggest that tilmicosin could suppress the cellular and humoral immune response in mice.

  9. Control of the Adaptive Immune Response by Tumor Vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Mauge, Laetitia; Terme, Magali; Tartour, Eric; Helley, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    The endothelium is nowadays described as an entire organ that regulates various processes: vascular tone, coagulation, inflammation, and immune cell trafficking, depending on the vascular site and its specific microenvironment as well as on endothelial cell-intrinsic mechanisms like epigenetic changes. In this review, we will focus on the control of the adaptive immune response by the tumor vasculature. In physiological conditions, the endothelium acts as a barrier regulating cell trafficking by specific expression of adhesion molecules enabling adhesion of immune cells on the vessel, and subsequent extravasation. This process is also dependent on chemokine and integrin expression, and on the type of junctions defining the permeability of the endothelium. Endothelial cells can also regulate immune cell activation. In fact, the endothelial layer can constitute immunological synapses due to its close interactions with immune cells, and the delivery of co-stimulatory or co-inhibitory signals. In tumor conditions, the vasculature is characterized by an abnormal vessel structure and permeability, and by a specific phenotype of endothelial cells. All these abnormalities lead to a modulation of intra-tumoral immune responses and contribute to the development of intra-tumoral immunosuppression, which is a major mechanism for promoting the development, progression, and treatment resistance of tumors. The in-depth analysis of these various abnormalities will help defining novel targets for the development of anti-tumoral treatments. Furthermore, eventual changes of the endothelial cell phenotype identified by plasma biomarkers could secondarily be selected to monitor treatment efficacy. PMID:24734218

  10. The Xs and Y of immune responses to viral vaccines.

    PubMed

    Klein, Sabra L; Jedlicka, Anne; Pekosz, Andrew

    2010-05-01

    The biological differences associated with the sex of an individual are a major source of variation, affecting immune responses to vaccination. Compelling clinical data illustrate that men and women differ in their innate, humoral, and cell-mediated responses to viral vaccines. Sex affects the frequency and severity of adverse effects of vaccination, including fever, pain, and inflammation. Pregnancy can also substantially alter immune responses to vaccines. Data from clinical trials and animal models of vaccine efficacy lay the groundwork for future studies aimed at identifying the biological mechanisms that underlie sex-specific responses to vaccines, including genetic and hormonal factors. An understanding and appreciation of the effect of sex and pregnancy on immune responses might change the strategies used by public health officials to start efficient vaccination programmes (optimising the timing and dose of the vaccine so that the maximum number of people are immunised), ensure sufficient levels of immune responses, minimise adverse effects, and allow for more efficient protection of populations that are high priority (eg, pregnant women and individuals with comorbid conditions).

  11. Mycobacterial infection induces a specific human innate immune response

    PubMed Central

    Blischak, John D.; Tailleux, Ludovic; Mitrano, Amy; Barreiro, Luis B.; Gilad, Yoav

    2015-01-01

    The innate immune system provides the first response to infection and is now recognized to be partially pathogen-specific. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is able to subvert the innate immune response and survive inside macrophages. Curiously, only 5–10% of otherwise healthy individuals infected with MTB develop active tuberculosis (TB). We do not yet understand the genetic basis underlying this individual-specific susceptibility. Moreover, we still do not know which properties of the innate immune response are specific to MTB infection. To identify immune responses that are specific to MTB, we infected macrophages with eight different bacteria, including different MTB strains and related mycobacteria, and studied their transcriptional response. We identified a novel subset of genes whose regulation was affected specifically by infection with mycobacteria. This subset includes genes involved in phagosome maturation, superoxide production, response to vitamin D, macrophage chemotaxis, and sialic acid synthesis. We suggest that genetic variants that affect the function or regulation of these genes should be considered candidate loci for explaining TB susceptibility. PMID:26586179

  12. Reversal of Refractory Ulcerative Colitis and Severe Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Symptoms Arising from Immune Disturbance in an HLADR/DQ Genetically Susceptible Individual with Multiple Biotoxin Exposures

    PubMed Central

    Gunn, Shelly R.; Gibson Gunn, G.; Mueller, Francis W.

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 25 Final Diagnosis: Ulcerative colitis and chronic fatigue syndrome Symptoms: Colitis • profound fatigue • multi-joint pain • cognitive impairment • corneal keratitis Medication: — Clinical Procedure: VIP replacement therapy Specialty: Family Medicine Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Patients with multisymptom chronic conditions, such as refractory ulcerative colitis (RUC) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), present diagnostic and management challenges for clinicians, as well as the opportunity to recognize and treat emerging disease entities. In the current case we report reversal of co-existing RUC and CFS symptoms arising from biotoxin exposures in a genetically susceptible individual. Case Report: A 25-year-old previously healthy male with new-onset refractory ulcerative colitis (RUC) and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) tested negative for autoimmune disease biomarkers. However, urine mycotoxin panel testing was positive for trichothecene group and air filter testing from the patient’s water-damaged rental house identified the toxic mold Stachybotrys chartarum. HLA-DR/DQ testing revealed a multisusceptible haplotype for development of chronic inflammation, and serum chronic inflammatory response syndrome (CIRS) biomarker testing was positive for highly elevated TGF-beta and a clinically undetectable level of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). Following elimination of biotoxin exposures, VIP replacement therapy, dental extractions, and implementation of a mind body intervention-relaxation response (MBI-RR) program, the patient’s symptoms resolved. He is off medications, back to work, and resuming normal exercise. Conclusions: This constellation of RUC and CFS symptoms in an HLA-DR/DQ genetically susceptible individual with biotoxin exposures is consistent with the recently described CIRS disease pathophysiology. Chronic immune disturbance (turbatio immuno) can be identified with clinically available CIRS biomarkers and

  13. Effects of NO/sub 2/ on immune responses

    SciTech Connect

    Lefkowitz, S.S.; McGrath, J.J.; Lefkowitz, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of NO/sub 2/ on immune responses of mice were investigated. Mice were exposed to various concentrations of NO/sub 2/ in inhalation chambers. After exposure the following parameters were measured: phagocytosis of polystyrene beads by both peritoneal and alveolar macrophages, production of antibody-forming cells from mice immunized with sheep erythrocytes, lymphocyte blastogenesis of splenic cells, and susceptibility to influenza virus. The production of antibody-forming cells was reduced in mice that were exposed to 5 ppm NO/sub 2/. The serum antibody titers, phagocytosis, and other immune parameters measured were not affected. Exposure to NO/sub 2/ did not affect mortality to influenza virus. These data indicate that certain immune parameters were altered by exposure to NO/sub 2/; however, NO/sub 2/ does not appear to be a major immunosuppressive factor at the concentrations tested.

  14. Intestinal infection with Trichinella spiralis induces distinct, regional immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Blum, L.K.; Mohanan, S.; Fabre, M.V.; Yafawi, R.E.; Appleton, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate differences between the small and large intestines (SI and LI) with regard to colonization and immunity during infection with Trichinella spiralis. In orally infected C57BL/6 mice, the gender ratios of worms differed among the SI, cecum, and LI. Mucosal mastocytosis developed in the SI but not in the LI, consistent with reduced IL-9 and IL-13 production by explants from the LI. Despite these differences, worms were cleared at the same rate from both sites. Furthermore, IL-10 production was reduced in the LI, yet it was instrumental in limiting local inflammation. Finally, passive immunization of rat pups with tyvelose-specific antibodies effectively cleared fist-stage larvae from all intestinal regions. We conclude that despite regional differences in immune responsiveness and colonization, immune mechanisms that clear T. spiralis operate effectively throughout the intestinal tract. PMID:23465441

  15. Bacterial RNA: An Underestimated Stimulus for Innate Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Eigenbrod, Tatjana; Dalpke, Alexander H

    2015-07-15

    Although DNA of bacterial and viral origin, as well as viral RNA, have been intensively studied as triggers of innate immune responses, the stimulatory properties of bacterial RNA and its role during infections have just begun to be deciphered. Bacterial RNA is a strong inducer of type I IFN and NF-κB-dependent cytokines, and it also can activate the Nlrp3 inflammasome. In this review, we focus on the receptors and signaling pathways involved in innate immune activation by bacterial RNA and analyze the physiological relevance of bacterial RNA recognition during infections. Furthermore, we present the concept that RNA modifications can impair RNA-dependent immune activation. RNA modifications differ between eukaryotes and prokaryotes; thus, they can serve to define the innate pattern that is recognized. In this regard, we discuss the role of ribose 2'-O-methylation as a potential immune-escape mechanism. PMID:26138638

  16. Systemic and Mucosal Immune Responses to Cryptosporidium—Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    Ludington, Jacob G.; Ward, Honorine D.

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidium spp is a major cause of diarrheal disease worldwide, particularly in malnourished children and untreated AIDS patients in developing countries in whom it can cause severe, chronic and debilitating disease. Unfortunately, there is no consistently effective drug for these vulnerable populations and no vaccine, partly due to a limited understanding of both the parasite and the host immune response. In this review, we will discuss our current understanding of the systemic and mucosal immune responses to Cryptosporidium infection, discuss the feasibility of developing a Cryptosporidium vaccine and evaluate recent advances in Cryptosporidium vaccine development strategies PMID:26279971

  17. Nanotechnology, neuromodulation & the immune response: discourse, materiality & ethics.

    PubMed

    Fins, Joseph J

    2015-04-01

    Drawing upon the American Pragmatic tradition in philosophy and the more recent work of philosopher Karen Barad, this paper examines how scientific problems are both obscured, and resolved by our use of language describing the natural world. Using the example of the immune response engendered by neural implants inserted in the brain, the author explains how this discourse has been altered by the advent of nanotechnology methods and devices which offer putative remedies that might temper the immune response in the central nervous system. This emergent nanotechnology has altered this problem space and catalyzed one scientific community to acknowledge a material reality that was always present, if not fully acknowledged.

  18. Protective and pathologic immune responses against Candida albicans infection.

    PubMed

    Ashman, Robert B

    2008-05-01

    Candida albicans is an important opportunistic fungal pathogen. Clinical observations have indicated that both innate and adaptive immune responses are involved in recovery from initial infection, but analysis in murine models has shown that the contribution of the two arms of the cellular immune response differ in oral, vaginal, and systemic infections. The relative contributions of T cells and phagocytic cells, and the cytokines that mediate their interactions are discussed for each of the different manifestations of the disease, and the consequences of infection, in terms of protection and pathology, are evaluated.

  19. Quantifying the Early Immune Response and Adaptive Immune Response Kinetics in Mice Infected with Influenza A Virus ▿

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Hongyu; Hollenbaugh, Joseph A.; Zand, Martin S.; Holden-Wiltse, Jeanne; Mosmann, Tim R.; Perelson, Alan S.; Wu, Hulin; Topham, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Seasonal and pandemic influenza A virus (IAV) continues to be a public health threat. However, we lack a detailed and quantitative understanding of the immune response kinetics to IAV infection and which biological parameters most strongly influence infection outcomes. To address these issues, we use modeling approaches combined with experimental data to quantitatively investigate the innate and adaptive immune responses to primary IAV infection. Mathematical models were developed to describe the dynamic interactions between target (epithelial) cells, influenza virus, cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), and virus-specific IgG and IgM. IAV and immune kinetic parameters were estimated by fitting models to a large data set obtained from primary H3N2 IAV infection of 340 mice. Prior to a detectable virus-specific immune response (before day 5), the estimated half-life of infected epithelial cells is ∼1.2 days, and the half-life of free infectious IAV is ∼4 h. During the adaptive immune response (after day 5), the average half-life of infected epithelial cells is ∼0.5 days, and the average half-life of free infectious virus is ∼1.8 min. During the adaptive phase, model fitting confirms that CD8+ CTLs are crucial for limiting infected cells, while virus-specific IgM regulates free IAV levels. This may imply that CD4 T cells and class-switched IgG antibodies are more relevant for generating IAV-specific memory and preventing future infection via a more rapid secondary immune response. Also, simulation studies were performed to understand the relative contributions of biological parameters to IAV clearance. This study provides a basis to better understand and predict influenza virus immunity. PMID:20410284

  20. Immunization with Single Oral Dose of Alginate-Encapsulated BCG Elicits Effective and Long-Lasting Mucosal Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, M; Dobakhti, F; Pakzad, S R; Ajdary, S

    2015-12-01

    Effective vaccination against pathogens, which enter the body through mucosal surfaces, requires the induction of both mucosal and systemic immune responses. Here, mucosal as well as systemic immune responses in the lung and spleen of BALB/c mice which were orally vaccinated with a single dose of alginate-encapsulated bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) were evaluated. Twenty weeks after immunization, the vaccinated mice were challenged intranasally with BCG. Twelve weeks after immunization and 5 weeks after challenge, the immune responses were evaluated. Moreover, immune responses were compared with those of mice that were vaccinated with free BCG by subcutaneous (sc) and oral routes. Twelve weeks after the immunization, serum IgG level was higher in the sc-immunized mice, while serum IgA level was higher in the orally immunized mice with encapsulated BCG. Significant productions of both IgG and IgA were only detected in lungs of mice orally immunized with encapsulated BCG. Proliferative and delayed-type hypersensitivity responses and IFN-γ production were significantly higher in mice immunized orally with encapsulated BCG, compared to mice immunized orally with free BCG. After challenge, the levels of IFN-γ were comparable between sc-immunized mice with free BCG and orally immunized with encapsulated BCG; however, significantly less IL-4 was detected in mice which had received encapsulated BCG via oral route. Moreover, significant control of the bacilli growth in the lung of the immunized mice after intranasal challenge with BCG was documented in mice vaccinated with encapsulated BCG. These results suggest that oral immunization with alginate-encapsulated BCG is an effective mean of inducing mucosal and systemic specific immune responses.

  1. Forest response to increased disturbance in the Central Amazon and comparison to Western Amazonian forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holm, J. A.; Chambers, J. Q.; Collins, W. D.; Higuchi, N.

    2014-05-01

    Uncertainties surrounding vegetation response to increased disturbance rates associated with climate change remains a major global change issue for Amazon forests. Additionally, turnover rates computed as the average of mortality and recruitment rates in the Western Amazon basin are doubled when compared to the Central Amazon, and notable gradients currently exist in specific wood density and aboveground biomass (AGB) between these two regions. This study investigates the extent to which the variation in disturbance regimes contributes to these regional gradients. To address these issues, we evaluated disturbance-recovery processes under two scenarios of increased disturbance rates in a complex Central Amazon forest using first ZELIG-TROP, a dynamic vegetation gap model which we calibrated using long-term inventory data, and second using the Community Land Model (CLM), a global land surface model that is part of the Community Earth System Model (CESM). Upon doubling the mortality rate in the Central Amazon to mirror the natural disturbance regime in the Western Amazon of ∼2% mortality, at steady-state, AGB significantly decreased by 41.9% and there was no significant difference between the modeled AGB of 104 Mg C ha-1 and empirical AGB from the western Amazon datasets of 107 Mg C ha-1. We confirm that increases in natural disturbance rates in the Central Amazon will result in terrestrial carbon loss associated with higher turnover. However, different processes were responsible for the reductions in AGB between the models and empirical datasets. We observed that with increased turnover, the subsequent decrease in wood density drives the reduction in AGB in empirical datasets. However, decrease in stand basal area was the driver of the drop in AGB in ZELIG-TROP, and decreased leaf area index (LAI) was the driver in CLM. Further comparisons found that stem density, specific wood density, and basal area growth rates differed between the two Amazonian regions. This

  2. Photodynamic therapy for cancer and activation of immune response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mroz, Pawel; Huang, Ying-Ying; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2010-02-01

    Anti-tumor immunity is stimulated after PDT for cancer due to the acute inflammatory response, exposure and presentation of tumor-specific antigens, and induction of heat-shock proteins and other danger signals. Nevertheless effective, powerful tumor-specific immune response in both animal models and also in patients treated with PDT for cancer, is the exception rather than the rule. Research in our laboratory and also in others is geared towards identifying reasons for this sub-optimal immune response and discovering ways of maximizing it. Reasons why the immune response after PDT is less than optimal include the fact that tumor-antigens are considered to be self-like and poorly immunogenic, the tumor-mediated induction of CD4+CD25+foxP3+ regulatory T-cells (T-regs), that are able to inhibit both the priming and the effector phases of the cytotoxic CD8 T-cell anti-tumor response and the defects in dendritic cell maturation, activation and antigen-presentation that may also occur. Alternatively-activated macrophages (M2) have also been implicated. Strategies to overcome these immune escape mechanisms employed by different tumors include combination regimens using PDT and immunostimulating treatments such as products obtained from pathogenic microorganisms against which mammals have evolved recognition systems such as PAMPs and toll-like receptors (TLR). This paper will cover the use of CpG oligonucleotides (a TLR9 agonist found in bacterial DNA) to reverse dendritic cell dysfunction and methods to remove the immune suppressor effects of T-regs that are under active study.

  3. Epithelium: At the interface of innate and adaptive immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Schleimer, Robert P.; Kato, Atsushi; Kern, Robert; Kuperman, Douglas; Avila, Pedro C.

    2009-01-01

    Several diseases of the airways have a strong component of allergic inflammation in their cause, including allergic rhinitis, asthma, polypoid chronic rhinosinusitis, eosinophilic bronchitis, and others. Although the roles played by antigens and pathogens vary, these diseases have in common a pathology that includes marked activation of epithelial cells in the upper airways, the lower airways, or both. Substantial new evidence indicates an important role of epithelial cells as both mediators and regulators of innate immune responses and adaptive immune responses, as well as the transition from innate immunity to adaptive immunity. The purpose of this review is to discuss recent studies that bear on the molecular and cellular mechanisms by which epithelial cells help to shape the responses of dendritic cells, T cells, and B cells and inflammatory cell recruitment in the context of human disease. Evidence will be discussed that suggests that secreted products of epithelial cells and molecules expressed on their cell surfaces can profoundly influence both immunity and inflammation in the airways. PMID:17949801

  4. A Plant-Derived Multi-HIV Antigen Induces Broad Immune Responses in Orally Immunized Mice.

    PubMed

    Rubio-Infante, Néstor; Govea-Alonso, Dania O; Romero-Maldonado, Andrea; García-Hernández, Ana Lilia; Ilhuicatzi-Alvarado, Damaris; Salazar-González, Jorge A; Korban, Schuyler S; Rosales-Mendoza, Sergio; Moreno-Fierros, Leticia

    2015-07-01

    Multi-HIV, a multiepitopic protein derived from both gp120 and gp41 envelope proteins of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), has been proposed as a vaccine prototype capable of inducing broad immune responses, as it carries various B and T cell epitopes from several HIV strains. In this study, the immunogenic properties of a Multi-HIV expressed in tobacco chloroplasts are evaluated in test mice. BALB/c mice orally immunized with tobacco-derived Multi-HIV have elicited antibody responses, including both the V3 loop of gp120 and the ELDKWA epitope of gp41. Based on splenocyte proliferation assays, stimulation with epitopes of the C4, V3 domain of gp120, and the ELDKWA domain of gp41 elicits positive cellular responses. Furthermore, specific interferon gamma production is observed in both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells stimulated with HIV peptides. These results demonstrate that plant-derived Multi-HIV induces T helper-specific responses. Altogether, these findings illustrate the immunogenic potential of plant-derived Multi-HIV in an oral immunization scheme. The potential of this low-cost immunization approach and its implications on HIV/AIDS vaccine development are discussed. PMID:25779638

  5. Immune responses in DNA vaccine formulated with PMMA following immunization and after challenge with Leishmania major.

    PubMed

    Zarrati, Somayeh; Mahdavi, Mehdi; Tabatabaie, Fatemeh

    2016-06-01

    Leishmaniasis is a major infectious disease caused by protozoan parasites of the genus Leishmania. Despite of many efforts toward vaccine against Leishmania no effective vaccine has been approved yet. DNA vaccines can generate more powerful and broad immune responses than conventional vaccines. In order to increase immunity, the DNA vaccine has been supplemented with adjuvant. In this study a new nano-vaccine containing TSA recombinant plasmid and poly(methylmethacrylate) nanoparticles (act as adjuvant) was designed and its immunogenicity tested on BALB/c mouse. After three intramuscular injection of nano-vaccine (100 μg), the recombinant TSA protein (20 μg) was injected subcutaneously. Finally as a challenge animals were infected by Leishmania major. After the last injection of nano-vaccine, after protein booster injection, and also after challenge, cellular immune and antibody responses were evaluated by ELISA method. The findings of this study showed the new nano-vaccine was capable of induction both cytokines secretion and specific antibody responses, but predominant Th1 immune response characterized by IFN-γ production compared to control groups. Moreover, results revealed that nano-vaccine was effective in reducing parasite burden in the spleen of Leishmania major-infected BALB/c mice. Base on results, current candidate vaccine has potency for further studies. PMID:27413316

  6. Immune Responses to Low Back Pain Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Splittstoesser, Riley E.; Marras, William S.; Best, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Investigate effects of interactions between biomechanical, psychosocial and individual risk factors on the body’s immune inflammatory responses. Background Current theories for low back pain causation do not fully account for the body’s response to tissue loading and tissue trauma. Methods Two groups possessing a preference for the sensor or intuitor personality trait performed repetitive lifting combined with high or low mental workload on separate occasions. Spinal loading was assessed using an EMG-assisted subject-specific biomechanical model and immune markers were collected before and after exposure. Results Mental workload was associated with a small decrease in AP shear. Both conditions were characterized by a regulated time-dependent immune response making use of markers of inflammation, tissue trauma and muscle damage. Intuitors’ creatine kinase levels were increased following low mental workload compared to that observed in Sensors with the opposite trend occurring for high mental workload. Conclusions A temporally regulated immune response to lifting combined with mental workload exists. This response is influenced by personality and mental workload. PMID:22317743

  7. Cytomegalovirus infection enhances the immune response to influenza.

    PubMed

    Furman, David; Jojic, Vladimir; Sharma, Shalini; Shen-Orr, Shai S; Angel, Cesar J L; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Kidd, Brian A; Maecker, Holden T; Concannon, Patrick; Dekker, Cornelia L; Thomas, Paul G; Davis, Mark M

    2015-04-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a β-herpesvirus present in a latent form in most people worldwide. In immunosuppressed individuals, CMV can reactivate and cause serious clinical complications, but the effect of the latent state on healthy people remains elusive. We undertook a systems approach to understand the differences between seropositive and negative subjects and measured hundreds of immune system components from blood samples including cytokines and chemokines, immune cell phenotyping, gene expression, ex vivo cell responses to cytokine stimuli, and the antibody response to seasonal influenza vaccination. As expected, we found decreased responses to vaccination and an overall down-regulation of immune components in aged individuals regardless of CMV status. In contrast, CMV-seropositive young adults exhibited enhanced antibody responses to influenza vaccination, increased CD8(+) T cell sensitivity, and elevated levels of circulating interferon-γ compared to seronegative individuals. Experiments with young mice infected with murine CMV also showed significant protection from an influenza virus challenge compared with uninfected animals, although this effect declined with time. These data show that CMV and its murine equivalent can have a beneficial effect on the immune response of young, healthy individuals, which may explain the ubiquity of CMV infection in humans and many other species. PMID:25834109

  8. Verification of immune response optimality through cybernetic modeling.

    PubMed

    Batt, B C; Kompala, D S

    1990-02-01

    An immune response cascade that is T cell independent begins with the stimulation of virgin lymphocytes by antigen to differentiate into large lymphocytes. These immune cells can either replicate themselves or differentiate into plasma cells or memory cells. Plasma cells produce antibody at a specific rate up to two orders of magnitude greater than large lymphocytes. However, plasma cells have short life-spans and cannot replicate. Memory cells produce only surface antibody, but in the event of a subsequent infection by the same antigen, memory cells revert rapidly to large lymphocytes. Immunologic memory is maintained throughout the organism's lifetime. Many immunologists believe that the optimal response strategy calls for large lymphocytes to replicate first, then differentiate into plasma cells and when the antigen has been nearly eliminated, they form memory cells. A mathematical model incorporating the concept of cybernetics has been developed to study the optimality of the immune response. Derived from the matching law of microeconomics, cybernetic variables control the allocation of large lymphocytes to maximize the instantaneous antibody production rate at any time during the response in order to most efficiently inactivate the antigen. A mouse is selected as the model organism and bacteria as the replicating antigen. In addition to verifying the optimal switching strategy, results showing how the immune response is affected by antigen growth rate, initial antigen concentration, and the number of antibodies required to eliminate an antigen are included. PMID:2338827

  9. Immune Responses and Protection of Aotus Monkeys Immunized with Irradiated Plasmodium vivax Sporozoites

    PubMed Central

    Jordán-Villegas, Alejandro; Perdomo, Anilza Bonelo; Epstein, Judith E.; López, Jesús; Castellanos, Alejandro; Manzano, María R.; Hernández, Miguel A.; Soto, Liliana; Méndez, Fabián; Richie, Thomas L.; Hoffman, Stephen L.; Arévalo-Herrera, Myriam; Herrera, Sócrates

    2011-01-01

    A non-human primate model for the induction of protective immunity against the pre-erythrocytic stages of Plasmodium vivax malaria using radiation-attenuated P. vivax sporozoites may help to characterize protective immune mechanisms and identify novel malaria vaccine candidates. Immune responses and protective efficacy induced by vaccination with irradiated P. vivax sporozoites were evaluated in malaria-naive Aotus monkeys. Three groups of six monkeys received two, five, or ten intravenous inoculations, respectively, of 100,000 irradiated P. vivax sporozoites; control groups received either 10 doses of uninfected salivary gland extract or no inoculations. Immunization resulted in the production low levels of antibodies that specifically recognized P. vivax sporozoites and the circumsporozoite protein. Additionally, immunization induced low levels of antigen-specific IFN-γ responses. Intravenous challenge with viable sporozoites resulted in partial protection in a dose-dependent manner. These findings suggest that the Aotus monkey model may be able to play a role in preclinical development of P. vivax pre-erythrocytic stage vaccines. PMID:21292877

  10. Immune response of the Antarctic teleost Trematomus bernacchii to immunization with Psychrobacter sp. (TAD1).

    PubMed

    Buonocore, Francesco; Bernini, Chiara; Coscia, Maria Rosaria; Giacomelli, Stefano; de Pascale, Donatella; Randelli, Elisa; Stocchi, Valentina; Scapigliati, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    Adult Trematomus bernacchii have been immunized intraperitoneally with heat-killed cells of the Antarctic marine bacterium Psychrobacter sp. (TAD1) up to 60 days. After immunizations and sampling at various times, fish sera were tested for specific IgM by ELISA, and different tissues (head kidney and spleen) were investigated for transcription of master genes of the acquired immune response (IgM, IgT, TRβ, TRγ). Results from ELISA assays showed a time-dependent induction of specific serum anti-TAD1 IgM, and western blot analysis of TAD1 lysates probed with fish sera revealed enhanced immunoreactivity in immunized animals compared to controls. Quantitative PCR analysis of transcripts coding for IgM, IgT, TRβ, TRγ was performed in T. bernacchii tissues to assess basal expression, and then on cDNAs of cells from head kidney and spleen of fish injected for 8, 24, and 72 h with inactivated TAD1. The results showed a differential basal expression of transcripts in the examined tissues, and a time-dependent strong up-regulation of IgT, TRβ, TRγ genes upon in vivo stimulation with TAD1. These results represent a first in vivo study on the mounting of a specific immune response in an Antarctic teleost species. PMID:27417227

  11. Elevated EBNA1 Immune Responses Predict Conversion to Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Lünemann, Jan D.; Tintoré, Mar; Messmer, Brady; Strowig, Till; Rovira, Álex; Perkal, Héctor; Caballero, Estrella; Münz, Christian; Montalban, Xavier; Comabella, Manuel

    2009-01-01

    Objective The aims of the study were to determine the immune responses to candidate viral triggers of multiple sclerosis (MS) in patients with clinically isolated syndromes (CIS), and to evaluate their potential value in predicting conversion to MS. Methods Immune responses to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), human herpesvirus 6, cytomegalovirus (HCMV), and measles were determined in a cohort of 147 CIS patients with a mean follow-up of 7 years and compared with 50 demographically matched controls. Results Compared to controls, CIS patients showed increased humoral (p<0.0001) and cellular (p=0.007) immune responses to the EBV-encoded nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA1), but not to other EBV-derived proteins. IgG responses to other virus antigens and frequencies of T cells specific for HCMV and influenza virus gene products were unchanged in CIS patients. EBNA1 was the only viral antigen towards which immune responses correlated with number of T2 lesions (p=0.006) and number of Barkhof criteria (p=0.001) at baseline, and with number of T2 lesions (p=0.012 both at 1 and 5 years), presence of new T2 lesions (p=0.003 and p=0.028 at 1 and 5 years), and EDSS (p=0.015 and p=0.010 at 1 and 5 years) during follow-up. In a univariate Cox regression model, increased EBNA1-specific IgG responses predicted conversion to MS based on McDonald criteria [hazard ratio (95% confidence interval), 2.2 (1.2–4.3); p=0.003]. Interpretation Our results indicate that elevated immune responses towards EBNA1 are selectively increased in CIS patients and suggest that EBNA1-specific IgG titers could be used as a prognostic marker for disease conversion and disability progression. PMID:20225269

  12. Exercise under hot conditions: a major threat to the immune response?

    PubMed

    Shephard, R J

    2002-09-01

    It seems likely that the disturbances of immune response induced by prolonged competitive exercise are exacerbated if athletes also face the stress of hot environmental conditions. We have investigated this question by manipulating the exercise-induced increases of body temperature in a climatic chamber and by submersion of exercisers in a large water-bath. Hot conditions increase the stress of a given bout of exercise, as assessed by personal perceptions, objective (heart rate variability) measures of autonomic nerve balance, and the secretion of "stress" hormones, with a parallel increase in effects upon critical lymphocyte subsets. Changes in the immune response show substantial correlations with plasma concentrations not only of epinephrine (which modulates the adhesiveness of peripherally sequestered lymphocytes), but also with norepinephrine. The latter hormone may mobilize leukocytes from the spleen and lymph glands, or it may act by increasing cardiac output and thus intravascular shear forces. Given the cumulative impact of various environmental stressors upon the immune system, every effort should be made to minimize the athlete's exposure to stresses other than the exercise to be performed. In some circumstances, the use of medications to reduce the overall stress response may also be warranted. PMID:12094129

  13. [Probiotics as stimulators of immune response against pathogens in the respiratory tract].

    PubMed

    Kalyuzhin, O V; Afanasyev, S S; Bykov, A S

    2016-01-01

    This review analyzes whether.it is expedient to use oral probiotics for the stimulation of immune response against pathogens in the respiratory tract. It considers a relationship between.mucosal microbial colonization in different biotopes of the body and mucosal.immunity in the respiratory tract. The principal and terminological controversial issues of colonic dysbiosis and the possibilities of using the medicines and products containing live commensals/symbionts to correct microbiota disturbances are examined. There are data on the degree of resistance and resilience of the colonic microbial community exposed to destabilizing factors, antibiotics in particular. The properties of probiotics that have been proven to enhance host response against pathogens and the phenomena that characterize these probiotics as immunomodifiers and distinguish them from other immunostimulating/immunomodulating agents are described. Criteria for choosing effective and safe oral probiotics to stimulate an immune response in the respiratory tract are formulated. Finally, we review the data on the clinical and immunomodulatory effects of dietary supplement containing a combination of three probiotic strains (Lactobacillus gasseri PA 16/8, Bifidobacterium bifidum MF 20/5 and Bifidobacterium longum SP 07/3) with vitamins and minerals as an agent to prevent and reduce the severity of acute and recurrent respiratory tract infections. PMID:27458629

  14. Adjuvant effects of saponins on animal immune responses*

    PubMed Central

    Rajput, Zahid Iqbal; Hu, Song-hua; Xiao, Chen-wen; Arijo, Abdullah G.

    2007-01-01

    Vaccines require optimal adjuvants including immunopotentiator and delivery systems to offer long term protection from infectious diseases in animals and man. Initially it was believed that adjuvants are responsible for promoting strong and sustainable antibody responses. Now it has been shown that adjuvants influence the isotype and avidity of antibody and also affect the properties of cell-mediated immunity. Mostly oil emulsions, lipopolysaccharides, polymers, saponins, liposomes, cytokines, ISCOMs (immunostimulating complexes), Freund’s complete adjuvant, Freund’s incomplete adjuvant, alums, bacterial toxins etc., are common adjuvants under investigation. Saponin based adjuvants have the ability to stimulate the cell mediated immune system as well as to enhance antibody production and have the advantage that only a low dose is needed for adjuvant activity. In the present study the importance of adjuvants, their role and the effect of saponin in immune system is reviewed. PMID:17323426

  15. HIV-1 and the immune response to TB

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Naomi F; Meintjes, Graeme; Wilkinson, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    TB causes 1.4 million deaths annually. HIV-1 infection is the strongest risk factor for TB. The characteristic immunological effect of HIV is on CD4 cell count. However, the risk of TB is elevated in HIV-1 infected individuals even in the first few years after HIV acquisition and also after CD4 cell counts are restored with antiretroviral therapy. In this review, we examine features of the immune response to TB and how this is affected by HIV-1 infection and vice versa. We discuss how the immunology of HIV–TB coinfection impacts on the clinical presentation and diagnosis of TB, and how antiretroviral therapy affects the immune response to TB, including the development of TB immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. We highlight important areas of uncertainty and future research needs. PMID:23653664

  16. Durable and sustained immune tolerance to ERT in Pompe disease with entrenched immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Kazi, Zoheb B.; Prater, Sean N.; Kobori, Joyce A.; Viskochil, David; Bailey, Carrie; Gera, Renuka; Stockton, David W.; McIntosh, Paul; Rosenberg, Amy S.; Kishnani, Priya S.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) has prolonged survival and improved clinical outcomes in patients with infantile Pompe disease (IPD), a rapidly progressive neuromuscular disorder. Yet marked interindividual variability in response to ERT, primarily attributable to the development of antibodies to ERT, remains an ongoing challenge. Immune tolerance to ongoing ERT has yet to be described in the setting of an entrenched immune response. METHODS Three infantile Pompe patients who developed high and sustained rhGAA IgG antibody titers (HSAT) and received a bortezomib-based immune tolerance induction (ITI) regimen were included in the study and were followed longitudinally to monitor the long-term safety and efficacy. A trial to taper the ITI protocol was attempted to monitor if true immune tolerance was achieved. RESULTS Bortezomib-based ITI protocol was safely tolerated and led to a significant decline in rhGAA antibody titers with concomitant sustained clinical improvement. Two of the 3 IPD patients were successfully weaned off all ITI protocol medications and continue to maintain low/no antibody titers. ITI protocol was significantly tapered in the third IPD patient. B cell recovery was observed in all 3 IPD patients. CONCLUSION This is the first report to our knowledge on successful induction of long-term immune tolerance in patients with IPD and HSAT refractory to agents such as cyclophosphamide, rituximab, and methotrexate, based on an approach using the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib. As immune responses limit the efficacy and cost-effectiveness of therapy for many conditions, proteasome inhibitors may have new therapeutic applications. FUNDING This research was supported by a grant from the Genzyme Corporation, a Sanofi Company (Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA), and in part by the Lysosomal Disease Network, a part of NIH Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network (RDCRN). PMID:27493997

  17. Fish immune responses against endoparasitic nematodes - experimental models.

    PubMed

    Buchmann, K

    2012-09-01

    Vertebrates mount a series of immune reactions when invaded by helminths but antihelmintic immune strategies allow, in many cases, the first invaders of the non-immune host to survive for prolonged periods, whereas subsequent larval invaders of the same parasite species face increased host resistance and thereby decreased colonization success. This concomitant immunity may represent a trade-off between adverse side effects (associated with killing of large helminths in the host tissue) and the need for future protection against invasion. Encapsulation and isolation of large live endoparasitic larvae may be associated with less pathology compared to coping with excess dead parasite tissue in host organs. Likewise, live adult nematodes may be accepted in tissues at a certain activity level for the same reasons. Various host cell receptors bind helminth molecules after which signal-transducing events lead to mobilization of specific reaction patterns depending on the combination of receptors and ligands involved. Both innate and adaptive responses (humoral and cellular) are prominent actors, but skewing of the Th1 lymphocyte response towards a Th2 type is a characteristic element of antihelminthic responses in mammalian hosts. Similar patterns may be expected also to occur in at least some fish species, such as salmonids, producing relevant cytokines, MHCII and CD4+ cells required for these lymphocyte subpopulations. Atlantic cod, Gadus morhua L., is without these immunological elements that indicate that alternative reaction pathways exist in at least some fish groups. Recent achievements within teleost immunology have made it possible to track these host responses in fish and the present work outlines the main immune reactions in fish against helminths and suggests three experimental fish models for exploration of these immune pathways in fish infected with nematodes.

  18. The time-dependent dynamical response of the thermosphere to major geomagnetic disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rees, D.

    1986-01-01

    Several recent observations of thermospheric dynamics, made in the polar regions during extremely disturbed geomagnetic periods are reviewed. In general, the magnitude and the variability of winds in the thermospheric polar regions increases with magnetic activity, as measured by any of the conventional indices. However, none of the conventional indices is a particularly good aid to predicting wind magnitudes. In very general terms, two major factors may be considered in describing the wind system. The magnitude of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) and, in particular, its southward component, determine the size of the auroral oval, and the strength of the cross-polar cap potential. This determines the size of the auroral oval, the magnitude of the sunward winds in the auroral oval and of those blowing anti-sunward over the polar cap, and is probably the major factor in determining the rate of geomagnetic energy deposition in the thermosphere. Superimposed on this enhanced polar circulation system are the effects of discrete auroral substorms. From a global view point, the effect of substorms is to generate a series of strong disturbances which propagate from their source region, usually near magnetic midnight in the auroral oval. The energy associated with discrete substorms is, however, usually a rather small proportion of the total global geomagnetic input during disturbed periods. These observations of thermospheric wind disturbances will be evaluated by comparison with global simulations of the thermospheric response to theoretical and semi-empirical models of the polar electric field, and of the effects of magnetospheric particle precipitation.

  19. HTLV-1, Immune Response and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Quaresma, Juarez A S; Yoshikawa, Gilberto T; Koyama, Roberta V L; Dias, George A S; Fujihara, Satomi; Fuzii, Hellen T

    2015-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) infection is associated with adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL). Tropical spastic paraparesis/HTLV-1-associated myelopathy (PET/HAM) is involved in the development of autoimmune diseases including Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE), and Sjögren’s Syndrome (SS). The development of HTLV-1-driven autoimmunity is hypothesized to rely on molecular mimicry, because virus-like particles can trigger an inflammatory response. However, HTLV-1 modifies the behavior of CD4+ T cells on infection and alters their cytokine production. A previous study showed that in patients infected with HTLV-1, the activity of regulatory CD4+ T cells and their consequent expression of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines are altered. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms underlying changes in cytokine release leading to the loss of tolerance and development of autoimmunity. PMID:26712781

  20. Optimal control strategy for abnormal innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jinying; Zou, Xiufen

    2015-01-01

    Innate immune response plays an important role in control and clearance of pathogens following viral infection. However, in the majority of virus-infected individuals, the response is insufficient because viruses are known to use different evasion strategies to escape immune response. In this study, we use optimal control theory to investigate how to control the innate immune response. We present an optimal control model based on an ordinary-differential-equation system from a previous study, which investigated the dynamics and regulation of virus-triggered innate immune signaling pathways, and we prove the existence of a solution to the optimal control problem involving antiviral treatment or/and interferon therapy. We conduct numerical experiments to investigate the treatment effects of different control strategies through varying the cost function and control efficiency. The results show that a separate treatment, that is, only inhibiting viral replication (u1(t)) or enhancing interferon activity (u2(t)), has more advantages for controlling viral infection than a mixed treatment, that is, controlling both (u1(t)) and (u2(t)) simultaneously, including the smallest cost and operability. These findings would provide new insight for developing effective strategies for treatment of viral infectious diseases.

  1. Veni, vidi, vici: in vivo molecular imaging of immune response.

    PubMed

    Gross, Shimon; Moss, Britney L; Piwnica-Worms, David

    2007-10-01

    "I came, I saw, I conquered," Julius Caesar proclaimed, highlighting the importance of direct visualization as a winning strategy. Continuing the "From the Field" series (see Editorial [2007] 26, 131), Gross et al. summarize how modern molecular imaging techniques can successfully dissect the complexities of immune response in vivo. PMID:17967405

  2. Anticarrier immunity suppresses the antibody response to polysaccharide antigens after intranasal immunization with the polysaccharide-protein conjugate.

    PubMed Central

    Bergquist, C; Lagergård, T; Holmgren, J

    1997-01-01

    We have conjugated cholera toxin (CT) B subunit (CTB) to dextran and studied the effect in mice of previous immunization with CT and CTB on the response to dextran after intranasal immunizations with conjugate. Preexisting immunity to CTB was found to inhibit both the lung mucosal response and serum antibody response to dextran, but this effect could be overcome by using a higher dose of conjugate and delaying the conjugate immunization until the CTB antibody titers had declined. The role of anti-CTB antibodies on the mucosal surface was probably to prevent uptake of the conjugate through a mechanism of immune exclusion. Passively transferred serum antibodies against CTB, on the other hand, suppressed both the serum response and the local antibody response against CTB but did not affect the response to dextran after intranasal immunization with conjugate. PMID:9125533

  3. Handling properties of diverse automobiles and correlation with full scale response data. [driver/vehicle response to aerodynamic disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoh, R. H.; Weir, D. H.

    1973-01-01

    Driver/vehicle response and performance of a variety of vehicles in the presence of aerodynamic disturbances are discussed. Steering control is emphasized. The vehicles include full size station wagon, sedan, compact sedan, van, pickup truck/camper, and wagon towing trailer. Driver/vehicle analyses are used to estimate response and performance. These estimates are correlated with full scale data with test drivers and the results are used to refine the driver/vehicle models, control structure, and loop closure criteria. The analyses and data indicate that the driver adjusts his steering control properties (when he can) to achieve roughly the same level of performance despite vehicle variations. For the more disturbance susceptible vehicles, such as the van, the driver tightens up his control. Other vehicles have handling dynamics which cause him to loosen his control response, even though performance degrades.

  4. Glassy Dynamics in the Adaptive Immune Response Prevents Autoimmune Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jun; Deem, Michael

    2006-03-01

    The immune system normally protects the human host against death by infection. However, when an immune response is mistakenly directed at self antigens, autoimmune disease can occur. We describe a model of protein evolution to simulate the dynamics of the adaptive immune response to antigens. Computer simulations of the dynamics of antibody evolution show that different evolutionary mechanisms, namely gene segment swapping and point mutation, lead to different evolved antibody binding affinities. Although a combination of gene segment swapping and point mutation can yield a greater affinity to a specific antigen than point mutation alone, the antibodies so evolved are highly cross-reactive and would cause autoimmune disease, and this is not the chosen dynamics of the immune system. We suggest that in the immune system a balance has evolved between binding affinity and specificity in the mechanism for searching the amino acid sequence space of antibodies. Our model predicts that chronic infection may lead to autoimmune disease as well due to cross-reactivity and suggests a broad distribution for the time of onset of autoimmune disease due to chronic exposure. The slow search of antibody sequence space by point mutation leads to the broad of distribution times.

  5. Ebola haemorrhagic fever virus: pathogenesis, immune responses, potential prevention.

    PubMed

    Marcinkiewicz, Janusz; Bryniarski, Krzysztof; Nazimek, Katarzyna

    2014-01-01

    Ebola zoonotic RNA filovirus represents human most virulent and lethal pathogens, which induces acute hemorrhagic fever and death within few days in a range of 60-90% of symptomatic individuals. Last outbreak in 2014 in West Africa caused panic that Ebola epidemic can be spread to other continents. Number of deaths in late December reached almost 8,000 individuals out of more than 20,000 symptomatic patients. It seems that only a coordinated international response could counteract the further spread of Ebola. Major innate immunity mechanisms against Ebola are associated with the production of interferons, that are inhibited by viral proteins. Activation of host NK cells was recognized as a leading immune function responsible for recovery of infected people. Uncontrolled cell infection by Ebola leads to an impairment of immunity with cytokine storm, coagulopathy, systemic bleeding, multi-organ failure and death. Tested prevention strategies to induce antiviral immunity include: i. recombinant virus formulations (vaccines); ii. cocktail of monoclonal antibodies (serotherapy); iii. alternative RNA-interference-based antiviral methods. Maintaining the highest standards of aseptic and antiseptic precautions is equally important. Present brief review summarizes a current knowledge concerning pathogenesis of Ebola hemorrhagic disease and the virus interaction with the immune system and discusses recent advances in prevention of Ebola infection by vaccination and serotherapy.

  6. Immune Response to Electromagnetic Fields through Cybernetic Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Godina-Nava, J. J.; Segura, M. A. Rodriguez; Cadena, S. Reyes; Sierra, L. C. Gaitan

    2008-08-11

    We study the optimality of the humoral immune response through a mathematical model, which involves the effect of electromagnetic fields over the large lymphocytes proliferation. Are used the so called cybernetic variables in the context of the matching law of microeconomics or mathematical psychology, to measure the large lymphocytes population and to maximize the instantaneous antibody production rate in time during the immunologic response in order to most efficiently inactivate the antigen.

  7. Immune Response to Electromagnetic Fields through Cybernetic Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godina-Nava, J. J.; Segura, M. A. Rodríguez; Cadena, S. Reyes; Sierra, L. C. Gaitán

    2008-08-01

    We study the optimality of the humoral immune response through a mathematical model, which involves the effect of electromagnetic fields over the large lymphocytes proliferation. Are used the so called cybernetic variables in the context of the matching law of microeconomics or mathematical psychology, to measure the large lymphocytes population and to maximize the instantaneous antibody production rate in time during the immunologic response in order to most efficiently inactivate the antigen.

  8. Disease resistance or growth: the role of plant hormones in balancing immune responses and fitness costs

    PubMed Central

    Denancé, Nicolas; Sánchez-Vallet, Andrea; Goffner, Deborah; Molina, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Plant growth and response to environmental cues are largely governed by phytohormones. The plant hormones ethylene, jasmonic acid, and salicylic acid (SA) play a central role in the regulation of plant immune responses. In addition, other plant hormones, such as auxins, abscisic acid (ABA), cytokinins, gibberellins, and brassinosteroids, that have been thoroughly described to regulate plant development and growth, have recently emerged as key regulators of plant immunity. Plant hormones interact in complex networks to balance the response to developmental and environmental cues and thus limiting defense-associated fitness costs. The molecular mechanisms that govern these hormonal networks are largely unknown. Moreover, hormone signaling pathways are targeted by pathogens to disturb and evade plant defense responses. In this review, we address novel insights on the regulatory roles of the ABA, SA, and auxin in plant resistance to pathogens and we describe the complex interactions among their signal transduction pathways. The strategies developed by pathogens to evade hormone-mediated defensive responses are also described. Based on these data we discuss how hormone signaling could be manipulated to improve the resistance of crops to pathogens. PMID:23745126

  9. Humoural immune response and pathological analysis in patients with false immune diagnosis of cystic echinococcosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, X; Zhang, J; Feng, X; Chen, X; Yin, S; Wen, H; Zheng, S

    2014-01-01

    The patients with false immune diagnosis of hydatid disease were investigated for the humoural immune response to analyse the possible reasons and mechanism leading to false immune diagnosis. Two hundred and thirty-nine patients with nature-unknown cysts and 30 healthy controls were detected by immunological assays (four hydatid antigen-based immunogold filtration assay and enzyme-linked immune absorbent assay) and ultrasound. Sensitivity of and specificity of immunological assay and ultrasound were calculated, respectively. The serological diagnosis was compared with surgical pathology to screen the patients with false immune diagnosis for the immunoglobulin measurement and pathological analysis. The history and cyst characteristics were also reviewed. The results indicate the immunoglobulin has little influence on false immunodiagnosis. The false-negative immunodiagnosis was caused by the cysts' inactive status while the false positive caused by previous rupture, antigen cross-reaction. The clinical diagnosis of cystic echinococcosis requires a combination of immunodiagnosis and ultrasonography, which is the necessary complementary confirmation. PMID:24372157

  10. Effect of age and maternal antibodies on the systemic and mucosal immune response after neonatal immunization in a porcine model

    PubMed Central

    Guzman-Bautista, Edgar R; Garcia-Ruiz, Carlos E; Gama-Espinosa, Alicia L; Ramirez-Estudillo, Carmen; Rojas-Gomez, Oscar I; Vega-Lopez, Marco A

    2014-01-01

    Newborn mammals are highly susceptible to respiratory infections. Although maternal antibodies (MatAb) offer them some protection, they may also interfere with their systemic immune response to vaccination. However, the impact of MatAb on the neonatal mucosal immune response remains incompletely described. This study was performed to determine the effect of ovalbumin (OVA)-specific MatAb on the anti-OVA antibody response in sera, nasal secretions and saliva from specific pathogen-free Vietnamese miniature piglets immunized at 7 or 14 days of age. Our results demonstrated that MatAb increased antigen-specific IgA and IgG responses in sera, and transiently enhanced an early secretory IgA response in nasal secretions of piglets immunized at 7 days of age. In contrast, we detected a lower mucosal (nasal secretion and saliva) anti-OVA IgG response in piglets with MatAb immunized at 14 days of age, compared with piglets with no MatAb, suggesting a modulatory effect of antigen-specific maternal factors on the isotype transfer to the mucosal immune exclusion system. In our porcine model, we demonstrated that passive maternal immunity positively modulated the systemic and nasal immune responses of animals immunized early in life. Our results, therefore, open the possibility of inducing systemic and respiratory mucosal immunity in the presence of MatAb through early vaccination. PMID:24754050

  11. Bifidobacterium bifidum PRL2010 Modulates the Host Innate Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Turroni, Francesca; Taverniti, Valentina; Ruas-Madiedo, Patricia; Duranti, Sabrina; Guglielmetti, Simone; Lugli, Gabriele Andrea; Gioiosa, Laura; Palanza, Paola; Margolles, Abelardo; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2014-01-01

    Here, we describe data obtained from transcriptome profiling of human cell lines and intestinal cells of a murine model upon exposure and colonization, respectively, with Bifidobacterium bifidum PRL2010. Significant changes were detected in the transcription of genes that are known to be involved in innate immunity. Furthermore, results from enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) showed that exposure to B. bifidum PRL2010 causes enhanced production of interleukin 6 (IL-6) and IL-8 cytokines, presumably through NF-κB activation. The obtained global transcription profiles strongly suggest that Bifidobacterium bifidum PRL2010 modulates the innate immune response of the host. PMID:24242237

  12. Reprogramming immune responses via microRNA modulation

    PubMed Central

    Cubillos-Ruiz, Juan R.; Rutkowski, Melanie R; Tchou, Julia; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R.

    2013-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that there are unique sets of miRNAs that have distinct governing roles in several aspects of both innate and adaptive immune responses. In addition, new tools allow selective modulation of the expression of individual miRNAs, both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we summarize recent advances in our understanding of how miRNAs drive the activity of immune cells, and how their modulation in vivo opens new avenues for diagnostic and therapeutic interventions in multiple diseases, from immunodeficiency to cancer. PMID:25285232

  13. Immune-Stimulatory Dinucleotide at the 5′-End of Oligodeoxynucleotides Is Critical for TLR9-Mediated Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) containing a CpG or certain synthetic dinucleotides, referred to as immune-stimulatory dinucleotides, induce Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9)-mediated immune responses. Chemical modifications such as 2′-O-methylribonucleotides incorporated adjacent to the immune-stimulatory dinucleotide on the 5′-side abrogate TLR9-mediated immune responses. In this study, we evaluated the effect of the location of immune-stimulatory dinucleotides in ODNs on TLR9-mediated immune responses. We designed and synthesized ODNs with two immune-stimulatory dinucleotides, one placed toward the 5′-end region and the other toward the 3′-end region, incorporated 2′-O-methylribonucleotides selectively preceding the 5′- or 3′-immune-stimulatory dinucleotide or both, and studied TLR9-mediated immune responses of these compounds in cell-based assays and in vivo in mice. These studies showed that an immune-stimulatory dinucleotide located closer to the 5′-end is critical for and dictates TLR9-mediated immune responses. These studies provide insights for the use of ODNs when employed as TLR9 agonists and antagonists or antisense agents. PMID:24900663

  14. Lack of effect of combining different stressors on innate immune responses of seabream (Sparus aurata L.).

    PubMed

    Ortuño, Jesús; Esteban, M Angeles; Meseguer, José

    2002-01-01

    A complex stressful event, which commonly occurs in modern aquacultural practices, was broken down into factors that were analysed both individually and jointly to assess their effect on two stress indicators (blood glucose and serum cortisol levels) and two activities of the innate immune response (serum complement and head-kidney leukocyte respiratory burst). For this, gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata L.) specimens were exposed to the following stressors: physical disturbance, crowding, anaesthesia with 2-phenoxyethanol and air exposure. At 0, 1, 2, 3 and 4 days post-stress, blood and serum samples were collected to measure glucose concentration and cortisol and complement levels, respectively. Head-kidney leukocytes were isolated and assayed to evaluate respiratory burst activity. The results show that physical disturbance, crowding and anaesthesia produced an occasional increase in glucose and cortisol concentrations. Crowding and anaesthesia induced a depression in complement activity, while hypoxia by air exposure caused a reduction in the respiratory burst. When all factors were jointly applied both humoral and cellular defences were compromised and cortisol values remained high throughout the experimental period. Any long-term effects of this abnormal serum cortisol levels on the immune system remain unknown.

  15. Immunization with Brucella VirB proteins reduces organ colonization in mice through a Th1-type immune response and elicits a similar immune response in dogs.

    PubMed

    Pollak, Cora N; Wanke, María Magdalena; Estein, Silvia M; Delpino, M Victoria; Monachesi, Norma E; Comercio, Elida A; Fossati, Carlos A; Baldi, Pablo C

    2015-03-01

    VirB proteins from Brucella spp. constitute the type IV secretion system, a key virulence factor mediating the intracellular survival of these bacteria. Here, we assessed whether a Th1-type immune response against VirB proteins may protect mice from Brucella infection and whether this response can be induced in the dog, a natural host for Brucella. Splenocytes from mice immunized with VirB7 or VirB9 responded to their respective antigens with significant and specific production of gamma interferon (IFN-γ), whereas interleukin-4 (IL-4) was not detected. Thirty days after an intraperitoneal challenge with live Brucella abortus, the spleen load of bacteria was almost 1 log lower in mice immunized with VirB proteins than in unvaccinated animals. As colonization reduction seemed to correlate with a Th1-type immune response against VirB proteins, we decided to assess whether such a response could be elicited in the dog. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from dogs immunized with VirB proteins (three subcutaneous doses in QuilA adjuvant) produced significantly higher levels of IFN-γ than cells from control animals upon in vitro stimulation with VirB proteins. A skin test to assess specific delayed-type hypersensitivity was positive in 4 out of 5 dogs immunized with either VirB7 or VirB9. As both proteins are predicted to locate in the outer membrane of Brucella organisms, the ability of anti-VirB antibodies to mediate complement-dependent bacteriolysis of B. canis was assessed in vitro. Sera from dogs immunized with either VirB7 or VirB9, but not from those receiving phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), produced significant bacteriolysis. These results suggest that VirB-specific responses that reduce organ colonization by Brucella in mice can be also elicited in dogs. PMID:25540276

  16. Immunization with Brucella VirB proteins reduces organ colonization in mice through a Th1-type immune response and elicits a similar immune response in dogs.

    PubMed

    Pollak, Cora N; Wanke, María Magdalena; Estein, Silvia M; Delpino, M Victoria; Monachesi, Norma E; Comercio, Elida A; Fossati, Carlos A; Baldi, Pablo C

    2015-03-01

    VirB proteins from Brucella spp. constitute the type IV secretion system, a key virulence factor mediating the intracellular survival of these bacteria. Here, we assessed whether a Th1-type immune response against VirB proteins may protect mice from Brucella infection and whether this response can be induced in the dog, a natural host for Brucella. Splenocytes from mice immunized with VirB7 or VirB9 responded to their respective antigens with significant and specific production of gamma interferon (IFN-γ), whereas interleukin-4 (IL-4) was not detected. Thirty days after an intraperitoneal challenge with live Brucella abortus, the spleen load of bacteria was almost 1 log lower in mice immunized with VirB proteins than in unvaccinated animals. As colonization reduction seemed to correlate with a Th1-type immune response against VirB proteins, we decided to assess whether such a response could be elicited in the dog. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from dogs immunized with VirB proteins (three subcutaneous doses in QuilA adjuvant) produced significantly higher levels of IFN-γ than cells from control animals upon in vitro stimulation with VirB proteins. A skin test to assess specific delayed-type hypersensitivity was positive in 4 out of 5 dogs immunized with either VirB7 or VirB9. As both proteins are predicted to locate in the outer membrane of Brucella organisms, the ability of anti-VirB antibodies to mediate complement-dependent bacteriolysis of B. canis was assessed in vitro. Sera from dogs immunized with either VirB7 or VirB9, but not from those receiving phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), produced significant bacteriolysis. These results suggest that VirB-specific responses that reduce organ colonization by Brucella in mice can be also elicited in dogs.

  17. Immunization with Brucella VirB Proteins Reduces Organ Colonization in Mice through a Th1-Type Immune Response and Elicits a Similar Immune Response in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Pollak, Cora N.; Wanke, María Magdalena; Estein, Silvia M.; Delpino, M. Victoria; Monachesi, Norma E.; Comercio, Elida A.; Fossati, Carlos A.

    2014-01-01

    VirB proteins from Brucella spp. constitute the type IV secretion system, a key virulence factor mediating the intracellular survival of these bacteria. Here, we assessed whether a Th1-type immune response against VirB proteins may protect mice from Brucella infection and whether this response can be induced in the dog, a natural host for Brucella. Splenocytes from mice immunized with VirB7 or VirB9 responded to their respective antigens with significant and specific production of gamma interferon (IFN-γ), whereas interleukin-4 (IL-4) was not detected. Thirty days after an intraperitoneal challenge with live Brucella abortus, the spleen load of bacteria was almost 1 log lower in mice immunized with VirB proteins than in unvaccinated animals. As colonization reduction seemed to correlate with a Th1-type immune response against VirB proteins, we decided to assess whether such a response could be elicited in the dog. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from dogs immunized with VirB proteins (three subcutaneous doses in QuilA adjuvant) produced significantly higher levels of IFN-γ than cells from control animals upon in vitro stimulation with VirB proteins. A skin test to assess specific delayed-type hypersensitivity was positive in 4 out of 5 dogs immunized with either VirB7 or VirB9. As both proteins are predicted to locate in the outer membrane of Brucella organisms, the ability of anti-VirB antibodies to mediate complement-dependent bacteriolysis of B. canis was assessed in vitro. Sera from dogs immunized with either VirB7 or VirB9, but not from those receiving phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), produced significant bacteriolysis. These results suggest that VirB-specific responses that reduce organ colonization by Brucella in mice can be also elicited in dogs. PMID:25540276

  18. The effects of pollutants on the allergic immune response.

    PubMed

    Kemeny, D M

    2000-11-01

    An increase in the prevalence of allergy and allergic diseases has taken place in the industrialised countries. Allergic diseases represent a major health problem, and appear linked to affluence and modern lifestyle. In the 20th century air pollution from industrial sources largely has been replaced by diesel exhaust and other traffic pollution. Further, the indoor environment in which we spend most of our time has changed dramatically. In order to understand the contribution of pollution and other environmental changes to the development of allergy, we need to understand the biologic processes that underlie allergic immune responses. In the present paper, immune regulatory pathways that control the allergic immune response are delineated. Castor bean dust causes widespread allergic sensitisation. The investigations that made clear the importance of CD8 T cells for the regulation of IgE production were triggered by studies of castor bean allergy. A special focus is in this review placed on the regulatory role of CD8 T cells in the development of the allergic immune response.

  19. Host Immune Status and Response to Hepatitis E Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Krain, Lisa J.; Nelson, Kenrad E.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Hepatitis E virus (HEV), identified over 30 years ago, remains a serious threat to life, health, and productivity in developing countries where access to clean water is limited. Recognition that HEV also circulates as a zoonotic and food-borne pathogen in developed countries is more recent. Even without treatment, most cases of HEV-related acute viral hepatitis (with or without jaundice) resolve within 1 to 2 months. However, HEV sometimes leads to acute liver failure, chronic infection, or extrahepatic symptoms. The mechanisms of pathogenesis appear to be substantially immune mediated. This review covers the epidemiology of HEV infection worldwide, the humoral and cellular immune responses to HEV, and the persistence and protection of antibodies produced in response to both natural infection and vaccines. We focus on the contributions of altered immune states (associated with pregnancy, human immunodeficiency virus [HIV], and immunosuppressive agents used in cancer and transplant medicine) to the elevated risks of chronic infection (in immunosuppressed/immunocompromised patients) and acute liver failure and mortality (among pregnant women). We conclude by discussing outstanding questions about the immune response to HEV and interactions with hormones and comorbid conditions. These questions take on heightened importance now that a vaccine is available. PMID:24396140

  20. Stimulating immune responses to fight cancer: Basic biology and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    O'Byrne, Kenneth

    2015-04-01

    Chronic inflammation is now recognized as a major cause of malignant disease. In concert with various mechanisms (including DNA instability), hypoxia and activation of inflammatory bioactive lipid pathways and pro-inflammatory cytokines open the doorway to malignant transformation and proliferation, angiogenesis, and metastasis in many cancers. A balance between stimulatory and inhibitory signals regulates the immune response to cancer. These include inhibitory checkpoints that modulate the extent and duration of the immune response and may be activated by tumor cells. This contributes to immune resistance, especially against tumor antigen-specific T-cells. Targeting these checkpoints is an evolving approach to cancer immunotherapy, designed to foster an immune response. The current focus of these trials is on the programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) receptor and its ligands (PD-L1, PD-L2) and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA-4). Researchers have developed anti-PD-1 and anti-PDL-1 antibodies that interfere with the ligands and receptor and allow the tumor cell to be recognized and attacked by tumor-infiltrating T-cells. These are currently being studied in lung cancer. Likewise, CTLA-4 inhibitors, which have had success treating advanced melanoma, are being studied in lung cancer with encouraging results.

  1. Host immune status and response to hepatitis E virus infection.

    PubMed

    Krain, Lisa J; Nelson, Kenrad E; Labrique, Alain B

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV), identified over 30 years ago, remains a serious threat to life, health, and productivity in developing countries where access to clean water is limited. Recognition that HEV also circulates as a zoonotic and food-borne pathogen in developed countries is more recent. Even without treatment, most cases of HEV-related acute viral hepatitis (with or without jaundice) resolve within 1 to 2 months. However, HEV sometimes leads to acute liver failure, chronic infection, or extrahepatic symptoms. The mechanisms of pathogenesis appear to be substantially immune mediated. This review covers the epidemiology of HEV infection worldwide, the humoral and cellular immune responses to HEV, and the persistence and protection of antibodies produced in response to both natural infection and vaccines. We focus on the contributions of altered immune states (associated with pregnancy, human immunodeficiency virus [HIV], and immunosuppressive agents used in cancer and transplant medicine) to the elevated risks of chronic infection (in immunosuppressed/immunocompromised patients) and acute liver failure and mortality (among pregnant women). We conclude by discussing outstanding questions about the immune response to HEV and interactions with hormones and comorbid conditions. These questions take on heightened importance now that a vaccine is available.

  2. Antiapoptotic Role for Lifeguard in T Cell Mediated Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Inder M.

    2015-01-01

    Anti-apoptotic protein Lifeguard (LFG) is upregulated on T cells upon in vitro activation. To investigate its role in T cell immunity we infected wild type and LFG knockout bone marrow chimaeras mice with LCMV. We observed a decreased number of LFG KO activated CD8 and CD4 T cells throughout the infection and a marked decrease in LFG KO LCMV specific memory T cells. WT and KO T cells proliferated at the same rate, however, LFG KO CD44hi T cells showed increased cell death during the initial phase of the immune response. LFG KO and WT T cells were equally sensitive to the FAS antibody Jo-2 in ex vivo cultures, and blocking extrinsic pathways of cell death in vivo with Fas L or caspase 8 inhibitors did not rescue the increased apoptosis in LFG KO T cells. Our data suggest that LFG plays a role in T cell survival during the initial phase of anti-viral immune response by protecting pre-existing memory T cells and possibly newly activated T cells resulting in a diminished immune response and a decreased number of LCMV specific memory T cells. PMID:26565411

  3. Time dependent response of equatorial ionospheric electric fields to magnetospheric disturbances

    SciTech Connect

    Fejer, B.G.; Scherliess, L.

    1995-04-01

    The authors use extensive radar measurements of F region vertical plasma drifts and auroral electrojet indices to determine the storm time dependence of equatorial zonal electric fields. These disturbance drifts result from the prompt penetration of high latitude electric fields and from the dynamo action of storm time winds which produce the largest perturbations a few hours after the onset of magnetic activity. The signatures of the equatorial disturbance electric fields change significantly depending on the relative contributions of these two components. The prompt electric field responses, with lifetimes of about one hour, are in excellent agreement with results from global convection models. The electric fields generated by storm time winds have longer lifetimes, amplitudes proportional to the energy input into the high latitude ionosphere, and a daily variation which follows closely the disturbance dynamo pattern of Blanc and Richmond. The storm wind driven electric fields are responsible for the larger amplitudes and longer lifetimes of the drift perturbations following sudden decreases in convection compared to those associated with sudden convection enhancements. 14 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Regulation of frontline antibody responses by innate immune signals

    PubMed Central

    Chorny, Alejo; Puga, Irene; Cerutti, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Mature B cells generate protective immunity by undergoing immunoglobulin (Ig) class switching and somatic hypermutation, two Ig gene-diversifying processes that usually require cognate interactions with T cells that express CD40 ligand. This T-cell-dependent pathway provides immunological memory but is relatively slow to occur. Thus, it must be integrated with a faster, T-cell-independent pathway for B-cell activation through CD40 ligand-like molecules that are released by innate immune cells in response to microbial products. Here, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of the interplay between the innate immune system and B cells, particularly “frontline” B cells located in the marginal zone of the spleen and in the intestine. PMID:22477522

  5. The Reticular Cell Network: A Robust Backbone for Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Textor, Johannes; Mandl, Judith N.; de Boer, Rob J.

    2016-01-01

    Lymph nodes are meeting points for circulating immune cells. A network of reticular cells that ensheathe a mesh of collagen fibers crisscrosses the tissue in each lymph node. This reticular cell network distributes key molecules and provides a structure for immune cells to move around on. During infections, the network can suffer damage. A new study has now investigated the network’s structure in detail, using methods from graph theory. The study showed that the network is remarkably robust to damage: it can still support immune responses even when half of the reticular cells are destroyed. This is a further important example of how network connectivity achieves tolerance to failure, a property shared with other important biological and nonbiological networks. PMID:27727272

  6. Genomics of immune response to typhoid and cholera vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Partha P.

    2015-01-01

    Considerable variation in antibody response (AR) was observed among recipients of an injectable typhoid vaccine and an oral cholera vaccine. We sought to find whether polymorphisms in genes of the immune system, both innate and adaptive, were associated with the observed variation in response. For both vaccines, we were able to discover and validate several polymorphisms that were significantly associated with immune response. For the typhoid vaccines, these polymorphisms were on genes that belonged to pathways of polysaccharide recognition, signal transduction, inhibition of T-cell proliferation, pro-inflammatory signalling and eventual production of antimicrobial peptides. For the cholera vaccine, the pathways included epithelial barrier integrity, intestinal homeostasis and leucocyte recruitment. Even though traditional wisdom indicates that both vaccines should act as T-cell-independent antigens, our findings reveal that the vaccines induce AR using different pathways. PMID:25964454

  7. Genomics of immune response to typhoid and cholera vaccines.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Partha P

    2015-06-19

    Considerable variation in antibody response (AR) was observed among recipients of an injectable typhoid vaccine and an oral cholera vaccine. We sought to find whether polymorphisms in genes of the immune system, both innate and adaptive, were associated with the observed variation in response. For both vaccines, we were able to discover and validate several polymorphisms that were significantly associated with immune response. For the typhoid vaccines, these polymorphisms were on genes that belonged to pathways of polysaccharide recognition, signal transduction, inhibition of T-cell proliferation, pro-inflammatory signalling and eventual production of antimicrobial peptides. For the cholera vaccine, the pathways included epithelial barrier integrity, intestinal homeostasis and leucocyte recruitment. Even though traditional wisdom indicates that both vaccines should act as T-cell-independent antigens, our findings reveal that the vaccines induce AR using different pathways.

  8. B lymphocyte immune response gene phenotype is genetically determined

    SciTech Connect

    Tse, H.Y.; Mond, J.J.; Longo, D.L.

    1982-04-01

    We examined the effects of the developmental milieu on the capacity of B cells to undergo immune response gene-controlled, T cell-dependent polyclonal proliferation. Although I-Aq poly(Glu60 Ala30 Tyr10)n (GAT)-nonresponder T cells developing in a responder environment become phenotypic GAT-responders, I-Aq B cells remain unresponsive to GAT, even after maturation in a GAT-responder animal. Conversely, (B10.A x B10.Q)F1 ((GAT responder x GAT nonresponder)F1) T cells developing in a B10.Q GAT nonresponder host fail to respond to GAT, but F1 B cells from the same F1 leads to parent chimeras make excellent proliferative responses in the presence of GAT and responder T cells. Thus, by this assay, B cell immune response gene function is genetically determined and is not affected by the developmental milieu.

  9. Immune response triggered by Brucella abortus following infection or vaccination.

    PubMed

    Dorneles, Elaine M S; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Araújo, Márcio S S; Sriranganathan, Nammalwar; Lage, Andrey P

    2015-07-17

    Brucella abortus live vaccines have been used successfully to control bovine brucellosis worldwide for decades. However, due to some limitations of these live vaccines, efforts are being made for the development of new safer and more effective vaccines that could also be used in other susceptible species. In this context, understanding the protective immune responses triggered by B. abortus is critical for the development of new vaccines. Such understandings will enhance our knowledge of the host/pathogen interactions and enable to develop methods to evaluate potential vaccines and innovative treatments for animals or humans. At present, almost all the knowledge regarding B. abortus specific immunological responses comes from studies in mice. Active participation of macrophages, dendritic cells, IFN-γ producing CD4(+) T-cells and cytotoxic CD8(+) T-cells are vital to overcome the infection. In this review, we discuss the characteristics of the immune responses triggered by vaccination versus infection by B. abortus, in different hosts.

  10. Disturbance of wildlife by outdoor winter recreation: allostatic stress response and altered activity-energy budgets.

    PubMed

    Arlettaz, Raphaël; Nusslé, Sébastien; Baltic, Marjana; Vogel, Peter; Palme, Rupert; Jenni-Eiermann, Susanne; Patthey, Patrick; Genoud, Michel

    2015-07-01

    Anthropogenic disturbance of wildlife is of growing conservation concern, but we lack comprehensive approaches of its multiple negative effects. We investigated several effects of disturbance by winter outdoor sports on free-ranging alpine Black Grouse by simultaneously measuring their physiological and behavioral responses. We experimentally flushed radio-tagged Black Grouse from their snow burrows, once a day, during several successive days, and quantified their stress hormone levels (corticosterone metabolites in feces [FCM] collected. from individual snow burrows). We also measured feeding time allocation (activity budgets reconstructed from radio-emitted signals) in response to anthropogenic disturbance. Finally, we estimated the related extra energy expenditure that may be incurred: based on activity budgets, energy expenditure was modeled from measures of metabolism obtained from captive birds subjected to different ambient temperatures. The pattern of FCM excretion indicated the existence of a funneling effect as predicted by the allostatic theory of stress: initial stress hormone concentrations showed a wide inter-individual variation, which decreased during experimental flushing. Individuals with low initial pre-flushing FCM values augmented their concentration, while individuals with high initial FCM values lowered it. Experimental disturbance resulted in an extension of feeding duration during the following evening foraging bout, confirming the prediction that Black Grouse must compensate for the extra energy expenditure elicited by human disturbance. Birds with low initial baseline FCM concentrations were those that spent more time foraging. These FCM excretion and foraging patterns suggest that birds with high initial FCM concentrations might have been experiencing a situation of allostatic overload. The energetic model provides quantitative estimates of extra energy expenditure. A longer exposure to ambient temperatures outside the shelter of snow

  11. Abnormal immune responses of Bloom's syndrome lymphocytes in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Hütteroth, T H; Litwin, S D; German, J

    1975-01-01

    Bloom's syndrome is a rare autosmal recessive disorder, first characterized by growth retardation and asum-sensitive facial telangiectasia and more recently demonstarted to have increased chromosome instability, a predisposition to malignancy, and increased susecptibitily to infection. The present report ocncern the immune function of Bloom's syndrom lymphoctes in vitro. Four affected homozgotes and five heterozygotes were studied. An abnormal serum concentartion of at least one class of immunoglobin was present in three out of four homozgotes. Affected homozgotes were shown capable of both a humoral and cellular response after antigenic challenge, the responses in general being weak but detectable. Blood lymphocytes from Bloom's syndrome individuals were cultured in impaired proliferavite response and synthesized less immunoglobulin at the end of 5 days than did normal controls. In contrast, they had a normal proliferative response to phytohemagglutinin except at highest concentrations of the mitogen. In the mixed lymphocte culture, Bloom's syndrome lymphocytes proved to be poor responder cells but normal stimulator cells. Lmyphoctes from the heterozgotes produced normal responses in these three systems. Distrubed immunity appears to be on of several major consequences of homozygosity for the Bloom's syndrome gene. Although the explanation for this pleiotropism is at present obscure, the idea was advanced that the aberrant immune function is, along with the major clincial feature-small body size, amanifestation of defect in cellular proliferation. PMID:124745

  12. Humoral immune responses in CD40 ligand-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Individuals with X-linked hyper-IgM syndrome fail to express functional CD40 ligand (CD40L) and, as a consequence, are incapable of mounting protective antibody responses to opportunistic bacterial infections. To address the role of CD40L in humoral immunity, we created, through homologous recombination, mice deficient in CD40L expression. These mice exhibited no gross developmental deficiencies or health abnormalities and contained normal percentages of B and T cell subpopulations. CD40L-deficient mice did display selective deficiencies in humoral immunity; basal serum isotype levels were significantly lower than observed in normal mice, and IgE was undetectable. Furthermore, the CD40L-deficient mice failed to mount secondary antigen- specific responses to immunization with a thymus-dependent antigen, trinitrophenol-conjugated keyhole limpet hemocyanin (TNP-KLH). By contrast, the CD40L-deficient mice produced antigen-specific antibody of all isotypes except IgE in response to the thymus-independent antigen, DNP-Ficoll. These results underscore the requirement of CD40L for T cell-dependent antibody responses. Moreover, Ig class switching to isotypes other than IgE can occur in vivo in the absence of CD40L, supporting the notion that alternative B cell signaling pathways regulate responses to thymus-independent antigens. PMID:7964465

  13. Radiation-induced immune responses: mechanisms and therapeutic perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Hoibin; Bok, Seoyeon; Hong, Beom-Ju; Choi, Hyung-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Recent advancement in the radiotherapy technology has allowed conformal delivery of high doses of ionizing radiation precisely to the tumors while sparing large volume of the normal tissues, which have led to better clinical responses. Despite this technological advancement many advanced tumors often recur and they do so within the previously irradiated regions. How could tumors recur after receiving such high ablative doses of radiation? In this review, we outlined how radiation can elicit anti-tumor responses by introducing some of the cytokines that can be induced by ionizing radiation. We then discuss how tumor hypoxia, a major limiting factor responsible for failure of radiotherapy, may also negatively impact the anti-tumor responses. In addition, we highlight how there may be other populations of immune cells including regulatory T cells (Tregs), myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) that can be recruited to tumors interfering with the anti-tumor immunity. Finally, the impact of irradiation on tumor hypoxia and the immune responses according to different radiotherapy regimen is also delineated. It is indeed an exciting time to see that radiotherapy is being combined with immunotherapy in the clinic and we hope that this review can add an excitement to the field. PMID:27722125

  14. Monitoring of riparian vegetation response to flood disturbances using terrestrial photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Džubáková, K.; Molnar, P.; Schindler, K.; Trizna, M.

    2014-03-01

    The distribution of riparian vegetation on river floodplains is strongly impacted by floods. In this study we use a new setup with high resolution ground-based cameras in an Alpine gravel bed braided river to quantify the immediate response of riparian vegetation to flood disturbance with the use of vegetation indices. Five largest floods with return periods between 1.4 and 20.1 years in the period 2008-2011 in the Maggia River were used to evaluate patterns of vegetation response in three distinct floodplain units (main bar, secondary bar, transitional zone) and to compare seven vegetation indices. The results show both negative (damage) and positive (enhancement) response of vegetation in a short period following floods, with a selective impact based on the hydrogeomorphological setting and the intensity of the flood forcing. The spatial distribution of vegetation damage provides a coherent picture of floodplain response in the three floodplain units with different flood stress. We show that the tested vegetation indices generally agree on the direction of predicted change and its spatial distribution. The average disagreement between indices was in the range 14.4-24.9% despite the complex environment, i.e. highly variable surface wetness, high gravel reflectance, extensive water-soil-vegetation contact zones. We conclude that immediate vegetation response to flood disturbance may be effectively monitored by terrestrial photography with potential for long-term assessment in river management and restoration projects.

  15. Humoral Immune Response to Primary Rubella Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Kim M.; Di Camillo, Carlie; Doughty, Larissa; Dax, Elizabeth M.

    2006-01-01

    An assay capable of distinguishing between the immune response generated by recent exposure to rubella virus and the immune response existing as a result of past exposure or immunization is required for the diagnosis of primary rubella virus infection, especially in pregnant women. Avidity assays, which are based on the premise that chaotropic agents can be used to selectively dissociate the low-avidity antibodies generated early in the course of infection, have become routinely used in an effort to accomplish this. We have thoroughly investigated the immunological basis of an avidity assay using a viral lysate-based assay and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) based on a peptide analogue of the putative immunodominant region of the E1 glycoprotein (E1208-239). The relative affinities of the antibodies directed against E1208-239 were measured by surface plasmon resonance and were found to correlate well with the avidity index calculated from the ELISA results. We found that the immune response generated during primary rubella virus infection consists of an initial low-affinity peak of immunoglobulin M (IgM) reactivity followed by transient peaks of low-avidity IgG3 and IgA reactivity. The predominant response is an IgG1 response which increases in concentration and affinity progressively over the course of infection. Incubation with the chaotropic agent used in the avidity assay abolished the detection of the early low-affinity peaks of IgM, IgA, and IgG3 reactivity while leaving the high-affinity IgG1 response relatively unaffected. The present study supported the premise that avidity assays based on appropriate antigens can be useful to confirm primary rubella virus infection. PMID:16522781

  16. Geomorphic responses of lower Bega River to catchment disturbance, 1851?1926

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Andrew P.; Brierley, Gary J.

    1997-03-01

    Prior to significant European settlement of the area in the 1850s, lower Bega River on the South Coast of NSW had a narrow, relatively deep channel lined by river oaks. The river had a suspended or mixed load, with platypus habitat available in pools. Banks were fine-grained and relatively cohesive (silts and clays), as was the floodplain, which graded to a series of valley-marginal swamps and lakes. Extensive evidence from maps and portion plans, archival photographs, bridge surveys, and anecdotal sources, complemented by field analysis of floodplain sedimentology (including radiocarbon-dated samples) and vegetation remnants are used to document the dramatic metamorphosis in the character and behaviour of lower Bega River in the latter half of the nineteenth century. By 1926 the channel had widened extensively (up to 340%) and shallowed in association with bed aggradation by coarse sandy bedload. Floodplain accretion was dominated by fine to medium sands, with some coarse sand splays. In contrast with most other studies of channel metamorphosis in Australia, which have emphasised river responses to climatically-induced flood histories, relegating human impacts to a secondary role, the profound changes to the geomorphic condition and behaviour of Bega River reflect indirect human disturbance of Bega catchment, and direct but non point source disturbance to the channel. Extensive clearance of catchment, floodplain, and channel-marginal vegetation occurred within a few decades of European settlement, altering the hydrologic and sediment regime of the river, and transforming the geomorphic effectiveness of floods. Although this study is situated in a relatively sensitive, granitic catchment, catchment clearance is likely to have induced equally significant responses in many other river systems in eastern Australia. In some instances the diffuse aspects of human disturbance on landscapes induce impacts on river character that are just as profound as major direct

  17. Immunoregulation of fetal and anti-paternal immune responses.

    PubMed

    Seavey, Matthew M; Mosmann, Tim R

    2008-01-01

    Immunological tolerance to the fetus is essential for fetal survival during pregnancy. The semi-allogeneic fetus expresses genes foreign to the mother that can be recognized by maternal T cells. Under times of stress or infection, deleterious immune responses can result in fetal destruction and/or maternal death. Exposure to non-maternal antigens begins as early as insemination and some of the mechanisms required to prevent maternal priming against these antigens are in place before sexual encounter. Continuous and overlapping regulatory mechanisms must cooperate to allow the best chances for fertilization, implantation, and healthy gestation, simultaneously protecting the fetus from maternal immune attack yet making minimal compromises in resistance to infection. Several types of immune cell from both the innate and adaptive arms of the immune system help protect both the mother and fetus during pregnancy. It's the intricate communication and interplay between the immune system and the endocrine system that will ultimately decide the success or fate of the developing fetus. PMID:18213524

  18. Immunization with extracellular proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis induces cell-mediated immune responses and substantial protective immunity in a guinea pig model of pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Pal, P G; Horwitz, M A

    1992-01-01

    We have studied the capacity of a selected fraction of Mycobacterium tuberculosis extracellular proteins (EP) released into broth culture by mid-logarithmic-growth-phase organisms to induce cell-mediated immune responses and protective immunity in a guinea pig model of pulmonary tuberculosis. Guinea pigs infected with M. tuberculosis by aerosol but not uninfected control guinea pigs exhibit strong cell-mediated immune responses to EP, manifest by dose-dependent cutaneous delayed-type hypersensitivity and splenic lymphocyte proliferation. Guinea pigs immunized subcutaneously with EP but not sham-immunized control guinea pigs also develop strong cell-mediated immune responses to EP, manifest by dose-dependent cutaneous delayed-type hypersensitivity and splenic lymphocyte proliferation. EP is nonlethal and nontoxic to guinea pigs upon subcutaneous immunization. Guinea pigs immunized with EP and then challenged with aerosolized M. tuberculosis exhibit protective immunity. In five independent experiments, EP-immunized guinea pigs were consistently protected against clinical illness, including weight loss. Compared with EP-immunized guinea pigs, sham-immunized control guinea pigs lost 12.9 +/- 2.0% (mean +/- SE) of their total weight. EP-immunized guinea pigs also had a 10-fold reduction in viable M. tuberculosis bacilli in their lungs and spleens (P = 0.004 and 0.001, respectively) compared with sham-immunized control animals. In the two experiments in which some guinea pigs died after aerosol challenge, EP-immunized animals were protected from death. Whereas all 12 (100%) EP-immunized guinea pigs survived challenge with aerosolized M. tuberculosis, only 6 of 12 (50%) sham-immunized control guinea pigs survived challenge (P = 0.007, Fisher exact test). This study demonstrates that actively growing M. tuberculosis cells release immunoprotective molecules extracellularly, that a subunit vaccine against tuberculosis is feasible, and that extracellular molecules of M

  19. Immune response to measles vaccine in Peruvian children.

    PubMed Central

    Bautista-López, N. L.; Vaisberg, A.; Kanashiro, R.; Hernández, H.; Ward, B. J.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the immune response in Peruvian children following measles vaccination. METHODS: Fifty-five Peruvian children received Schwarz measles vaccine (about 10(3) plaque forming units) at about 9 months of age. Blood samples were taken before vaccination, then twice after vaccination: one sample at between 1 and 4 weeks after vaccination and the final sample 3 months post vaccination for evaluation of immune cell phenotype and lymphoproliferative responses to measles and non-measles antigens. Measles-specific antibodies were measured by plaque reduction neutralization. FINDINGS: The humoral response developed rapidly after vaccination; only 4 of the 55 children (7%) had plaque reduction neutralization titres <200 mlU/ml 3 months after vaccination. However, only 8 out of 35 children tested (23%) had lymphoproliferative responses to measles antigens 3-4 weeks after vaccination. Children with poor lymphoproliferative responses to measles antigens had readily detectable lymphoproliferative responses to other antigens. Flow cytometric analysis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells revealed diffuse immune system activation at the time of vaccination in most children. The capacity to mount a lymphoproliferative response to measles antigens was associated with expression of CD45RO on CD4+ T-cells. CONCLUSION: The 55 Peruvian children had excellent antibody responses after measles vaccination, but only 23% (8 out of 35) generated detectable lymphoproliferative responses to measles antigens (compared with 55-67% in children in the industrialized world). This difference may contribute to the less than uniform success of measles vaccination programmes in the developing world. PMID:11731811

  20. The innate and adaptive immune response to avian influenza virus infections and vaccines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protective immunity against viruses is mediated by the early innate immune responses and later on by the adaptive immune responses. The early innate immunity is designed to contain and limit virus replication in the host, primarily through cytokine and interferon production. Most all cells are cap...

  1. How B cells Shape the Immune Response against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Maglione, Paul J.; Chan, John

    2009-01-01

    Extensive work illustrating the importance of cellular immune mechanisms for protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis has largely relegated B cell biology to an afterthought within the tuberculosis (TB) field. However, recent studies have illustrated that B lymphocytes, through a variety of interactions with the cellular immune response, play previously underappreciated roles in shaping host defense against nonviral intracellular pathogens, including M. tuberculosis. Work in our laboratory has recently shown that, by considering these lymphocytes more broadly within their variety of interactions with cellular immunity, B cells have a significant impact on the outcome of airborne challenge with M. tuberculosis as well as the resultant inflammatory response. In this review, we advocate for a revised view of TB immunology in which roles of cellular and humoral immunity are not mutually exclusive. In the context of our current understanding of host defense against nonviral intracellular infections, we review recent data supporting a more significant role of B cells during M. tuberculosis infection than previously thought. PMID:19283721

  2. Chicken Immune Response after In Ovo Immunization with Chimeric TLR5 Activating Flagellin of Campylobacter jejuni

    PubMed Central

    Radomska, Katarzyna A.; Vaezirad, Mahdi M.; Verstappen, Koen M.; Wösten, Marc M. S. M.; Wagenaar, Jaap A.; van Putten, Jos P. M.

    2016-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is the main cause of bacterial food-borne diseases in developed countries. Chickens are the most important source of human infection. Vaccination of poultry is an attractive strategy to reduce the number of C. jejuni in the intestinal tract of chickens. We investigated the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a recombinant C. jejuni flagellin-based subunit vaccine with intrinsic adjuvant activity. Toll-like receptor activation assays demonstrated the purity and TLR5 stimulating (adjuvant) activity of the vaccine. The antigen (20–40 μg) was administered in ovo to 18 day-old chicken embryos. Serum samples and intestinal content were assessed for antigen-specific systemic and mucosal humoral immune responses. In ovo vaccination resulted in the successful generation of IgY and IgM serum antibodies against the flagellin-based subunit vaccine as determined by ELISA and Western blotting. Vaccination did not induce significant amounts of flagellin-specific secretory IgA in the chicken intestine. Challenge of chickens with C. jejuni yielded similar intestinal colonization levels for vaccinated and control animals. Our results indicate that in ovo delivery of recombinant C. jejuni flagellin subunit vaccine is a feasible approach to yield a systemic humoral immune response in chickens but that a mucosal immune response may be needed to reduce C. jejuni colonization. PMID:27760175

  3. The Immune Response in Measles: Virus Control, Clearance and Protective Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Diane E.

    2016-01-01

    Measles is an acute systemic viral infection with immune system interactions that play essential roles in multiple stages of infection and disease. Measles virus (MeV) infection does not induce type 1 interferons, but leads to production of cytokines and chemokines associated with nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB) signaling and activation of the NACHT, LRR and PYD domains-containing protein (NLRP3) inflammasome. This restricted response allows extensive virus replication and spread during a clinically silent latent period of 10–14 days. The first appearance of the disease is a 2–3 day prodrome of fever, runny nose, cough, and conjunctivitis that is followed by a characteristic maculopapular rash that spreads from the face and trunk to the extremities. The rash is a manifestation of the MeV-specific type 1 CD4+ and CD8+ T cell adaptive immune response with lymphocyte infiltration into tissue sites of MeV replication and coincides with clearance of infectious virus. However, clearance of viral RNA from blood and tissues occurs over weeks to months after resolution of the rash and is associated with a period of immunosuppression. However, during viral RNA clearance, MeV-specific antibody also matures in type and avidity and T cell functions evolve from type 1 to type 2 and 17 responses that promote B cell development. Recovery is associated with sustained levels of neutralizing antibody and life-long protective immunity. PMID:27754341

  4. Acidic chitinase primes the protective immune response to gastrointestinal nematodes.

    PubMed

    Vannella, Kevin M; Ramalingam, Thirumalai R; Hart, Kevin M; de Queiroz Prado, Rafael; Sciurba, Joshua; Barron, Luke; Borthwick, Lee A; Smith, Allen D; Mentink-Kane, Margaret; White, Sandra; Thompson, Robert W; Cheever, Allen W; Bock, Kevin; Moore, Ian; Fitz, Lori J; Urban, Joseph F; Wynn, Thomas A

    2016-05-01

    Acidic mammalian chitinase (AMCase) is known to be induced by allergens and helminths, yet its role in immunity is unclear. Using AMCase-deficient mice, we show that AMCase deficiency reduced the number of group 2 innate lymphoid cells during allergen challenge but was not required for establishment of type 2 inflammation in the lung in response to allergens or helminths. In contrast, AMCase-deficient mice showed a profound defect in type 2 immunity following infection with the chitin-containing gastrointestinal nematodes Nippostrongylus brasiliensis and Heligmosomoides polygyrus bakeri. The impaired immunity was associated with reduced mucus production and decreased intestinal expression of the signature type 2 response genes Il13, Chil3, Retnlb, and Clca1. CD103(+) dendritic cells, which regulate T cell homing, were also reduced in mesenteric lymph nodes of infected AMCase-deficient mice. Thus, AMCase functions as a critical initiator of protective type 2 responses to intestinal nematodes but is largely dispensable for allergic responses in the lung. PMID:27043413

  5. Inhibition of the immune response to experimental fresh osteoarticular allografts

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigo, J.J.; Schnaser, A.M.; Reynolds, H.M. Jr.; Biggart, J.M. 3d.; Leathers, M.W.; Chism, S.E.; Thorson, E.; Grotz, T.; Yang, Q.M. )

    1989-06-01

    The immune response to osteoarticular allografts is capable of destroying the cartilage--a tissue that has antigens on its cells identical to those on the bone and marrow cells. Osteoarticular allografts of the distal femur were performed in rats using various methods to attempt to temporarily inhibit the antibody response. The temporary systemic immunosuppressant regimens investigated were cyclophosphamide, azathioprine and prednisolone, cyclosporine A, and total lymphoid irradiation. The most successful appeared to be cyclosporine A, but significant side effects were observed. To specifically inhibit the immune response in the allograft antigens without systemically inhibiting the entire immune system, passive enhancement and preadministration of donor blood were tried. Neither was as effective as coating the donor bone with biodegradable cements, a method previously found to be successful. Cyclosporine A was investigated in dogs in a preliminary study of medial compartmental knee allografts and was found to be successful in inhibiting the antibody response and in producing a more successful graft; however, some significant side effects were similarly observed.

  6. [Adaptive immune response and associated trigger factors in atopic dermatitis].

    PubMed

    Heratizadeh, A; Werfel, T; Rösner, L M

    2015-02-01

    Due to a broad variety of extrinsic trigger factors, patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) are characterized by complex response mechanisms of the adaptive immune system. Notably, skin colonization with Staphylococcus aureus seems to be of particular interest since not only exotoxins, but also other proteins of S. aureus can induce specific humoral and cellular immune responses which partially also correlate with the severity of AD. In a subgroup of AD patients Malassezia species induce specific IgE- and T cell-responses which has been demonstrated by atopy patch tests. Moreover, Mala s 13 is characterized by high cross-reactivity to the human corresponding protein (thioredoxin). Induction of a potential autoallergy due to molecular mimicry seems therefore to be relevant for Malassezia-sensitized AD patients. In addition, sensitization mechanisms to autoallergens aside from cross-reactivity are under current investigation. Regarding inhalant allergens, research projects are in progress with the aim to elucidate allergen-specific immune response mechanisms in more depth. For grass-pollen allergens a flare-up of AD following controlled exposure has been observed while for house dust mite-allergens a polarization towards Th2 and Th2/Th17 T cell phenotypes can be observed. These and further findings might finally contribute to the development of specific and effective treatments for aeroallergen-sensitized AD patients. PMID:25532900

  7. Systemic PPARgamma ligation inhibits allergic immune response in the skin.

    PubMed

    Dahten, Anja; Koch, Christin; Ernst, Dennis; Schnöller, Corinna; Hartmann, Susanne; Worm, Margitta

    2008-09-01

    We have shown previously that specific ligands of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARgamma) inhibit the systemic allergic immune response. The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of PPARgamma-ligand treatment on the local allergic immune response. We established a murine model exhibiting clinical and histological features of AD-like skin lesions with high reproducibility. In this model, the PPARgamma ligand was applied in an either preventive or therapeutic manner via systemic and local routes. The affected skin areas were assessed by standardized skin score, histological analyses, and immunohistochemical examinations. Our data show that systemic application of PPARgamma ligand by a preventive protocol led to significantly reduced onset of eczematous skin lesions. This was confirmed by histology, showing decreased skin thickness accompanied by significantly reduced infiltrations of CD4+ and CD8+ lymphocytes but also mast cells. Additionally, early allergen-specific IgE and IgG1 responses were reduced (day 21/35), whereas IgG2a levels remained unchanged. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that PPARgamma-ligand treatment inhibits not only systemic allergic immune response, but also local allergen-mediated dermatitis. Our findings point to therapeutic strategies, including a PPARgamma-ligand-based treatment. PMID:18401424

  8. Tailoring the Immune Response via Customization of Pathogen Gene Expression.

    PubMed

    Runco, Lisa M; Stauft, Charles B; Coleman, J Robert

    2014-01-01

    The majority of studies focused on the construction and reengineering of bacterial pathogens have mainly relied on the knocking out of virulence factors or deletion/mutation of amino acid residues to then observe the microbe's phenotype and the resulting effect on the host immune response. These knockout bacterial strains have also been proposed as vaccines to combat bacterial disease. Theoretically, knockout strains would be unable to cause disease since their virulence factors have been removed, yet they could induce a protective memory response. While knockout strains have been valuable tools to discern the role of virulence factors in host immunity and bacterial pathogenesis, they have been unable to yield clinically relevant vaccines. The advent of synthetic biology and enhanced user-directed gene customization has altered this binary process of knockout, followed by observation. Recent studies have shown that a researcher can now tailor and customize a given microbe's gene expression to produce a desired immune response. In this commentary, we highlight these studies as a new avenue for controlling the inflammatory response as well as vaccine development. PMID:24719769

  9. CD28 Aptamers as Powerful Immune Response Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Pastor, Fernando; Soldevilla, Mario M; Villanueva, Helena; Kolonias, Despina; Inoges, Susana; de Cerio, Ascensión L; Kandzia, Romy; Klimyuk, Victor; Gleba, Yuri; Gilboa, Eli; Bendandi, Maurizio

    2013-01-01

    CD28 is one of the main costimulatory receptors responsible for the proper activation of T lymphocytes. We have isolated two aptamers that bind to the CD28 receptor. As a monomer, one of them interfered with the binding of CD28 to its ligand (B7), precluding the costimulatory signal, whereas the other one was inactive. However, dimerization of any of the anti-CD28 aptamers was sufficient to provide an artificial costimulatory signal. No antibody has featured a dual function (i.e., the ability to work as agonist and antagonist) to date. Two different agonistic structures were engineered for each anti-CD28 aptamer. One showed remarkably improved costimulatory properties, surpassing the agonistic effect of an anti-CD28 antibody. Moreover, we showed in vivo that the CD28 agonistic aptamer is capable of enhancing the cellular immune response against a lymphoma idiotype and of prolonging survival of mice which receive the aptamer together with an idiotype vaccine. The CD28 aptamers described in this work could be used to modulate the immune response either blocking the interaction with B7 or enhancing vaccine-induced immune responses in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:23756353

  10. Divergent responses of viral and bacterial communities in the gut microbiome to dietary disturbances in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Howe, Adina; Ringus, Daina L.; Williams, Ryan J.; Choo, Zi-Ning; Greenwald, Stephanie M.; Owens, Sarah M.; Coleman, Maureen L.; Meyer, Folker; Chang, Eugene B.

    2015-10-16

    To improve our understanding of the stability of mammalian intestinal communities, we characterized the responses of both bacterial and viral communities in murine fecal samples to dietary changes between high- and low-fat (LF) diets. Targeted DNA extraction methods for bacteria, virus-like particles and induced prophages were used to generate bacterial and viral metagenomes as well as 16S ribosomal RNA amplicons. Gut microbiome communities from two cohorts of C57BL/6 mice were characterized in a 6-week diet perturbation study in response to high fiber, LF and high-refined sugar, milkfat (MF) diets. The resulting metagenomes from induced bacterial prophages and extracellular viruses showed significant overlap, supporting a largely temperate viral lifestyle within these gut microbiomes. The resistance of baseline communities to dietary disturbances was evaluated, and we observed contrasting responses of baseline LF and MF bacterial and viral communities. In contrast to baseline LF viral communities and bacterial communities in both diet treatments, baseline MF viral communities were sensitive to dietary disturbances as reflected in their non-recovery during the washout period. The contrasting responses of bacterial and viral communities suggest that these communities can respond to perturbations independently of each other and highlight the potentially unique role of viruses in gut health.

  11. Divergent responses of viral and bacterial communities in the gut microbiome to dietary disturbances in mice

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Adina; Ringus, Daina L; Williams, Ryan J; Choo, Zi-Ning; Greenwald, Stephanie M; Owens, Sarah M; Coleman, Maureen L; Meyer, Folker; Chang, Eugene B

    2016-01-01

    To improve our understanding of the stability of mammalian intestinal communities, we characterized the responses of both bacterial and viral communities in murine fecal samples to dietary changes between high- and low-fat (LF) diets. Targeted DNA extraction methods for bacteria, virus-like particles and induced prophages were used to generate bacterial and viral metagenomes as well as 16S ribosomal RNA amplicons. Gut microbiome communities from two cohorts of C57BL/6 mice were characterized in a 6-week diet perturbation study in response to high fiber, LF and high-refined sugar, milkfat (MF) diets. The resulting metagenomes from induced bacterial prophages and extracellular viruses showed significant overlap, supporting a largely temperate viral lifestyle within these gut microbiomes. The resistance of baseline communities to dietary disturbances was evaluated, and we observed contrasting responses of baseline LF and MF bacterial and viral communities. In contrast to baseline LF viral communities and bacterial communities in both diet treatments, baseline MF viral communities were sensitive to dietary disturbances as reflected in their non-recovery during the washout period. The contrasting responses of bacterial and viral communities suggest that these communities can respond to perturbations independently of each other and highlight the potentially unique role of viruses in gut health. PMID:26473721

  12. Community and species-level responses of phyllostomid bats to a disturbance gradient in the tropical Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montaño-Centellas, Flavia; Moya, M. Isabel; Aguirre, Luis F.; Galeón, Raquel; Palabral, Oswaldo; Hurtado, Rosember; Galarza, Isabel; Tordoya, Julieta

    2015-01-01

    Understanding animal responses to habitat change and habitat loss is central to the development of conservation and management strategies. Behavioral responses could allow for early detection of animal responses even to small scale disturbances, becoming of increasing importance for conservation. Here, we explore the effects of a low to moderate disturbance gradient on a phyllostomid bat assemblage in a tropical Andean forest of Bolivia, focusing on both community-level (changes in species richness and composition) and species-level (temporal and spatial activity patterns) responses. Although few differences were found in bat assemblages along the disturbance gradient, strong changes in behavioral patterns were noted; activity patterns varied spatially and temporarily. Spatially, some species increased their activity in more disturbed areas whereas others concentrated their activity towards more forested areas. Temporally, niche overlap among frugivores varied along the disturbance gradient: higher temporal niche overlap occurred in disturbed areas whereas a more segregated temporal pattern was observed in forest habitats. Nectarivores did not change their temporal niche patterns, but they segregated their activities in space. Altogether, our results suggest that comparisons based only on community-level responses might be misleading, failing to detect effects of habitat conversion when organisms are actually responding to disturbances.

  13. Anti-tumor immune response after photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mroz, Pawel; Castano, Ana P.; Wu, Mei X.; Kung, Andrew L.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2009-06-01

    Anti-tumor immunity is stimulated after PDT due a number of factors including: the acute inflammatory response caused by PDT, release of antigens from PDT-damaged tumor cells, priming of the adaptive immune system to recognize tumor-associated antigens (TAA), and induction of heat-shock proteins. The induction of specific CD8+ T-lymphocyte cells that recognize major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) restricted epitopes of TAAs is a highly desirable goal in cancer therapy as it would allow the treatment of tumors that may have already metastasized. The PDT killed tumor cells may be phagocytosed by dendritic cells (DC) that then migrate to draining lymph nodes and prime naÃve T-cells that recognize TAA epitopes. We have carried out in vivo PDT with a BPD-mediated vascular regimen using a pair of BALB/c mouse colon carcinomas: CT26 wild type expressing the naturally occurring retroviral antigen gp70 and CT26.CL25 additionally expressing beta-galactosidase (b-gal) as a model tumor rejection antigen. PDT of CT26.CL25 cured 100% of tumors but none of the CT26WT tumors (all recurred). Cured CT26.CL25 mice were resistant to rechallenge. Moreover mice with two bilateral CT26.CL25 tumors that had only one treated with PDT demonstrated spontaneous regression of 70% of untreated contralateral tumors. T-lymphocytes were isolated from lymph nodes of PDT cured mice that recognized a particular peptide specific to b-gal antigen. T-lymphocytes from LN were able to kill CT26.CL25 target cells in vitro but not CT26WT cells as shown by a chromium release assay. CT26.CL25 tumors treated with PDT and removed five days later had higher levels of Th1 cytokines than CT26 WT tumors showing a higher level of immune response. When mice bearing CT26WT tumors were treated with a regimen of low dose cyclophosphamide (CY) 2 days before, PDT led to 100% of cures (versus 0% without CY) and resistance to rechallenge. Low dose CY is thought to deplete regulatory T-cells (Treg, CD4+CD25+foxp

  14. Interplay between thermal and immune ecology: effect of environmental temperature on insect immune response and energetic costs after an immune challenge.

    PubMed

    Catalán, Tamara P; Wozniak, Aniela; Niemeyer, Hermann M; Kalergis, Alexis M; Bozinovic, Francisco

    2012-03-01

    Although the study of thermoregulation in insects has shown that infected animals tend to prefer higher temperatures than healthy individuals, the immune response and energetic consequences of this preference remain unknown. We examined the effect of environmental temperature and the energetic costs associated to the activation of the immune response of Tenebrio molitor larvae following a lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge. We measured the effect of temperature on immune parameters including phenoloxidase (PO) activity and antibacterial responses. Further as proximal and distal costs of the immune response we determined the standard metabolic rate (SMR) and the loss of body mass (m(b)), respectively. Immune response was stronger at 30°C than was at 10 or 20°C. While SMR at 10 and 20°C did not differ between immune treatments, at 30°C SMR of LPS-treated larvae was almost 25-60% higher than SMR of PBS-treated and naïve larvae. In addition, the loss in m(b) was 1.9 and 4.2 times higher in LPS-treated larvae than in PBS-treated and naïve controls. The immune responses exhibited a positive correlation with temperature and both, SMR and m(b) change, were sensitive to environmental temperature. These data suggest a significant effect of environmental temperature on the immune response and on the energetic costs of immunity. PMID:22019347

  15. Immune responses in humans after 60 days of confinement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, D. A.; Peres, C.; Sonnenfeld, G.; Tkackzuk, J.; Arquier, M.; Mauco, G.; Ohayon, E.

    1995-01-01

    A confinement experiment in a normobaric diving chamber was undertaken to better understand the effect of confinement and isolation on human psychology and physiology. Pre- and postconfinement blood samples were obtained from four test subjects and control donors to analyze immune responses. No modification in the levels of CD2+, CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD19+, and CD56+ cells was observed after confinement. Mitogen-induced T-lymphocyte proliferation and interleukin-2 receptor expression were not altered significantly. Whole blood interferon-alpha and gamma-induction and plasma cortisol levels were also unchanged, as was natural killer cell activity. These data suggest that in humans, no specific components of the immune response are affected by a 2-month isolation and confinement of a small group.

  16. Responsive immunization and intervention for infectious diseases in social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qingchu; Zhang, Haifeng; Zeng, Guanghong

    2014-06-01

    By using the microscopic Markov-chain approximation approach, we investigate the epidemic spreading and the responsive immunization in social networks. It is assumed that individual vaccination behavior depends on the local information of an epidemic. Our results suggest that the responsive immunization has negligible impact on the epidemic threshold and the critical value of initial epidemic outbreak, but it can effectively inhibit the outbreak of epidemic. We also analyze the influence of the intervention on the disease dynamics, where the vaccination is available only to those individuals whose number of neighbors is greater than a certain value. Simulation analysis implies that the intervention strategy can effectively reduce the vaccine use under the epidemic control.

  17. Curcumin prevents human dendritic cell response to immune stimulants

    SciTech Connect

    Shirley, Shawna A.; Montpetit, Alison J.; Lockey, R.F.; Mohapatra, Shyam S.

    2008-09-26

    Curcumin, a compound found in the Indian spice turmeric, has anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties, though the mechanism remains unclear. Dendritic cells (DCs) are important to generating an immune response and the effect of curcumin on human DCs has not been explored. The role curcumin in the DC response to bacterial and viral infection was investigated in vitro using LPS and Poly I:C as models of infection. CD14{sup +} monocytes, isolated from human peripheral blood, were cultured in GM-CSF- and IL-4-supplemented medium to generate immature DCs. Cultures were incubated with curcumin, stimulated with LPS or Poly I:C and functional assays were performed. Curcumin prevents DCs from responding to immunostimulants and inducing CD4{sup +} T cell proliferation by blocking maturation marker, cytokine and chemokine expression and reducing both migration and endocytosis. These data suggest a therapeutic role for curcumin as an immune suppressant.

  18. Viral dynamics model with CTL immune response incorporating antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Zhou, Yicang; Brauer, Fred; Heffernan, Jane M

    2013-10-01

    We present two HIV models that include the CTL immune response, antiretroviral therapy and a full logistic growth term for uninfected CD4+ T-cells. The difference between the two models lies in the inclusion or omission of a loss term in the free virus equation. We obtain critical conditions for the existence of one, two or three steady states, and analyze the stability of these steady states. Through numerical simulation we find substantial differences in the reproduction numbers and the behaviour at the infected steady state between the two models, for certain parameter sets. We explore the effect of varying the combination drug efficacy on model behaviour, and the possibility of reconstituting the CTL immune response through antiretroviral therapy. Furthermore, we employ Latin hypercube sampling to investigate the existence of multiple infected equilibria. PMID:22930342

  19. Antiviral immune responses in CTLA4 transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, C; Seiler, P; Lane, P; Zinkernagel, R M

    1997-01-01

    The role of B7 binding CD28 in the regulation of T- and B-cell responses against viral antigens was assessed in transgenic mice expressing soluble CTLA4-Hgamma1 (CTLA4-Ig tg mice) that blocks B7-CD28 interactions. The results indicate that transgenic soluble CTLA4 does not significantly alter cytotoxic T-cell responses against replicating lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) or vaccinia virus but drastically impairs the induction of cytotoxic T-cell responses against abortively replicating vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). While the T-independent neutralizing immunoglobulin M (IgM) responses were within normal ranges, the switch to IgG was reduced 4- to 16-fold after immunization with abortively replicating VSV and more than 30-fold after immunization with an inert VSV glycoprotein antigen in transgenic mice. IgG antibody responses to LCMV, as detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and by neutralizing action, were reduced about 3- to 20-fold and more than 50-fold, respectively. These results suggest that responses in CTLA4-Ig tg mice are mounted according to their independence of T help. While immune responses to nonreplicating or poorly replicating antigens are in general most dependent on T help and B7-CD28 interactions, they are most impaired in CTLA4-Ig tg mice. The results of the present experiments also indicate that highly replicating viruses, because of greater quantities of available antigens and by inducing as-yet-undefined factors and/or cell surface changes, are capable of compensating for the decrease in T help caused by the blocking effects of soluble CTLA4. PMID:9032309

  20. Immune response to racotumomab in a child with relapsed neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Sampor, C; Guthmann, M D; Scursoni, A; Cacciavillano, W; Torbidoni, A; Galluzzo, L; Camarero, S; Lopez, J; de Dávila, M T G; Fainboim, L; Chantada, G L

    2012-01-01

    Immunotherapy targeting ganglioside antigens is a powerful tool for the treatment of high risk neuroblastoma. However, only treatment with anti-GD2 antibodies has been used in clinical practice and other options may be pursued. We report the use of racotumomab, an anti-idiotype vaccine against N-glycolyl neuraminic acid (NeuGc)- containing gangliosides, eliciting an immune response in a child with relapsed neuroblastoma expressing the NeuGcGM3 ganglioside.

  1. Immune response to Streptococcus pyogenes and the susceptibility to psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Muto, M; Fujikura, Y; Hamamoto, Y; Ichimiya, M; Ohmura, A; Sasazuki, T; Fukumoto, T; Asagami, C

    1996-05-01

    Monoclonal antibodies directed against type 12 Group A streptococcal cell wall antigens cross-react with nuclei and cytoplasm of cells from skin and synovium from controls, uninvolved skin of psoriatics and psoriatic plaques. Patients with psoriasis had high serum titres of antibody against the M12 (C-region) streptococcal antigen compared to controls. An abnormal immune response directed against a "self' antigen after initiation by Group A streptococcal infection may play an important role in the exacerbation or development of psoriasis.

  2. Dysregulation of the humoral immune response in old mice.

    PubMed

    Zhao, K S; Wang, Y F; Guéret, R; Weksler, M E

    1995-06-01

    The increase in autoantibodies with age of both experimental animals and humans has been thought to reflect a shift in the antibody repertoire from foreign to self antigens. In mice, before immunization, the age-associated increase in antibodies reactive with a prototypic autoantigen, bromelain-treated autologous erythrocytes (BrMRBC), reflected a 3-fold increase in serum IgM and the number of IgM-secreting spleen cells in old compared with young mice. However, the percentage of the IgM-secreting spleen cell repertoire reactive with BrMRBC in old mice was actually approximately 50% that in young mice. In contrast, after immunization with sheep erythrocytes (SRBC), old mice showed a 5-fold increase in the percentage of IgM-secreting cells reactive with BrMRBC while young mice showed no significant increase. The converse is true for the percentage of IgM-secreting spleen cells in old mice specific for SBRC, which is 10% the number generated by young mice. The increased autoantibody response of old mice is not, however, linked to their poor response to the nominal antigen. Thus, immunization with phosphorylcholine (PC) conjugated keyhole limpet hemocyanin, an antigen that induces a comparable anti-PC response in old and young mice, also induced more autoantibody forming cells in old than young mice. The increased autoantibody response of old mice after immunization can be accounted for by both an increased number of Ig-secreting spleen cells as well as an increased percentage of the expressed repertoire of IgM-secreting spleen cells that react with autoantigens.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. The Immune Response to Papillomavirus During Infection Persistence and Regression

    PubMed Central

    Hibma, Merilyn H

    2012-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections cause a significant global health burden, predominantly due to HPV-associated cancers. HPV infects only the epidermal cells of cutaneous and mucosal skin, without penetration into the dermal tissues. Infections may persist for months or years, contributed by an array of viral immune evasion mechanisms. However in the majority of cases immunity-based regression of HPV lesions does eventually occur. The role of the innate immune response to HPV in persistence and regression of HPV infection is not well understood. Although an initial inflammatory infiltrate may contribute to disease regression, sustained inflammation at the HPV-induced lesions, characterized by macrophage and neutrophil infiltration, has been observed in persistence. Pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) are important in innate recognition. The double stranded DNA and an L1 and L2 capsid components of the HPV virion are potential PAMPs that can trigger signaling through cellular pattern recognition receptors, including toll-like receptors (TLR). TLR expression is increased in regressing HPV disease but is reduced in persistent lesions, suggesting a role for TLR in HPV regression. With regard to the adaptive immune response, a key indicator of regression in humans is infiltration of the lesion with both CD4 and CD8 T cells. In individuals with persistent lesions, CD8 T cell and immune suppressive regulatory T cells (Tregs) infiltrate the infection site. There is no association between persistence or regression and the presence of serum antibodies to the viral capsid antigens of HPV. There is still much to be learned about the immunological events that trigger regression of HPV disease. Understanding the viral and host factors that influence persistence and regression is important for the development of better immunotherapeutic treatments for HPV-associated disease. PMID:23341859

  4. Immune response to firefly luciferase as a naked DNA.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Yong Hyun; Choi, Yun; Kang, Joo Hyun; Kim, Chul Woo; Jeong, Jae Min; Lee, Dong Soo; Chung, June-Key

    2007-05-01

    Firefly luciferase (Fluc) has been widely used as a reporter gene. The aim of this study was to investigate immune response to luciferase protein after an intradermal injection of pcDNA3.1-Fluc in immunocompetent BALB/c mice. We observed bioluminescence at injection sites from one to seven days post-injection when pcDNA3.1-Fluc was intradermally injected into ear-pinnae. To observe induced immune response, the percentages of CD8+IFNgamma+ cells in the draining lymphoid cells of immunocompetent BALB/c mice immunized by pcDNA3.1-Fluc were measured. And the tumor growths of CT26/Fluc in pcDNA3.1-Fluc group were monitored by observing bioluminescent signals and measuring tumor mass, and these were compared with those of the pcDNA3.1 group in immunocompetent BALB/c mice and immunodeficient Nu/Nu mice. In the immunocompetent BALB/c mice, percentages of CD8+IFNgamma+ cells in the pcDNA3.1-Fluc group were higher than those in the pcDNA3.1 group. Ten days after tumor inoculation, tumor growth inhibition was found in the pcDNA3.1-Fluc group, but not in the pcDNA3.1 group in the immunocompetent BALB/c mice. No significant difference in tumor growth inhibition was observed when CT26/Fluc was injected into immunodeficient Nu/Nu mice. In terms of cytokine profiles of draining lymphoid cells of immunized mice, IFNgamma protein levels in the pcDNA3.1-Fluc group were higher than in pcDNA3.1 group animals among the immunocompetent BALB/c mice. In conclusion, Fluc induced a Th1 immune response to Fluc protein delivered by injecting pcDNA3.1-Fluc into immunocompetent BALB/c mice. We suggest that immune response to the Fluc gene is cautionary in preclinical or clinical trials involving the Fluc gene, and that the immunologic potential of firefly luciferase as a naked DNA may be useful in cancer immunotherapy.

  5. Immune Responses to Pertussis Antigens in Infants and Toddlers after Immunization with Multicomponent Acellular Pertussis Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Chen, Qingxia

    2014-01-01

    Given the resurgence of pertussis despite high rates of vaccination with the diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis (DTaP) vaccine, a better understanding of vaccine-induced immune responses to Bordetella pertussis is needed. We investigated the antibody, cell-mediated, and cytokine responses to B. pertussis antigens in children who received the primary vaccination series (at 2, 4, and 6 months) and first booster vaccination (at 15 to 18 months) with 5-component acellular pertussis (aP) vaccine. The majority of subjects demonstrated a 4-fold increase in antibody titer to all four pertussis antigens (pertussis toxin [PT], pertactin [PRN], filamentous hemagglutinin [FHA], and fimbriae [FIM]) following the primary series and booster vaccination. Following the primary vaccine series, the majority of subjects (52 to 67%) mounted a positive T cell proliferative response (stimulation index of ≥3) to the PT and PRN antigens, while few subjects (7 to 12%) mounted positive proliferative responses to FHA and FIM. One month after booster vaccination (age 16 to 19 months), our study revealed significant increase in gamma interferon (IFN-γ) production in response to the PT and FIM antigens, a significant increase in IL-2 production with the PT, FHA, and PRN antigens, and a lack of significant interleukin-4 (IL-4) secretion with any of the antigens. While previous reports documented a mixed Th1/Th2 or Th2-skewed response to DTaP vaccine in children, our data suggest that following the first DTaP booster, children aged 16 to 19 months have a cytokine profile consistent with a Th1 response, which is known to be essential for clearance of pertussis infection. To better define aP-induced immune responses following the booster vaccine, further studies are needed to assess cytokine responses pre- and postbooster in DTaP recipients. PMID:25253666

  6. DAP12 Inhibits Pulmonary Immune Responses to Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Heung, Lena J; Hohl, Tobias M

    2016-06-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that is inhaled into the lungs and can lead to life-threatening meningoencephalitis in immunocompromised patients. Currently, the molecular mechanisms that regulate the mammalian immune response to respiratory cryptococcal challenge remain poorly defined. DAP12, a signaling adapter for multiple pattern recognition receptors in myeloid and natural killer (NK) cells, has been shown to play both activating and inhibitory roles during lung infections by different bacteria and fungi. In this study, we demonstrate that DAP12 plays an important inhibitory role in the immune response to C. neoformans Infectious outcomes in DAP12(-/-) mice, including survival and lung fungal burden, are significantly improved compared to those in C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) mice. We find that eosinophils and macrophages are decreased while NK cells are increased in the lungs of infected DAP12(-/-) mice. In contrast to WT NK cells, DAP12(-/-) NK cells are able to repress C. neoformans growth in vitro Additionally, DAP12(-/-) macrophages are more highly activated than WT macrophages, with increased production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and CCL5/RANTES and more efficient uptake and killing of C. neoformans These findings suggest that DAP12 acts as a brake on the pulmonary immune response to C. neoformans by promoting pulmonary eosinophilia and by inhibiting the activation and antifungal activities of effector cells, including NK cells and macrophages. PMID:27068093

  7. Immune surveillance and response to JC virus infection and PML

    PubMed Central

    Beltrami, Sarah; Gordon, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitous human polyomavirus JC virus (JCV) is the established etiological agent of the debilitating and often fatal demyelinating disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Most healthy individuals have been infected with JCV and generate an immune response to the virus, yet remain persistently infected at subclinical levels. The onset of PML is rare in the general population, but has become an increasing concern in immunocompromised patients, where reactivation of JCV leads to uncontrolled replication in the CNS. Understanding viral persistence and the normal immune response to JCV provides insight into the circumstances which could lead to viral resurgence. Further, clues on the potential mechanisms of reactivation may be gleaned from the crosstalk among JCV and HIV-1, as well as the impact of monoclonal antibody therapies used for the treatment of autoimmune disorders, including multiple sclerosis, on the development of PML. In this review, we will discuss what is known about viral persistence and the immune response to JCV replication in immunocompromised individuals to elucidate the deficiencies in viral containment that permit viral reactivation and spread. PMID:24297501

  8. Hantaan virus triggers TLR4-dependent innate immune responses.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hai-Tao; Jiang, Hong; Zhang, Ye; Nan, Xue-Ping; Li, Yu; Wang, Wei; Jiang, Wei; Yang, Dong-Qiang; Su, Wen-Jing; Wang, Jiu-Ping; Wang, Ping-Zhong; Bai, Xue-Fan

    2012-10-01

    The innate immune response induced by Hantavirus is responsible for endothelial cell dysfunction and viral pathogenicity. Recent studies demonstrate that TLR4 expression is upregulated and mediates the secretion of several cytokines in Hantaan virus (HTNV)-infected endothelial cells. To examine viral interactions with host endothelial cells and characterize the innate antiviral responses associated with Toll-like receptors, we selected TLR4 as the target molecule to investigate anti-hantavirus immunity. TLR4 mRNA-silenced EVC-304 (EVC-304 TLR4-) cells and EVC-304 cells were used to investigate signaling molecules downstream of TLR4. The expression of the adaptor protein TRIF was higher in HTNV-infected EVC-304 cells than in EVC-304 TLR4- cells. However, there was no apparent difference in the expression of MyD88 in either cell line. The transcription factors for NF-κB and IRF-3 were translocated from the cytoplasm into the nucleus in HTNV-infected EVC-304 cells, but not in HTNV-infected EVC-304 TLR4- cells. Our results demonstrate that TLR4 may play an important role in the antiviral immunity of the host against HTNV infection through an MyD88-independent signaling pathway.

  9. Mice Lacking Endoglin in Macrophages Show an Impaired Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Ojeda-Fernández, Luisa; Recio-Poveda, Lucía; Aristorena, Mikel; Lastres, Pedro; Blanco, Francisco J.; Sanz-Rodríguez, Francisco; Gallardo-Vara, Eunate; de las Casas-Engel, Mateo; Corbí, Ángel; Arthur, Helen M.; Bernabeu, Carmelo; Botella, Luisa M.

    2016-01-01

    Endoglin is an auxiliary receptor for members of the TGF-β superfamily and plays an important role in the homeostasis of the vessel wall. Mutations in endoglin gene (ENG) or in the closely related TGF-β receptor type I ACVRL1/ALK1 are responsible for a rare dominant vascular dysplasia, the Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT), or Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome. Endoglin is also expressed in human macrophages, but its role in macrophage function remains unknown. In this work, we show that endoglin expression is triggered during the monocyte-macrophage differentiation process, both in vitro and during the in vivo differentiation of blood monocytes recruited to foci of inflammation in wild-type C57BL/6 mice. To analyze the role of endoglin in macrophages in vivo, an endoglin myeloid lineage specific knock-out mouse line (Engfl/flLysMCre) was generated. These mice show a predisposition to develop spontaneous infections by opportunistic bacteria. Engfl/flLysMCre mice also display increased survival following LPS-induced peritonitis, suggesting a delayed immune response. Phagocytic activity is impaired in peritoneal macrophages, altering one of the main functions of macrophages which contributes to the initiation of the immune response. We also observed altered expression of TGF-β1 target genes in endoglin deficient peritoneal macrophages. Overall, the altered immune activity of endoglin deficient macrophages could help to explain the higher rate of infectious diseases seen in HHT1 patients. PMID:27010826

  10. Evaluation of the Adaptive Immune Response to Respiratory Syncytial Virus.

    PubMed

    Knudson, Cory J; Weiss, Kayla A; Stoley, Megan E; Varga, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Evaluation of the adaptive immune response is critical to the advancement of our basic knowledge and understanding of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). The cellular composition in the lung following RSV infection is often evaluated using flow cytometry. However, a limitation of this approach has been the inability to readily distinguish cells that are within the lung parenchyma from cells that remain in the pulmonary blood vessels. Herein, we detail a procedure to evaluate the adaptive immune response via flow cytometric analysis that incorporates an in vivo intravascular staining technique. This technique allows for discrimination of immune cells in the lung tissue from cells that remain in the pulmonary vasculature following perfusion. Therefore at any given time point following an RSV infection, the leukocytic populations in the lung parenchyma can be quantified and phenotypically assessed with high resolution. While we focus on the T lymphocyte response in the lung, this technique can be readily adapted to examine various leukocytic cell types in the lung following RSV infection. PMID:27464699

  11. Evolutionary immune response to conserved domains in parasites and aeroallergens.

    PubMed

    Bielory, Brett Phillip; Mainardi, Timothy; Rottem, Menachem

    2013-01-01

    The immune response based on immunoglobulin E (IgE) evolved as a defense against specific parasitic infections. In the absence of active helminthic infections, the immune system has redirected its IgE epitopes toward innocuous environmental antigens. Helminths and aeroallergens have a similar stereotypical IgE response to unique antigens that can not be explained by chance alone. This study was designed to evaluate potential homology between conserved protein domains embedded in parasitic organisms and aeroallergens. Search and retrieval systems for nucleotide and protein sequences (Entrez, BLAST, and National Center for Biotechnology Information) were searched to identify conserved domains between allergens and certain parasites. A total score was developed that correlated positively with homology between compared sequences. Over 2000 domains were examined. We found matches with a high total score (>100) that signified a strong positive correlation between sequences in allergens (n = 30) and parasites (n = 13). Multiple shared conserved domains were identified between parasites and allergens. Parasite-allergen combinations with the most significant homology (greatest total score) were Plasmodium falciparum enolase and Hev b9 (total score, 612), Schistosoma mansoni albumin and Fel d 2 (total score, 991), Ascaris lumbricoides tropomyosin and Ani s3 (total score, 531), and Wuchereria bancrofti trypsin and Blo t3 (138). Homologous conserved domains exist in specific parasites and allergens, consistent with the theory that the human IgE-eosinophil immune response to common allergens is a direct consequence of stimulation by parasitic organisms. PMID:23406942

  12. Hemocyanins and the immune response: defense against the dark arts.

    PubMed

    Terwilliger, Nora B

    2007-10-01

    The innate immune response is a conserved trait shared by invertebrates and vertebrates. In crustaceans, circulating hemocytes play significant roles in the immune response, including the release of prophenoloxidases. Activated phenoloxidase (tyrosinase) participates in encapsulation and melanization of foreign organisms as well as sclerotization of the new exoskeleton after wound-repair or molting. Hemocyanin functions as a phenoloxidase under certain conditions and thus also participates in the immune response and molting. The relative contributions of hemocyte phenoloxidase and hemocyanin in the physiological ratio at which they occur in hemolymph have been investigated in the crab Cancer magister. Differences in activity, substrate affinity, and catalytic ability between the two enzymes indicate that hemocytes are the predominant source of phenoloxidase activity in crabs. In contrast, hemocyanin is the primary source of phenoloxidase activity in isopods and chelicerates whose hemocytes show no phenoloxidase activity. Quantitative PCR studies on the distribution of prophenoloxidase mRNA in the tissues of Carcinus maenas showed little effect relative to salinity stress. Phylogenetic analysis of hemocyanin, phenoloxidase, and other members of this arthropod gene family are consistent with the possibility that a common ancestral molecule had both phenoloxidase and oxygen-binding capabilities.

  13. A systematic review of humoral immune responses against tumor antigens.

    PubMed

    Reuschenbach, Miriam; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus; Wentzensen, Nicolas

    2009-10-01

    This review summarizes studies on humoral immune responses against tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) with a focus on antibody frequencies and the potential diagnostic, prognostic, and etiologic relevance of antibodies against TAAs. We performed a systematic literature search in Medline and identified 3,619 articles on humoral immune responses and TAAs. In 145 studies, meeting the inclusion criteria, humoral immune responses in cancer patients have been analyzed against over 100 different TAAs. The most frequently analyzed antigens were p53, MUC1, NY-ESO-1, c-myc, survivin, p62, cyclin B1, and Her2/neu. Antibodies against these TAAs were detected in 0-69% (median 14%) of analyzed tumor patients. Antibody frequencies were generally very low in healthy individuals, with the exception of few TAAs, especially MUC1. For several TAAs, including p53, Her2/neu, and NY-ESO-1, higher antibody frequencies were reported when tumors expressed the respective TAA. Antibodies against MUC1 were associated with a favorable prognosis while antibodies against p53 were associated with poor disease outcome. These data suggest different functional roles of endogenous antibodies against TAAs. Although data on prediagnostic antibody levels are scarce and antibody frequencies for most TAAs are at levels precluding use in diagnostic assays for cancer early detection, there is some promising data on achieving higher sensitivity for cancer detection using panels of TAAs.

  14. A systematic review of humoral immune responses against tumor antigens

    PubMed Central

    Reuschenbach, Miriam; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus; Wentzensen, Nicolas

    2009-01-01

    This review summarizes studies on humoral immune responses against tumor associated antigens (TAA) with a focus on antibody frequencies and the potential diagnostic, prognostic, and etiologic relevance of antibodies against TAAs. We performed a systematic literature search in Medline and identified 3619 articles on humoral immune responses and TAAs. In 145 studies meeting the inclusion criteria, humoral immune responses in cancer patients have been analyzed against over 100 different TAAs. The most frequently analyzed antigens were p53, MUC1, NY-ESO-1, c-myc, survivin, p62, cyclin B1 and Her2/neu. Antibodies against these TAAs were detected in 0 to 69% (median 14%) of analyzed tumor patients. Antibody frequencies were generally very low in healthy individuals, with the exception of few TAAs, especially MUC1. For several TAAs, including p53, Her2/neu, and NY-ESO-1, higher antibody frequencies were reported when tumors expressed the respective TAA. Antibodies against MUC1 were associated with a favorable prognosis while antibodies against p53 were associated with poor disease outcome. These data suggest different functional roles of endogenous antibodies against TAAs. Although data on prediagnostic antibody levels is scarce and antibody frequencies for most TAAs are at levels precluding use in diagnostic assays for cancer early detection, there is some promising data on achieving higher sensitivity for cancer detection using panels of TAAs. PMID:19562338

  15. Assessing humoral and cell-mediated immune response in Hawaiian green turtles, Chelonia mydas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Work, T.M.; Balazs, G.H.; Rameyer, R.A.; Chang, S.P.; Berestecky, J.

    2000-01-01

    Seven immature green turtles, Chelonia mydas, captured from Kaneohe Bay on the island of Oahu were used to evaluate methods for assessing their immune response. Two turtles each were immunized intramuscularly with egg white lysozyme (EWL) in Freunda??s complete adjuvant, Gerbu, or ISA-70; a seventh turtle was immunized with saline only and served as a control. Humoral immune response was measured with an indirect enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Cell-mediated immune response was measured using in vitro cell proliferation assays (CPA) using whole blood or peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBM) cultured with concanavalin A (ConA), phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), or soluble egg EWL antigen. All turtles, except for one immunized with Gerbu and the control, produced a detectable humoral immune response by 6 weeks which persisted for at least 14 weeks after a single immunization. All turtles produced an anamnestic humoral immune response after secondary immunization. Antigen specific cell-mediated immune response in PBM was seen in all turtles either after primary or secondary immunization, but it was not as consistent as humoral immune response; antigen specific cell-mediated immune response in whole blood was rarely seen. Mononuclear cells had significantly higher stimulation indices than whole blood regardless of adjuvant, however, results with whole blood had lower variability. Both Gerbu and ISA-70 appeared to potentiate the cell-mediated immune response when PBM or whole blood were cultured with PHA. This is the first time cell proliferation assays have been compared between whole blood and PBM for reptiles. This is also the first demonstration of antigen specific cell-mediated response in reptiles. Cell proliferation assays allowed us to evaluate the cell-mediated immune response of green turtles. However, CPA may be less reliable than ELISA for detecting antigen specific immune response. Either of the three adjuvants appears suitable to safely elicit a

  16. Host Control of Insect Endogenous Retroviruses: Small RNA Silencing and Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Fablet, Marie

    2014-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses are relics of ancient infections from retroviruses that managed to integrate into the genome of germline cells and remained vertically transmitted from parent to progeny. Subsequent to the endogenization process, these sequences can move and multiply in the host genome, which can have deleterious consequences and disturb genomic stability. Natural selection favored the establishment of silencing pathways that protect host genomes from the activity of endogenous retroviruses. RNA silencing mechanisms are involved, which utilize piRNAs. The response to exogenous viral infections uses siRNAs, a class of small RNAs that are generated via a distinct biogenesis pathway from piRNAs. However, interplay between both pathways has been identified, and interactions with anti-bacterial and anti-fungal immune responses are also suspected. This review focuses on Diptera (Arthropods) and intends to compile pieces of evidence showing that the RNA silencing pathway of endogenous retrovirus regulation is not independent from immunity and the response to infections. This review will consider the mechanisms that allow the lasting coexistence of viral sequences and host genomes from an evolutionary perspective. PMID:25412365

  17. Effects of land cover changes induced by large physical disturbances on hydrological responses in Central Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Hong, Nien Ming; Chu, Hone-Jay; Lin, Yu-Pin; Deng, Dung-Po

    2010-07-01

    This study analyzes the significant impacts of typhoons and earthquakes on land cover change and hydrological response. The occurrence of landslides following typhoons and earthquakes is a major indicator of natural disturbance. The hydrological response of the Chenyulan watershed to land use change was assessed from 1996 to 2005. Land use changes revealed by seven remote images corresponded to typhoons and a catastrophic earthquake in central Taiwan. Hydrological response is discussed as the change in quantities and statistical distributions of hydrological components. The land cover change results indicate that the proportion of landslide relative to total area increased to 6.1% after the Chi-Chi earthquake, representing the largest increase during the study period. The study watershed is dominated by forest land cover. Comparisons of hydrological components reveal that the disturbance significantly affects base flow and direct runoff. The hydrological modeling results demonstrate that the change in forest area correlates with the variation of base flow and direct runoff. Base flow and direct runoff are sensitive to land use in discussions of distinction. The proposed approach quantifies the effect of typhoons and earthquakes on land cover changes.

  18. Learned helplessness: effects of noncontingent reinforcement and response cost with emotionally disturbed children.

    PubMed

    Saylor, C F; Finch, A J; Cassel, S C; Saylor, C B; Penberthy, A R

    1984-07-01

    In order to investigate the effectiveness of noncontingent reinforcement and response cost in inducing learned helplessness and to determine whether depressed Ss respond differently than nondepressed Ss, 28 emotionally disturbed children (20 boys, 8 girls) were tested in a modified learned helplessness paradigm. Children's Depression Inventory score and diagnosis were each used to distinguish "depressed" and "nondepressed" children. Half of the depressed group and half of the nondepressed group received noncontingent response cost, the other half of the two groups received noncontingent positive reinforcement. Results indicated that both noncontingent response cost and noncontingent reinforcement led to reduced persistence time relative to persistence under conditions of contingent reinforcement. There was only one significant difference between depressed and nondepressed Ss (differential persistence time over trials) and there were no significant interactions. Results were discussed in terms of Seligman's formulation of learned helplessness and the extension of this model to a clinical child population.

  19. New concepts in immunity to Neisseria gonorrhoeae: innate responses and suppression of adaptive immunity favor the pathogen, not the host.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingru; Feinen, Brandon; Russell, Michael W

    2011-01-01

    It is well-known that gonorrhea can be acquired repeatedly with no apparent development of protective immunity arising from previous episodes of infection. Symptomatic infection is characterized by a purulent exudate, but the host response mechanisms are poorly understood. While the remarkable antigenic variability displayed by Neisseria gonorrhoeae and its capacity to inhibit complement activation allow it to evade destruction by the host's immune defenses, we propose that it also has the capacity to avoid inducing specific immune responses. In a mouse model of vaginal gonococcal infection, N. gonorrhoeae elicits Th17-driven inflammatory-immune responses, which recruit innate defense mechanisms including an influx of neutrophils. Concomitantly, N. gonorrhoeae suppresses Th1- and Th2-dependent adaptive immunity, including specific antibody responses, through a mechanism involving TGF-β and regulatory T cells. Blockade of TGF-β alleviates the suppression of specific anti-gonococcal responses and allows Th1 and Th2 responses to emerge with the generation of immune memory and protective immunity. Genital tract tissues are naturally rich in TGF-β, which fosters an immunosuppressive environment that is important in reproduction. In exploiting this niche, N. gonorrhoeae exemplifies a well-adapted pathogen that proactively elicits from its host innate responses that it can survive and concomitantly suppresses adaptive immunity. Comprehension of these mechanisms of gonococcal pathogenesis should allow the development of novel approaches to therapy and facilitate the development of an effective vaccine. PMID:21833308

  20. MUC1-specific immune responses in human MUC1 transgenic mice immunized with various human MUC1 vaccines.

    PubMed

    Acres, B; Apostolopoulos, V; Balloul, J M; Wreschner, D; Xing, P X; Ali-Hadji, D; Bizouarne, N; Kieny, M P; McKenzie, I F

    2000-01-01

    Analyses of MUC1-specific cytotoxic T cell precursor (CTLp) frequencies were performed in mice immunized with three different MUC1 vaccine immunotherapeutic agents. Mice were immunized with either a fusion protein comprising MUC1 and glutathione S-transferase (MUC1-GST), MUC1-GST fusion protein coupled to mannan (MFP) or with a recombinant vaccinia virus expressing both MUC1 and interleukin-2. Mouse strain variations in immune responsiveness have been observed with these vaccines. We have constructed mice transgenic for the human MUC1 gene to study MUC1-specific immune responses and the risk of auto-immunity following MUC1 immunization. Transgenic mice immunized with MUC1 were observed to be partially tolerant in that the MUC1-specific antibody response is lower than that observed in syngeneic but non-transgenic mice. However, a significant MUC1-specific CTLp response to all three vaccines was observed, indicating the ability to overcome T cell, but to a lesser extent B cell, tolerance to MUC1 in these mice. Histological analysis indicates no evidence of auto-immunity to the cells expressing the human MUC1 molecule. These results suggest that it is possible to generate an immune response to a cancer-related antigen without damage to normal tissues expressing the antigen. PMID:10630311

  1. Injury and immune response: applying the danger theory to mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-García, Miguel; Recio-Tótoro, Benito; Claudio-Piedras, Fabiola; Lanz-Mendoza, Humberto

    2014-01-01

    The insect immune response can be activated by the recognition of both non-self and molecular by-products of tissue damage. Since pathogens and tissue damage usually arise at the same time during infection, the specific mechanisms of the immune response to microorganisms, and to tissue damage have not been unraveled. Consequently, some aspects of damage caused by microorganisms in vector-borne arthropods have been neglected. We herein reassess the Anopheles–Plasmodium interaction, incorporating Matzinger’s danger/damage hypothesis and George Salt’s injury assumptions. The invasive forms of the parasite cross the peritrophic matrix and midgut epithelia to reach the basal lamina and differentiate into an oocyst. The sporozoites produced in the oocyst are released into the hemolymph, and from there enter the salivary gland. During parasite development, wounds to midgut tissue and the basement membrane are produced. We describe the response of the different compartments where the parasite interacts with the mosquito. In the midgut, the response includes the expression of antimicrobial peptides, production of reactive oxygen species, and possible activation of midgut regenerative cells. In the basal membrane, wound repair mainly involves the production of molecules and the recruitment of hemocytes. We discuss the susceptibility to damage in tissues, and how the place and degree of damage may influence the differential response and the expression of damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). Knowledge about damage caused by parasites may lead to a deeper understanding of the relevance of tissue damage and the immune response it generates, as well as the origins and progression of infection in this insect–parasite interaction. PMID:25250040

  2. Therapeutic proteins and nanotechnology: immune response and stealth bioengineered constructs.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Marin, Luz M; Tamariz, Elisa; Acosta-Torres, Laura S; Castaño, Victor M

    2013-06-01

    With unique potentials for organ drug delivery and targeting, intravenous administration of drugs has represented a key tool in biomedicine. A major concern of this route is the rapid capture and destruction of foreign substances by circulating immune cells. Knowledge about the inter-relationships between drugs and blood cells is essential for a better control in drug stability and bioavailability. In this review, both classical pathways and novel insights into the immune mechanisms leading to drug clearance after systemic delivery are described. Drug surface chemistry and size have been identified as critical factors for the activation of host immune responses, and their modification has been extensively explored in order to evade immune surveillance. Common strategies to camouflage drug surfaces through polymer-grafting are presented, with special emphasis on Poly(Ethylene Glycol) (PEG) linkages, one of the most diverse strategies for modifying biomolecular surfaces. Finally, the use of "smart shields", such as PEG attachments shed at particular intracellular conditions, is briefly overviewed as an interesting approach for balancing circulation half lives VS bioavailability in polymer-grafted formulations.

  3. Control of the Immune Response by Pro-Angiogenic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Voron, Thibault; Marcheteau, Elie; Pernot, Simon; Colussi, Orianne; Tartour, Eric; Taieb, Julien; Terme, Magali

    2014-01-01

    The progressive conversion of normal cells into cancer cells is characterized by the acquisition of eight hallmarks. Among these criteria, the capability of the cancer cell to avoid the immune destruction has been noted. Thus, tumors develop mechanisms to become invisible to the immune system, such as the induction of immunosuppressive cells, which are able to inhibit the development of an efficient immune response. Molecules produced in the tumor microenvironment are involved in the occurrence of an immunosuppressive microenvironment. Recently, it has been shown that vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) exhibits immunosuppressive properties in addition to its pro-angiogenic activities. VEGF-A can induce the accumulation of immature dendritic cells, myeloid-derived suppressor cells, regulatory T cells, and inhibit the migration of T lymphocytes to the tumor. Other pro-angiogenic factors such as placental growth factor (PlGF) could also participate in tumor-induced immunosuppression, but only few works have been performed on this point. Here, we review the impact of pro-angiogenic factors (especially VEGF-A) on immune cells. Anti-angiogenic molecules, which target VEGF-A/VEGFR axis, have been developed in the last decades and are commonly used to treat cancer patients. These drugs have anti-angiogenic properties but can also counteract the tumor-induced immunosuppression. Based on these immunomodulatory properties, anti-angiogenic molecules could be efficiently associated with immunotherapeutic strategies in preclinical models. These combinations are currently under investigation in cancer patients. PMID:24765614

  4. Tailored immune responses: novel effector helper T cell subsets in protective immunity.

    PubMed

    Kara, Ervin E; Comerford, Iain; Fenix, Kevin A; Bastow, Cameron R; Gregor, Carly E; McKenzie, Duncan R; McColl, Shaun R

    2014-02-01

    Differentiation of naïve CD4⁺ cells into functionally distinct effector helper T cell subsets, characterised by distinct "cytokine signatures," is a cardinal strategy employed by the mammalian immune system to efficiently deal with the rapidly evolving array of pathogenic microorganisms encountered by the host. Since the T(H)1/T(H)2 paradigm was first described by Mosmann and Coffman, research in the field of helper T cell biology has grown exponentially with seven functionally unique subsets having now been described. In this review, recent insights into the molecular mechanisms that govern differentiation and function of effector helper T cell subsets will be discussed in the context of microbial infections, with a focus on how these different helper T cell subsets orchestrate immune responses tailored to combat the nature of the pathogenic threat encountered.

  5. Royal Decree: Gene Expression in Trans-Generationally Immune Primed Bumblebee Workers Mimics a Primary Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Schmid-Hempel, Paul; Sadd, Ben M.

    2016-01-01

    Invertebrates lack the cellular and physiological machinery of the adaptive immune system, but show specificity in their immune response and immune priming. Functionally, immune priming is comparable to immune memory in vertebrates. Individuals that have survived exposure to a given parasite are better protected against subsequent exposures. Protection may be cross-reactive, but demonstrations of persistent and specific protection in invertebrates are increasing. This immune priming can cross generations ("trans-generational" immune priming), preparing offspring for the prevailing parasite environment. While these phenomena gain increasing support, the mechanistic foundations underlying such immune priming, both within and across generations, remain largely unknown. Using a transcriptomic approach, we show that exposing bumblebee queens with an injection of heat-killed bacteria, known to induce trans-generational immune priming, alters daughter (worker) gene expression. Daughters, even when unexposed themselves, constitutively express a core set of the genes induced upon direct bacterial exposure, including high expression of antimicrobial peptides, a beta-glucan receptor protein implicated in bacterial recognition and the induction of the toll signaling pathway, and slit-3 which is important in honeybee immunity. Maternal exposure results in a distinct upregulation of their daughters’ immune system, with a signature overlapping with the induced individual response to a direct exposure. This will mediate mother-offspring protection, but also associated costs related to reconfiguration of constitutive immune expression. Moreover, identification of conserved immune pathways in memory-like responses has important implications for our understanding of the innate immune system, including the innate components in vertebrates, which share many of these pathways. PMID:27442590

  6. Royal Decree: Gene Expression in Trans-Generationally Immune Primed Bumblebee Workers Mimics a Primary Immune Response.

    PubMed

    Barribeau, Seth M; Schmid-Hempel, Paul; Sadd, Ben M

    2016-01-01

    Invertebrates lack the cellular and physiological machinery of the adaptive immune system, but show specificity in their immune response and immune priming. Functionally, immune priming is comparable to immune memory in vertebrates. Individuals that have survived exposure to a given parasite are better protected against subsequent exposures. Protection may be cross-reactive, but demonstrations of persistent and specific protection in invertebrates are increasing. This immune priming can cross generations ("trans-generational" immune priming), preparing offspring for the prevailing parasite environment. While these phenomena gain increasing support, the mechanistic foundations underlying such immune priming, both within and across generations, remain largely unknown. Using a transcriptomic approach, we show that exposing bumblebee queens with an injection of heat-killed bacteria, known to induce trans-generational immune priming, alters daughter (worker) gene expression. Daughters, even when unexposed themselves, constitutively express a core set of the genes induced upon direct bacterial exposure, including high expression of antimicrobial peptides, a beta-glucan receptor protein implicated in bacterial recognition and the induction of the toll signaling pathway, and slit-3 which is important in honeybee immunity. Maternal exposure results in a distinct upregulation of their daughters' immune system, with a signature overlapping with the induced individual response to a direct exposure. This will mediate mother-offspring protection, but also associated costs related to reconfiguration of constitutive immune expression. Moreover, identification of conserved immune pathways in memory-like responses has important implications for our understanding of the innate immune system, including the innate components in vertebrates, which share many of these pathways. PMID:27442590

  7. Phylogeny of immune recognition: antigen processing/presentation in channel catfish immune responses to hemocyanins.

    PubMed

    Vallejo, A N; Miller, N W; Jørgensen, T; Clem, L W

    1990-10-15

    Studies were conducted to address the role(s) of antigen (Ag) processing/presentation in channel catfish immune responses. Vigorous and specific secondary in vitro proliferative and antibody (Ab) responses were obtained to keyhole limpet and Limulus polyphemus hemocyanins with peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) from catfish previously primed in vivo with Ag. In addition, such antigen-specific in vitro proliferative and Ab responses were efficiently elicited by antigen-pulsed and subsequently paraformaldehyde-fixed autologous PBL used as putative antigen-presenting cells (APC) but not by APC fixed prior to Ag pulsing. Treatment of these putative APC with lysosomotropic agents, protease inhibitors, or the ionophore monensin prior to or during pulsing with Ag significantly inhibited both in vitro responses. Furthermore, the use of radiolabeled protein indicated that both untreated and inhibitor-treated PBL but not erythrocytes take up Ag; however, only untreated PBL were able to degrade Ag. Immune restriction was indicated by the use of allogeneic PBL as APC in that only strong MLRs were generated with no detectable antibodies produced in vitro. Finally, the employment of isolated leukocyte subpopulations demonstrated that both catfish B (sIg+) lymphocytes and monocytes were efficient Ag presentors. PMID:2208303

  8. The transition between immune and disease states in a cellular automaton model of clonal immune response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezzi, Michele; Celada, Franco; Ruffo, Stefano; Seiden, Philip E.

    1997-02-01

    In this paper we extend the Celada-Seiden (CS) model of the humoral immune response to include infections virus and killer T cells (cellular response). The model represents molecules and cells with bitstrings. The response of the system to virus involves a competition between the ability of the virus to kill the host cells and the host's ability to eliminate the virus. We find two basins of attraction in the dynamics of this system, one is identified with disease and the other with the immune state. There is also an oscillating state that exists on the border of these two stable states. Fluctuations in the population of virus or antibody can end the oscillation and drive the system into one of the stable states. The introduction of mechanisms of cross-regulation between the two responses can bias the system towards one of them. We also study a mean field model, based on coupled maps, to investigate virus-like infections. This simple model reproduces the attractors for average populations observed in the cellular automaton. All the dynamical behavior connected to spatial extension is lost, as is the oscillating feature. Thus the mean field approximation introduced with coupled maps destroys oscillations.

  9. Multi-scale modeling of the CD8 immune response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbarroux, Loic; Michel, Philippe; Adimy, Mostafa; Crauste, Fabien

    2016-06-01

    During the primary CD8 T-Cell immune response to an intracellular pathogen, CD8 T-Cells undergo exponential proliferation and continuous differentiation, acquiring cytotoxic capabilities to address the infection and memorize the corresponding antigen. After cleaning the organism, the only CD8 T-Cells left are antigen-specific memory cells whose role is to respond stronger and faster in case they are presented this very same antigen again. That is how vaccines work: a small quantity of a weakened pathogen is introduced in the organism to trigger the primary response, generating corresponding memory cells in the process, giving the organism a way to defend himself in case it encounters the same pathogen again. To investigate this process, we propose a non linear, multi-scale mathematical model of the CD8 T-Cells immune response due to vaccination using a maturity structured partial differential equation. At the intracellular scale, the level of expression of key proteins is modeled by a delay differential equation system, which gives the speeds of maturation for each cell. The population of cells is modeled by a maturity structured equation whose speeds are given by the intracellular model. We focus here on building the model, as well as its asymptotic study. Finally, we display numerical simulations showing the model can reproduce the biological dynamics of the cell population for both the primary response and the secondary responses.

  10. Tissue communication in a systemic immune response of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hairu; Hultmark, Dan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Several signaling pathways, including the JAK/STAT and Toll pathways, are known to activate blood cells (hemocytes) in Drosophila melanogaster larvae. They are believed to regulate the immune response against infections by parasitoid wasps, such as Leptopilina boulardi, but how these pathways control the hemocytes is not well understood. Here, we discuss the recent discovery that both muscles and fat body take an active part in this response. Parasitoid wasp infection induces Upd2 and Upd3 secretion from hemocytes, leading to JAK/STAT activation mainly in hemocytes and in skeletal muscles. JAK/STAT activation in muscles, but not in hemocytes, is required for an efficient encapsulation of wasp eggs. This suggests that Upd2 and Upd3 are important cytokines, coordinating different tissues for the cellular immune response in Drosophila. In the fat body, Toll signaling initiates a systemic response in which hemocytes are mobilized and activated hemocytes (lamellocytes) are generated. However, the contribution of Toll signaling to the defense against wasps is limited, probably because the wasps inject inhibitors that prevent the activation of the Toll pathway. In conclusion, parasite infection induces a systemic response in Drosophila larvae involving major organ systems and probably the physiology of the entire organism. PMID:27116253

  11. Preexisting Immunity, More Than Aging, Influences Influenza Vaccine Responses

    PubMed Central

    Reber, Adrian J.; Kim, Jin Hyang; Biber, Renata; Talbot, H. Keipp; Coleman, Laura A.; Chirkova, Tatiana; Gross, F. Liaini; Steward-Clark, Evelene; Cao, Weiping; Jefferson, Stacie; Veguilla, Vic; Gillis, Eric; Meece, Jennifer; Bai, Yaohui; Tatum, Heather; Hancock, Kathy; Stevens, James; Spencer, Sarah; Chen, Jufu; Gargiullo, Paul; Braun, Elise; Griffin, Marie R.; Sundaram, Maria; Belongia, Edward A.; Shay, David K.; Katz, Jacqueline M.; Sambhara, Suryaprakash

    2015-01-01

    Background. Influenza disproportionately impacts older adults while current vaccines have reduced effectiveness in the older population. Methods. We conducted a comprehensive evaluation of cellular and humoral immune responses of adults aged 50 years and older to the 2008–2009 seasonal trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine and assessed factors influencing vaccine response. Results. Vaccination increased hemagglutination inhibition and neutralizing antibody; however, 66.3% of subjects did not reach hemagglutination inhibition titers ≥ 40 for H1N1, compared with 22.5% for H3N2. Increasing age had a minor negative impact on antibody responses, whereas prevaccination titers were the best predictors of postvaccination antibody levels. Preexisting memory B cells declined with age, especially for H3N2. However, older adults still demonstrated a significant increase in antigen-specific IgG+ and IgA+ memory B cells postvaccination. Despite reduced frequency of preexisting memory B cells associated with advanced age, fold-rise in memory B cell frequency in subjects 60+ was comparable to subjects age 50–59. Conclusions. Older adults mounted statistically significant humoral and cell-mediated immune responses, but many failed to reach hemagglutination inhibition titers ≥40, especially for H1N1. Although age had a modest negative effect on vaccine responses, prevaccination titers were the best predictor of postvaccination antibody levels, irrespective of age. PMID:26380344

  12. Tissue communication in a systemic immune response of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hairu; Hultmark, Dan

    2016-07-01

    Several signaling pathways, including the JAK/STAT and Toll pathways, are known to activate blood cells (hemocytes) in Drosophila melanogaster larvae. They are believed to regulate the immune response against infections by parasitoid wasps, such as Leptopilina boulardi, but how these pathways control the hemocytes is not well understood. Here, we discuss the recent discovery that both muscles and fat body take an active part in this response. Parasitoid wasp infection induces Upd2 and Upd3 secretion from hemocytes, leading to JAK/STAT activation mainly in hemocytes and in skeletal muscles. JAK/STAT activation in muscles, but not in hemocytes, is required for an efficient encapsulation of wasp eggs. This suggests that Upd2 and Upd3 are important cytokines, coordinating different tissues for the cellular immune response in Drosophila. In the fat body, Toll signaling initiates a systemic response in which hemocytes are mobilized and activated hemocytes (lamellocytes) are generated. However, the contribution of Toll signaling to the defense against wasps is limited, probably because the wasps inject inhibitors that prevent the activation of the Toll pathway. In conclusion, parasite infection induces a systemic response in Drosophila larvae involving major organ systems and probably the physiology of the entire organism. PMID:27116253

  13. Early immune responses accompanying human asymptomatic Ebola infections

    PubMed Central

    Leroy, E M; Baize, S; Debre, P; Lansoud-Soukate, J; Mavoungou, E

    2001-01-01

    In a recent study we identified certain asymptomatic individuals infected by Ebola virus (EBOV) who mounted specific IgG and early and strong inflammatory responses. Here, we further characterized the primary immune response to EBOV during the course of asymptomatic infection in humans. Inflammatory responses occurred in temporal association with anti-inflammatory phase composed by soluble antagonist IL-1RA, circulating TNF receptors, IL-10 and cortisol. At the end of the inflammatory process, mRNA expression of T-cell cytokines (IL-2 and IL-4) and activation markers (CD28, CD40L and CTLA4) was up-regulated, strongly suggesting T-cell activation. This T-cell activation was followed by EBOV-specific IgG responses (mainly IgG3 ang IgG1), and by marked and sustained up-regulation of IFNγ, FasL and perforin mRNA expression, suggesting activation of cytotoxic cells. The terminal down-regulation of these latter markers coincided with the release of the apoptotic marker 41/7 NMP in blood and with the disappearance of viral RNA from PBMC, suggesting that infected cells are eliminated by cytotoxic mechanisms. Finally, RT-PCR analysis of TCR-Vβ repertoire usage showed that TCR-Vβ12 mRNA was never expressed during the infection. Taken together, these findings improve our understanding about immune response during human asymptomatic Ebola infection, and throw new light on protection against Ebola virus. PMID:11472407

  14. Responses of aboveground and belowground forest carbon stocks to disturbances in boreal forests of Northeastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chao; He, Hong S.; Hawbaker, Todd J.; Liang, Yu; Gong, Peng; Wu, Wuzhiwei; Zhu, Zhiliang

    2016-04-01

    Boreal forests represents about 1/3 of forest area and 1/3 of forest carbon on earth. Carbon dynamics of boreal forests are sensitive to climate change, natural (e.g., fire) and anthropogenic (e.g., harvest) disturbances. Field-based studies suggest that disturbances alter species composition, stand structure, and litter decomposition, and have significant effects on boreal forest carbon dynamics. Most of these studies, however, covered a relatively short period of time (e.g., few decades), which is limited in revealing such long-term effects of disturbances. Models are therefore developed as important tools in exploring the long-term (e.g., hundreds of years) effects of disturbances on forest carbon dynamics. In this study, we applied a framework of coupling forest ecosystem and landscape model to evaluating the effect of fire, harvest and their interactions on carbon stocks in a boreal forest landscape of Northeastern China. We compared the simulation results under fire, harvest and fire-harvest interaction scenarios with the simulated value of succession scenario at 26 landtypes over 150 years at a 10-year time step. Our results suggest that aboveground and belowground carbon are significantly reduced by fire and harvest over 150years. Fire reduced aboveground carbon by 2.3±0.6 ton/ha, harvest by 6.0±1.4 ton/ha, and fire and harvest interaction by 8.0±1.9 tons/ha. Fire reduced belowground carbon by 4.6±3.4 ton/ha, harvest by 5.0±3.5 ton/ha, and fire-harvest interaction by 5.7±3.7 tons/ha. The divergent response of carbon stocks among landtypes and between disturbance scenarios was due to the spatial interactions between fire, harvest, and species composition. Our results indicated that boreal forests carbon stocks prediction needs to consider the effects of fire and harvest for improving the estimation accuracy.

  15. Modeling Amazon forest vegetation dynamics and community response to increased wind disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holm, J. A.; Negron Juarez, R. I.; Chambers, J. Q.; Marra, D.; Rifai, S. W.; Knox, R. G.; Riley, W. J.; Koven, C. D.; McGroddy, M. E.; Urquiza-Muñoz, J. D.; Tello-Espinoza, R.; Ribeiro, G. H. P. M.; Higuchi, N.

    2015-12-01

    Determining the drivers of tree mortality in Amazonia is a complex task, yet essential to reliable prediction of carbon storage in a warmer climate. Past studies have shown an east-west gradient of forest disturbance and rainfall amount across Amazonia. This study uses remote sensing and dynamic vegetation modeling to take a deeper look at drivers of tree mortality and community composition shifts associated with varying mortality rates. Our analysis, using 20 years of Landsat 5 images, showed that ever-wet Amazonia (located in north-west Amazonia, i.e. NWA) was more susceptible to windthrows than the Central Amazon (i.e. CA), which has a a well-defined dry season. The higher frequency of windthrows in NWA forest correlates with higher frequency and intensity of deep convection events in this region, observed using Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) data. While a combination of factors including: soil characteristics (and by proxy rooting depth) and community composition exacerbate the regional gradient of disturbance, wind was the mechanistic agent of disturbance. Using an individual-based gap model for tropical forests populated with the most representative NWA tree species and increased mortality rates, we found a decrease of biomass in this region and a slight increase in NPP compared to a control simulation, a pattern that is similar to observations. The model predicted which species had the largest response in basal area change due to elevated disturbance, but there was a non-significant shift in community composition in the NWA forests. However, analysis found strong differences in community composition between the modeled NWA and CA regions, consistent with observed results. When CA forests were subject to higher mortality rate similar to the current NWA region, dissimilarity in community composition continued to persist. In addition the model identified species-specific maximum tree height and maximum diameter as the most influential predictors of

  16. Multidimensional trade-offs in species responses to disturbance: implications for diversity in a subtropical forest.

    PubMed

    Uriarte, María; Clark, James S; Zimmerman, Jess K; Comita, Liza S; Forero-Montaña, Jimena; Thompson, Jill

    2012-01-01

    Species employ diverse strategies to cope with natural disturbance, but the importance of these strategies for maintaining tree species diversity in forests has been debated. Mechanisms that have the potential to promote tree species coexistence in the context of repeated disturbance include life history trade-offs in colonization and competitive ability or in species' ability to survive at low resource conditions and exploit the temporary resource-rich conditions often generated in the wake of disturbance (successional niche). Quantifying these trade-offs requires long-term forest monitoring and modeling. We developed a hierarchical Bayes model to investigate the strategies tree species employ to withstand and recover from hurricane disturbance and the life history trade-offs that may facilitate species coexistence in forests subject to repeated hurricane disturbance. Unlike previous approaches, our model accommodates temporal variation in process error and observations from multiple sources. We parameterized the model using growth and mortality data from four censuses of a 16-ha plot taken every five years (1990-2005), together with damage data collected after two hurricanes and annual seed production data (1992-2005). Species' susceptibilities to hurricane damage as reflected by changes in diameter growth and fecundity immediately following a storm were weak, highly variable, and unpredictable using traditional life history groupings. The lower crowding conditions (e.g., high light) generated in the wake of storms, however, led to greater gains in growth and fecundity for pioneer and secondary-forest species than for shade-tolerant species, in accordance with expectation of life history. We found moderate trade-offs between survival in high crowding conditions, a metric of competitive ability, and long-distance colonization. We also uncovered a strong trade-off between mean species fecundity in low crowding conditions, a metric of recovery potential, and

  17. Multidimensional trade-offs in species responses to disturbance: implications for diversity in a subtropical forest.

    PubMed

    Uriarte, María; Clark, James S; Zimmerman, Jess K; Comita, Liza S; Forero-Montaña, Jimena; Thompson, Jill

    2012-01-01

    Species employ diverse strategies to cope with natural disturbance, but the importance of these strategies for maintaining tree species diversity in forests has been debated. Mechanisms that have the potential to promote tree species coexistence in the context of repeated disturbance include life history trade-offs in colonization and competitive ability or in species' ability to survive at low resource conditions and exploit the temporary resource-rich conditions often generated in the wake of disturbance (successional niche). Quantifying these trade-offs requires long-term forest monitoring and modeling. We developed a hierarchical Bayes model to investigate the strategies tree species employ to withstand and recover from hurricane disturbance and the life history trade-offs that may facilitate species coexistence in forests subject to repeated hurricane disturbance. Unlike previous approaches, our model accommodates temporal variation in process error and observations from multiple sources. We parameterized the model using growth and mortality data from four censuses of a 16-ha plot taken every five years (1990-2005), together with damage data collected after two hurricanes and annual seed production data (1992-2005). Species' susceptibilities to hurricane damage as reflected by changes in diameter growth and fecundity immediately following a storm were weak, highly variable, and unpredictable using traditional life history groupings. The lower crowding conditions (e.g., high light) generated in the wake of storms, however, led to greater gains in growth and fecundity for pioneer and secondary-forest species than for shade-tolerant species, in accordance with expectation of life history. We found moderate trade-offs between survival in high crowding conditions, a metric of competitive ability, and long-distance colonization. We also uncovered a strong trade-off between mean species fecundity in low crowding conditions, a metric of recovery potential, and

  18. Hypocretin/orexin loss changes the hypothalamic immune response.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Susumu; Takizawa, Nae; Honda, Yoshiko; Koike, Taro; Oe, Souichi; Toyoda, Hiromi; Kodama, Tohru; Yamada, Hisao

    2016-10-01

    Hypocretin, also known as orexin, maintains the vigilance state and regulates various physiological processes, such as arousal, sleep, food intake, energy expenditure, and reward. Previously, we found that when wild-type mice and hypocretin/ataxin-3 littermates (which are depleted of hypothalamic hypocretin-expressing neurons postnatally) were administered lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the two genotypes exhibited significant differences in their sleep/wake cycle, including differences in the degree of increase in sleep periods and in recovery from sickness behaviour. In the present study, we examined changes in the hypothalamic vigilance system and in the hypothalamic expression of inflammatory factors in response to LPS in hypocretin/ataxin-3 mice. Peripheral immune challenge with LPS affected the hypothalamic immune response and vigilance states. This response was altered by the loss of hypocretin. Hypocretin expression was inhibited after LPS injection in both hypocretin/ataxin-3 mice and their wild-type littermates, but expression was completely abolished only in hypocretin/ataxin-3 mice. Increases in the number of histidine decarboxylase (HDC)-positive cells and in Hdc mRNA expression were found in hypocretin/ataxin-3 mice, and this increase was suppressed by LPS. Hypocretin loss did not impact the change in expression of hypothalamic inflammatory factors in response to LPS, except for interferon gamma and colony stimulating factor 3. The number of c-Fos-positive/HDC-positive cells in hypocretin/ataxin-3 mice administered LPS injections was elevated, even during the rest period, in all areas, suggesting that there is an increase in the activity of histaminergic neurons in hypocretin/ataxin-3 mice following LPS injection. Taken together, our results suggest a novel role for hypocretin in the hypothalamic response to peripheral immune challenge. Our findings contribute to the understanding of the pathophysiology of narcolepsy.

  19. Hypocretin/orexin loss changes the hypothalamic immune response.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Susumu; Takizawa, Nae; Honda, Yoshiko; Koike, Taro; Oe, Souichi; Toyoda, Hiromi; Kodama, Tohru; Yamada, Hisao

    2016-10-01

    Hypocretin, also known as orexin, maintains the vigilance state and regulates various physiological processes, such as arousal, sleep, food intake, energy expenditure, and reward. Previously, we found that when wild-type mice and hypocretin/ataxin-3 littermates (which are depleted of hypothalamic hypocretin-expressing neurons postnatally) were administered lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the two genotypes exhibited significant differences in their sleep/wake cycle, including differences in the degree of increase in sleep periods and in recovery from sickness behaviour. In the present study, we examined changes in the hypothalamic vigilance system and in the hypothalamic expression of inflammatory factors in response to LPS in hypocretin/ataxin-3 mice. Peripheral immune challenge with LPS affected the hypothalamic immune response and vigilance states. This response was altered by the loss of hypocretin. Hypocretin expression was inhibited after LPS injection in both hypocretin/ataxin-3 mice and their wild-type littermates, but expression was completely abolished only in hypocretin/ataxin-3 mice. Increases in the number of histidine decarboxylase (HDC)-positive cells and in Hdc mRNA expression were found in hypocretin/ataxin-3 mice, and this increase was suppressed by LPS. Hypocretin loss did not impact the change in expression of hypothalamic inflammatory factors in response to LPS, except for interferon gamma and colony stimulating factor 3. The number of c-Fos-positive/HDC-positive cells in hypocretin/ataxin-3 mice administered LPS injections was elevated, even during the rest period, in all areas, suggesting that there is an increase in the activity of histaminergic neurons in hypocretin/ataxin-3 mice following LPS injection. Taken together, our results suggest a novel role for hypocretin in the hypothalamic response to peripheral immune challenge. Our findings contribute to the understanding of the pathophysiology of narcolepsy. PMID:27318095

  20. Redox rhythm reinforces the circadian clock to gate immune response.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mian; Wang, Wei; Karapetyan, Sargis; Mwimba, Musoki; Marqués, Jorge; Buchler, Nicolas E; Dong, Xinnian

    2015-07-23

    Recent studies have shown that in addition to the transcriptional circadian clock, many organisms, including Arabidopsis, have a circadian redox rhythm driven by the organism's metabolic activities. It has been hypothesized that the redox rhythm is linked to the circadian clock, but the mechanism and the biological significance of this link have only begun to be investigated. Here we report that the master immune regulator NPR1 (non-expressor of pathogenesis-related gene 1) of Arabidopsis is a sensor of the plant's redox state and regulates transcription of core circadian clock genes even in the absence of pathogen challenge. Surprisingly, acute perturbation in the redox status triggered by the immune signal salicylic acid does not compromise the circadian clock but rather leads to its reinforcement. Mathematical modelling and subsequent experiments show that NPR1 reinforces the circadian clock without changing the period by regulating both the morning and the evening clock genes. This balanced network architecture helps plants gate their immune responses towards the morning and minimize costs on growth at night. Our study demonstrates how a sensitive redox rhythm interacts with a robust circadian clock to ensure proper responsiveness to environmental stimuli without compromising fitness of the organism.

  1. Transgenic Leishmania and the immune response to infection.

    PubMed

    Beattie, L; Evans, K J; Kaye, P M; Smith, D F

    2008-04-01

    Genetic manipulation of single-celled organisms such as the Leishmania parasite enables in depth analysis of the consequences of genotypic change on biological function. In probing the immune responses to infection, use of transgenic Leishmania has the potential to unravel both the contribution of the parasite to the infection process and the cellular interactions and mechanisms that characterize the innate and adaptive immune responses of the host. Here, we briefly review recent technical advances in parasite genetics and explore how these methods are being used to investigate parasite virulence factors, elucidate immune regulatory mechanisms and contribute to the development of novel therapeutics for the leishmaniases. Recent developments in imaging technology, such as bioluminescence and intravital imaging, combined with parasite transfection with fluorescent or enzyme-encoding marker genes, provides a rich opportunity for novel assessment of intimate, real-time host-parasite interactions at a previously unexplored level. Further advances in transgenic technology, such as the introduction of robust inducible gene cassettes for expression in intracellular parasite stages or the development of RNA interference methods for down-regulation of parasite gene expression in the host, will further advance our ability to probe host-parasite interactions and unravel disease-promoting mechanisms in the leishmaniases.

  2. Immunomodulatory properties of beta-sitosterol in pig immune responses.

    PubMed

    Fraile, Lorenzo; Crisci, Elisa; Córdoba, Lorena; Navarro, María A; Osada, Jesús; Montoya, María

    2012-07-01

    The ability to control an immune response for the benefit and production efficiency of animals is the objective of immunomodulation in food-producing animals; substances that exert this control are called immunomodulators. A Spanish product (Inmunicín MAYMO®), based on food plant phytosterols, is being commercialized as complementary feed. The main component of this product is Beta-sitosterol (BSS). BSS and its glycoside (BSSG) have been shown to exhibit anti-inflammatory, anti-neoplasic, anti-pyretic and immune-modulating activity demonstrated by in vitro and in vivo experiments. The objective of the present study was to characterize the effect of BSS on the pig immune system using in vitro cell cultures first and to elucidate whether BSS possesses any in vivo activity in fattener pigs after vaccination with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) modified life vaccine (MLV). Firstly, our in vitro results showed that BSS increased viable peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) numbers and it activated swine dendritic cells (DCs) in culture. Secondly, pigs treated with phytosterols prior to vaccination with PRRSV-MLV vaccine exhibited some changes in immunological parameters at different times post-vaccination, such as the proliferation ability of PBMC after phytohemaglutinin stimulation and increased apolipoprotein A1 plasma concentration which may contribute to enhance PRRSV vaccine response. In conclusion, the data in this report show that BSS can be considered an immunomodulator in pigs. PMID:22595193

  3. Cortisol response and subjective sleep disturbance after low-frequency noise exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson Waye, K.; Agge, A.; Clow, A.; Hucklebridge, F.

    2004-10-01

    A previous experimental study showed that the cortisol response upon awakening was reduced following nights with low-frequency noise exposure. This study comprised a larger number of subjects and an extended period of acclimatisation nights. In total, 26 male subjects slept during five consecutive nights in a sleep laboratory. Half of the subjects were exposed to low-frequency noise (40 dBA) on the 4th night and had their reference night (24 dBA) on the 5th night, while the reverse conditions were present for the other half of the group. Subjective sleep disturbances were recorded by questionnaires and cortisol response upon awakening was measured in saliva. The results showed that subjects were more tired and felt less socially orientated in the morning after nights with low-frequency noise. Mood was negatively affected in the evening after nights with low-frequency noise. No effect of noise condition was found on the cortisol secretion. There was a significant effect of group and weekday, indicating that further methodological developments are necessary before saliva cortisol secretion can be reliably used as an indicator of noise-disturbed sleep.

  4. Understanding the Spatio-Temporal Response of Coral Reef Fish Communities to Natural Disturbances: Insights from Beta-Diversity Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Lamy, Thomas; Legendre, Pierre; Chancerelle, Yannick; Siu, Gilles; Claudet, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how communities respond to natural disturbances is fundamental to assess the mechanisms of ecosystem resistance and resilience. However, ecosystem responses to natural disturbances are rarely monitored both through space and time, while the factors promoting ecosystem stability act at various temporal and spatial scales. Hence, assessing both the spatial and temporal variations in species composition is important to comprehensively explore the effects of natural disturbances. Here, we suggest a framework to better scrutinize the mechanisms underlying community responses to disturbances through both time and space. Our analytical approach is based on beta diversity decomposition into two components, replacement and biomass difference. We illustrate this approach using a 9-year monitoring of coral reef fish communities off Moorea Island (French Polynesia), which encompassed two severe natural disturbances: a crown-of-thorns starfish outbreak and a hurricane. These disturbances triggered a fast logistic decline in coral cover, which suffered a 90% decrease on all reefs. However, we found that the coral reef fish composition remained largely stable through time and space whereas compensatory changes in biomass among species were responsible for most of the temporal fluctuations, as outlined by the overall high contribution of the replacement component to total beta diversity. This suggests that, despite the severity of the two disturbances, fish communities exhibited high resistance and the ability to reorganize their compositions to maintain the same level of total community biomass as before the disturbances. We further investigated the spatial congruence of this pattern and showed that temporal dynamics involved different species across sites; yet, herbivores controlling the proliferation of algae that compete with coral communities were consistently favored. These results suggest that compensatory changes in biomass among species and spatial

  5. Understanding the Spatio-Temporal Response of Coral Reef Fish Communities to Natural Disturbances: Insights from Beta-Diversity Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Lamy, Thomas; Legendre, Pierre; Chancerelle, Yannick; Siu, Gilles; Claudet, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how communities respond to natural disturbances is fundamental to assess the mechanisms of ecosystem resistance and resilience. However, ecosystem responses to natural disturbances are rarely monitored both through space and time, while the factors promoting ecosystem stability act at various temporal and spatial scales. Hence, assessing both the spatial and temporal variations in species composition is important to comprehensively explore the effects of natural disturbances. Here, we suggest a framework to better scrutinize the mechanisms underlying community responses to disturbances through both time and space. Our analytical approach is based on beta diversity decomposition into two components, replacement and biomass difference. We illustrate this approach using a 9-year monitoring of coral reef fish communities off Moorea Island (French Polynesia), which encompassed two severe natural disturbances: a crown-of-thorns starfish outbreak and a hurricane. These disturbances triggered a fast logistic decline in coral cover, which suffered a 90% decrease on all reefs. However, we found that the coral reef fish composition remained largely stable through time and space whereas compensatory changes in biomass among species were responsible for most of the temporal fluctuations, as outlined by the overall high contribution of the replacement component to total beta diversity. This suggests that, despite the severity of the two disturbances, fish communities exhibited high resistance and the ability to reorganize their compositions to maintain the same level of total community biomass as before the disturbances. We further investigated the spatial congruence of this pattern and showed that temporal dynamics involved different species across sites; yet, herbivores controlling the proliferation of algae that compete with coral communities were consistently favored. These results suggest that compensatory changes in biomass among species and spatial

  6. Understanding the Spatio-Temporal Response of Coral Reef Fish Communities to Natural Disturbances: Insights from Beta-Diversity Decomposition

    PubMed Central

    Lamy, Thomas; Legendre, Pierre; Chancerelle, Yannick; Siu, Gilles; Claudet, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how communities respond to natural disturbances is fundamental to assess the mechanisms of ecosystem resistance and resilience. However, ecosystem responses to natural disturbances are rarely monitored both through space and time, while the factors promoting ecosystem stability act at various temporal and spatial scales. Hence, assessing both the spatial and temporal variations in species composition is important to comprehensively explore the effects of natural disturbances. Here, we suggest a framework to better scrutinize the mechanisms underlying community responses to disturbances through both time and space. Our analytical approach is based on beta diversity decomposition into two components, replacement and biomass difference. We illustrate this approach using a 9-year monitoring of coral reef fish communities off Moorea Island (French Polynesia), which encompassed two severe natural disturbances: a crown-of-thorns starfish outbreak and a hurricane. These disturbances triggered a fast logistic decline in coral cover, which suffered a 90% decrease on all reefs. However, we found that the coral reef fish composition remained largely stable through time and space whereas compensatory changes in biomass among species were responsible for most of the temporal fluctuations, as outlined by the overall high contribution of the replacement component to total beta diversity. This suggests that, despite the severity of the two disturbances, fish communities exhibited high resistance and the ability to reorganize their compositions to maintain the same level of total community biomass as before the disturbances. We further investigated the spatial congruence of this pattern and showed that temporal dynamics involved different species across sites; yet, herbivores controlling the proliferation of algae that compete with coral communities were consistently favored. These results suggest that compensatory changes in biomass among species and spatial

  7. Effects of anti-schistosomal chemotherapy on immune responses, protection and immunity. II. Concomitant immunity and immunization with irradiated cercariae

    SciTech Connect

    Tawfik, A.F.; Colley, D.G.

    1986-01-01

    Resistance of mice to challenge infections of Schistosoma mansoni was evaluated before and after elimination of their primary, established S. mansoni infections with the chemotherapeutic drug praziquantel. Mice treated after either 10 or 20 weeks of primary infection were challenged 6 or 10 weeks after treatment. Mice infected for for 10 weeks prior to treatment expressed progressively less resistance 6 and 10 weeks after treatment. By 10 weeks after treatment significant levels of protection were no longer observed. Resistance waned more slowly if mice were treated 20 weeks after infection, and there was still significant expression of resistance to challenge 10 weeks after treatment. A separate set of experiments evaluated the use of highly irradiated cercariae as a vaccine in mice that had been previously infected with S. mansoni and cured with praziquantel. It was observed that effective immunizations were possible in previously infected mice. These studies demonstrate that established resistance waned after treatment and the rate of loss of protection was dependent upon the duration of infection prior to treatment. Furthermore, the irradiated cercarial vaccine studies indicate that in the murine model induction of immunological resistance was feasible following chemotherapeutic treatment of infected populations.

  8. Original Antigenic Sin Response to RNA Viruses and Antiviral Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Park, Mee Sook; Kim, Jin Il; Park, Sehee; Lee, Ilseob

    2016-01-01

    The human immune system has evolved to fight against foreign pathogens. It plays a central role in the body's defense mechanism. However, the immune memory geared to fight off a previously recognized pathogen, tends to remember an original form of the pathogen when a variant form subsequently invades. This has been termed 'original antigenic sin'. This adverse immunological effect can alter vaccine effectiveness and sometimes cause enhanced pathogenicity or additional inflammatory responses, according to the type of pathogen and the circumstances of infection. Here we aim to give a simplified conceptual understanding of virus infection and original antigenic sin by comparing and contrasting the two examples of recurring infections such as influenza and dengue viruses in humans. PMID:27799871

  9. Net primary production of a temperate deciduous forest exhibits a threshold response to increasing disturbance severity.

    PubMed

    Stuart-Haëntjens, Ellen J; Curtis, Peter S; Fahey, Robert T; Vogel, Christoph S; Gough, Christopher M

    2015-09-01

    The global carbon (C) balance is vulnerable to disturbances that alter terrestrial C storage. Disturbances to forests occur along a continuum of severity, from low-intensity disturbance causing the mortality or defoliation of only a subset of trees to severe stand- replacing disturbance that kills all trees; yet considerable uncertainty remains in how forest production changes across gradients of disturbance intensity. We used a gradient of tree mortality in an upper Great Lakes forest ecosystem to: (1) quantify how aboveground wood net primary production (ANPP,) responds to a range of disturbance severities; and (2) identify mechanisms supporting ANPPw resistance or resilience following moderate disturbance. We found that ANPPw declined nonlinearly with rising disturbance severity, remaining stable until >60% of the total tree basal area senesced. As upper canopy openness increased from disturbance, greater light availability to the subcanopy enhanced the leaf-level photosynthesis and growth of this formerly light-limited canopy stratum, compensating for upper canopy production losses and a reduction in total leaf area index (LAI). As a result, whole-ecosystem production efficiency (ANPPw/LAI) increased with rising disturbance severity, except in plots beyond the disturbance threshold. These findings provide a mechanistic explanation for a nonlinear relationship between ANPPw, and disturbance severity, in which the physiological and growth enhancement of undisturbed vegetation is proportional to the level of disturbance until a threshold is exceeded. Our results have important ecological and management implications, demonstrating that in some ecosystems moderate levels of disturbance minimally alter forest production. PMID:26594704

  10. Net primary production of a temperate deciduous forest exhibits a threshold response to increasing disturbance severity.

    PubMed

    Stuart-Haëntjens, Ellen J; Curtis, Peter S; Fahey, Robert T; Vogel, Christoph S; Gough, Christopher M

    2015-09-01

    The global carbon (C) balance is vulnerable to disturbances that alter terrestrial C storage. Disturbances to forests occur along a continuum of severity, from low-intensity disturbance causing the mortality or defoliation of only a subset of trees to severe stand- replacing disturbance that kills all trees; yet considerable uncertainty remains in how forest production changes across gradients of disturbance intensity. We used a gradient of tree mortality in an upper Great Lakes forest ecosystem to: (1) quantify how aboveground wood net primary production (ANPP,) responds to a range of disturbance severities; and (2) identify mechanisms supporting ANPPw resistance or resilience following moderate disturbance. We found that ANPPw declined nonlinearly with rising disturbance severity, remaining stable until >60% of the total tree basal area senesced. As upper canopy openness increased from disturbance, greater light availability to the subcanopy enhanced the leaf-level photosynthesis and growth of this formerly light-limited canopy stratum, compensating for upper canopy production losses and a reduction in total leaf area index (LAI). As a result, whole-ecosystem production efficiency (ANPPw/LAI) increased with rising disturbance severity, except in plots beyond the disturbance threshold. These findings provide a mechanistic explanation for a nonlinear relationship between ANPPw, and disturbance severity, in which the physiological and growth enhancement of undisturbed vegetation is proportional to the level of disturbance until a threshold is exceeded. Our results have important ecological and management implications, demonstrating that in some ecosystems moderate levels of disturbance minimally alter forest production.

  11. Stimulation of dendritic cells enhances immune response after photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mroz, Pawel; Castano, Ana P.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2009-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) involves the administration of photosensitizers followed by illumination of the primary tumor with red light producing reactive oxygen species that cause vascular shutdown and tumor cell necrosis and apoptosis. Anti-tumor immunity is stimulated after PDT due to the acute inflammatory response, priming of the immune system to recognize tumor-associated antigens (TAA). The induction of specific CD8+ Tlymphocyte cells that recognize major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) restricted epitopes of TAAs is a highly desirable goal in cancer therapy. The PDT killed tumor cells may be phagocytosed by dendritic cells (DC) that then migrate to draining lymph nodes and prime naÃve T-cells that recognize TAA epitopes. This process is however, often sub-optimal, in part due to tumor-induced DC dysfunction. Instead of DC that can become mature and activated and have a potent antigen-presenting and immune stimulating phenotype, immature dendritic cells (iDC) are often found in tumors and are part of an immunosuppressive milieu including regulatory T-cells and immunosuppressive cytokines such as TGF-beta and IL10. We here report on the use of a potent DC activating agent, an oligonucleotide (ODN) that contains a non-methylated CpG motif and acts as an agonist of toll like receptor (TLR) 9. TLR activation is a danger signal to notify the immune system of the presence of invading pathogens. CpG-ODN (but not scrambled non-CpG ODN) increased bone-marrow DC activation after exposure to PDT-killed tumor cells, and significantly increased tumor response to PDT and mouse survival after peri-tumoral administration. CpG may be a valuable immunoadjuvant to PDT especially for tumors that produce DC dysfunction.

  12. The Lung Immune Response to Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (Lung Immunity to NTHi)

    PubMed Central

    King, Paul T.; Sharma, Roleen

    2015-01-01

    Haemophilus influenzae is divided into typeable or nontypeable strains based on the presence or absence of a polysaccharide capsule. The typeable strains (such as type b) are an important cause of systemic infection, whilst the nontypeable strains (designated as NTHi) are predominantly respiratory mucosal pathogens. NTHi is present as part of the normal microbiome in the nasopharynx, from where it may spread down to the lower respiratory tract. In this context it is no longer a commensal and becomes an important respiratory pathogen associated with a range of common conditions including bronchitis, bronchiectasis, pneumonia, and particularly chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. NTHi induces a strong inflammatory response in the respiratory tract with activation of immune responses, which often fail to clear the bacteria from the lung. This results in recurrent/persistent infection and chronic inflammation with consequent lung pathology. This review will summarise the current literature about the lung immune response to nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae, a topic that has important implications for patient management. PMID:26114124

  13. Murine immune responses to oral BCG immunization in the presence or absence of prior BCG sensitization.

    PubMed

    Cross, Martin L; Lambeth, Matthew R; Aldwell, Frank E

    2010-02-01

    Oral delivery of live Mycobacterium bovis BCG in a lipid matrix invokes cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses in mice and consequent protection against pulmonary challenge with virulent mycobacteria. To investigate the influence of prior BCG sensitization on oral vaccine efficacy, we assessed CMI responses and BCG colonization of the alimentary tract lymphatics 5 months after oral vaccination, in both previously naive mice and in mice that had been sensitized to BCG by injection 6 months previously. CMI responses did not differ significantly between mice that received subcutaneous BCG followed by oral BCG and those that received either injected or oral BCG alone. In vivo BCG colonization was predominant in the mesenteric lymph nodes after oral vaccination; this colonizing ability was not influenced by prior BCG sensitization. From this murine model study, we conclude that although prior parenteral-route BCG sensitization does not detrimentally affect BCG colonization after oral vaccination, there is no significant immune-boosting effect of the oral vaccine either.

  14. Innate Cellular Immune Responses in Aedes caspius (Diptera: Culicidae) Mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Soliman, D E; Farid, H A; Hammad, R E; Gad, A M; Bartholomay, L C

    2016-03-01

    Mosquitoes transmit a variety of pathogens that have devastating consequences for global public and veterinary health. Despite their capacity to serve as vectors, these insects have a robust capacity to respond to invading organisms with strong cellular and humoral immune responses. In Egypt, Aedes caspius (Pallas, 1771) has been suspected to act as a bridge vector of Rift Valley Fever virus between animals and humans. Microscopic analysis of Ae. caspius hemolymph revealed the presence of phagocytic cells called granulocytes. We further evaluated cellular immune responses produced by Ae. caspius as a result of exposure to a Gram-negative, and Gram-positive bacterium, and to latex beads. After challenge, a rapid and strong phagocytic response against either a natural or synthetic invader was evident. Hemocyte integrity in bacteria-inoculated mosquitoes was not morphologically affected. The number of circulating granulocytes decreased with age, reducing the overall phagocytic capacity of mosquitoes over time. The magnitude and speed of the phagocytic response suggested that granulocytes act as an important force in the battle against foreign invaders, as has been characterized in other important mosquito vector species.

  15. Mitochondrial DNA Stress Primes the Antiviral Innate Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    West, A. Phillip; Khoury-Hanold, William; Staron, Matthew; Tal, Michal C.; Pineda, Cristiana M.; Lang, Sabine M.; Bestwick, Megan; Duguay, Brett A.; Raimundo, Nuno; MacDuff, Donna A.; Kaech, Susan M.; Smiley, James R.; Means, Robert E.; Iwasaki, Akiko; Shadel, Gerald S.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is normally present at thousands of copies per cell and is packaged into several hundred higher-order structures termed nucleoids1. The abundant mtDNA-binding protein, transcription factor A mitochondrial (TFAM), regulates nucleoid architecture, abundance, and segregation2. Complete mtDNA depletion profoundly impairs oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), triggering calcium-dependent stress signaling and adaptive metabolic responses3. However, the cellular responses to mtDNA instability, a physiologically relevant stress observed in many human diseases and aging, remain ill-defined4. Here we show that moderate mtDNA stress elicited by TFAM deficiency engages cytosolic antiviral signaling to enhance the expression of a subset of interferon-stimulated genes (ISG). Mechanistically, we have found that aberrant mtDNA packaging promotes escape of mtDNA into the cytosol, where it engages the DNA sensor cGAS and promotes STING-IRF3-dependent signaling to elevate ISG expression, potentiate type I interferon responses, and confer broad viral resistance. Furthermore, we demonstrate that herpesviruses induce mtDNA stress, which potentiates antiviral signaling and type I interferon responses during infection. Our results further demonstrate that mitochondria are central participants in innate immunity, identify mtDNA stress as a cell-intrinsic trigger of antiviral signaling, and suggest that cellular monitoring of mtDNA homeostasis cooperates with canonical virus sensing mechanisms to fully license antiviral innate immunity. PMID:25642965

  16. Transcriptomic Study on Ovine Immune Responses to Fasciola hepatica Infection

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yan; Chryssafidis, Andreas L.; Browne, John A.; O'Sullivan, Jack; McGettigan, Paul A.; Mulcahy, Grace

    2016-01-01

    Background Fasciola hepatica is not only responsible for major economic losses in livestock farming, but is also a major food-borne zoonotic agent, with 180 million people being at risk of infection worldwide. This parasite is sophisticated in manipulating the hosts’ immune system to benefit its own survival. A better understanding of the mechanisms underpinning this immunomodulation is crucial for the development of control strategies such as vaccines. Methodology/principal findings This in vivo study investigated the global gene expression changes of ovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) response to both acute & chronic infection of F. hepatica, and revealed 6490 and 2364 differential expressed genes (DEGS), respectively. Several transcriptional regulators were predicted to be significantly inhibited (e.g. IL12 and IL18) or activated (e.g. miR155-5p) in PBMC during infection. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis highlighted a series of immune-associated pathways involved in the response to infection, including ‘Transforming Growth Factor Beta (TGFβ) signaling’, ‘Production of Nitric Oxide in Macrophages’, ‘Toll-like Receptor (TLRs) Signaling’, ‘Death Receptor Signaling’ and ‘IL17 Signaling’. We hypothesize that activation of pathways relevant to fibrosis in ovine chronic infection, may differ from those seen in cattle. Potential mechanisms behind immunomodulation in F. hepatica infection are a discussed. Significance In conclusion, the present study performed global transcriptomic analysis of ovine PBMC, the primary innate/adaptive immune cells, in response to infection with F. hepatica, using deep-sequencing (RNAseq). This dataset provides novel information pertinent to understanding of the pathological processes in fasciolosis, as well as a base from which to further refine development of vaccines. PMID:27661612

  17. Muscles provide protection during microbial infection by activating innate immune response pathways in Drosophila and zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Arunita; Roy, Debasish; Patnaik, Esha

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Muscle contraction brings about movement and locomotion in animals. However, muscles have also been implicated in several atypical physiological processes including immune response. The role of muscles in immunity and the mechanism involved has not yet been deciphered. In this paper, using Drosophila indirect flight muscles (IFMs) as a model, we show that muscles are immune-responsive tissues. Flies with defective IFMs are incapable of mounting a potent humoral immune response. Upon immune challenge, the IFMs produce anti-microbial peptides (AMPs) through the activation of canonical signaling pathways, and these IFM-synthesized AMPs are essential for survival upon infection. The trunk muscles of zebrafish, a vertebrate model system, also possess the capacity to mount an immune response against bacterial infections, thus establishing that immune responsiveness of muscles is evolutionarily conserved. Our results suggest that physiologically fit muscles might boost the innate immune response of an individual. PMID:27101844

  18. High Dietary Folate in Mice Alters Immune Response and Reduces Survival after Malarial Infection

    PubMed Central

    Meadows, Danielle N.; Bahous, Renata H.; Best, Ana F.; Rozen, Rima

    2015-01-01

    Malaria is a significant global health issue, with nearly 200 million cases in 2013 alone. Parasites obtain folate from the host or synthesize it de novo. Folate consumption has increased in many populations, prompting concerns regarding potential deleterious consequences of higher intake. The impact of high dietary folate on the host’s immune function and response to malaria has not been examined. Our goal was to determine whether high dietary folate would affect response to malarial infection in a murine model of cerebral malaria. Mice were fed control diets (CD, recommended folate level for rodents) or folic acid-supplemented diets (FASD, 10x recommended level) for 5 weeks before infection with Plasmodium berghei ANKA. Survival, parasitemia, numbers of immune cells and other infection parameters were assessed. FASD mice had reduced survival (p<0.01, Cox proportional hazards) and higher parasitemia (p< 0.01, joint model of parasitemia and survival) compared with CD mice. FASD mice had lower numbers of splenocytes, total T cells, and lower numbers of specific T and NK cell sub-populations, compared with CD mice (p<0.05, linear mixed effects). Increased brain TNFα immunoreactive protein (p<0.01, t-test) and increased liver Abca1 mRNA (p<0.01, t-test), a modulator of TNFα, were observed in FASD mice; these variables correlated positively (rs = 0.63, p = 0.01). Bcl-xl/Bak mRNA was increased in liver of FASD mice (p<0.01, t-test), suggesting reduced apoptotic potential. We conclude that high dietary folate increases parasite replication, disturbs the immune response and reduces resistance to malaria in mice. These findings have relevance for malaria-endemic regions, when considering anti-folate anti-malarials, food fortification or vitamin supplementation programs. PMID:26599510

  19. Disrupted glucocorticoid--Immune interactions during stress response in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Chiappelli, Joshua; Shi, Qiaoyun; Kodi, Priyadurga; Savransky, Anya; Kochunov, Peter; Rowland, Laura M; Nugent, Katie L; Hong, L Elliot

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoid and immune pathways typically interact dynamically to optimize adaptation to stressful environmental challenges. We tested the hypothesis that a dysfunctional glucocorticoid-immune relationship contributes to abnormal stress response in schizophrenia. Saliva samples from 34 individuals with schizophrenia (20 male, 14 female) and 40 healthy controls (20 male, 20 female) were collected prior to and at 3 time points following completion of a computerized psychological challenge meant to be frustrating. Salivary concentrations of cortisol and interleukin-6 (IL-6) and their response to the challenge were examined. Both cortisol and IL-6 significantly increased in response to stress in the combined sample (both p<.05). In controls, the rise in cortisol following the challenge was negatively correlated to the subsequent changes in IL-6 (r=-.461, p=.003), such that rise of cortisol immediately after stress predicts subsequently lower IL-6 levels. In contrast, this relationship was positive in schizophrenia patients (r=.379, p=.027). The trends were significantly different (Z=3.7, p=.0002). This stress paradigm induces a rise in both cortisol and IL-6. In healthy controls, a more robust acute cortisol response was associated with a steeper decline of IL-6 levels following stress, corresponding to the expected anti-inflammatory effects of cortisol. Patients exhibited the opposite relationship, suggesting an inability to down-regulate inflammatory responses to psychological stress in schizophrenia; or even a paradoxical increase of IL-6 response. This finding may partially underlie abnormalities in inflammatory and stress pathways previously found in the illness, implicating dysregulated stress response in the chronic inflammatory state in schizophrenia.

  20. Exosomal membrane molecules are potent immune response modulators

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Exosomes are endosome-derived vesicles (40–100 nm) formed during the formation of multi-vesicular bodies (MVBs). Occasionally, the MVBs fuse with the plasma membrane releasing their intra-luminal vesicles into the extracellular media, which are then known as exosomes. Different cell types such as B-cells, dendritic cells, platelets, reticulocytes and macrophages can release exosomes and current research in this area is more focused towards exosomes released by antigen-presenting cells. Exosomes have recently been shown to be immunomodulatory and the mechanism of immune response initiation by them is beginning to emerge. Besides molecules present inside the lumen of exosomes, it has been suggested that certain exosomal membrane molecules can interact with their surface receptors on the target cells thereby inducing an immunomodulatory response. In this review, Hsp70 and galectin-5, two immunogenic molecules present on exosomal membrane, are discussed in detail for initiating this response. PMID:21057626

  1. Yersinia type III effectors perturb host innate immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Pha, Khavong; Navarro, Lorena

    2016-01-01

    The innate immune system is the first line of defense against invading pathogens. Innate immune cells recognize molecular patterns from the pathogen and mount a response to resolve the infection. The production of proinflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species, phagocytosis, and induced programmed cell death are processes initiated by innate immune cells in order to combat invading pathogens. However, pathogens have evolved various virulence mechanisms to subvert these responses. One strategy utilized by Gram-negative bacterial pathogens is the deployment of a complex machine termed the type III secretion system (T3SS). The T3SS is composed of a syringe-like needle structure and the effector proteins that are injected directly into a target host cell to disrupt a cellular response. The three human pathogenic Yersinia spp. (Y. pestis, Y. enterocolitica, and Y. pseudotuberculosis) are Gram-negative bacteria that share in common a 70 kb virulence plasmid which encodes the T3SS. Translocation of the Yersinia effector proteins (YopE, YopH, YopT, YopM, YpkA/YopO, and YopP/J) into the target host cell results in disruption of the actin cytoskeleton to inhibit phagocytosis, downregulation of proinflammatory cytokine/chemokine production, and induction of cellular apoptosis of the target cell. Over the past 25 years, studies on the Yersinia effector proteins have unveiled tremendous knowledge of how the effectors enhance Yersinia virulence. Recently, the long awaited crystal structure of YpkA has been solved providing further insights into the activation of the YpkA kinase domain. Multisite autophosphorylation by YpkA to activate its kinase domain was also shown and postulated to serve as a mechanism to bypass regulation by host phosphatases. In addition, novel Yersinia effector protein targets, such as caspase-1, and signaling pathways including activation of the inflammasome were identified. In this review, we summarize the recent discoveries made on Yersinia

  2. Yersinia type III effectors perturb host innate immune responses.

    PubMed

    Pha, Khavong; Navarro, Lorena

    2016-02-26

    The innate immune system is the first line of defense against invading pathogens. Innate immune cells recognize molecular patterns from the pathogen and mount a response to resolve the infection. The production of proinflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species, phagocytosis, and induced programmed cell death are processes initiated by innate immune cells in order to combat invading pathogens. However, pathogens have evolved various virulence mechanisms to subvert these responses. One strategy utilized by Gram-negative bacterial pathogens is the deployment of a complex machine termed the type III secretion system (T3SS). The T3SS is composed of a syringe-like needle structure and the effector proteins that are injected directly into a target host cell to disrupt a cellular response. The three human pathogenic Yersinia spp. (Y. pestis, Y. enterocolitica, and Y. pseudotuberculosis) are Gram-negative bacteria that share in common a 70 kb virulence plasmid which encodes the T3SS. Translocation of the Yersinia effector proteins (YopE, YopH, YopT, YopM, YpkA/YopO, and YopP/J) into the target host cell results in disruption of the actin cytoskeleton to inhibit phagocytosis, downregulation of proinflammatory cytokine/chemokine production, and induction of cellular apoptosis of the target cell. Over the past 25 years, studies on the Yersinia effector proteins have unveiled tremendous knowledge of how the effectors enhance Yersinia virulence. Recently, the long awaited crystal structure of YpkA has been solved providing further insights into the activation of the YpkA kinase domain. Multisite autophosphorylation by YpkA to activate its kinase domain was also shown and postulated to serve as a mechanism to bypass regulation by host phosphatases. In addition, novel Yersinia effector protein targets, such as caspase-1, and signaling pathways including activation of the inflammasome were identified. In this review, we summarize the recent discoveries made on Yersinia

  3. Ribavirin stimulates the immune response of Atlantic salmon.

    PubMed

    Rivas-Aravena, A; Guajardo, S; Valenzuela, B; Cartagena, J; Imarai, M I; Spencer, E; Sandino, A M

    2015-03-15

    Ribavirin is a synthetic nucleotide analog capable of inhibiting or even preventing some viral infections in mammals and also in fish. It has been seen by others that ribavirin by itself is able to stimulate the immune system of mammals, causing a differentiation of T-cells to T helper 1 cells (Th)-1. In this work, we evaluated the immune effect of ribavirin in vitro on kidney cells from Atlantic salmon and in vivo by oral administration of ribavirin to Atlantic salmon. For this purpose, the transcripts of immune molecules Tbet, GATA3, CD8, CD4, IFNα, IFNγ, IL-4/13, IL-10, IL-12, IL-15 and TGF-B were quantified. The results show that ribavirin administered orally in food to Atlantic salmon increased IFNγ and CD4 transcripts in the in vivo assays and, in addition, increased IL-12, IL-15 and CD8 in the in vitro analyses, indicating that the treatment stimulates a Th1 type response in salmon. PMID:25631788

  4. Timing of plant immune responses by a central circadian regulator.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Barnaby, Jinyoung Yang; Tada, Yasuomi; Li, Hairi; Tör, Mahmut; Caldelari, Daniela; Lee, Dae-un; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Dong, Xinnian

    2011-02-01

    The principal immune mechanism against biotrophic pathogens in plants is the resistance (R)-gene-mediated defence. It was proposed to share components with the broad-spectrum basal defence machinery. However, the underlying molecular mechanism is largely unknown. Here we report the identification of novel genes involved in R-gene-mediated resistance against downy mildew in Arabidopsis and their regulatory control by the circadian regulator, CIRCADIAN CLOCK-ASSOCIATED 1 (CCA1). Numerical clustering based on phenotypes of these gene mutants revealed that programmed cell death (PCD) is the major contributor to resistance. Mutants compromised in the R-gene-mediated PCD were also defective in basal resistance, establishing an interconnection between these two distinct defence mechanisms. Surprisingly, we found that these new defence genes are under circadian control by CCA1, allowing plants to 'anticipate' infection at dawn when the pathogen normally disperses the spores and time immune responses according to the perception of different pathogenic signals upon infection. Temporal control of the defence genes by CCA1 differentiates their involvement in basal and R-gene-mediated defence. Our study has revealed a key functional link between the circadian clock and plant immunity.

  5. Comparison of Protective Immune Responses to Apicomplexan Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Frölich, Sonja; Entzeroth, Rolf; Wallach, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Members of the phylum Apicomplexa, which includes the species Plasmodium, Eimeria, Toxoplasma, and Babesia amongst others, are the most successful intracellular pathogens known to humankind. The widespread acquisition of antimicrobial resistance to most drugs used to date has sparked a great deal of research and commercial interest in the development of vaccines as alternative control strategies. A few antigens from the asexual and sexual stages of apicomplexan development have been identified and their genes characterised; however, the fine cellular and molecular details of the effector mechanisms crucial for parasite inhibition and stimulation of protective immunity are still not entirely understood. This paper provides an overview of what is currently known about the protective immune response against the various types of apicomplexan parasites and focuses mainly on the similarities of these pathogens and their host interaction. Finally, the evolutionary relationships of these parasites and their hosts, as well as the modulation of immune functions that are critical in determining the outcome of the infection by these pathogenic organisms, are discussed. PMID:21876783

  6. Stress, Nutrition, and Intestinal Immune Responses in Pigs - A Review.

    PubMed

    Lee, In Kyu; Kye, Yoon Chul; Kim, Girak; Kim, Han Wool; Gu, Min Jeong; Umboh, Johnny; Maaruf, Kartini; Kim, Sung Woo; Yun, Cheol-Heui

    2016-08-01

    Modern livestock production became highly intensive and large scaled to increase production efficiency. This production environment could add stressors affecting the health and growth of animals. Major stressors can include environment (air quality and temperature), nutrition, and infection. These stressors can reduce growth performance and alter immune systems at systemic and local levels including the gastrointestinal tract. Heat stress increases the permeability, oxidative stress, and inflammatory responses in the gut. Nutritional stress from fasting, antinutritional compounds, and toxins induces the leakage and destruction of the tight junction proteins in the gut. Fasting is shown to suppress pro-inflammatory cytokines, whereas deoxynivalenol increases the recruitment of intestinal pro-inflammatory cytokines and the level of lymphocytes in the gut. Pathogenic and viral infections such as Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) and porcine epidemic diarrhea virus can lead to loosening the intestinal epithelial barrier. On the other hand, supplementation of Lactobacillus or Saccharaomyces reduced infectious stress by ETEC. It was noted that major stressors altered the permeability of intestinal barriers and profiles of genes and proteins of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in mucosal system in pigs. However, it is not sufficient to fully explain the mechanism of the gut immune system in pigs under stress conditions. Correlation and interaction of gut and systemic immune system under major stressors should be better defined to overcome aforementioned obstacles.

  7. Twisting immune responses for allogeneic stem cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shengwen Calvin; Zhong, Jiang F

    2009-01-01

    Stem cell-derived tissues and organs have the potential to change modern clinical science. However, rejection of allogeneic grafts by the host’s immune system is an issue which needs to be addressed before embryonic stem cell-derived cells or tissues can be used as medicines. Mismatches in human leukocyte class I antigens and minor histocompatibility antigens are the central factors that are responsible for various graft-versus-host diseases. Traditional strategies usually involve suppressing the whole immune systems with drugs. There are many side effects associated with these methods. Here, we discuss an emerging strategy for manipulating the central immune tolerance by naturally “introducing” donor antigens to a host so a recipient can acquire tolerance specifically to the donor cells or tissues. This strategy has two distinct stages. The first stage restores the thymic function of adult patients with sex steroid inhibitory drugs (LHRH-A), keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), interleukin 7 (IL-7) and FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3). The second stage introduces hematopoietic stem cells and their downstream progenitors to the restored thymus by direct injection. Hematopoietic stem cells are used to introduce donor antigens because they have priority access to the thymus. We also review several clinical cases to explain this new strategy. PMID:20975985

  8. Stress, Nutrition, and Intestinal Immune Responses in Pigs - A Review.

    PubMed

    Lee, In Kyu; Kye, Yoon Chul; Kim, Girak; Kim, Han Wool; Gu, Min Jeong; Umboh, Johnny; Maaruf, Kartini; Kim, Sung Woo; Yun, Cheol-Heui

    2016-08-01

    Modern livestock production became highly intensive and large scaled to increase production efficiency. This production environment could add stressors affecting the health and growth of animals. Major stressors can include environment (air quality and temperature), nutrition, and infection. These stressors can reduce growth performance and alter immune systems at systemic and local levels including the gastrointestinal tract. Heat stress increases the permeability, oxidative stress, and inflammatory responses in the gut. Nutritional stress from fasting, antinutritional compounds, and toxins induces the leakage and destruction of the tight junction proteins in the gut. Fasting is shown to suppress pro-inflammatory cytokines, whereas deoxynivalenol increases the recruitment of intestinal pro-inflammatory cytokines and the level of lymphocytes in the gut. Pathogenic and viral infections such as Enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC) and porcine epidemic diarrhea virus can lead to loosening the intestinal epithelial barrier. On the other hand, supplementation of Lactobacillus or Saccharaomyces reduced infectious stress by ETEC. It was noted that major stressors altered the permeability of intestinal barriers and profiles of genes and proteins of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in mucosal system in pigs. However, it is not sufficient to fully explain the mechanism of the gut immune system in pigs under stress conditions. Correlation and interaction of gut and systemic immune system under major stressors should be better defined to overcome aforementioned obstacles. PMID:27189643

  9. Feliform carnivores have a distinguished constitutive innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Sonja K; Wachter, Bettina; Aschenborn, Ortwin H K; Thalwitzer, Susanne; Melzheimer, Jörg; Hofer, Heribert; Czirják, Gábor Á

    2016-01-01

    Determining the immunological phenotype of endangered and threatened populations is important to identify those vulnerable to novel pathogens. Among mammals, members of the order Carnivora are particularly threatened by diseases. We therefore examined the constitutive innate immune system, the first line of protection against invading microbes, of six free-ranging carnivore species; the black-backed jackal (Canis mesomelas), the brown hyena (Hyena brunnea), the caracal (Caracal caracal), the cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus), the leopard (Panthera pardus) and the lion (Panthera leo) using a bacterial killing assay. The differences in immune responses amongst the six species were independent of their foraging behaviour, body mass or social organisation but reflected their phylogenetic relatedness. The bacterial killing capacity of black-backed jackals, a member of the suborder Caniformia, followed the pattern established for a wide variety of vertebrates. In contrast, the five representatives of the suborder Feliformia demonstrated a killing capacity at least an order of magnitude higher than any species reported previously, with a particularly high capacity in caracals and cheetahs. Our results suggest that the immunocompetence of threatened felids such as the cheetah has been underestimated and its assessment ought to consider both innate and adaptive components of the immune system. PMID:27044323

  10. Humoral and Cellular Immune Response in Canine Hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Miller, J; Popiel, J; Chełmońska-Soyta, A

    2015-07-01

    Hypothyroidism is one of the most common endocrine diseases in dogs and is generally considered to be autoimmune in nature. In human hypothyroidism, the thyroid gland is destroyed by both cellular (i.e. autoreactive helper and cytotoxic T lymphocytes) and humoral (i.e. autoantibodies specific for thyroglobulin, thyroxine and triiodothyronine) effector mechanisms. Other suggested factors include impaired peripheral immune suppression (i.e. the malfunction of regulatory T cells) or an additional pro-inflammatory effect of T helper 17 lymphocytes. The aim of this study was to evaluate immunological changes in canine hypothyroidism. Twenty-eight clinically healthy dogs, 25 hypothyroid dogs without thyroglobulin antibodies and eight hypothyroid dogs with these autoantibodies were enrolled into the study. There were alterations in serum proteins in hypothyroid dogs compared with healthy controls (i.e. raised concentrations of α-globulins, β2- and γ-globulins) as well as higher concentration of acute phase proteins and circulating immune complexes. Hypothyroid animals had a lower CD4:CD8 ratio in peripheral blood compared with control dogs and diseased dogs also had higher expression of interferon γ (gene and protein expression) and CD28 (gene expression). Similar findings were found in both groups of hypothyroid dogs. Canine hypothyroidism is therefore characterized by systemic inflammation with dominance of a cellular immune response.

  11. Feliform carnivores have a distinguished constitutive innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Sonja K; Wachter, Bettina; Aschenborn, Ortwin H K; Thalwitzer, Susanne; Melzheimer, Jörg; Hofer, Heribert; Czirják, Gábor Á

    2016-05-15

    Determining the immunological phenotype of endangered and threatened populations is important to identify those vulnerable to novel pathogens. Among mammals, members of the order Carnivora are particularly threatened by diseases. We therefore examined the constitutive innate immune system, the first line of protection against invading microbes, of six free-ranging carnivore species; the black-backed jackal (Canis mesomelas), the brown hyena (Hyena brunnea), the caracal (Caracal caracal), the cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus), the leopard (Panthera pardus) and the lion (Panthera leo) using a bacterial killing assay. The differences in immune responses amongst the six species were independent of their foraging behaviour, body mass or social organisation but reflected their phylogenetic relatedness. The bacterial killing capacity of black-backed jackals, a member of the suborder Caniformia, followed the pattern established for a wide variety of vertebrates. In contrast, the five representatives of the suborder Feliformia demonstrated a killing capacity at least an order of magnitude higher than any species reported previously, with a particularly high capacity in caracals and cheetahs. Our results suggest that the immunocompetence of threatened felids such as the cheetah has been underestimated and its assessment ought to consider both innate and adaptive components of the immune system.

  12. Feliform carnivores have a distinguished constitutive innate immune response

    PubMed Central

    Heinrich, Sonja K.; Wachter, Bettina; Aschenborn, Ortwin H. K.; Thalwitzer, Susanne; Melzheimer, Jörg; Hofer, Heribert; Czirják, Gábor Á.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Determining the immunological phenotype of endangered and threatened populations is important to identify those vulnerable to novel pathogens. Among mammals, members of the order Carnivora are particularly threatened by diseases. We therefore examined the constitutive innate immune system, the first line of protection against invading microbes, of six free-ranging carnivore species; the black-backed jackal (Canis mesomelas), the brown hyena (Hyena brunnea), the caracal (Caracal caracal), the cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus), the leopard (Panthera pardus) and the lion (Panthera leo) using a bacterial killing assay. The differences in immune responses amongst the six species were independent of their foraging behaviour, body mass or social organisation but reflected their phylogenetic relatedness. The bacterial killing capacity of black-backed jackals, a member of the suborder Caniformia, followed the pattern established for a wide variety of vertebrates. In contrast, the five representatives of the suborder Feliformia demonstrated a killing capacity at least an order of magnitude higher than any species reported previously, with a particularly high capacity in caracals and cheetahs. Our results suggest that the immunocompetence of threatened felids such as the cheetah has been underestimated and its assessment ought to consider both innate and adaptive components of the immune system. PMID:27044323

  13. Importance of immune response genes in hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    de Alencar, Josiane Bazzo; Macedo, Luciana Conci; de Barros, Morgana Ferreira; Rodrigues, Camila; Cadide, Renata Campos; Sell, Ana Maria; Visentainer, Jeane Eliete Laguila

    2013-01-01

    Hemophilia A is a disease caused by a deficiency of coagulation factor VIII resulting from genetic inheritance linked to chromosome X. One treatment option is the administration of plasma or recombinant FVIII. However, some patients develop inhibitors or antibodies against this factor. Inhibitors are alloantibodies that bind to the epitope of factor VIII causing it to be recognized by the immune system as a foreign peptide. This is the most serious complication in hemophilia patients in respect to replacement therapy. Some studies have suggested that genetic factors influence the development of factor VIII inhibitors such as ethnicity, family history, mutations in the factor VIII gene and in genes of the immune system. The aim of this study was to conduct a literature review to assess the influence of genetic factors of immune response genes, especially genes of the major histocompatibility complex and cytokines, which may be related to the development of factor VIII inhibitors in hemophilia A patients. Understanding these risk factors will help to determine future differential treatment in the control and prevention of the development of inhibitors. PMID:24106448

  14. Socioeconomic gradients in immune response to latent infection.

    PubMed

    Dowd, Jennifer Beam; Haan, Mary N; Blythe, Lynn; Moore, Kari; Aiello, Allison E

    2008-01-01

    There is a strong relation between socioeconomic position and health outcomes, although the mechanisms are poorly understood. The authors used data from 1,503 California participants in the 1998-1999 Sacramento Area Latino Study on Aging aged 60-100 years to ask whether socioeconomic position is related to immune function as measured by the body's ability to keep latent herpesvirus antibody levels in a quiescent state. Individuals with lower educational levels had significantly higher levels of immunoglobulin G antibodies to cytomegalovirus and herpes simplex virus type 1. The odds ratio for being in a higher tertile of cytomegalovirus antibodies was 1.54 (95% confidence interval: 1.18, 2.01) for those in the lowest educational group, and the odds ratio for being in a higher tertile of herpes simplex virus type 1 was 1.63 (95% confidence interval: 1.25, 2.13). The relation between education and cytomegalovirus and herpes simplex virus type 1 antibody levels remained strong after controlling for baseline health conditions, smoking status, and body mass index. This is the first study known to show a relation between socioeconomic position and immune response to latent infection. It provides suggestive evidence that modulation of the immune system via latent infections may play a role in the observed associations between socioeconomic position and disease.

  15. How stress alters immune responses during respiratory infection.

    PubMed

    Griebel, Philip; Hill, Kevin; Stookey, Joseph

    2014-12-01

    Fall-weaned calves entering the feedlot experience a variety of psychological and physical stressors, including maternal separation, transportation, social mixing, restraint, and dietary changes. Mixing calves from multiple sources also exposes them to respiratory pathogens at a time when maternal immunity has waned. Using an experimental bovine respiratory disease (BRD) challenge, we analyzed the effects of specific stressors on clinical disease and immune responses following bovine herpes virus (BHV-1/IBR) infection of naïve calves. Transportation stress was compared to either abrupt weaning plus transportation or transportation following a two-step weaning process. Transportation alone significantly (P < 0.05) increased BHV-1 shedding in nasal secretions despite elevated interferon-gamma production in the upper respiratory tract. In contrast, abrupt weaning and transportation, significantly (P < 0.05) increased serum haptoglobin on day 3 post-infection (PI) and blood leukocyte tumor necrosis factor α secretion on day 5 PI. These systemic responses were reduced by instituting a two-step weaning process 4 days prior to transportation and BHV-1 infection. In conclusion, these observations are consistent with earlier studies implicating weaning and transportation as stressors contributing to BRD severity and mortality. Current studies also revealed that different stressors or combination of stressors have distinct effects on host responses to viral infection in naïve calves. PMID:25497501

  16. Innate immune inflammatory response in the acutely ischemic myocardium.

    PubMed

    Deftereos, Spyridon; Angelidis, Christos; Bouras, Georgios; Raisakis, Konstantinos; Gerckens, Ulrich; Cleman, Michael W; Giannopoulos, Georgios

    2014-01-01

    The "holy grail" of modern interventional cardiology is the salvage of viable myocardial tissue in the distribution of an acutely occluded coronary artery. Thrombolysis and percutaneous coronary interventions, provided they can be delivered on time, can interrupt the occlusion and save tissue. At the same time restoring the patency of the coronary vessels and providing the ischemic myocardium with blood can cause additional tissue damage. A key element of ischemic and reperfusion injury and major determinant of the evolution of damage in the injured myocardium is the inflammatory response. The innate immune system initiates and directs this response which is a prerequisite for subsequent healing. The complement cascade is set in motion following the release of subcellular membrane constituents. Endogenous 'danger' signals known as danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) released from ischemic and dying cells alert the innate immune system and activate several signal transduction pathways through interactions with the highly conserved Toll like receptors (TLRs). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation directly induces pro-inflammatory cascades and triggers formation of the inflammasome. The challenge lies into designing strategies that specifically block the inflammatory cascades responsible for tissue damage without affecting those concerned with tissue healing.

  17. Immunological aspects of the immune response induced by mosquito allergens.

    PubMed

    Cantillo, José Fernando; Fernández-Caldas, Enrique; Puerta, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Allergies caused by mosquito bites may produce local or systemic reactions. The inhalation of mosquito allergens may also cause asthma and/or allergic rhinoconjunctivitis in sensitized individuals. The mechanisms implicated in the development of these immune responses involve IgE antibodies, different subtypes of IgG and proinflammatory cytokines as well as basophils, eosinophils and mast cells. Several allergenic components have been identified in the saliva and bodies of mosquitoes and some of these are present in different mosquito species. The most common species implicated in allergic reactions belong to the genera Aedes, Culex and Anopheles. Several Aedes aegypti allergens have been cloned and sequenced. The recombinant molecules show IgE reactivity similar to that of the native allergens, making them good candidates for the diagnosis of mosquito allergies. Allergen-specific immunotherapy with mosquito extracts induces a protective response characterized by a decreased production of IgE antibodies, increased IgG levels, a reduction in the severity of cutaneous and respiratory symptoms and the need for medication. The aims of this review are to summarize the progress made in the characterization of mosquito allergens and discuss the types of immune responses induced by mosquito bites and the inhalation of mosquito allergens in atopic individuals.

  18. Interactions between soil thermal and hydrological dynamics in the response of Alaska ecosystems to fire disturbance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yi, Shuhua; McGuire, Anthony; Harden, Jennifer; Kasischke, Eric; Manies, Kristen L.; Hinzman, Larry; Liljedahl, Anna K.; Randerson, J.; Liu, Heping; Romanovsky, V.adimir E; Marchenko, Sergey S.; Kim, Yongwon

    2009-01-01

    Soil temperature and moisture are important factors that control many ecosystem processes. However, interactions between soil thermal and hydrological processes are not adequately understood in cold regions, where the frozen soil, fire disturbance, and soil drainage play important roles in controlling interactions among these processes. These interactions were investigated with a new ecosystem model framework, the dynamic organic soil version of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model, that incorporates an efficient and stable numerical scheme for simulating soil thermal and hydrological dynamics within soil profiles that contain a live moss horizon, fibrous and amorphous organic horizons, and mineral soil horizons. The performance of the model was evaluated for a tundra burn site that had both preburn and postburn measurements, two black spruce fire chronosequences (representing space-for-time substitutions in well and intermediately drained conditions), and a poorly drained black spruce site. Although space-for-time substitutions present challenges in model-data comparison, the model demonstrates substantial ability in simulating the dynamics of evapotranspiration, soil temperature, active layer depth, soil moisture, and water table depth in response to both climate variability and fire disturbance. Several differences between model simulations and field measurements identified key challenges for evaluating/improving model performance that include (1) proper representation of discrepancies between air temperature and ground surface temperature; (2) minimization of precipitation biases in the driving data sets; (3) improvement of the measurement accuracy of soil moisture in surface organic horizons; and (4) proper specification of organic horizon depth/properties, and soil thermal conductivity.

  19. Observation of Sudden Ionospheric Disturbances over Istanbul in Response to X-Ray Flare Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceren Kalafatoglu Eyiguler, Emine; Kaymaz, Zerefsan; Ceren Moral, Aysegul

    2016-07-01

    Sudden ionospheric disturbances (SID) are the enhanced electron density structures in the D region ionosphere which occur in response to the increase in X-ray flares and EUV flux. SIDs can be monitored using Very Low Frequency (VLF) radio signals (3-30 kHz) which travel between the D-region and the surface of the Earth. In this study, we use SID monitors obtained from the Stanford University Solar Center and two antennas which were built at the Istanbul Technical University to track the ionospheric disturbances in the VLF range. Our antennas are capable of capturing signals from several VLF transmitting stations. In this work, we focus on the variations in the signal strength of the closest VLF transmitting station 'TBB' which is operating at 26.7 kHz frequency at BAFA, Turkey (37.43N, 27.15E). We present ITU SID observations from both antennas; show the daily variation, general structure and the typical patterns we observe as well as case studies of significant events. Our initial analysis shows close relationship between observed X-ray flares from geosynchronous GOES 13 and GOES 15 satellites and VLF station signal strength received by the monitors.

  20. Meiofauna Responses to Mechanical Disturbances in Stream Mesocosms on the Illinois River, Arkansas (U. S. A.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, A. V.; Reese, R. A.

    2005-05-01

    Benthic meiofauna responses to mechanical disturbance of the substrate was studied in August, 2003 on the Illinois River, Arkansas, (U. S. A.) in stream mesocosms. The Illinois River is a gravel/bed, riffle/pool stream located in the Ozark Highlands. Three levels of disturbance (undisturbed, moderate/frequent, and severe/infrequent) were assigned randomly to twelve stream mesocosms. After 18 days, substrate samples were taken from each mesocosm using a core sampler. Planktonic and natural stream bed samples were taken every third day during the study to identify potential colonizers and to serve as a reference. Within the mesocosms, four of the 17 taxa found and total density of meiofauna L-1 of substrate were significantly different between treatments with the undisturbed channels having higher densities than the severe/ frequent treatment. Total meiofauna densities L-1 in the undisturbed treatment, 4471.9 ± 1308 (2 s. e.), were significantly higher than either of the other treatment levels (F = 15.43, P = 0.001). Chironomidae and Ephemeroptera were numerically dominant in undisturbed channels but both were significantly reduced by the treatments (F = 12.28, P = 0.003; F = 61.22, P < 0.000 respectively). Shannon's diversity index ('H) was highest in the moderate/frequent treatment reflecting the increase in evenness.

  1. Response of Permafrost to Anthropogenic Land Surface Disturbance near Fairbanks, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astley, B. N.; Douglas, T. A.; Campbell, S.; Snyder, C.; Goggin, E.; Saari, S.

    2011-12-01

    Permafrost near Fairbanks Alaska is relatively warm (measured between -1 and 0°C in this study), and is thus highly susceptible to thawing following surface disturbance by land clearing or fire. The surface moss layer and other vegetation are important insulators for near-surface permafrost in the summer months. The removal of this insulation causes the seasonally thawed (active layer) depth to increase and eventually results in formation of taliks (thawed ground below the seasonally frozen active layer). We have been investigating the response of permafrost seasonal thaw depths and rates in soils commonly found around Fairbanks, Alaska following anthropogenic disturbances such as trails, roads, and large clearings. This information is useful to predict the impact of future disturbances on the permafrost landscape and on local ecology and aids in modeling permafrost stability under land that has already been cleared of vegetation. We combined direct current resistivity, ground-penetrating radar (GPR), and borehole data to evaluate permafrost top-down thawing at multiple locations in the Fairbanks area: on Fort Wainwright north of the Chena River, south of the Chena River within Yukon Training Area (YTA), and at the Farmer's Loop Permafrost Research Site. These sites were cleared of vegetation in the past and were selected to represent time since disturbance. The trails north of the Chena River were cleared in 1994 and were surveyed with GPR in 1994-1995, the YTA site was cleared around 1965, and the Farmer's Loop site was cleared in 1946. These sites represent varying types of soil including alluvial soils (containing sandy gravel capped with sandy silt) on Fort Wainwright and thick loess at Farmer's Loop Road. The YTA site does not contain deep borings for detailed stratigraphic interpretation, but hand auguring confirmed this site also contains thick loess at the surface. Resistivity data were used to discern taliks from permafrost and were compared to the 1994

  2. Immune response to an Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae vaccine in swine

    PubMed Central

    Rousseau, Paul; Assaf, Robert; Boulay, Gaston; Désy, Marie

    1988-01-01

    Piglets vaccinated with an inactivated tetravalent vaccine (Pleurovac 4) against Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotypes 1, 2, 5 and 7, produced circulating antibodies after a first intramuscular injection and showed an anamnestic reaction after a second. The rise in antibody levels in vaccinated piglets was statistically significant when compared with those of the control group. The administration of 1 or 2 mL of vaccine did not lead to significantly different antibody levels. The specificity of the immune response is demonstrated by an increase in titer to all four serotypes in pigs given the tetravalent vaccine, but an increase in titer to only two serotypes in pigs given a bivalent vaccine (Pleurovac). PMID:17423199

  3. The changing shape of vaccination: improving immune responses through geometrical variations of a microdevice for immunization.

    PubMed

    Crichton, Michael Lawrence; Muller, David Alexander; Depelsenaire, Alexandra Christina Isobel; Pearson, Frances Elizabeth; Wei, Jonathan; Coffey, Jacob; Zhang, Jin; Fernando, Germain J P; Kendall, Mark Anthony Fernance

    2016-06-02

    Micro-device use for vaccination has grown in the past decade, with the promise of ease-of-use, painless application, stable solid formulations and greater immune response generation. However, the designs of the highly immunogenic devices (e.g. the gene gun, Nanopatch or laser adjuvantation) require significant energy to enter the skin (30-90 mJ). Within this study, we explore a way to more effectively use energy for skin penetration and vaccination. These modifications change the Nanopatch projections from cylindrical/conical shapes with a density of 20,000 per cm(2) to flat-shaped protrusions at 8,000 per cm(2), whilst maintaining the surface area and volume that is placed within the skin. We show that this design results in more efficient surface crack initiations, allowing the energy to be more efficiently be deployed through the projections into the skin, with a significant overall increase in penetration depth (50%). Furthermore, we measured a significant increase in localized skin cell death (>2 fold), and resultant infiltrate of cells (monocytes and neutrophils). Using a commercial seasonal trivalent human influenza vaccine (Fluvax 2014), our new patch design resulted in an immune response equivalent to intramuscular injection with approximately 1000 fold less dose, while also being a practical device conceptually suited to widespread vaccination.

  4. The changing shape of vaccination: improving immune responses through geometrical variations of a microdevice for immunization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crichton, Michael Lawrence; Muller, David Alexander; Depelsenaire, Alexandra Christina Isobel; Pearson, Frances Elizabeth; Wei, Jonathan; Coffey, Jacob; Zhang, Jin; Fernando, Germain J. P.; Kendall, Mark Anthony Fernance

    2016-06-01

    Micro-device use for vaccination has grown in the past decade, with the promise of ease-of-use, painless application, stable solid formulations and greater immune response generation. However, the designs of the highly immunogenic devices (e.g. the gene gun, Nanopatch or laser adjuvantation) require significant energy to enter the skin (30–90 mJ). Within this study, we explore a way to more effectively use energy for skin penetration and vaccination. These modifications change the Nanopatch projections from cylindrical/conical shapes with a density of 20,000 per cm2 to flat-shaped protrusions at 8,000 per cm2, whilst maintaining the surface area and volume that is placed within the skin. We show that this design results in more efficient surface crack initiations, allowing the energy to be more efficiently be deployed through the projections into the skin, with a significant overall increase in penetration depth (50%). Furthermore, we measured a significant increase in localized skin cell death (>2 fold), and resultant infiltrate of cells (monocytes and neutrophils). Using a commercial seasonal trivalent human influenza vaccine (Fluvax 2014), our new patch design resulted in an immune response equivalent to intramuscular injection with approximately 1000 fold less dose, while also being a practical device conceptually suited to widespread vaccination.

  5. The changing shape of vaccination: improving immune responses through geometrical variations of a microdevice for immunization.

    PubMed

    Crichton, Michael Lawrence; Muller, David Alexander; Depelsenaire, Alexandra Christina Isobel; Pearson, Frances Elizabeth; Wei, Jonathan; Coffey, Jacob; Zhang, Jin; Fernando, Germain J P; Kendall, Mark Anthony Fernance

    2016-01-01

    Micro-device use for vaccination has grown in the past decade, with the promise of ease-of-use, painless application, stable solid formulations and greater immune response generation. However, the designs of the highly immunogenic devices (e.g. the gene gun, Nanopatch or laser adjuvantation) require significant energy to enter the skin (30-90 mJ). Within this study, we explore a way to more effectively use energy for skin penetration and vaccination. These modifications change the Nanopatch projections from cylindrical/conical shapes with a density of 20,000 per cm(2) to flat-shaped protrusions at 8,000 per cm(2), whilst maintaining the surface area and volume that is placed within the skin. We show that this design results in more efficient surface crack initiations, allowing the energy to be more efficiently be deployed through the projections into the skin, with a significant overall increase in penetration depth (50%). Furthermore, we measured a significant increase in localized skin cell death (>2 fold), and resultant infiltrate of cells (monocytes and neutrophils). Using a commercial seasonal trivalent human influenza vaccine (Fluvax 2014), our new patch design resulted in an immune response equivalent to intramuscular injection with approximately 1000 fold less dose, while also being a practical device conceptually suited to widespread vaccination. PMID:27251567

  6. The changing shape of vaccination: improving immune responses through geometrical variations of a microdevice for immunization

    PubMed Central

    Crichton, Michael Lawrence; Muller, David Alexander; Depelsenaire, Alexandra Christina Isobel; Pearson, Frances Elizabeth; Wei, Jonathan; Coffey, Jacob; Zhang, Jin; Fernando, Germain J. P.; Kendall, Mark Anthony Fernance

    2016-01-01

    Micro-device use for vaccination has grown in the past decade, with the promise of ease-of-use, painless application, stable solid formulations and greater immune response generation. However, the designs of the highly immunogenic devices (e.g. the gene gun, Nanopatch or laser adjuvantation) require significant energy to enter the skin (30–90 mJ). Within this study, we explore a way to more effectively use energy for skin penetration and vaccination. These modifications change the Nanopatch projections from cylindrical/conical shapes with a density of 20,000 per cm2 to flat-shaped protrusions at 8,000 per cm2, whilst maintaining the surface area and volume that is placed within the skin. We show that this design results in more efficient surface crack initiations, allowing the energy to be more efficiently be deployed through the projections into the skin, with a significant overall increase in penetration depth (50%). Furthermore, we measured a significant increase in localized skin cell death (>2 fold), and resultant infiltrate of cells (monocytes and neutrophils). Using a commercial seasonal trivalent human influenza vaccine (Fluvax 2014), our new patch design resulted in an immune response equivalent to intramuscular injection with approximately 1000 fold less dose, while also being a practical device conceptually suited to widespread vaccination. PMID:27251567

  7. Immune response to 60-day head-down bed rest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jinping; Guo, Aihua; Zhong, Ping; Zhang, Hongyu; Wu, Feng; Wan, Yumin; Bai, Yanqiang; Chen, Shanguang; Li, Yinghui

    Introduction: Exposure of humans to spaceflight has resulted in disregulation of the immune system. Head-down bed rest (HDBR) has been extensively used as an earth-bound analog to study physiologic effects mimicking those occurring in weightlessness during spaceflight. It is uncertain how a prolonged period of bed rest affect human immune responses. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of 60-day HDBR on immune function and EB virus reactivation in seven male volunteers. Methods: There were seven healthy male volunteers who were subjected to HDBR for 60d. Immunological parameters including leukocyte subset distribution, lymphocyte proliferation to mitogens, secreted cytokine profiles and EB virus reactivation were monitored. Results: Total WBC conunts increased significantly 10d post-HDBR as compared with pre-HDBR. At the same time, the relative percentage of neutrophils was also higher than pre-HDBR but not significant. MFI of CD11b in neutrophils was reduced obviously at thd end of HDBR. T Lymphocyte proliferations to PHA reduced at HDBR 30, HDBR 60 and 10d post-HDBR while IL-2 production decreased significantly at the same time. IFN-and IL-4 production trended to decrease at HDBR 30 and HDBR 60. The relative percentage of T lymphocyte subset, B lymphocyte and NK cells were not altered. EBV EA (early antigen) were negative and EBV VCA titers had no changes through HDBR. Conclusion: The results indicate that several immunological parameters (mainly cellular immunity) are altered significantly by prolonged HDBR, and these changes were similar to those happened in spaceflight.

  8. Paradoxical Immune Responses in Non-HIV Cryptococcal Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Panackal, Anil A; Wuest, Simone C; Lin, Yen-Chih; Wu, Tianxia; Zhang, Nannan; Kosa, Peter; Komori, Mika; Blake, Andrew; Browne, Sarah K; Rosen, Lindsey B; Hagen, Ferry; Meis, Jacques; Levitz, Stuart M; Quezado, Martha; Hammoud, Dima; Bennett, John E; Bielekova, Bibi; Williamson, Peter R

    2015-05-01

    The fungus Cryptococcus is a major cause of meningoencephalitis in HIV-infected as well as HIV-uninfected individuals with mortalities in developed countries of 20% and 30%, respectively. In HIV-related disease, defects in T-cell immunity are paramount, whereas there is little understanding of mechanisms of susceptibility in non-HIV related disease, especially that occurring in previously healthy adults. The present description is the first detailed immunological study of non-HIV-infected patients including those with severe central nervous system (s-CNS) disease to 1) identify mechanisms of susceptibility as well as 2) understand mechanisms underlying severe disease. Despite the expectation that, as in HIV, T-cell immunity would be deficient in such patients, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) immunophenotyping, T-cell activation studies, soluble cytokine mapping and tissue cellular phenotyping demonstrated that patients with s-CNS disease had effective microbiological control, but displayed strong intrathecal expansion and activation of cells of both the innate and adaptive immunity including HLA-DR+ CD4+ and CD8+ cells and NK cells. These expanded CSF T cells were enriched for cryptococcal-antigen specific CD4+ cells and expressed high levels of IFN-γ as well as a lack of elevated CSF levels of typical T-cell specific Th2 cytokines -- IL-4 and IL-13. This inflammatory response was accompanied by elevated levels of CSF NFL, a marker of axonal damage, consistent with ongoing neurological damage. However, while tissue macrophage recruitment to the site of infection was intact, polarization studies of brain biopsy and autopsy specimens demonstrated an M2 macrophage polarization and poor phagocytosis of fungal cells. These studies thus expand the paradigm for cryptococcal disease susceptibility to include a prominent role for macrophage activation defects and suggest a spectrum of disease whereby severe neurological disease is characterized by immune-mediated host cell

  9. Paradoxical Immune Responses in Non-HIV Cryptococcal Meningitis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tianxia; Zhang, Nannan; Kosa, Peter; Komori, Mika; Blake, Andrew; Browne, Sarah K.; Rosen, Lindsey B.; Hagen, Ferry; Meis, Jacques; Levitz, Stuart M.; Quezado, Martha; Hammoud, Dima; Bennett, John E.; Bielekova, Bibi; Williamson, Peter R.

    2015-01-01

    The fungus Cryptococcus is a major cause of meningoencephalitis in HIV-infected as well as HIV-uninfected individuals with mortalities in developed countries of 20% and 30%, respectively. In HIV-related disease, defects in T-cell immunity are paramount, whereas there is little understanding of mechanisms of susceptibility in non-HIV related disease, especially that occurring in previously healthy adults. The present description is the first detailed immunological study of non-HIV-infected patients including those with severe central nervous system (s-CNS) disease to 1) identify mechanisms of susceptibility as well as 2) understand mechanisms underlying severe disease. Despite the expectation that, as in HIV, T-cell immunity would be deficient in such patients, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) immunophenotyping, T-cell activation studies, soluble cytokine mapping and tissue cellular phenotyping demonstrated that patients with s-CNS disease had effective microbiological control, but displayed strong intrathecal expansion and activation of cells of both the innate and adaptive immunity including HLA-DR+ CD4+ and CD8+ cells and NK cells. These expanded CSF T cells were enriched for cryptococcal-antigen specific CD4+ cells and expressed high levels of IFN-γ as well as a lack of elevated CSF levels of typical T-cell specific Th2 cytokines -- IL-4 and IL-13. This inflammatory response was accompanied by elevated levels of CSF NFL, a marker of axonal damage, consistent with ongoing neurological damage. However, while tissue macrophage recruitment to the site of infection was intact, polarization studies of brain biopsy and autopsy specimens demonstrated an M2 macrophage polarization and poor phagocytosis of fungal cells. These studies thus expand the paradigm for cryptococcal disease susceptibility to include a prominent role for macrophage activation defects and suggest a spectrum of disease whereby severe neurological disease is characterized by immune-mediated host cell

  10. Oxygenated drinking water enhances immune activity in pigs and increases immune responses of pigs during Salmonella typhimurium infection.

    PubMed

    Jung, Bock-Gie; Lee, Jin-A; Lee, Bong-Joo

    2012-12-01

    It has been considered that drinking oxygenated water improves oxygen availability, which may increase vitality and improve immune functions. The present study evaluated the effects of oxygenated drinking water on immune function in pigs. Continuous drinking of oxygenated water markedly increased peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation, interleukin-1β expression level and the CD4(+):CD8(+) cell ratio in pigs. During Salmonella Typhimurium infection, total leukocytes and relative cytokines expression levels were significantly increased in pigs consuming oxygenated water compared with pigs consuming tap water. These findings suggest that oxygenated drinking water enhances immune activity in pigs and increases immune responses of pigs during S. Typhimurium Infection.

  11. Impact of forest disturbance on the runoff response in headwater catchments. Case study: Sumava mountains, Czech republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langhammer, Jakub; Hais, Martin; Bartunkova, Kristyna; Su, Ye

    2013-04-01

    , extent and dynamics of forest disturbance. The research proved that the different types of forest disturbance have distinctly diverse effect on distribution of moisture and temperature in the analyzed plots. The analysis of runoff response was carried out on the example of selected types of precipitation events, occurring across the experimental catchment. There were detected clear links among the selected properties of runoff response to the given situation, type of forest disturbance and selected physiographic features. The research results help to better understand the impact of forest disturbance on runoff response. As the forest disturbance in montane environments is a widespread problem, new findings in the field can have implication in finding balance between the nature conservation, forest and water management. Key words: forest disturbance, land cover, stream modification, runoff, fluvial dynamics.

  12. Coordinate actions of innate immune responses oppose those of the adaptive immune system during Salmonella infection of mice.

    PubMed

    Hotson, Andrew N; Gopinath, Smita; Nicolau, Monica; Khasanova, Anna; Finck, Rachel; Monack, Denise; Nolan, Garry P

    2016-01-12

    The immune system enacts a coordinated response when faced with complex environmental and pathogenic perturbations. We used the heterogeneous responses of mice to persistent Salmonella infection to model system-wide coordination of the immune response to bacterial burden. We hypothesized that the variability in outcomes of bacterial growth and immune response across genetically identical mice could be used to identify immune elements that serve as integrators enabling co-regulation and interconnectedness of the innate and adaptive immune systems. Correlation analysis of immune response variation to Salmonella infection linked bacterial load with at least four discrete, interacting functional immune response "cassettes." One of these, the innate cassette, in the chronically infected mice included features of the innate immune system, systemic neutrophilia, and high serum concentrations of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6. Compared with mice with a moderate bacterial load, mice with the highest bacterial burden exhibited high activity of this innate cassette, which was associated with a dampened activity of the adaptive T cell cassette-with fewer plasma cells and CD4(+) T helper 1 cells and increased numbers of regulatory T cells-and with a dampened activity of the cytokine signaling cassette. System-wide manipulation of neutrophil numbers revealed that neutrophils regulated signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) signaling in B cells during infection. Thus, a network-level approach demonstrated unappreciated interconnections that balanced innate and adaptive immune responses during the dynamic course of disease and identified signals associated with pathogen transmission status, as well as a regulatory role for neutrophils in cytokine signaling.

  13. IFNγ-responsive nonhematopoietic cells regulate the immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Desvignes, Ludovic; Ernst, Joel D.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Immunity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis in humans and in mice requires interferon gamma (IFNγ). While IFNγ has been studied extensively for its effects on macrophages in tuberculosis, we determined that protective immunity to tuberculosis also requires IFNγ responsive nonhematopoietic cells. Bone marrow chimeric mice with IFNγ-unresponsive lung epithelial and endothelial cells exhibited earlier mortality and higher bacterial burdens than control mice, underexpressed indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (Ido) in lung endothelium and epithelium and overexpressed IL-17 with massive neutrophilic inflammation in the lungs. We also found that the products of IDO catabolism of tryptophan selectively inhibit IL-17 production by Th17 cells, by inhibiting the action of IL-23. These results reveal a previously-unsuspected role for IFNγ responsiveness in nonhematopoietic cells in regulation of immunity to M. tuberculosis, and reveal a novel mechanism for IDO inhibition of Th17 responses. PMID:20064452

  14. Compartmentalized Immune Response in Leishmaniasis: Changing Patterns throughout the Disease.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Cortés, Alhelí; Carrillo, Eugenia; Martorell, Susanna; Todolí, Felicitat; Ojeda, Ana; Martínez-Flórez, Alba; Urniza, Alicia; Moreno, Javier; Alberola, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is characterized by loss of T-cell responsiveness and absence of Leishmania-specific IFN-γ production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells. However, the expressions of IFN-γ and TNF-α are up-regulated in the tissues and plasma of VL patients. There is a paucity of information regarding the cytokine profile expressed by different target tissues in the same individual and the changes it undergoes throughout the course of infection. In this work we evaluated IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-10, and TGF-β mRNA expression using real-time RT-PCR in 5 target tissues at 6 months and 16 months post-infection (PI) in a canine experimental model which mimics many aspects of human VL. The spleen and liver of Leishmania infantum experimentally-infected dogs elicited a pro- and anti- inflammatory response and high parasite density at 6 and 16 months PI. The popliteal lymph node, however, showed an up-regulation of IFN-γ cytokin at commencement of the study and was at the chronic phase when the IL-10 and TGF-β expression appeared. In spite of skin parasite invasion, local cytokine response was absent at 6 months PI. Parasite growth and onset of clinical disease both correlated with dermal up-regulation of all the studied cytokines. Our VL model suggests that central target organs, such as the spleen and liver, present a mixed cytokine immune response early on infection. In contrast, an anti-inflammatory/regulatory immune response in peripheral tissues is activated in the later chronic-patent stages of the disease. PMID:27171409

  15. Compartmentalized Immune Response in Leishmaniasis: Changing Patterns throughout the Disease

    PubMed Central

    Carrillo, Eugenia; Martorell, Susanna; Todolí, Felicitat; Martínez-Flórez, Alba; Urniza, Alicia; Moreno, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is characterized by loss of T-cell responsiveness and absence of Leishmania-specific IFN-γ production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells. However, the expressions of IFN-γ and TNF-α are up-regulated in the tissues and plasma of VL patients. There is a paucity of information regarding the cytokine profile expressed by different target tissues in the same individual and the changes it undergoes throughout the course of infection. In this work we evaluated IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-10, and TGF-β mRNA expression using real-time RT-PCR in 5 target tissues at 6 months and 16 months post-infection (PI) in a canine experimental model which mimics many aspects of human VL. The spleen and liver of Leishmania infantum experimentally-infected dogs elicited a pro- and anti- inflammatory response and high parasite density at 6 and 16 months PI. The popliteal lymph node, however, showed an up-regulation of IFN-γ cytokin at commencement of the study and was at the chronic phase when the IL-10 and TGF-β expression appeared. In spite of skin parasite invasion, local cytokine response was absent at 6 months PI. Parasite growth and onset of clinical disease both correlated with dermal up-regulation of all the studied cytokines. Our VL model suggests that central target organs, such as the spleen and liver, present a mixed cytokine immune response early on infection. In contrast, an anti-inflammatory/regulatory immune response in peripheral tissues is activated in the later chronic-patent stages of the disease. PMID:27171409

  16. Modeling forest carbon cycle response to tree mortality: Effects of plant functional type and disturbance intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frasson, Renato Prata de Moraes; Bohrer, Gil; Medvigy, David; Matheny, Ashley M.; Morin, Timothy H.; Vogel, Christoph S.; Gough, Christopher M.; Maurer, Kyle D.; Curtis, Peter S.

    2015-11-01

    Natural and anthropogenic disturbances influence ecological succession and impact the carbon cycle. Understanding disturbance effects and ecosystem recovery is essential to carbon modeling. We hypothesized that (1) species-specific disturbances impact the carbon cycle differently from nonspecific disturbances. In particular, disturbances that target early-successional species will lead to higher carbon uptake by the postrecovery, middle- and late-successional community and (2) disturbances that affect the midsuccessional deciduous species have more intense and long-lasting impacts on carbon uptake than disturbances of similar intensity that only affect the early-successional species. To test these hypotheses, we employed a series of simulations conducted with the Ecosystem Demography model version 2 to evaluate the sensitivity of a temperate mixed-deciduous forest to disturbance intensity and type. Our simulation scenarios included a control (undisturbed) case, a uniform disturbance case where we removed 30% of all trees regardless of their successional status, five cases where only early-successional deciduous trees were removed with increasing disturbance intensity (30%, 70%, 85%, and 100%), and four cases of midsuccessional disturbances with increasing intensity (70%, 85%, and 100%). Our results indicate that disturbances affecting the midsuccessional deciduous trees led to larger decreases in carbon uptake as well as longer recovery times when compared to disturbances that exclusively targeted the early-successional deciduous trees at comparable intensities. Moreover, disturbances affecting 30% to 100% of early-successional deciduous trees resulted in an increased carbon uptake, beginning 6 years after the disturbance and sustained through the end of the 100 year simulation.

  17. The responses of immune cells to iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yaolin; Sherwood, Jennifer A; Lackey, Kimberly H; Qin, Ying; Bao, Yuping

    2016-04-01

    Immune cells play an important role in recognizing and removing foreign objects, such as nanoparticles. Among various parameters, surface coatings of nanoparticles are the first contact with biological system, which critically affect nanoparticle interactions. Here, surface coating effects on nanoparticle cellular uptake, toxicity and ability to trigger immune response were evaluated on a human monocyte cell line using iron oxide nanoparticles. The cells were treated with nanoparticles of three types of coatings (negatively charged polyacrylic acid, positively charged polyethylenimine and neutral polyethylene glycol). The cells were treated at various nanoparticle concentrations (5, 10, 20, 30, 50 μg ml(-1) or 2, 4, 8, 12, 20 μg cm(-2)) with 6 h incubation or treated at a nanoparticle concentration of 50 μg ml(-1) (20 μg cm(-2)) at different incubation times (6, 12, 24, 48 or 72 h). Cell viability over 80% was observed for all nanoparticle treatment experiments, regardless of surface coatings, nanoparticle concentrations and incubation times. The much lower cell viability for cells treated with free ligands (e.g. ~10% for polyethylenimine) suggested that the surface coatings were tightly attached to the nanoparticle surfaces. The immune responses of cells to nanoparticles were evaluated by quantifying the expression of toll-like receptor 2 and tumor necrosis factor-α. The expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and toll-like receptor 2 were not significant in any case of the surface coatings, nanoparticle concentrations and incubation times. These results provide useful information to select nanoparticle surface coatings for biological and biomedical applications. PMID:26817529

  18. The Mediterranean Benthic Herbivores Show Diverse Responses to Extreme Storm Disturbances

    PubMed Central

    Pagès, Jordi F.; Gera, Alessandro; Romero, Javier; Farina, Simone; Garcia-Rubies, Antoni; Hereu, Bernat; Alcoverro, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Catastrophic storms have been observed to be one of the major elements in shaping the standing structure of marine benthic ecosystems. Yet, little is known about the effect of catastrophic storms on ecosystem processes. Specifically, herbivory is the main control mechanism of macrophyte communities in the Mediterranean, with two main key herbivores: the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus and the fish Sarpa salpa. Consequently, the effects of extreme storm events on these two herbivores (at the population level and on their behaviour) may be critical for the functioning of the ecosystem. With the aim of filling this gap, we took advantage of two parallel studies that were conducted before, during and after an unexpected catastrophic storm event. Specifically, fish and sea urchin abundance were assessed before and after the storm in monitored fixed areas (one site for sea urchin assessment and 3 sites for fish visual transects). Additionally, we investigated the behavioural response to the disturbance of S. salpa fishes that had been tagged with acoustic transmitters. Given their low mobility, sea urchins were severely affected by the storm (ca. 50% losses) with higher losses in those patches with a higher density of sea urchins. This may be due to a limited availability of refuges within each patch. In contrast, fish abundance was not affected, as fish were able to move to protected areas (i.e. deeper) as a result of the high mobility of this species. Our results highlight that catastrophic storms differentially affect the two dominant macroherbivores of rocky macroalgal and seagrass systems due to differences in mobility and escaping strategies. This study emphasises that under catastrophic disturbances, the presence of different responses among the key herbivores of the system may be critical for the maintenance of the herbivory function. PMID:23667512

  19. Environmental context and magnitude of disturbance influence trait-mediated community responses to wastewater in streams.

    PubMed

    Burdon, Francis J; Reyes, Marta; Alder, Alfredo C; Joss, Adriano; Ort, Christoph; Räsänen, Katja; Jokela, Jukka; Eggen, Rik I L; Stamm, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Human land uses and population growth represent major global threats to biodiversity and ecosystem services. Understanding how biological communities respond to multiple drivers of human-induced environmental change is fundamental for conserving ecosystems and remediating degraded habitats. Here, we used a replicated 'real-world experiment' to study the responses of invertebrate communities to wastewater perturbations across a land-use intensity gradient in 12 Swiss streams. We used different taxonomy and trait-based community descriptors to establish the most sensitive indicators detecting impacts and to help elucidate potential causal mechanisms of change. First, we predicted that streams in catchments adversely impacted by human land-uses would be less impaired by wastewater inputs because their invertebrate communities should be dominated by pollution-tolerant taxa ('environmental context'). Second, we predicted that the negative effects of wastewater on stream invertebrate communities should be larger in streams that receive proportionally more wastewater ('magnitude of disturbance'). In support of the 'environmental context' hypothesis, we found that change in the Saprobic Index (a trait-based indicator of tolerance to organic pollution) was associated with upstream community composition; communities in catchments with intensive agricultural land uses (e.g., arable cropping and pasture) were generally more resistant to eutrophication associated with wastewater inputs. We also found support for the 'magnitude of disturbance' hypothesis. The SPEAR Index (a trait-based indicator of sensitivity to pesticides) was more sensitive to the relative input of effluent, suggesting that toxic influences of wastewater scale with dilution. Whilst freshwater pollution continues to be a major environmental problem, our findings highlight that the same anthropogenic pressure (i.e., inputs of wastewater) may induce different ecological responses depending on the environmental

  20. Environmental context and magnitude of disturbance influence trait-mediated community responses to wastewater in streams.

    PubMed

    Burdon, Francis J; Reyes, Marta; Alder, Alfredo C; Joss, Adriano; Ort, Christoph; Räsänen, Katja; Jokela, Jukka; Eggen, Rik I L; Stamm, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Human land uses and population growth represent major global threats to biodiversity and ecosystem services. Understanding how biological communities respond to multiple drivers of human-induced environmental change is fundamental for conserving ecosystems and remediating degraded habitats. Here, we used a replicated 'real-world experiment' to study the responses of invertebrate communities to wastewater perturbations across a land-use intensity gradient in 12 Swiss streams. We used different taxonomy and trait-based community descriptors to establish the most sensitive indicators detecting impacts and to help elucidate potential causal mechanisms of change. First, we predicted that streams in catchments adversely impacted by human land-uses would be less impaired by wastewater inputs because their invertebrate communities should be dominated by pollution-tolerant taxa ('environmental context'). Second, we predicted that the negative effects of wastewater on stream invertebrate communities should be larger in streams that receive proportionally more wastewater ('magnitude of disturbance'). In support of the 'environmental context' hypothesis, we found that change in the Saprobic Index (a trait-based indicator of tolerance to organic pollution) was associated with upstream community composition; communities in catchments with intensive agricultural land uses (e.g., arable cropping and pasture) were generally more resistant to eutrophication associated with wastewater inputs. We also found support for the 'magnitude of disturbance' hypothesis. The SPEAR Index (a trait-based indicator of sensitivity to pesticides) was more sensitive to the relative input of effluent, suggesting that toxic influences of wastewater scale with dilution. Whilst freshwater pollution continues to be a major environmental problem, our findings highlight that the same anthropogenic pressure (i.e., inputs of wastewater) may induce different ecological responses depending on the environmental

  1. Synthesis of Concepts in Disturbance Hydrology and the Importance for Hydrologic Response to Extreme Hydroclimatic Events in the Critical Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebel, B. A.; Mirus, B. B.

    2014-12-01

    The watersheds we rely on for water resources, ecosystem services, and protection from hydrologically driven natural hazards are increasingly impacted by landscape disturbance. Abrupt alterations of hydrologic processes resulting from wildfires, urban development, resource extraction, deforestation, hurricanes, tsunamis, and landslides change the storage or buffering capacity as well as the hydrologic functional connectivity in watersheds. We highlight some of the critical issues and major challenges to predicting disturbance impacts on water resources and natural hazards and outline some of the opportunities for improved mechanistic understanding of how disturbances propagate through landscape hydrological processes. In particular, we emphasize synthesis of conceptual commonalities and opportunities from other disciplines, primarily ecologic sciences, which are well versed in the study of disturbed landscapes. Cross scale interactions and complex adaptive systems theory are examples of useful concepts for synthesis across different disturbance effects. We also highlight the importance of improved understanding of disturbance hydrology for predicting the effects of extreme hydroclimatic events on the hydrologic response of the Critical Zone. An example from the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains, USA of a watershed with multiple disturbances subjected to a low frequency extreme rainfall event is presented to show the diversity of runoff generation mechanisms and the implications for watershed scale impacts.

  2. Modulation of cellular immune response against hepatitis C virus nonstructural protein 3 by cationic liposome encapsulated DNA immunization.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Xuanmao; Wang, Richard Y-H; Feng, Zhiming; Alter, Harvey J; Shih, James Wai-Kuo

    2003-02-01

    A vaccine strategy directed to increase Th1 cellular immune responses, particularly to hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural protein 3 (NS3), has considerable potential to overcome the infection with HCV. DNA vaccination can induce both humoral and cellular immune responses, but it became apparent that the cellular uptake of naked DNA injected into muscle was not very efficient, as much of the DNA is degraded by interstitial nucleases before it reaches the nucleus for transcription. In this paper, cationic liposomes composed of different cationic lipids, such as dimethyl-dioctadecylammonium bromide (DDAB), 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP), or 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycerol-3-ethylphosphocholine (DOEPC), were used to improve DNA immunization in mice, and their efficiencies were compared. It was found that cationic liposome-mediated DNA immunization induced stronger HCV NS3-specific immune responses than immunization with naked DNA alone. Cationic liposomes composed of DDAB and equimolar of a neutral lipid, egg yolk phosphatidylcholine (EPC), induced the strongest antigen-specific Th1 type immune responses among the cationic liposome investigated, whereas the liposomes composed of 2 cationic lipids, DDAB and DOEPC, induced an antigen-specific Th2 type immune response. All cationic liposomes used in this study triggered high-level, nonspecific IL-12 production in mice, a feature important for the development of maximum Th1 immune responses. In conclusion, the cationic liposome-mediated gene delivery is a viable HCV vaccine strategy that should be further tested in the chimpanzee model. PMID:12540796

  3. The immune response in cattle infected with Tritrichomonas foetus.

    PubMed

    Soto, P; Parma, A E

    1989-10-01

    Holando-Argentina calves (males and females) were experimentally infected with Tritrichomonas foetus var. Belfast (T. foetus) by introducing 10(7) protozoa into the preputial and vaginal cavities, in order to analyse the course of the immune response to infection. Samples of serum, vaginal mucus and preputial secretion were taken periodically and assayed by means of microagglutination of living protozoa. The serum antibody titre, which averaged 32 before infection and was equivalent to titres in a non-infected group, increased to 512 in the heifers 11 weeks later and to 128 in the bulls 4 months post-infection. Agglutinating antibodies were not detected in the preputial cavity, but heifers showed antibodies in the vaginal mucus and became trichomoniasis free after 4 months. Conversely, genital secretions from the bulls gave rise to positive cultures during the whole period of experimentation. The intradermal sensitivity was checked using a soluble antigen from T. foetus. The diameter of the papula increased up to three times in heifers, while in bulls the results were no different than those from the non-infected group. Serum antibodies were of the IgG2 subclass, while those isolated from vaginal mucus were characterized as IgG1, an opsonizing antibody. Heifers were refractory to challenge infection after 1 year. The poor immune response in bulls is consistent with their role as carriers of T. foetus.