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Sample records for disturbed rock zone

  1. The disturbed rock zone at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant.

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Francis D.

    2003-12-01

    The Disturbed Rock Zone constitutes an important geomechanical element of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The science and engineering underpinning the disturbed rock zone provide the basis for evaluating ongoing operational issues and their impact on performance assessment. Contemporary treatment of the disturbed rock zone applied to the evaluation of the panel closure system and to a new mining horizon improves the level of detail and quantitative elements associated with a damaged zone surrounding the repository openings. Technical advancement has been realized by virtue of ongoing experimental investigations and international collaboration. The initial portion of this document discusses the disturbed rock zone relative to operational issues pertaining to re-certification of the repository. The remaining sections summarize and document theoretical and experimental advances that quantify characteristics of the disturbed rock zone as applied to nuclear waste repositories in salt.

  2. Discrete fracture hydromechanical model for the disturbed rock zone in a clay rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asahina, D.; Houseworth, J. E.; Birkholzer, J. T.

    2013-12-01

    We have developed a coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical (THM) fracture damage model, TOUGH-RBSN, to investigate the behavior of fracture generation and evolution in rock in the presence of perturbations to THM conditions. This model combines the capabilities of the TOUGH2 simulator to represent thermal-hydrological processes with a rigid-body-spring-network (RBSN) model, a type of discrete modeling, to treat geomechanical and fracture-damage processes. In particular, the development and evolution of fractures in the excavation damaged zone (EDZ) of a clay rock, with application to high-level nuclear waste disposal, is a focus for this model development. Previously, the TOUGH-RBSN approach has been used to model fracture damage under tensile conditions as a result of desiccation shrinkage. The next phase of model testing will be application to the HG-A test being conducted at the Mont Terri underground research laboratory (URL) near Saint-Ursanne, Switzerland. This test is being conducted in a 13-m long, 1-m diameter microtunnel in the Opalinus clay rock in which a test section at the far end of the microtunnel is isolated using a packer. The test is specifically targeted to observe how fluids injected into the test section penetrate into the rock, with particular emphasis on the EDZ. The HG-A microtunnel was excavated in 2005 and subsequent mapping of the tunnel surface shows preferential fracturing and tunnel breakouts along zones where bedding planes are tangential to the tunnel wall and where faults intercept the tunnel. It appears that the EDZ fracture damage can be attributed to both tensile and shear fracturing mechanisms. A series of injection tests with water and gas have been performed which also show preferential invasion of the fluid pressure along the observed damage zones, as well as fracture self-sealing over time. The TOUGH-RBSN approach has been successfully applied to modeling fracture driven by predominately tensile loading, whereas only

  3. Extent of the Disturbed Rock Zone Around a WIPP Disposal Room

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrick, C. G.; Park, B. Y.; Holcomb, D. J.

    2008-12-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), located in southeastern New Mexico, is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) as the underground disposal facility for transuranic (TRU) nuclear waste. It is located in a bedded salt formation at a depth of about 650 m. Salt at this depth behaves as a viscous material having an initially lithostatic state of stress. Mining of an opening disturbs the static equilibrium to a degree where fracturing of the rock surrounding a room occurs, changing its mechanical and hydrologic properties. This disturbed rock zone (DRZ) is an important geomechanical feature included in the performance assessment process models used to predict future repository conditions as a part of certification by the EPA as meeting regulatory compliance. Based on ongoing scientific investigations and evaluation of published data since the original certification in 1998, our understanding of the DRZ has continued to progress. Three deformation processes are activated as deviatoric stresses are induced upon excavation of a room in a salt formation: (1) elastic response, (2) inelastic viscoplastic flow, and (3) inelastic- damage induced flow. Damage, the least understood of these processes, is manifested by the time- dependent initiation, growth, coalescence, and healing of microfractures with a deviatoric stress state. Since the ability to model the spatial and temporal changes in salt damage is not available at this time, various means to measure it have been attempted. At the WIPP, for this study, we used sonic velocity measurements obtained over a 12 year period as the principal field method to describe the extent of the DRZ. Predictions of the DRZ extent based on these experimental results are substantiated by permeability measurements and microfracture density analysis from other places in the repository. Extensive laboratory salt creep data demonstrate that damage can be assessed in terms of volumetric strain and principal stresses. Stress states

  4. Coupled Biological-Geomechanical-Geochemical Effects of the Disturbed Rock Zone on the Performance of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunagan, S. C.; Herrick, C. G.; Lee, M. Y.

    2008-12-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is located at a depth of 655 m in bedded salt in southeastern New Mexico and is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy as a deep underground disposal facility for transuranic (TRU) waste. The WIPP must comply with the EPA's environmental regulations that require a probabilistic risk analysis of releases of radionuclides due to inadvertent human intrusion into the repository at some time during the 10,000-year regulatory period. Sandia National Laboratories conducts performance assessments (PAs) of the WIPP using a system of computer codes representing the evolution of underground repository and emplaced TRU waste in order to demonstrate compliance. One of the important features modeled in a PA is the disturbed rock zone (DRZ) surrounding the emplacement rooms in the repository. The extent and permeability of DRZ play a significant role in the potential radionuclide release scenarios. We evaluated the phenomena occurring in the repository that affect the DRZ and their potential effects on the extent and permeability of the DRZ. Furthermore, we examined the DRZ's role in determining the performance of the repository. Pressure in the completely sealed repository will be increased by creep closure of the salt and degradation of TRU waste contents by microbial activity in the repository. An increased pressure in the repository will reduce the extent and permeability of the DRZ. The reduced DRZ extent and permeability will decrease the amount of brine that is available to interact with the waste. Furthermore, the potential for radionuclide release from the repository is dependent on the amount of brine that enters the repository. As a result of these coupled biological-geomechanical-geochemical phenomena, the extent and permeability of the DRZ has a significant impact on the potential radionuclide releases from the repository and, in turn, the repository performance. Sandia is a multi program laboratory operated by Sandia

  5. Drilling and coring methods that minimize the disturbance of cuttings, core, and rock formation in the unsaturated zone, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Hammermeister, D.P.; Blout, D.O.; McDaniel, J.C.

    1985-12-31

    A drilling-and-casing method (Odex 115 system) utilizing air as a drilling fluid was used successfully to drill through various rock types within the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This paper describes this method and the equipment used to rapidly penetrate bouldery alluvial-colluvial deposits, poorly consolidated bedded and nonwelded tuff, and fractured, densely welded tuff to depths of about 130 meters. A comparison of water-content and water-potential data from drill cuttings with similar measurements on rock cores indicates that drill cuttings were only slightly disturbed for several of the rock types penetrated. Coring, sampling, and handling methods were devised to obtain minimally disturbed drive core from bouldery alluvial-colluvial deposits. Bulk-density values obtained from bulk samples dug from nearby trenches were compared to bulk-density values obtained from drive core to determine the effects of drive coring on the porosity of the core. Rotary coring methods utilizing a triple-tube core barrel and air as the drilling fluid were used to obtain core from welded and nonwelded tuff. Results indicate that the disturbance of the water content of the core was minimal. Water-content distributions in alluvium-colluvium were determined before drilling occurred by drive-core methods. After drilling, water-content distributions were determined by nuclear-logging methods. A comparison of the water-content distributions made before and after drilling indicates that Odex 115 drilling minimally disturbs the water content of the formation rock. 10 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

  6. RATDAMPER - A Numerical Model for Coupling Mechanical and Hydrological Properties within the Disturbed Rock Zone at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect

    RATH,JONATHAN S.; PFEIFLE,T.W.; HUNSCHE,U.

    2000-11-27

    A numerical model for predicting damage and permeability in the disturbed rock zone (DRZ) has been developed. The semi-empirical model predicts damage based on a function of stress tensor invariant. For a wide class of problems hydrologic/mechanical coupling is necessary for proper analysis. The RATDAMPER model incorporates dilatant volumetric strain and permeability. The RATDAMPER model has been implemented in a weakly coupled code, which combines a finite element structural code and a finite difference multi-phase fluid flow code. Using the development of inelastic volumetric strain, a value of permeability can be assigned. This flexibility allows empirical permeability functional relationships to be evaluated.

  7. Testing the disturbed zone around a rigid inclusion in salt

    SciTech Connect

    Knowles, M.K.; Borns, D.; Fredrich, J.; Holcomb, D.; Price, R.; Zeuch, D.; Dale, T.; Van Pelt, R.S.

    1996-12-01

    Deformational processes within a zone of rock surrounding excavations in salt result in alteration of the geophysical and hydrologic properties as compared to the undisturbed condition. The disturbed rock zone offers little resistance to fluid flow. It is hypothesized that rigid inclusions such as concrete seals will arrest and subsequently reverse the disturbance process and induce healing in the disturbed This experiment gathered in situ data that substantiates this hypothesis. A series of tests was conducted in a volume of rock surrounding concrete seals that were placed in a 1-m borehole approximately eight years ago. Fluid flow measurements, measurements of geophysical parameters of the surrounding rock and petrographic analyses on core samples were performed to characterize the rock. This paper presents the testing methodology and summarizes the data gathered from the field test program.

  8. Brine and Gas Flow Patterns Between Excavated Areas and Disturbed Rock Zone in the 1996 Performance Assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant for a Single Drilling Intrusion that Penetrates Repository and Castile Brine Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    ECONOMY,KATHLEEN M.; HELTON,JON CRAIG; VAUGHN,PALMER

    1999-10-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), which is located in southeastern New Mexico, is being developed for the geologic disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Waste disposal will take place in panels excavated in a bedded salt formation approximately 2000 ft (610 m) below the land surface. The BRAGFLO computer program which solves a system of nonlinear partial differential equations for two-phase flow, was used to investigate brine and gas flow patterns in the vicinity of the repository for the 1996 WIPP performance assessment (PA). The present study examines the implications of modeling assumptions used in conjunction with BRAGFLO in the 1996 WIPP PA that affect brine and gas flow patterns involving two waste regions in the repository (i.e., a single waste panel and the remaining nine waste panels), a disturbed rock zone (DRZ) that lies just above and below these two regions, and a borehole that penetrates the single waste panel and a brine pocket below this panel. The two waste regions are separated by a panel closure. The following insights were obtained from this study. First, the impediment to flow between the two waste regions provided by the panel closure model is reduced due to the permeable and areally extensive nature of the DRZ adopted in the 1996 WIPP PA, which results in the DRZ becoming an effective pathway for gas and brine movement around the panel closures and thus between the two waste regions. Brine and gas flow between the two waste regions via the DRZ causes pressures between the two to equilibrate rapidly, with the result that processes in the intruded waste panel are not isolated from the rest of the repository. Second, the connection between intruded and unintruded waste panels provided by the DRZ increases the time required for repository pressures to equilibrate with the overlying and/or underlying units subsequent to a drilling intrusion. Third, the large and areally extensive DRZ void volumes is a

  9. Properties of Flow Zones in Fractured Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salve, R.

    2004-12-01

    Observations over the last 25 years from various field studies suggest that preferential flow is common in soils and rocks. Despite this realization, very little is known about the large-scale properties (e.g., structure, distribution, continuity) of such flow regimes. This information is important for predictive models, but it remains elusive, mainly because of the difficulties involved in characterizing flow that has substantial spatial (both vertical and horizontal) and temporal variability. To better understand preferential flow in fractured rock, we carried out an in situ field experiment in the Topopah Spring tuff found in Exploratory Studies Facility at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This experiment involved the release of ~22 m3 of ponded water (at a pressure head of ~0.04 m) over a period of 7 months, directly onto a 12 m2 infiltration plot. As water was released, changes in moisture content were monitored along horizontal boreholes located in the formation ~19-22 m below. Distinct flow zones, with significant differences in flow velocity, size, and extent of lateral movement, intercepted the 6-9 m long monitoring boreholes. Further, in some flow zones saturation levels persisted for the time period in which water was released, while in others there were periodic fluctuations. There was also evidence of water being diverted above the ceiling of a cavity in the immediate vicinity of the monitoring boreholes. Observations from this field experiment suggested that inconsistencies exist in present conceptual models of flow in fractured rock. Particularly, these observations suggest that isolated conduits within the fractured rock formation encompass a large number of fractures to form preferential flow paths that persist if there is a continuous supply of water. It appears that in fractured welded tuffs, the propensity for vertical dispersion and fracture-matrix interactions may be significantly greater than suggested by existing conceptual models. These observations

  10. Geohydromechanical Processes in the Excavation Damaged Zone in Crystalline Rock, Rock Salt, and Indurated and Plastic Clays

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, Chin-Fu; Bernier, Frederic; Davies, Christophe

    2004-06-20

    The creation of an excavation disturbed zone or excavation damaged zone is expected around all man-made openings in geologic formations. Macro- and micro-fracturing, and in general a redistribution of in situ stresses and rearrangement of rock structures, will occur in this zone, resulting in drastic changes of permeability to flow, mainly through the fractures and cracks induced by excavation. Such an EDZ may have significant implications for the operation and long-term performance of an underground nuclear waste repository. Various issues of concern need to be evaluated, such as processes creating fractures in the excavation damaged zone, the degree of permeability increase, and the potential for sealing or healing (with permeability reduction) in the zone. In recent years, efforts along these lines have been made for a potential repository in four rock types-crystalline rock, salt, indurated clay, and plastic clay-and these efforts have involved field, laboratory, and theoretical studies. The present work involves a synthesis of the ideas and issues that emerged from presentations and discussions on EDZ in these four rock types at a CLUSTER Conference and Workshop held in Luxembourg in November, 2003. First, definitions of excavation disturbed and excavation damaged zones are proposed. Then, an approach is suggested for the synthesis and intercomparison of geohydromechanical processes in the EDZ for the four rock types (crystalline rock, salt, indurated clay, and plastic clay). Comparison tables of relevant processes, associated factors, and modeling and testing techniques are developed. A discussion of the general state-of-the-art and outstanding issues are also presented. A substantial bibliography of relevant papers on the subject is supplied at the end of the paper.

  11. Disturbed zones; indicators of deep-seated subsurface faults in the Valley and Ridge and Appalachian structural front of Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pohn, Howard A.; Purdy, Terri L.

    1982-01-01

    Field studies of geologic structures in the Valley and Ridge and adjacent parts of the Appalachian Plateau provinces in Pennsylvania have shown a new type of structure, formerly poorly understood and frequently unmapped, is a significant indicator of deep-seated subsurface faulting. These structures, herein called disturbed zones, are formed by movement between closely spaced pairs of thrust faults. Disturbed zones are characterized at the surface by long, narrow, intensely folded and faulted zones of rocks in a relatively undisturbed stratigraphic sequence. These zones are frequently kilometers to tens of kilometers long and tens to hundreds of meters wide. Although disturbed zones generally occur in sequences of alternating siltstone and shale beds, they can also occur in other lithologies including massively-bedded sandstones and carbonates. Disturbed zones are not only easily recognized in outcrop but their presence can also be inferred on geologic maps by disharmonic fold patterns, which necessitates a detachment between adjacent units that show the disharmony. A number of geologic problems can be clarified by understanding the principles of the sequence of formation and the method of location of disturbed zones, including the interpretation of some published geologic cross sections and maps. The intense folding and faulting which accompanies the formation of a typical disturbed zone produces a region of fracture porosity which, if sealed off from the surface, might well serve as a commercially-exploitable hydrocarbon trap. We believe that the careful mapping of concentrations of disturbed zones can serve as an important exploration method which is much less expensive than speculation seismic lines.

  12. Study on the Characteristic Energy Factor of the Deep Rock Mass Under Weak Disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mingyang; Li, Jie; Ma, Linjian; Huang, Houxu

    2016-08-01

    This study aims to investigate the characteristic energy factor of the deep rock mass deformation subjected to the disturbance induced by excavation or explosion. Based on the well-known rock hierarchical structure, the equivalent average kinetic energy of the deep rock mass under weak disturbance is first introduced. The characteristic energy factor that reflects the instable deformation of the deep rock mass is derived using the principle of variation. The relationship between the characteristic energy factor and the energy hierarchical sequence of the deep rock mass deformation and failure has also been illustrated. We believe that the characteristic energy factor is closely related to the characteristic scientific phenomena of deep rock mass in essence, which can provide a new approach for the study of deep rock mass in the fields of nonlinear mechanics, statistic physical mechanics, and mechanics of explosion and geophysics.

  13. Bioprotection and disturbance: Seaweed, microclimatic stability and conditions for mechanical weathering in the intertidal zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coombes, Martin A.; Naylor, Larissa A.; Viles, Heather A.; Thompson, Richard C.

    2013-11-01

    As well as their destructive roles, plants, animals and microorganisms contribute to geomorphology and ecology via direct and indirect bioprotection, which can reduce weathering and erosion. For example, indirect bioprotection can operate via biotic influences on microclimate whereby physical decay processes associated with fluctuations in temperature and moisture (salt crystallization, thermal fatigue and wetting-drying), are limited. In the intertidal zone, the spatial and temporal distribution of macroalgae (seaweeds) is patchy, related to physical and ecological conditions for colonization and growth, and the nature and frequency of natural and anthropogenic disturbance. We examined the influence of seaweed canopies (Fucus spp.) on near-surface microclimate and, by implication, on conditions for mechanical rock decay and under-canopy ecology. Monitoring on hard artificial coastal structures in South West England, UK, built from limestone and concrete showed that both the range and maxima of daily summertime temperatures were significantly lower, by an average of 56% and 25%, respectively, in areas colonized by seaweed compared to experimentally cleared areas. Short-term microclimatic variability (minutes-hours) was also significantly reduced, by an average of 78% for temperature and 71% for humidity, under algal canopies during low-tide events. Using seaweed as an example, we develop a conceptual model of the relationship between biological cover and microclimate in the intertidal zone. Disturbance events that remove or drastically reduce seaweed cover mediate shifts between relatively stable and unstable states with respect to mechanical decay and ecological stress associated with heat and desiccation. In urban coastal environments where disturbance may be frequent, facilitating the establishment and recovery of canopy-forming species on rocks and engineered structures could enhance the durability of construction materials as well as support conservation

  14. On the Damage Zone Along Tensile Cracks in Natural Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telenga, K. A.; Stöckhert, B.

    2006-12-01

    A process zone with inelastic deformation develops around the propagating tip of macroscopic tensile cracks in rocks. Within the process zone local failure by both crystal plastic deformation and microcracking may occur concomitantly, driven by the high stress concentration. The advancing process zone at a tip of the propagating crack leaves a wake of damage to both sides of the fracture surface. The width of this wake is controlled by the diameter of the process zone. In many natural rocks, where the fractures formed at elevated temperatures, this damage zone is well visible in the field due to conspicuous alteration. The main fracture is widened and filled with minerals precipitated from the fluid phase, forming a vein. The alteration halos appear internally homogeneous and display sharp boundaries. On the microscopic scale, the original nature of the damage is blurred by mineral reactions and healing of microcracks. The mineral reactions are controlled by fluid infiltration into the zone with a transient high crack permeability. The microcrack density measured in specific minerals is found to be a bell-shaped function of distance from the main fracture. Within the damage zone it is about one order of magnitude higher compared to the background value beyond, and decays over a short distance at the boundary of the macroscopically visible alteration halo. Analysis of a large number of tensile cracks with conspicuous alteration halos shows that the width of the damage zone is correlated with the width of the open main fracture (i.e. the central vein). For well defined alteration halos in igneous rocks, the ratio is similar to 10. In contrast to faults [1], for tensile cracks the damage is created at a single instant and not expected to undergo later modification. The width of the alteration halo is defined by the radius of the process zone at the instant of passage of the crack tip. For one specific fracture event in a given rock at given environmental conditions, i

  15. Development of shear zone-related lozenges in foliated rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponce, Carlos; Druguet, Elena; Carreras, Jordi

    2013-05-01

    Tectonic lozenges are elongate bodies bounded by relatively more deformed rocks. The focus of this study is on the 2-D structure of tectonic lozenges developed during ductile shear in rocks with a pre-existing mechanical anisotropy. On the basis of a detailed analysis of shear zones in foliated rocks from the Cap de Creus area (Variscan of the eastern Pyrenees), five mechanisms to explain the development of different types of lozenges in foliated rocks are suggested. These mechanisms are explained on the basis of the orientation of the previous foliation relative to the bulk shearing direction. It is shown that the prevailing mechanism does not majorly depend on the bulk kinematics but on the angular relationship between the pre-existing foliation and the bulk kinematic axes, and on shear zone interaction. This has implications on the use of lozenge shapes in tectonic interpretations. The fact that there is a wide range of initial orientations, propagation modes and coalescence types implies that the final lozenge geometry is not univocally related neither to the type of strain nor to the kinematic regime.

  16. 76 FR 29647 - Safety Zone; Big Rock Blue Marlin Air Show; Bogue Sound, Morehead City, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-23

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Big Rock Blue Marlin Air Show; Bogue Sound... establishing a temporary Safety Zone for the ``Big Rock Blue Marlin Air Show,'' an aerial demonstration to be... published a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM) entitled Safety Zone; Big Rock Blue Marlin Air Show;...

  17. Weathering of Fractured Rock in the Deep Critical Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buss, H. L.; Bazilevskaya, E.; Brantley, S. L.; Scatena, F. N.; Schulz, M. S.; White, A. F.

    2012-12-01

    The interfaces where intact bedrock physically and chemically weathers to form regolith, are often hidden deep within the critical zone and are thus difficult to access. However, weathering of primary minerals along bedrock fractures located in the groundwater or deep vadose zones may supply significant weathering products to streams and oceans and influence topography and soil fertility. We investigated the deep critical zone in the Bisley watershed at the Luquillo Critical Zone Observatory from two 9.6 cm diameter boreholes drilled with a hydraulic rotary drill to 37.2 and 27.0 m depth. Continuous core samples through coherent rock were taken using an HQ-wireline barrel. Bulk solid-state chemical analysis and quantitative XRD were performed on rock and saprock samples. Thin sections were examined by optical microscopy, SEM, EDS, and EPMA. A history of low- to moderate-grade metamorphism is reflected by the presence of epidote, prehnite, pyrite, and tourmaline in the fresh rock (visibly un-weathered). Fresh rock also contains abundant plagioclase and Mg-rich chlorite, with lesser quartz, K-spar, and pyroxene. The quartz is microcrystalline and present in variable quantities in the fresh rock, consistent with infiltration of Si-rich hydrothermal fluids. Evidence of reaction-induced porosity development is observed in the visibly un-weathered rock, but the majority of weathering occurs within weathering rinds (<15 mm thick). These rinds are developed on fracture surfaces (and the outer surfaces of exposed corestones) and contain abundant secondary Fe(III)-oxides, which fill pore space, decreasing porosity relative to the core-rind interface. In the case of exposed corestones, the rinds spall off, refresing the surface for continued weathering. In the case of subsurface corestones, rinds grow thicker and sometimes consume rock fragments entirely. Borehole cores revealed repeated zones of highly fractured rock, interpreted as subsurface corestones, embedded within

  18. Coupled diffusion and abiotic reaction of trichlorethene in minimally disturbed rock matrices.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Charles E; Towne, Rachael M; Lippincott, David R; Lazouskaya, Volha; Fischer, Timothy B; Bishop, Michael E; Dong, Hailiang

    2013-05-01

    Laboratory experiments were performed using minimally disturbed sedimentary rocks to measure the coupled diffusion and abiotic reaction of trichloroethene (TCE) through rock core samples. Results showed that, for all rock types studied, TCE dechlorination occurred, as evidenced by generation of acetylene, ethene, and/or ethane daughter products. First-order bulk reaction rate constants for TCE degradation ranged from 8.3 × 10(-10) to 4.2 × 10(-8) s(-1). Observed reaction rate constants showed a general correlation to the available ferrous iron content of the rock, which was determined by evaluating the spatial distribution of ferrous iron relative to that of the rock porosity. For some rock types, exposure to TCE resulted in a decrease in the effective diffusivity. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) indicated that the decrease in the effective diffusivity was due to a decrease in the porosity that occurred after exposure to TCE. Overall, these coupled diffusion and reaction results suggest that diffusion of TCE into rock matrices as well as the rate and extent of back-diffusion may be substantially mitigated in rocks that contain ferrous iron or other naturally occurring reactive metals, thereby lessening the impacts of matrix diffusion on sustaining dissolved contaminant plumes in bedrock aquifers. PMID:23590334

  19. Coupled diffusion and abiotic reaction of trichlorethene in minimally disturbed rock matrices.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Charles E; Towne, Rachael M; Lippincott, David R; Lazouskaya, Volha; Fischer, Timothy B; Bishop, Michael E; Dong, Hailiang

    2013-05-01

    Laboratory experiments were performed using minimally disturbed sedimentary rocks to measure the coupled diffusion and abiotic reaction of trichloroethene (TCE) through rock core samples. Results showed that, for all rock types studied, TCE dechlorination occurred, as evidenced by generation of acetylene, ethene, and/or ethane daughter products. First-order bulk reaction rate constants for TCE degradation ranged from 8.3 × 10(-10) to 4.2 × 10(-8) s(-1). Observed reaction rate constants showed a general correlation to the available ferrous iron content of the rock, which was determined by evaluating the spatial distribution of ferrous iron relative to that of the rock porosity. For some rock types, exposure to TCE resulted in a decrease in the effective diffusivity. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) indicated that the decrease in the effective diffusivity was due to a decrease in the porosity that occurred after exposure to TCE. Overall, these coupled diffusion and reaction results suggest that diffusion of TCE into rock matrices as well as the rate and extent of back-diffusion may be substantially mitigated in rocks that contain ferrous iron or other naturally occurring reactive metals, thereby lessening the impacts of matrix diffusion on sustaining dissolved contaminant plumes in bedrock aquifers.

  20. Internal structure of fault zones in geothermal reservoirs: Examples from palaeogeothermal fields and potential host rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonie Philipp, Sonja; Reyer, Dorothea; Meier, Silke; Bauer, Johanna F.; Afşar, Filiz

    2014-05-01

    characterized by increased fracture densities and higher percentages of fractures with large apertures. In the Upper Rhine Graben (2) damage zones in Muschelkalk limestones (Middle Triassic) are well developed even in fault zones with dm-scale displacements. Their fault cores, however, are narrow compared with that of fault zones with larger displacements and comprise brecciated material, clay smear, host rock lenses or zones of mineralization. Fracture apertures are larger parallel or subparallel to fault zone strike. A large fault zone footwall in Triassic Bunter sandstone shows a clearly developed fault core with fault gouge, slip zones, deformation bands and host rock lenses, a distal fault core with disturbed layering and high fracture density and a damage zone with increased fracture density compared with the host rock. In the study areas of palaeogeothermal fields in the Bristol Channel (3), all the mineral veins are clearly related to the faults and occur almost exclusively in the damage zones, indicating that geothermal water was transported along the then-active faults into the host rocks. Field measurements indicate that in all the localities, a large majority of the fractures in the fault damage zones are extension fractures, fewer are shear fractures. In the Jurassic Blue Lias there is evidence that the veins were injected as hydrofractures from fault planes into the limestone layers. In the Triassic Mercia Mudstone most veins were arrested during their propagation by layers with contrasting mechanical properties (stress barriers). Some veins, however, propagated through the barriers along faults to shallower levels. Our studies contribute to understanding and modelling of hydromechanical behaviour of fault zones and fluid transport in geothermal reservoirs. For successful exploration and exploitation, fault zones must be studied in detail regarding their likely internal structure, fracture parameters and orientation in relation to the current stress field. We show

  1. Fracture systems in normal fault zones crosscutting sedimentary rocks, Northwest German Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyer, Dorothea; Bauer, Johanna F.; Philipp, Sonja L.

    2012-12-01

    Field studies of fracture systems associated with 58 normal fault zones crosscutting sedimentary rocks were performed in the Northwest German Basin. Fracture orientations, densities, apertures and lengths, as well as fault zone structural indices, were analysed separately for fault damage zones and host rocks. The results show a pronounced difference between carbonate and clastic rocks: mainly in carbonate rocks we found presence of clear damage zones, characterized by higher fracture densities than in the host rocks. While the maximum aperture is similar for both units, the percentage of fractures with large apertures is much higher in the damage zones than in the host rocks. Based on laboratory measurements of Young's moduli and field measurements of fracture densities, we calculate effective stiffnesses Ee, that is the Young's moduli of the in situ rock masses, within the normal fault zones. Compared with carbonate rocks, Ee computed for clastic-rock damage zones decreases significantly less due to lower fracture densities. We conclude that normal fault zones in carbonate rocks have more profound effects on enhancing permeability in fluid reservoirs than those in clastic rocks. The results are of great importance for modelling the hydromechanical behaviour of normal fault zones in subsurface fluid reservoirs.

  2. Rock mechanics. Superplastic nanofibrous slip zones control seismogenic fault friction.

    PubMed

    Verberne, Berend A; Plümper, Oliver; de Winter, D A Matthijs; Spiers, Christopher J

    2014-12-12

    Understanding the internal mechanisms controlling fault friction is crucial for understanding seismogenic slip on active faults. Displacement in such fault zones is frequently localized on highly reflective (mirrorlike) slip surfaces, coated with thin films of nanogranular fault rock. We show that mirror-slip surfaces developed in experimentally simulated calcite faults consist of aligned nanogranular chains or fibers that are ductile at room conditions. These microstructures and associated frictional data suggest a fault-slip mechanism resembling classical Ashby-Verrall superplasticity, capable of producing unstable fault slip. Diffusive mass transfer in nanocrystalline calcite gouge is shown to be fast enough for this mechanism to control seismogenesis in limestone terrains. With nanogranular fault surfaces becoming increasingly recognized in crustal faults, the proposed mechanism may be generally relevant to crustal seismogenesis.

  3. Evolving subduction zones in the Western United States, as interpreted from igneous rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lipman, P.W.; Prostka, H.J.; Christiansen, R.L.

    1971-01-01

    Variations in the ratio of K2O to SiO4 in andesitic rocks suggest early and middle Cenozoic subduction beneath the western United States along two subparallel imbricate zones dipping about 20 degrees eastward. The western zone emerged at the continental margin, but the eastern zone was entirely beneath the continental plate. Mesozoic subduction apparently occurred along a single steeper zone.

  4. Evolving subduction zones in the Western United States, as interpreted from igneous rocks.

    PubMed

    Lipman, P W; Prostka, H J; Christiansen, R L

    1971-11-19

    Variations in the ratio of K(2)O to SiO(2) in andesitic rocks suggest early and middle Cenozoic subduction beneath the western United States along two subparallel imbricate zones dipping about 20 degrees eastward. The western zone emerged at the continental margin, but the eastern zone was entirely beneath the continental plate. Mesozoic subduction apparently occurred along a single steeper zone.

  5. 76 FR 18672 - Safety Zone; Big Rock Blue Marlin Air Show; Bogue Sound, Morehead City, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-05

    ..., 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Big Rock Blue Marlin Air Show; Bogue Sound... proposes to establish a temporary Safety Zone for the ``Big Rock Blue Marlin Air Show'', an...

  6. A Green's function approach for assessing the thermal disturbance caused by drilling deep boreholes in rock or ice

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clow, Gary D.

    2015-01-01

    A knowledge of subsurface temperatures in sedimentary basins, fault zones, volcanic environments and polar ice sheets is of interest for a wide variety of geophysical applications. However, the process of drilling deep boreholes in these environments to provide access for temperature and other measurements invariably disturbs the temperature field around a newly created borehole. Although this disturbance dissipates over time, most temperature measurements are made while the temperature field is still disturbed. Thus, the measurements must be ‘corrected’ for the drilling-disturbance effect if the undisturbed temperature field is to be determined. This paper provides compact analytical solutions for the thermal drilling disturbance based on 1-D (radial) and 2-D (radial and depth) Green's functions (GFs) in cylindrical coordinates. Solutions are developed for three types of boundary conditions (BCs) at the borehole wall: (1) prescribed temperature, (2) prescribed heat flux and (3) a prescribed convective condition. The BC at the borehole wall is allowed to vary both with depth and time. Inclusion of the depth dimension in the 2-D solution allows vertical heat-transfer effects to be quantified in situations where they are potentially important, that is, near the earth's surface, at the bottom of a well and when considering finite-drilling rates. The 2-D solution also includes a radial- and time-dependent BC at the earth's surface to assess the impact of drilling-related infrastructure (drilling pads, mud pits, permanent shelters) on the subsurface temperature field. Latent-heat effects due to the melting and subsequent refreezing of interstitial ice while drilling a borehole through ice-rich permafrost can be included in the GF solution as a moving-plane heat source (or sink) located at the solid–liquid interface. Synthetic examples are provided illustrating the 1-D and 2-D GF solutions. The flexibility of the approach allows the investigation of thermal

  7. A Green's function approach for assessing the thermal disturbance caused by drilling deep boreholes in rock or ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clow, Gary D.

    2015-12-01

    A knowledge of subsurface temperatures in sedimentary basins, fault zones, volcanic environments and polar ice sheets is of interest for a wide variety of geophysical applications. However, the process of drilling deep boreholes in these environments to provide access for temperature and other measurements invariably disturbs the temperature field around a newly created borehole. Although this disturbance dissipates over time, most temperature measurements are made while the temperature field is still disturbed. Thus, the measurements must be `corrected' for the drilling-disturbance effect if the undisturbed temperature field is to be determined. This paper provides compact analytical solutions for the thermal drilling disturbance based on 1-D (radial) and 2-D (radial and depth) Green's functions (GFs) in cylindrical coordinates. Solutions are developed for three types of boundary conditions (BCs) at the borehole wall: (1) prescribed temperature, (2) prescribed heat flux and (3) a prescribed convective condition. The BC at the borehole wall is allowed to vary both with depth and time. Inclusion of the depth dimension in the 2-D solution allows vertical heat-transfer effects to be quantified in situations where they are potentially important, that is, near the earth's surface, at the bottom of a well and when considering finite-drilling rates. The 2-D solution also includes a radial- and time-dependent BC at the earth's surface to assess the impact of drilling-related infrastructure (drilling pads, mud pits, permanent shelters) on the subsurface temperature field. Latent-heat effects due to the melting and subsequent refreezing of interstitial ice while drilling a borehole through ice-rich permafrost can be included in the GF solution as a moving-plane heat source (or sink) located at the solid-liquid interface. Synthetic examples are provided illustrating the 1-D and 2-D GF solutions. The flexibility of the approach allows the investigation of thermal drilling

  8. Multiple-code benchmark simulation study of coupled THMC processesin the excavation disturbed zone associated with geological nuclear wasterepositories

    SciTech Connect

    Rutqvist, J.; Feng, X-T.; Hudson, J.; Jing, L.; Kobayashi, A.; Koyama, T.; Pan, P-Z.; Lee, H-S.; Rinne, M.; Sonnenthal, E.; Yamamoto, Y.

    2006-05-10

    An international, multiple-code benchmark test (BMT) studyis being conducted within the international DECOVALEX project to analysecoupled thermal, hydrological, mechanical and chemical (THMC) processesin the excavation disturbed zone (EDZ) around emplacement drifts of anuclear waste repository. This BMT focuses on mechanical responses andlong-term chemo-mechanical effects that may lead to changes in mechanicaland hydrological properties in the EDZ. This includes time-de-pendentprocesses such as creep, and subcritical crack, or healing of fracturesthat might cause "weakening" or "hardening" of the rock over the longterm. Five research teams are studying this BMT using a wide range ofmodel approaches, including boundary element, finite element, and finitedifference, particle mechanics, and elasto-plastic cellular automatamethods. This paper describes the definition of the problem andpreliminary simulation results for the initial model inception part, inwhich time dependent effects are not yet included.

  9. Deformation of footwall rock of Phulad Shear Zone, Rajasthan: Evidence of transpressional shear zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Manideepa Roy; Das, Subhrajyoti; Chatterjee, Sadhana M.; Sengupta, Sudipta

    2016-07-01

    Phulad Shear Zone (PSZ) of Delhi Fold Belt in Rajasthan is a northeasterly striking ductile shear zone with a well developed mylonitic foliation (035/70E) and a downdip stretching lineation. The deformation in the PSZ has developed in a transpressional regime with thrusting sense of movement. The northeastern unit, i.e., the hanging wall contains a variety of rocks namely calc-silicates, pelites and amphibolites and the southwestern unit, i.e., the footwall unit contains only granitic rocks. Systematic investigation of the granites of the southwestern unit indicate a gradual change in the intensity of deformation from a distance of about 1 km west of the shear zone to the shear zone proper. The granite changes from weakly deformed granite to a mylonite/ultramylonite as we proceed towards the PSZ. The weakly deformed granite shows a crude foliation with the same attitude of mylonitic foliation of the PSZ. Microscopic study reveals the incipient development of C and S fabric with angle between C and S varying from 15 ∘ to 24 ∘. The small angle between the C and S fabric in the least deformed granite variety indicates that the deformation has strong pure shear component. At a distance of about 1 m away from the PSZ, there is abrupt change in the intensity of deformation. The granite becomes intensely foliated with a strong downdip lineation and the rock becomes a true mylonite. In mesoscopic scale, the granite shows stretched porphyroclasts in both XZ and YZ sections indicating a flattening type of deformation. The angle between the C and S fabric is further reduced and finally becomes nearly parallel. In most places, S fabric is gradually replaced by C fabric. Calculation of sectional kinematic vorticity number ( W n) from the protomylonitic and mylonite/ultramylonite granites varies from 0.3 ± 0.03 to 0.55 ± 0.04 indicating a strong component of pure shear. The similarity of the geometry of structures in the PSZ and the granites demonstrates that the

  10. 76 FR 55796 - Safety Zone; TriRock Triathlon, San Diego Bay, San Diego, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-09

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; TriRock Triathlon, San Diego Bay, San Diego... safety zone upon the specified navigable waters of the San Diego Bay, San Diego, California, in support of a bay swim in San Diego Harbor. This safety zone is necessary to provide for the safety of...

  11. Example Building Damage Caused by Mining Exploitation in Disturbed Rock Mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florkowska, Lucyna

    2013-06-01

    Issues concerning protection of buildings against the impact of underground coal mining pose significant scientific and engineering challenges. In Poland, where mining is a potent and prominent industry assuring domestic energy security, regions within reach of mining influences are plenty. Moreover, due to their industrial character they are also densely built-up areas. Because minerals have been extracted on an industrial scale in majority of those areas for many years, the rock mass structure has been significantly disturbed. Hence, exploitation of successive layers of multi-seam deposits might cause considerable damage - both in terms of surface and existing infrastructure networks. In the light of those facts, the means of mining and building prevention have to be improved on a regular basis. Moreover, they have to be underpinned by reliable analyses holistically capturing the comprehensive picture of the mining, geotechnical and constructional situation of structures. Scientific research conducted based on observations and measurements of mining-induced strain in buildings is deployed to do just that. Presented in this paper examples of damage sustained by buildings armed with protection against mining influences give an account of impact the mining exploitation in disturbed rock mass can have. This paper is based on analyses of mining damage to church and Nursing Home owned by Evangelical Augsburg Parish in Bytom-Miechowice. Neighbouring buildings differ in the date they were built, construction, building technology, geometry of the building body and fitted protection against mining damage. Both the buildings, however, have sustained lately significant deformation and damage caused by repeated mining exploitation. Selected damage has been discussed hereunder. The structures have been characterised, their current situation and mining history have been outlined, which have taken their toll on character and magnitude of damage. Description has been supplemented

  12. Disturbance, A Mechanism for Increased Microbial Diversity in a Yellowstone National Park Hot Spring Mixing Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howells, A. E.; Oiler, J.; Fecteau, K.; Boyd, E. S.; Shock, E.

    2014-12-01

    The parameters influencing species diversity in natural ecosystems are difficult to assess due to the long and experimentally prohibitive timescales needed to develop causative relationships among measurements. Ecological diversity-disturbance models suggest that disturbance is a mechanism for increased species diversity, allowing for coexistence of species at an intermediate level of disturbance. Observing this mechanism often requires long timescales, such as the succession of a forest after a fire. In this study we evaluated the effect of mixing of two end member hydrothermal fluids on the diversity and structure of a microbial community where disturbance occurs on small temporal and spatial scales. Outflow channels from two hot springs of differing geochemical composition in Yellowstone National Park, one pH 3.3 and 36 °C and the other pH 7.6 and 61 °C flow together to create a mixing zone on the order of a few meters. Geochemical measurements were made at both in-coming streams and at a site of complete mixing downstream of the mixing zone, at pH 6.5 and 46 °C. Compositions were estimated across the mixing zone at 1 cm intervals using microsensor temperature and conductivity measurements and a mixing model. Qualitatively, there are four distinct ecotones existing over ranges in temperature and pH across the mixing zone. Community analysis of the 16S rRNA genes of these ecotones show a peak in diversity at maximal mixing. Principle component analysis of community 16S rRNA genes reflects coexistence of species with communities at maximal mixing plotting intermediate to communities at distal ends of the mixing zone. These spatial biological and geochemical observations suggest that the mixing zone is a dynamic ecosystem where geochemistry and biological diversity are governed by changes in the flow rate and geochemical composition of the two hot spring sources. In ecology, understanding how environmental disruption increases species diversity is a foundation

  13. Decimeter Scale Ultra-Fine Fault Rocks (Possible Pseudotachylites) in an Ancient Subduction Thrust Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, C. D.; Moore, J. C.; Meneghini, F.; McKiernan, A. W.

    2004-12-01

    Large bodies of ultrafine fault rock (possible pseudotachylite or frictional melt) occur within cataclastic thrust zones in the Ghost Rocks Formation, Kodiak Accretionary Complex, Alaska. The Paleocene Ghost Rocks Formation includes map-scale mélange belts formed by flattening and shearing of seafloor sediments and volcanic rocks at about 250 degrees C and 325 MPa (~13 km depth) during subduction between 65-60Ma. Ten to 15-meter thick cataclastite zones crosscut the mélange fabric at a low angle, representing a stage of increasingly localized shear during subduction thrusting. Ultrafine fault rocks occur as thick (10-25cm) continuous planar beds along the boundaries of cataclastites, or in discontinuous accumulation bodies within cataclastite zones. The boundaries of the ultrafine fault rocks are intrusive, sharp but irregular and deform the cataclastite host fabric. Single pulse intrusions of the ultrafine fault rock range up to 0.5m in intrusive dimension and form complex morphologies resembling both upward and downward directed flame structures and dike-sill complexes, as well as sheath folds and disharmonic flow banding and folding. These field characteristics indicate fluidization and perhaps frictional melting of the ultrafine fault rocks. Ultrafine fault rock bodies can be traced laterally for meters to tens of meters at individual outcrops and occur for about 2 km along strike. Preliminary SEM analysis reveals that the primary matrix material is physically and chemically homogenous down to few-micron scale, consistent with the field identification of pseudotachylite. Thin sections show rounded remnant quartz aggregates, typical of pseudotachylytes. Although some thin sections show suggest melting others may represent ultracataclastite. Some ultrafine fault rock material is rebrecciated and cataclastized to a fine scale, indicating reactivation of previous fault rock generation surfaces. These ultrafine fault rock zones represent the most highly deformed

  14. Where microorganisms meet rocks in the Earth's Critical Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akob, D. M.; Küsel, K.

    2011-12-01

    The Critical Zone (CZ) is the Earth's outer shell where all the fundamental physical, chemical, and biological processes critical for sustaining life occur and interact. As microbes in the CZ drive many of these biogeochemical cycles, understanding their impact on life-sustaining processes starts with an understanding of their biodiversity. In this review, we summarize the factors controlling where terrestrial CZ microbes (prokaryotes and micro-eukaryotes) live and what is known about their diversity and function. Microbes are found throughout the CZ, down to 5 km below the surface, but their functional roles change with depth due to habitat complexity, e.g. variability in pore spaces, water, oxygen, and nutrients. Abundances of prokaryotes and micro-eukaryotes decrease from 1010 or 107 cells g soil-1 or rock-1, or ml water-1 by up to eight orders of magnitude with depth. Although symbiotic mycorrhizal fungi and free-living decomposers have been studied extensively in soil habitats, where they occur up to 103 cells g soil-1, little is known regarding their identity or impact on weathering in the deep subsurface. The relatively low abundance of micro-eukaryotes in the deep subsurface suggests that they are limited in space, nutrients, are unable to cope with oxygen limitations, or some combination thereof. Since deep regions of the CZ have limited access to recent photosynthesis-derived carbon, microbes there depend on deposited organic material or a chemolithoautotrophic metabolism that allows for a complete food chain, independent from the surface, although limited energy flux means cell growth may take tens to thousands of years. Microbes are found in all regions of the CZ and can mediate important biogeochemical processes, but more work is needed to understand how microbial populations influence the links between different regions of the CZ and weathering processes. With the recent development of "omics" technologies, microbial ecologists have new methods that

  15. 43 CFR 6302.15 - When and how may I collect or disturb natural resources such as rocks and plants in wilderness...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... natural resources such as rocks and plants in wilderness areas? 6302.15 Section 6302.15 Public Lands... disturb natural resources such as rocks and plants in wilderness areas? (a) You may remove or disturb natural resources for non-commercial purposes in wilderness areas, including prospecting, provided—...

  16. 43 CFR 6302.15 - When and how may I collect or disturb natural resources such as rocks and plants in wilderness...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... natural resources such as rocks and plants in wilderness areas? 6302.15 Section 6302.15 Public Lands... disturb natural resources such as rocks and plants in wilderness areas? (a) You may remove or disturb natural resources for non-commercial purposes in wilderness areas, including prospecting, provided—...

  17. 43 CFR 6302.15 - When and how may I collect or disturb natural resources such as rocks and plants in wilderness...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... natural resources such as rocks and plants in wilderness areas? 6302.15 Section 6302.15 Public Lands... disturb natural resources such as rocks and plants in wilderness areas? (a) You may remove or disturb natural resources for non-commercial purposes in wilderness areas, including prospecting, provided—...

  18. 43 CFR 6302.15 - When and how may I collect or disturb natural resources such as rocks and plants in wilderness...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... natural resources such as rocks and plants in wilderness areas? 6302.15 Section 6302.15 Public Lands... disturb natural resources such as rocks and plants in wilderness areas? (a) You may remove or disturb natural resources for non-commercial purposes in wilderness areas, including prospecting, provided—...

  19. The October 30, 1994, seismic disturbance in South Africa: Earthquake or large rock burst?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowers, David

    1997-05-01

    The relative amplitude method is applied to body waves recorded at teleseismic distances from the October 30, 1994, mb 5.6 seismic disturbance, in South Africa, to determine the source depth and moment tensor. The results indicate that the source is shallow and that moment tensors with a positive volume change component are inconsistent with the observations. Observations of Rg in the frequency range 0.5-2.0 Hz at two regional distance stations also indicate that the source is shallow (less than about 3 km deep). Three-component broadband and long-period seismograms recorded at regional distances show strong Love wave excitation and a lobed Rayleigh radiation pattern, observations that are inconsistent with collapse mechanisms recently proposed for some large rock bursts (mine tremors). Modeling of teleseismic broadband P and regional distance surface waves shows that the source depth is shallow (2-3 km) and that the observed source radiation is consistent with that expected from a 45° normal dip-slip fault. The results of the modeling are confirmed by reports from the mining region that the disturbance was a mine tremor caused by slip on the Stuirmanspan Fault in the President Brand mine at a depth of between 2 and 3 km. The close match between observed and synthetic P and Rayleigh wave amplitudes suggests that the explosion-like mb: Ms of the mine tremor (mb 5.6, Ms 4.7) is attributable to the effect of the mechanism and the shallow depth of the source. The above results are at odds with those of Fan and Wallace [1995], who interpreted this disturbance as an earthquake at a depth of 12 km, based on a broadband inversion of three-component waveforms from two regional distance stations. This study confirms the need to interpret both broadband waveforms (to match amplitude and polarity) and short-period waveforms (to confirm (relative) onset times in the model structure) if inversion of regional broadband waveforms is to provide a reliable estimate of the moment

  20. Peculiarities of ULF electromagnetic disturbances before strong earthquakes in seismic active zone of Kamchatka peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopytenko, Y. A.; Ismagilov, V. S.; Schekotov, A.; Molchanov, O.; Chebrov, V.; Raspopov, O. M.

    2006-12-01

    Regular observations of ULF electromagnetic disturbances and acoustic emissions at st. Karymshino in seismic active zone of Kamchatka peninsula were carried out during 2001-2003 years. Five seismic active periods with strong earthquakes (M>5) were displayed during this period. These EQs occurred at the Pacific at 20-60 km depth at 100-140 km distances to the East from the st. Karymshino. Analysis of normalized dynamic power spectra of data of high-sensitive (0.2 pT/sqrt(Hz)) three-component induction magnetometer achieved a significant disorder of daily variation and increasing of the magnetic disturbance intensities (from 0.2 to ~1 pT) in the whole investigated frequency range (0.2-5 Hz). The anomaly intensity increasing was observed during the 12-18 hours before main seismic shocks. Maximum of the increasing occurred during 4-6 hours before the EQs. An increasing of acoustic emissions (F=30 Hz) was observed during the same period. A sharp decreasing of the magnetic disturbance intensities was observed 2-4 hours before the EQs. We suppose that physical processes in a hearth of forthcoming EQ lead to an irreversible avalanche-like formation of cracks and stimulation of the acoustic and ULF electromagnetic disturbances.

  1. 78 FR 53243 - Safety Zone; TriRock San Diego, San Diego Bay, San Diego, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-29

    ... Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; TriRock San Diego, San Diego Bay, San Diego... temporary safety zone upon the navigable waters of the San Diego Bay, San Diego, CA, in support of...

  2. 77 FR 54811 - Safety Zone; TriRock San Diego, San Diego Bay, San Diego, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-06

    .... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Table of Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; TriRock San Diego, San Diego Bay, San Diego... safety zone upon the navigable waters of the San Diego Bay, San Diego, CA, in support of a bay swim...

  3. Multiscale model for predicting shear zone structure and permeability in deforming rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleary, Paul W.; Pereira, Gerald G.; Lemiale, Vincent; Piane, Claudio Delle; Clennell, M. Ben

    2016-04-01

    A novel multiscale model is proposed for the evolution of faults in rocks, which predicts their internal properties and permeability as strain increases. The macroscale model, based on smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), predicts system scale deformation by a pressure-dependent elastoplastic representation of the rock and shear zone. Being a continuum method, SPH contains no intrinsic information on the grain scale structure or behaviour of the shear zone, so a series of discrete element method microscale shear cell models are embedded into the macroscale model at specific locations. In the example used here, the overall geometry and kinematics of a direct shear test on a block of intact rock is simulated. Deformation is imposed by a macroscale model where stresses and displacement rates are applied at the shear cell walls in contact with the rock. Since the microscale models within the macroscale block of deforming rock now include representations of the grains, the structure of the shear zone, the evolution of the size and shape distribution of these grains, and the dilatancy of the shear zone can all be predicted. The microscale dilatancy can be used to vary the macroscale model dilatancy both spatially and temporally to give a full two-way coupling between the spatial scales. The ability of this model to predict shear zone structure then allows the prediction of the shear zone permeability using the Lattice-Boltzmann method.

  4. Deformation and fluid flow during fault zone development in granitic rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Pollard, D.D.; Buergmann, R.; Christiansen, P.P. . Geology Dept.); Martel, S.J. )

    1992-01-01

    Fault zone development in crystalline rock of the Lake Edison granodiorite, Sierra Nevada, California, is characterized by five stages with distinct physical mechanisms, each identified by outcrop mapping, and understood through mechanical analysis. Because fluid flow through the developing fault system can influence the rock properties and loading, and because rock fracturing can influence the fluid pathways, the phenomena of deformation and fluid flow are closely coupled. Both the faulting mechanisms and the evolution of permeability in crystalline rocks are demonstrably different from fault zones in porous sedimentary rocks. The paper describes the five stages of fault development. Deformation of the adjacent granodiorite at each stage of growth for a particular fault zone depended on the distribution of slip. This distribution is a function of the remote stress state, the constitutive rock properties, the geometry of the fault surfaces, and their frictional properties. Simple forward models, using elasticity theory, illustrate how the displacement distributions can vary with remote loading, friction, and geometry. Inverse methods provide the analytical tools to deduce these variables from outcrop data, but their implementation awaits a credible model that couples the fluid flow and rock deformation.

  5. Disturbances of the circadian sleep-wake rhythm after time zone changes.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, M; Endo, S

    1985-03-01

    Studies on the changes in circadian rhythms due to time zone changes were described with emphasis placed on sleep. The results were summarized as follows. Eastward flights; Decrease of total sleep time, or increase of TST, Disturbances of intra-sleep cycles, Increase of slow wave sleep, Decrease of REM sleep in the amount, Prolonged REM sleep latency. Westward flights; Shortened sleep latency, Shortened REM sleep latency, Increase of percentage REM sleep, Unusual temporal distributions of REM sleep periods. Southward flight; No significant change. From all above mentioned it becomes evident that after transmeridian flight sleep rhythm is clearly disturbed. In this time we emphasized the changes in particular sleep stages rather than the overall changes in sleep-wake cycles. The changes in sleep pattern followed by time zone changes, however, are thought to result from a complicated summation of effects, such as sleep deprivation, sleep reversal, naps, shift in sleep onset time, and circadian rhythm alternation. The possible factors about the changes in sleep will be presented by Dr. Endo in the next lecture.

  6. Characteristics of Fault Zones in Volcanic Rocks Near Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Donald Sweetkind; Ronald M. Drake II

    2007-11-27

    During 2005 and 2006, the USGS conducted geological studies of fault zones at surface outcrops at the Nevada Test Site. The objectives of these studies were to characterize fault geometry, identify the presence of fault splays, and understand the width and internal architecture of fault zones. Geologic investigations were conducted at surface exposures in upland areas adjacent to Yucca Flat, a basin in the northeastern part of the Nevada Test Site; these data serve as control points for the interpretation of the subsurface data collected at Yucca Flat by other USGS scientists. Fault zones in volcanic rocks near Yucca Flat differ in character and width as a result of differences in the degree of welding and alteration of the protolith, and amount of fault offset. Fault-related damage zones tend to scale with fault offset; damage zones associated with large-offset faults (>100 m) are many tens of meters wide, whereas damage zones associated with smaller-offset faults are generally a only a meter or two wide. Zeolitically-altered tuff develops moderate-sized damage zones whereas vitric nonwelded, bedded and airfall tuff have very minor damage zones, often consisting of the fault zone itself as a deformation band, with minor fault effect to the surrounding rock mass. These differences in fault geometry and fault zone architecture in surface analog sites can serve as a guide toward interpretation of high-resolution subsurface geophysical results from Yucca Flat.

  7. Characteristics of Fault Zones in Volcanic Rocks Near Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sweetkind, Donald S.; Drake II, Ronald M.

    2007-01-01

    During 2005 and 2006, the USGS conducted geological studies of fault zones at surface outcrops at the Nevada Test Site. The objectives of these studies were to characterize fault geometry, identify the presence of fault splays, and understand the width and internal architecture of fault zones. Geologic investigations were conducted at surface exposures in upland areas adjacent to Yucca Flat, a basin in the northeastern part of the Nevada Test Site; these data serve as control points for the interpretation of the subsurface data collected at Yucca Flat by other USGS scientists. Fault zones in volcanic rocks near Yucca Flat differ in character and width as a result of differences in the degree of welding and alteration of the protolith, and amount of fault offset. Fault-related damage zones tend to scale with fault offset; damage zones associated with large-offset faults (>100 m) are many tens of meters wide, whereas damage zones associated with smaller-offset faults are generally a only a meter or two wide. Zeolitically-altered tuff develops moderate-sized damage zones whereas vitric nonwelded, bedded and airfall tuff have very minor damage zones, often consisting of the fault zone itself as a deformation band, with minor fault effect to the surrounding rock mass. These differences in fault geometry and fault zone architecture in surface analog sites can serve as a guide toward interpretation of high-resolution subsurface geophysical results from Yucca Flat.

  8. Fluid-rock Interaction and Episodic Fluid Flow within the Hurricane Fault-zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koger, J.; Newell, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    The Hurricane Fault is an active 250-km long, west dipping, Basin and Range bounding normal fault in SW Utah and NW Arizona. Fault rock alteration and mineralization is common in the damage zone along strike, indicating that this structure has influenced past groundwater flow. Multiple Quaternary basaltic centers are located proximal to the fault. This study tests the hypothesis that fault-zone diagenesis is being driven by deeply circulated meteoric groundwater infiltration and associated rock-water interaction that is punctuated by periods of hydrothermal alteration associated with local magmatism. Fault-parallel/oblique fractures and small-offset antithetic and synthetic normal faults have been found within fault-zone rocks. The intensity of fracturing and associated evidence of fluid-rock interaction progressively decreases away from the main fault trace into the footwall. Host rock alteration, hematite mineralized fault surfaces, and calcite and hematite cemented deformation bands and veins are observed. These features are focused in 1 - 2 m wide zones of fracturing with densities of 6 - 18 m-1 located within the footwall damage zone. Host rock alteration in the form of both "bleaching" and oxidation along fractures provides evidence for past redox reactions. Mineralization in deformation bands suggests that some fluid flow and diagenesis was penecontemporaneous with deformation. Laminations and cross-cutting relationships in veins indicate periodic mineralization that could be controlled by episodic fluid flow, or fracturing and degassing leading to calcite precipitation. Stable isotopic results from calcite veins show δ13CPDB values of -7 to 3 ‰ and δ18OPDB values of -19 to -9 ‰. Carbon stable isotope ratios suggest multiple carbon sources such as marine carbonates, organic sedimentary rocks, and mantle derived CO2. Temperature differences in paleofluids and associated fluid-rock interaction may explain the observed range in δ18O values. Fluid

  9. Thermo-physical rock properties of greywacke basement rock and intrusive lavas from the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielke, P.; Weinert, S.; Bignall, G.; Sass, I.

    2016-09-01

    Greywacke of the Waipapa and Torlesse (Composite) Terrane form the basement of the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ), New Zealand. Together with inferred buried lavas, domes and igneous complexes they are likely to be the dominant rock type prevailing at depths > 4 km beneath the TVZ. A fundamental understanding of the rock properties of the deep formations is of utmost importance for the exploration of deep unconventional geothermal resources. An outcrop analogue study was conducted to improve the understanding of the thermo-physical rock properties of likely deep buried rock formations beneath the TVZ. A total of 145 core samples were taken at 10 locations inside and outside the TVZ and their grain and bulk density, porosity, matrix permeability, bulk thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity, and the compressional and shear wave velocities measured on oven-dry samples. Additional tests of the unconfined compressive strength were conducted for selected greywacke samples to quantify their mechanical rock strength. The obtained data indicates that the thermo-physical rock properties are mainly controlled by porosity, and minor by mineralogy, texture and grain size. Samples from Waipapa-type and Torlesse-type greywacke exhibit minor rheological differences, with Waipapa-type greywacke having lowest porosity (about 1% vs. 3%) and highest bulk thermal conductivity (2.5 W m- 1 K- 1 vs. 1.7 W m- 1 K- 1) and specific heat capacity (0.8 kJ kg- 1 K- 1 vs. 0.7 kJ kg- 1 K- 1). Matrix permeability is < 1E-16 m2 for all greywacke samples. Tested lavas exhibit heterogeneous rock properties due to their wide range of porosity (< 1% up to 32%). The thermo-physical rock properties were tested at laboratory conditions (ambient temperature and pressure), which do not reflect the in situ conditions at greater depth. With depth, thermal conductivity and acoustic wave velocity are likely to decrease caused by micro fractures resulting from thermal cracking of the rock, while specific

  10. Saturated Zone Plumes in Volcanic Rock: Implications for Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect

    S. Kelkar; R. Roback; B. Robinson; G. Srinivasan; C. Jones; P. Reimus

    2006-02-14

    This paper presents a literature survey of the occurrences of radionuclide plumes in saturated, fractured rocks. Three sites, Idaho National laboratory, Hanford, and Oak Ridge are discussed in detail. Results of a modeling study are also presented showing that the length to width ratio of a plume starting within the repository footprint at the Yucca Mountain Project site, decreases from about 20:1 for the base case to about 4:1 for a higher value of transverse dispersivity, indicating enhanced lateral spreading of the plume. Due to the definition of regulatory requirements, this lateral spreading does not directly impact breakthrough curves at the 18 km compliance boundary, however it increases the potential that a plume will encounter reducing conditions, thus significantly retarding the transport of sorbing radionuclides.

  11. Swirling flow can suppress monocyte adhesion in the flow disturbance zones of the endovascular stent.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zengsheng; Zhang, Xiwen; Deng, Xiaoyan

    2012-01-01

    Adhesion of monocytes (U-937 cells) along a silicone tube deployed with circular ring stents was studied to test the hypothesis that by intentionally inducing swirling flow in an endovascular stent, the adhesion of monocytes would be suppressed. The results revealed that under a normal flow condition, the flow disturbance created by the circular ring stents enhanced the adhesion of U-937 cells in the silicone tube. By inducing a swirling flow in the silicone tube, the average wall shear stress (WSS) in the tube with the circular ring stents was elevated and significantly suppressed the adhesion density of U-937 cells to the surface in the disturbed flow zones to a level equal to that when no stents were deployed in the tube. The results also showed that, due to the attenuation of the swirling flow along the tube, the adhesion density of U-937 cells increased monotonically along the tube, indicating that the adhesion density was negatively correlated with the strength of the swirling flow. Thus, the present study suggests that intentionally introducing swirling flow in an artery deployed with stents may be a solution to solve the problem of stent restenosis by restraining the adhesion of monocytes. PMID:23380900

  12. Alleghanian development of the Goat Rock fault zone, southernmost Appalachians: Temporal compatibility with the master decollement

    SciTech Connect

    Steltenpohl, M.G. ); Goldberg, S.A. ); Hanley, T.B. ); Kunk, M.J. )

    1992-09-01

    The Goat Rock and associated Bartletts Ferry fault zones, which mark the eastern margin of the Pine Mountain Grenville basement massif, are controversial due to the suggestion that they are rare exposed segments of the late Paleozoic southern Appalachian master decollement. The controversy in part stems from reported middle Paleozoic (Acadian) radiometric dates postulated as the time of movement along these fault zones. Ultramylonite samples from the type area at Goat Rock Dam yield a 287 [plus minus] 15 Ma Rb-Sr isochron interpreted as the time of Sr isotopic rehomgenization during mylonitization. This date is corroborated by Late Pennsylvanian-Early Permian [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar mineral ages on hornblende (297-288 Ma) and muscovite (285-278 Ma) from neomineralized and dynamically recrystallized rocks within and straddling the fault zone. These Late Pennsylvanian-Early Permian dates indicate the time of right-slip movement (Alleghenian) along the Goat Rock fault zone, which is compatible with the timing suggested by COCORP for thrusting along the southern Appalachian master decollement.

  13. Alleghanian development of the Goat Rock fault zone, southernmost Appalachians: Temporal compatibility with the master decollement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steltenpohl, Mark G.; Goldberg, Steven A.; Hanley, Thomas B.; Kunk, Michael J.

    1992-09-01

    The Goat Rock and associated Bartletts Ferry fault zones, which mark the eastern margin of the Pine Mountain Grenville basement massif, are controversial due to the suggestion that they are rare exposed segments of the late Paleozoic southern Appalachian master decollement. The controversy in part stems from reported middle Paleozoic (Acadian) radiometric dates postulated as the time of movement along these fault zones. Ultramylonite samples from the type area at Goat Rock Dam yield a 287 ±15 Ma Rb-Sr isochron interpreted as the time of Sr isotopic rehomogenization during mylonitization. This date is corroborated by Late Pennsylvanian-Early Permian 40Ar/39Ar mineral ages on hornblende (297-288 Ma) and muscovite (285-278 Ma) from neomineralized and dynamically recrystallized rocks within and straddling the fault zone. These Late Pennsylvanian-Early Permian dates indicate the time of right-slip movement (Alleghanian) along the Goat Rock fault zone, which is compatible with the timing suggested by COCORP for thrusting along the southern Appalachian master decollement.

  14. Where microorganisms meet rocks in the Earth's Critical Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akob, D. M.; Küsel, K.

    2011-03-01

    The Earth's Critical Zone (CZ) is the critical, outer shell of the Earth that provides an arena for the interplay of diverse physical, chemical, and biological processes that are fundamental for sustaining life. As microbes are the principle drivers of biogeochemical cycles, it is necessary to understand the biodiversity of the CZ unseen majority and their impact on life-sustaining processes. This review aims to summarize the factors controlling where microbes (prokaryotes and micro-eukaryotes) live within the CZ and what is known to date about their diversity and function. Microbes live in all regions of the CZ down to 5 km depth, but due to changing habitat complexity, e.g., variability in pore spaces, water, oxygen, and nutrients, their functional role changes with depth. The abundance of prokaryotes and micro-eukaryotes decreases from a maximum of 1010 or 107 cells g soil-1 up to eight orders of magnitude with depth. Symbiotic mycorrhizal fungi and free-living decomposers are best understood in soil habitats, where they are up to 103 cells g soil-1. However, little is known about their identity and impact on weathering in the deep subsurface. The relatively low abundance of micro-eukaryotes in the deep subsurface suggests that these organisms are either limited in space or nutrients or unable to cope with oxygen limitations. Since deep regions of the CZ are limited in the recent input of photosynthesis-derived carbon, microbes are dependent on deposited organic material or on chemolithoautotrophic metabolism that allows for the establishment of a complete food chain independent from the surface. However, the energy flux available might only allow cell growth over tens to thousands of years. The recent development of "omics" technologies has provided microbial ecologists with methods to link the composition and function of in situ microbial communities. We should expect new metabolic discoveries as we have a closer look utilizing a polyphasic approach into the

  15. Characterising and modelling the excavation damaged zone in crystalline rock in the context of radioactive waste disposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, John A.; Bäckström, A.; Rutqvist, J.; Jing, L.; Backers, T.; Chijimatsu, M.; Christiansson, R.; Feng, X.-T.; Kobayashi, A.; Koyama, T.; Lee, H.-S.; Neretnieks, I.; Pan, P.-Z.; Rinne, M.; Shen, B.-T.

    2009-05-01

    This paper describes current knowledge about the nature of and potential for thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical modelling of the excavation damaged zone (EDZ) around the excavations for an underground radioactive waste repository. In the first part of the paper, the disturbances associated with excavation are explained, together with reviews of Workshops that have been held on the subject. In the second part of the paper, the results of a DECOVALEX [DEmonstration of COupled models and their VALidation against EXperiment: research funded by an international consortium of radioactive waste regulators and implementers ( http://www.decovalex.com )] research programme on modelling the EDZ are presented. Four research teams used four different models to simulate the complete stress-strain curve for Avro granite from the Swedish Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory. Subsequent research extended the work to computer simulation of the evolution of the repository using a ‘wall-block model’ and a ‘near-field model’. This included assessing the evolution of stress, failure and permeability and time-dependent effects during repository evolution. As discussed, all the computer models are well suited to sensitivity studies for evaluating the influence of their respective supporting parameters on the complete stress-strain curve for rock and for modelling the EDZ.

  16. Characterising and modelling the excavation damaged zone (EDZ) in crystalline rock in the context of radioactive waste disposal

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, J.A.; Backstrom, A.; Rutqvist, J.; Jing, L.; Backers, T.; Chijimatsu, M.; Christiansson, R.; Feng, X.-T.; Kobayashi, A.; Koyama, T.; Lee, H.-S.; Neretnieks, I.; Pan, P.Z.; Rinne, M.; Shen, B.-T.

    2008-10-01

    This paper describes current knowledge about the nature of and potential for thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical modelling of the Excavation Damaged Zone (EDZ) around the excavations for an underground radioactive waste repository. In the first part of the paper, the disturbances associated with excavation are explained, together with reviews of Workshops that have been held on the subject. In the second part of the paper, the results of a DECOVALEX research programme on modelling the EDZ are presented. Four research teams used four different models to simulate the complete stress-strain curve for Avro granite from the Swedish Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. Subsequent research extended the work to computer simulation of the evolution of the repository using a 'wall block model' and a 'near-field model'. This included assessing the evolution of stress, failure and permeability and time dependent effects during repository evolution. As discussed, all the computer models are well suited to sensitivity studies for evaluating the influence of their respective supporting parameters on the complete stress-strain curve for rock and for modelling the EDZ.

  17. Possible detachment zone in Precambrian rocks of Kanjamalai Hills, Cauvery Suture Zone, Southern India: Implications to accretionary tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, D. P.; Chetty, T. R. K.

    2014-07-01

    Existence of a possible detachment zone at Elampillai region, NW margin of Kanjamalai Hills, located in the northern part of Cauvery Suture Zone (CSZ), Southern India, is reported here for the first time. Detailed structural mapping provides anatomy of the zone, which are rarely preserved in Precambrian high grade terranes. The detachment surface separates two distinct rock units of contrasting lithological and structural characters: the upper and lower units. The detachment zone is characterized by a variety of fold styles with the predominance of tight isoclinal folds with varied plunge directions, limb rotations and the hinge line variations often leading to lift-off fold like geometries and deformed sheath folds. Presence of parasitic folding and associated penetrative strains seem to be controlled by differences in mechanical stratigraphy, relative thicknesses of the competent and incompetent units, and the structural relief of the underlying basement. Our present study in conjunction with other available geological, geochemical and geochronological data from the region indicates that the structures of the detachment zone are genetically related to thrust tectonics forming a part of subduction-accretion-collision tectonic history of the Neoproterozoic Gondwana suture.

  18. Seismic Fault Zone Rocks from a Subduction Megathrust (Kodiak Is., AK)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meneghini, F.; di Toro, G.; Moore, C. J.; Rowe, C. D.

    2008-12-01

    Subduction megathrusts nucleate some of the largest earthquakes on Earth, including the 1964 Mw9.2 Alaskan earthquake. We describe the fault zone and the fault rocks from the thickest slipping zone ever described in subduction complexes. The aim is to discriminate (microstructurally and chemically) fault rocks produced during seismic slip and to reconstruct the seismic cycle in the fault zone. In the ancient analogue of the active Alaskan subduction complex, cropping out in Kodiak Island, decimeter- thick cohesive black-colored layers are at the core of 10's of meters thick foliated cataclasites. The cataclasites are part of a melange regarded as a paleo-decollement active at 12 - 14 km in depth and 230 - 260 ° C. Each black layer is traced continuously for tens of meters along a single outcrop, and, through structural correlations, across 2 km of section along strike. The black rocks features a complex layering of glass-looking and granular-looking layers. "Glassy" and "granular" layers textures are composed of sub-rounded grains (< 100 micron) of quartz and albite floating in an ultrafine matrix (< 4 micron). In the matrix of glassy-looking layers, tabular microlites of albite are common, showing an oscillatory zoning typical of magmatic rocks that is absent in the cataclasites. "Granular" layers, are more tightly packed, less sorted, enriched in crushed feldspar microlites and depleted in phyllosilicates with respect to the "glassy" layers. XRF and XRPD analyses suggest chemical fractionation between the foliated cataclasites and the black rocks (e.g. enrichment in Na in the black rocks). Crosscutting relationships between granular- and glassy-like layers occur. Alternatively, flow and intrusion structures between the two layers are observed, suggesting that they flowed and deformed in a ductile fashion. Based on these observations, we hypothesize that the black rocks (1) are the result of frictional melting (glassy-looking layers) and fluidization (granular

  19. Multiple-Code BenchMaek Simulation Stidy of Coupled THMC Processes IN the EXCAVATION DISTURBED ZONE Associated with Geological Nuclear Waste Repositories

    SciTech Connect

    J. Rutqvist; X. Feng; J. Hudson; L. Jing; A. Kobayashi; T. Koyama; P.Pan; H. Lee; M. Rinne; E. Sonnenthal; Y. Yamamoto

    2006-05-08

    An international, multiple-code benchmark test (BMT) study is being conducted within the international DECOVALEX project to analyze coupled thermal, hydrological, mechanical and chemical (THMC) processes in the excavation disturbed zone (EDZ) around emplacement drifts of a nuclear waste repository. This BMT focuses on mechanical responses and long-term chemo-mechanical effects that may lead to changes in mechanical and hydrological properties in the EDZ. This includes time-dependent processes such as creep, and subcritical crack, or healing of fractures that might cause ''weakening'' or ''hardening'' of the rock over the long term. Five research teams are studying this BMT using a wide range of model approaches, including boundary element, finite element, and finite difference, particle mechanics, and elasto-plastic cellular automata methods. This paper describes the definition of the problem and preliminary simulation results for the initial model inception part, in which time dependent effects are not yet included.

  20. Synthesis of Concepts in Disturbance Hydrology and the Importance for Hydrologic Response to Extreme Hydroclimatic Events in the Critical Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebel, B. A.; Mirus, B. B.

    2014-12-01

    The watersheds we rely on for water resources, ecosystem services, and protection from hydrologically driven natural hazards are increasingly impacted by landscape disturbance. Abrupt alterations of hydrologic processes resulting from wildfires, urban development, resource extraction, deforestation, hurricanes, tsunamis, and landslides change the storage or buffering capacity as well as the hydrologic functional connectivity in watersheds. We highlight some of the critical issues and major challenges to predicting disturbance impacts on water resources and natural hazards and outline some of the opportunities for improved mechanistic understanding of how disturbances propagate through landscape hydrological processes. In particular, we emphasize synthesis of conceptual commonalities and opportunities from other disciplines, primarily ecologic sciences, which are well versed in the study of disturbed landscapes. Cross scale interactions and complex adaptive systems theory are examples of useful concepts for synthesis across different disturbance effects. We also highlight the importance of improved understanding of disturbance hydrology for predicting the effects of extreme hydroclimatic events on the hydrologic response of the Critical Zone. An example from the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains, USA of a watershed with multiple disturbances subjected to a low frequency extreme rainfall event is presented to show the diversity of runoff generation mechanisms and the implications for watershed scale impacts.

  1. Typology of lozenges and their development in anastomosing shear zones in foliated rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponce, Carlos; Carreras, Jordi; Druguet, Elena

    2010-05-01

    Lozenges are characteristic common structures related to anastomosing networks of shear zones. They are ellipsoid-shaped bodies of undeformed (or less deformed) country rock bounded by mylonites. They have been studied since the 1980's (Bell and Rubenach 1980, Bell 1981, Simpson, 1982, Choukroune and Gapais 1987, Hudleston 1999, Fusseis 2006), and various formation processes have been proposed. However, the lack of a systematic typology has led to confronting interpretations about their origin, development and significance in the context of anastomosing shear zones. A typology of shear zone-related lozenges is proposed with regard to the pre-shearing rock properties: 1) Lozenges in rheologically heterogeneous rocks. Their development is related to the presence of volumes of rock that behave more competent than the surrounding media. These are therefore typically developed in shear zones affecting rocks with a marked competence constrast. This is the case e.g. of a sheared competent dyke in a less competent schistose matrix. 2) Lozenges in homogeneous (2a, isotropic or 2b, anisotropic) rocks that arise from the confluence of differently oriented shears. The development of this type of lozenges is at present less understood than type 1 lozenges. The present work is focused in the formation and development of type 2 lozenges. The here presented preliminary results are based on a 2D approach (sections parallel to the shear direction) and supported by the analysis of natural examples from the Cap de Creus shear belt Eastern Pyrenees). Two main variables are taken into account for the interpretation of this type of lozenges. First, the relative kinematics of the bounding shear zones, i.e., shear zones have the same shear sense or, instead, they have opposite shear sense (conjugate sets). Second, only for foliated rocks, the relative orientation of the previous foliation with regard to the lozenge major axis. Furthermore, some models are presented to explain the

  2. Fracturing and rock pulverization along an exhumed seismogenic fault zone in dolostones: The Foiana Fault Zone (Southern Alps, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fondriest, Michele; Aretusini, Stefano; Di Toro, Giulio; Smith, Steven A. F.

    2015-07-01

    The Foiana Fault Zone (FFZ) is a major sinistral transpressive fault zone exhumed from < 2 km depth in the Italian Southern Alps. The fault zone crosscuts thick sequences of sedimentary dolostones and shows increasing cumulative throw (0.3-1.8 km) moving from south to north along fault strike. The FFZ consists of variably fractured and fragmented dolostones locally cut by small-displacement (< 0.5 m) faults containing discrete, highly-reflective (so-called "mirror-like") slip surfaces. The mirror-like slip surfaces are typically embedded within fine-grained cataclasite layers up to a few centimeters thick. Preservation of bedding planes in the fragmented dolostones indicates a lack of significant shear strain. Instead, the fragmented dolostones are affected by in-situ shattering from the centimeter down to the micrometer scale, resembling pulverized rocks in crystalline lithologies. Detailed field and aerial structural mapping reveals significant changes in the structure of the FFZ along strike. In particular, the fault zone exhibits large variations in thickness (from c. 100 m in the north to more than 300 m in the south) and changes in mean fault orientation and fault kinematics (from dominant oblique- and strike-slip in the north to dip-slip reverse in the south), together with the reactivation of preexisting anisotropies (i.e. bedding). Overall, the structure of the FFZ, when considered together with possible variable exhumation levels along strike, compares favorably to the predicted damage distribution in three-dimensional earthquake rupture simulations on strike-slip faults, as well as to the characteristics of active seismic sources hosted in carbonate rocks as illuminated by recent seismological studies.

  3. Imaging of reflection seismic energy for mapping shallow fracture zones in crystalline rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J.D.; Moon, W.M. ); Lodha, G.; Serzu, M.; Soonawala, N. )

    1994-05-01

    The high-resolution reflection seismic technique is being used increasingly to address geologic exploration and engineering problems. There are, however, a number of problems in applying reflection seismic techniques in a crystalline rock environment. The reflection seismic data collected over a fractured crystalline rock environment are often characterized by low signal-to-noise (S/N) and inconsistent reflection events. Thus it is important to develop data processing strategies and correlation schemes for the imaging of fracture zones in crystalline rocks. Two sets of very low S/N, high-resolution seismic data, previously collected by two different contractors in Pinawa, Canada, and the island of Aespoe, Sweden, were reprocessed and analyzed, with special emphasis on the shallow reflection events occurring at depths as shallow as 60--100 m.

  4. In Brief: Anoxic ``dead zones'' in oceans; Some Mars rocks likely formed in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy; Jacobs, Judith

    2004-04-01

    The number of oxygen-starved ``dead zones'' in the world's oceans and seas is rising, according to a report of the United Nations Environment Programme published 29 March-the result of excessive nutrients, mainly nitrogen, from the use of synthetic fertilizers in agriculture, as well as vehicle and factory air emissions. NASA's Opportunity Rover has found that some rocks on Mars probably formed as deposits in a shallow salt flat, or playa, rover science team members announced on 23 March. When scientists announced on 2 March that they had found strong evidence that a rock outcrop in Mars' Meridiana Planum region once was a wet and habitable environment, they had still been uncertain about whether the rocks had been laid down in liquid water. (See Eos, 16 March 2004.)

  5. The Bolivian source rocks: Sub Andean Zone-Madre de Dios-Chaco

    SciTech Connect

    Moretti, I.; Montemurro, G.; Aguilera, E.; Perez, M.; Martinez, E.Diaz

    1996-08-01

    A complete study of source rocks has been carried out in the Bolivian foothills and foreland (Sub Andean Zone, Chaco and Madre de Dios) in order to quantify the petroleum potential of the area. Besides the classical mid-Devonian source rocks (Tequeje Formation in the north, Limoncito Formation in the center and Los Monos Formation in the south), others are important: the Tomachi Formation (late Devonian) in the north and the Copacabana Formation (Upper Carboniferous-lower Permian) in the northern Sub Andean Zone. Both show an excellent potential with S{sub 2} over 50 mg HC/g and average values higher than 10 mg HC/g over few hundred meters. The Latest Cretaceous Flora Formation present locally a high potential but is very thin. Almost all the source rocks matured during the Neogene due to the subsidence in the Andean foreland and in the piggyback basins, and are thus involved on the current petroleum system. Silurian and Lower Paleozoic units also contain thick shale beds, but these source rocks were mature before the Jurassic in the south of the country. In the center, the Silurian is not nowadays overmature and may play an important role. The different zones are compared based on their Source Potential Index which indicates that the richest areas are the northern Sub Andean Zone and the Madre de Dios basin with SPI greater than 10 t/m{sup 2}. Since these two areas remain almost unexplored, these results allow us to be optimistic about the possibilities for future exploration.

  6. Possible emplacement of crustal rocks into the forearc mantle of the Cascadia Subduction Zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calvert, A.J.; Fisher, M.A.; Ramachandran, K.; Trehu, A.M.

    2003-01-01

    Seismic reflection profiles shot across the Cascadia forearc show that a 5-15 km thick band of reflections, previously interpreted as a lower crustal shear zone above the subducting Juan de Fuca plate, extends into the upper mantle of the North American plate, reaching depths of at least 50 km. In the extreme western corner of the mantle wedge, these reflectors occur in rocks with P wave velocities of 6750-7000 ms-1. Elsewhere, the forearc mantle, which is probably partially serpentinized, exhibits velocities of approximately 7500 ms-1. The rocks with velocities of 6750-7000 ms-1 are anomalous with respect to the surrounding mantle, and may represent either: (1) locally high mantle serpentinization, (2) oceanic crust trapped by backstepping of the subduction zone, or (3) rocks from the lower continental crust that have been transported into the uppermost mantle by subduction erosion. The association of subparallel seismic reflectors with these anomalously low velocities favours the tectonic emplacement of crustal rocks. Copyright 2003 by the American Geophysical Union.

  7. Physical property characterization of a damage zone in granitic rock - Implications for geothermal reservoir properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenning, Quinn; Madonna, Claudio; Amann, Florian; Gischig, Valentin; Burg, Jean-Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Geothermal energy offers a viable alternative to mitigate greenhouse gas emitting energy production. A tradeoff between less expensive drilling costs and increased permeability at shallow depths versus increased heat production at deeper depths stipulates the economic energy potential of a given reservoir. From a geological perspective, successful retrieval of geothermal energy from the subsurface requires sufficient knowledge of the structural and stratigraphic relationship of the target formations, which govern the thermal conditions, physical properties, and fluid flow properties of reservoir rocks. In Switzerland, deep basement rocks (~5 km) with fluid conducting damage zones and enhanced fractured systems stimulated by hydraulic shearing are seen as a potential geothermal reservoir system. Damage zones, both natural and induced, provide permeability enhancement that is especially important for creating fluid conductivity where the matrix permeability is low. This study concentrates on characterizing the elastic and transport properties entering into a natural damage zone penetrated by a borehole at the Grimsel underground research laboratory. The borehole drilled from a cavern at 480 m below ground surface penetrates approximately 20 m of mostly intact Grimsel granodiorite before entering the first phyllosilicate-rich shear zone (~0.2 m thick). The borehole intersects a second shear zone at approximately 23.8m. Between the two shear zones the Grimsel granodiorite is heavily fractured. The minimum principle stress magnitude from in-situ measurements decreases along the borehole into the first shear zone. Two mutually perpendicular core samples of Grimsel granodiorite were taken every 0.1 m from 19.5 to 20.1 m to characterize the physical properties and anisotropy changes as a gradient away from the damage zone. Measurements of ultrasonic compressional (Vp) and shear (Vs) velocities at 1 MHz frequency are conducted at room temperature and hydrostatic pressures

  8. Geochemical evolution of a fractured zone in the cap rock of an underground carbon storage site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vialle, S.; Druhan, J. L.; Maher, K.

    2013-12-01

    Assessment and management of environmental risks associated with underground storage of CO2 in geological systems is essential for the commercial deployment of this technology. A major risk is leakage of the CO2 from its storage reservoir, through wellbores, and along faults and fractures in the cap rock. The geochemical reactions likely to take place as CO2 leaks through a damage zone and their impact on cap rock integrity still need to be better understood and quantified. Should CO2 leakage occur, geochemical reactions would govern the environmental impact on shallow groundwater aquifers and could provide an indication of the leak prior to surface-based monitoring techniques. We used the reactive transport code TOUGH2/TOUGHREACT to model a leakage scenario through a fractured cap rock. Since geochemical reactions will strongly depend upon the local hydrodynamics of the CO2 leak, the first step of the study is to provide an appropriate physical representation of fluid flow through the system. Typically, for a low porosity rock formation, a fault/damaged zone system is composed of a core of low permeability and a damage zone with second-order fractures whose density decreases with distance from the fault core. Permeability is thus increased along the fault plane and laterally decreases down to the permeability value of the undamaged cap rock. Appropriate scaling relationships (e.g., and analytical expression of for permeability as a function of fracture aperture and fracture density), effective physical parameters as well as constitutive relationships are carefully chosen to model the fractured system, treated as an equivalent porous medium. The cap rock is initially saturated with brine (salinity of 0.15 in mass fraction) and due to overpressure in the lower storage reservoir, CO2 migrates through the damage zone. Geochemical reactions involve both salt precipitation due to the partitioning of H2O and CO2 between liquid and gas phases as well as well reactions

  9. Ultramafic rocks of the western Idaho suture zone: Asbestos Peak and Misery Ridge

    SciTech Connect

    Godchaux, M.M. . Dept. of Geology); Bonnichsen, B. )

    1993-04-01

    The Western Idaho Ultramafic Belt extends northward from the town of Weiser to the northern end of Dworshak Reservoir; in its northern portion most of the ultramafic bodies are localized along the suture zone where the Mesozoic oceanic accreted terranes meet the continental craton. Of the twenty bodies investigated, all are small, all are in fault contact with their metavolcanic and metasedimentary host rocks, all have been metamorphosed, and all display deformational fabrics in at least some portion of the outcrop area, suggesting that deformation continued after peak metamorphism. The degree of metamorphism ranges from incipient serpentinization to attainment of equilibrium in the upper amphibolite facies. Some bodies have been intruded by granitic dikes or pegmatite veins after emplacement, and have locally undergone contact metasomatism. Two particularly complex bodies, Asbestos Peak and Misery Ridge, were chosen for detailed petrographic and chemical study. Asbestos Peak is composed mostly of decussate anthophyllite-talc rock containing isolated patches of harzburgite protolith, and has blackwall border zones. Misery Ridge is composed mostly of coarse-grained sheared tremolite-talc schist without remnant protolith, and lacks true blackwall zones. Both bodies exhibit an unusual and enigmatic hornblende-poikiloblastic garnet-green spinel-skeletal ilmenite assemblage, present in some places as well-defined border zones and in other places as cross-cutting bodies.

  10. Magnetic fabrics induced by dynamic faulting reveal damage zone sizes in soft rocks, Dead Sea basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levi, T.; Weinberger, R.; Marco, S.

    2014-11-01

    The anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) of soft rocks was measured in order to distinguish between the effect of remote and local strain fields, determine the size of the related inelastic damage zone and resolve the fault-plane solutions of past earthquakes. The AMS fabrics were explored next to late Pleistocene syndepositional normal faults (total displacement up to ˜3.5 m) that cross soft lacustrine rocks within the seismically active Dead Sea basin. `Deposition fabrics' prevail meters away from the fault planes and are characterized by scattered maximum and intermediate principal AMS axes. `Deformation fabrics' are detected up to tens of centimetres from the fault planes and are characterized by well-grouped AMS axes, in which one of the principal axes is parallel to the strike of the nearby fault. Variations in the AMS fabrics and magnetic lineations define the size of the inelastic damage zone around the faults. The results demonstrate that the deformation-driven magnetic fabrics and the associated inelastic damage zones are compatible with coseismic dynamic faulting and the effects of the local strain field during earthquakes. Most of the AMS fabrics show a conspicuous similarity to that of the fault-plane solutions, i.e., the principal AMS axes and instantaneous strain ellipsoids are coaxial. These results suggest a novel application of the AMS method for defining the shape and size of the damage zones surrounding dynamic faults and determining the full tensor of the local strain field.

  11. Characterizing fractures and shear zones in crystalline rock using seismic and GPR methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doetsch, Joseph; Jordi, Claudio; Laaksonlaita, Niko; Gischig, Valentin; Schmelzbach, Cedric; Maurer, Hansruedi

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the natural or artificially created hydraulic conductivity of a rock mass is critical for the successful exploitation of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). The hydraulic response of fractured crystalline rock is largely governed by the spatial organization of permeable fractures. Defining the 3D geometry of these fractures and their connectivity is extremely challenging, because fractures can only be observed directly at their intersections with tunnels or boreholes. Borehole-based and tunnel-based ground-penetrating radar (GPR) and seismic measurements have the potential to image fractures and other heterogeneities between and around boreholes and tunnels, and to monitor subtle time-lapse changes in great detail. We present the analysis of data acquired in the Grimsel rock laboratory as part of the In-situ Stimulation and Circulation (ISC) experiment, in which a series of stimulation experiments have been and will be performed. The experiments in the granitic rock range from hydraulic fracturing to controlled fault-slip experiments. The aim is to obtain a better understanding of coupled seismo-hydro-mechanical processes associated with high-pressure fluid injections in crystalline rocks and their impact on permeability creation and enhancement. GPR and seismic data have been recorded to improve the geological model and characterize permeable fractures and shear zones. The acquired and processed data include reflection GPR profiles measured from tunnel walls, single-borehole GPR images, and borehole-to-borehole and tunnel-to-tunnel seismic and GPR tomograms. The reflection GPR data reveal the geometry of shear zones up to a distance of 30 m from the tunnels and boreholes, but the interpretation is complicated by the geometrical ambiguity around tunnels and boreholes and by spurious reflections from man-made structures such as boreholes. The GPR and seismic traveltime tomography results reveal brittle fractured rock between two ductile shear zones. The

  12. Geochemistry and geochronology of pre-Brasiliano rocks from the Transversal Zone, Borborema Province, Northeast Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sá, J. M.; Bertrand, J. M.; Leterrier, J.; Macedo, M. H. F.

    2002-03-01

    Proterozoic metamorphosed sequences are identified in the Transversal Zone (TZ) domain of the Borborema geological province, Northeast Brazil. This TZ domain is located between the well-known E-W Patos and Pernambuco continental shear zones. In its eastern part, in the Taquaritinga region, a large mass of augen gneisses with a conspicuous horizontal to subhorizontal tectonic foliation forms one of the most important rock types in the region that displays U-Pb zircon ages ca. 1.52 Ga. Paleoproterozoic orthogneisses dated by U-Pb on zircon at ca. 1.97 Ga and older paragneisses and banded gneisses represent basement rocks, which were cross-cut by these Mesoproterozoic augen gneisses, and have been in turn intruded by plutonic rocks in upper Neoproterozoic (U-Pb and Rb-Sr, ca. 0.6 Ga) times. Chemical analyses of major, minor, and trace elements (including REE) for the basement orthogneisses indicate calcalkaline affinities and a signature very similar to volcanic arc granites, representing crustal accretion during the Paleoproterozoic Transamazonian/Eburnean orogenesis in the region. In turn, the chemical data for augen gneisses indicate that they are relatively homogeneous and evolved metaluminous metaplutonic rocks with characteristics very similar to A-type granites generated and emplaced in an extensional anorogenic setting. Relatively high 87Sr/ 86Sr initial ratio and negative ɛNd( t) are signatures of crustal components in these rocks. Based on geochemical, geochronological, and structural data, the Taquaritinga region is composed of Paleoproterozoic (>1.97 Ga) rocks intruded by Mesoproterozoic (ca. 1.5 Ga) anorogenic granites and Neoproterozoic granites (ca. 0.6 Ga). These data also suggest that the tectonometamorphic structures displayed by Meso and Neoproterozoic suites were developed by the Brasiliano/Pan-African orogeny and that the record of Transamazonian/Eburnean orogeny is restricted to basement rocks. This means that there is no evidence for a

  13. Anisotropy of Resisitiviy Distributions and Fault Rock Microstructures in Fault Zones -Two Case Studies of Hatagawa and Atotsugawa Fault, Japan-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omura, K.

    2015-12-01

    Structure and physical characteristics in a fault zone are not homogeneous. The inhomogeneity should be related to earthquake generation mechanism. However, main features of the inhomogeneity in fault zones are not yet sufficiently understood. It is considered to be effective to compare geophysical data of geophysical survey and/or downhole logging with physical properties, microstructures and mineral compositions of fault rocks in the fault zone. In this presentation, results of the comparisons are introduced in the case of two fault zones; Hatagawa and Atotsugawa fault, in north-east and central Japan, respectively, and factors affecting the inhomogeneity of fault structure are suggested.Anisotropic resistivity measurements in laboratory were compared with microscopic observations of fault rocks recovered from outcrops of Hatagawa fault. In the case of Atotsugawa fault, the anisotropic resistivity profiles by physical survey across the fault zones were compared with microscopic observations and mineral composition analysis of fault rocks provided by drilling into the fault zone. As a result, the anisotropic resistivity profiles are strongly related to foliation structure of fault rocks. It is suggested that fault slip at the earthquake and shear deformation during the earthquake recurrence time develope foliation fabrics of fault rocks, and that the resistivity profile becomes anisotropic progressively in the fault zone.

  14. Dissecting Oceanic Detachment Faults: Fault Zone Geometry, Deformation Mechanisms, and Nature of Fluid-Rock Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnemains, D.; Escartin, J.; Verlaguet, A.; Andreani, M.; Mevel, C.

    2015-12-01

    To understand the extreme strain localization at long-lived oceanic detachment faults rooting deeply below the axis, we present results of geological investigations at the 13°19'N detachment along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, conducted during the ODEMAR cruise (Nov-Dec13, NO Pourquoi Pas?) with ROV Victor6000 (IFREMER). During this cruise we investigated and sampled the corrugated fault to understand its geometry, nature of deformation, and links to fluid flow. We identified and explored 7 fault outcrops on the flanks of microbathymetric striations subparallel to extension. These outcrops expose extensive fault planes, with the most prominent ones extending 40-90m laterally, and up to 10 m vertically. These fault surfaces systematically show subhorizontal striations subparallel to extension, and define slabs of fault-rock that are flat and also striated at sample scale. Visual observations show a complex detachment fault zone, with anastomosing fault planes at outcrop scale (1-10 m), with a highly heterogeneous distribution of deformation. We observe heterogeneity in fault-rock nature at outcrop scale. In situ samples from striated faults are primarily basalt breccias with prior green-schist facies alteration, and a few ultramafic fault-rocks that show a complex deformation history, with early schistose textures, brittlely reworked as clasts within the fault. The basalt breccias show variable silicification and associated sulfides, recording important fluid-rock interactions during exhumation. To understand the link between fluid and deformation during exhumation, we will present microstructural observation of deformation textures, composition, and distribution and origin of quartz and sulfides, as well as constraints on the temperature of silicifying fluids from fluid inclusions in quartz. These results allow us to characterize in detail the detachment fault zone geometry, and investigate the timing of silicification relative to deformation.

  15. 77 FR 59551 - Safety Zone, Changes to Original Rule; Boston Harbor's Rock Removal Project, Boston Inner Harbor...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-28

    ... Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking COTP Captain of the... Zone; Boston Harbor's Rock Removal Project, Boston Inner Harbor, Boston, MA'' (77 FR 50916). This new... Captain of the Port (COTP) Zone for the drilling, blasting, and dredging operation on the navigable...

  16. 76 FR 53403 - Foreign-Trade Zone 14-Little Rock, AR; Application for Subzone; Mitsubishi Power Systems Americas...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 14--Little Rock, AR; Application for Subzone; Mitsubishi Power Systems Americas, Inc. (Wind Turbine Nacelles and Generating Sets); Fort Smith, AR An application has been submitted to the Foreign-Trade...

  17. Ultramafic rocks of a fracture-zone ophiolite, North Cascades, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Robert B.; Mogk, David W.

    1987-11-01

    The Ingalls Complex was deformed in a Late Jurassic oceanic fracture zone. An unusually diverse group of ultramafic tectonites comprise three units in this ophiolite. Unit 1 consists mostly of poorly to moderately foliated harzburgite and dunite characterized by porphyroclastic textures. Irregular-shaped and tabular dunite bodies probably represent intrusive bodies or residues of partial melting. Voluminous Unit 2 consists mostly of poorly to strongly foliated Iherzolite and clinopyroxene-bearing harzburgite, plagioclase peridotite is present locally. Olivine and enstatite generally define equigranular mosaics or weakly porphyroclastic textures. Clinopyroxene, however, in some samples displays only weak deformation, compositional zoning, simple (growth?) twins and interstitial, commonly poikilitic texture. Clinopyroxene and plagioclase in these samples probably formed from a melt after recrystallization of olivine and enstatite, indicating that these Iherzolites are impregnated peridotites. Other Iherzolites and clinopyroxene-bearing harzburgites may represent weakly depleted mantle. Pods of metagabbroic gneiss within Unit 2 probably are small intrusions that were deformed as they cooled. Unit 3 represents a major high-temperature ( 700 °≥ 900 ° C) shear zone that separates Units 1 and 2, and consists of strongly foliated, commonly mylonitic Iherzolites and hornblende peridotites. The latter are the most strongly foliated ultramafites, and olivine in them records stresses as high as 275 MPa. The abundance of hornblende implies a genetic relationship between mylonitization and the hydration and metasomatism necessary to form such rocks from Iherzolites. Mineral chemistry and geothermometry are typical of mantle tectonites in many ophiolites and oceanic fracture zones. There is a particularly strong similarity between the spinels in the Ingalls Complex and the spinels from the Owen and Vema fracture zones. Hornblende in Unit 3 ranges from edenite to edenitic

  18. Geoelectric characteristics of portions of the Raha fault zone and surrounding rocks, Jabal As Silsilah Quadrangle, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zablocki, Charles J.; Hajnour, M.O.

    1987-01-01

    Telluric-electric and auto-magnetotelluric measurements obtained in and around the Raha fault zone in the Buqaya area indicate that it dips steeply to the southwest. Large contrasts in the electrical properties of Qarnayn and Maraghan metasedimentary rocks located on either side of the fault are characteristic of the rocks within the fault zone. However, no large electrical contrasts were detected along several segments of a southern branch of the main fault in the Shiaila area, indicating that the rocks on either side of the fault are of similar composition. Extremely low resistivity readings in the Buqaya and Shiaila areas are associated with fracturing and clay-bearing gouge that accompany known shear zones. The locations of several shallow plutons have been inferred from these studies, one of which is probably a source of gold-bearing quartz veins in the metasedimentary rocks of the Shiaila area.

  19. Sedimentation, zoning of reservoir rocks in W. Siberian basin oil fields

    SciTech Connect

    Kliger, J.A. )

    1994-02-07

    A line pattern of well cluster spacing was chosen in western Siberia because of taiga, marshes, etc., on the surface. The zoning of the oil pools within productive Upper Jurassic J[sub 3] intervals is complicated. This is why until the early 1990s almost each third well drilled in the Shaimsky region on the western edge of the West Siberian basin came up dry. The results of development drilling would be much better if one used some sedimentological relationships of zoning of the reservoir rocks within the oil fields. These natural phenomena are: Paleobasin bathymetry; Distances from the sources of the clastic material; and Proximity of the area of deposition. Using the diagram in this article, one can avoid drilling toward areas where the sandstone pinch out, area of argillization of sand-stones, or where the probability of their absence is high.

  20. Magnetic fabrics induced by dynamic faulting reveal damage zone sizes in soft rocks, Dead Sea basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levi, Tsafrir; Weinberger, Rami; Marco, Shmulik

    2015-04-01

    Distinguishing between the effect of remote versus local strain fields, determining the size of the related inelastic damage zone, and resolving the fault-plane solutions of past earthquakes are of fundamental importance to neotectonic reconstructions and paleoseismic studies. In order to shad lights on these issues, we measured the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) of soft rocks within a seismically active region. The AMS fabrics were explored next to late Pleistocene syndepositional normal faults (total displacement up to ~3.5 m) that cross soft lacustrine rocks in the Dead Sea basin. 'Deposition fabrics' prevail meters away from the fault planes and are characterized by scattered maximum and intermediate principal AMS axes. 'Deformation fabrics' are detected up to tens of centimeters from the fault planes and are characterized by well-grouped AMS axes, in which one of the principal axes is parallel to the strike of the nearby fault. Variations in the AMS fabrics and magnetic lineations define the size of the inelastic damage zone around the faults. The results demonstrate that the deformation-driven magnetic fabrics and the associated inelastic deformation zones are compatible with coseismic dynamic faulting and the effects of the local strain field during earthquakes. Most of the AMS fabrics show a conspicuous similarity to that of the fault-plane solutions, i.e. the principal AMS axes and instantaneous strain ellipsoids are coaxial. These results suggest a novel application of the AMS method for defining the shape and size of the damage zones surrounding the paleo- dynamic faults and determining the principal axes of the local strain field.

  1. Dynamics of mantle rock metasomatic transformation in permeable lithospheric zones beneath Siberian craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharapov, Victor; Sorokin, Konstantin; Perepechko, Yury

    2015-04-01

    The numerical descriptions of hydrodynamic model of two - velocity heat and mass transfer in permeable zones above the asthenospheric lenses was formulated and solved basing on the study the composition of inclusions in minerals of low crust ultra metamorphic rocks and lithospheric mantle metasomatites and estimation of thermodynamic conditions of the processes. Experimental study of influence of the simulated hot reduced gas flows on the minerals of low crust and mantle xenolith of the Siberian craton platform (SP) give the basic information for this processes. In detail: 1. Thermobarometric study of composition of inclusions in granulite and lithospheric mantle rocks beneath the diamondiferous cratons allowed to estimate the gas phase compositions during the metamorphism and metasomatism as well as products of their re equilibration during decompression. 2. Results of the pilot study of the influence of hot gas impact flows on minerals of mantle xenoliths are taken into account. This allowed to reproduce the elements and heterophase kinetics of interactions within a temperature range of about 300 to 1300o on relative to the interactions between the solid, liquid and gas phases. 3. Correct mathematical two-velocities model of fluid dynamics for compressible multiphase fluid -rock systems. 4. Numerical schemes are simulated and solved for the problems of quantitative description of 2D dynamics behavior of P and T within the permeable zone above the asthenospheric lens. 5. Quantitative description of heterophase non isothermal fluid-rock interaction within the framework of the approximation was obtained on the basis of the parallel solutions of the exchange between the ideal gas flow and solid phase according to the model of multi-reservoir reactors based on minimization of the Gibbs potential. Qualitatively the results of numerical simulation are as follows: 1) appearance in permeable zones of the any composition fluid flows from the upper mantle magma chambers

  2. P-waves imaging of the FRI and BK zones at the Grimsel Rock Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Majer, E.L.; Peterson, J.E. Jr. ); Blueming, P.; Sattel, G. )

    1990-08-01

    This report is one of a series documenting the results of the Nagra-DOE Cooperative (NDC-I) research program in which the cooperating scientists explore the geological, geophysical, hydrological, geochemical, and structural effects anticipated from the use of a rock mass as a geological repository for nuclear waste. Tomographic imaging studies using a high frequency (10 Khz.) piezoelectric source and a three component receiver were carried out in two different regions of the underground Nagra Grimsel test facility in Switzerland. Both sites were in fractured granite, one being in a strongly foliated granite (FRI site), and the other being in a relatively homogeneous granite (BK zone). The object of the work was to determine if the seismic techniques could be useful in imaging the fracture zones and provide information on the hydrologic conditions. Both amplitude and velocity tomograms were obtained from the Data. The results indicate that the fracture zones strongly influenced the seismic wave propagation, thus imaging the fracture zones that were hydrologically important. 11 refs., 24 figs.

  3. Petrological and geochemical studies of ultramafic-mafic rocks from the North Puruliya Shear Zone (eastern India)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Aditi; Ray, Arijit

    2015-12-01

    Ultramafic and mafic rocks occur within a linear belt, trending nearly E-W along North Puruliya Shear Zone of the Chhotanagpur Gneissic Complex (CGC). These rocks are classified as gabbro, norite, gabbro-norite, dolerite, diorite, olivine-websterite and lherzolite. Mafic rocks (Group 1) often occur in association with ultramafic variants (Group 2) and sometimes in isolation. A genetic link has been established between these mafic and ultramafic rocks using disposition of ultramafic and mafic rocks in the outcrop, systematic variation in modal mineralogy, co-linearity of plots in biaxial chemical variation diagram. Chemical composition of biotite and clinopyroxene reveal calc-alkaline nature and arc signature in these mafic-ultramafic rocks and whole rock geochemical characters indicate similarity with arc magma in subduction zone setting. The high values of Mg no. (47-81) and Al 2 O 3 (5.5-17.9) of mafic rocks indicate primitive, aluminous nature of the parental melt and presence of amphibole and biotite indicate its hydrous nature. The parent mafic melt evolved through fractionation of olivine, spinel, clinopyroxene and plagioclase. The crystal cumulates gave rise to the ultramafic rocks and the associated mafic rocks formed from residual melt. Crustal contamination played an important role in magmatic evolution as evident from variation in abundance of Rb in different lithomembers. Mafic-ultramafic rocks of the present study have been compared with intra-cratonic layered complexes, mafic-ultramafic rocks of high grade terrain, Alaskan type ultramafic-mafic complex and ophiolites. It is observed that the ultramafic-mafic rocks of present study have similarity with Alaskan type complex.

  4. Deciphering groundwater potential zones in hard rock terrain using geospatial technology.

    PubMed

    Dar, Imran A; Sankar, K; Dar, Mithas A

    2011-02-01

    Remote sensing and geographical information system (GIS) has become one of the leading tools in the field of groundwater research, which helps in assessing, monitoring, and conserving groundwater resources. This paper mainly deals with the integrated approach of remote sensing and GIS to delineate groundwater potential zones in hard rock terrain. Digitized vector maps pertaining to chosen parameters, viz. geomorphology, geology, land use/land cover, lineament, relief, and drainage, were converted to raster data using 23 m×23 m grid cell size. Moreover, curvature of the study area was also considered while manipulating the spatial data. The raster maps of these parameters were assigned to their respective theme weight and class weights. The individual theme weight was multiplied by its respective class weight and then all the raster thematic layers were aggregated in a linear combination equation in Arc Map GIS Raster Calculator module. Moreover, the weighted layers were statistically modeled to get the areal extent of groundwater prospects with respect to each thematic layer. The final result depicts the favorable prospective zones in the study area and can be helpful in better planning and management of groundwater resources especially in hard rock terrains. PMID:20364317

  5. Comparative mineral chemistry and textures of SAFOD fault gouge and damage-zone rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, Diane E.

    2014-01-01

    Creep in the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) drillhole is localized to two foliated gouges, the central deforming zone (CDZ) and southwest deforming zone (SDZ). The gouges consist of porphyroclasts of serpentinite and sedimentary rock dispersed in a foliated matrix of Mg-smectite clays that formed as a result of shearing-enhanced reactions between the serpentinite and quartzofeldspathic rocks. The CDZ takes up most of the creep and exhibits differences in mineralogy and texture from the SDZ that are attributable to its higher shearing rate. In addition, a ∼0.2-m-wide sector of the CDZ at its northeastern margin (NE-CDZ) is identical to the SDZ and may represent a gradient in creep rate across the CDZ. The SDZ and NE-CDZ have lower clay contents and larger porphyroclasts than most of the CDZ, and they contain veinlets and strain fringes of calcite in the gouge matrix not seen elsewhere in the CDZ. Matrix clays in the SDZ and NE-CDZ are saponite and corrensite, whereas the rest of the CDZ lacks corrensite. Saponite is younger than corrensite, reflecting clay crystallization under declining temperatures, and clays in the more actively deforming portions of the CDZ have better equilibrated to the lower-temperature conditions.

  6. Towards quantifying the matrix permeability of fault damage zones in low porosity rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, T. M.; Faulkner, D. R.

    2012-07-01

    In nature, permeability is enhanced in the damage zone of faults in crystalline rocks, where fracturing occurs on a wide range of scales. Understanding this permeability structure is paramount for predicting crustal fluid flow. We combine quantitative field and laboratory measurements to predict microfracture damage zone permeability in low-porosity granitic rocks as a function of distance from the fault core and displacement. Microfracture controlled matrix permeability exerts an increasingly dominant role on fluid flow with increasing depth. In the field we analysed the scaling relationships of microfracture densities surrounding strike-slip faults developed in granodiorite within the Atacama fault system in northern Chile. Displacements ranging over 5 orders of magnitude (˜0.012-5000 m), allow the variation of microfracture damage with increasing distance from faults to be determined empirically as a function of displacement. We reproduce microfracture damage in the laboratory in a suite of triaxial deformation experiments by inducing cyclic damage in initially intact samples while continuously measuring permeability. Combining field and laboratory datasets through the microfracture density allows the permeability profile with distance from the fault to be predicted from fault displacement.

  7. Rocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Alice

    This science unit is designed for limited- and non-English speaking students in a Chinese bilingual education program. The unit covers rock material, classification, characteristics of types of rocks, and rock cycles. It is written in Chinese and simple English. At the end of the unit there is a list of main terms in both English and Chinese, and…

  8. Evaluation of Coseismic Fluid-Rock Interaction in Fault Zones on the Basis of Geochemistry of Fault Rocks in Accretionary Prisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, T.; Hirono, T.; Honda, G.

    2011-12-01

    Recent studies revealed that concentration and isotopic composition of fluid-mobile trace elements such as Li, Rb, Cs and Sr in slip-zone rocks can change significantly during coseismic fluid-rock interaction at high temperatures (e.g., Ishikawa et al., 2008). In this study, we summarize the results obtained for fault-zone rocks recovered from various depths of the subduction zones. Analysis of a slip-zone sample recovered from shallow portion (0.27 km bsf) of the magasplay fault at Site C0004, IODP Exp. 316, Nankai Trough showed no clear fluid-induced geochemical signals, although a peak temperature over 300 deg. C is estimated on the basis of vitrinite reflectance data (Sakaguchi et al., 2011). In contrast, a major reverse fault in a fossil accretionary prism, the Emi Group (burial depth, 1-2 km) exhibited marked decreases of Li, Rb and Cs relative to adjacent host rocks, suggesting coseismic fluid-rock interactions at >350 deg. C. Geochemical signals observed in the Emi slip zone have a strong resemblance to those observed in the Taiwan chelungpu fault at comparable depths (1.1-1.2 km). Slip-zone samples collected from a fossil out-of-sequence thrust at greater depth (2.5-5.5 km) adjacent to the Kure Melange in the Shimanto accretionary prism showed unique geochemical characteristics, in which effects from disequilibrium flash melting to generate pseudotachylyte coexist with those from fluid-rock interactions at >350 deg. C. In the cases of Emi and Chelungpu, it is possible that the fluid-induced geochemical signatures, together with fluidization structures observed in these samples, resulted from thermal pressurization. On the other hand, the Kure data suggest a slip process in which high-temperature pore fluids were generated by frictional slip, but the thermally-enhanced pressure might not have reached a sufficient level to cause thermal pressurization, and the temperature continued to increase to attain melting. Kinetic estimation suggests that fluid

  9. Gouge-zone or solid-rock: An experimental view on fault frictional behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reches, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Natural faults always include zone(s) of breccia, gouge or cataclasite that localize the slip. In contrast, many rock mechanics experiments are conducted on experimental faults made of rough, solid blocks without fault-rock zones. We experimentally compare the frictional strength of solid experimental faults with fault-zones made of granular material in high-velocity/long-distance runs. The frictional evolution of solid and granular dolomite fault was tested in a rotary apparatus at slip velocity up to 1 m/s and normal stress up to 7 MPa. The granular samples were composed of the 125-250 microns fraction of the crushed dolomite. They were sheared in a confined, rotary cell with continuous monitoring of CO2 and H2O and mechanical data. The tests showed that the granular samples required longer slip-distances and higher velocities to evolve to a frictional strength similar to the solid samples. Yet, both sample types display similar evolution trends, including slip-weakening at velocities above ~0.05 m/s, and drastic velocity-weakening as slip velocity approached 1 m/s. At velocity above 0.3 m/s, a shining principal-slip-zone developed spontaneously with identical microstructure in both solid and granular sample: thickness < 1 micron and sintered, 20-40 nm nano-grains. This development was associated with intense emission of CO2 (Fig. 1). In a similar testing approach and conditions, we tested the friction evolution of granular granite from the San-Andreas fault-zone at Tejon-Pass, CA. These samples remained strong, μ =0.8-0.9, at velocities up to 0.8 m/s and slip-distances up to 3 m, in contrast to known frictional evolution of solid faults made of granite and tonalite. We envision that at the present slip-velocity/normal-stress, the dolomite samples reached a stage of thermally activated phase-transition and associated weakening, whereas the granitic samples were below such transition. Fig. 1. Evolotion of slip-velocity, friction, temperature and CO2 emission in

  10. Rheologic evolution of low-grade metasedimentary rocks and granite across a large strike-slip fault zone: A case study of the Kellyland fault zone, Maine, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, W. A.; Monz, M. E.

    2016-05-01

    We examine a large strike-slip fault zone that juxtaposes low-grade clastic metasedimentary rocks with coarse-grained granite near the brittle-ductile transition. The load-bearing matrixes in granite-derived ultramylonites and pelite and wacke metasedimentary intervals are texturally similar, and all deformed by diffusion-assisted granular flow. Granite underwent rapid strengthening as the pluton cooled followed by rapid weakening driven by brittle grain-size reduction and mixing that catalyzed ultramylonite formation. The textural and mineralogical similarity of pelitic intervals across the zone indicates they experienced little textural and reaction weakening. Wacke intervals record progressive textural and reaction weakening in an open system. Quartz recrystallized grain sizes in granite-derived ultramylonites record ∼2-times more differential stress than those in metasedimentary rocks in the interior of the zone. The relative weakness of metasedimentary rocks is correlated with fluid influx that likely enhanced diffusion and grain-boundary sliding in pelitic and wacke intervals and catalyzed textural and reaction weakening in wacke intervals. The lack of evidence for fluid and ionic communication with granitic rocks indicates that fluid movement was restricted to foliation-parallel pathways within single rock units. This localized fluid influx is the best explanation for the strength contrasts between texturally similar fault rocks deformed by similar mechanisms.

  11. Deformation Mechanisms of Antigorite Serpentinite at Subduction Zone Conditions Determined from Experimentally and Naturally Deformed Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auzende, A. L.; Escartin, J.; Walte, N.; Guillot, S.; Hirth, G.; Frost, D. J.

    2014-12-01

    The rheology of serpentinite, and particularly that of antigorite-bearing rocks, is of prime importance for understanding subduction zone proceses, including decoupling between the downwelling slab and the overriding plate, exhumation of high-pressure rocks, fluids pathways and, more generally, mantle wedge dynamics. We present results from deformation-DIA experiments on antigorite serpentinite performed under conditions relevant of subduction zones (1-3.5 GPa ; 400-650°C). We complemented our study with a sample deformed in a Griggs-type apparatus at 1 GPa and 400°C (Chernak and Hirth, EPSL, 2010), and with natural samples from Cuba and the Alps deformed under blueschist/eclogitic conditions. Our observations on experimental samples of antigorite deformed within its stability field show that deformation is dominated by cataclastic flow; we can only document a minor contribution of plastic deformation. In naturally deformed samples, deformation-related plastic structures largely dominate strain accommodation, but we also document a minor contribution of brittle deformation. When dehydration occurs in experiments, plasticity increases, and is coupled to local embrittlement attributed to hydraulic fracturating due to the migration of dehydration fluids. Our results thus show that semibrittle deformation operates within and above the stability field of antigorite. We also document that the corrugated structure of antigorite has a control on the strain accommodation mechanisms under subduction conditions, with preferred inter and intra-cracking along (001) and gliding along both a and b. Deformation dominated by brittle processes, as observed in experiments, may occur during deformation at elevated (seismic?) strain rates, while plastic deformation, as observed in naturally deformed rocks, may correspond instead to low strain rates instead (aseismic creep?). We also discuss the role of antigorite rheology and mode of deformation on fluid transport.

  12. Fault damage zones in mechanically layered rocks: The effects of planar anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Santanu; Ellis, Susan; Mandal, Nibir

    2015-08-01

    This study shows how inherited strength anisotropy influences damage localization at both the tip and wall regions of a fault or fracture. We performed analogue and numerical compression experiments on transversely isotropic models with single and multiple cuts of finite length, simulating the propagation of preexisting faults and cracks in layered rock. The stress-strain curves from the analogue experiments show a change in bulk yield behavior with fault inclination and anisotropy orientation with respect to the stress direction. Earlier isotropic models demonstrated a brittle (wing fracturing) to ductile (shear-zone formation) transition as the fault angle (α) to the principal compression direction increased. The experiments with anisotropic models show patterns of damage localization change dramatically with the orientation of transversely isotropic planes (θ, measured with respect to principal extension direction). Under layer-normal (θ = 0°) and layer-parallel compression (θ = 90°), preexisting faults undergo significant reactivation when 0 < α < 90°, and fault slip eventually leads to mechanical instabilities within the anisotropic layering, causing damage zones in the tip regions. For layer-normal (θ = 0°) compression, the damage processes involve intense extensional shear localization, whereas for layer-parallel compression, contractional shear localization and tensile opening result in characteristic internal shear-band structures. In contrast, for 0 < θ < 90°, the faults undergo little or no reactivation, irrespective of α. In this case, bulk compression leads to an interlayer slip-mediated global deformation. Obliquely anisotropic models thus produce weak or no fault damage zones. We also show that the fault-parallel principal damage localized at the tips can be coupled with transversely oriented, antithetic secondary damage in the wall regions. However, secondary damage develops predominantly when θ = 90°. Field examples of fault damage

  13. Fluid Flow and Fault Zone Damage in Crystalline Basement Rocks (Ore Mountains Saxony)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achtziger-Zupančič, P.; Loew, S.; Hiller, A.; Mariethoz, G.

    2015-12-01

    Groundwater flow in fractured basement rocks on aquifer scale and processes involved in the creation of fracture network permeability are poorly understood even though they have been studied for decades. A unique hydrogeological dataset consisting of 1030 discrete inflows (corresponding to preferential groundwater pathways) to the Poehla Ore Mine (Ore Mountains) of the SDAG Wismut has been compiled and quantitatively interpreted. Transmissivities and permeabilities were calculated from discrete and cumulative inflows using analytical equations and numerical groundwater flow models. The Variscan basement at Poehla Mine was modelled in 3-D, covering a volume of 14x4x1 km3 with 14 metamorphosed litho-stratigraphic units and 131 faults separated in 6 main strike directions. Mesoscale fractures mapped at inflows points, i.e. locally conductive fractures, show a weak correlation with fault orientation, and a large orientation scattering, which could be related to small scale stress heterogeneities. Inflow points were spatially correlated with major faults considering two distance criteria. This correlation suggests that mainly NW-SE and NE-SW striking faults are transmissive, which should be critically stressed considering all available data about the regional stress field. The trace length (extent) and width of the core and damage zones of the modelled faults were compiled in order to investigate the flow distribution and permeability profiles in directions perpendicular to fault strike. It can be shown that 90% of all inflows are located in damage zones. The inflows are usually situated within multiple fault zones which overlap each other. Cumulative flow distribution functions within damage zones are non-linear and vary between faults with different orientation. 75-95% of the flow occurs in the inner 50% of the damage zone. Significantly lower flow rates were recognized within most fault cores.

  14. The use of trace element zoning patterns in garnet to infer reaction paths of metamorphic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konrad-Schmolke, Matthias; Witte, Clemens; Dohmen, Ralf; O'Brien, Patrick; Erpel, Lars; Halama, Ralf; Schmidt, Alexander; Ditterova, Hana

    2015-04-01

    Garnet is one of the most versatile minerals in metamorphic petrology. It is stable over a large pressure and temperature range and thus occurs in many metamorphic environments. Garnet has a wide range of chemical compositions and its major and trace element composition well reflects the pressure (P), temperature (T) and chemical conditions (X) as well as the element transport kinetic properties of the host rock during growth. Hence, compositional growth zonations in garnet contain information about most geochemical, mineralogical and petrological properties of metamorphic rocks. However, detailed interpretation of complex zoning patterns in metamorphic garnet was hindered mainly by the lack of knowledge about the various contributions of kinetic and equilibrium effects to the trace element incorporation into garnet. In this contribution we combine thermodynamic equilibrium calculations together with mass balanced trace element distribution among coexisting phases with diffusion models that simulate kinetically controlled element transport in a reacting host rock. Comparison of the model results with natural garnets enables detailed interpretation of commonly observed major and trace element patterns in high-pressure (HP) and ultra-high pressure (UHP) garnets in terms of reaction paths and physico-chemical properties of the host rock. The comparison of our numerical models with a series of well-investigated (U)HP samples shows that the kinetic influence on rare earth element incorporation into garnet is limited in most rocks at the early stages of garnet growth and increases with increasing grade of rock transformation. We show that REE zoning patterns can be used to distinguish between cold (lawsonite-stable) and warm (epidote-stable) prograde reaction paths. REE liberation along a warm P-T trajectory occurs in three breakdown reactions involving chlorite, epidote and amphibole. All three reactions result in characteristic heavy (HREE) and medium (MREE) REE growth

  15. Major and Trace Element Geochemistry of the Mafic Magmatic Rocks from the Betul Mobile Belt, Central Indian Tectonic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, A.; Ghatak, A.

    2015-12-01

    Peninsular shield of India is composed of several Archaean cratons bordered by Proterozoic mobile belts which amalgamated the Archaean cratons and helped in the growth of the Indian subcontinent. The ENE-WSW trending Central Indian Tectonic Zone (CITZ) is one such important mobile belt which sutures the Bundelkhand and the Aravalli craton in the north and Bastar, Singhbhum and Dharwar cratons in the south. The CITZ is a collection of lithotectonic terranes ranging in age from Archaean to recent and comprises supracrustal belts, granulite belts, shear zones and felsic-mafic magmatic rocks. The Betul belt is characterized by a litho-package of plutonic magmatic rocks, volcano-sedimentary rocks, bimodal volcanics and associated base metal sulphide mineralization. The petrological, geochemical and geochronological evolution of the mafic magmatic rocks has significance in our understanding of Proterozoic crustal evolution in central India. Here we report major and trace element concentrations of 14 mafic samples (basaslts, gabbors, pyroxenites and dolerites) in an attempt to classify, characterise and suggest a spatial and temporal evolution of the mafic magmatic rocks of the Betul mobile belt vis-à-vis CITZ. Traditionally these rocks have been classified as being calc-alkaline rocks, related to arc volcanism and rift tectonics. We have divided these rocks into those have a positive Europium anomaly and those having a negative Europium anomaly to better understand the source and the contaminant for these rocks. We find characterisitic difference specifically in the trace element ratios and concentrations of the rocks with +Eu anomaly [La=10.69ppm; LaN/YbN=3.65] and those with -Eu anomaly [La=27.59; LaN/YbN=8.86]. Based on these data we propose that the Betul mafic rocks may have been derived from an enriched mantle source that experienced contamination from the lower continental crust or sub-continental lithosphere prior to eruption.

  16. Strain localisation in mechanically layered rocks beneath detachment zones: insights from numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Pourhiet, L.; Huet, B.; Labrousse, L.; Yao, K.; Agard, P.; Jolivet, L.

    2013-04-01

    We have designed a series of fully dynamic numerical simulations aimed at assessing how the orientation of mechanical layering in rocks controls the orientation of shear bands and the depth of penetration of strain in the footwall of detachment zones. Two parametric studies are presented. In the first one, the influence of stratification orientation on the occurrence and mode of strain localisation is tested by varying initial dip of inherited layering in the footwall with regard to the orientation of simple shear applied at the rigid boundary simulating a rigid hanging wall, all scaling and rheological parameter kept constant. It appears that when Mohr-Coulomb plasticity is being used, shear bands are found to localise only when the layering is being stretched. This corresponds to early deformational stages for inital layering dipping in the same direction as the shear is applied, and to later stages for intial layering dipping towards the opposite direction of shear. In all the cases, localisation of the strain after only γ=1 requires plastic yielding to be activated in the strong layer. The second parametric study shows that results are length-scale independent and that orientation of shear bands is not sensitive to the viscosity contrast or the strain rate. However, decreasing or increasing strain rate is shown to reduce the capacity of the shear zone to localise strain. In the later case, the strain pattern resembles a mylonitic band but the rheology is shown to be effectively linear. Based on the results, a conceptual model for strain localisation under detachment faults is presented. In the early stages, strain localisation occurs at slow rates by viscous shear instabilities but as the layered media is exhumed, the temperature drops and the strong layers start yielding plastically, forming shear bands and localising strain at the top of the shear zone. Once strain localisation has occured, the deformation in the shear band becomes extremely penetrative but

  17. Laboratory simulation of the structure of disturbed zones around bodies in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, N. H.; Oran, W. A.; Samir, U.

    1974-01-01

    Description of laboratory studies of certain aspects of the spacecraft/space plasma interaction regarding, in particular, the near and intermediate wake regions. The plasma wind tunnel facilities and the diagnostic techniques employed in these tests are described. Results are obtained which concern the variation of the normalized ion flux with normalized distance along the wake axis downstream from a conducting spherical body, the variation of the normalized width of the disturbed region with normalized distance downstream from the body center, and the location of the point of maximum ion current enhancement as a function of body potential.

  18. Carbonation by fluid-rock interactions at High-Pressure conditions: implications for Carbon cycling in subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccoli, Francesca; Vitale Brovarone, Alberto; Beyssac, Olivier; Martinez, Isabelle; Ague, Jay J.; Chaduteau, Carine

    2016-04-01

    Carbonate-bearing lithologies are the main carbon carrier into subduction zones. Their evolution during metamorphism largely controls the fate of carbon regulating its fluxes between shallow and deep reservoirs. In subduction zones, most works have focused on subtractive processes responsible for carbon release from subducting slabs. As an example, several recent works have stressed on the importance of carbonate dissolution as a mean to mobilize large amounts of carbon in subduction zones. By contrast, little is known on additive processes such as rock carbonation at high-pressure (HP) conditions. At shallow depths (e.g. ocean floor and shallow subduction zones, i.e. <40 km), carbonation of mafic and ultramafic rocks deeply contributes to the regulation of carbon fluxes between the geo-biosphere and the atmosphere. We report the occurrence of eclogite-facies marbles associated with metasomatic systems in HP metamorphic unit in Alpine Corsica (France). We performed a field-based study on metasomatic marbles. We will present the petrology and geochemistry that characterize carbonate metasomatism together with fluid inclusions study and pseudosection modeling. Altogether, we bring strong evidences for the precipitation of these carbonate-rich assemblages from carbonic fluids during HP metamorphism. We propose that rock carbonation can occur at HP conditions by either vein-injection or chemical replacement mechanisms. Rock carbonation indicates that carbonic fluids produced by decarbonation reactions and carbonate dissolution may not be directly transferred to the mantle wedge, but may have a preferential and complex pathway within the slab and along slab/mantle interface. Rock carbonation by fluid-rock interactions has a potentially great impact on the residence time of carbon and oxygen and on carbonates isotopic signature in subduction zones. Lastly, carbonation may modulate the emission of CO2 at volcanic arcs over geological time scales.

  19. Sediment Dynamics Within Buffer Zone and Sinkhole Splay Areas Under Extreme Soil Disturbance Conditions.

    PubMed

    Schoonover, Jon E; Crim, Jackie F; Williard, Karl W J; Groninger, John W; Zaczek, James J; Pattumma, Klairoong

    2015-09-01

    Sedimentation dynamics were assessed in sinkholes within training areas at Ft. Knox Military Installation, a karst landscape subjected to decades of tracked vehicle use and extreme soil disturbance. Sinkholes sampled were sediment-laden and behaved as intermittent ponds. Dendrogeomorphic analyses were conducted using willow trees (Salix spp.) located around the edge of 18 sinkholes to estimate historical sedimentation rates, and buried bottles were installed in 20 sinkholes at the center, outer edge, and at the midpoint between the center and edge to estimate annual sedimentation rates. Sedimentation data were coupled with vegetation characteristics of sinkhole buffers to determine relationships among these variables. The dendrogeomorphic method estimated an average accumulation rate of 1.27 cm year(-1) translating to a sediment loss rate of 46.1 metric ton year(-1) from the training areas. However, sediment export to sinkholes was estimated to be much greater (118.6 metric ton year(-1)) via the bottle method. These data suggest that the latter method provided a more accurate estimate since accumulation was greater in the center of sinkholes compared to the periphery where dendrogeomorphic data were collected. Vegetation data were not tightly correlated with sedimentation rates, suggesting that further research is needed to identify a viable proxy for direct measures of sediment accumulation in this extreme deposition environment. Mitigation activities for the sinkholes at Ft. Knox's tank training area, and other heavily disturbed karst environments where extreme sedimentation exists, should consider focusing on flow path and splay area management.

  20. Sediment Dynamics Within Buffer Zone and Sinkhole Splay Areas Under Extreme Soil Disturbance Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoonover, Jon E.; Crim, Jackie F.; Williard, Karl W. J.; Groninger, John W.; Zaczek, James J.; Pattumma, Klairoong

    2015-09-01

    Sedimentation dynamics were assessed in sinkholes within training areas at Ft. Knox Military Installation, a karst landscape subjected to decades of tracked vehicle use and extreme soil disturbance. Sinkholes sampled were sediment-laden and behaved as intermittent ponds. Dendrogeomorphic analyses were conducted using willow trees ( Salix spp.) located around the edge of 18 sinkholes to estimate historical sedimentation rates, and buried bottles were installed in 20 sinkholes at the center, outer edge, and at the midpoint between the center and edge to estimate annual sedimentation rates. Sedimentation data were coupled with vegetation characteristics of sinkhole buffers to determine relationships among these variables. The dendrogeomorphic method estimated an average accumulation rate of 1.27 cm year-1 translating to a sediment loss rate of 46.1 metric ton year-1 from the training areas. However, sediment export to sinkholes was estimated to be much greater (118.6 metric ton year-1) via the bottle method. These data suggest that the latter method provided a more accurate estimate since accumulation was greater in the center of sinkholes compared to the periphery where dendrogeomorphic data were collected. Vegetation data were not tightly correlated with sedimentation rates, suggesting that further research is needed to identify a viable proxy for direct measures of sediment accumulation in this extreme deposition environment. Mitigation activities for the sinkholes at Ft. Knox's tank training area, and other heavily disturbed karst environments where extreme sedimentation exists, should consider focusing on flow path and splay area management.

  1. 75 FR 31321 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Rock Sole, Flathead Sole, and “Other...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-03

    ... the BSAI (75 FR 11778, March 12, 2010). In accordance with Sec. 679.21(e)(3)(vi)(B) and Sec. 679.21(e... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Rock Sole, Flathead Sole, and ``Other Flatfish'' by Vessels Participating in the... ``other flatfish'' by vessels participating in the Amendment 80 limited access fishery in the Bering...

  2. 75 FR 51185 - Fisheries of the Exclusive Economic Zone Off Alaska; Reallocation of Rock Sole in the Bering Sea...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-19

    ... 2010 and 2011 harvest specifications for groundfish in the BSAI (75 FR 11778, March 12, 2010). The... specifications for groundfish in the BSAI (75 FR 11778, March 12, 2010) are revised as follows: 4,000 mt to the... Economic Zone Off Alaska; Reallocation of Rock Sole in the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands Management...

  3. Gravity wave parameters derived from traveling ionospheric disturbances observations in the auroral zone

    SciTech Connect

    Natorf, L.; Schlegel, K.; Wernik, A.W. Space Research Centre, Warsaw )

    1992-12-01

    Large-scale wavelike fluctuations of ion velocity, as measured by the European incoherent scatter radar along the geomagnetic field line, have been attributed to gravity wave effects. The height-dependent parameters of the causative gravity waves are calculated, taking into account the neutral horizontal wind and the electric field. The results are compared with the solutions of a dissipative dispersion relation. Much better agreement is achieved for the imaginary part of the vertical wave vector than for its real part. The calculated wave damping is greater than that given by theory. The possible reasons for this are discussed. It is suggested that E x B drift of the ions and vertical neutral winds, which are characteristic features of the auroral zone ionosphere, may contribute to the observed discrepancies. 40 refs.

  4. Carbonation by fluid-rock interactions at high-pressure conditions: Implications for carbon cycling in subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccoli, Francesca; Vitale Brovarone, Alberto; Beyssac, Olivier; Martinez, Isabelle; Ague, Jay J.; Chaduteau, Carine

    2016-07-01

    Carbonate-bearing lithologies are the main carbon carrier into subduction zones. Their evolution during metamorphism largely controls the fate of carbon, regulating its fluxes between shallow and deep reservoirs. Recent estimates predict that almost all subducted carbon is transferred into the crust and lithospheric mantle during subduction metamorphism via decarbonation and dissolution reactions at high-pressure conditions. Here we report the occurrence of eclogite-facies marbles associated with metasomatic systems in Alpine Corsica (France). The occurrence of these marbles along major fluid-conduits as well as textural, geochemical and isotopic data indicating fluid-mineral reactions are compelling evidence for the precipitation of these carbonate-rich assemblages from carbonic fluids during metamorphism. The discovery of metasomatic marbles brings new insights into the fate of carbonic fluids formed in subducting slabs. We infer that rock carbonation can occur at high-pressure conditions by either vein-injection or chemical replacement mechanisms. This indicates that carbonic fluids produced by decarbonation reactions and carbonate dissolution may not be directly transferred to the mantle wedge, but can interact with slab and mantle-forming rocks. Rock-carbonation by fluid-rock interactions may have an important impact on the residence time of carbon and oxygen in subduction zones and lithospheric mantle reservoirs as well as carbonate isotopic signatures in subduction zones. Furthermore, carbonation may modulate the emission of CO2 at volcanic arcs over geological time scales.

  5. Ductile shear zone rheology: the viewpoint of experimentally crept lower crustal rocks and analogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimanov, Alexandre; Raphanel, Jean; Bornert, Michel; Bourcier, Mathieu; Gaye, Ababacar; Ludwig, Wolfgang

    2015-04-01

    With respect to lithosphere rheology, we are especially interested in the mechanical behavior and evolution of ductile shear zones at depth, which present polyphase and heterogeneous character and multi-scale strain localization patterns. According to structural geology, most strain concentrates in ultramylonitic layers, which exhibit along with metamorphism overprinted or concomitant microstructural signatures from several deformation mechanisms. The latter are either active in volume (crystal slip plasticity and dislocation recovery processes), or in the vicinity and along interfaces (grain sliding, phase transformations and solution mass transfer). Because all of these contribute to the drastic evolution of microstructures with respect to the wall rock and the protomylonite, and because the chronology of their activation and their interactions are unclear, inference of the overall rheology from these microstructural records seems illusory. Therefore, since more than a decade we investigate experimentally and numerically the rheology of synthetic rocks representative of lower crustal mineralogy (namely plagioclases and clinopyroxenes). Samples are elaborated with different microstructures and with variable phases, fluid and melt contents for the purpose of being representative of diverse geodynamical contexts. Experiments were performed either at constant stress or strain rate, in co-axial compression or in torsion. For macroscopic non-Newtonian flow we clearly identified dislocation glide and creep mechanisms. That is to say that power law rheology relates to dominant crystal slip plasticity accommodated by recovery processes, including dislocation climb and pile-up, sub-grain rotation and marginal recrystallization. We further refer to this regime as RCSP (recovery crystal slip plasticity). Conversely, Newtonian (linear viscous) behavior mostly involves grain boundary sliding (GBS) accommodated by diffusional mass transfer and grain boundary dislocation

  6. Origin and accumulation mechanisms of petroleum in the Carboniferous volcanic rocks of the Kebai Fault zone, Western Junggar Basin, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhonghong; Zha, Ming; Liu, Keyu; Zhang, Yueqian; Yang, Disheng; Tang, Yong; Wu, Kongyou; Chen, Yong

    2016-09-01

    The Kebai Fault zone of the West Junggar Basin in northwestern China is a unique region to gain insights on the formation of large-scale petroleum reservoirs in volcanic rocks of the western Central Asian Orogenic Belt. Carboniferous volcanic rocks are widespread in the Kebai Fault zone and consist of basalt, basaltic andesite, andesite, tuff, volcanic breccia, sandy conglomerate and metamorphic rocks. The volcanic oil reservoirs are characterized by multiple sources and multi-stage charge and filling history, characteristic of a complex petroleum system. Geochemical analysis of the reservoir oil, hydrocarbon inclusions and source rocks associated with these volcanic rocks was conducted to better constrain the oil source, the petroleum filling history, and the dominant mechanisms controlling the petroleum accumulation. Reservoir oil geochemistry indicates that the oil contained in the Carboniferous volcanic rocks of the Kebai Fault zone is a mixture. The oil is primarily derived from the source rock of the Permian Fengcheng Formation (P1f), and secondarily from the Permian Lower Wuerhe Formation (P2w). Compared with the P2w source rock, P1f exhibits lower values of C19 TT/C23 TT, C19+20TT/ΣTT, Ts/(Ts + Tm) and ααα-20R sterane C27/C28 ratios but higher values of TT C23/C21, HHI, gammacerane/αβ C30 hopane, hopane (20S) C34/C33, C29ββ/(ββ + αα), and C29 20S/(20S + 20R) ratios. Three major stages of oil charge occurred in the Carboniferous, in the Middle Triassic, Late Triassic to Early Jurassic, and in the Middle Jurassic to Late Jurassic periods, respectively. Most of the oil charged during the first stage was lost, while moderately and highly mature oils were generated and accumulated during the second and third stages. Oil migration and accumulation in the large-scale stratigraphic reservoir was primarily controlled by the top Carboniferous unconformity with better porosity and high oil enrichment developed near the unconformity. Secondary dissolution

  7. Semi-automatic mapping of fault rocks on a Digital Outcrop Model, Gole Larghe Fault Zone (Southern Alps, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vho, Alice; Bistacchi, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    A quantitative analysis of fault-rock distribution is of paramount importance for studies of fault zone architecture, fault and earthquake mechanics, and fluid circulation along faults at depth. Here we present a semi-automatic workflow for fault-rock mapping on a Digital Outcrop Model (DOM). This workflow has been developed on a real case of study: the strike-slip Gole Larghe Fault Zone (GLFZ). It consists of a fault zone exhumed from ca. 10 km depth, hosted in granitoid rocks of Adamello batholith (Italian Southern Alps). Individual seismogenic slip surfaces generally show green cataclasites (cemented by the precipitation of epidote and K-feldspar from hydrothermal fluids) and more or less well preserved pseudotachylytes (black when well preserved, greenish to white when altered). First of all, a digital model for the outcrop is reconstructed with photogrammetric techniques, using a large number of high resolution digital photographs, processed with VisualSFM software. By using high resolution photographs the DOM can have a much higher resolution than with LIDAR surveys, up to 0.2 mm/pixel. Then, image processing is performed to map the fault-rock distribution with the ImageJ-Fiji package. Green cataclasites and epidote/K-feldspar veins can be quite easily separated from the host rock (tonalite) using spectral analysis. Particularly, band ratio and principal component analysis have been tested successfully. The mapping of black pseudotachylyte veins is more tricky because the differences between the pseudotachylyte and biotite spectral signature are not appreciable. For this reason we have tested different morphological processing tools aimed at identifying (and subtracting) the tiny biotite grains. We propose a solution based on binary images involving a combination of size and circularity thresholds. Comparing the results with manually segmented images, we noticed that major problems occur only when pseudotachylyte veins are very thin and discontinuous. After

  8. Deformation of Sedimentary Rock Across the San Andreas Fault Zone: Mesoscale and Microscale Structures Displayed in Core From SAFOD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chester, J. S.; Chester, F. M.; Kirschner, D. L.; Almeida, R.; Evans, J. P.; Guillemette, R. N.; Hickman, S.; Zoback, M.; Ellsworth, W.

    2007-12-01

    Sedimentary rocks captured in cores taken at the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) provide an unparalleled sampling of deformation in the transition zone between creeping and locked segments of a major transform fault at 2.5-3.1 km vertical depth. These samples provide the unique opportunity to study deformation processes and the development of brittle structures within porous and granular rocks that have been subjected to variable loading rates and chemically reactive fluids while residing at the top of the seismogenic zone. The samples provide a transect from relatively undeformed host rock through highly fractured and sheared rock, and capture the two prominent zones of active, aseismic slip. Core recovery was almost complete. Wrap-around 1:1 map tracings of the outer surfaces of all cores characterize the lithology and mesoscale deformation. Cores from 3056-3067 m and 3141-3153 m measured depth (MD) sample moderately deformed rock at the western boundary of the fault zone. The cores display massive to finely laminated, pebbly arkosic sandstones with lesser amounts of fine-grained sandstone and siltstone. Numerous shear fractures and cm-thick cataclastic shear zones form a conjugate geometry indicating contraction at high angles to the San Andreas fault. Both intervals display minor faults that juxtapose different lithologies consistent with meters or greater of slip. Fracture density is variable but tends to increase with proximity to the minor faults. Cross-cutting relationships between shear fractures and cataclastic zones indicate a general progression from early faulting along thicker shear zones to later, more localized slip within shear zones and along fractures. Microstructures provide ample evidence for densification of the sandstones through grain-scale fracture and crushing, as well as fluid assisted processes of crack-sealing, dissolution-precipitation, and alteration-neocrystallization. Grain-scale features are consistent with these

  9. Delineating a shallow fault zone and dipping bed rock strata using multichannal analysis of surface waves with a land streamer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ivanov, J.; Miller, R.D.; Lacombe, P.; Johnson, C.D.; Lane, J.W.

    2006-01-01

    The multichannel analysis of surface waves (MASW) seismic method was used to delineate a fault zone and gently dipping sedimentary bedrock at a site overlain by several meters of regolith. Seismic data were collected rapidly and inexpensively using a towed 30-channel land streamer and a rubberband-accelerated weight-drop seismic source. Data processed using the MASW method imaged the subsurface to a depth of about 20 m and allowed detection of the overburden, gross bedding features, and fault zone. The fault zone was characterized by a lower shear-wave velocity (Vs) than the competent bedrock, consistent with a large-scale fault, secondary fractures, and in-situ weathering. The MASW 2D Vs section was further interpreted to identify dipping beds consistent with local geologic mapping. Mapping of shallow-fault zones and dipping sedimentary rock substantially extends the applications of the MASW method. ?? 2006 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  10. Reconstruction of the Magnetkoepfl rockfall event - Detecting rock fall release zones using terrestrial laser scanning, Hohe Tauern, Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmeyer, I.; Keuschnig, M.; Delleske, R.; Schrott, L.

    2012-04-01

    Instability of rock faces in high mountain areas is an important risk factor for man and infrastructure, particularly within the context of climate change. Numerous rock fall events in the European Alps suggest an increasing occurrence of mass movements due to rising temperatures in recent years. Within the MOREXPERT project ('Monitoring Expert System for Hazardous Rock Walls') a new long-term monitoring site for mass movement and permafrost interaction has been initiated in the Austrian Alps. The study area is located at the Kitzsteinhorn (Hohe Tauern), a particularly interesting site for the investigation of glacier retreat and potential permafrost degradation and their respective consequences for the stability of alpine rock faces. To detect and quantify changes occurring at the terrain surface an extensive terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) monitoring campaign was started in 2011. TLS creates three-dimensional high-resolution images of the scanned area allowing precise quantification of changes in geometry and volume in steep rock faces over distances of up to several hundreds of meters. Within the TLS monitoring campaign at the Kitzsteinhorn a large number of differently dimensioned rock faces is examined (varying size, slope inclination etc.). Scanned areas include the Kitzsteinhorn northwest and south face, the Magnetkoepfl east face as well as a couple of small rock faces in the vicinity of the summit station. During the night from August 27th to August 28th 2011 a rock fall event was documented by employees of the cable car company. The release zone could not immediately be detected. The east face of the Magnetkoepfl covers approximately 70 meters in height and about 200 meters in width. It is made up of calcareous mica-schist and displays an abundance of well-developed joint sets with large joint apertures. Meteorological data from a weather station located at the same altitude (2.950m) and just 500m away from the release zone show that the rock fall event

  11. High temperature pseudotachylytes and ductile shear zones in dry rocks from the continental lower crust (Lofoten, Norway)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menegon, Luca; Pennacchioni, Giorgio; Harris, Katherine; Wood, Elliot

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of initiation and growth of shear zones under lower crustal conditions is of fundamental importance when assessing lithosphere rheology and strength. In this study we investigate brittle-ductile shear zones developed under lower crustal conditions in anorthosites from Nusfjord, Lofoten (northern Norway). Steep ductile shear zones trend E-W to ESE-WSW and have a stretching lineation plunging steeply to the SSW or SSE. The shear sense is normal (south block down to the south) as indicated by SC and SC' fabrics and sigmoidal foliations. The shear zone show a mylonitic to ultramylonitic fabric, sharp boundaries to the host anorthosites, and abundant anastomosing dark fine-grained layers along the main foliation. The fine-grained layers localized much of the strain. Relatively lower strain domains within or adjacent to shear zones indicate that the fine dark bands of mylonites represent transposed pseudotachylyte which still locally preserve the pristine structures such as chilled margins, breccia textures with angular clasts of the host rock and injection veins; intersecting veins of pseudotachylyte record multiple stages of seismic slip. The orientation of injection veins and marker offset along the most preserved pseudotachylyte fault veins indicate approximately a sinistral strike slip kinematic during faulting event responsible for the friction-induced melting. These observations indicate that ductile shear zones exploited pre-existing brittle fault zones including a network of pseudotachylytes, and that the fine-grained "ultramylonites" derive from former fine-grained pseudotachylytes. The pseudotachylyte microstructure is dominated by plagioclase microlites dispersed in a groundmass of fine-grained clinopyroxene. Clinopyroxene recrystallizes in the damage zone flanking the pseudotachylytes, indicating high metamorphic grade during pseudotachylyte formation. Small idioblastic or cauliflower garnet are scattered through the matrix and

  12. Application of the TitaniQ Geothermobarometer to metamorphic rocks of the Santa Rosa Mylonite Zone in southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canada, T.; Behr, W. M.; Stockli, L.; Stockli, D. F.

    2014-12-01

    In order to study the behavior of the crust in different regions and over time, it remains important to be able to quantify the pressure (P) and temperature (T) conditions of metamorphism in exhumed rocks. The recently developed technique, known as "Titanium-in-quartz" (TitaniQ) shows particular promise as both a geothermometer and geobarometer, because it focuses on one of the most abundant minerals on Earth—quartz—and it can thus be applied to a very wide range of rock types. Despite the potential of TitaniQ, two aspects of the technique remain poorly understood. Firstly, the two most recently developed calibrations predict Ti concentrations that differ by close to a factor of three at the same temperature. Secondly, the effect of deformation on Ti re-equilibration at temperatures where static diffusion is sluggish is debated. We address these aspects of the TitaniQ thermobarometer by applying the technique to a suite of rocks in the Santa Rosa mylonite zone of eastern California that were deformed and metamorphosed at known P-T conditions. The Santa Rosa mylonite zone is a 100-km-long Cretaceous ductile thrust system that juxtaposes deformed metasedimentary rocks (P = 3-5 kbar, T = 600-800 C) known as the Palm Canyon Series in the hanging wall against mylonitized granodiorites (P 4-5 kbar, T = 400-550) of the Peninsular Ranges Batholith in the footwall. The Palm Canyon series includes quartzites, amphibolites and garnet-mica schists, most of which contain titanite as the primary Ti-bearing phase. We measure Ti concentrations in several samples from this unit to see whether they are consistent among different rock types and whether calibrations of the TitaniQ thermobarometer match the P-T conditions constrained by mineral assemblages. The granodiorites show a distinct strain gradient developed over approximately one kilometer as they are incorporated into the Santa Rosa mylonite zone; they range from weakly deformed at the shear zone margin to ultramylonitic

  13. Nanoscale Properties of Rocks and Subduction Zone Rheology: Inferences for the Mechanisms of Deep Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedel, M. R.

    2007-12-01

    Grain boundaries are the key for the understanding of mineral reaction kinetics. More generally, nanometer scale processes involved in breaking and establishing bonds at reaction sites determine how and at which rate bulk rock properties change in response to external tectonic forcing and possibly feed back into various geodynamic processes. A particular problem is the effects of grain-boundary energy on the kinetics of the olivine-spinel phase transformation in subducting slabs. Slab rheology is affected in many ways by this (metastable) mineral phase change. Sluggish kinetics due to metastable hindrance is likely to cause particular difficulties, because of possible strong non-linear feedback loops between strain-rate and change of creep properties during transformation. In order to get these nanoscale properties included into thermo-mechanical models, reliable kinetic data is required. The measurement of grain-boundary energies is, however, a rather difficult problem. Conventional methods of grain boundary surface tension measurement include (a) equilibrium angles at triple junction (b) rotating ball method (c) thermal groove method, and others (Gottstein & Shvindlerman, 1999). Here I suggest a new method that allows for the derivation of grain-boundary energies for an isochemical phase transformation based on experimental (in-situ) kinetic data in combination with a corresponding dynamic scaling law (Riedel and Karato, 1997). The application of this method to the olivine-spinel phase transformation in subducting slabs provides a solution to the extrapolation problem of measured kinetic data: Any kinetic phase boundary measured at the laboratory time scale can be "scaled" to the correct critical isotherm at subduction zones, under experimentelly "forbidden" conditions (Liou et al., 2000). Consequences for the metastability hypothesis that relates deep seismicity with olivine metastability are derived and discussed. References: Gottstein G, Shvindlerman LS (1999

  14. Joint seismic, hydrogeological, and geomechanical investigations of a fracture zone in the Grimsel Rock Laboratory, Switzerland

    SciTech Connect

    Majer, E.L.; Myer, L.R.; Peterson, J.E. Jr.; Karasaki, K.; Long, J.C.S.; Martel, S.J. ); Bluemling, P.; Vomvoris, S. )

    1990-06-01

    This report is one of a series documenting the results of the Nagra-DOE Cooperative (NDC-I) research program in which the cooperating scientists explore the geological, geophysical, hydrological, geochemical, and structural effects anticipated from the use of a rock mass as a geologic repository for nuclear waste. From 1987 to 1989 the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and the Swiss Cooperative for the Storage of Nuclear Waste (Nagra) participated in an agreement to carryout experiments for understanding the effect of fractures in the storage and disposal of nuclear waste. As part of this joint work field and laboratory experiments were conducted at a controlled site in the Nagra underground Grimsel test site in Switzerland. The primary goal of these experiments in this fractured granite was to determine the fundamental nature of the propagation of seismic waves in fractured media, and to relate the seismological parameters to the hydrological parameters. The work is ultimately aimed at the characterization and monitoring of subsurface sites for the storage of nuclear waste. The seismic experiments utilizes high frequency (1000 to 10,000 Hertz) signals in a cross-hole configuration at scales of several tens of meters. Two-, three-, and four-sided tomographic images of the fractures and geologic structure were produced from over 60,000 raypaths through a 10 by 21 meter region bounded by two nearly horizontal boreholes and two tunnels. Intersecting this region was a dominant fracture zone which was the target of the investigations. In addition to these controlled seismic imaging experiments, laboratory work using core from this region were studied for the relation between fracture content, saturation, and seismic velocity and attenuation. In-situ geomechanical and hydrologic tests were carried out to determine the mechanical stiffness and conductivity of the fractures. 20 refs., 90 figs., 6 tabs.

  15. Evaluation of Methods for Delineating Zones of Transport for Production Wells in Karst and Fractured-Rock Aquifers of Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Perry M.

    2010-01-01

    Assessment of groundwater-flow conditions in the vicinity of production wells in karst and fractured-rock settings commonly is difficult due in part to the lack of detailed hydrogeologic information and the resources needed to collect it. To address this concern and to better understand the hydrogeology and aquifer properties of karst and fractured-rock aquifers in Minnesota, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Minnesota Department of Health, conducted a study to evaluate methods for delineating zones of transport for 24 production wells in karst and fractured-rock aquifers in Minnesota. Two empirical methods for delineating zones of transport around wells were applied to the 24 production wells that extract groundwater from karst and fractured-rock aquifers in nine Minnesota communities. These methods were the truncated-parabola and modified-ellipse methods, and both methods assume porous-media flow conditions. The 24 wells extracted water from a karst aquifer (Prairie du Chien-Jordan aquifer), porous aquifers interspersed with solution-enhanced fractures (Jordan and Hinckley aquifers), or fractured-bedrock aquifers (Biwabik Iron-Formation and Sioux Quartzite aquifers). Zones of transport delineated using these two empirical methods were compared with zones of transport previously delineated by Minnesota Department of Health hydrologists for the wells using the calculated-fixed-radius method and groundwater-flow models. Large differences were seen in the size and shapes of most zones of transport delineated using the truncated-parabola and modified-ellipse methods compared with the zones of transport delineated by the Minnesota Department of Health. In general, the zones of transport delineated using the truncated-parabola and modified-ellipse methods were smaller in area than those delineated by the Minnesota Department of Health and included only small parts of the Minnesota Department of Health zones of transport. About two-thirds(67 percent) of

  16. Physical rock properties in and around a conduit zone by well-logging in the Unzen Scientific Drilling Project, Japan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ikeda, R.; Kajiwara, T.; Omura, K.; Hickman, S.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the Unzen Scientific Drilling Project (USDP) is not only to reveal the structure and eruption history of the Unzen volcano but also to clarify the ascent and degassing mechanisms of the magma conduit. Conduit drilling (USDP-4) was conducted in 2004, which targeted the magma conduit for the 1990-95 eruption. The total drilled length of USDP-4 was 1995.75??m. Geophysical well logging, including resistivity, gamma-ray, spontaneous potential, sonic-wave velocity, density, neutron porosity, and Fullbore Formation MicroImager (FMI), was conducted at each drilling stage. Variations in the physical properties of the rocks were revealed by the well-log data, which correlated with not only large-scale formation boundaries but also small-scale changes in lithology. Such variations were evident in the lava dike, pyroclastic rocks, and breccias over depth intervals ranging from 1 to 40??m. These data support previous models for structure of the lava conduit, in that they indicate the existence of alternating layers of high-resistivity and high P-wave velocity rocks corresponding to the lava dikes, in proximity to narrower zones exhibiting high porosity, low resistivity, and low P-wave velocity. These narrow, low-porosity zones are presumably higher in permeability than the adjacent rocks and may form preferential conduits for degassing during magma ascent. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V.

  17. Hydrogen sulfide gas emissions in the human-occupied zone during disturbance and removal of stored spent mushroom compost.

    PubMed

    Velusami, B; Curran, T P; Grogan, H M

    2013-10-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) gas levels were monitored in the human-occupied zone at four spent mushroom compost (SMC) storage sites during removal of SMC for application on agricultural land. During SMC removal operations, H2S gas monitors were mounted on the outside of the tractor positioned at the SMC periphery, and worn by individual tractor drivers. The highest H2S concentrations (10 s average) detected outside the tractor, at the SMC periphery, and for the tractor driver were, respectively, 454, 249, and 100 ppm for the outdoor sites and 214, 75, and 51 ppm for the indoor sites. The highest short-term exposure values (STEV over a 15 min period) outside the tractor at the SMC periphery, and for the tractor driver were 147, 55, and 86 ppm for the outdoor sites and 19, 9, and 10 ppm for the indoor sites. The values exceeded the current maximum permissible concentration limit of 10 ppm for all the sites except for the SMC periphery and tractor driver at the indoor sites. Results suggest that H2S levels detected at indoor storage sites during SMC removal are lower compared to outdoor storage sites. Results indicate that there is a substantial health and safety risk associated with working in the vicinity of stored SMC when it is being disturbed and removed for land application, and that the risk is great for the tractor driver. This article discusses possible control measures and lists recommendations to reduce the risks. PMID:24673036

  18. Mount St. Augustine volcano fumarole wall rock alteration: mineralogy, zoning, composition and numerical models of its formation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getahun, Aberra; Reed, Mark H.; Symonds, Robert

    1996-05-01

    Intensely altered wall rock was collected from high-temperature (640 °C) and low-temperature (375 °C) vents at Augustine volcano in July 1989. The high-temperature altered rock exhibits distinct mineral zoning differentiated by color bands. In order of decreasing temperature, the color bands and their mineral assemblages are: (a) white to grey (tridymite-anhydrite); (b) pink to red (tridymite-hematite-Fe hydroxide-molysite (FeCl 3) with minor amounts of anhydrite and halite); and (c) dark green to green (anhydrite-halite-sylvite-tridymite with minor amounts of molysite, soda and potash alum, and other sodium and potassium sulfates). The alteration products around the low-temperature vents are dominantly cristobalite and amorphous silica with minor potash and soda alum, aphthitalite, alunogen and anhydrite. Compared to fresh 1986 Augustine lava, the altered rocks exhibit enrichments in silica, base metals, halogens and sulfur and show very strong depletions in Al in all alteration zones and in iron, alkali and alkaline earth elements in some of the alteration zones. To help understand the origins of the mineral assemblages in altered Augustine rocks, we applied the thermochemical modeling program, GASWORKS, in calculations of: (a) reaction of the 1987 and 1989 gases with wall rock at 640 and 375 °C; (b) cooling of the 1987 gas from 870 to 100 °C with and without mineral fractionation; (c) cooling of the 1989 gas from 757 to 100 °C with and without mineral fractionation; and (d) mixing of the 1987 and 1989 gases with air. The 640 °C gas-rock reaction produces an assemblage consisting of silicates (tridymite, albite, diopside, sanidine and andalusite), oxides (magnetite and hercynite) and sulfides (bornite, chalcocite, molybdenite and sphalerite). The 375 °C gas-rock reaction produces dominantly silicates (quartz, albite, andalusite, microcline, cordierite, anorthite and tremolite) and subordinate amounts of sulfides (pyrite, chalcocite and wurtzite), oxides

  19. Modeling Spatial Structure of Rock Fracture Surfaces Before and After Shear Test: A Method for Estimating Morphology of Damaged Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babanouri, Nima; Karimi Nasab, Saeed

    2015-05-01

    This paper deals with the structural analysis of rock fracture roughness, and accordingly, a method is developed for estimating/predicting the post-shearing 3D geometry of the fracture surface. For this purpose, surfaces of three natural rock fractures were digitized and studied before and after the direct shear test. The variogram analysis of the surfaces indicated a strong non-linear trend in the topography data. Hence, the spatial variability of the rock fracture surfaces was decomposed to: one deterministic component, characterized by a high-order polynomial representing the large-scale undulations, and one stochastic component, described by the variogram of residuals representing the small-scale roughness. Using an image-processing technique, a total of 343 damage zones with different sizes, shapes, initial roughness characteristics, local stress fields, and/or asperity strength values were spatially located and clustered. In order to characterize the overall spatial structure of the degraded zones, the concept of the `pseudo-zonal variogram' was introduced. The results showed that the spatial continuity at the damage zones increases due to the asperity degradation. The increase in the variogram range is anisotropic and tends to be higher along the shearing. Consequently, the direction of maximum continuity rotates towards the shear direction. After modeling the evolution of the spatial structure with shearing and detecting boundaries of the degraded areas, a methodology was presented to provide a regression-kriging estimate of the morphology of sheared surfaces. The proposed method can be considered as a cost-free and reasonably accurate alternative to expensive techniques of scanning the rock fracture surface after the shear test.

  20. Dynamics of inelastic deformation of porous rocks and formation of localized compaction zones studied by numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanov, Yu P.; Chertov, M. A.; Aidagulov, G. R.; Myasnikov, A. V.

    2011-11-01

    The paper presents a numerical analysis of the inelastic deformation process in porous rocks during different stages of its development and under non-equiaxial loading. Although numerous experimental studies have already investigated many aspects of plasticity in porous rocks, numerical modeling gives valuable insight into the dynamics of the process, since experimental methods cannot extract detailed information about the specimen structure during the test and have strong limitations on the number of tests. The numerical simulations have reproduced all different modes of deformation observed in experimental studies: dilatant and compactive shear, compaction without shear, uniform deformation, and deformation with localization. However, the main emphasis is on analysis of the compaction mode of plastic deformation and compaction localization, which is characteristic for many porous rocks and can be observed in other porous materials as well. The study is largely inspired by applications in petroleum industry, i.e. surface subsidence and reservoir compaction caused by extraction of hydrocarbons and decrease of reservoir pressure. Special attention is given to the conditions, evolution, and characteristic patterns of compaction localization, which is often manifested in the form of compaction bands. Results of the study include stress-strain curves, spatial configurations and characteristics of localized zones, analysis of bifurcation of stress paths inside and outside localized zones and analysis of the influence of porous rocks properties on compaction behavior. Among other results are examples of the interplay between compaction and shear modes of deformation. To model the evolution of plastic deformation in porous rocks, a new constitutive model is formulated and implemented, with the emphasis on selection of adequate functions defining evolution of yield surface with deformation. The set of control parameters of the model is kept as short as possible; the

  1. Climate Change and Human Disturbance Can Lead to Local Extinction of Alpine Rock Ptarmigan: New Insight from the Western Italian Alps

    PubMed Central

    Imperio, Simona; Bionda, Radames; Viterbi, Ramona; Provenzale, Antonello

    2013-01-01

    Alpine grouses are particularly vulnerable to climate change due to their adaptation to extreme conditions and to their relict distributions in the Alps where global warming has been particularly marked in the last half century. Grouses are also currently threatened by habitat modification and human disturbance, and an assessment of the impact of multiple stressors is needed to predict the fate of Alpine populations of these birds in the next decades. We estimated the effect of climate change and human disturbance on a rock ptarmigan population living in the western Italian Alps by combining an empirical population modelling approach and stochastic simulations of the population dynamics under the a1B climate scenario and two different disturbance scenarios, represented by the development of a ski resort, through 2050.The early appearance of snow-free ground in the previous spring had a favorable effect on the rock ptarmigan population, probably through a higher reproductive success. On the contrary, delayed snowfall in autumn had a negative effect possibly due to a mismatch in time to molt to white winter plumage which increases predation risk. The regional climate model PROTHEUS does not foresee any significant change in snowmelt date in the study area, while the start date of continuous snow cover is expected to be significantly delayed. The net effect in the stochastic projections is a more or less pronounced (depending on the model used) decline in the studied population. The addition of extra-mortality due to collision with ski-lift wires led the population to fatal consequences in most projections. Should these results be confirmed by larger studies the conservation of Alpine populations would deserve more attention. To counterbalance the effects of climate change, the reduction of all causes of death should be pursued, through a strict preservation of the habitats in the present area of occurrence. PMID:24260581

  2. Climate change and human disturbance can lead to local extinction of Alpine rock ptarmigan: new insight from the western Italian Alps.

    PubMed

    Imperio, Simona; Bionda, Radames; Viterbi, Ramona; Provenzale, Antonello

    2013-01-01

    Alpine grouses are particularly vulnerable to climate change due to their adaptation to extreme conditions and to their relict distributions in the Alps where global warming has been particularly marked in the last half century. Grouses are also currently threatened by habitat modification and human disturbance, and an assessment of the impact of multiple stressors is needed to predict the fate of Alpine populations of these birds in the next decades. We estimated the effect of climate change and human disturbance on a rock ptarmigan population living in the western Italian Alps by combining an empirical population modelling approach and stochastic simulations of the population dynamics under the a1B climate scenario and two different disturbance scenarios, represented by the development of a ski resort, through 2050.The early appearance of snow-free ground in the previous spring had a favorable effect on the rock ptarmigan population, probably through a higher reproductive success. On the contrary, delayed snowfall in autumn had a negative effect possibly due to a mismatch in time to molt to white winter plumage which increases predation risk. The regional climate model PROTHEUS does not foresee any significant change in snowmelt date in the study area, while the start date of continuous snow cover is expected to be significantly delayed. The net effect in the stochastic projections is a more or less pronounced (depending on the model used) decline in the studied population. The addition of extra-mortality due to collision with ski-lift wires led the population to fatal consequences in most projections. Should these results be confirmed by larger studies the conservation of Alpine populations would deserve more attention. To counterbalance the effects of climate change, the reduction of all causes of death should be pursued, through a strict preservation of the habitats in the present area of occurrence.

  3. Relations of zoned pegmatites to other pegmatites, granite, and metamorphic rocks in the southern Black Hills, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Norton, J.J.; Redden, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    The pegmatite field and the Harney Peak Granite of the southern Black Hills, South Dakota, form an igneous system that progresses from slightly biotitic muscovite granite through layered pegmatitic granite, with alternating sodic and potassic rocks, to simple plagioclase-quartz-perthite pegmatites, and on to zoned pegmatites. Most of the country rocks are Lower Proterozoic mica schists. At 1700 Ga, intrusion of the Harney Peak Granite created a large dome in these rocks, a thermal aureole with a staurolite, a first sillimanite isograd, and a small area of metamorphism above the second sillimanite isograd. The zoned pegmatites have a strong tendency to occur in clusters, and the types of pegmatites are different in different clusters. A less obvious tendency is a regional zonation in which rare-mineral pegmatites become more abundant and muscovite pegmatites less abundant toward the outskirts of the region. The composition of the granite indicates that its magma originated by partial melting of metasedimentary mica schists similar to those at the present surface. The pegmatitic nature of most of the granite probably reflects exsolution of an aqueous phase. -from Authors

  4. Abnormal Activation of RhoA/ROCK-I Signaling in Junctional Zone Smooth Muscle Cells of Patients With Adenomyosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, S; Duan, H; Zhang, Y; Sun, F Q

    2016-03-01

    Adenomyosis (ADS) is a common estrogen-dependent gynecological disease with unknown etiology. The RhoA/Rho-kinase (ROCK) signaling pathway is involved in various cellular functions, including migration, proliferation, and smooth muscle contraction. Here we examined the potential role of this pathway in junctional zone (JZ) contraction in women with and without ADS. We demonstrated that in the normal JZ, RhoA and ROCK-I messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression was significantly higher in the proliferative phase of the menstrual cycle than in the secretory phase. Expression of RhoA and ROCK-I in the JZ from women with ADS was significantly higher than in the control women and showed no significant differences across the menstrual cycle. Treatment of JZ smooth muscle cells (JZSMCs) with estrogen at 0, 1, 10, or 100 nmol/L for 24 hours resulted in increased expression of RhoA, ROCK-I, and myosin light-chain (MLC) phosphorylation (p-MLC) in a dose-dependent manner. In parallel to its effects on p-MLC, estrogen-mediated, dose-dependent contraction responses in JZSMCs. Estrogen-mediated contraction in the ADS group was significantly higher than in the controls and also showed no significant differences across the menstrual cycle. These effects were suppressed in the presence of ICI 182780 or Y27632, supporting an estrogen receptor-dependent and RhoA activation-dependent mechanism. Our results indicate that the level of RhoA and ROCK-I increases in patients with ADS and the cyclic change is lost. Estrogen may affect uterine JZ contraction of ADS by enhancing RhoA/ ROCK-I signaling. PMID:26335177

  5. Abnormal Activation of RhoA/ROCK-I Signaling in Junctional Zone Smooth Muscle Cells of Patients With Adenomyosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, S; Duan, H; Zhang, Y; Sun, F Q

    2016-03-01

    Adenomyosis (ADS) is a common estrogen-dependent gynecological disease with unknown etiology. The RhoA/Rho-kinase (ROCK) signaling pathway is involved in various cellular functions, including migration, proliferation, and smooth muscle contraction. Here we examined the potential role of this pathway in junctional zone (JZ) contraction in women with and without ADS. We demonstrated that in the normal JZ, RhoA and ROCK-I messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression was significantly higher in the proliferative phase of the menstrual cycle than in the secretory phase. Expression of RhoA and ROCK-I in the JZ from women with ADS was significantly higher than in the control women and showed no significant differences across the menstrual cycle. Treatment of JZ smooth muscle cells (JZSMCs) with estrogen at 0, 1, 10, or 100 nmol/L for 24 hours resulted in increased expression of RhoA, ROCK-I, and myosin light-chain (MLC) phosphorylation (p-MLC) in a dose-dependent manner. In parallel to its effects on p-MLC, estrogen-mediated, dose-dependent contraction responses in JZSMCs. Estrogen-mediated contraction in the ADS group was significantly higher than in the controls and also showed no significant differences across the menstrual cycle. These effects were suppressed in the presence of ICI 182780 or Y27632, supporting an estrogen receptor-dependent and RhoA activation-dependent mechanism. Our results indicate that the level of RhoA and ROCK-I increases in patients with ADS and the cyclic change is lost. Estrogen may affect uterine JZ contraction of ADS by enhancing RhoA/ ROCK-I signaling.

  6. Rock mechanics observations pertinent to the rheology of the continental lithosphere and the localization of strain along shear zones

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirby, S.H.

    1985-01-01

    Emphasized in this paper are the deformation processes and rheologies of rocks at high temperatures and high effective pressures, conditions that are presumably appropriate to the lower crust and upper mantle in continental collision zones. Much recent progress has been made in understanding the flexure of the oceanic lithosphere using rock-mechanics-based yield criteria for the inelastic deformations at the top and base. At mid-plate depths, stresses are likely to be supported elastically because bending strains and elastic stresses are low. The collisional tectonic regime, however, is far more complex because very large permanent strains are sustained at mid-plate depths and this requires us to include the broad transition between brittle and ductile flow. Moreover, important changes in the ductile flow mechanisms occur at the intermediate temperatures found at mid-plate depths. Two specific contributions of laboratory rock rheology research are considered in this paper. First, the high-temperature steady-state flow mechanisms and rheology of mafic and ultramafic rocks are reviewed with special emphasis on olivine and crystalline rocks. Rock strength decreases very markedly with increases in temperature and it is the onset of flow by high temperature ductile mechanisms that defines the base of the lithosphere. The thickness of the continental lithosphere can therefore be defined by the depth to a particular isotherm Tc above which (at geologic strain rates) the high-temperature ductile strength falls below some arbitrary strength isobar (e.g., 100 MPa). For olivine Tc is about 700??-800??C but for other crustal silicates, Tc may be as low as 400??-600??C, suggesting that substantial decoupling may take place within thick continental crust and that strength may increase with depth at the Moho, as suggested by a number of workers on independent grounds. Put another way, the Moho is a rheological discontinuity. A second class of laboratory observations pertains to

  7. Deep rock damage in the San Andreas Fault revealed by P- and S-type fault-zone-guided waves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellsworth, William L.; Malin, Peter E.

    2011-01-01

    Damage to fault-zone rocks during fault slip results in the formation of a channel of low seismic-wave velocities. Within such channels guided seismic waves, denoted by Fg, can propagate. Here we show with core samples, well logs and Fg-waves that such a channel is crossed by the SAFOD (San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth) borehole at a depth of 2.7 km near Parkfield, California, USA. This laterally extensive channel extends downwards to at least half way through the seismogenic crust, more than about 7 km. The channel supports not only the previously recognized Love-type- (FL) and Rayleigh-type- (FR) guided waves, but also a new fault-guided wave, which we name FF. As recorded 2.7 km underground, FF is normally dispersed, ends in an Airy phase, and arrives between the P- and S-waves. Modelling shows that FF travels as a leaky mode within the core of the fault zone. Combined with the drill core samples, well logs and the two other types of guided waves, FF at SAFOD reveals a zone of profound, deep, rock damage. Originating from damage accumulated over the recent history of fault movement, we suggest it is maintained either by fracturing near the slip surface of earthquakes, such as the 1857 Fort Tejon M 7.9, or is an unexplained part of the fault-creep process known to be active at this site.

  8. Fabric-related velocity anisotropy and shear wave splitting in rocks from the Santa Rosa Mylonite Zone, California

    SciTech Connect

    Kern, H. ); Wenk, H.R. )

    1990-07-10

    The directional dependence of P and S wave velocities have been measured at pressures (up to 600 MPa) and temperatures (up to 700C) in rocks from the Santa Rosa Mylonite Zone (southern California). During tectonism, these were progressively deformed from granodiorite protolith to mylonite and ultimately phyllonite. The mineralogical and chemical composition of protolith and mylonite is nearly identical. Thus these rocks provide excellent material for documenting the effect of microstructural and textural changes on rock anisotropy. Velocity anisotropy increases significantly with the degree of deformation, whereas average velocities and densities do not change. At low pressure (50 MPa) the velocity anisotropy ranges from 1.7% in granodiorite up to 19% in phyllonite and is due to both oriented microfractures and crystallographic preferred orientation. At high pressure (600 MPa), the residual anisotropy up to 12% is mainly due to preferred mineral orientation, in particular of biotite. Significant shear wave splitting is measured parallel to the foliation plane and shows a good correlation with the biotite texture. These observations confirm that oriented microcracks and preferred orientation of minerals should be taken into account in the interpretation of seismic reflection and refraction data in terranes with deformed rocks.

  9. Mount St. Augustine volcano fumarole wall rock alteration: Mineralogy, zoning, composition and numerical models of its formation process

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Getahun, A.; Reed, M.H.; Symonds, R.

    1996-01-01

    Intensely altered wall rock was collected from high-temperature (640??C) and low-temperature (375??C) vents at Augustine volcano in July 1989. The high-temperature altered rock exhibits distinct mineral zoning differentiated by color bands. In order of decreasing temperature, the color bands and their mineral assemblages are: (a) white to grey (tridymite-anhydrite); (b) pink to red (tridymite-hematite-Fe hydroxide-molysite (FeCl3) with minor amounts of anhydrite and halite); and (c) dark green to green (anhydrite-halite-sylvite-tridymite with minor amounts of molysite, soda and potash alum, and other sodium and potassium sulfates). The alteration products around the low-temperature vents are dominantly cristobalite and amorphous silica with minor potash and soda alum, aphthitalite, alunogen and anhydrite. Compared to fresh 1986 Augustine lava, the altered rocks exhibit enrichments in silica, base metals, halogens and sulfur and show very strong depletions in Al in all alteration zones and in iron, alkali and alkaline earth elements in some of the alteration zones. To help understand the origins of the mineral assemblages in altered Augustine rocks, we applied the thermochemical modeling program, GASWORKS, in calculations of: (a) reaction of the 1987 and 1989 gases with wall rock at 640 and 375??C; (b) cooling of the 1987 gas from 870 to 100??C with and without mineral fractionation; (c) cooling of the 1989 gas from 757 to 100??C with and without mineral fractionation; and (d) mixing of the 1987 and 1989 gases with air. The 640??C gas-rock reaction produces an assemblage consisting of silicates (tridymite, albite, diopside, sanidine and andalusite), oxides (magnetite and hercynite) and sulfides (bornite, chalcocite, molybdenite and sphalerite). The 375??C gas-rock reaction produces dominantly silicates (quartz, albite, andalusite, microcline, cordierite, anorthite and tremolite) and subordinate amounts of sulfides (pyrite, chalcocite and wurtzite), oxides (magnetite

  10. Seismogenic Coupling at Convergent Margins - Geophysical Observations from the South American Subduction Zone and the Alpine Rock Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oncken, O.

    2008-12-01

    Convergent continental margins are the Earth's principal locus of important earthquake hazards with nearly all interplate megathrust earthquakes (M>8) in the seismogenic coupling zone between the converging plates. Despite the key importance of this zone, the processes that shape it are poorly understood. This is underscored by a number of novel observations attributed to processes in the interface zone that are attracting increasing attention: silent slip events, non-volcanic tremors, afterslip, locked patches embedded in a creeping environment, etc. We here compare the rock record from a field study with recent results from two major geophysical experiments (ANCORP and TIPTEQ) that have imaged the South Chilean subduction zone at the site of the largest historically recorded earthquake (Valdivia, 1969; Mw = 9.5) and the plate boundary in Northern Chile, where a major seismic event is expected in the near future (Iquique segment). The reflection seismic data exhibit well defined changes of reflectivity and Vp/Vs ratio along the plate interface that can be correlated with different parts of the coupling zone as well as with changes during the seismic cycle. Observations suggest an important role of the hydraulic system. The rock record from the exhumed Early Tertiary seismogenic coupling zone of the European Alps provides indications for the mechanisms and processes responsible for the geophysical images. Fabric formation and metamorphism in a largely preserved subduction channel chiefly record the deformation conditions of the pre-collisional setting along the plate interface. We identify an unstable slip domain from pseudotachylytes occurring in the temperature range between 200-300°C. This zone coincides with a domain of intense veining in the subduction mélange with mineral growth into open cavities, indicating fast, possibly seismic, rupture. Evidence for transient near-lithostatic fluid pressure as well as brittle fractures competing with mylonitic shear

  11. Fluid flow and water-rock interaction across the active Nankai Trough subduction zone forearc revealed by boron isotope geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hüpers, Andre; Kasemann, Simone A.; Kopf, Achim J.; Meixner, Anette; Toki, Tomohiro; Shinjo, Ryuichi; Wheat, C. Geoffrey; You, Chen-Feng

    2016-11-01

    Compositional changes, dehydration reactions and fluid flow in subducted sediments influence seismogenesis and arc magmatism in subduction zones. To identify fluid flow and water-rock interaction processes in the western Nankai Trough subduction zone (SW Japan) we analyzed boron concentration and boron isotope composition (δ11B) of pore fluids sampled across the subduction zone forearc from depths of up to ∼922 m below seafloor during four Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expeditions. The major structural regimes that were sampled by coring include: (1) sedimentary inputs, (2) the frontal thrust zone, (3) the megasplay fault zone, and (4) the forearc basin. From mass balance consideration we find that consumption of boron (B) by ash alteration and desorption of B from the solid phase, mediated by organic matter degradation, produces a net decrease in B concentrations with depth down to ∼120 μM and variable δ11B values in the range of ∼+20‰ and +49‰. Interstitial water in sediments on the incoming oceanic plate are influenced by more efficient mobilization of exchangeable B from the solid phase due to higher temperatures and alteration of the oceanic crust that acts as a sink for 10B. At the tip of the megasplay fault zone, elevated B concentration and B isotopic composition suggest that underthrust coarse-grained slope sediments provide a pathway for fluids out of the upper (<2 km) accretionary prism. Silt and sand layers in the underthrust section of the downgoing plate favor fluid escape in seaward direction from depths equivalent to the temperature range of 60-150 °C. At both locations the δ11B signature evolves during updip migration through re-adsorption. Mass balance considerations suggest a shallower fluid source depth compared to pore fluids sampled previously near the décollement zone along the central portion of the Nankai margin.

  12. Rift-zone magmatism: Petrology of basaltic rocks transitional from CFB to MORB, southeastern Brazil margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fodor, R. V.; Vetter, S. K.

    1984-12-01

    Compositions of basaltic samples from the southeastern Brazil passive margin (18° 24° S) depict the change from continental to oceanic lithosphere during the opening of the South Atlantic Ocean. Samples studied range from 138 to 105 m.y. old and are from 12 Petrobrás drill cores recovered from the coastline to about 150 km offshore in the Espirito Santo, Campos, and Santos basins. Compositions vary, ranging, for example, from 49 54 wt.% SiO2, 0.5 3.0 wt.% TiO2, 0.6 5.0 FeO*/MgO, and <1->6 La/ Yb(n), but can be grouped: (i) basalts enriched in incompatible elements, such as K (some K2O>2.0 wt.%), Rb (>18 ppm), Zr (>120 ppm), and LREE (some FeO* 16 wt.%; most with SiO2 51 54 wt.%), and resembling Serra Geral continental flood basalts (SG-CFB) of southern Brazil; (ii) basalts less enriched, or transitional, in incompatible elements, having K2O <0.40 wt.% and flat REE patterns, and resemble N. Atlantic diabases and FAMOUS basalts; and (iii) one depleted sample, Ce/Yb(n)=0.7, where Ce(n)=4. Expressed in oceanic-basalt terminology and Zr-Nb-Y abundances, ‘enriched’ samples are P- and T-type MORB (e.g., Zr/Nb ˜4 25), ‘transitional’ samples are T-type (Zr/ Nb ˜8 27), and the ‘depleted’ sample is N-type MORB (Zr/Nb>30). Trace-element ratios (e.g., Zr/Nb, Zr/Y) link the Brazil margin basalts to a heterogeneous mantle (attributed to metasomatic veining) of variably proportioned mixtures of depleted-mantle (N-MORB) and plume (P-MORB, e.g., Tristan hotspot) materials. The various compositions therefore reflect, in part, different zones of melting during the separation of Gondwanaland, where gradual decompression during rifting enabled concurrent melting of upper, more depleted (non- or sparsely-veined) mantle and enriched (densely-veined) mantle. Within the time represented, melting produced enriched, transitional, and depleted magmas that were emplaced subaerially, hypabyssally, and subaqueously; they mark the transition from CFB before rifting and separation

  13. Effects of fluid-rock interaction on 40Ar/39Ar geochronology in high-pressure rocks (Sesia-Lanzo Zone, Western Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halama, Ralf; Konrad-Schmolke, Matthias; Sudo, Masafumi; Marschall, Horst R.; Wiedenbeck, Michael

    2014-02-01

    In situ UV laser spot 40Ar/39Ar analyses of distinct phengite types in eclogite-facies rocks from the Sesia-Lanzo Zone (Western Alps, Italy) were combined with SIMS boron isotope analyses as well as boron (B) and lithium (Li) concentration data to link geochronological information with constraints on fluid-rock interaction. In weakly deformed samples, apparent 40Ar/39Ar ages of phengite cores span a range of ˜20 Ma, but inverse isochrons define two distinct main high-pressure (HP) phengite core crystallization periods of 88-82 and 77-74 Ma, respectively. The younger cores have on average lower B contents (˜36 μg/g) than the older ones (˜43-48 μg/g), suggesting that loss of B and resetting of the Ar isotopic system were related. Phengite cores have variable δ11B values (-18‰ to -10‰), indicating the lack of km scale B homogenization during HP crystallization. Overprinted phengite rims in the weakly deformed samples generally yield younger apparent 40Ar/39Ar ages than the respective cores. They also show variable effects of heterogeneous excess 40Ar incorporation and Ar loss. One acceptable inverse isochron age of 77.1 ± 1.1 Ma for rims surrounding older cores (82.6 ± 0.6 Ma) overlaps with the second period of core crystallization. Compared to the phengite cores, all rims have lower B and Li abundances but similar δ11B values (-15‰ to -9‰), reflecting internal redistribution of B and Li and internal fluid buffering of the B isotopic composition during rim growth. The combined observation of younger 40Ar/39Ar ages and boron loss, yielding comparable values of both parameters only in cores and rims of different samples, is best explained by a selective metasomatic overprint. In low permeability samples, this overprint caused recrystallization of phengite rims, whereas higher permeability in other samples led to complete recrystallization of phengite grains. Strongly deformed samples from a several km long, blueschist-facies shear zone contain mylonitic

  14. Characterisation and monitoring of the Excavation Disturbed Zone (EDZ) in fractured gneisses of the Roselend underground laboratory: permeability measurements, transport property changes and related radon bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wassermann, Jérôme; Sabroux, Jean-Christophe; Richon, Patrick; Pontreau, Sébastien; Guillon, Sophie; Pili, Eric

    2010-05-01

    pressure measurements between an obturated borehole and the tunnel is conducted to monitor the possible modifications of the transport properties of the EDZ due to hydraulical and/or mechanical sollicitations of the nearby Roselend reservoir lake. As radon level is controlled by emanation and transport path through the medium. The observed bursts of radon should be due to changes of the radon transport properties (Trique et al. 1999) of the EDZ. A correlation between the differential pressure variations and radon bursts is clearly observed. Radon bursts seem to be related to overpressure events that take place in the instrumented borehole. Which external sollicitations, hydraulical or mechanical, or both, induce such a behaviour? References Bossart, P., Meier, P. M., Moeri, A., Trick, T., and J.-C. Mayor (2002). Geological and hydraulic characterisation of the excavation disturbed zone in the Opalinus Clay of the Mont Terri Rock Laboratory, Engineering Geology, 66, 19-38. Dezayes, C., and T. Villemin (2002). Etat de la fracturation dans la galerie CEA de Roselend et analyse de la déformation cassante dans le massif du Méraillet, technical report, Lab. de Geodyn. de Chaisnes Alp., Univ. de Savoie, Savoie, France. Jakubick, A. T., and T. Franz (1993). Vacuum testing of the permeability of the excavation damaged zone, Rock Mech. Rock Engng., 26(2), 165-182. Patriarche, D., Pili, E., Adler, P. M., and J.-F. Thovert (2007). Stereological analysis of fractures in the Roselend tunnel and permeability determination, Water Resour. Res., 43, W09421. Richon, P., Perrier, F., Sabroux, J.-C., Trique, M., Ferry, C., Voisin, V., and E. Pili (2004). Spatial and time variations of radon-222 concentration in the atmosphere of a dead-end horizontal tunnel, J. Environ. Radioact., 78, 179-198. Richon, P., Perrier, F., Pili, E., and J.-C. Sabroux (2009). Detectability and significance of the 12hr barometric tide in radon-222 signal, dripwater flow rate, air temperature and carbon dioxide

  15. Linking Weathering, Rock Moisture Dynamics, Geochemistry, Runoff, Vegetation and Atmospheric Processes through the Critical Zone: Graduate Student led Research at the Eel River Critical Zone Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, W. E.

    2014-12-01

    In the Eel River Critical Zone Observatory lies Rivendell, a heavily-instrumented steep forested hillslope underlain by nearly vertically dipping argillite interbedded with sandstone. Under this convex hillslope lies "Zb", the transition to fresh bedrock, which varies from less than 6 m below the surface near the channel to 20 m at the divide. Rempe and Dietrich (2014, PNAS) show that the Zb profile can be predicted from the assumption that weathering occurs when drainage is induced in the uplifting fresh bedrock under hillslopes by lateral head gradients driven by channel incision at the hillslope boundary. Infiltrating winter precipitation is impeded at the lower conductivity boundary at Zb, generating perched groundwater that dynamically pulses water laterally to the channel, controlling stream runoff. Below the soil and above the water table lies an unsaturated zone through which all recharge to the perched groundwater (and thus all runoff to channels) occurs. It is this zone and the waters in them that profoundly affect critical zone processes. In our seasonally dry environment, the first rains penetrate past the soil and moisten the underlying weathered bedrock (Salve et al., 2012, WRR). It takes about 200 to 400 mm of cumulative rain, however, before the underlying groundwater rises significantly. Oshun et al (in review) show that by this cumulative rainfall the average of the wide-ranging isotopic signature of rain reaches a nearly constant average annual value. Consequently, the recharging perched groundwater shows only minor temporal isotopic variation. Kim et al, (2014, GCA) find that the winter high-flow groundwater chemistry is controlled by relatively fast-reacting cation exchange processes, likely occurring in transit in the unsaturated zone. Oshun also demonstrates that the Douglas fir rely on this rock moisture as a water source, while the broadleaf trees (oaks and madrone) use mostly soil moisture. Link et al (2014 WRR) show that Doug fir declines

  16. Intrusive rocks of the Holden and Lucerne quadrangles, Washington; the relation of depth zones, composition, textures, and emplacement of plutons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cater, Fred W.

    1982-01-01

    serpentine. These occur either as included irregular masses in later intrusives or as tectonically emplaced lenses in metamorphic rocks. Also of uncertain age but probably much younger, perhaps as young as Eocene, are larger masses of hornblendite and hornblende periodotite that grade into hornblende gabbro. These are exposed on the surface and in the underground workings of the Holden mine. Oldest of the granitoid intrusives are the narrow, nearly concordant Dumbell Mountain plutons, having a radiometric age of about 220 m.y. They consist of gneissic hornblende-quartz diorite and quartz diorite gneiss. Most contacts consist of lit-par-lit zones, but some are gradational or more rarely sharp. The plutons are typically catazonal. Closely resembling the Dumbell Mountain plutons in outcrop appearance, but differing considerably in composition, are the Bearcat Ridge plutons. These consist of gneissic quartz diorite and granodiorite. The Bearcat Ridge plutons are not in contact with older dated plutons, but because their textural and structural characteristics so closely resemble those of the Dumbell Mountain plutons, they are considered to be the same age. Their composition, however, is suggestive of a much younger age. Cutting the Dumbell Mountain plutons is the Leroy Creek pluton, consisting of gneissic biotite-quartz diorite and trondjhemite. The gneissic foliation in the Leroy Creek is characterized by a strong and pervasive swirling. Cutting both the Dumbell Mountain and Leroy Creek plutons are the almost dikelike Seven-fingered Jack plutons. These range in composition from gabbro to quartz diorite; associated with them are contact complexes of highly varied rocks characterized by gabbro and coarse-grained hornblendite. Most of the rocks are gneissic, but some are massive and structureless. Radiometric ages by various methods range from 100 to 193 m.y. Dikes, sills, small stocks, and irregular clots of leucocratic quartz diorite and granodiorite are abundant in t

  17. Maine Pseudotachylyte Localities and the Role of Host Rock Anisotropy in Fault Zone Development and Frictional Melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, M. T.

    2004-12-01

    Three brittle strike-slip fault localities in coastal Maine have developed pseudotachylyte fault veins, injection veins and other reservoir structures in a variety of host rocks where the pre-existing layering can serve as a controlling fabric for brittle strike-slip reactivation. Host rocks with a poorly-oriented planar anisotropy at high angles to the shear direction will favor the development of R-shears in initial en echelon arrays as seen in the Two Lights and Richmond Island Fault Zones of Cape Elizabeth that cut gently-dipping phyllitic quartzites. These en echelon R-shears grow to through-going faults with the development of P-shear linkages across the dominantly contractional stepovers in the initial arrays. Pseudotachylyte on these faults is very localized, typically up to 1-2 mm in thickness and is restricted to through-going fault segments, P-shear linkages and some sidewall ripouts. Overall melt production is limited by the complex geometry of the multi-fault array. Host rocks with a favorably-oriented planar anisotropy for reactivation in brittle shear, however, preferentially develop a multitude of longer, non-coplanar layer-parallel fault segments. Pseudotachylyte in the newly-discovered Harbor Island Fault Zone in Muscongus Bay is developed within vertical bedding on regional upright folds with over 50 individual layer-parallel single-slip fault veins, some of which can be traced for over 40 meters along strike. Many faults show clear crosscuts of pre-existing quartz veins that indicate a range of coseismic displacements of 0.23-0.53 meters yielding fault vein widths of a few mm and dilatant reservoirs up to 2 cm thick. Both vertical and rare horizontal lateral injection veins can be found in the adjoining wall rock up to 0.7 cm thick and 80 cm in length. The structure of these faults is simple with minor development of splay faults, sidewall ripouts and strike-slip duplexes. The prominent vertical flow layering within the mylonite gneisses of

  18. Stratigraphic and structural relations of Lower Triassic rocks within the frontal fold-and-thrust zone of southwestern Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Paull, R.K.; Paull, R.A. )

    1991-06-01

    New sections of Lower Triassic rocks were measured within the frontal fold-and-thrust zone of southwestern Montana at Garfield Canyon, Horse Prairie Creek, Kennison Spring, and Birch Creek to clarify stratigraphic and structural relations. Triassic rocks disconformably overlie Upper Permian units and unconformably underlie younger rocks. From oldest to youngest, they include the Dinwoody, Woodside, and Thaynes formations. The Dinwoody consists of shale, siltstone, and limestone; thickness varies from 152 to 273 m. Red beds of the Woodside thin northward to zero in the northern Tendoy Mountains. The Thaynes is comprised of limestone, siltstone, and sandstone; thickness varies from 244 m in the south, zero in the central area, to 51 m in the north. North of the Woodside termination, recognition of the Thaynes depends upon recovery of Smithian conodonts. Conodonts provide correlation and biofacies information for this study. From Birch Creek northward, conodonts are basinal, consistent with lithofacies data. This area is within the McCartney Mountain salient, a depositional basin which may have existed on the craton margin prior to thrusting. However, there is no evidence to support basinal conditions in the Blacktail Mountain salient to the south. Although thermal alteration values for most conodonts are within the range of oil and condensate production, those from Birch Creek north exceed the stability regime for hydrocarbons.

  19. Assessing the disturbed rock zone (DRZ) around a 655 meter vertical shaft in salt using ultrasonic waves: An update

    SciTech Connect

    HARDY,ROBERT D.; HOLCOMB,DAVID J.

    2000-03-14

    An array of ultrasonic transducers was constructed consisting of three identical arrays at various depths in an air intake shaft at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Each array consists of transducers permanently installed in three holes arranged in an L shape. An active array, created by appropriate arrangement of the transducers and selection of transmitter-receiver pairs, allows the measurement of transmitted signal velocities and amplitudes (for attenuation studies) along 216 paths parallel, perpendicular and tangential to the shaft walls. Transducer positions were carefully surveyed, allowing absolute velocity measurements. Installation occurred over a period of about two years beginning in early 1989, with nearly continuous operation since that time, resulting in a rare, if not unique, record of the spatial and temporal variability of damage development around an underground opening. This paper reports results from the last two years of operation, updating the results reported by Holcomb, 1999. Results will be related to the damage, due to microcracking, required to produce the observed changes. It is expected that the results will be useful to other studies of the long-term deformation characteristics of salt.

  20. Petrography and geochemistry of basaltic rocks from the Conrad fracture zone on the America-Antarctica Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    le Roex, Anton P.; Dick, Henry J. B.

    1981-06-01

    Intrusive and extrusive basaltic rocks have been dredged from the Conrad fracture zone (transecting the slow-spreading America-Antarctica Ridge). The majority of rocks recovered are holocrystalline with the dominant mineral assemblage being plagioclase plus clinopyroxene with or without minor Fe-Ti oxides (olivine occurs in only three samples) and many of the samples show evidence of extensive alteration. Secondary minerals include chlorite, actinolite, K- and Na-feldspar, analcite and epidote. In terms of bulk chemistry the rocks are characterized by their generally evolved and highly variable compositions (e.g. Mg *=0.65-0.35;TiO 2=0.7-3.6%;Zr=31-374ppm;Nb=<3-21ppm;Y=17-96ppm;Ni=100-9ppm ), but with respect to the immobile incompatible element ratios (e.g. Zr/Nb, Y/Nb, La/Sm) are similar to "normal" or depleted mid-oceanic ridge basalts. Quantitative major and trace element modelling indicate that most of the variation observed can be attributed to low-pressure fractional crystallization of plagioclase plus clinopyroxene in approximately equal proportions with or without minor Fe-Ti oxides. The range in composition can be accounted for by up to 76% fractional crystallization. Although ferrobasalts have not frequently been associated with slow spreading ridges, the extreme differentiation observed in the Conrad fracture zone basalts implies some additional constraint other than spreading rate on the formation of ferrobasalt and reaffirms the importance of extensive crustal differentiation during the production of this basalt type.

  1. What's so critical about the critical zone?: New insights at the boundaries between hydrology, pedology, geomorphology, rocks and life (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, G.

    2013-12-01

    understanding of feedbacks among vegetation growth and water uptake, soil moisture regimes, snowpack dynamics, and overall forest health are challenging previous assumptions about how best to manage forest environments in the face of a warming atmosphere and increased frequencies of disturbance. Time will tell whether these new perspectives represent incremental or fundamental shifts in our thinking about the critical zone, but it is clearly an exciting time for critical zone science and scientists.

  2. Genesis of rare-metal pegmatites and alkaline apatite-fluorite rocks of Burpala massi, Northern Baikal folded zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotnikova, Irina; Vladykin, Nikolai

    2015-04-01

    Burpalinsky rare metal alkaline massif in the Northern Baikal folded zone in southern margin of Siberian Platform, is a of intrusion central type, created 287 Ma covering area of about 250 km2. It is composed of nepheline syenites and pulaskites grading to quartz syenites in the contacts. Veines and dykes are represented by shonkinites, sodalite syenite, leucocratic granophyres, alkali granites and numerous rare metal alkaline syenite pegmatites and two dykes of carbonatites. All rocks except for granites are cut by a large apatite-fluorite dyke rocks with mica and magnetite, which in turn is cut by alaskite granites dyke. The massif has been studied by A.M. Portnov, A.A. Ganzeev et al. (1992) Burpalinsky massif is highly enriched with trace elements, which are concentrated in pegmatite dykes. About 70 rare-metal minerals we found in massif. Zr-silicates: zircon, eudialyte, lovenite, Ti-lovenite, velerite, burpalite, seidozerite, Ca- seidozerite, Rosenbuschite, vlasovite, katapleite, Ca-katapleite, elpidite. Ti- minerals:- sphene, astrophyllite, ramsaite, Mn-neptunite bafertisite, chevkinite, Mn-ilmenite, pirofanite, Sr-perrerit, landauite, rutile, anatase, brookite; TR- minerals - loparite, metaloparite, britolite, rinkolite, melanocerite, bastnesite, parisite, ankilite, monazite, fluocerite, TR-apatite; Nb- minerals - pyrochlore, loparite. Other rare minerals leucophanite, hambergite, pyrochlore, betafite, torite, thorianite, tayniolite, brewsterite, cryolite and others. We have proposed a new scheme massif: shonkinites - nepheline syenites - alkaline syenite - quartz syenites - veined rocks: mariupolites, rare-metal pegmatites, apatite, fluorite rock alyaskite and alkaline granites and carbonatites (Sotnikova, 2009). Apatite-fluorite rocks are found in the central part of massif. This is a large vein body of 2 km length and a 20 m width cutting prevailing pulaskites. Previously, these rocks were regarded as hydrothermal low-temperature phase. New geological and

  3. A long-term rock uplift rate for eastern Crete and geodynamic implications for the Hellenic subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strobl, M.; Hetzel, R.; Fassoulas, C.; Kubik, P. W.

    2014-08-01

    The island of Crete in the forearc of the Hellenic subduction zone has a rugged topography with local relief exceeding 2 km. Based on the elevation of marine shorelines, rates of rock uplift during the Late Holocene were previously estimated to range between 1 and 4 mm/a in different parts of the island. These rates may, however, not be representative for longer timescales, because subduction earthquakes with up to 9 m of vertical coseismic displacement have affected Crete in the Late Holocene. Here we use a well preserved sequence of marine terraces near Kato Zakros in eastern Crete to determine the rate of rock uplift over the last ∼600 ka. Field investigations and topographic profiles document a flight of more than 13 marine bedrock terraces that were carved into limestones of the Tripolitza unit. Preliminary age constraints for the terraces were obtained by 10Be exposure dating of rare quartz-bearing sandstone clasts, which are present on some terraces. The 10Be ages of these samples, which have been corrected for an inherited nuclide component, yielded exposure ages between ∼100 ka and zero. Combined with geomorphologic evidence the two oldest 10Be ages suggest that the terraces T4 and T5, with shoreline angles at an elevation of ∼68 and ∼76 m above sea level, respectively, formed during the marine isotope stage 5e about 120 ka ago. The correlation of the higher terraces (T6 to T13) with regional sea-level highstands indicates sustained rock uplift at a rate of ∼0.5 m/ka since at least ∼600 ka. As normal faulting has dominated the tectonics of Crete during the last several million years, upper crustal shortening can be ruled out as a cause for rock uplift. We argue that the sustained uplift of the island results from the continuous underplating of sediments, which are transferred from the subducting African plate to the base of the crust beneath Crete.

  4. Experimental and Numerical Studies on Development of Fracture Process Zone (FPZ) in Rocks under Cyclic and Static Loadings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghamgosar, M.; Erarslan, N.

    2016-03-01

    The development of fracture process zones (FPZ) in the Cracked Chevron Notched Brazilian Disc (CCNBD) monsonite and Brisbane tuff specimens was investigated to evaluate the mechanical behaviour of brittle rocks under static and various cyclic loadings. An FPZ is a region that involves different types of damage around the pre-existing and/or stress-induced crack tips in engineering materials. This highly damaged area includes micro- and meso-cracks, which emerge prior to the main fracture growth or extension and ultimately coalescence to macrofractures, leading to the failure. The experiments and numerical simulations were designed for this study to investigate the following features of FPZ in rocks: (1) ligament connections and (2) microcracking and its coalescence in FPZ. A Computed Tomography (CT) scan technique was also used to investigate the FPZ behaviour in selected rock specimens. The CT scan results showed that the fracturing velocity is entirely dependent on the appropriate amount of fracture energy absorbed in rock specimens due to the change of frequency and amplitudes of the dynamic loading. Extended Finite Element Method (XFEM) was used to compute the displacements, tensile stress distribution and plastic energy dissipation around the propagating crack tip in FPZ. One of the most important observations, the shape of FPZ and its extension around the crack tip, was made using numerical and experimental results, which supported the CT scan results. When the static rupture and the cyclic rupture were compared, the main differences are twofold: (1) the number of fragments produced is much greater under cyclic loading than under static loading, and (2) intergranular cracks are formed due to particle breakage under cyclic loading compared with smooth and bright cracks along cleavage planes under static loading.

  5. Integrating GIS-based geologic mapping, LiDAR-based lineament analysis and site specific rock slope data to delineate a zone of existing and potential rock slope instability located along the grandfather mountain window-Linville Falls shear zone contact, Southern Appalachian Mountains, Watauga County, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gillon, K.A.; Wooten, R.M.; Latham, R.L.; Witt, A.W.; Douglas, T.J.; Bauer, J.B.; Fuemmeler, S.J.

    2009-01-01

    Landslide hazard maps of Watauga County identify >2200 landslides, model debris flow susceptibility, and evaluate a 14km x 0.5km zone of existing and potential rock slope instability (ZEPRSI) near the Town of Boone. The ZEPRSI encompasses west-northwest trending (WNWT) topographic ridges where 14 active/past-active rock/weathered rock slides occur mainly in rocks of the Grandfather Mountain Window (GMW). The north side of this ridgeline is the GMW / Linville Falls Fault (LFF) contact. Sheared rocks of the Linville Falls Shear Zone (LFSZ) occur along the ridge and locally in the valley north of the contact. The valley is underlain principally by layered granitic gneiss comprising the Linville Falls/Beech Mountain/Stone Mountain Thrust Sheet. The integration of ArcGIS??? - format digital geologic and lineament mapping on a 6m LiDAR (Light Detecting and Ranging) digital elevation model (DEM) base, and kinematic analyses of site specific rock slope data (e.g., presence and degree of ductile and brittle deformation fabrics, rock type, rock weathering state) indicate: WNWT lineaments are expressions of a regionally extensive zone of fractures and faults; and ZEPRSI rock slope failures concentrate along excavated, north-facing LFF/LFSZ slopes where brittle fabrics overprint older metamorphic foliations, and other fractures create side and back release surfaces. Copyright 2009 ARMA, American Rock Mechanics Association.

  6. Lateral variations in mylonite zone thickness as influenced by fluid-rock interactions, Linville falls fault, North Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, J.; Mitra, G.

    1993-07-01

    Over a distance of approximately 20 km, along strike, the Linville Falls mylonite varies in thickness from 1 m at Linville Falls to >60 m at Banner Elk. Along strike, pressure, temperature and displacement variations are minimized, allowing this study to focus on the influences of fluid behavior and protolith mineralogy on fault zone development. The protolith at Linville Falls contains mainly K-feldspar, perthite and quartz, while at Banner Elk the protolith contains plagioclase and quartz. At Linville Falls, quartz deformed by dynamic recrystallization, feldspar by intragranular fracturing and alteration to quartz and mica, and mica by sliding along cleavage planes. Modal mineralogies change from the protolith to the mylonite with quartz decreasing from 39 to 19% and feldspar from 59 to 1.5%; muscovite increases from <1 to 80%. Mean grain size of the quartz and feldspar also decreased, from 30 to 20 μm and from 110 to 50 μm, respectively. At Banner Elk, deformation occurred predominantly by dynamic recrystallization within the quartz and by sliding along cleavage planes in mica; no feldspar remains within the mylonite zone. Modal mineralogies change from the protolith to the mylonite with quartz and muscovite increasing from 21 to 50% and from < 1 to 44%, respectively. Mean grain size of quartz decreases from 60 to 24 μm. Mass-balance calculations, based on major- and trace-element geochemistry, indicate approximately 75% volume loss at Linville Falls and 20% at Banner Elk. Fluid-rock ratios estimated from the calculated depletions of Si are an order of magnitude higher at Linville Falls than at Banner Elk. Fluids infiltrated the fault zone over a thicker zone at Banner Elk than at Linville Falls because the plagioclase altered more readily than K-feldspar, creating new pathways for fluids. Fluids migrated preferentially through channels along the fault zone, creating a three-dimensional network of higher fluid flow.

  7. Rock deformation processes in the Karakoram fault zone, Eastern Karakoram, Ladakh, NW India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutter, E. H.; Faulkner, D. R.; Brodie, K. H.; Phillips, R. J.; Searle, M. P.

    2007-08-01

    The Karakoram fault shows a full range of fault rocks from ductile (deformation by intracrystalline plasticity) mylonites to low temperature brittle fault rocks along the trace of the fault in the Eastern Karakoram, Ladakh, NW India. The Karakoram fault is a prominent feature on satellite images and has estimated long-term average slip rates between 3 and 11 mm/year, based on U-Pb geochronology of mapped offset markers, notably mid-Miocene leucogranites. Mylonitic marbles, superimposed by cataclastic deformation and clay-bearing fault gouges and late fracturing were found on a presently active strand of the fault, and testify to progressive deformation from plastic through brittle deformation during unroofing and cooling. From microstructural analysis we confirmed the right-lateral strike slip character of the fault, estimated peak differential stresses of ca. 200 MPa at the transition from plastic to brittle deformation, and found microstructural features to be consistent with inferences from the extrapolation of deformation behaviour from experimental rock deformation studies. Implied long-term averaged slip rates from microstructural constraints were found to be broadly consistent with estimates from geochronologic and geodetic studies.

  8. Biogeochemical Reactive Transport Model of the Redox Zone Experiment of the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory in Sweden

    SciTech Connect

    Molinero-Huguet, Jorge; Samper-Calvete, F. Javier; Zhang Guoxiang; Yang Changbing

    2004-11-15

    Underground facilities are being operated by several countries around the world for performing research and demonstration of the safety of deep radioactive waste repositories. The Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory is one such facility launched and operated by the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company where various in situ experiments have been performed in fractured granites. One such experiment is the redox zone experiment, which aimed at evaluating the effects of the construction of an access tunnel on the hydrochemical conditions of a fracture zone. Dilution of the initially saline groundwater by fresh recharge water is the dominant process controlling the hydrochemical evolution of most chemical species, except for bicarbonate and sulfate, which unexpectedly increase with time. We present a numerical model of water flow, reactive transport, and microbial processes for the redox zone experiment. This model provides a plausible quantitatively based explanation for the unexpected evolution of bicarbonate and sulfate, reproduces the breakthrough curves of other reactive species, and is consistent with previous hydrogeological and solute transport models.

  9. Integrating geospatial and ground geophysical information as guidelines for groundwater potential zones in hard rock terrains of south India.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Mehnaz; Lone, Mahjoor Ahmad; Ahmed, Shakeel

    2012-08-01

    The increasing demand of water has brought tremendous pressure on groundwater resources in the regions were groundwater is prime source of water. The objective of this study was to explore groundwater potential zones in Maheshwaram watershed of Andhra Pradesh, India with semi-arid climatic condition and hard rock granitic terrain. GIS-based modelling was used to integrate remote sensing and geophysical data to delineate groundwater potential zones. In the present study, Indian Remote Sensing RESOURCESAT-1, Linear Imaging Self-Scanner (LISS-4) digital data, ASTER digital elevation model and vertical electrical sounding data along with other data sets were analysed to generate various thematic maps, viz., geomorphology, land use/land cover, geology, lineament density, soil, drainage density, slope, aquifer resistivity and aquifer thickness. Based on this integrated approach, the groundwater availability in the watershed was classified into four categories, viz. very good, good, moderate and poor. The results reveal that the modelling assessment method proposed in this study is an effective tool for deciphering groundwater potential zones for proper planning and management of groundwater resources in diverse hydrogeological terrains. PMID:21901310

  10. Helium 4 and radon 222 concentrations in groundwater and soil as indicators of zones of fracture concentration in unexposed rock

    SciTech Connect

    Banwell, G.M.; Parizek, R.R.

    1988-01-10

    The presence of zones of fracture concentration in unexposed rock may be partially assessed by measuring the concentrations of /sup 4/He and /sup 222/Rn in groundwater and soil gas. Helium 4 in groundwater and soil gas and /sup 222/Rn in groundwater were measured in the vicinity of two intersecting linements in Lehigh County, Pennsylvania. The limeaments are thought to mark deep fracture systems which provide conduits for the migration of /sup 4/He and /sup 222/Rn. High groundwater /sup 4/He concentrations revealed the presence of the two lineaments. Low groundwater /sup 222/Rn activities are found near the lineaments and qualitatively support a numerical model which relates low /sup 222/Rn activity to high fracture transmissivity. Radon 222 activity correlates most strongly with the presence of H/sub 2/S in groundwater, implying that geochemical controls or groundwater circulation patterns strongly influence radon concentration. Soil gas concentrations of /sup 4/He barely exceeded background levels and did not reliably indicate the lineament zones. The data show that groundwater /sup 4/He concentrations may be used to identify fracture zones in unexposed bedrock. copyright American Geophysical Union 1988

  11. Geodynamic setting and geochemical signatures of Cambrian?Ordovician rift-related igneous rocks (Ossa-Morena Zone, SW Iberia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez-García, T.; Bellido, F.; Quesada, C.

    2003-04-01

    An important rifting event, accompanied by massive igneous activity, is recorded in the Ossa-Morena Zone of the SW Iberian Massif (European Variscan Orogen). It likely culminated in the formation of a new oceanic basin (Rheic ocean?), remnants of which appear presently accreted at the southern margin of the Ossa-Morena Zone. Rifting propagated diachronously across the zone from the Early Cambrian to the Late Ordovician, but by Early Ordovician time, the existence of a significant tract of new ocean is evidenced by a breakup unconformity. Although early stages of rifting were not accompanied by mantle-derived igneous activity, a pronounced increase of the geothermal gradient is indicated by partial melting of metasedimentary protoliths in the upper and middle crust, and by coeval core-complex formation. Geochemistry of the main volume of igneous rocks, emplaced some million years later during more mature stages of rifting, suggests an origin in a variably enriched asthenospheric source, similar to that of many OIB, from which subsequent petrogenetic processes produced a wide range of compositions, from basalt to rhyolite. A tectonic model involving collision with, and subsequent overriding of, a MOR is proposed to account for the overall evolution, a present-day analogue for which lies in the overriding of the East Pacific Rise by North America and the rifting of Baja California.

  12. Characteristics of the Lithology, Fault-related Rocks and Fault Zone Structures in the TCDP Hole-A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, S.; Kou, L.; Yeh, E.

    2005-12-01

    Probing a fault zone of recently major activity at depth to study the physical, mechanical and chemical properties is the one of main purposes of the Taiwan Chelungpu-fault Drilling Project (TCDP). We have finished drilling the hole-A which it has the cuttings from 0 to 430 m and cores from 430 to 2003.67 m deep in the end of 2004. Stratigraphically, from surface to 1029 m deep is the Pliocene to Pleistocene Cholan Formation which is dominantly composed of sandstone and sandstone-siltstone alternation with weak to heavy bioturbations. The Pliocene Chinshui Shale occurs from 1029 to 1303 m deep and predominantly consists of siltstone with weak bioturbation. From 1303 to 1712 m deep is the late Miocene to early Pliocene Kueichulin Formation and is dominantly composed of massive sandstone with minor siltstone. Below the 1712 m deep, the Formation is back to the younger Cholan Formation with mollusca-rich thick layered shale and heavy bioturbated sandstone. Four kinds of fault rocks can be identified in the cores. They are the fault breccia, gouge, foliated and non-foliated cataclasites and pseudotachylyte. At least six major fault zones can be found in the cores: FZ1111, FZ1153, FZ1222, FZ1580, FZ1712 and FZ1818. In those fault zones, the FZ1111 may be correlative to the surface rupture of Chi-Chi earthquake,1999, while the FZ1712 may be the Sanyi fault.

  13. 77 FR 50916 - Safety Zone; Boston Harbor's Rock Removal Project, Boston Inner Harbor, Boston, MA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-23

    ... INFORMATION: Table of Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed...) Zone for the drilling, blasting, and dredging operation on the navigable waters of Boston Inner Harbor... navigable waters during the drilling, blasting and dredging operations in support of the U.S. Army Corps...

  14. Stability of sharp reaction fronts in porous rocks and implications for non-sharp reaction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wangen, Magnus

    2014-05-01

    The flow of reactive fluids in the subsurface, like for instance acids, may create reaction fronts. A sharp reaction front is an idealization of the narrow zone where the reaction takes place. Narrow reaction zones are studied with a one-component reaction transport model, where a first order reaction changes the porosity. The porosity field is coupled to the permeability field, where an increasing porosity leads to an increasing permeability. Therefore, the reaction has a feed-back on the flow field. We have derived 1D approximate solutions for the change in concentration and porosity across the reaction zone. These solutions are used to derive a condition for reaction fronts to be narrow. The condition gives a minimum reaction rate necessary for 90% of the reaction to be restricted to the given area. Sharp fronts are idealizations of narrow fronts that are more amendable for analytical treatment. A condition has recently been derived for the stability of sharp reaction fronts in homogeneous porous medium using linear stability analysis. The condition gives that a perturbation of a flat reaction front of any wave-length becomes unstable if the permeability behind the front increases. The front instability grows faster for short wave lengths than for long wave lengths. Similarly, the perturbations of the front will die out if the permeability behind the front decreases, and short wave length perturbations will die out faster than long wave length perturbations. It is a condition that applies for both 2D and 3D porous media. Numerical experiments are shown that demonstrate the front stability criterion, when the fronts are narrow, but not sharp. The sharp front approximation turns out to be useful for the interpretation of reactions that are not sufficiently fast to give narrow reaction zones, when the reaction alters the porosity- and the permeability fields. Dissolution is an important example of reactions that increase the porosity and therefore the permeability

  15. Geochronological and geochemical constraints on the mafic rocks along the Luang Prabang zone: Carboniferous back-arc setting in northwest Laos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Xin; Feng, Qinglai; Wang, Yuejun; Chonglakmani, Chongpan; Monjai, Denchok

    2016-02-01

    The key to gaining a better understanding of Paleotethyan tectonic evolution is to determine the tectonic setting of the main suture/tectonic zones and their relationships in SE Asia. The Luang Prabang tectonic zone in NW Laos lies in the area that aligns with the Jinshajiang-Ailaoshan suture zone to the north and the Nan suture zone to the south. Correlations among them have been debated. Samples from a diabase dyke and coarse-grained basalt in the Luang Prabang tectonic zone yield zircon U-Pb weighted mean ages of 335.5 ± 3.3 Ma and 304.9 ± 3.9 Ma, respectively, suggesting that these mafic rocks formed in the Carboniferous rather than in the Permian, as previously inferred. The zircon in-situ εHf (t) values range from 11.6 to 13.3. Their initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios range from 0.70318 to 0.70522, and εNd (t) ranges from + 5.16 to + 6.93. The diabase samples have E-MORB-like characteristics with an addition of a subduction-related component, and the basalt samples were derived from the same type of source as N-MORB magmas newly modified by a slab-derived component. The ages of the mafic rocks along the Luang Prabang tectonic zone are similar to the mafic rocks from the Jinshajiang-Ailaoshan, Song Ma and Nan suture zones in SE Asia. A synthesis of available data suggests the development of a Carboniferous continental back-arc basin separating the Sukhothai Terrane and the Indochina Block. The Luang Prabang tectonic zone represents a remnant of a series of synchronous back-arc basins to the northeast of the Paleotethyan Main Ocean. It is proposed that the Luang Prabang tectonic zone links with the Nan suture zone to the southwest and with the Jinshajiang-Ailaoshan suture zone to the north.

  16. The effect of stagnant water zones on retarding radionuclide stransport in fractured rocks: An extension to the Channel Network Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahkarami, Pirouz; Liu, Longcheng; Moreno, Luis; Neretnieks, Ivars

    2016-09-01

    An essential task of performance assessment of radioactive waste repositories is to predict radionuclide release into the environment. For such a quantitative assessment, the Channel Network Model and the corresponding computer program, CHAN3D, have been used to simulate radionuclide transport in crystalline bedrocks. Recent studies suggest, however, that the model may tend to underestimate the rock retarding capability, because it ignores the presence of stagnant water zones, STWZs, situated in the fracture plane. Once considered, the STWZ can provide additional surface area over which radionuclides diffuse into the rock matrix and thereby contribute to their retardation. The main objective of this paper is to extend the Channel Network Model and its computer implementation to account for diffusion into STWZs and their adjacent rock matrices. In the first part of the paper, the overall impact of STWZs in retarding radionuclide transport is investigated through a deterministic calculation of far-field releases at Forsmark, Sweden. Over the time-scale of the repository safety assessments, radionuclide breakthrough curves are calculated for increasing STWZ width. It is shown that the presence of STWZs enhances the retardation of most long-lived radionuclides except for 36Cl and 129I. The rest of the paper is devoted to the probabilistic calculation of radionuclide transport in fractured rocks. The model that is developed for transport through a single channel is embedded into the Channel Network Model and new computer codes are provided for the CHAN3D. The program is used to (I) simulate the tracer test experiment performed at Äspö HRL, STT-1 and (II) investigate the short- and long-term effect of diffusion into STWZs. The required data for the model are obtained from detailed hydraulic tests in boreholes intersecting the rock mass where the tracer tests were made. The simulation results fairly well predict the release of the sorbing tracer 137Cs. It is found that

  17. Semi-automatic mapping of fault rocks on a Digital Outcrop Model, Gole Larghe Fault Zone (Southern Alps, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittempergher, Silvia; Vho, Alice; Bistacchi, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    A quantitative analysis of fault-rock distribution in outcrops of exhumed fault zones is of fundamental importance for studies of fault zone architecture, fault and earthquake mechanics, and fluid circulation. We present a semi-automatic workflow for fault-rock mapping on a Digital Outcrop Model (DOM), developed on the Gole Larghe Fault Zone (GLFZ), a well exposed strike-slip fault in the Adamello batholith (Italian Southern Alps). The GLFZ has been exhumed from ca. 8-10 km depth, and consists of hundreds of individual seismogenic slip surfaces lined by green cataclasites (crushed wall rocks cemented by the hydrothermal epidote and K-feldspar) and black pseudotachylytes (solidified frictional melts, considered as a marker for seismic slip). A digital model of selected outcrop exposures was reconstructed with photogrammetric techniques, using a large number of high resolution digital photographs processed with VisualSFM software. The resulting DOM has a resolution up to 0.2 mm/pixel. Most of the outcrop was imaged using images each one covering a 1 x 1 m2 area, while selected structural features, such as sidewall ripouts or stepovers, were covered with higher-resolution images covering 30 x 40 cm2 areas.Image processing algorithms were preliminarily tested using the ImageJ-Fiji package, then a workflow in Matlab was developed to process a large collection of images sequentially. Particularly in detailed 30 x 40 cm images, cataclasites and hydrothermal veins were successfully identified using spectral analysis in RGB and HSV color spaces. This allows mapping the network of cataclasites and veins which provided the pathway for hydrothermal fluid circulation, and also the volume of mineralization, since we are able to measure the thickness of cataclasites and veins on the outcrop surface. The spectral signature of pseudotachylyte veins is indistinguishable from that of biotite grains in the wall rock (tonalite), so we tested morphological analysis tools to discriminate

  18. Measurement of the optical properties of lunar rocks in the transition zone, resulting from observations made by Lunokhod 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lipskiy, Y. N.; Shevchenko, V. V.

    1977-01-01

    Photometric measurements were carried out directly on the lunar surface with the aid of a calibration device, a plate with fields of different brightness, placed in the field of view of the panoramic telephotometers. The brightness of the fields of the calibration plate were measured in preliminary studies, relative to the brightness of a magnesia screen. This permitted determination of the reflectance features of the surficial lunar material relative to the standard most widely used in brightness studies of natural substances. The total brightness of sections a few centimeters across was recorded in direct proximity to the apparatus. The total area investigated in one panorama was about one square meter. Several areas in the mare and highland regions were studied. The albedos of various surface objects were obtained. A comparison of the brightness measurements with data from the RIFMA-M instrument discloses a correlation of the albedo change with change in chemical composition of the surface rock. Direct photometric studies of the lunar surface in the "mare-highland" transition zone assist in tracing the transition from one type of rock to another, and in obtaining information on the processes of material exchange between these two types of lunar landscape.

  19. New Caledonia as a New Site on Ultramafic Rocks for the French Critical Zone Exploration Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juillot, F.; Dublet, G.; Fandeur, D.; Fonteneau, L.; Fritsch, E.; Morin, G.; Ambrosi, J.; Olivi, L.; Cognigni, A.; Hazemann, J.; Proux, O.; Webb, S.; Brown, G. E.

    2011-12-01

    One of the main geological features of New Caledonia is the large occurrence of peridotites (mainly harzburgite) that were obducted during regional tectonic events at the Late Eocene (Cluzel et al., 2001). Tropical weathering of these ultramafic rocks lead to the development of very thick lateritic regoliths (up to 80 m depth) where Ni, Cr and Co concentration can reach several wt%, which render them very interesting for ore mining (New Caledonia is the third Ni producer in the world). However, these high levels of potentially toxic elements also represent an environmental hazard for New Caledonia (classified as a ''biodiversity hotspot'' ; Myers, 2000), which emphasizes the strong need for a better characterization of the natural cycling of Ni, Cr and Co during initial geological events and more recent weathering processes. Results of studies initiated few years ago on that topic suggest that both endogenous (i.e. oceanic serpentinization, low-grade metamorphism and hydrothermalism upon obduction) and supergene (i.e. meteoritic weathering) processes controlled the distribution and crystal-chemistry of Ni, Cr and Co that can now be observed in the freely-drained lateritic regoliths (Fandeur et al., 2009a; 2009b; Fritsch et al., 2011; Dublet et al., 2011). Remaining questions concern the actual quantification of major and trace elements fluxes towards the coastal environment during these events and the estimation of the impact of these migrations on both terrestrial and coastal biodiversity. These issues will be addressed thanks to the installation of a long-term ''catchment-scale'' observatory in New Caledonia that will bring new insights on the biogeochemical behavior of major and trace elements upon weathering of ultramafic rocks under tropical conditions. Due to the specific geology of the chosen site, this observatory will complement the French CZEN that already includes carbonaceous, acidic and mafic geological settings.

  20. Experimental Measurements of Permeability Evolution During Brittle Deformation of Crystalline Rocks and Implications for Fluid Flow in Fault Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, T.; Faulkner, D.

    2004-12-01

    Detailed experimental studies of the development of permeability of crustal rock during deformation are essential in helping to understand fault mechanics and constrain larger scale models that predict bulk fluid flow within the crust. The strength, permeability and pore fluid volume evolution of initially intact crystalline rock (Westerly granite and Cerro Cristales granodiorite) under increasing differential load leading to macroscopic failure has been measured in a triaxial deformation apparatus. Experiments were run under pore water pressures of 50 MPa and varying effective pressures from 10 to 50 MPa. Permeability is seen to increase by up to and over two orders of magnitude prior to macroscopic failure, from 3.5 x 10-21 to 9 x 10-19 m2 with the greatest increase seen at lowest effective pressures. Post-failure permeability is shown to be over 3 orders of magnitude higher than initial intact permeabilities, as high as 4 x 10-18 m2, and approaches lower the limit of measurements of in situ bulk crustal permeabilities. Increasing amplitude cyclic loading tests show permeability-stress hysteresis, with high permeabilities maintained as differential stress is reduced. The largest permeability increases are seen between 90-99% of the failure stress. Under hydrothermal conditions without further loading, it is suggested that much of this permeability can be recovered, and pre-macroscopic failure fracture damage may heal relatively faster than post-failure macroscopic fractures. Pre-failure permeabilities are nearly seven to nine orders of magnitude lower than that predicted by some high pressure diffusive models suggesting that microfracture matrix flow cannot dominate, and agrees with inferences that bulk fluid flow and dilatancy must be dominated by larger scale structures, such as macrofractures. It is suggested that the permeability of a highly stressed fault tip process zone in low-permeability crystalline rocks could increase by more than 2 orders of magnitude

  1. Experimental Measurements of Permeability Evolution During Brittle Deformation of Crystalline Rocks and Implications for Fluid Flow in Fault Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, T.; Faulkner, D.

    2007-12-01

    Detailed experimental studies of the development of permeability of crustal rock during deformation are essential in helping to understand fault mechanics and constrain larger scale models that predict bulk fluid flow within the crust. The strength, permeability and pore fluid volume evolution of initially intact crystalline rock (Westerly granite and Cerro Cristales granodiorite) under increasing differential load leading to macroscopic failure has been measured in a triaxial deformation apparatus. Experiments were run under pore water pressures of 50 MPa and varying effective pressures from 10 to 50 MPa. Permeability is seen to increase by up to and over two orders of magnitude prior to macroscopic failure, from 3.5 x 10-21 to 9 x 10-19 m2 with the greatest increase seen at lowest effective pressures. Post-failure permeability is shown to be over 3 orders of magnitude higher than initial intact permeabilities, as high as 4 x 10-18 m2, and approaches lower the limit of measurements of in situ bulk crustal permeabilities. Increasing amplitude cyclic loading tests show permeability-stress hysteresis, with high permeabilities maintained as differential stress is reduced. The largest permeability increases are seen between 90-99% of the failure stress. Under hydrothermal conditions without further loading, it is suggested that much of this permeability can be recovered, and pre-macroscopic failure fracture damage may heal relatively faster than post-failure macroscopic fractures. Pre-failure permeabilities are nearly seven to nine orders of magnitude lower than that predicted by some high pressure diffusive models suggesting that microfracture matrix flow cannot dominate, and agrees with inferences that bulk fluid flow and dilatancy must be dominated by larger scale structures, such as macrofractures. It is suggested that the permeability of a highly stressed fault tip process zone in low-permeability crystalline rocks could increase by more than 2 orders of magnitude

  2. Seismic heating signatures in the Japan Trench subduction plate-boundary fault zone: evidence from a preliminary rock magnetic `geothermometer'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tao; Dekkers, Mark J.; Zhang, Bo

    2016-04-01

    Frictional heating during earthquake rupture reveals important information on earthquake mechanisms and energy dissipation. The amount of annealing varies widely and is, as yet, poorly constrained. Here we use magnetic susceptibility versus temperature measurements during cycling to increasingly elevated temperatures to constrain the maximum temperature a slip zone has experienced. The case study comprises sheared clay cored from the Japan Trench subduction plate-boundary fault zone (décollement), which accommodated the large slip of the 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku-oki earthquake. The décollement was cored during the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 343, the Japan Trench Fast Drilling Project (JFAST). Heating signatures with estimated maximum temperatures ranging from ˜300 to over 500 °C are determined close to the multiple slip surfaces within the décollement. Since it is impossible to tie a specific slip surface to a certain earthquake, thermal evidence for the cumulative effect of several earthquakes is unveiled. This as yet preliminary rock magnetic `geothermometer' would be a useful tool to detect seismic heating along faults that experienced medium temperature rise, a range which is difficult to assess with other approaches.

  3. Determination of geochemical affinities of granitic rocks from the Aue-Schwarzenberg zone (Erzgebirge, Germany) by multivariate statistics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Forster, H.-J.; Davis, J.C.

    2000-01-01

    Variscan granites of the Erzgebirge region can be effectively classified into five genetically distinct major groups by canonical analysis of geochemical variables. The same classification procedure, when applied to small plutons in the Aue-Schwarzenberg granite zone (ASGZ), shows that all ASGZ granites have compositional affinities to low-F biotite or low-F two-mica granite groups. This suggests that the ASGZ granites were emplaced during the first, late-collisional stage of silicic magmatism in the region, which occurred between about 325 and 318 Ma. The numerous biotite granite bodies in the zone are geochemically distinct from both the neighboring Kirchberg granite pluton and the spatially displaced Niederbobritzsch biotite granite massif. Instead, these bodies seem to constitute a third sub-group within the low-F biotite granite class. The ASGZ biotite granites represent three or more genetically distinct bodies, thus highlighting the enormous compositional variability within this group of granites. Least evolved samples of two-mica granites from the ASGZ apparently reflect the assimilation of low-grade metamorphic country rocks during emplacement, altering the original composition of the melts by enhancing primary Al content. The same genesis is implied for the rare "cordierite granite" facies of the Bergen massif, the type pluton for the low-F two-mica granite group in the Erzgebirge.

  4. Preferential and diffuse high-volume flow through an interbedded fractured-rock unsaturated zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, K. S.; Nimmo, J. R.; Creasey, K. M.; Mirus, B. B.

    2015-12-01

    Layers of strong geologic contrast within the unsaturated zone can control recharge and contaminant transport to underlying aquifers. The importance of slow diffuse flow in certain geologic layers and rapid preferential flow in others complicates the prediction of vertical and lateral fluxes. Here we present a simple model designed to use limited geological site information to predict these critical subsurface flow processes in response to a sustained recharge source. The model is developed and tested using site-specific information from the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP), where confined anthropogenic sources of infiltration from spills, leaks, waste-water disposal, or retention ponds are often associated with facilities where contamination is present. In the thick unsaturated zone overlying the ESRP Aquifer, multiple sedimentary interbeds, which vary in thickness and hydraulic properties, are interspersed between massive fractured basalt units. The combination of surficial sediments, basalts, and interbeds determines the water fluxes through the variably saturated subsurface. Interbeds are often less conductive, causing perched water to collect above them, which is consistent with a hypothesis of rapid flow through the basalt being impeded from vertical percolation by the interbeds. The model successfully predicts volume and extent of perching, and approximates vertical travel times, during events that generate high fluxes from the land surface. The model is useful at sites like the INL where little hydrologic information is available about the combination of preferential and diffuse fluxes, but simple approximations of these combined flow processes can help inform operational decisions.

  5. Crystallographic preferred orientation and elastic anisotropy of high-pressure rocks from the Eclogite Zone of the Tauern Window, Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keppler, R.; Ullemeyer, K.; Behrmann, J. H.; Stipp, M.

    2013-12-01

    So far, it has not been possible to image the fine scale internal structure of subduction channels with geophysical methods. In part, this is due to a lack of knowledge regarding elastic wave velocities, anisotropy, and textures (crystallographic preferred orientation, or CPO) of the rocks. Subduction channel fills are likely metabasalts of oceanic origin, and metamorphosed deep-sea sediments. These rock types contain polyphase mineral assemblages, for which CPO is difficult to obtain. In this study, the mineral assemblage of high pressure rocks was assessed by microprobe analysis and subsequently, the CPO was determined from time-of-flight neutron spectra applying full pattern fit method ('Rietveld texture analysis'). With this method, it is possible to investigate polyphase samples, since the CPOs of all mineral phases can be determined simultaneously despite overlapping Bragg reflections in the spectra. From the CPO, 3D models for P-wave velocity anisotropies were calculated. Since subduction channels are not directly accessible, samples were collected in the Eclogite Zone of the Tauern Window, Austria. This is a paleo-subduction channel of the Alpine orogen, which originally formed in the Tertiary during subduction of the Penninic ocean beneath the Adriatic continent. It comprises eclogites, blueschists and greenschists, as well as gneisses, micaschists, marbles and quartzites. The rocks have been exposed to P-T-conditions of 20-25 kbar and 600 +/- 30°C, and were exhumed in a very short time span of 1-2 Ma. Microprobe analysis reveals a complex metamorphic and tectonic history. Some of the eclogites still exhibit their high pressure mineral assemblage, while others were strongly overprinted during exhumation. CPO analysis shows that in some of the eclogites, omphacite, the main constituent (37-49%), exhibits a well pronounced CPO, while in others it is relatively weak. The same applies for retrograde hornblende, if present. In the eclogites, with original high

  6. A long-term rock uplift rate for eastern Crete and geodynamic implications for the Hellenic subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strobl, M.; Hetzel, R.; Fassoulas, C.; Kubik, P.

    2014-12-01

    The island of Crete in the forearc of the Hellenic subduction zone has a rugged topography with a local relief exceeding 2 km. Based on the elevation of marine shorelines, rates of rock uplift during the Late Holocene were previously estimated to range between 1 and 4 mm/a in different parts of the island (e.g. Lambeck, 1995). These rates may, however, not be representative for longer timescales, because subduction earthquakes with up to 9 m of vertical coseismic displacement have recently affected Crete (Stiros, 2001). Here we use a well preserved sequence of marine terraces near Kato Zakros in eastern Crete to determine the rate of rock uplift over the last ˜600 ka. Field investigations and topographic profiles document a flight of more than 13 marine bedrock terraces that were carved into limestones of the Tripolitza unit. Preliminary age constraints for the terraces were obtained by 10Be exposure dating of rare quartz-bearing sandstone clasts, which are present on some terraces. The 10Be ages of these samples, which have been corrected for an inherited nuclide component, yielded exposure ages between ˜100 ka and zero. Combined with geomorphologic evidence the two oldest 10Be ages suggest that the terraces T4 and T5, with shoreline angles at an elevation of ca. 68 and ca. 76 m above sea level, respectively, formed during the marine isotope stage 5e about 120 ka ago. The correlation of the higher terraces (T6 to T13) with regional sea-level high-stands (Siddall et al., 2003) indicates sustained rock uplift at a rate of ˜0.5 m/ka since at least ˜600 ka. As normal faulting has dominated the tectonics of Crete during the last several million years, upper crustal shortening can be ruled out as a cause for rock uplift. We argue that the sustained uplift of the island results from the continuous underplating of sediments, which are transferred from the subducting African plate to the base of the crust beneath Crete. Lambeck, 1995, Geophys. J. Int. 122, 1022

  7. Deformation mechanisms of antigorite serpentinite at subduction zone conditions determined from experimentally and naturally deformed rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auzende, Anne-Line; Escartin, Javier; Walte, Nicolas P.; Guillot, Stéphane; Hirth, Greg; Frost, Daniel J.

    2015-02-01

    We performed deformation-DIA experiments on antigorite serpentinite at pressures of 1-3.5 GPa and temperatures of between 400 and 650 °C, bracketing the stability of antigorite under subduction zone conditions. For each set of pressure-temperature (P-T) conditions, we conducted two runs at strain rates of 5 ×10-5 and 1 ×10-4 s-1. We complemented our study with a sample deformed in a Griggs-type apparatus at 1 GPa and 400 °C (Chernak and Hirth, 2010), and with natural samples from Cuba and the Alps deformed under blueschist/eclogitic conditions. Optical and transmission electron microscopies were used for microstructural characterization and determination of deformation mechanisms. Our observations on experimentally deformed antigorite prior to breakdown show that deformation is dominated by cataclastic flow with observable but minor contribution of plastic deformation (microkinking and (001) gliding mainly expressed by stacking disorder mainly). In contrast, in naturally deformed samples, plastic deformation structures are dominant (stacking disorder, kinking, pressure solution), with minor but also perceptible contribution of brittle deformation. When dehydration occurs in experiments, plasticity increases and is coupled to local embrittlement that we attribute to antigorite dehydration. In dehydrating samples collected in the Alps, embrittlement is also observed suggesting that dehydration may contribute to intermediate-depth seismicity. Our results thus show that semibrittle deformation operates within and above the stability field of antigorite. However, the plastic deformation recorded by naturally deformed samples was likely acquired at low strain rates. We also document that the corrugated structure of antigorite controls the strain accommodation mechanisms under subduction conditions, with preferred inter- and intra-grain cracking along (001) and gliding along both a and b. We also show that antigorite rheology in subduction zones is partly controlled

  8. High-pressure mafic oceanic rocks from the Makbal Complex, Tianshan Mountains (Kazakhstan & Kyrgyzstan): Implications for the metamorphic evolution of a fossil subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Melanie; Klemd, Reiner; Konopelko, Dmitry

    2013-09-01

    The Makbal Complex in the western Tianshan Mountains of Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan consists of HP/UHP metasedimentary host rocks which enclose various HP mafic blocks or boudins. These mafic rocks comprise rare eclogites (sensu stricto and sensu lato), garnet amphibolites (retrograded eclogites) and a newly discovered glaucophanite (glaucophane-garnet-omphacite bearing rock). So far the Makbal Complex has been interpreted to predominantly consist of continental lithologies and the mafic rocks were considered as dismembered dikes intruding continental metasediments. This interpretation is mainly based on the geological relationship and bulk rock chemistry of the different rock types. It was further suggested that the continental lithologies of the Makbal Complex underwent eclogite-facies metamorphism in a former subduction zone. In the present study we combined conventional geothermometry, P-T pseudosection modeling and major and trace element whole rock geochemistry for different mafic samples (glaucophanite and eclogites (sensu lato)) in order to shed light on both the metamorphic evolution and the protoliths of the mafic HP rocks in the Makbal Complex. Prograde to peak-pressure clockwise P-T paths of glaucophanite and eclogites (sensu lato) were modeled using garnet isopleth thermobarometry. The results show that the glaucophanite and eclogite (sensu lato) samples experienced similar prograde P-T paths and slightly different peak metamorphic conditions at ~ 560 °C at 2.4 GPa for the former and between ~ 520 °C at 2.2 GPa and ~ 555 °C at ~ 2.5 GPa for the latter, corresponding to burial depths between 70 and 85 km. Whole rock major and trace element analyses and petrological evidence imply that the various rock types at the Makbal Complex most likely originated from different precursor rocks. Eclogites (sensu lato) are believed to represent strongly retrogressed former eclogite-facies rocks that had never been eclogites (sensu stricto, i.e. > 70 vol.% garnet and

  9. Characterization of fractures and flow zones in a contaminated crystalline-rock aquifer in the Tylerville section of Haddam, Connecticut

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Carole D.; Kiel, Kristal F.; Joesten, Peter K.; Pappas, Katherine L.

    2016-10-04

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection, investigated the characteristics of the bedrock aquifer in the Tylerville section of Haddam, Connecticut, from June to August 2014. As part of this investigation, geophysical logs were collected from six water-supply wells and were analyzed to (1) identify well construction, (2) determine the rock type and orientation of the foliation and layering of the rock, (3) characterize the depth and orientation of fractures, (4) evaluate fluid properties of the water in the well, and (5) determine the relative transmissivity and head of discrete fractures or fracture zones. The logs included the following: caliper, electromagnetic induction, gamma, acoustic and (or) optical televiewer, heat-pulse flowmeter under ambient and pumped conditions, hydraulic head data, fluid electrical conductivity and temperature under postpumping conditions, and borehole-radar reflection collected in single-hole mode. In a seventh borehole, a former water-supply well, only caliper, fluid electrical conductivty, and temperature logs were collected, because of a constriction in the borehole.This report includes a description of the methods used to collect and process the borehole geophysical data, the description of the data collected in each of the wells, and a comparison of the results collected in all of the wells. The data are presented in plots of the borehole geophysical logs, tables, and figures. Collectively these data provide valuable characterizations that can be used to improve or inform site conceptual models of groundwater flow in the study area.

  10. Characterization of Fractures and Flow Zones in a Contaminated Crystalline-Rock Aquifer in the Tylerville Section of Haddam, Connecticut

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Carole D.; Kiel, Kristal F.; Joesten, Peter K.; Pappas, Katherine L.

    2016-10-04

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection, investigated the characteristics of the bedrock aquifer in the Tylerville section of Haddam, Connecticut, from June to August 2014. As part of this investigation, geophysical logs were collected from six water-supply wells and were analyzed to (1) identify well construction, (2) determine the rock type and orientation of the foliation and layering of the rock, (3) characterize the depth and orientation of fractures, (4) evaluate fluid properties of the water in the well, and (5) determine the relative transmissivity and head of discrete fractures or fracture zones. The logs included the following: caliper, electromagnetic induction, gamma, acoustic and (or) optical televiewer, heat-pulse flowmeter under ambient and pumped conditions, hydraulic head data, fluid electrical conductivity and temperature under postpumping conditions, and borehole-radar reflection collected in single-hole mode. In a seventh borehole, a former water-supply well, only caliper, fluid electrical conductivty, and temperature logs were collected, because of a constriction in the borehole.This report includes a description of the methods used to collect and process the borehole geophysical data, the description of the data collected in each of the wells, and a comparison of the results collected in all of the wells. The data are presented in plots of the borehole geophysical logs, tables, and figures. Collectively these data provide valuable characterizations that can be used to improve or inform site conceptual models of groundwater flow in the study area.

  11. Compositional variations in spinel-hosted pargasite inclusions in the olivine-rich rock from the oceanic crust-mantle boundary zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamura, Akihiro; Morishita, Tomoaki; Ishimaru, Satoko; Hara, Kaori; Sanfilippo, Alessio; Arai, Shoji

    2016-05-01

    The crust-mantle boundary zone of the oceanic lithosphere is composed mainly of olivine-rich rocks represented by dunite and troctolite. However, we still do not fully understand the global variations in the boundary zone, and an effective classification of the boundary rocks, in terms of their petrographical features and origin, is an essential step in achieving such an understanding. In this paper, to highlight variations in olivine-rich rocks from the crust-mantle boundary, we describe the compositional variations in spinel-hosted hydrous silicate mineral inclusions in rock samples from the ocean floor near a mid-ocean ridge and trench. Pargasite is the dominant mineral among the inclusions, and all of them are exceptionally rich in incompatible elements. The host spinel grains are considered to be products of melt-peridotite reactions, because their origin cannot be ascribed to simple fractional crystallization of a melt. Trace-element compositions of pargasite inclusions are characteristically different between olivine-rich rock samples, in terms of the degree of Eu and Zr anomalies in the trace-element pattern. When considering the nature of the reaction that produced the inclusion-hosting spinel, the compositional differences between samples were found to reflect a diversity in the origin of the olivine-rich rocks, as for example in whether or not a reaction was accompanied by the fractional crystallization of plagioclase. The differences also reflect the fact that the melt flow system (porous or focused flow) controlled the melt/rock ratios during reaction. The pargasite inclusions provide useful data for constraining the history and origin of the olivine-rich rocks and therefore assist in our understanding of the crust-mantle boundary of the oceanic lithosphere.

  12. Geology of Precambrian rocks and isotope geochemistry of shear zones in the Big Narrows area, northern Front Range, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abbott, Jeffrey T.

    1970-01-01

    Rocks within the Big Narrows and Poudre Park quadrangles located in the northern Front Range of Colorado are Precambrian metasedimentary and metaigneous schists and gneisses and plutonic igneous rocks. These are locally mantled by extensive late Tertiary and Quaternary fluvial gravels. The southern boundary of the Log Cabin batholith lies within the area studied. A detailed chronology of polyphase deformation, metamorphism and plutonism has been established. Early isoclinal folding (F1) was followed by a major period of plastic deformation (F2), sillimanite-microcline grade regional metamorphism, migmatization and synkinematic Boulder Creek granodiorite plutonism (1.7 b.y.). Macroscopic doubly plunging antiformal and synformal structures were developed. P-T conditions at the peak of metamorphism were probably about 670?C and 4.5 Kb. Water pressures may locally have differed from load pressures. The 1.4 b.y. Silver Plume granite plutonism was post kinematic and on the basis of petrographic and field criteria can be divided into three facies. Emplacement was by forcible injection and assimilation. Microscopic and mesoscopic folds which postdate the formation of the characteristic mineral phases during the 1.7 b.y. metamorphism are correlated with the emplacement of the Silver Plume Log Cabin batholith. Extensive retrograde metamorphism was associated with this event. A major period of mylonitization postdates Silver Plume plutonism and produced large E-W and NE trending shear zones. A detailed study of the Rb/Sr isotope geochemistry of the layered mylonites demonstrated that the mylonitization and associated re- crystallization homogenized the Rb87/Sr 86 ratios. Whole-rock dating techniques applied to the layered mylonites indicate a probable age of 1.2 b.y. Petrographic studies suggest that the mylonitization-recrystallization process produced hornfels facies assemblages in the adjacent metasediments. Minor Laramide faulting, mineralization and igneous activity

  13. Quantifying elemental compositions of primary minerals from granitic rocks and saprolite within the Santa Catalina Mountain Critical Zone Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lybrand, R. A.; Rasmussen, C.

    2011-12-01

    Granitic terrain comprises a significant area of the earth's land surface (>15%). Quantifying weathering processes involved in the transformation of granitic rock to saprolite and soil is central to understanding landscape evolution in these systems. The quantification of primary mineral composition is important for assessing subsequent mineral transformations and soil production. This study focuses on coupling detailed analysis of primary mineral composition to soil development across an array of field sites sampled from the Santa Catalina Mountain Critical Zone observatory (SCM-CZO) environmental gradient. The gradient spans substantial climate-driven shifts in vegetation, ranging from desert scrub to mixed conifer forests. The parent material is a combination of Precambrian and Tertiary aged granites and quartz diorite. Primary mineral type and composition are known to vary among the various aged granitic materials and this variability is hypothesized to manifest as significant variation in regolith forming processes across the SCM-CZO. To address this variability, the mineral composition and mineral formulae of rock and saprolite samples were determined by electron microprobe chemical analyses. The rocks were pre-dominantly quartz, biotite, muscovite, orthoclase and calcium/sodium-rich plagioclase feldspars. Trace minerals observed in the samples included sphene, rutile, zircon, garnet, ilmenite, and apatite. Mineral formulae from electron microprobe analyses were combined with quantitative x-ray diffraction (QXRD) and x-ray fluorescence (XRF) data to quantify both primary and secondary mineralogical components in soil profiles from each of the field sites. Further, electron microprobe analyses of <2mm mixed conifer saprolite revealed weathered plagioclase grains coated with clay-sized particles enriched in silica and aluminum (~25% and 15%, respectively), suggesting kaolin as the secondary phase. The coatings were interspersed within each plagioclase grain, a

  14. Migmatites in the Ivrea Zone (NW Italy): Constraints on partial melting and melt loss in metasedimentary rocks from Val Strona di Omegna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redler, Charlotte; White, Richard W.; Johnson, Tim E.

    2013-08-01

    The mid to lower crustal metamorphic field gradient through amphibolite and granulite facies rocks in the Ivrea Zone offers the potential to study partial melting and melt loss in the crust. Metapelitic rocks in Val Strona di Omegna show a progressive evolution in migmatite structures from metatexites with rare isolated leucosome veins in the amphibolite facies rocks to stromatic migmatites and diatexites in granulite facies rocks. Little field or petrographic evidence for melting can be seen on crossing the position of the modelled wet solidus, consistent with the small amounts of melt predicted to occur by H2O-saturated melting. The first field evidence for partial melting, in the form of narrow discontinuous leucosomes, coincides with the fluid-absent breakdown of muscovite and the prograde appearance of K-feldspar. The consumption of biotite, which is modelled to occur over a 50-100 °C wide field of coexisting garnet-sillimanite-biotite, led to more pronounced melting and the formation of abundant garnet-bearing leucosomes. At the highest grades, metagreywacke compositions contain leucosomes that are spatially focussed on orthopyroxene porphyroblasts. Calculated P-T pseudosections show that the metapelitic rocks could have produced up to 40 mol% melt and the metagreywackes up to 25% melt at peak metamorphic conditions of around 11 kbar, 900 °C. Modelling of granulite facies samples shows elevated solidi suggesting significant melt loss prior to cooling, consistent with depletion in SiO2, Na2O and K2O and enrichment in FeO, MgO and TiO2 relative to amphibolite facies samples. Zones of diatexite in the highest grade rocks indicate that, at least locally, melt loss was inefficient and/or accumulation of melt occurred. Zones of apparent accumulation of melt are common at the boundaries between metatexitic metagreywacke and diatexitic metapelite, and may indicate that the metagreywacke formed a low-permeability barrier that restricted melt flow.

  15. The Age and Geodynamic Evolution of the Metamorphic sole rocks from Izmir-Ankara-Erzıncan suture zone (Northern-Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melih Çörtük, Rahmi; Faruk Çelik, Ömer; Özkan, Mutlu; Sherlock, Sarah C.; Marzoli, Andrea; Altıntaş, İsmail Emir; Topuz, Gültekin

    2016-04-01

    The İzmir-Ankara-Erzincan suture zone in northern Turkey is one of the major tectonic zones separating the Pontides to the North from the Anatolide-Tauride block and Kı rşehir Massif to the South. The accretionary complex of the İzmir-Ankara-Erzincan suture zone, near Artova, is composed mainly of peridotites with varying degree serpentinization, metamorphic rocks, basalt, sandstones, pelagic and neritic limestones. The metamorphic rocks are represented by amphibolite, garnet micaschit, calc-schist and marble. The metamorphic rocks were interpreted as the metamorphic sole rocks. Because; (i) They are tectonically located beneath the serpentinized peridotites. (ii) Foliation planes of both the amphibolites and mantle tectonites are parallel to each other. (iii) The metamorphic rocks are crosscut by non-metamorphic dolerite dikes which exhibite Nb and Ta depletion relative to Th enrichment on the N-MORB normalized multi-element spider diagram. The dolerite dikes display flat REE patterns (LaN/YbN=0.85-1.24). These geochemical signatures of the dolerite dikes are indicative of subduction component during their occurrences. Geochemical observations of the amphibolites suggest E-MORB- and OIB-like signatures (LaN/SmN= 1.39-3.14) and their protoliths are represented by basalt and alkali basaltic rocks. Amphiboles from the amphibolites are represented by calcic amphiboles (magnesio-hornblende, tchermakite and tremolite) and they yielded 40Ar-39Ar ages between 157.8 ± 3.6 Ma and 139 ± 11 Ma. These cooling ages were interpreted to be the intra-oceanic subduction/thrusting time of the İzmir-Ankara-Erzincan oceanic domain. This study was funded by TÜBİTAK (Project no: 112Y123).

  16. Integrating gamma log and conventional electrical logs to improve identification of fracture zones in hard rocks for hydrofracturing: a case study from Ghana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amartey, E. O.; Akiti, T. T.; Armah, T.; Osae, S.; Agyekum, W. A.

    2016-07-01

    Hydrofracturing of low-yielding boreholes in hard rocks is a widely used technique in Africa for improvement of yield, thus making them qualified for installation of a hand-pump for domestic water supply. However, the success rate of the hydrofracturing campaigns seems not to be that high as generally claimed by contractors. One reason amongst others might be that the selection of zones for hydrofracturing in the individual borehole is based on pre-hydrofracturing investigation using conventional electrical logs only. Thereby, the zones selected are the occurring resistivity minima interpreted as weak zones with some fracturing. However, resistivity minima can also be caused solely by lithological reasons, which then in most cases could have been seen on a gamma log as corresponding increased gamma radiation. The advantages of using gamma logging in combination with conventional electrical logging technique for prediction of fractured zones in basement rocks is illustrated by investigations of three low-yielding boreholes located in different geological environments in crystalline basement rocks in Ghana.

  17. Climate change induced effects on the predisposition of forests of the water protection zone Wildalpen to disturbances by bark beetles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baier, P.; Pennerstorfer, J.; Schopf, A.

    2012-04-01

    The provision of drinking water of high quality is a precious service of forests. Large-scale disturbances like forest fires, wind throws, pest outbreaks and subsequent clear cutting may lead to changes in hydrology (runoff as well as percolation). Furthermore, water quality can be negatively influenced by increased erosion, increased decomposition of litter and humus and leaching of nitrate. Large-scale epidemics of forest pests may induce forest decline at landscape scale with subsequent long-lasting negative effects on water quality. The European spruce bark beetle, Ips typographus (L.), is one of the most significant sources of mortality in mature spruce forest ecosystems in Eurasia. The objective of this study was to apply a complex predisposition assessment system for hazard rating and for the evaluation of climate change impacts for the water protection forests of the City of Vienna in Wildalpen. The following steps have been done to adapt/apply the bark beetle phenology model and the hazard rating system: -application, adaptation and validation of the bark beetle phenology model PHENIPS concerning start of dispersion, brood initiation, duration of development, beginning of sister broods, voltinism and hibernation - spatial/temporal modelling of the phenology and voltinism of I. typographus using past, present as well as projected climate data - application and validation of the stand- and site related long-term predisposition assessment system using forest stand/site data, annual damage reports and outputs of phenology modelling as data input - mapping of endangered areas and assessment of future susceptibility to infestations by I. typographus and other disturbing agents based on climate scenarios using GIS. The assessment of site- and stand-related predisposition revealed that the forest stands in Wildalpen are highly susceptible to bark beetle infestation. More than 65% of the stands were assigned to the predisposition classes high/very high. Only 10% of

  18. Plume-proximal mid-ocean ridge origin of Zhongba mafic rocks in the western Yarlung Zangbo Suture Zone, Southern Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Juan; Li, Yalin; Wang, Chengshan; Dilek, Yildirim; Wei, Yushuai; Chen, Xi; Hou, Yunling; Zhou, Aorigele

    2016-05-01

    The >2000 km-long Yarlung Zangbo Suture Zone (YZSZ) in southern Tibet includes the remnants of the Mesozoic Neotethyan oceanic lithosphere, and is divided by the Zhada-Zhongba microcontinent into northern and southern branches in its western segment. Zircon U-Pb dating of a doleritic rock from the northern branch has revealed a concordant age of 160.5 ± 1.3 Ma. All of the doleritic samples from the northern branch and the pillow basalt and gabbro samples from the southern branch display consistent REE and trace element patterns similar to those of modern OIB-type rocks. The geochemical and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic signatures of these OIB-type rocks from the western segment are identical with those of OIB-type and alkaline rocks from other ophiolite massifs along the central and eastern segments of the YZSZ, suggesting a common mantle plume source for their melt evolution. The enriched Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic character of the gabbroic dike rocks from the southern branch points to a mantle plume source, contaminated by subducted oceanic crust or pelagic sediments. We infer that the mafic rock associations exposed along the YZSZ represent the remnants of a Neotethyan oceanic lithosphere, which was developed as part of a plume-proximal seafloor-spreading system, reminiscent of the seamount chains along-across the modern mid-ocean ridges in the Pacific Ocean.

  19. Rock pulverization and localization of a strike-slip fault zone in dolomite rocks (Salzach-Ennstal-Mariazell-Puchberg fault, Austria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröckenfuchs, Theresa; Bauer, Helene; Grasemann, Bernhard; Decker, Kurt

    2015-09-01

    Detailed investigations of dolomite fault rocks, formed at shallow crustal depths along the Salzach-Ennstal-Mariazell-Puchberg (SEMP) fault system in the Northern Calcareous Alps, revealed new insights into cataclasite formation. The examined Miocene, sinistral strike-slip faults reveal grain size reduction of dolomite host rocks by tensile microfracturing at a large range of scales, producing rock fragments of centimetre to micrometre sizes. In situ fracturing leads to grain size reduction down to grain sizes <25 μm, producing mosaic breccias and fault rocks which have previously been described as "initial/embryonic" and "intermediate" cataclasites. At all scales, grain fragments display little to no rotation and no or minor evidence of shear deformation. The observed microstructures are similar to those previously described in studies on pulverized rocks. Microstructural investigations of cataclasites and mosaic breccias revealed aggregations of small dolomite grains (<50 μm) that accumulated on top of large fragments or as infillings of V-shaped voids between larger grains and show constant polarity throughout the investigated samples. Fabrics indicate deposition in formerly open pore space and subsequent polyphase cementation. The newly described tectonic geopetal fabrics (geopetal-particle-aggregates, GPA) prove that these faults temporarily passed through a stage of extremely high porosity/permeability prior to partial cementation.

  20. Spatial and temporal variability of rock fall in a (peri)glacial environment: a LiDAR-based, multi-year investigation of rock fall release zones and volumes, Kitzsteinhorn, Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delleske, Robert; Hartmeyer, Ingo; Keuschnig, Markus; Götz, Joachim

    2014-05-01

    October). All scans (n = 41) were conducted using a RIEGL LMS-Z620. The resulting spatial resolution varies between 0.1 and 0.5 m and object distance (i.e. distance between scanner and rock face) ranges from 250 to 500 m. Post-processing of TLS data enabled to precisely identify rock fall release zones, rock fall volumes and surface changes of the Schmiedingerkees glacier (lowering rate of approximately 1.5 m per year). Since 2011 a total number of nine rock fall events with a volume exceeding 100 m³ have been recorded - with the largest reaching a volume of approx. 500 m³. All were triggered from areas that have been exposed by the retreating Schmiedingerkees glacier over the last 1-2 decades. Thus, glacial debuttressing and subsequent exposure to atmospheric influences might be considered as the dominant destabilizing factors. Temporal clustering of rock fall events over the first three seasons (2011 to 2013) tentatively indicates a bimodal occurrence pattern with a first maximum during snowmelt (May/June) and a second distinct peak during the warmest period of the year (August).

  1. Effect of petrophysical properties and deformation on vertical zoning of metasomatic rocks in U-bearing volcanic structures: A case of the Strel'tsovka caldera, Transbaikal region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, V. A.; Andreeva, O. V.; Poluektov, V. V.

    2014-03-01

    The development of vertical zoning of wall-rock metasomatic alteration is considered with the Mesozoic Strel'tsovka caldera as an example. This caldera hosts Russia's largest uranium ore field. Metasomatic rocks with the participation of various phyllosilicates, carbonates, albite, and zeolites are widespread in the ore field. In the eastern block of the caldera, where the main uranium reserves are accommodated, hydromica metasomatic alteration gives way to beresitization with depth. Argillic alteration, which is typical of the western block, is replaced with hydromica and beresite alteration only at a significant depth. Postore argillic alteration is superposed on beresitized rocks in the lower part of the section. Two styles of vertical metasomatic zoning are caused by different modes of deformation in the western and eastern parts of the caldera. Variations of the most important petrophysical properties of host rocks—density, apparent porosity, velocities of P- and S-waves, dynamic Young's modulus, and Poisson coefficient—have been determined by sonic testing of samples taken from different depths. It is suggested that downward migration of the brittle-ductile transition zone could have been a factor controlling facies diversity of metasomatic rocks. Such a migration was caused by a new phase of tectonothermal impact accompanied by an increase in the strain rate or by emplacement of a new portion of heated fluid. Transient subsidence of the brittle-ductile boundary increases the depth of the hydrodynamically open zone related to the Earth's surface and accelerates percolation of cold meteoric water to a greater depth. As a result, the temperature of the hydrothermal solution falls down, increasing the vertical extent of argillic alteration. High-grade uranium mineralization is also localized more deeply than elsewhere.

  2. The significance of geological and zircon age data derived from the wall rocks of the Ailao Shan-Red River Shear Zone, NW Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Żelaźniewicz, Andrzej; Hòa, Trần Trọng; Larionov, Alexander N.

    2013-09-01

    This paper offers new evidence on whether the Ailao Shan-Red River Shear Zone of NW Vietnam is part of a suture zone between two continental blocks (the IndoChina Block and the South China Block) or whether it is itself of intracontinental origin, developed within the South China margin. To help clarify the role that the Ailao Shan-Red River Shear Zone plays in South China tectonic reconstructions, we gathered new whole-rock geochemistry, structural field data, and zircon U-Pb (SHRIMP) ages from granites, rhyodacites, and migmatites that occur within geological units adjacent to both the SW and NE sides of the Red River Fault Zone, a segment of the larger shear zone. The new zircon ages show that both walls of the Red River Fault Zone contain metamorphic and intraplate A-type granitoid rocks of Late Permian-Early Triassic age (263-240 Ma) and are of Indosinian origin. In the SW wall, the Fan Si Pan complex is a Neoproterozoic basement of metagranites and metasediments that was intruded by Late Permian (˜260 Ma), peralkaline, A-type granites and by subalkaline, A-type, biotite granite of Eocene age (˜35 Ma), containing xenoliths of gneissified Permian granitoids. The two intrusive episodes were separated by regional tectonic deformations occurring within a transpressional regime of a NW/W-vergent thrusting with a left-lateral oblique component, that was associated with greenschist to amphibolite facies metamorphism, presumably also of Eocene age (˜50-35 Ma), and that may have been related to the left-lateral movement on the Ailao Shan-Red River Shear Zone. In the NE wall, the Lo Gam complex is a Neoproterozoic basement (˜767 Ma) that was repeatedly subjected to tectonothermal activity throughout the Palaeozoic (at ˜450-420 Ma, ˜350 Ma, ˜265 Ma), ending in the Early Triassic (˜248 Ma). There was no thermal overprint during the Cenozoic. In this wall, a significant part of the Permo-Triassic thermotectonism was ductile shearing that was concentrated along

  3. Pressure solution in rocks: focused ion beam/transmission electron microscopy study on orthogneiss from South Armorican Shear Zone, France

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukovská, Zita; Wirth, Richard; Morales, Luiz F. G.

    2015-09-01

    In order to characterize the µm-to-nm structures related to operation of pressure solution on phase boundaries in naturally deformed rocks, we have performed a detailed focused ion beam/transmission electron microscopy study in ultramylonite samples from South Armorican Shear Zone (France) that focused on grain boundary scale. We have studied phase boundaries between quartz, K-feldspar and white mica in both 2D and 3D and compare our evidences with theoretical dissolution precipitation models in the current literature. The dissolution (re)precipitation processes lead to the development of different features at different phase boundaries. In both quartz-white mica and quartz-K-feldspar phase boundaries, voids were ubiquitously observed. These voids have different shapes, and the development of some of them is crystallographically controlled. In addition, part of these voids might be filled with vermiculite. Amorphous leached layers with kaolinite composition were observed at the boundaries of K-feldspar-quartz and K-feldspar-white mica. The development of different features along the phase boundaries is mainly controlled by the crystallography of the phases sharing a common interface, together with the presence of fluids that either leaches or directly dissolve the mineral phases. In addition, the local dislocation density in quartz may play an important role during pressure solution. We suggest that the nanoscale observations of the quartz-white mica phase boundaries show direct evidence for operation of island-and-channel model as described in Wassmann and Stockhert (Tectonophysics 608:1-29, 2013), while K-feldspar-quartz phase boundaries represents amorphous layers formed via interface-coupled dissolution reprecipitation as described by Hellmann et al. (Chem Geol 294-295:203-216, 2012).

  4. Crystal preferred orientations of minerals from mantle xenoliths in alkali basaltic rocks form the Catalan Volcanic Zone (NE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Roig, Mercè; Galán, Gumer; Mariani, Elisabetta

    2015-04-01

    Mantle xenoliths in alkali basaltic rocks from the Catalan Volcanic Zone, associated with the Neogene-Quaternary rift system in NE Spain, are formed of anhydrous spinel lherzolites and harzburgites with minor olivine websterites. Both peridotites are considered residues of variable degrees of partial melting, later affected by metasomatism, especially the harzburgites. These and the websterites display protogranular microstructures, whereas lherzolites show continuous variation between protogranular, porphyroclastic and equigranular forms. Thermometric data of new xenoliths indicate that protogranular harzburgites, lherzolites and websterites were equilibrated at higher temperatures than porphyroclastic and equigranular lherzolites. Mineral chemistry also indicates lower equilibrium pressure for porphyroclastic and equigranular lherzolites than for the protogranular ones. Crystal preferred orientations (CPOs) of olivine and pyroxenes from these new xenoliths were determined with the EBSD-SEM technique to identify the deformation stages affecting the lithospheric mantle in this zone and to assess the relationships between the deformation fabrics, processes and microstructures. Olivine CPOs in protogranular harzburgites, lherzolites and a pyroxenite display [010]-fiber patterns characterized by a strong point concentration of the [010] axis normal to the foliation and girdle distribution of [100] and [001] axes within the foliation plane. Olivine CPO symmetry in porphyroclastic and equigranular lherzolites varies continuously from [010]-fiber to orthorhombic and [100]-fiber types. The orthorhombic patterns are characterized by scattered maxima of the three axes, which are normal between them. The rare [100]-fiber patterns display strong point concentration of [100] axis, with normal girdle distribution of the other two axes, which are aligned with each other. The patterns of pyroxene CPOs are more dispersed than those of olivine, especially for clinopyroxene, but

  5. Fault-related clay authigenesis along the Moab Fault: Implications for calculations of fault rock composition and mechanical and hydrologic fault zone properties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Solum, J.G.; Davatzes, N.C.; Lockner, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    The presence of clays in fault rocks influences both the mechanical and hydrologic properties of clay-bearing faults, and therefore it is critical to understand the origin of clays in fault rocks and their distributions is of great importance for defining fundamental properties of faults in the shallow crust. Field mapping shows that layers of clay gouge and shale smear are common along the Moab Fault, from exposures with throws ranging from 10 to ???1000 m. Elemental analyses of four locations along the Moab Fault show that fault rocks are enriched in clays at R191 and Bartlett Wash, but that this clay enrichment occurred at different times and was associated with different fluids. Fault rocks at Corral and Courthouse Canyons show little difference in elemental composition from adjacent protolith, suggesting that formation of fault rocks at those locations is governed by mechanical processes. Friction tests show that these authigenic clays result in fault zone weakening, and potentially influence the style of failure along the fault (seismogenic vs. aseismic) and potentially influence the amount of fluid loss associated with coseismic dilation. Scanning electron microscopy shows that authigenesis promotes that continuity of slip surfaces, thereby enhancing seal capacity. The occurrence of the authigenesis, and its influence on the sealing properties of faults, highlights the importance of determining the processes that control this phenomenon. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Fault-related clay authigenesis along the Moab Fault: Implications for calculations of fault rock composition and mechanical and hydrologic fault zone properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solum, John G.; Davatzes, Nicholas C.; Lockner, David A.

    2010-12-01

    The presence of clays in fault rocks influences both the mechanical and hydrologic properties of clay-bearing faults, and therefore it is critical to understand the origin of clays in fault rocks and their distributions is of great importance for defining fundamental properties of faults in the shallow crust. Field mapping shows that layers of clay gouge and shale smear are common along the Moab Fault, from exposures with throws ranging from 10 to ˜1000 m. Elemental analyses of four locations along the Moab Fault show that fault rocks are enriched in clays at R191 and Bartlett Wash, but that this clay enrichment occurred at different times and was associated with different fluids. Fault rocks at Corral and Courthouse Canyons show little difference in elemental composition from adjacent protolith, suggesting that formation of fault rocks at those locations is governed by mechanical processes. Friction tests show that these authigenic clays result in fault zone weakening, and potentially influence the style of failure along the fault (seismogenic vs. aseismic) and potentially influence the amount of fluid loss associated with coseismic dilation. Scanning electron microscopy shows that authigenesis promotes that continuity of slip surfaces, thereby enhancing seal capacity. The occurrence of the authigenesis, and its influence on the sealing properties of faults, highlights the importance of determining the processes that control this phenomenon.

  7. Orogenic potassic mafic magmatism, a product of alkaline-peraluminous mixing ? Variscan 'calc-alkaline' rocks from the Central Iberian and Ossa Morena Zones, Central Spain.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarrow, Jane H.; Cambeses, Aitor; Bea, Fernando; Montero, Pilar; Molina, José F.; Moreno, Juan Antonio

    2013-04-01

    Orogenic magmatic rocks provide information about mantle and crust melt-generation and -interaction processes. In this context, minor potassic mafic stocks which are formed of enriched mantle and crustal components and are common as late-orogenic intrusions in granitic plutons give insight into the timing of new crust formation and crustal recycling. Potassic mafic stocks are prevalent, albeit low volume, constituents of granite batholiths all through the European Variscan (350-280 Ma). In the Central Iberia Zone, Spanish Central System, crustal-melt, S-type, granitoid plutons are intruded by minor concomitant ultramafic-intermediate appinitic-vaugneritic stocks. Notwithstanding their whole-rock calc-alkaline composition, the stocks apparently did not have a subduction-related origin. Recent studies have attributed their genesis to mixing of alkaline mantle and peraluminous crustal melts. Their primary alkaline character, as indicated by amphibole and biotite mineral chemistry data, points, rather, towards an extension-related genesis. In the Ossa Morena Zone, south of the Central Iberian Zone, the igneous rocks also have a whole-rock calc-alkaline composition which has been considered to be the result of northward subduction of the South Portuguese Zone. Nevertheless, identification of a 'sill' of significant volume of mafic magma in the middle crust, the ´IBERSEIS reflective body', in a seismic profile across the Ossa Morena and South Portuguese Zones has cast doubt upon the calc-alkaline magmatism-subduction model; leading, instead, to the magmatism being attributed to intra-orogenic extension related to a mantle plume active from 340 Ma to 330 Ma. The aim here, then, is to reinvestigate the petrogenesis and age of the calc-alkaline rocks of the Ossa Morena Zone to determine their tectonomagmatic context be it subduction-, plume- or extension-related, and establish what they may reveal about mantle-crust interactions. Focussing, initially, on the Valencia del

  8. Fault-rock magnetism from the earth surface trench closed to the Wenchuan Earthquake Surface Rupture Zone imply the different slip dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D.; Li, H.; Lee, T. Q.; Sun, Z.

    2014-12-01

    The 2008 Mw 7.9 Wenchuan Earthquake had induced two major earthquake surface rupture zones, including the Yingxiu-Beichuan earthquake fault (Y-B F.) and Guanxian-Anxian earthquake fault (G-A F.) earthquake surface rupture zones. This giant earthquake had caused great human and financial loss. After main shock, the Wenchuan earthquake Fault Scientific Drilling project (WFSD) was co-organized by the Ministry of Science and Technology, Ministry of Land and Resources and China Bureau of Seismology, and this project focused on earthquake fault mechanics, earthquake slip process, fault physical and chemical characteristics, mechanical behavior, fluid behavior, fracture energy, and so on. In this study, the fault-rocks in the two trenches close to the two Wenchuan Earthquake surface rupture zone were used to discuss the earthquake slip dynamics, including the Bajiaomiao and Jiulong trenches along the Y-B F. and G-A F. earthquake surface rupture zones, respectively. This study also combined with the recent fault-rock magnetism from the earth surface and WFSD-1. The rock magnetism, from the Bajiaomiao trench and other previous researches, shows that the high susceptibility of the fault gouge along the Yingxiu-Beichuan earthquake fault zone was caused by the new-formed ferrimagnetic minerals, such as magnetite and hematite, so the Y-B F. had experienced high temperature and rapid speed thermal pressurization earthquake slip mechanism. The rock magnetism from the Jiulong trench implied that the slightly low average susceptibility of fault gouge was caused by high content of Fe-sulfides than that of fault breccia and Jurassic sandstones, which was possibly induced by earthquake process or earth surface process after the fault rocks exposed to the surface. If the high content of Fe-sulfides was induced by earthquake process, the G-A F. had experienced the low temperature and slow speed machanical lubrication earthquake slip mechanism. The different earthquake slip mechanism was

  9. The Eldivan ophiolite and volcanic rocks in the İzmir-Ankara-Erzincan suture zone, Northern Turkey: Geochronology, whole-rock geochemical and Nd-Sr-Pb isotope characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çelik, Ömer Faruk; Chiaradia, Massimo; Marzoli, Andrea; Billor, Zeki; Marschik, Robert

    2013-07-01

    Gabbros and dolerite dikes of the Eldivan ophiolite and basaltic volcanic rocks of the ophiolitic mélange in the central part of the İzmir-Ankara-Erzincan (IAE) suture zone were investigated for their 40Ar/39Ar age and whole-rock-major-trace element and Sr-Nd-Pb isotope compositions. Based on geological and geochemical characteristics basaltic volcanic rocks in the ophiolitic mélange are subdivided into two groups (Groups I and II) with ocean island basalts or enriched mid-ocean ridge basalt characteristics, respectively. Gabbros and dolerite dikes of the Eldivan ophiolite (Groups III and IV) have instead geochemical compositions indicative of a subduction-related environment. The volcanic rocks of Group I have 87Sr/86Sr(i) between 0.7037 and 0.7044, ƐNd(i)-DM of - 4.5 to - 5.6, and 206Pb/204Pb(i) ranging between 18.35 and 18.75. Group II volcanic rocks have higher 87Sr/86Sr(i) values (0.7049-0.7055), ƐNd(i)-DM ranging between - 5.4 and - 6.0, and 206Pb/204Pb(i) between 18.14 and 18.62. The Nd isotopic signatures and 207Pb/204Pb(i) values of the volcanic rocks of both groups point to a different source with respect to those of the Eldivan ophiolite. The low 206Pb/204Pb(i) values relative to the ophiolitic rocks seem to exclude a significant contribution from a HIMU reservoir, whereas the 207Pb/204Pb(i) values slightly above the NHRL might indicate some contribution from an EM2-type reservoir. Gabbros (Group III) of the Eldivan ophiolite and dolerite dikes (Group IV) cross-cutting the ultramafic part of the ophiolite show 87Sr/86Sr(i) between 0.7038 and 0.7053, ƐNd(i)-DM from - 2 to - 3.6 and 206Pb/204Pb(i) between 18.10 and 18.80. The gabbros yield ca. 150 Ma 40Ar/39Ar amphibole-plateau ages, which, together with the geochemical data, indicate that they were produced above subducted oceanic lithosphere in the IAE ocean domain in Late Jurassic times. Therefore, the Eldivan ophiolite in the IAE suture zone constitutes a link between the Hellenide

  10. Origin of caves and other solution openings in the unsaturated ( vadose) zone of carbonate rocks: a model for CO2 generation.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, W.W.

    1985-01-01

    The enigma that caves and other solution openings form in carbonate rocks at great depths below land surface rather than forming from the surface downward can be explained by the generation of CO2 within the aquifer system. In the proposed model, CO2 is generated by the oxidation of particulate and/or dissolved organic carbon that is transported from the land surface deep into the unsaturated zone by recharging ground water. The organic material is oxidized to CO2 by aerobic bacteria utilizing oxygen that diffuses in from the atmosphere. Because gas transport in the unsaturated zone is controlled largely by diffusion, steady-state generation of even minute amounts of CO2 deep in the unsaturated zone results in the creation of large concentrations of CO2 at depth as it establishes a concentration gradient to the surface or other sink. -from Author

  11. Preservation of methane generated during serpentinization of upper mantle rocks: Evidence from fluid inclusions in the Nidar ophiolite, Indus Suture Zone, Ladakh (India)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachan, Himanshu K.; Mukherjee, Barun K.; Bodnar, Robert J.

    2007-05-01

    The Nidar Ophiolite Complex (NOC) within the Indus Suture Zone in Eastern Ladakh, India, represents a suprasubduction zone (SSZ) ophiolite from a fore-arc setting. The lower part of the ophiolite sequence is comprised of ultramafic upper mantle rocks that are Mg-rich (Fo in olivine > 90-92) and contain 2-7% Cr-spinel. Pure-methane (CH 4) fluid inclusions occur in olivine from partially serpentinized harzburgite and dunite from the NOC. Homogenization temperatures range from - 160 °C to - 108 °C, and freezing behavior combined with Raman analyses indicate that the inclusions contain no other gaseous species. The majority of the inclusions appear to be of secondary origin although some isolated inclusions of indeterminate origin were observed. CH 4 in the Nidar ophiolite was generated as a by-product of serpentinization of ultramafic rocks in the mantle wedge above the subducting slab, coupled with the complete consumption of water during hydration of serpentine. The presence of the lizardite polymorph of serpentine is consistent with formation in a rock-dominated system (low water activity) that was being deformed in a non-isotropic stress environment. The observed fluid inclusion isochores suggest various degrees of reequlibration during the history of the rocks, with the more extreme (high P) isochores most closely approximating the serpentinization conditions during prograde metamorphism at temperatures < 600 °C and pressures in excess of about 2 kbars. These results support previous studies that have shown that early-formed fluid inclusions in mantle-derived rocks may be preserved during tectonic uplift to the surface and maintain the original mantle chemical signature.

  12. Teaching Marine Geoscience at Sea: Integrated Ocean Drilling Program's School of Rock Explores Cascadia Subduction Zone - Cores, Logs, and ACORKs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reagan, M.; Collins, J.; Ludwig, K. A.; Slough, S.; Delaney, M. L.; Hovan, S. A.; Expedition 328 Scientists

    2010-12-01

    For twelve days this past September, seventeen formal and informal educators from the US, UK, and France joined six instructors and a small science party on the scientific drillship JOIDES Resolution for the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP)’s Cascadia ACORK Expedition. The educators were part of the annual “School of Rock (SOR)” education program. SOR is coordinated by the U.S. Implementing Organization (USIO) of IODP and is designed to engage participants in seagoing Earth systems research and education workshops onboard the JOIDES Resolution and on shore at the Gulf Coast Core Repository in Texas. The scientific objective of the Cascadia ACORK expedition was to install a new permanent hydrologic observatory at ODP Site 889 to provide long-term monitoring of the pressure at the frontal part of the Cascadia accretionary prism. This year’s SOR workshop focused on how cores, logs, and ACORKs shed light on the hydrology and geology of the Cascadia subduction zone in the Northeast Pacific. In addition to observing the deployment of the ACORK, the SOR participants conducted daily hands-on analyses of archived sediment and hard-rock cores with scientists and technicians who specialize in IODP research using the lab facilities on the ship. Throughout the expedition, participants engaged in different activities and lessons designed to explore the deep biosphere, methane hydrates, paleoceanography, sedimentology, biostratigraphy, seafloor spreading, and drilling technology. The workshop also provided participants with “C3” time; time to communicate their experience using the successful joidesresolution.org website and other tools, make connections to their prior knowledge and expertise, and to be creative in developing and planning new education and outreach activities based on their new knowledge and research. As part of participating in the expedition, participants committed to further developing and testing their education and outreach products after

  13. Extensional Detachment faulting in melange rocks. Plurikilometres migration by W the External Zone (Cordillera Bética, Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldán, Francisco Javier; Azañon, Jose Miguel; Rodríguez, Jose; Mateos, Rosa Maria

    2014-05-01

    The synthesis and correlation of units carried out in the continuous geological map (Roldán et al., 2012), has revealed a fragmentation of the carbonate outcrops belong to the Subbetic Domain (García-Hernández et al., 1980). Subbetic NW verging thrust and fold axial traces have not lateral continuity and Jurassic carbonate outscrops appear as klippes on the olistotromic unit. These ductile structures that can be observed in the internal structure of these jurassic blocks are unrelated to the brittle-ductile deformation bands observed at the basal pelitic levels. Basal detachments are rooted in: a) the Olistostromic unit, a Upper Langhian-Lower Serravallian breccia constituted by gypsum-bearing clay and marls; b) Cretaceous-Tertiary marly sedimentary rocks (Rodríguez-Fernández, et al., 2013) . In both kind of rocks, cataclastic structures allows to infer a top-to-the WSW displacement. Paleostress measurements, made on these detachments levels, are compatible with a extensional regime (Roldán et al., 2012). At the same time, the analysis and interpretation of subsurface data (seismic surveys and borehole testing) shows that the Subbetic Domain (External Subbetic, Molina 1987) are affected by westward low-angle normal faults. A balanced cross-section, based on morphological and cartographic data in the area between Sierra de Cabra and Sierra de Alta Coloma (Valdepeñas de Jaén), shows plurikilometric displacements which has been produced during Late Serravallian-Early Tortonian times. References: García-Hernández, M., López-Garrido, A.C., Rivas, P., Sanz de Galdeano, C., Vera, J.A. (1980): Mesozoic paleogeographic evolution of the zones of the Betic Cordillera. Geol. Mijnb. 59 (2). 155-168. Molina, J.M. (1987). Análisis de facies del Mesozoico en el Subbético. Tesis Doctoral, Univ. Granada. 518 p. Rodríguez-Fernández, J., Roldán, F. J., Azañón, J.M. y García-Cortés, A. (2013). El colapso gravitacional del frente orogénico a lpino en el Dominio Subb

  14. Influence of host lithofacies on fault rock variation in carbonate fault zones: A case study from the Island of Malta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michie, E. A. H.

    2015-07-01

    Relatively few studies have examined fault rock microstructures in carbonates. Understanding fault core production helps predict the hydraulic behaviour of faults and the potential for reservoir compartmentalisation. Normal faults on Malta, ranging from <1 m to 90 m displacement, cut two carbonate lithofacies, micrite-dominated and grain-dominated carbonates, allowing the investigation of fault rock evolution with increasing displacement in differing lithofacies. Lithological heterogeneity leads to a variety of deformation mechanisms. Nine different fault rock types have been identified, with a range of deformation microstructures along an individual slip surface. The deformation style, and hence type of fault rock produced, is a function of host rock texture, specifically grain size and sorting, porosity and uniaxial compressive strength. Homogeneously fine-grained micrtie-dominated carbonates are characterised by dispersed deformation with large fracture networks that develop into breccias. Alternatively, this lithofacies is commonly recrystallised. In contrast, in the coarse-grained, heterogeneous grain-dominated carbonates the development of faulting is characterised by localised deformation, creating protocataclasite and cataclasite fault rocks. Cementation also occurs within some grain-dominated carbonates close to and on slip surfaces. Fault rock variation is a function of displacement as well as juxtaposed lithofacies. An increase in fault rock variability is observed at higher displacements, potentially creating a more transmissible fault, which opposes what may be expected in siliciclastic and crystalline faults. Significant heterogeneity in the fault rock types formed is likely to create variable permeability along fault-strike, potentially allowing across-fault fluid flow. However, areas with homogeneous fault rocks may generate barriers to fluid flow.

  15. Rock Geochemistry and Mineralogy from Fault Zones and Polymetallic Fault Veins of the Central Front Range, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caine, Jonathan Saul; Bove, Dana J.

    2010-01-01

    During the 2004 to 2008 field seasons, approximately 200 hand samples of fault and polymetallic vein-related rocks were collected for geochemical and mineralogical analyses. The samples were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey as part of the Evolution of Brittle Structures Task under the Central Colorado Assessment Project (CCAP) of the Mineral Resources Program (http://minerals.cr.usgs.gov/projects/colorado_assessment/index.html). The purpose of this work has been to characterize the relation between epithermal, polymetallic mineral deposits, paleostress, and the geological structures that hosted fluid flow and localization of the deposits. The data in this report will be used to document and better understand the processes that control epithermal mineral-deposit formation by attempting to relate the geochemistry of the primary structures that hosted hydrothermal fluid flow to their heat and fluid sources. This includes processes from the scale of the structures themselves to the far field scale, inclusive of the intrusive bodies that have been thought to be the sources for the hydrothermal fluid flow. The data presented in this report are part of a larger assessment effort on public lands. The larger study area spans the region of the southern Rocky Mountains in Colorado from the Wyoming to New Mexico borders and from the eastern boundary of the Front Range to approximately the longitude of Vail and Leadville, Colorado. Although the study area has had an extensive history of geological mapping, the mapping has resulted in a number of hypotheses that are still in their infancy of being tested. For example, the proximity of polymetallic veins to intrusive bodies has been thought to reflect a genetic relation between the two features; however, this idea has not been well tested with geochemical indicators. Recent knowledge regarding the coupled nature of stress, strain, fluid flow, and geochemistry warrant new investigations and approaches to test a variety of

  16. The Moho as a transition zone: A revisit from seismic and electrical properties of minerals and rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qin; Bagdassarov, Nickolai; Ji, Shaocheng

    2013-12-01

    The seismic Moho discontinuity is not always consistent with a chemical boundary (the “petrological Moho”) that separates the mafic lower crust from the ultramafic upper mantle. We summarize the effects of pressure, temperature and metamorphism on seismic and electrical properties of lower crustal and mantle rocks. The sharpness of the Moho discontinuity is generally related with the petrological transition from olivine-poor to olivine-rich compositions. Due to serpentinizat]ion, the seismic Moho may not correspond with the petrological Moho beneath the oceanic crust and forearcs. More precise velocity-density relationships are established for typical oceanic and continental crust-mantle boundaries, as well as for serpentinization of peridotites at low and high temperatures. Combined with Poisson's ratio, the occurrence of continental lowest crust with Vp > 7.2 km/s may reflect pyroxenites and garnet gabbros by magma underplating, or eclogitization of gabbros and mafic granulites by crustal thickening. On the other hand, the “electrical Moho” is defined as the bottom of the relatively conductive continental lower crust (10- 4 to 10- 1 S/m). Electrical conductivity of granulites and peridotites is mainly controlled by temperature, composition (iron content and water content) and oxygen fugacity, but weakly depends on pressure. Even a small amount of hydrogen can significantly enhance electrical conductivity of olivine, pyroxene and garnet. Although amphibole and serpentine are resistive under their stability conditions, their electrical conductivity will be remarkably increased by dehydration reaction at temperature > 600 °C. Granulites and eclogites show similar conductivity of 10- 4 to 10- 2 S/m at 500-1000 °C, about one order more conductive than water-poor garnet pyroxenites and spinel peridotites. Therefore the depth of the electrical Moho varies with temperature and water content at the crust-mantle boundary. The discrepancy between the seismic

  17. A new stent with streamlined cross-section can suppress monocyte cell adhesion in the flow disturbance zones of the endovascular stent.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zengsheng; Zhan, Fan; Ding, Jun; Zhang, Xiwen; Deng, Xiaoyan

    2016-01-01

    We proposed a new stent with streamlined cross-sectional wires, which is different from the clinical coronary stents with square or round cross-sections. We believe the new stent might have better hemodynamic performance than the clinical metal stents. To test the hypothesis, we designed an experimental study to compare the performance of the new stent with the clinical stents in terms of monocyte (U-937 cells) adhesion. The results showed that when compared with the clinical stents, the adhesion of U-937 cells were much less in the new stent. The results also showed that, when Reynolds number increased from 180 (the rest condition for the coronary arteries) to 360 (the strenuous exercise condition for the coronary arteries), the flow disturbance zones in the clinical stents became larger, while they became smaller with the new stent. The present experimental study therefore suggests that the optimization of the cross-sectional shape of stent wires ought to be taken into consideration in the design of endovascular stents.

  18. Snow-cover dynamics monitored by automatic digital photography at the rooting zone of an active rock glacier in the Hinteres Lantal Cirque, Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellerer-Pirklbauer, Andreas; Rieckh, Matthias; Avian, Michael

    2010-05-01

    Knowledge regarding snow-cover dynamics and climatic conditions in the rooting zone of active rock glaciers is still limited. The number of meteorological stations on the surface of or close to active rock glaciers is increasing. However, areal information on snow-cover distribution and its spatial dynamics caused by different processes on rock glaciers surfaces with a high temporal resolution from such remote alpine areas are mostly difficult to obtain. To face this problem an automatic remote digital camera (RDC) system was proprietary developed. The core parts of the RDC system are a standard hand-held digital camera, a remote control, a water proof casing with a transparent opening, a 12V/25Ah battery and solar panels with a charge controller. Three such devices were constructed and installed at different sites in the Central Alps of Austria. One RDC system is used to monitor the rooting zone of the highly active rock glacier in the Hinteres Langtal Cirque (46°59'N, 12°47'E), Central Schober Mountains, Austria. The 0.15 km² large NW-facing rock glaciers is tongue-shaped with a fast moving lower part (>1m/a) and a substantially slower upper part, ranging in elevation between 2455-2700 m a.s.l. The RDC system was set up in September 2006 and is located since than at 2770 m a.s.l. on a pronounced ridge crest that confines the Hinteres Langtal Cirque to the SW. The water proof casing was attached to a 1.5 m high metal pole which itself was fixed to the bedrock by screws and concrete glue. The viewing direction of the camera is NE. Hence, the image section of the RDC focuses on the rooting zone of the rock glacier and its headwalls up to c. 3000 m a.s.l. Photographs were taken daily at 3 pm providing the optimal lighting conditions in the relevant part of the cirque. 720 photographs were taken continuously in the period 12.09.2006 to 31.08.2008. These optical data were analysed by applying GIS and remote sensing techniques regarding snow-cover distribution

  19. Geological setting and geochemical signatures of the mafic rocks from the Intra-Pontide Suture Zone: implications for the geodynamic reconstruction of the Mesozoic Neotethys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayit, Kaan; Marroni, Michele; Göncüoglu, M. Cemal; Pandolfi, Luca; Ellero, Alessandro; Ottria, Giuseppe; Frassi, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    A number of suture zones exist in Turkey, which is believed to represent the closure of Paleo and NeoTethyan oceanic basins. Regarding the development of the latter oceanic entity, namely Neotethys, the geodynamic evolution of the Intra-Pontide branch, the northernmost one of a number of oceanic basins remains enigmatic. The Intra-Pontide Suture Zone in Northwest Turkey includes several tectonic units most of which are characterized by the occurrence of mafic rocks with distinct geochemical signatures. In this paper, the mafic rocks collected from four of these units (the Domuz Dağ Unit, the Saka Unit, the Daday Unit and the Arkot Dağ Mèlange) have been studied in detail along two selected transects. The Domuz Dağ Unit is characterized by amphibolites, micaschists and marbles, which have been overprinted by low-grade metamorphism.The Saka Unit is in turn represented by an assemblage of slices of amphibolites, marbles and micaschists metamorphosed under upper amphibolite facies metamorphic conditions in the Late Jurassic time. In these units, the amphibolites and their retrograded counterparts display E-MORB-, OIB- BABB- and IAT-type signatures. The Daday Unit is characterized by metasedimentary and metamafic rocks metamorphosed under blueschist to sub-greenschist facies conditions. The metamafic rocks comprise actinolite-bearing schists and Na-amphibole-bearing varieties possibly derived from basaltic and gabbroic protoliths. They have a wide range of chemical compositions, displaying N-MORB-, E-MORB-, OIB- BABB- and IAT-type signatures. The Arkot Dağ Mèlange consists of a Late Santonian assemblage of slide-blocks mainly represented by basaltic lithologies showing affinities ranging from N-MORB- and IAT- to BABB-type magmas. The geochemical signature of the studied mafic rocks indicates that the tectonic units documented along the two studied transects of the Intra-Pontide Suture Zone have been derived from a supra-subduction zone. This hypothesis

  20. Burial and exhumation of high- and ultra high-pressure (U) HP rocks: some lessons on orogenic root-zone dynamics from the Scandinavian Caledonides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, T. B.

    2011-12-01

    The Caledonides of southern Norway have some of the best-exposed examples of (U) HP rocks in the world. A regional southeast to northwest metamorphic gradient in eclogite bearing rocks from ~550-600C; 1.8 GPa, to ~800C; >2.8-3GPa is documented in several studies. In addition there are several examples of diamond and majorite-bearing extreme UHP rocks indicating pressures up to 5.5 to 6 GPa (e.g. Van Roermund, 2009). The Proterozoic protoliths of the Western Gneiss Region (WGR) and trailing ends of Caledonian allochthons were deeply buried during the Scandian continental collision at 430-400 Ma. The initial response of the down-going Fennoscandian crust below the Caledonian floor-thrust was brittle failure and coseismic deformation as recorded by eclogite pseudotachylytes and localized high-strain zones (e.g. Austrheim & Boundy 1994). The co-facial brittle and ductile high-strain zones provide important lessons about the mechanism controlling deformation, particularly intermediate depth earthquakes in collision zones (e.g. Labrousse et al. 2010). Restorations of regional SE-NW cross-sections show that burial- and exhumation of coesite eclogites from 90-100 km can be reconciled with the observable structures. The exhumation can be explained by: 1) >50% pure shear vertical shortening at eclogite to amphibolite facies, 2) large-scale (>100 km) rotational deformation along extensional detachments at amphibolite to greenschist facies, 3) upper crustal normal faulting and 4) an average of 15 km erosion (e.g., Andersen et al. 1991). Preservation of the regional metamorphic gradient strongly suggests that the WGR was buried and exhumed as a mostly coherent unit. Within the coesite UHP-domains some occurrences of diamond, majorite and extreme-UHP opx-eclogites suggest pressure anomalies of up to 6 GPa, perturbing the regional metamorphic gradient by very local doubling of the regional P-max. Radiometric ages from the majorite-diamond UHP, coesite UHP and normal eclogites are

  1. Fluid-mediated mass transfer from a paleosubduction channel to its mantle wedge: Evidence from jadeitite and related rocks from the Guatemala Suture Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harlow, George E.; Flores, Kennet E.; Marschall, Horst R.

    2016-08-01

    Jadeitites in serpentinite mélanges are the product of crystallization from and/or metasomatism by aqueous fluids that transfer components from and within a subduction channel-the slab-mantle interaction volume-into discrete rock units, most commonly found within the serpentinized or serpentinizing portion of the channel or the overlying mantle rocks at high pressure (1 to > 2 GPa). Two serpentinite mélanges on either side of the Motagua fault system (MFS) of the Guatemala Suture Zone contain evidence of this process. Whole rock compositional analyses are reported here from 86 samples including jadeitites and the related rocks: omphacitites, albitites and mica rocks. The predominance of a single phase in most of these rocks is reflected in the major element compositions and aspects of the trace elements, such as REE abundances tracking Ca in clinopyroxene. Relative to N-MORB all samples show relative enrichments in the high field strength elements (HFSE) Hf, Zr, U, Th, and the LILE Ba and Cs, contrasted by depletions in K and in some cases Pb or Sr. Most jadeitites are also depleted in the highly compatible elements Cr, Sc and Ni despite their occurrence in serpentinite mélange; however, some omphacitite samples show the opposite. Trace elements in these jadeitite samples show a strong similarity with GLOSS (globally subducted oceanic sediment) and other terrigenous sediments in terms of their trace-element patterns, but are offset to lower abundances. Jadeitites thus incorporate a strong trace-element signature derived from sediments mixed with that from fluid derived from altered oceanic crust. Enrichment in the HFSE argues for mobility of these elements in aqueous fluids at high P/T conditions in the subduction channel and a remarkable lack of fractionation that might otherwise be expected from dissolution and fluid transport.

  2. Critical zone co-evolution: evidence that weathering and consequent seasonal rock moisture storage leads to a mixed forest canopy of conifer and evergreen broadleaf trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshun, J.; Dietrich, W. E.; Dawson, T. E.; Rempe, D. M.; Fung, I. Y.

    2014-12-01

    Despite recent studies demonstrating the importance of rock moisture as a source of water to vegetation, much remains unknown regarding species-specific and seasonal patterns of water uptake in a Mediterranean climate. Here, we use stable isotopes of water (d18O, dD) to define the isotope composition of water throughout the subsurface critical zone of Rivendell, within the Eel River Critical Zone Observatory. We find that a structured heterogeneity of water isotope composition exists in which bulk saprolite is chronically more negative than bulk soil, and tightly held moisture is more negative than the mobile water that recharges the saturated zone and generates runoff. These moisture reservoirs provide a blueprint from which to measure the seasonal uptake patterns of different species collocated on the site. Douglas-firs use unsaturated saprolite and weathered bedrock moisture (i. e. rock moisture) throughout the year. Contrastingly, hardwood species (madrone, live oak, tanoak) modify their source water depending on which moisture is energetically favorable. Hardwoods use freely mobile water in the wet season, and rely on unsaturated zone soil moisture in the dry season. When soil water tension decreases on the drier south-facing slope, hardwood species use saprolite moisture. Although adjacent hardwoods and Douglas-firs partition water based on matric pull on the north side, there is competition for saprolite moisture in late summer on the south side. These results reveal the eco-hydrological importance of moisture derived from weathered bedrock, and show that the hardwoods have a competitive advantage under the drier conditions predicted in many climate models. Finally, the data emphasize that isotope measurements of all subsurface reservoirs and potential water sources are necessary for a complete and accurate characterization of the eco-hydrological processes within the critical zone.

  3. Fault Zone Architecture and Permeability-Structure Evolution in Basalts: the Generation of Fluid-Flow Pathways in low Permeability Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, R. J.; Holdsworth, R. E.; Armitage, P. J.; Faulkner, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    Understanding fluid flow and sealing potential in basaltic sequences is becoming increasingly important with the rising economic significance of intra- and sub-volcanic hydrocarbon plays. Fluid flow in upper-crustal brittle fault zones is dependent on the permeability of the fault rock assemblage and its architecture. Models for clastic sedimentary sequences typically involve a low-permeability fault core surrounded by a high-permeability damage zone, relative to the intermediate permeability of the undeformed host rock. Here we present a combined field, microstructural and experimental characterization of basalt-hosted fault zones from the Faroe Islands. Samples that are representative of the various fault zone components, and of early to late stage fault development, were used for experimental determination of the permeability structure of faults in basalts. Fault rock characterization reveals that the intensity of fault-associated brittle deformation increases towards the principal slip surface, from crackle and mosaic breccias, to chaotic breccias and cataclasite along the principal slip zone. Identified breccia styles involve collapse/infill, wear/abrasion, and implosion processes, which respectively indicate increasingly short-lived syn-kinematic permeability. Collapse/infill breccias indicate sustained fluid-migration pathways, as they require open, subterranean cavities that are formed faster than mineral precipitation can seal them. Wear/abrasion and implosion breccias record crack-seal behaviour during successive slip events. Experimental permeability measurements were performed with argon gas, at a range of confining pressures (20-200 MPa) and constant fluid pressure (10 MPa) using the Transient Pulse Decay technique. Results indicate that, within the depth range of ~0.3 to ~3.0 km, basalt-hosted faults evolve from relatively low-permeability mm-cm-scale displacement structures (e.g. ~9.47x10-18 to 3.40x10-19 m2), to relatively high-permeability metre

  4. Thermal Evolution of Juvenile Subduction Zones ' New Constraints from Lu-Hf Geochronology on HP oceanic rocks (Halilbaǧi, Central Anatolia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pourteau, Amaury; Scherer, Erik; Schmidt, Alexander; Bast, Rebecca

    2015-04-01

    The thermal structure of subduction zones plays a key role on mechanical and chemical processes taking place along the slab-mantle interface. Until now, changes through time of this thermal structure have been explored mostly by the means of numerical simulations. However, both "warm" (i.e., epidote-bearing), and "cold" (i.e., lawsonite-bearing) HP oceanic rocks have been reported in some fossil subduction complexes exposed at the Earth's surface (e.g., Franciscan Complex, California; Rio San Juan Complex, Hispañola; Halilbağı Unit, Central Anatolia). These a-priori "incompatible" rocks witness different thermal stages of ancient subduction zones and their study might provide complementary constraints to numerical models. To decipher the meaning of these contrasting metamorphic rocks in the Halilbağı Unit, we are carrying out Lu-Hf geochronology on garnet (grt) and lws from a variety of HP oceanic rocks, as well as the metamorphic sole of the overlying ophiolite. We selected five samples that are representative of the variety of metamorphic evolutions (i.e. peak conditions and P-T paths) encountered in this area. Preliminary analyses yielded 110 Ma (grt-hbl isochron) for a sub-ophiolitic grt amphibolite; 92 Ma (grt-omp) for an eclogite with prograde and retrograde ep; 90 Ma (grt-omp) for an eclogitic metabasite with prograde ep and retrograde ep+lws; 87 Ma (grt-gln) for a lws eclogite with prograde ep; and 86 Ma (grt-gln) for a blueschist with prograde and retrograde lws. These ages are mainly two-point isochrons. Further-refined data will be presented at the EGU General Assembly 2015, in Vienna. The consistent younging trend from "warm" to "cold" metamorphic rocks revealed by these first-order results points to metamorphic-sole formation during the initiation of intra-oceanic subduction at ~110 Ma, and subsequent cooling of the slab-mantle interface between 92 and 86 Ma. Therefore, the contrasting metamorphic evolutions encountered in the Halilbağı Unit

  5. Effects of fluid-rock interactions on faulting within active fault zones - evidence from fault rock samples retrieved from international drilling projects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, C.; Wirth, R.; Kienast, M.; Yabe, Y.; Sulem, J.; Dresen, G. H.

    2015-12-01

    Chemical and mechanical effects of fluids influence the fault mechanical behavior. We analyzed fresh fault rocks from several scientific drilling projects to study the effects of fluids on fault strength. For example, in drill core samples on a rupture plane of an Mw 2.2 earthquake in a deep gold mine in South Africa the main shock occurred on a preexisting plane of weakness that was formed by fluid-rock interaction (magnesiohornblende was intensively altered to chlinochlore). The plane acted as conduit for hydrothermal fluids at some time in the past. The chemical influence of fluids on mineralogical alteration and geomechanical processes in fault core samples from SAFOD (San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth) is visible in pronounced dissolution-precipitation processes (stylolites, solution seams) as well as in the formation of new phases. Detrital quartz and feldspar grains are partially dissolved and replaced by authigenic illite-smectite (I-S) mixed-layer clay minerals. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) imaging of these grains reveals that the alteration processes and healing were initiated within pores and small intra-grain fissures. Newly formed phyllosilicates growing into open pore spaces likely reduced the fluid permeability. The mechanical influence of fluids is indicated by TEM observations, which document open pores that formed in-situ in the gouge material during or after deformation. Pores were possibly filled with formation water and/or hydrothermal fluids suggesting elevated fluid pressure preventing pore collapse. Fluid-driven healing of fractures in samples from SAFOD and the DGLab Gulf of Corinth project is visible in cementation. Cathodoluminescence microscopy (CL) reveals different generations of calcite veins. Differences in CL-colors suggest repeated infiltration of fluids with different chemical composition from varying sources (formation and meteoric water).

  6. Determination of the Low Permeability of the Rocks from Fracture Zones in Beishan by Incorporating ERT into Infiltration Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Y.; Song, Z.

    2015-12-01

    The hydraulic study of low permeability rocks has a great significance for the low permeable oilfield and nature gas field development, as well as the nuclear waste disposal. The traditional test method for hydraulic parameters usually determines an average value of certain region, and this is always insufficient in the study of fractured porous media. This research developed a method with high performance and accuracy to show the heterogeneity and anisotropy of sample rocks. While permeability measurement was conducted, electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) method was incorporated simultaneously to obtain the rock saturation information, which could be used to determine the permeability. Besides, the infiltration process of water infiltrating through the fractured porous media was simulated by TOUGH2 to corroborate the results calculated from the experimental data. The preliminary results showed that the permeability of rock samples was as low as 10-16 m2 and showed high sample variance. By incorporating electrical resistivity tomography into the experiment, the test could specify more details of the infiltration process as well as identify the heterogeneity and anisotropy of sample rocks.

  7. Variscan terrane boundaries in the Odenwald-Spessart basement, Mid-German Crystalline Zone: New evidence from ocean ridge, intraplate and arc-derived metabasaltic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Will, T. M.; Lee, S.-H.; Schmädicke, E.; Frimmel, H. E.; Okrusch, M.

    2015-04-01

    The Mid-German Crystalline Zone is part of a large Variscan suture and consists of various basement complexes that are exposed in central Germany. New lithogeochemical and Sr-Nd-Pb isotope data obtained on various amphibolites from the Odenwald-Spessart basement show that their protoliths formed in different tectonic settings and were subsequently incorporated into a subduction zone prior to Variscan continental collision. Metabasic rocks from the northernmost Spessart and the western Odenwald are geochemically almost identical and their protoliths are interpreted to have formed in an extensional, possibly, a back-arc setting. The tholeiitic and calc-alkaline rocks have intermediate TiO2 concentrations and high Th/Nb ratios, typical of volcanic arc-type and/or subduction-fluid modified rocks. The Nd initial ratios are depleted (εNd330 Ma = 5.0-5.8) and Nd model ages range from 660 to 610 Ma, which points at juvenile crustal addition towards the end of the Neoproterozoic. The samples define a linear array in 206Pb/204Pb versus 207Pb/204Pb space. In contrast, the protoliths of the metabasic rocks from the southern and central Spessart formed either in an intraplate oceanic island or a continental arc setting. The alkaline intraplate rocks from the southern Spessart basement are very TiO2-rich and have very low Th/Nb ratios. The rocks have weakly depleted Nd initals (εNd330 Ma = 2.6-3.3) and Nd model ages between 870 and 810 Ma. In contrast, the central Spessart within-plate rocks have considerably lower TiO2 concentrations but higher Th/Nb ratios. In addition, these rocks are isotopically enriched (εNd330 Ma = - 13.1 to - 9.5) and have Palaeoproterozoic Nd model ages. The continental arc rocks from the central and southern Spessart basement have low TiO2 concentrations and variable Th/Nb ratios. Mostly negative Nd initials (εNd330 Ma = - 2.6 to + 0.9) and late Mesoproterozoic Nd model ages indicate that recycling of older crust or mixing of crustal components of

  8. Revised correlation chart of coal beds, coal zones, and key stratigraphic units in the Pennsylvanian rocks of eastern Kentucky

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rice, Charles L.; Hiett, John K.

    1994-01-01

    This report revises Miscellaneous Field Studies Map MF-1188 (Rice and Smith, 1980). Major revisions to the original correlation chart include formal naming of key marine units in Kentucky and replacement of informally named marine units incorrectly projected into Kentucky from adjacent states. Also included in the report is the proper correlation of some regionally recognized coal bed names that have been incorrectly projected into Kentucky, particularly from Ohio and West Virginia. Besides these additions and corrections, minor changes have been made to the correlation chart, all of which are discussed below in detail. The Pennsylvania rocks of the eastern Kentucky coal field underlie an area of about 27,000 square kilometers (see index map). Largely because of the size and stratigra[hic complexity of the area, Huddle and others (1963, p. 31) divided the coal field into six coal-reserve districts. District boundaries utilize state and county line as well as geologic features, drainage areas, and coal producing areas. Their division is followed herein because, in general, each of the districts has a characteristic stratigraphic nomenclature, particularly with regard to coal bed names. The six districts are the Princess, Licking River, Big Sandy, Hazard, Southwestern, and Upper Cumberland River district is divided into the Middlesboro and Harlan subdistricts. The correlation chart lists most of the stratigraphic units of Pennsylvanian age used in eastern Kentucky, and is concerned principally with coal bed names used in publications since about 1950, especially all of the names of coal beds for which resources and reserves have been calculated. Coal constitutes only a small percentage of the total Pennsylvanian-rock sequence, but is present in as many as 26 major coal zones that have been prospected and mined extensively in all parts of the coal field since the early 1900's. Coal names listed in this chart represent coal beds that have been mined commercially or

  9. Anthropogenic disturbance as a driver of microspatial and microhabitat segregation of cytotypes of Centaurea stoebe and cytotype interactions in secondary contact zones

    PubMed Central

    Mráz, Patrik; Španiel, Stanislav; Keller, Andreas; Bowmann, Gillianne; Farkas, Alexandre; Šingliarová, Barbora; Rohr, Rudolf P.; Broennimann, Olivier; Müller-Schärer, Heinz

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims In a mixed-ploidy population, strong frequency-dependent mating will lead to the elimination of the less common cytotype, unless prezygotic barriers enhance assortative mating. However, such barriers favouring cytotype coexistence have only rarely been explored. Here, an assessment is made of the mechanisms involved in formation of mixed-ploidy populations and coexistence of diploid plants and their closely related allotetraploid derivates from the Centaurea stoebe complex (Asteraceae). Methods An investigation was made of microspatial and microhabitat distribution, life-history and fitness traits, flowering phenology, genetic relatedness of cytotypes and intercytotype gene flow (cpDNA and microsatellites) in six mixed-ploidy populations in Central Europe. Key Results Diploids and tetraploids were genetically differentiated, thus corroborating the secondary origin of contact zones. The cytotypes were spatially segregated at all sites studied, with tetraploids colonizing preferentially drier and open microhabitats created by human-induced disturbances. Conversely, they were rare in more natural microsites and microsites with denser vegetation despite their superior persistence ability (polycarpic life cycle). The seed set of tetraploid plants was strongly influenced by their frequency in mixed-ploidy populations. Triploid hybrids originated from bidirectional hybridizations were extremely rare and almost completely sterile, indicating a strong postzygotic barrier between cytotypes. Conclusions The findings suggest that tetraploids are later immigrants into already established diploid populations and that anthropogenic activities creating open niches favouring propagule introductions were the major factor shaping the non-random distribution and habitat segregation of cytotypes at fine spatial scale. Establishment and spread of tetraploids was further facilitated by their superior persistence through the perennial life cycle. The results highlight

  10. Middle Miocene nepheline-bearing mafic and evolved alkaline igneous rocks at House Mountain, Arizona Transition Zone, north-central Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Wittke, J.; Holm, R.F.; Ranney, W.D.R. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    The Middle Miocene House Mountain shield volcano is located on the northern margin of the Arizona Transition Zone, about 7 km SW of Sedona, AZ. Deep erosion has exposed internal structural and stratigraphic relationships of the volcano. Mapping documents two igneous suites: (1) alkali basalt to trachyte and alkali-feldspar syenite, and (2) olivine melanephelinite, nepheline monzodiorite, nepheline monzosyenite and nepheline syenite. The rocks of the first suite occur as dikes and flows, which, with a thick pyroclastic section, are the principal units of the volcano. The melanephelinite is nonvesicular and intruded as a large irregular dike and several smaller dikes. The nepheline-bearing syenitic rocks, which are phaneritic with nepheline and clinopyroxene crystals up to 1 cm in diameter, occur as pods and sheets within the melanephelinite. Also within the melanephelinite are wispy leucocratic segregations, syenitic fracture-fillings, and ocelli. The largest phaneritic sheet is [approx]18 m thick; it displays crude subhorizontal compositional banding and vuggy surfaces. The latter indicate that the magmas were fluid-rich. Compositions intermediate between the melanephelinite and syenitic rocks have not been found. Although the syenitic rocks are coarse-grained, mapping indicates the they are near the summit of the volcano and were probably emplaced at a depth of less than 1 km, possibly of only a few hundred meters. The field relationships of the phaneritic rocks can be explained by ascent and coalescence of immiscible syenitic liquids within the melanephelinite dike. Calculated density contrasts between melanephelinite and syenitic liquids exceed 0.2 g/cm[sup 3].

  11. Key role of Upper Mantle rocks in Alpine type orogens: some speculations derived from extensional settings for subduction zone processes and mountain roots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müntener, Othmar

    2016-04-01

    Orogenic architecture and mountain roots are intrinsically related. Understanding mountain roots largely depends on geophysical methods and exhumed high pressure and high temperature rocks that might record snapshots of the temporal evolution at elevated pressure, temperatures and/or fluid pulses. If such high pressure rocks represent ophiolitic material they are commonly interpreted as exhumed remnants of some sort of 'mid-ocean ridge' processes. Mantle peridotites and their serpentinized counterparts thus play a key role in understanding orogenic architecture as they are often considered to track suture zones or ancient plate boundaries. The recognition that some mantle peridotites and their serpentinized counterparts are derived from ocean-continent transition zones (OCT's) or non-steady state (ultra-)slow plate separation systems question a series of 'common beliefs' that have been applied to understand Alpine-type collisional orogens in the framework of the ophiolite concept. Among these are: (i) the commonly held assumption of a simple genetic link between mantle melting and mafic (MORB-type) magmatism, (ii) the commonly held assumption that mélange zones represent deep subduction zone processes at the plate interface, (iii) that pre-collisional continental crust and oceanic crust can easily be reconstructed to their original thickness and used for reconstructions of the size of small subducted oceanic basins as geophysical data from rifted margins increasingly indicate that continental crust is thinned to much less than the average 30-35 kilometers over a large area that might be called the 'zone of hyperextension', and (iv) the lack of a continuous sheet of mafic oceanic crust and the extremely short time interval of formation results in a lack of 'eclogitization potential' during convergence and hence a lack of potential for subsequent slab pull and, perhaps, a lack of potential for 'slab-breakoff'. Here we provide a synopsis of mantle rocks from the

  12. UNDERSTANDING HARD ROCK HYDROGEOLOGY THROUGH AN EXPERIMENTAL HYDROGEOLOGICAL PARK IN SOUTH INDIA: Site development and investigations on the major role of the fractured zone in crystalline aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, S.; Guiheneuf, N.; Boisson, A.; Marechal, J.; Chandra, S.; Dewandel, B.; Perrin, J.

    2012-12-01

    In water stressed south India most of the groundwater used for irrigation is pumped from crystalline rocks aquifers. In those structures groundwater flow dominantly occur in a shallow higher-permeability zone that overlies a deeper lower-permeability zone hosting little flow. The fractured zone of the weathering profile plays an important role for groundwater. In order to understand clearly this impact on water availability and quality changes the Experimental Hydrogeological Park at Choutuppal, Andhra Pradesh, India is developed in the framework of the SORE H+ network. Several hydraulic tests (injection, flowmeter profiles, single-packer tests…) and geophysical measurements (ERT, Borehole logging…) are carried out on the site in order to characterize the depth-dependence of hydrodynamic parameters in the Indian Archean granite. Specific investigation on a borewell through packer tests demonstrate that the most conductive part of the aquifer corresponds to the upper part of the fractured layer, located just below the saprolite bottom, between 15 meters and 20 meters depth. There is no highly conductive fracture beyond 20 meters depth and no indication for any conductive fracture beyond 25 meters depth. Packer tests show that the upper part of the fractured layer (15-20 m depth) is characterized by a good vertical connectivity. On the contrary, the tests carried out below 20 m depth show no vertical connectivity at all. The geometry of the fracture network and associated hydrodynamic parameters are in agreement with the conceptual model of hard-rock aquifers that derive its properties from weathering processes. The general existence of such a highly conductive structure at the top of the fractured zone has a great impact on water prospection and exploitation in such crystalline aquifers.

  13. Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd, and U-Pb geochronology of the rocks within the Khlong Marui shear zone, southern Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanjanapayont, Pitsanupong; Klötzli, Urs; Thöni, Martin; Grasemann, Bernhard; Edwards, Michael A.

    2012-08-01

    In southern Thailand, the Khlong Marui shear zone is dominated by a NNE-SSW striking high topographic lozenge shaped area of ca. 40 km long and 6 km wide between the Khlong Marui Fault and the Bang Kram Fault. The geology within this strike-slip zone consists of strongly deformed layers of mylonitic meta-sedimentary rocks associated with orthogneisses, mylonitic granites, and pegmatitic veins with a steeply dipping foliation. The strike-slip deformation is characterized by dextral ductile deformation under amphibolite facies and low to medium greenschist facies. In situ U-Pb ages of inherited zircon cores from all zircons in the Khlong Marui shear zone indicate that they have the same material from the Archean. Late Triassic to Late Cretaceous ages obtained for zircon outer cores of the mylonitic granite are probably related to a period of magmatic activity that was significantly influenced by the West Burma and Shan-Thai collision and the subduction along the Sunda Trench. The early dextral ductile deformation phase of the Khlong Marui shear zone in the Early Eocene suggested by U-Pb ages of zircon rims, and the later dextral transpressional deformation in the Late Eocene indicated by mica Rb-Sr ages. Rb-Sr, Sm-Nd, and U-Pb dating correlation implies that the major exhumation period of the ductile lens was in the Eocene. This period was tectonically influenced in the SE Asia region by the early India-Asia collision.

  14. Lichen Persistence and Recovery in Response to Varied Volcanic Disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, P.; Wheeler, T. B.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanic eruptions produce many ecological disturbances that structure vegetation. While lichens are sensitive to disturbances, little is known about their responses to volcanic disturbances, except for colonization of lava. We examined lichen community responses through time to different disturbances produced by the May 1, 2008 eruption of Volcan Chaiten in south-central Chile. Pre-eruption vegetation near the volcano was old-growth Valdivian temperate rainforest dominated by closed-canopy Nothofagus sp... In 2012, we installed thirteen 1-acre plots across volcanic disturbance zones on which a time-constrained search was done for all macrolichen species, each of which was assigned an approximate log10 categorical abundance. We also installed a 0.2 m2 quadrat on two representative trees per plot for repeat photography of lichen cover. We remeasured at least one plot per disturbance zone in 2014 and re-photographed tree quadrats in 2013 and 2014. We then analyzed species composition and abundance differences among disturbance zones. In 2012, the blast (pyroclastic density flow), scorch (standing scorched forest at the edge of the blast) and deep tephra (>10 cm) zones had the lowest lichen species richness (5-13 species), followed by reference (unimpacted) and shallow (<10 cm) tephra (17-20 species). Gravel rain (preexisting rock ejected by eruption initiation), gravel rain + pumice and flooded forests (fluvially reworked volcanic material entrained by heavy rains) were species-rich (25-42 species). In 2014, the blast and deep tephra had regained 2-3 times the number of lichen species since 2012 while the light tephra and reference were essentially unchanged. Gravel rain, gravel rain + pumice and flooded forest plots all had about the same number of species in 2014 as 2012. Lichen colonization and growth in tree quadrats varied widely, from very little colonization in the blast to prolific colonization in the gravel rain + pumice zone. Lichen's varied responses to

  15. A Methodology to Hydraulically Parameterize Deformation Zones and Fracture Networks in Fractured Crystalline Rock Using Fracture Borehole Data and Inflow Data from Single- Hole Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Follin, S.; Hartley, L.; Rhen, I.; Selroos, J.

    2008-12-01

    Three-dimensional, regional, numerical models of groundwater flow and solute transport in fractured crystalline rock are used for two sites in Sweden that are considered for geological disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The models are used to underpin the conceptual modeling that is based on multi-disciplinary data and include descriptions of the geometry of geological features (deformation zones and fracture networks), transient hydrological and chemical boundary conditions, strong spatial heterogeneity in the hydraulic properties, density driven flow, solute transport including rock matrix diffusion, and mixing of different water types in a palaeo-hydrogeological perspective (last 10,000 years). The general approach applied in the numerical modeling was to first parameterize the deformation zones and fracture networks hydraulically using fracture and inflow data from single-hole tests. Second, a confirmatory step was attempted using essentially the same groundwater flow and solute transport model in terms of grid discretization and parameter settings for matching three types of independent field data: 1) large-scale cross-hole (interference) tests, 2) long- term monitoring of groundwater levels, and 3) hydrochemical composition of fracture water and matrix pore water in deep boreholes. We demonstrate here the adopted modelling approach for the first step, i.e. hydraulic parameterization of deformation zones and fracture networks, using single-hole test data from the site investigations undertaken at one of the sites in Sweden (Forsmark). The adopted modelling approach combines a deterministic representation of the major deformation zones with a stochastic representation of the less fractured bedrock outside these zones using the discrete fracture network (DFN) concept. An exponential model for the depth dependency of the in-plane deformation zone transmissivity was suggested based on the data. Lateral heterogeneity was simulated by adding a log-normal random deviate

  16. Anhydrite-bearing rocks from the Rožná district (Moldanubian zone, Czech Republic): high-grade metamorphosed exhalites?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kříbek, Bohdan; Hladíková, Jana; Holeczy, Daniel

    2002-06-01

    Several types of anhydrite-bearing rocks have been found in the amphibolite-facies metamorphosed rocks at the north-eastern margin of the Moldanubian Zone. Anhydrite either forms monomineralic bands up to 40 cm thick, or occurs in the form of disseminated grains in surrounding calc-silicate gneiss together with feldspar, scapolite, amphibole, pyroxene, epidote and pyrite. The isotopic composition of sulphur (δ34S=30.6 to 32.3‰) and strontium (87Sr/86Sr=0.70797 to 0.70781) in anhydrite may indicate a marine source of sulphate. The isotopic ratio of strontium is in the same range as that of metamorphosed strata-bound barite-sulphide ores, which have been previously described in the same area. The δ34S values of coexisting pyrite range from 21.4 to 22.5‰, the Δ34Sanhydrite-pyrite corresponding to the metamorphic temperature of 600 to 660 °C. In contrast to many submarine-exhalative deposits, the oxygen isotopic compositions of anhydrite (δ18O=9.3 to 10.2‰) are lighter than that of barite (δ18O=10.4 to 13.8‰). This indicates that the both minerals are not in isotopic equilibrium. Therefore, it is probable that anhydrite and barite from the Rožná district were deposited from fluids that contained different proportions of seawater and hydrothermal fluids or from hydrothermal fluids that underwent variable extent of oxygen isotope exchange with seafloor rocks. The δ13C values in calcite (δ13C=-17.2 to -18.7‰) from anhydrite-bearing rock are lower than those in distant marbles. As graphite is absent in anhydrite- and calcite-bearing rocks, impoverishment in the 13C isotope cannot be attributed to the graphite-carbonate isotopic exchange during metamorphism. It is proposed that low δ13C values in carbonates are caused by pre-metamorphic oxidation of organic matter in course of hydrothermal processes. Anhydrite and anhydrite-bearing calc-silicate gneiss from the north-eastern part of the Moldanubian Zone are interpreted to be the high-grade metamorphosed

  17. K-Ar constraints on fluid-rock interaction and dissolution-precipitation events within the actively creeping shear zones from SAFOD cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, S.; Hemming, S. R.; Torgersen, T.; Fleisher, M. Q.; Cox, S. E.; Stute, M.

    2009-12-01

    The San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) was drilled to study the physical and chemical processes responsible for faulting and earthquake generation along an active, plate-bounding fault at depth. SAFOD drill cores show multiple zones of alteration and deformation due to fluid-rock interaction in the fault rocks(Schleicher et al. 2008). In context of fluid studies in the SAFZ, noble gas and potassium measurements were performed on solid samples of sedimentary rocks obtained from drill cores across the fault (3050-4000m-MD). We used a combination of 40Ar/39Ar and K-Ar methods on crushed samples of mudrock with variable amounts of visible slickensides to constrain the degree of resetting of the K-Ar system across the San Andreas Fault zone. 40Ar/39Ar was analyzed from small fragments (sand sized grains) while K-Ar was measured in crushed bulk rock samples (100-250 mg for Ar, and 5-10 mg for K analyses). The apparent 40Ar/39Ar ages based on single step laser fusion of small fragments corresponding to the detrital component in the coarse fraction, show varying ages ranging from the provenance age to <13Ma. Although more data are needed to make detailed comparisons, the apparent K-Ar ages of bulk samples in the fault zone are biased toward authigenic materials contained in the fine fraction, similar to the 40Ar/39Ar ages reported for mineralogical separates from very fine size fractions of samples obtained from 3065.98m-MD and 3294.89m-MD (Schleicher et al., submitted to Geology). The small samples measured for 40Ar/39Ar show scatter in the apparent ages, generally bracketing the bulk ages. However they are picked from sieved portions of the samples, and it is likely that there may be a loss of the younger (finer) material. Detrital provenance ages appear to be 50-60Ma in the Pacific Plate, and 100Ma in the North American Plate. 40Ar/39Ar ages within the SAFZ, as defined by geophysical logs (3200-3400m MD), are dominated by apparent detrital ages of ˜100Ma

  18. Geochemistry of primary-carbonate bearing K-rich igneous rocks in the Awulale Mountains, western Tianshan: Implications for carbon-recycling in subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wu-Bin; Niu, He-Cai; Shan, Qiang; Chen, Hua-Yong; Hollings, Pete; Li, Ning-Bo; Yan, Shuang; Zartman, Robert E.

    2014-10-01

    Arc magmatism plays an important role in the recycling of subducted carbon and returning it to the surface. However, the transfer mechanisms of carbon are poorly understood. In this study, the contribution of subducted carbonate-rich sediments to the genesis of the carbonate-bearing K-rich igneous rocks from western Tianshan was investigated. Four key triggers are involved, including sediments subduction, slab decarbonation, partial melting and magma segregation. The globular carbonate ocelli show C-O isotope signatures intermediate between oceanic sediments and mantle, suggesting that the carbon of the primary carbonate ocelli was derived from recycled subducted sediments in the mantle. Decarbonation of the subducted slab is regarded as the primary agent to carbonize the mantle wedge. Geochemical features indicate that the carbonate ocelli are primary, and that the parental K- and carbon-rich mafic alkaline magma was derived from partial melting of carbonated mantle wedge veined with phlogopite. Major and trace element compositions indicate that globular carbonate ocelli hosted in the Bugula K-rich igneous rocks are calcio-carbonate and formed primarily by segregation of the differentiated CO2-rich alkaline magma after crystallization fractionation. The K-rich alkaline magma, which formed from partial melting of metasomatized (i.e., phlogopite bearing) mantle wedge in the sub-arc region, is a favorable agent to transport subducted carbon back to the Earth's surface during carbon recycling in subduction zones, because of the high CO2 solubility in alkaline mafic magma. We therefore propose a model for the petrogenesis of the carbonate-bearing K-rich igneous rocks in western Tianshan, which are significant for revealing the mechanism of carbon recycling in subduction zones.

  19. Phengite-hosted LILE enrichment in eclogite and related rocks: Implications for fluid-mediated mass transfer in subduction zones and arc magma genesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sorensen, Sorena S.; Grossman, J.N.; Perfit, M.R.

    1997-01-01

    Geochemical differences between island arc basalts (LAB) and ocean-floor basalts (mid-ocean ridge basalts; MORB) suggest that the large-ion lithophile elements (LILE) K, Ba, Rb and Cs are probably mobilized in subduction zone fluids and melts. This study documents LILE enrichment of eclogite, amphibolite, and epidote ?? garnet blueschist tectonic blocks and related rocks from melanges of two subduction complexes. The samples are from six localities of the Franciscan Complex, California, and related terranes of Oregon and Baja California, and from the Samana Metamorphic Complex, Samana Peninsula, Dominican Republic. Most Franciscan blocks are MORB-like in their contents of rare earth elements (REE) and high field strength elements (HFSE); in contrast, most Samana blocks show an LAB signature of these elements. The whole-rock K2O contents of both groups range from 1 to 3 wt %; K, Ba, Rb, and Cs are all strongly intercorrelated. Many blocks display K/Ba similar to melasomatized transition zones and rinds at their outer margins. Some transition zones and rinds are enriched in LILE compared with host blocks; others are relatively depleted in these elements. Some LILE-rich blocks contain 'early' coarse-grained muscovite that is aligned in the foliation defined by coarse-grained omphacite or amphibole grains. Others display 'late' muscovite in veins and as a partial replacement of garnet; many contain both textural types. The muscovite is phengite that contains ???3??25-3??55 Si per 11 oxygens, and ???0??25-0??50 Mgper 11 oxygens. Lower-Si phengite has a significant paragonite component: Na per 11 oxygens ranges to ???0??12. Ba contents of phengite range to over 1 wt % (0??027 per 11 oxygens). Ba in phengite does not covary strongly with either Na or K. Ba contents of phengite increase from some blocks to their transition zones or rinds, or from blocks to their veins. Averaged KlBa ratios for phengite and host samples define an array which describes other subsamples of

  20. Geochronological and geochemical constraints on the petrogenesis of late Cretaceous volcanic rock series from the eastern Sakarya zone, NE Anatolia-Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydin, Faruk; Oǧuz, Simge; Şen, Cüneyt; Uysal, İbrahim; Başer, Rasim

    2016-04-01

    New SHRIMP zircon U-Pb ages and whole-rock geochemical data as well as Sr-Nd-Pb and δ18O isotopes of late Cretaceous volcanic rock series from the Giresun and Artvin areas (NE Anatolia, Turkey) in the northern part of the eastern Sakarya zone (ESZ) provide important evidence for northward subduction of the Neo-Tethyan oceanic lithosphere along the southern border of the ESZ. In particular, tectonic setting and petrogenesis of these subduction-related volcanites play a critical role in determining the nature of the lower continental crust and mantle dynamics during late Mesozoic orogenic processes in this region. The late Cretaceous time in the ESZ is represented by intensive volcanic activities that occurred in two different periods, which generally consist of alternation of mafic-intermediate (basaltic to andesitic) and felsic rock series (dacitic to rhyolitic) within each period. Although there is no geochronological data for the lower mafic-intermediate rock series of the first volcanic period, U-Pb zircon dating from the first cycle of felsic rocks yielded ages ranging from 88.6±1.8 to 85.0±1.3 Ma (i.e. Coniacian-Early Santonian). The first volcanic period in the region is generally overlain by reddish biomicrite-rich sedimentary rocks of Santonian-Early Campanian. U-Pb zircon dating for the second cycle of mafic-intermediate and felsic rocks yielded ages varying from 84.9±1.7 to 80.8±1.5Ma (i.e. Early to Middle Campanian). The studied volcanic rocks have mostly transitional geochemical character changing from tholeiitic to calc-alkaline with typical arc signatures. N-MORB-normalised multi-element and chondrite-normalised rare earth element (REE) patterns show that all rocks are enriched in LILEs (e.g. Rb, Ba, Th) and LREEs (e.g. La, Ce) but depleted in Nb and Ti. In particular, the felsic samples are characterised by distinct negative Eu anomalies. The samples are characterized by a wide range of Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic compositions (initial ɛNd values from -7

  1. Diagenesis of the Oligocene-Miocene rocks of the Upper Floridan and Intermediate aquifer systems by meteoric and mixing-zone waters in southwest Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Weedman, S.D. ); McCartan, L. )

    1993-03-01

    Optical and SEM of samples from 6 cores of Oligocene and Miocene rocks that compose portions of the Florida and Intermediate aquifers and the intervening semiconfining unit documents meteoric and mixing-zone (seawater and fresh carbonate ground water) diagenesis inferred to have occurred over several cycles of sea level change. Dolomite, limestone, sandstone, and claystone of the Suwannee Formation and the Arcadia Formation (Hawthorn Group) were examined. Core samples from time-equivalent strata in two E--W transects in Manatee, Hardee, Highlands, Sarasota, and DeSoto Counties are estimated to be 16--33 Ma on the basis of [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr ratios from unaltered mollusk shells and by molluscan biostratigraphy. Lithostratigraphic correlations are based on examination of 19 cores, 62 thin sections, 60 geophysical logs, and mineralogy determined by X-ray diffraction. Diagenetic indicators that the authors tracked petrographically include shell micritization, shell dissolution, equant and (or) fibrous CaCO[sub 3] cement, neomorphism, dolomite, etched phosphate grains, echinoderm fragment syntaxial overgrowths, and amorphous silica pore lining. Infiltration of meteoric water caused dissolution of carbonate minerals, especially aragonite, and precipitation of equant calcite crystals in voids of dissolved fossils and in pore spaces between grains. The silica was precipitated as pore linings in zones having soil textures. Observed replacement of calcite by limpid dolomite is consistent with modeling predictions of mixing-zone diagenesis. Etched crystals of limpid dolomite may indicate freshwater dissolution of a mixing-zone precipitate. Mapping of regional unconformities revealed pronounced thickening and thinning of some units. Evidence of meteoric water diagenesis is observed in the upper 600 ft of the transects examined. Evidence of mixing-zone diagenesis is observed at varying depths, but appears to increase in abundance and thickness toward the west.

  2. Reaction zone between pre-UHP titanite and host rock: insights into fluid-rock interaction and deformation mechanisms during exhumation of deeply subducted continental crust (Dabie Shan UHP unit, China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wawrzenitz, N.; Romer, R. L.; Grasemann, B.; Morales, L. F. G.

    2012-04-01

    Exhumed crustal UHP rocks may occur as relict blocks in strongly metasomatized matrix rocks. Due to variations in competence between the mm to km sized blocks and their ductile matrix, the largely undeformed blocks may preserve the pre-subduction and the prograde history, whereas the matrix rocks have been ductilely deformed to high magnitudes and record successive stages of deformation. The reaction zones between blocks and matrix, however, provide insights into the fluid-rock interaction, deformation and the deformation mechanisms active during the exhumation of deeply subducted continental crust in the subduction channel. We investigate a titanite megacryst (3 cm in diameter) in a calc-silicate marble from the UHP unit in the Dabie Shan, China. The core of the titanite megacryst grew prograde during subduction. Its U-Pb system remained closed and yields a maximum age for UHP metamorphism. Sr and Nd isotope compositions in the core demonstrate that the titanite megacryst precipitated from a homogeneous fluid source. During metamorphism in the subduction zone, infiltration of external fluids resulted first in Sr-loss from the marbles and then introduction of Sr with unusually low 87Sr/86S values (Romer et al., 2003), leading to the contrasting 87Sr/86Sr values in the titanite megacryst and the hosting UHP marbles (Wawrzenitz et al., 2006). Related to deformation in the calc-silicate marble matrix, the rim of the titanite megacryst has been replaced during the following dissolution-precipitation reactions: (i) Pseudomorphic replacement of the old titanite megacryst by coupled dissolution-reprecipitation. Fluid migrated into the old grain producing a sharp boundary of the replacement front. (ii) New small titanite grains grew with their long axes parallel to the foliation of the marble matrix, reflecting the activation of dissolution precipitation creep. In the matrix, the foliation is defined by the orientation of the basal planes of phengitic white mica. The new

  3. Ductile shear zones can induce hydraulically over-pressured fractures in deep hot-dry rock reservoirs: a new target for geothermal exploration?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrank, C. E.; Karrech, A.; Regenauer-Lieb, K.

    2014-12-01

    It is notoriously difficult to create and maintain permeability in deep hot-dry rock (HDR) geothermal reservoirs with engineering strategies. However, we predict that long-lived, slowly deforming HDR reservoirs likely contain hydraulically conductive, over-pressured fracture systems, provided that (a) the underlying lower crust and/or mantle are not entirely depleted of fluids and (b) the fracture system has not been drained into highly permeable overlying rocks. Such fracture systems could be targeted for the extraction of geothermal energy. Our prediction hinges on the notion that polycrystalline creep through matter transfer by a liquid phase (dissolution-precipitation creep) is a widespread mechanism for extracting fluids from the lower crust and mantle. Such processes - where creep cavities form during the slow, high-temperature deformation of crystalline solids, e.g., ceramics, metals, and rocks - entail the formation of (intergranular) fluid-assisted creep fractures. They constitute micron-scale voids formed along grain boundaries due to incompatibilities arising from diffusion or dislocation creep. Field and laboratory evidence suggest that the process leading to creep fractures may generate a dynamic permeability in the ductile crust, thus extracting fluids from this domain. We employed an elasto-visco-plastic material model that simulates creep fractures with continuum damage mechanics to model the slow contraction of high-heat-producing granites overlain by sedimentary rocks in 2D. The models suggest that deformation always leads to the initiation of a horizontal creep-damage front in the lower crust. This front propagates upwards towards the brittle-ductile transition (BDT) during protracted deformation where it collapses into highly damaged brittle-ductile shear zones. If the BDT is sufficiently shallow or finite strain sufficiently large, these shear zones trigger brittle faults emerging from their tips, which connect to the sub-horizontal damage

  4. Behavior of major and trace elements upon weathering of peridotites in New Caledonia : A possible site on ultramafic rocks for the Critical Zone Exploration Network (CZEN) ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juillot, Farid; Fandeur, D.; Fritsch, E.; Morin, G.; Ambrosi, J. P.; Olivi, L.; Cognigni, A.; Hazemann, J. L.; Proux, O.; Webb, S.; Brown, G. E., Jr.

    2010-05-01

    ). However, these high concentration of potentially toxic elements can represent a serious hazard for the environmental quality of the Caledonian ecosystem which is a '' biodiversity hotspot' (Myers, 2000), which emphasize the strong need for characterizing the natural cycling of these elements upon weathering of ultramafic rocks. To reach this goal, we have studied the mineralogical distribution, crystal-chemistry and mass balance modelling of major (Si, Mg, Al, Fe, Mn) and trace elements (Ni, Cr and Co) in the freely-drained weathering profile developed in the serpentinized harzburgites of Mt Koniambo (West Coast of New Caledonia). Results show that both hydrothermal and meteoric processes contributed to the vertical differentiation of this freely drained weathering profiles in serpentinized ultramafic rocks. Finally, they also emphasize the importance of both redox reactions and interactions with Mn- and Fe-oxyhydroxydes (Fandeur et al., 2009a; 2009b) to explain the opposite behavior observed between very mobile Ni and almost immobile Cr (Fandeur et al., 2010). These results bring new insights on the geochemical behavior of trace elements upon weathering of ultramafic rocks under tropical conditions leading to the formation of supergene ore deposits. They also emphasize the interest of such a weathering site on ultramafic rocks under tropical climate to complemente the reference sites of the Critical Zone Exploration Network (CZEN). References Cluzel D., Aitchinson J.C. and Picard C. (2001) Tectonic accretion and underplating of mafic terranes in the Late Eocene intraoceanic fore-arc of New-Caledonia (Southwest Pacific): geodynamic implications. Tectonophysics, 340, 23-59. Coleman, R.G. (1977) Ophiolites: Ancient oceanic lithosphere?: Berlin, Germany, Springer-Verlag, 229p. Fandeur D., Juillot F., Morin G., Olivi L., Cognigni A., Fialin M., Coufignal F., Ambrosi J.P., Guyot F. and Fritsch E. (2009a). Synchrotron-based speciation of chromium in an Oxisol from New

  5. Deciphering igneous and metamorphic events in high-grade rocks of the Wilmington complex, Delaware: Morphology, cathodoluminescence and backscattered electron zoning, and SHRIMP U-Pb geochronology of zircon and monazite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aleinikoff, J.N.; Schenck, W.S.; Plank, M.O.; Srogi, L.A.; Fanning, C.M.; Kamo, S.L.; Bosbyshell, H.

    2006-01-01

    High-grade rocks of the Wilmington Complex, northern Delaware and adjacent Maryland and Pennsylvania, contain morphologically complex zircons that formed through both igneous and metamorphic processes during the development of an island-arc complex and suturing of the arc to Laurentia. The arc complex has been divided into several members, the protoliths of which include both intrusive and extrusive rocks. Metasedimentary rocks are interlayered with the complex and are believed to be the infrastructure upon which the arc was built. In the Wilmingto n Complex rocks, both igneous and metamorphic zircons occur as elongate and equant forms. Chemical zoning, shown by cathodoluminescence (CL), includes both concentric, oscillatory patterns, indicative of igneous origin, and patchwork and sector patterns, suggestive of metamorphic growth. Metamorphic monazites are chemically homogeneous, or show oscillatory or spotted chemical zoning in backscattered electron images. U-Pb geochronology by sensitive high resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) was used to date complexly zoned zircon and monazite. All but one member of the Wilmington Complex crystallized in the Ordovician between ca. 475 and 485 Ma; these rocks were intruded by a suite of gabbro-to-granite plutonic rocks at 434 ?? Ma. Detrital zircons in metavolcanic and metasedimentary units were derived predominantly from 0.9 to 1.4 Ga (Grenvillian) basement, presumably of Laurentian origin. Amphibolite to granulite facies metamorphism of the Wilmington Complex, recorded by ages of metamorphic zircon (428 ?? 4 and 432 ?? 6 Ma) and monazite (429 ?? 2 and 426 ?? 3 Ma), occurred contemporaneously with emplacement of the younger plutonic rocks. On the basis of varying CL zoning patterns and external morphologies, metamorphic zircons formed by different processes (presumably controlled by rock chemistry) at slightly different times and temperatures during prograde metamorphism. In addition, at least three other thermal episodes are

  6. Oxygen isotope zoning in garnets from Franciscan eclogite blocks: evidence for rock-buffered fluid interaction in the mantle wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Errico, J. C.; Barnes, J.; Strickland, A.; Valley, J. W.

    2012-12-01

    The oxygen isotope composition of Franciscan Complex eclogite garnets and actinolite rind encasing the high-grade blocks have been analyzed to place constraints on the fluid history of these blocks. In situ SIMS oxygen isotope analysis of single garnet crystals from three eclogite blocks (Ring Mountain, Jenner Beach, Mt. Hamilton) shows an abrupt decrease in the δ18O value by ~1-3‰ from core to rim at ~120 ± 50 μm from the rim at all locations. The δ18O values of two Ring Mountain eclogite garnets decrease from 6.0 ± 0.3‰ to 3.8 ± 0.6‰ from core to rim. Four Mt. Hamilton eclogite garnets decrease from 8.6 ± 0.5‰ to 5.9 ± 0.6‰ from core to rim and two decrease from 7.1 ± 0.2‰ in the core to 5.7 ± 0.5‰ at the rim. Two Jenner Beach eclogite garnets decrease from ~11.0 to ~10‰, whereas two others show little to no variation at 9.9 ± 0.3‰ and 11.4 ± 0.2‰. δ18O values of eclogite garnet cores likely inherit the original oxygen isotope composition of the altered MORB protolith, whereas the abrupt and >1‰ change in the δ18O values of the garnet rims suggest interaction with a lower δ18O value fluid during the final stages of growth. Equilibrium calculations indicate that the temperature change associated with Franciscan eclogite metamorphism (400-600°C) is not likely to account for >~1‰ change in the δ18O value of the growing garnet. Previous work suggests sediments as a potential source of metasomatic fluid during blueschist facies metamorphism (300-350°C); however, these temperatures are too low for garnet growth and sedimentary derived fluids would have high δ18O values. Instead, mantle wedge peridotite is a significant source of lower δ18O material. We suggest that the oxygen composition of infiltrating slab derived fluids is buffered by surrounding ultramafic rock since the volume of ultramafic rock is much greater than that of the fluids. The oxygen isotope composition is recorded in the garnet during final stages of

  7. Tectonic Setting and Bimodal Magmatic Evolution of Eocene Volcanic Rocks of the Bijgerd-Kuh-e Kharchin area, Uromieh-Dokhtar Zone, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davarpanah, A.; Khalatbari-Jafari, M.; Babaie, H. A.; Krogstad, E. J.; Mobasher, K.; La Tour, T. E.; Deocampo, D. M.

    2008-12-01

    Geochemical composition and texture of the Middle and Late Eocene volcanic, volcaniclastic, and volcanic- sedimentary rocks in the Bijgerd-Kuh-e Kharchin area, northwest of Saveh, provide significant geochemical and geological clues for the tectonic and magmatic evolution of the Uromieh-Dokhtar volcanic-plutonic zone of Iran. The Middle Eocene volcanic rocks have an intermediate composition and include green tuff and tuffaceous sandstone with intercalated sandstone, sandy tuff, and shale. The shale has lenses of nummulite- bearing limestone with a Middle Eocene detrital age. The time between the Middle and Late Eocene volcanic activities in this area is marked by the presence of andesite and rhyolitic tuff. The Late Eocene succession is distinguished by the presence of four alternating levels (horizons) of intermediate lava and ignimbrite which we designate as Eig. The ignimbrites of the Eig sequence have a rhyolitic composition and include ignimbrite- breccia, ignimbrite-tuff, and ignimbrite-lava pairs. The volume of the felsic volcanic rocks in this sequence far exceeds that of the intermediate rocks, which makes it unlikely that they evolved through the magmatic differentiation of a basaltic magma. The presence of the nummulite-bearing limestone lenses, and sandstone and conglomerate interbeds between the ignimbrites, suggests a shallow marine environment for the pyroclastic deposition and probably the eruptions. The tuff and siltstone of the Est unit that sits above the first ignimbrite may represent deep water, Late Eocene deposit. Oligo-Miocene limestone of the Qom Formation unconformably overlies the uppermost Late Eocene ignimbrite. Washings from red marls give microfossils with Late Eocene age for the Eig sequence, which is synchronous with other paleontological evidence that puts the peak volcanic activity as Late Eocene in the Bijgerd-Kuh-e Kharchin area. Field and petrographic evidence for magma mixing/mingling is given by the presence of mafic

  8. H2O-fluid-saturated melting of subducted continental crust facilitates exhumation of ultrahigh-pressure rocks in continental subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labrousse, L.; Duretz, T.; Gerya, T.

    2015-10-01

    We present two-dimensional numerical models of plate subduction and collision inspired by the Scandinavian Caledonian orogeny to investigate the possible impact of continental crust partial melting on the exhumation of ultra-high pressure metamorphic rocks. Three possible reactions were tested: low temperature solidus representing H2O-fluid-saturated partial melting, and two end-member reaction curves for dehydration melting. Thermo-mechanical effects of partial melting were implemented as (1) a viscosity decrease as a determined rheologically critical melt percentage was reached (here 0.1), (2) a change in effective heat capacity and adiabatic heating/cooling accounting for a latent heat term in the heat equation. Among the 3 tested reactions, only H2O-fluid-saturated partial melting drastically modifies the collision dynamics from the non-melting reference model holding all other parameters constant. A substantially low general viscosity truncation (here 1017 Pa s) is needed to properly resolve the effect of partial melting on deep collision processes. Low temperature melting indeed induces the development of a low viscosity buoyant plume prior to slab detachment, where migmatites exhume from UHP conditions at rates and with pressure-temperature paths similar to the natural values acknowledged for the Norwegian Caledonides. High temperature melting has no drastic influence on early collision dynamics. While positive buoyancy remains the first order driver for the exhumation of buried continental rocks, exhumation initiates in these cases with eduction subsequent to slab detachment. Melting and formation of a migmatite plume can later occur along decompression path while continental crust undergoes thermal reequilibration at temperatures above 900 °C. Some of the partially molten material can also relaminate in the overriding plate rather than exhume within the collision zone. Even if minor in terms of amount of magma produced, H2O-fluid-saturated partial melting

  9. Diffusional modification of prograde chemical zoning in garnet and its bearing on the estimates of prograde metamorphic conditions in medium to high grade rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konopásek, Jiří; Caddick, Mark J.

    2016-04-01

    Preserved prograde chemical zoning in metamorphic garnet is often used for quantification of pressure and temperature conditions during its growth. However, from the time that zoning is established during growth, intra-crystalline diffusion continually acts to modify it. This operates at various rates throughout the entire metamorphic cycle and causes progressive deviation of garnet compositional profiles from those established during growth, potentially leading to large errors if these compositions are used to estimate pressure-temperature (P-T) conditions. To illustrate, we quantify the extent of compositional changes due to intra-crystalline diffusion occurring during 20 Ma of burial along 16-19°C/km geotherms followed by 1, 15 and 30 Ma of exhumation, for a pelitic sample. Typically, garnet growth in our modelling starts at c. 420°C and 5.5-7 kbar and is terminated at Tmax (600-750°C at c. 10-10.5 kbar). Calculations involve development of growth zoning (inferred from equilibrium thermodynamic modelling) and its simultaneous modification due to intra-crystalline multi-component diffusion along these prescribed paths. This allows us to quantify the extent to which zoning modification depends on crystal growth rate and size, maximum temperature achieved, and garnet composition. The use of diffusionally modified garnet compositions for thermobarometry leads to shortening of the inferred prograde pressure-temperature paths (relative to the actual path experienced) and can introduce significant errors in estimates of P-T conditions at different stages of a rock's evolution. In our model example, the conditions of earliest garnet growth would be overestimated by c. 1.5-2 kbar and c. 40-70°C for garnet crystal diameters of c. 3-5 mm in samples eventually reaching mid-amphibolite facies temperatures (or by 2-4 kbar and c. 130-180°C for crystal diameters of c. 0.2-0.5 mm). The conditions of earliest garnet growth in crystals reaching 1 mm in diameter can be

  10. Correlation of coal beds, coal zones, and key stratigraphic units in the Pennsylvanian rocks of eastern Kentucky

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rice, Charles L.; Smith, J. Hiram

    1980-01-01

    The Pennsylvanian rocks of the eastern Kentucky coal field unlderlie an area of about 27,000 square kilometers (see index map). Largely because of the size and stratigraphic complexity of the area, Huddle and others (1963, p. 31) divided it into six coal reserve districts (unofficial), utilizing state and county lines as well as geologic features, drainage areas, and cola producing areas. This division is followed herein because, in general, each of these districts has a characteristic stratigraphic nomenclature, particularly as related to coal bed names. The six districts shown on the index mat, are the Princess, Licking River, Big Sandy, Hazard, Southwestern, and Upper Cumberland River; the Upper Cumberland River district has been divided into the Harlan and Middlesboro subdistricts. 

  11. Carbon deposition during brittle rock deformation: Changes in electrical properties of fault zones and potential geoelectric phenomena during earthquakes

    SciTech Connect

    Mathez, E A; Roberts, J J; Duba, A G; Kronenberg, A K; Karner, S L

    2008-05-16

    To investigate potential mechanisms for geoelectric phenomena accompanying earthquakes, we have deformed hollow cylinders of Sioux quartzite to failure in the presence of carbonaceous pore fluids and investigated the resulting changes in electrical conductivity and carbon distribution. Samples were loaded at room temperature or 400 C by a hydrostatic pressure at their outer diameter, increasing pressure at a constant rate to {approx}290 MPa. Pore fluids consisted of pure CO, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and a 1:1 mixture of CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}, each with pore pressures of 2.0 to 4.1 MPa. Failure occurred by the formation of mode II shear fractures transecting the hollow cylinder walls. Radial resistivities of the cylinders fell to 2.9 to 3.1 M{Omega}-m for CO tests and 15.2 to 16.5 M{Omega}-m for CO{sub 2}:CH{sub 4} tests, compared with >23 M{Omega}-m for dry, undeformed cylinders. Carbonaceous fluids had no discernable influence on rock strength. Based on mapping using electron microprobe techniques, carbon occurs preferentially as quasi-continuous films on newly-formed fracture surfaces, but these films are absent from pre-existing surfaces in those same experiments. The observations support the hypothesis that electrical conductivity of rocks is enhanced by the deposition of carbon on fracture surfaces and imply that electrical properties may change in direct response to brittle deformation. They also suggest that the carbon films formed nearly instantaneously as the cracks formed. Carbon film deposition may accompany the development of microfracture arrays prior to and during fault rupture and thus may be capable of explaining precursory and coseismic geoelectric phenomena.

  12. Deciphering P-T paths in metamorphic rocks involving zoned minerals using quantified maps (XMapTools software) and thermodynamics methods: Examples from the Alps and the Himalaya.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanari, P.; Vidal, O.; Schwartz, S.; Riel, N.; Guillot, S.; Lewin, E.

    2012-04-01

    Metamorphic rocks are made by mosaic of local thermodynamic equilibria involving minerals that grew at different temporal, pressure (P) and temperature (T) conditions. These local (in space but also in time) equilibria can be identified using micro-structural and textural criteria, but also tested using multi-equilibrium techniques. However, linking deformation with metamorphic conditions requires spatially continuous estimates of P and T conditions in least two dimensions (P-T maps), which can be superimposed to the observed structures of deformation. To this end, we have developed a new Matlab-based GUI software for microprobe X-ray map processing (XMapTools, http://www.xmaptools.com) based on the quantification method of De Andrade et al. (2006). XMapTools software includes functions for quantification processing, two chemical modules (Chem2D, Triplot3D), the structural formula functions for common minerals, and more than 50 empirical and semi-empirical geothermobarometers obtained from the literature. XMapTools software can be easily coupled with multi-equilibrium thermobarometric calculations. We will present examples of application for two natural cases involving zoned minerals. The first example is a low-grade metapelite from the paleo-subduction wedge in the Western Alps (Schistes Lustrés unit) that contains only both zoned chlorite and phengite, and also quartz. The second sample is a Himalayan eclogite from the high-pressure unit of Stak (Pakistan) with an eclogitic garnet-omphacite assemblage retrogressed into clinopyroxene-plagioclase-amphibole symplectite, and later into amphibole-biotite during the collisional event under crustal conditions. In both samples, P-T paths were recovered using multi-equilibrium, or semi-empirical geothermobarometers included in the XMapTools package. The results will be compared and discussed with pseudosections calculated with the sample bulk composition and with different local bulk rock compositions estimated with XMap

  13. Modeling study of the small-scale mantle convection in the subduction zone mantle wedge including the melting mechanism of mantle rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, M.; Tamura, Y.

    2014-12-01

    It is observed that subduction zone mantle wedge is not uniform even in the direction along the overlying island-arc that is perpendicular to the subducting direction. The hot fingers model is a hypothetical model specifying the three dimensional structural variation within the mangle wedge; it assumes that there is a fingers-like stripe pattern of mechanical and thermodynamical properties within the wedge. Those non-uniformity appears over the arc crust as nonuniform distribution of volcanic eruptions. Indeed, quaternary volcanoes in the NE Japan arc could be grouped into ten volcano clusters striking transverse to the arc. These have an average width of ∼50 km, and are separated by parallel gaps 30-75 km wide. Moreover, the structure of the mantle wedge and arc crust beneath the NE Japan arc and the Izu-Bonin-Mariana arc, respectively, suggest that the third dimension, lying along the strike of the arc, is necessary to understand the actual production of magmas in subduction zones. To explore the physical and mathematical mechanism of formation of the hot-fingers pattern, we develop a model of mantle convection in the mantle wedge. Our model incorporates the melting mechanism of the mantle rocks, which affect temperature and velocity of mantle. Our model produces a spatiotemporal pattern in those variables. The obtained results are compared with the spatiotemporal patterns observed in the NE Japan arc.

  14. Tracking magmatic processes through Zr/Hf ratios in rocks and Hf and Ti zoning in zircons: An example from the Spirit Mountain batholith, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lowery, Claiborne L.E.; Miller, C.F.; Walker, B.A.; Wooden, J.L.; Mazdab, F.K.; Bea, F.

    2006-01-01

    Zirconium and Hf are nearly identical geochemically, and therefore most of the crust maintains near-chondritic Zr/Hf ratios of ???35-40. By contrast, many high-silica rhyolites and granites have anomalously low Zr/Hf (15-30). As zircon is the primary reservoir for both Zr and Hf and preferentially incorporates Zr, crystallization of zircon controls Zr/ Hf, imprinting low Zr/Hf on coexisting melt. Thus, low Zr/Hf is a unique fingerprint of effective magmatic fractionation in the crust. Age and compositional zonation in zircons themselves provide a record of the thermal and compositional histories of magmatic systems. High Hf (low Zr/ Hf) in zircon zones demonstrates growth from fractionated melt, and Ti provides an estimate of temperature of crystallization (TTiZ) (Watson and Harrison, 2005). Whole-rock Zr/Hf and zircon zonation in the Spirit Mountain batholith, Nevada, document repeated fractionation and thermal fluctuations. Ratios of Zr/Hf are ???30-40 for cumulates and 18-30 for high-SiO2 granites. In zircons, Hf (and U) are inversely correlated with Ti, and concentrations indicate large fluctuations in melt composition and TTiZ (>100??C) for individual zircons. Such variations are consistent with field relations and ion-probe zircon geochronology that indicate a >1 million year history of repeated replenishment, fractionation, and extraction of melt from crystal mush to form the low Zr/Hf high-SiO2 zone. ?? 2006 The Mineralogical Society.

  15. Sensors and Monitoring Techniques for the Deep Unsaturated Zone: Reducing Uncertainty Related to Seepage and Transport in Fractured Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinwiddie, C. L.; Or, D.; Stothoff, S. A.; Fedors, R. W.; Pohle, J. A.; Tuller, M.

    2007-12-01

    Planning for performance confirmation of hydrologic properties and processes in a potential geologic repository for high-level radioactive waste at Yucca Mountain is a requirement stated in Subpart F of 10 CFR Part 63. An important goal of performance confirmation is to acquire information indicating whether natural and engineered barriers are functioning as intended, and whether the conditions encountered are within the limits assumed during a licensing review. Long-term monitoring of hydrologic properties and processes and in situ confirmation of design assumptions will play a key role in the safe operation of the potential geologic radioactive waste repository and in the decision to close the repository. Despite remarkable advances in cyberinfrastructure for linking sensors into spatially distributed environmental networks, the extended time horizon (decades to hundreds of years) for long-term monitoring activities, the harsh thermal and radiative conditions in the near-field environment, the deep fractured unsaturated rock environment at Yucca Mountain, the potential scope of observations, and restricted access to observation ports for maintenance and upgrades each present unprecedented challenges to the design of hydro-environmental monitoring networks. Activities for performance confirmation could include the use of pore water samplers and sensors for measuring water content, matric potential, temperature, relative humidity, and water and gas fluxes. Current sensor technology for deep fractured rock systems (i) lags behind environmental observatory network solutions for surface and near-surface processes, (ii) lags behind analogous technology for unconsolidated porous media, (iii) cannot be reliably deployed without ongoing maintenance or replacement at relatively frequent intervals, and (iv) is not designed to withstand harsh thermal and radiative conditions. Long-term monitoring could require special design considerations, such as measurement redundancy

  16. Studying the structure of a zone in which the single-phase flow moving in an annular channel with partially blocked cross section becomes spatially disturbed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashinskii, O. N.; Lobanov, P. D.; Kurdyumov, A. S.; Pribaturin, N. A.

    2013-05-01

    The flow of liquid in an annular channel with a partially shaded flow section is experimentally studied using the electrodiffusion method. The effect on the flow structure produced by a shutter closing one-quarter of the channel cross section is shown. An obstacle installed in the channel causes the flow to attain a 3D structure. The flow pattern in such channel differs significantly from that observed in undisturbed flow moving in an annular channel. It is revealed that the friction stress values measured on the channel's inner wall depend essentially on the azimuth angle over the channel height. With distance away from the obstacle, the influence it has on the hydrodynamic flow structure tends to decrease, but the disturbance produced by it does not die out completely even at a distance of more than 600 mm from the obstacle. Data quantitatively characterizing the disturbance of flow structure in the studied channel are presented.

  17. A ˜ 700 Ma Sm Nd garnet whole rock age from the granulite facies Central Kaoko Zone (Namibia): Evidence for a cryptic high-grade polymetamorphic history?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, S.; Kröner, A.; Kröner, S.

    2007-09-01

    Continental collision of the Kalahari and the Congo craton in Africa and the Rio de la Plata Craton in South America resulted in a structurally complex Neoproterozoic belt system, the Kaoko-Dom Feliciano-Ribeira belt. It is uncertain whether these three cratons collided more or less simultaneously during one single orogenic event at ˜ 580-550 Ma or whether the belt owe its structural and metamorphic features to several so far poorly constrained events. The Kaoko Belt (NW Nambia), representing the belt system between the southern Congo Craton and the Rio de la Plata Craton, is an ideal object to study these complexities. Within this belt, high-grade meta-igneous and metasedimentary rocks of the sillimanite-K-feldspar zone contain large garnet porphyroblasts that grew at ca. 730 ± 10 °C at 6.7 ± 1.2 kbar during peak metamorphic granulite-facies conditions. A Sm-Nd garnet-whole rock errorchron ( n = 7, MSWD = 6.0) obtained on a siliceous metasediment yielded an unexpected old age of 692 ±14 Ma which is interpreted as an inherited metamorphic age of an older granulite facies event. It is evident that the dated garnets survived the younger high-grade granulite facies metamorphism that occurred between ca. 570 and 520 Ma and preserved their old Sm-Nd isotope systematics implying that the closure temperature for Sm-Nd in garnet is higher than ca. 730 °C in this case. These results imply fast cooling rates at different times during the Pan-African orogeny that prevent isotopic homogenization at sample scale. Moreover, it is suggestive that trace element (REE) diffusion in garnet is considerably slower than major element diffusion. From a regional point of view, it is possible that these specific siliceous metasedimentary rocks may be unrelated to the Pan-African metamorphic evolution of the Kaoko Belt between 570 and 520 Ma and may represent lithological units that belong to so far unrecognized terranes in the Kaoko Belt.

  18. Mantle-crust interactions in a paleosubduction zone: Evidence from highly siderophile element systematics of eclogite and related rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penniston-Dorland, Sarah C.; Walker, Richard J.; Pitcher, Lynnette; Sorensen, Sorena S.

    2012-02-01

    Substantial differences in 187Os/188Os and absolute and relative abundances of highly siderophile elements (HSE: Os, Ir, Ru, Pt, Pd, Re) in mantle peridotites compared to oceanic crust indicate that this suite of elements may prove useful in assessing mechanisms and pathways of mantle and slab mass transfer within the subduction channel. Currently, however, information regarding the mobility of the HSE in subduction zone environments is limited. To better understand the systematics of highly siderophile elements in subduction settings, we measured Os isotopic compositions and HSE abundances of cores and rinds of meter-scale blocks of eclogite, blueschist and garnet amphibolite from subduction-related mélanges within 1) the Franciscan Complex, CA, and a related terrane in Oregon; 2) the Catalina Schist, CA; and 3) the Samana Metamorphic Complex, Samana Peninsula, Dominican Republic. Rinds composed of amphibole, chlorite, ± phengite, talc, titanite and rutile partly enclose blocks at each location. Mineralogic, petrologic and geochemical data suggest that these rinds are metasomatic features that formed by fluid-mediated interaction between mafic blocks and an ultramafic matrix. The cores of high-grade blocks are characterized by high (Pt + Pd)/(Os + Ir + Ru), and variably radiogenic Os; initial 187Os/188Os ranges from 0.197 to 4.30. These characteristics are consistent with the HSE compositions of subducted basalts. In contrast, (Pt + Pd)/(Os + Ir + Ru) of rinds are generally much lower than cores, approaching values typical of mantle peridotites. The initial 187Os/188Os of most rinds are also typical of upper mantle peridotites; values for most rinds fall between 0.125 and 0.14. The similarities of the 187Os/188Os and HSE abundances between rinds and mantle peridotites indicate that the HSE contained within rinds reflect a contribution by mantle peridotite, whether by fluid-mediated transfer or through mechanical processes. If the HSE signatures of the rinds were

  19. Identification and characterization of hydrothermally altered zones in granite by combining synthetic clay content logs with magnetic mineralogical investigations of drilled rock cuttings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meller, Carola; Kontny, Agnes; Kohl, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Clay minerals as products of hydrothermal alteration significantly influence the hydraulic and mechanical properties of crystalline rock. Therefore, the localization and characterization of alteration zones by downhole measurements is a great challenge for the development of geothermal reservoirs. The magnetite bearing granite of the geothermal site in Soultz-sous-Forêts (France) experienced hydrothermal alteration during several tectonic events and clay mineral formation is especially observed in alteration halos around fracture zones. During the formation of clay minerals, magnetite was oxidized into hematite, which significantly reduces the magnetic susceptibility of the granite from ferrimagnetic to mostly paramagnetic values. The aim of this study was to find out if there exists a correlation between synthetic clay content logs (SCCLs) and measurements of magnetic susceptibility on cuttings in the granite in order to characterize their alteration mineralogy. Such a correlation has been proven for core samples of the EPS1 reference well. SCCLs were created from gamma ray and fracture density logs using a neural network. These logs can localize altered fracture zones in the GPK1-4 wells, where no core material is available. Mass susceptibility from 261 cutting samples of the wells GPK1-GPK4 was compared with the neural network derived synthetic logs. We applied a combination of temperature dependent magnetic susceptibility measurements with optical and electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy to discriminate different stages of alteration. We found, that also in the granite cuttings an increasing alteration grade is characterized by an advancing oxidation of magnetite into hematite and a reduction of magnetic susceptibility. A challenge to face for the interpretation of magnetic susceptibility data from cuttings material is that extreme alteration grades can also display increased susceptibilities due to the formation of secondary magnetite

  20. A transmissivity model for deformation zones in fractured crystalline rock and its possible correlation to in situ stress at the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository site at Forsmark, Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Follin, Sven; Stigsson, Martin

    2014-03-01

    The Forsmark site was recently proposed by the Svensk Kärnbränslehantering AB (SKB) to serve as the potential site for construction of a future geological repository for spent high-level nuclear fuel at about 470 m depth in fractured crystalline rock. The considerations included, among other things, distance from regionally significant deformation zones with highly strained rock, lithological homogeneity, low hydraulic conductivity, groundwater salinity with an acceptable range, and lack of potential mineral resources. This report describes the calculation of transmissivity of deduced deformation zones at Forsmark and the transmissivity model used in the regional groundwater flow modeling carried out in support of the integrated site description. Besides significant decrease with increasing depth (more than four orders of magnitude over a depth of about 1 km), the calculated transmissivity values also reveal considerable spatial variability along the strikes of the zones, i.e. lateral heterogeneity (more than two orders of magnitude). A hydro-mechanical coupling is discussed, based on presented models for the tectonic evolution and the principal stress tensor. Tentatively, laboratory-scale relationships developed from normal stress experiments on a single fracture in crystalline rock can be used to estimate the maximum values of transmissivity of deduced deformation zones at Forsmark.

  1. Hydrogeologic setting and simulation of pesticide fate and transport in the unsaturated zone of a regolith-mantled, carbonate-rock terrain near Newville, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hippe, D.J.; Hall, D.W.

    1996-01-01

    Physical and chemical data were collected from May 1991 through April 1993 at a 4.5 hectare field site in Cumberland County, Pa., about 5 kilometers southeast of Newville. These data were used to define the hydrogeologic setting of a field site representative of the intensively farmed carbonate valleys of southeastern and south-central Pennsylvania. The environmental processing of commonly used pesticides (herbicides, fungicides, and insecticides) in the unsaturated zone was simulated with a process- oriented digital model to evaluate the environmental fate and transport of pesticides to ground water. Site data and modelling results provide a basis for a discussion of water-quality implications of agricultural best-management practices. The carbonate valleys of Pennsylvania comprise regolith-mantled carbonate-rock terrains that consist of broad undulating upland areas dissected by mostly dry valleys and widely spaced spring-fed creeks. The upland areas are farmed and exhibit possess a doline karst topography with many closed depressions, sinkholes, and bedrock outcrops. Unsaturated materials at the field site consist of an almost continuous soil cover composed of fine-grained residuum underlain by an intermediate vadose zone composed of karstified limestone. Soils are absent on scattered bedrock outcrops and are more than 12 meters thick in other areas of the site. The soil profile stores appreciable quantities of water with a volumetric average of about 36 percent water at field capacity. Organic carbon content of soil materials is about 1.7 percent in the Ap-horizon and from 0.1 to 0.3 percent throughout the full thickness of the B- and C-horizons. Atrazine, metolachlor, simazine, and the atrazine soil metabolites deethylatrazine and deisopropylatrazine were detected at concentrations above 0.05 mg/L in just the upper 0.6 meters of soil materials. However, detectable concentrations of atrazine, simazine, and atrazine soil metabolites were measured in water

  2. Deformation and softening mechanism in naturally deformed rocks at the brittle-ductile transition zone in upper crust: pervasive micro-faulting accommodated by pressure solution of quartz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeshita, T.; El-Fakharani, A.

    2011-12-01

    Although the conventional two-mechanism strength profile of upper crustal rheology has been applied for a long time to geodynamical problems, the high differential stresses as much as a few hundreds of MPa have never been reported from geophysical observations such as those inferred from heat flow along active faults and stress drop during earthquakes. These facts suggest that there must be some softening mechanisms around the brittle-ductile transition zone in upper crust, where inland earthquakes most frequently occur. In order to unravel softening mechanisms in these regions, we have been examining natural microstructures in exhumed metamorphic rocks, which experienced pervasive deformation at brittle-ductile conditions (T=c. 300 oC). The Sambagawa metamorphic rocks experienced localized deformation under brittle-ductile transition conditions at D2 phase during exhumation. At outcrop scales, low-angle normal faults were pervasively developed with a dominant top-to-the-NNW movement recorded in quartz slickenfibre. In quartz schist deformed at D2 phase, shear bands coated by phengite were pervasively developed. We have extensively studied quartz c-axis fabrics and microstructures in the micro-faulted quartz schist. In quartz lenses surrounded by D2 shear bands, quartz microstructures and c-axis fabrics formed at D1 phase indicative of dislocation creep were well preserved. However, in the matrix (i.e. domains outside the lenses), quartz c-axis fabrics became weakened, and in some cases, became completely random. We have analyzed the degree of undulation of recrystallized quartz grain boundaries using the index called normalized perimeter of grains to that of the equivalent ellipse obtained with the NIH image, and compared the degree among different quartz schist samples and domains in the same sample. As a result, it has been found out that there is a nice positive correlation between the degree of grain boundary undulation and c-axis fabric intensity in quartz

  3. Complex hydrothermal alteration and illite K-Ar ages in Upper Visean molasse sediments and magmatic rocks of the Variscan Badenweiler-Lenzkirch suture zone, Black Forest, Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brockamp, Olaf; Schlegel, Andreas; Wemmer, Klaus

    2015-04-01

    Post-collisional Upper Visean molasse sediments and magmatic rocks of the Badenweiler-Lenzkirch Zone reveal by microscopy of thin sections different degrees of hydrothermal illitization of feldspar and mica particles, and XRD, IR and XRF data of the <2 µm fractions show illitic material as the dominant clay mineral consisting of a mixture of 1M and 2M1 polytypes. Moreover, small amounts of illite/smectite mixed-layer minerals of R1-ordering are proved in the granites. In the separates, two illite mixing lines with different Fe + Mg contents are verified between authigenic illite from feldspar alteration and detrital illite in the molasse sediments, as well as between authigenic illite from feldspar alteration and altered mica flakes in the granites. Fe-rich detrital chlorite is present within the molasse sediments, while mixtures of high aluminous Fe-poor dioctahedral/di-trioctahedral chlorite with randomly interstratified chlorite/smectite mixed-layer minerals are formed from feldspar alteration in the granites. Illite K-Ar dating of the <2 and <0.63 µm fractions yields hydrothermal illitization of feldspar and partial resetting of the K-Ar system of detrital illite and mica flakes in the molasse sediments at ≥200 °C during Upper Permian to Middle Triassic times, while the granites in the eastern part of the study area were not altered contemporaneously. In contrast, hydrothermal activity at ≤200 °C during Upper Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous times occurred in the granites, whereas these temperatures were too low for resetting the older `Permo-Triassic' illite K-Ar ages in the molasse rocks. Within both K-Ar age clusters, the data are seen to decrease with grain size and portion of illite 2M1 polytype. The alteration phenomena indicate multiple hydrothermal episodes in the study area, and they match those from the Central and Western European crust as fluid supply was controlled geodynamically by episodic break up of Pangea.

  4. Post-Caledonian brittle fault zones along the SW Barents Sea Margin: Onshore-offshore margin architecture and fault rock-forming conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Indrevær, Kjetil; Bergh, Steffen; Stunitz, Holger; Schermer, Elizabeth; Koehl, Jean-Baptiste; Ingebrigtsen, Arild; Hansen, John-Are

    2014-05-01

    The architecture of the SW Barents Sea margin off Northern Norway is, both onshore and offshore, controlled mainly by alternating NNE-SSW and ENE-WSW trending, steeply to moderately dipping, brittle normal fault zones. These fault zones constitute at least two major fault complexes that run partly onshore in Troms, linking major horsts and ridges in the South with offshore basins and fault complexes in the North. At least two major transfer fault systems accommodate changes in fault polarity and lateral segmentation along the margin. The onshore fault activity in Troms is interpreted to have occurred in the Late Permian through Early Triassic, with no major fault movement in the Mesozoic and Cenozoic. However, later Mesozoic fault activity has taken place offshore along the Troms-Finnmark Fault Complex, and both further north and south along the margin. The fault activity in Troms is therefore believed to have migrated progressively west in time, to the Troms-Finnmark Fault Complex. This resulted in a short-tapered margin in the region after final continental break-up at ~55Ma and preserved fault rocks from the Late Permian/Early Triassic stages of rifting onshore. The onshore Late Permian/Early Triassic faulting activity took place during multiple phases, with initial fault movement at minimum P-T conditions of ~300°C and ~240MPa (~10km depth), followed by later fault movement introducing pumpellyite indicating minimum P-T conditions of ~275°C and ~220MPa (~8.5km depth). The studied faults are thought to have acted as fluid conduits, where microstructural evidence suggests that pore pressures locally reached lithostatic levels (240MPa) during faulting. A maximum differential stress of c. 35 MPa prior to-, and during faulting is estimated based on the evidence for lithostatic pore pressure and assuming a typical Mohr-Coloumb failure criterion. Fluid flow is shown to be controlled by healing and precipitation processes through time, with fluid flow localized to

  5. Elemental composition, distribution and control of biogenic silica in the anthropogenically disturbed and pristine zone inter-tidal sediments of Indian Sundarbans mangrove-estuarine complex.

    PubMed

    Dhame, Shreya; Kumar, Alok; Ramanathan, Al; Chaudhari, Punarbasu

    2016-10-15

    Spatial distribution and interrelationship among organic nutrients - silica and carbon - and various lithogenic elements were investigated in the surficial sediments of Matla estuary and Core Zone of Indian Sundarbans Reserve Forest using spatial analysis and multivariate statistics. Biogenic silica (BSi), an important parameter for coastal biogeochemisry, was measured using Si-time alkaline leaching method. BSi concentration ranged from 0.01% to 0.85% with higher concentrations in upstream region of Matla estuary and attenuated values towards the bay, seemingly due to changes in hydrodynamics and land use conditions. Spatial distribution of BSi did not exhibit significant correlation with sediment parameters of organic carbon (OC), elemental composition and clay content. However, it showed significant contrasting trends with total phosphorus (TP) and total silica of human influenced Matla estuary sediments as well as the dissolved silica (DSi) of its surface waters. Anthropogenic influence on sediment geochemistry is discernable with the presence of higher concentrations of organic and inorganic elements in Matla estuary than in Core Zone sediments. Spatial variation trends are often challenging to interpret due to multiple sources of input, varying energy and salinity conditions and constant physical, chemical and biological alterations occurring in the environment. Nonetheless, it is certain that anthropogenic activities have a substantial influence on biogeochemical processes of Sundarbans mangrove-estuarine complex and potentially the coastal ocean. PMID:27480337

  6. Unraveling eclogite-facies fluid-rock interaction using thermodynamic modelling and whole-rock experiments: the in-situ eclogitization of metapelites from Val Savenca (Sesia Zone, Western Alps)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jentsch, Marie; Tropper, Peter

    2015-04-01

    A common feature of HP and UHP terranes is the subduction of crustal rocks to great depths. Previous investigations have shown that this process is triggered by fluids present during an eclogite-facies metamorphic overprint. An examples is exposed in the metapelites at Val Savenca in the Sesia-Lanzo Zone, Italy where Alpine eclogite-facies metamorphism and fluid flow led to partial transformation of Variscan amphibolite-eclogite facies metapelites (garnet + biotite + sillimanite + K-feldspar + plagioclase + quartz) to zoisite ± jadeite + kyanite + phengite + quartz. This transformation took place under P-T conditions of 1.7 - 2.1 GPa at 600°C and low a(H2O) of 0.3-0.6. The replacement of plagioclase by jadeite + zoisite + kyanite + quartz takes place also along former fractures. Biotite is replaced by the assemblage phengite + omphacite ± kyanite adjacent to former plagioclase, otherwise by phengite + rutile/titanite. Garnet and clinopyroxene show variable compositions depending in which micro-domain (plagioclase or biotite) they grew. The extreme development of microdomains can best be studied by thermodynamic pseudosection modelling of individual microdomains using stoichiometric mixtures of protolith minerals from this domain and the program DOMINO (De Capitani & Petrakakis, 2010). The aim of these calculations was: 1.) to reproduce the observed mineral assemblage and 2.) to provide constraints on the amount of fluid present in the transformation. The results so far indicate that the amount of fluid was very low, otherwise paragonite would have formed instead of jadeite and reproduction of the observed mineral assemblage has only been partly successful so far since biotite is still stable in the calculations. In addition to understand the role of fluids in the mineralogical and textural transformation piston-cylinder experiments with a fresh, natural orthogneiss granulite from the Moldanubic Unit in upper Austria with the assemblage garnet + biotite + K

  7. 17β-Estradiol Induces Overproliferation in Adenomyotic Human Uterine Smooth Muscle Cells of the Junctional Zone Through Hyperactivation of the Estrogen Receptor-Enhanced RhoA/ROCK Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fu-Qing; Duan, Hua; Wang, Sha; Li, Jin-Jiao

    2015-11-01

    Adenomyosis (ADS) is a common estrogen-dependent gynecological disease with unknown etiology. Recent models favor abnormal thickening of the junctional zone (JZ) may be the causative factor in the development of ADS. RhoA, a small guanosine triphosphatase which controls multiple cellular processes, is involved in the control of cell proliferation. Here we demonstrate that treatment of human uterine smooth muscle cells (SMCs) of the JZ with 17β-estradiol (E2) increased expression of RhoA and its downstream effectors (-associated coiled coil containing protein kinase [ROCK] 1 and ROCK2). Compared with non-ADS cells, RhoA, ROCK1, and ROCK2 were overexpressed and hyperactivated in ADS cells. These effects were suppressed in the presence of ICI 182,780, supporting an estrogen receptor (ER)-dependent mechanism. Hyperactivation of ER-enhanced RhoA/ROCK signaling was associated with overproliferation in ADS human uterine SMCs of the JZ. Moreover, E2-induced overproliferation was accompanied by downregulation of cyclin-dependent kinases inhibitors (CKIs; p21(Waf1/Cip1) and p27(Kip1)) and upregulation of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) and cyclins (cyclin D1, cyclin E1, CDK2, CDK4, and CDK6).

  8. The nature of the Ailao Shan-Red River (ASRR) shear zone: Constraints from structural, microstructural and fabric analyses of metamorphic rocks from the Diancang Shan, Ailao Shan and Day Nui Con Voi massifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Junlai; Tang, Yuan; Tran, My-Dung; Cao, Shuyun; Zhao, Li; Zhang, Zhaochong; Zhao, Zhidan; Chen, Wen

    2012-03-01

    The structural geology, timing of shearing, and tectonic implications of the ASRR shear zone, one of the most striking lineaments in Southeast Asia, have been the topics of extensive studies over the past few decades. The Xuelong Shan (XLS), Diancang Shan (DCS), Ailao Shan (ALS) and Day Nui Con Voi (DNCV) metamorphic massifs along the shear zone have preserved important information on its structural and tectonic evolution. Our field structural analysis, detailed microstructural and fabric analysis, as well as the quartz, sillimanite and garnet fabric studies of the sheared rocks from the massifs demonstrate the dominant roles of three deformation episodes during Cenozoic tectonic evolution in the shear zone. Among the contrasting structural and microstructural associations in the shear zone, D2 structures, which were formed at the brittle to ductile transition during large-scale left-lateral shearing in the second deformation episode, predominate over the structural styles of the other two deformation episodes. Discrete micro-shear zones with intensive grain size reduction compose the characteristic structural style of D2 deformation. In addition, several types of folds (early shearing folds, F21, and late-shearing folds, F22) were formed in the sheared rocks, including discrete to distributed mylonitic foliation, stretching lineation and shear fabrics (e.g., mica fish, domino structures, as well as sigma and delta fabrics). A sequence of microstructures from syn-kinematic magmatic flow, high-temperature solid-state deformation, to brittle-ductile shearing is well-preserved in the syn-kinematic leucocratic intrusions. Deformation structures from the first episode (D1) are characterized by F1 folds and distributed foliations (S1) in rocks due to pure shearing at high temperatures. They are preserved in weakly sheared (D2) rocks along the eastern margin of the ALS belt or in certain low-strain tectonic enclaves within the shear zone. Furthermore, semi

  9. Basaltic rocks from the Andean Southern Volcanic Zone: Insights from the comparison of along-strike and small-scale geochemical variations and their sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickey-Vargas, Rosemary; Holbik, Sven; Tormey, Daniel; Frey, Frederick A.; Moreno Roa, Hugo

    2016-08-01

    The origin of spatial variations in the geochemical characteristics of volcanic rocks erupted in the Andean Southern Volcanic Zone (SVZ) has been studied by numerous researchers over the past 40 years. Diverse interpretations for along-strike, across-strike, and small-scale variations have been proposed. In this paper, we review geochemical data showing along-strike geochemical variations and address the processes causing such trends. We compare large- and small-scale changes of the same geochemical parameters in basaltic rocks in order to use spatial scale as a tool for isolating processes that may have the same result. Along-strike geochemical variations in the SVZ are expected, due to 1) greater thickness or age of the sub-arc continental crust and mantle lithosphere in the Northern SVZ (NSVZ; 33°S-34°30‧S) and Transitional SVZ (TSVZ; 34°30‧S-37°S) compared with the Central SVZ (CSVZ; 37°S-41.5°S) and Southern SVZ (SSVZ: 41.5°S-46°S); and 2) along-strike changes of the subducting Nazca plate and overlying asthenosphere. Basalts and basaltic andesites erupted at volcanic front stratovolcanoes define several along-strike geochemical trends: 1) higher 87Sr/86Sr and lower 143Nd/144Nd at volcanoes in the NSVZ compared with the TSVZ, CSVZ, and SSVZ; 2) higher and more variable La/Yb at volcanoes in the NSVZ and TSVZ compared with the CSVZ and SSVZ; 3) lower 87Sr/86Sr for a given 143Nd/144Nd at volcanoes in the TSVZ compared with the CSVZ and SSVZ; and 4) large values for time-sensitive subduction tracers such as 10Be/9Be and (238U/230Th) at some volcanoes in the CSVZ, but not in the NSVZ and TSVZ. Geochemical parameters that distinguish the TSVZ from the CSVZ and SSVZ are also found within the CSVZ at small basaltic eruptive centers (SEC) aligned with the Liquiñe-Ofqui Fault System (LOFS), which extends from 38°S to the southernmost SVZ. Our interpretation is that CSVZ magmas with strong time-sensitive subduction tracers represent the ambient subduction

  10. A study of uranium favorability of Cenozoic sedimentary rocks, Basin and Range Province, Arizona: Part I, General geology and chronology of pre-late Miocene Cenozoic sedimentary rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scarborough, Robert Bryan; Wilt, Jan Carol

    1979-01-01

    This study focuses attention on Cenozoic sedimentary rocks in the Basin and Range Province of Arizona. The known occurrences of uranium and anomalous radioactivity in these rocks are associated with sediments that accumulated in a low energy environment characterized by fine-grained clastics, including important tuffaceous materials, and carbonate rocks. Most uranium occurrences, in these rocks appear to be stratabound. Emphasis was placed on those sedimentary materials that pre-date the late Cenozoic Basin and Range disturbance. They are deformed and crop out on pedimented range blocks and along the province interface with the Transition Zone. Three tentative age groups are recognized: Group I - Oligocene, pre-22 m.y., Group II - early Miocene - 22 m.y. - 16 m.y., and Group III - middle Miocene - 16 m.y. to 13--10 m.y. Regionally, these three groups contain both coarse to fine-grained red clastics and low energy lighter colored 'lacustrine' phases. Each of the three groups has been the object of uranium exploration. Group II, the early Miocene strata, embraces the Anderson Mine - Artillery region host rocks and also the New River - Cave Creek early Miocene beds-along the boundary with the Transition Zone. These three groups of rocks have been tectonically deformed to the extent that original basins of deposition cannot yet be reconstructed. However, they were considerably more extensive in size than the late Cenozoic basins the origin of which deformed the former. Group II rocks are judged to be of prime interest because of: (1) the development and preservation of organic matter in varying lithologies, (2) apparent contemporaneity with silicic volcanic centers, (3) influence of Precambrian crystalline rocks, and (4) relative outcrop continuity near the stable Transition Zone. The Transition Zone, especially along its boundary with the Basin and Range Province, needs additional geologic investigation, especially as regards the depositional continuity of Group II

  11. Isotopic compositions of volcanic arc rocks in the Southern Volcanic Zone (33°-43°S), Chile: along- and across-arc variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacques, Guillaume; Hoernle, Kaj; Gill, Jim; Wehrmann, Heidi

    2014-05-01

    We investigate young, olivine-bearing volcanic arc (VA) rocks from the Southern Volcanic Zone (33-43°S; SVZ) in Chile, and from the backarc (BA) in Argentina for their major and trace element, and Sr-Nd-Hf-Pb-O isotope geochemistry. The compositional data are processed to identify the source components contributing to the arc magmas and to estimate their proportions, with the aim to better understand the effects of the large-scale along-arc tectonic variations onto melt generation and erupted compositions. The Transitional (T) SVZ (34.5-38°S; Jacques et al., 2013) samples overlap the BA samples in Sr and Nd isotopes, whereas the Central (C) SVZ (38-43°S; Jacques et al., submitted, Chemical Geology) samples are shifted to slightly higher Sr and/or Nd isotope ratios. All samples form a tight correlation on the Pb isotope diagrams. The VA samples plot at the radiogenic end of the positive BA array and overlap trench sediment, indicating mixing between a South Atlantic MORB-type source and a slab component derived from subducted trench sediments and altered oceanic crust. On the Nd versus Hf isotope diagram, the VA and BA form two sub parallel linear trends, neither pointing to subducting sediment. The VA may display an asthenospheric mantle array, whereas enriched Proterozoic lithospheric mantle may be involved in the BA. The CSVZ samples have higher fluid-mobile to fluid-immobile element ratios and lower more- to less-incompatible fluid-immobile element ratios than the TSVZ samples, consistent with higher hydrous melt flux and higher degrees of melting resulting in higher magma production and eruption rates in the CSVZ. Low δ18O(melt) of CSVZ lavas suggests that the source of the enhanced water flux is likely to be hydrated lower crust and serpentinized upper mantle of the incoming plate, resulting from the multiple large fracture zones in this part of the SVZ. The δ18O(melt) values of the NSVZ, TSVZ and BA, on the other hand, largely overlap the MORB mantle

  12. Exploratory Analysis of Sediment Related Disturbance on Post-Spate Periphyton Retention on the Ste. Marguerite River, Saguenay, Quebec.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luce, J. J.; Lapointe, M.

    2004-05-01

    Both natural and human induced disturbance can cause significant shifts in the viability and spatial distribution of river organisms. The dominant primary producers in unshaded streams are benthic algae. Algae grow within a biofilm called periphyton and provide the main energy source driving production in higher trophic levels. Literature suggests that periphyton are adapted to a range of both resources (e.g. sunlight and nutrients) and disturbance (e.g. floods and grazing). Site scale studies of flood disturbance effects on periphyton have demonstrated that spatially discrete refuge zones (e.g. gravel clusters, boulders, inside of point bars) exist where periphyton removal after floods is minimal. The purpose of this study is to examine the hypothesis that stable refugia can be found within the drainage basin at larger spatial and temporal scales than previously demonstrated. The intent is to identify refuge zones through the study of geomorphic disturbance processes, resource availability and periphyton resistance. Four sedimentary links, characterized by 30 cross-sections, have been selected on the Ste Marguerite River, each providing a gradient of channel disturbance but limited nutrient variation. A sequence of spates during the 2003 field season were monitored for discharge, temperature, water quality and sediment mobility using fine sediment traps and tracer rocks. The overall approach employs a combination of field work, numerical modeling and statistical analyses. Exploratory data analysis will be presented examining the role of resources and disturbance responsible for sources of variability in post spate algal biomass.

  13. Thermal Influence of an Alpine Deep Hydrothermal Fault on the Surrounding Rocks.

    PubMed

    Dzikowski, Marc; Josnin, Jean Yves; Roche, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Major fault zones in mountain areas are often associated with cold-water circulations and hydrothermal pathways. Compared with the massif as a whole, the deep groundwater flows in these high hydraulic-conductivity zones modify the thermal state of the surrounding rock. This paper examines the thermal effects of groundwater flow in the area around the steeply dipping La Léchère deep fault zone (LFZ, French Alps) and associated shallow decompressed zone. We used a 3D numerical model drawn up from groundwater circulation data to investigate the La Léchère hydrothermal system and the thermal state of the rock in the valley sides. Hydrothermal simulations showed that convective flow into the LFZ cools the valley sides and creates a thermal upwelling under the valley floor. An unsteady thermal regime that continues for about 10,000 years is also needed to obtain the temperatures currently found under the valley floor in the LFZ. Temperature-depth profiles around the LFZ show disturbances in the thermal gradients in the valley sides and the valley floor. Convective heat transfer into the LFZ and the decompressed zone, and conductive heat transfer in the surrounding rocks produce an unsteady, asymmetric thermal state in the rock on both sides of the LFZ.

  14. Constraints to the timing of India-Eurasia collision; a re-evaluation of evidence from the Indus Basin sedimentary rocks of the Indus-Tsangpo Suture Zone, Ladakh, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Alexandra L.; Najman, Yani; Parrish, Randall; Mark, Darren F.; Foster, Gavin L.

    2011-06-01

    Deposited within the Indus-Tsangpo suture zone, the Cenozoic Indus Basin sedimentary rocks have been interpreted to hold evidence that may constrain the timing of India-Eurasia collision, a conclusion challenged by data presented here. The Eurasian derived 50.8-51 Ma Chogdo Formation was previously considered to overlie Indian Plate marine sedimentary rocks in sedimentary contact, thus constraining the timing of collision as having occurred by this time. Using isotopic analysis (U-Pb dating on detrital zircons, Ar-Ar dating on detrital white mica, Sm-Nd analyses on detrital apatite), sandstone and conglomerate petrography, mudstone geochemistry, facies analysis and geological mapping to characterize and correlate the formations of the Indus Basin Sedimentary rocks, we review the nature of these contacts and the identification and correlation of the formations. Our results reveal that previously interpreted stratigraphic contacts identifying Chogdo Formation unconformably overlying Indian plate sedimentary rocks are incorrect. Rather, we suggest that the inaccuracy of previous interpretations is most likely a result of Formation misidentification and thus cannot be used to constrain the timing of India-Asia collision.

  15. Correcting for inclination shallowing of early Carboniferous sedimentary rocks from Kyrgyzstan—indication of stable subtropical position of the North Tianshan Zone in the mid-late Palaeozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirscher, U.; Bilardello, D.; Mikolaichuk, A.; Bachtadse, V.

    2014-08-01

    High-quality palaeomagnetic data for the early Carboniferous of Central Asia are scarce and the palaeogeographic evolution of this area prior to final amalgamation of the region east of the Ural mountains is still rather obscure. Here, we present palaeomagnetic data for early Carboniferous deposits from two areas in the Kyrgyz North Tianshan (NTS). Detailed rock-magnetic analysis indicates the presence of magnetite and haematite as magnetic carriers in these red sediments. In the Kazakh basin section (KEL), we identify a high-temperature component (HTC) of magnetization during stepwise thermal demagnetization at temperatures of up to ˜680 °C yielding a site mean direction of D = 176.2°, I = -36.4°, k = 57.4 and α95 = 8.9° after tilt correction. Two HTCs of magnetization were identified in samples from the Sonkul Basin (DUN) with maximum blocking temperatures of ˜600 °C (magnetite) and ˜680 °C (haematite). The magnetite component was also identified with alternating field demagnetization. The resulting site mean directions for these two components identified in 16 and 14 sites, respectively, are D = 149.3°, I = -50.3°, k = 73.6 and α95 = 4.3° for the magnetite and D = 139.6°, I = -35.1°, k = 71.6 and α95 = 4.7° for the haematite component. All three mean directions show a significant increase of the precision parameter k after tilt correction indicating acquisition of the high-temperature magnetization prior to the main folding event in the Jurassic. We explain the difference of the two components of DUN by a process of inclination bias due to compaction to which the platy haematite particles are more susceptible. Applying the elongation-inclination (E/I) method to directional data from over 100 individual samples from location DUN results in a negligible correction for the magnetite component (<5°), whereas the inclination of the haematite component corrects from -35.0° to -50.3° (f = 0.6, error interval -41.4° to -57.9°), which is then equal

  16. Talking Rocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Dale; Corley, Brenda

    1987-01-01

    Discusses some of the ways that rocks can be used to enhance children's creativity and their interest in science. Suggests the creation of a dramatic production involving rocks. Includes basic information on sedimentary, igneous, and metamorphic rocks. (TW)

  17. Processes controlling the migration and biodegradation of non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) within fractured rocks in the vadose zone. FY96 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Geller, J.T.; Holman, H.Y.; Conrad, M.; Pruess, K.; Hunter-Cevera, J.C.; Su, G.

    1997-02-01

    This project investigates both flow dynamics and microbial processes affecting NAPLs in fractured rock in a closely coupled, integrated manner. The objective is to develop a qualitative and quantitative understanding of the behavior of two and three immiscible fluid phases, microbial transformation and/or degradation, and to provide a scientific basis for field investigations, site characterization, and remedial action for NAPL contamination in fractured rocks. To achieve this, the program combines laboratory and theoretical investigations, coupled with the evaluation of conditions at relevant field sites. This report summarizes the work accomplished since inception of the project in April 1996.

  18. 300 Area Disturbance Report

    SciTech Connect

    LL Hale; MK Wright; NA Cadoret

    1999-01-07

    The objective of this study was to define areas of previous disturbance in the 300 Area of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site to eliminate these areas from the cultural resource review process, reduce cultural resource monitoring costs, and allow cultural resource specialists to focus on areas where subsurface disturbance is minimal or nonexistent. Research into available sources suggests that impacts from excavations have been significant wherever the following construction activities have occurred: building basements and pits, waste ponds, burial grounds, trenches, installation of subsurface pipelines, power poles, water hydrants, and well construction. Beyond the areas just mentioned, substrates in the' 300 Area consist of a complex, multidimen- sional mosaic composed of undisturbed stratigraphy, backfill, and disturbed sediments; Four Geographic Information System (GIS) maps were created to display known areas of disturbance in the 300 Area. These maps contain information gleaned from a variety of sources, but the primary sources include the Hanford GIS database system, engineer drawings, and historic maps. In addition to these maps, several assumptions can be made about areas of disturbance in the 300 Area as a result of this study: o o Buried pipelines are not always located where they are mapped. As a result, cultural resource monitors or specialists should not depend on maps depicting subsurface pipelines for accurate locations of previous disturbance. Temporary roads built in the early 1940s were placed on layers of sand and gravel 8 to 12 in. thick. Given this information, it is likely that substrates beneath these early roads are only minimally disturbed. Building foundations ranged from concrete slabs no more than 6 to 8 in. thick to deeply excavated pits and basements. Buildings constructed with slab foundations are more numerous than may be expected, and minimally disturbed substrates may be expected in these locations. Historic black

  19. Spatial patterns of rockfall in recently deglaciated high-alpine rock faces: Analysing rockfall release zones and volumes based on a multiannual LiDAR time series, Kitzsteinhorn, Austria.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmeyer, Ingo; Keuschnig, Markus; Delleske, Robert; Wichmann, Volker; Hoffmann, Thomas; Schrott, Lothar

    2015-04-01

    Rock instabilities in high-alpine areas represent a considerable risk factor for man and infrastructure. In the Alps numerous, mainly visual, observations suggest an increasing occurrence of rockfall events potentially associated to climate warming. However, unbiased high-precision information on the location of rockfall release zones and the size of event volumes is scarce. Thus, frequency/magnitude patterns of high-alpine rockfall often remain elusive. The presented study addresses the need for systematically acquired, objective field data by presenting an extensive, multiannual LiDAR time series from a high-alpine (peri)glacial environment. The study area is located in the summit region of the Kitzsteinhorn (3.203 m), Hohe Tauern Range, Austria. The beginning of the terrestrial laserscanning (TLS) monitoring campaign dates back to July 2011. Since then six rock faces have been scanned repeatedly at an interval of 1-2 months during the snow-free summer season (June to October). The investigated rock faces predominantly consist of calcareous mica-schist and differ in terms of height, slope, aspect, and discontinuity orientation. The rock faces are partially underlain by permafrost, their combined surface area is approx. 1.3 km². They are located directly adjacent to the Schmiedingerkees cirque glacier, which has retreated and thinned significantly in recent decades (downwasting rate ~1.5 m/a). TLS data acquisition was performed using a Riegl LMS-Z620i. During data acquisition no permanently fixed installations and no artificial reflective markers were used. This is in line with the requirement to develop a quick, flexible methodology that can be applied not only at the Kitzsteinhorn, but also in other, similar environments. For data post-processing a new analysis procedure has been developed which allows (i) point cloud alignment by surface geometry matching, (ii) objective, automated discrimination between measurement errors und real surface changes, and (iii

  20. Experimental rock-water interactions at temperatures to 300/sup 0/C: implications for fluid flow, solute transport, and silicate mineral zoning in crustal geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    Geothermal reservoirs commonly occur in permeable volcanic rock (rhyolite, andesite, basalt) or sedimentary (sandstone) strata at temperatures below 300/sup 0/C. Knowledge of how these reservoirs develop chemically and physically has been based almost entirely on field studies. Four types of experiments were conducted to supplement available data on the chemistry, mineralogy, and fluid flow aspects of hydrothermal processes occurring in crustal geothermal systems: (1) agitated rock-water experiments; (2) high temperature flow through experiments; (3) low temperature permeability experiments; and (4) corrosion monitoring experiments. Initial experiments reacted rhyolite glass and holocrystalline basalt with water-NaCl solutions at 300/sup 0/C in agitated hydrothermal equipment. Concentrations of components in solution depend on initial salinity, rock type, and particle size. The secondary phases consist of zeolites, clay, and feldspar minerals and the alteration assemblage is dependent on both initial salinity, rock type, and duration of the experiment. A second set of experiments were conducted at 300/sup 0/C using the rhyolite glass in a flow through type of apparatus. Compositions of outlet fluids show a dependence of fluid flow rate and core length.

  1. Radioecological investigations of technogenically disburbed landscape in the uranium deposit zone in Sakha Republic (Yakutia)

    SciTech Connect

    Sobakin, P.I.; Molchanova, I.V.

    1995-05-01

    The results of a radioecological investigation of the technogenically disturbed territory adjacent to a rock waste dump enriched with uranium and its decay products are given. The removal of such rocks to the surface led to the formation of a zone of radioactive contamination characterized by a high content of {sup 238}U and {sup 226}Ra in biotic and abiotic components. Transport of the radionuclides in the sediment load and liquid runoff dominated in their dispersal processes. A special role of ground mosses and lichens in the accumulation of uranium was noted.

  2. Kinematics of syn- and post-exhumational shear zones at Lago di Cignana (Western Alps, Italy): constraints on the exhumation of Zermatt-Saas (ultra)high-pressure rocks and deformation along the Combin Fault and Dent Blanche Basal Thrust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirst, Frederik; Leiss, Bernd

    2016-03-01

    Kinematic analyses of shear zones at Lago di Cignana in the Italian Western Alps were used to constrain the structural evolution of units from the Piemont-Ligurian oceanic realm (Zermatt-Saas and Combin zones) and the Adriatic continental margin (Dent Blanche nappe) during Palaeogene syn- and post-exhumational deformation. Exhumation of Zermatt-Saas (U)HP rocks to approximately lower crustal levels at ca. 39 Ma occurred during normal-sense top-(S)E shearing under epidote-amphibolite-facies conditions. Juxtaposition with the overlying Combin zone along the Combin Fault at mid-crustal levels occurred during greenschist-facies normal-sense top-SE shearing at ca. 38 Ma. The scarcity of top-SE kinematic indicators in the hanging wall of the Combin Fault probably resulted from strain localization along the uppermost Zermatt-Saas zone and obliteration by subsequent deformation. A phase of dominant pure shear deformation around 35 Ma affected units in the direct footwall and hanging wall of the Combin Fault. It is interpreted to reflect NW-SE crustal elongation during updoming of the nappe stack as a result of underthrusting of European continental margin units and the onset of continental collision. This phase was partly accompanied and followed by ductile bulk top-NW shearing, especially at higher structural levels, which transitioned into semi-ductile to brittle normal-sense top-NW deformation due to Vanzone phase folding from ca. 32 Ma onwards. Our structural observations suggest that syn-exhumational deformation is partly preserved within units and shear zones exposed at Lago di Cignana but also that the Combin Fault and Dent Blanche Basal Thrust experienced significant post-exhumational deformation reworking and overprinting earlier structures.

  3. Petrology, geochemistry and U-Pb geochronology of magmatic rocks from the high-sulfidation epithermal Au-Cu Chelopech deposit, Srednogorie zone, Bulgaria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambefort, Isabelle; Moritz, Robert; von Quadt, Albrecht

    2007-10-01

    The Chelopech deposit is one of the largest European gold deposits and is located 60 km east of Sofia, within the northern part of the Panagyurishte mineral district. It lies within the Banat-Srednegorie metallogenic belt, which extends from Romania through Serbia to Bulgaria. The magmatic rocks define a typical calc-alkaline suite. The magmatic rocks surrounding the Chelopech deposit have been affected by propylitic, quartz-sericite, and advanced argillic alteration, but the igneous textures have been preserved. Alteration processes have resulted in leaching of Na2O, CaO, P2O5, and Sr and enrichment in K2O and Rb. Trace element variation diagrams are typical of subduction-related volcanism, with negative anomalies in high field strength elements (HFSE) and light element, lithophile elements. HFSE and rare earth elements were relatively immobile during the hydrothermal alteration related to ore formation. Based on immobile element classification diagrams, the magmatic rocks are andesitic to dacitic in compositions. Single zircon grains, from three different magmatic rocks spanning the time of the Chelopech magmatism, were dated by high-precision U-Pb geochronology. Zircons of an altered andesitic body, which has been thrust over the deposit, yield a concordant 206Pb/238U age of 92.21 ± 0.21 Ma. This age is interpreted as the crystallization age and the maximum age for magmatism at Chelopech. Zircon analyses of a dacitic dome-like body, which crops out to the north of the Chelopech deposit, give a mean 206Pb/238U age of 91.95 ± 0.28 Ma. Zircons of the andesitic hypabyssal body hosting the high-sulfidation mineralization and overprinted by hydrothermal alteration give a concordant 206Pb/238U age of 91.45 ± 0.15 Ma. This age is interpreted as the intrusion age of the andesite and as the maximum age of the Chelopech epithermal high-sulfidation deposit. 176Hf/177Hf isotope ratios of zircons from the Chelopech magmatic rocks, together with published data on the

  4. Correlation chart of Pennsylvanian rocks in Alabama, Tennessee, Kentucky, Virginia, West Virginia, Ohio, Maryland, and Pennsylvania showing approximate position of coal beds, coal zones, and key stratigraphic units

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruppert, Leslie F.; Trippi, Michael H.; Slucher, Ernie R.

    2010-01-01

    This report contains a simplified provisional correlation chart that was compiled from both published and unpublished data in order to fill a need to visualize the currently accepted stratigraphic relations between Appalachian basin formations, coal beds and coal zones, and key stratigraphic units in the northern, central, and southern Appalachian basin coal regions of Alabama, Tennessee, Kentucky, Virginia, West Virginia, Ohio, Maryland, and Pennsylvania. Appalachian basin coal beds and coal zones were deposited in a variety of geologic settings throughout the Lower, Middle, and Upper Pennsylvanian and Pennsylvanian formations were defined on the presence or absence of economic coal beds and coarse-grained sandstones that often are local or regionally discontinuous. The correlation chart illustrates how stratigraphic units (especially coal beds and coal zones) and their boundaries can differ between States and regions.

  5. Comparative geochronology in the reversely zoned plutons of the Bottle Lake Complex, Maine: U-Pb on zircons and Rb-Sr on whole rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ayuso, R.A.; Arth, Joseph G.; Sinha, A.K.; Carlson, J.; Wones, D.R.

    1984-01-01

    The Bottle Lake Complex is a composite granitic batholith emplaced into Cambrian to Lower Devonian metasedimentary rocks. Both plutons (Whitney Cove and Passadumkeag River) are very coarse grained hornblende and biotite-bearing granites showing petrographic and geochemical reverse zonation. Two linear whole rock Rb/Sr isochrons on xenolith-free Whitney Cove and Passadumkeag River samples indicate ages of 379??5 m.y. and 381??4 m.y., respectively, in close agreement with published K-Ar ages for biotite from Whitney Cove of 377 m.y. and 379 m.y., and for hornblende 40Ar/39Ar determinations from Passadumkeag River which indicate an age of 378??4 m.y. The initial Sr isotopic ratio for Whitney Cove is 0.70553 and for Passadumkeag River is 0.70414. A whole-rock isochron on a suite of xenoliths from the Passadumkeag River granite indicates a whole rock Rb-Sr age of 496??14 m.y., with an initial Sr isotopic ratio of 0.70262. Two types of zircon exhibiting wide petrographic diversity are evident in variable proportions throughout the batholith. One of these types is preferentially found in a mafic xenolith and it is widely dispersed in the host granites forming discrete grains and probably as inclusions in the other type of zircon. U-Pb analyses of zircons give concordia intercept ages of 399??8 m.y. for Whitney Cove, 388??6 m.y. for Passadumkeag River, 415 m.y. for a mafic xenolith in Passadumkeag River, and 396??32 for combined Whitney Cove and Passadumkeag River granite. The zircons show a spread of up to 20 m.y. in the 207Pb/206Pb ages. Omitting the finest zircon fraction in the Passadumkeag River results in a concordia intercept age of 381??3 m.y., in better agreement with the whole-rock Rb-Sr and mineral K-Ar ages. For the Whitney Cove pluton, exclusion of the finest fraction does not bring the zircon age into agreement with the Rb-Sr data. Age estimates by the whole rock Rb-Sr, mineral K-Ar and Ar-Ar methods suggest that the crystallization age of the plutons is

  6. [Climacteric disturbances. 2. Therapy of climacteric disturbances].

    PubMed

    Döring, G K

    1976-07-01

    After defining the terms climacterium and menopause the causes of climacteric disturbances are explained. During the premenopausal stage disturbances of the cycle are prevailing, caused by an insufficiency of the corpus luteum. Of climacteric disturbances should be spoken only after menopause. They are divided into: vegetative disturbances, troubles of metabolism, cardiovascular dysregulation, psychic deviations, sexual troubles and changes of the skin. The therapy of disturbances during the premenopausal stage mainly consists of the substitution of progesterone or in a cycle-like estrogen-progesterone-therapy. In the premenopausal stage estrogens are the therapy of choice. Among orally efficient estrogens the conjugated estrogen and the estradiol-valerianat are preferred. Side-effects and contraindications are discussed in detail. Among gynecologists there exists no disagreement about the necessity of therapy of serious climacteric disturbances, the opinions about prophylactic estrogen-therapy in women differ. PMID:184019

  7. Mechanism of Rock Burst Occurrence in Specially Thick Coal Seam with Rock Parting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian-chao; Jiang, Fu-xing; Meng, Xiang-jun; Wang, Xu-you; Zhu, Si-tao; Feng, Yu

    2016-05-01

    Specially thick coal seam with complex construction, such as rock parting and alternative soft and hard coal, is called specially thick coal seam with rock parting (STCSRP), which easily leads to rock burst during mining. Based on the stress distribution of rock parting zone, this study investigated the mechanism, engineering discriminant conditions, prevention methods, and risk evaluation method of rock burst occurrence in STCSRP through setting up a mechanical model. The main conclusions of this study are as follows. (1) When the mining face moves closer to the rock parting zone, the original non-uniform stress of the rock parting zone and the advancing stress of the mining face are combined to intensify gradually the shearing action of coal near the mining face. When the shearing action reaches a certain degree, rock burst easily occurs near the mining face. (2) Rock burst occurrence in STCSRP is positively associated with mining depth, advancing stress concentration factor of the mining face, thickness of rock parting, bursting liability of coal, thickness ratio of rock parting to coal seam, and difference of elastic modulus between rock parting and coal, whereas negatively associated with shear strength. (3) Technologies of large-diameter drilling, coal seam water injection, and deep hole blasting can reduce advancing stress concentration factor, thickness of rock parting, and difference of elastic modulus between rock parting and coal to lower the risk of rock burst in STCSRP. (4) The research result was applied to evaluate and control the risk of rock burst occurrence in STCSRP.

  8. Thermal-maturity trends within Franciscan rocks near Big Sur, California: Implications for offset along the San Gregorio San Simeon Hosgri fault zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, Michael B.; Laughland, Matthew M.; Shelton, Kevin L.; Sedlock, Richard L.

    1995-09-01

    Conventional neotectonic interpretations place the Lucia and Point Sur subterranes of the Franciscan subduction complex on opposite sides of the San Gregorio San Simeon Hosgri dextral fault system and connect that system through the Sur fault zone. Our reconstructed paleotemperature contours, however, are not offset across the San Simeon segment, so differential displacement between the subterranes after peak heating appears to have been negligible. One explanation is that dextral slip on the faults has totaled only 5 10 km. A second possibility is that a discrete Hosgri San Simeon segment extends offshore of the amalgamated Point Sur and Lucia subterranes and that an en echelon stepover transfers dextral slip eastward to the San Gregorio Palo Colorado segment. In either case, the Sur fault zone appears to play a relatively insignificant role in the late Cenozoic tectonic evolution of central California.

  9. Structural characteristics and LA-ICP-MS U-Pb zircon geochronology of the deformed granitic rocks from the Mesozoic Xingcheng-Taili ductile shear zone in the North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Chenyue; Liu, Yongjiang; Neubauer, Franz; Jin, Wei; Zeng, Zuoxun; Genser, Johann; Li, Weimin; Li, Wei; Han, Guoqing; Wen, Quanbo; Zhao, Yingli; Cai, Libin

    2015-05-01

    We describe the recently detected ENE-trending Xingcheng-Taili ductile strike-slip shear zone, which is an important Mesozoic low- to middle-grade tectonic element formed during the reactivation of the North China Craton (NCC) at the eastern termination of the Yanshanian orogenic belt. Within the Xingcheng-Taili ductile shear zone, the degree of deformation weakens gradually from NW to SE. Three main types of banded granitic gneisses represent low- to middle-grade metamorphic tectonites. New U-Pb zircon dating gives a wide range of protolith ages. Neoarchean granitic rocks with an emplacement age of 2498.4 ± 6.3 Ma have obvious E-W trending banded structures. Upper Triassic granitic rocks with U-Pb zircon ages of 219.7 ± 1.1 Ma, 218.74 ± 0.61 Ma, 212.1 ± 1.6 Ma and 212.3 ± 1.9 Ma are considered to relate to the collision of the NCC and Yangtze craton in early Mesozoic times. The emplacement of biotite adamellite bodies with ages of 159.0 ± 0.8 Ma and 152.4 ± 1.9 Ma is related to the thinning of the NCC's continental crust. An ENE-trending sinistral ductile shear zone developed within these granites. The strongly deformed biotite adamellite bodies bear a gneissosity with S-C fabrics, ENE-trending sinistral shear zones and show the deformation characteristics of a shallow crustal level, reflecting decratonization of the NCC. Crystal lattice preferred orientations (LPO) of quartz, determined by electron back-scatter diffraction, suggest sinistral strike-slip shear and a deformation temperature at about 400 to 500 °C. Quartz mainly shows low-temperature fabrics with a dominant {0001}-slip system similar to the temperature estimated by the micro-structural characteristics of quartz and feldspar. This deformation event might have occurred in Early Cretaceous times and is related to the lithospheric thinning and extension of the North China Craton triggered by an ongoing roll-back of the Pacific Plate beneath the eastern North China Craton.

  10. Infiltration of meteoric fluids in an extensional detachment shear zone (Kettle dome, WA, USA): How quartz dynamic recrystallization relates to fluid-rock interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quilichini, Antoine; Siebenaller, Luc; Nachlas, William O.; Teyssier, Christian; Vennemann, Torsten W.; Heizler, Matthew T.; Mulch, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    We document the interplay between meteoric fluid flow and deformation processes in quartzite-dominated lithologies within a ductile shear zone in the footwall of a Cordilleran extensional fault (Kettle detachment system, Washington, USA). Across 150 m of shear zone section, hydrogen isotope ratios (δD) from synkinematic muscovite fish are constant (δD ˜ -130‰) and consistent with a meteoric fluid source. Quartz-muscovite oxygen isotope thermometry indicates equilibrium fractionation temperatures of ˜365 ± 30 °C in the lower part of the section, where grain-scale quartz deformation was dominated by grain boundary migration recrystallization. In the upper part of the section, muscovite shows increasing intragrain compositional zoning, and quartz microstructures reflect bulging recrystallization, solution-precipitation, and microcracking that developed during progressive cooling and exhumation. The preserved microstructural characteristics and hydrogen isotope fingerprints of meteoric fluids developed over a short time interval as indicated by consistent mica 40Ar/39Ar ages ranging between 51 and 50 Ma over the entire section. Pervasive fluid flow became increasingly channelized during detachment activity, leading to microstructural heterogeneity and large shifts in quartz δ18O values on a meter scale. Ductile deformation ended when brittle motion on the detachment fault rapidly exhumed the mylonitic footwall.

  11. Collecting Rocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Rachel M.

    One of a series of general interest publications on science topics, the booklet provides those interested in rock collecting with a nontechnical introduction to the subject. Following a section examining the nature and formation of igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks, the booklet gives suggestions for starting a rock collection and using…

  12. Rock Finding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rommel-Esham, Katie; Constable, Susan D.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss a literature-based activity that helps students discover the importance of making detailed observations. In an inspiring children's classic book, "Everybody Needs a Rock" by Byrd Baylor (1974), the author invites readers to go "rock finding," laying out 10 rules for finding a "perfect" rock. In this way, the…

  13. Rock Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henn, Cynthia A.

    2004-01-01

    There are many interpretations for the symbols that are seen in rock art, but no decoding key has ever been discovered. This article describes one classroom's experiences with a lesson on rock art--making their rock art and developing their own personal symbols. This lesson allowed for creativity, while giving an opportunity for integration…

  14. Disturbance to wintering western snowy plovers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lafferty, Kevin D.

    2001-01-01

    In order to better understand the nature of disturbances to wintering snowy plovers, I observed snowy plovers and activities that might disturb them at a beach near Devereux Slough in Santa Barbara, California, USA. Disturbance (activity that caused plovers to move or fly) to wintering populations of threatened western snowy plovers was 16 times higher at a public beach than at protected beaches. Wintering plovers reacted to disturbance at half the distance (∼40 m) as has been reported for breeding snowy plovers (∼80 m). Humans, dogs, crows and other birds were the main sources of disturbance on the public beach, and each snowy plover was disturbed, on average, once every 27 weekend min and once every 43 weekday min. Dogs off leash were a disproportionate source of disturbance. Plovers were more likely to fly from dogs, horses and crows than from humans and other shorebirds. Plovers were less abundant near trail heads. Over short time scales, plovers did not acclimate to or successfully find refuge from disturbance. Feeding rates declined with increased human activity. I used data from these observations to parameterize a model that predicted rates of disturbance given various management actions. The model found that prohibiting dogs and a 30 m buffer zone surrounding a 400 m stretch of beach provided the most protection for plovers for the least amount of impact to beach recreation.

  15. Crustal contamination versus subduction zone enrichment: Examples from the Lesser Antilles and implications for mantle source compositions of island arc volcanic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, Jon P.

    1987-08-01

    Isotopic and geochemical data are presented from the northern and central Lesser Antilles arc. Island arc tholeiites from the northern islands are restricted in 143Nd /144Nd and 87Sr /86Sr and show large enrichments in LILE relative to other trace elements, as exemplified particularly in high Ba/La ratios. These volcanic rocks represent typical island arc compositions, similar to those described from the Aleutians, Marianas and South Sandwich Islands. In contrast, samples from the central islands (Martinique and St. Lucia) are highly variable in isotopic and trace element ratios, and reflect overprinting of primitive island arc magma chemistry by subsequent crustal contamination. Such magmas therefore do not represent island arc mantle source characteristics. Northern Lesser Antilles arc mantle sources are displaced from MORB Pb isotopic compositions towards the higher 207Pb /204Pb ratios characteristic of sediments. Also, Sr and Nd isotopic compositions are highly restricted and distinct from those of MORB. As a result, mixing models between MORB source and subducted sediment are tightly constrained in terms of the allowable proportion of sediment. The characteristically high LILE/REE and LILE/HFSE ratios of island arc volcanics cannot be easily reconciled with sediment + MORB source mixing. Buffering of isotopic compositions together with considerable relative LILE enrichment might be achieved by mixing between mantle and a hydrous fluid which has equilibrated with not only sediment but also a large proportion of variably altered oceanic crust. The fluid has isotopic compositions closer to those of MORB, thereby permitting a greater range of mixing proportions. At the same time, the LILE characteristics of the modified mantle source are dominated by the very high concentrations of these elements in the fluid. High degrees of partial melting of mantle modified by a hydrous fluid reproduce the trace element pattern of the source in the derivative volcanic rocks and

  16. Vadose zone microbiology

    SciTech Connect

    Kieft, Thomas L.; Brockman, Fred J.

    2001-01-17

    The vadose zone is defined as the portion of the terrestrial subsurface that extends from the land surface downward to the water table. As such, it comprises the surface soil (the rooting zone), the underlying subsoil, and the capillary fringe that directly overlies the water table. The unsaturated zone between the rooting zone and the capillary fringe is termed the "intermediate zone" (Chapelle, 1993). The vadose zone has also been defined as the unsaturated zone, since the sediment pores and/or rock fractures are generally not completely water filled, but instead contain both water and air. The latter characteristic results in the term "zone of aeration" to describe the vadose zone. The terms "vadose zone," "unsaturated zone", and "zone of aeration" are nearly synonymous, except that the vadose zone may contain regions of perched water that are actually saturated. The term "subsoil" has also been used for studies of shallow areas of the subsurface immediately below the rooting zone. This review focuses almost exclusively on the unsaturated region beneath the soil layer since there is already an extensive body of literature on surface soil microbial communities and process, e.g., Paul and Clark (1989), Metting (1993), Richter and Markowitz, (1995), and Sylvia et al. (1998); whereas the deeper strata of the unsaturated zone have only recently come under scrutiny for their microbiological properties.

  17. Design and installation of deep multilevel piezometer nests in Columbia River basalts at the Hanford Site, Washington. [Measurement of head in different rock zones sealed from each other

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, R.L.; Veatch, M.D.

    1985-04-01

    The Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) was established in 1976 as part of the National Waste Terminal Storage Program, now the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. The BWIP objective is to assess the suitability of basalt as a repository medium for the long-term storage of commercial high-level radioactive waste. As part of the hydrogeologic characterization activities, BWIP designed and installed multilevel piezometer nests at three borehole cluster sites within and adjacent to the 18-square-mile reference repository location. These borehole cluster sites will provide multilevel piezometric baseline data across the reference repository location prior to, during, and after drilling a large-diameter exploratory shaft. They will also be used to monitor future hydraulic stress tests on a large scale. Three series of piezometer nests (A-, C-, and D-series) were installed at three borehole cluster sites in nine hydrogeologic units from a depth of about 500 to 3700 feet within the Columbia River Basalt Group. These multilevel monitoring zones are isolated from each other and the next overlying hydrogeologic unit by high-density cement seals. The A-series piezometer nests monitor two shallow sedimentary units. The C-series piezometer nests monitor basalt flow tops in the six deepest zones. The D-series piezometer monitors an intermediate sedimentary unit. Each piezometer tube was developed by air-lift pumping to complete the installtion prior to installing downhole pressure transducers. 23 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  18. A seismogenic zone in the deep crust indicated by pseudotachylytes and ultramylonites in granulite-facies rocks of Calabria (Southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altenberger, U.; Prosser, G.; Grande, A.; Günter, C.; Langone, A.

    2013-10-01

    Pseudotachylyte veins frequently associated with mylonites and ultramylonites occur within migmatitic paragneisses, metamonzodiorites, as well as felsic and mafic granulites at the base of the section of the Hercynian lower crust exposed in Calabria (Southern Italy). The crustal section is tectonically superposed on lower grade units. Ultramylonites and pseudotachylytes are particularly well developed in migmatitic paragneisses, whereas sparse fault-related pseudotachylytes and thin mylonite/ultramylonite bands occur in granulite-facies rocks. The presence of sillimanite and clinopyroxene in ultramylonites and mylonites indicates that relatively high-temperature conditions preceded the formation of pseudotachylytes. We have analysed pseudotachylytes from different rock types to ascertain their deep crustal origin and to better understand the relationships between brittle and ductile processes during deformation of the deeper crust. Different protoliths were selected to test how lithology controls pseudotachylyte composition and textures. In migmatites and felsic granulites, euhedral or cauliflower-shaped garnets directly crystallized from pseudotachylyte melts of near andesitic composition. This indicates that pseudotachylytes originated at deep crustal conditions (>0.75 GPa). In mafic protoliths, quenched needle-to-feather-shaped high-alumina orthopyroxene occurs in contact with newly crystallized plagioclase. The pyroxene crystallizes in garnet-free and garnet-bearing veins. The simultaneous growth of orthopyroxene and plagioclase as well as almandine, suggests lower crustal origin, with pressures in excess of 0.85 GPa. The existence of melts of different composition in the same vein indicates the stepwise, non-equilibrium conditions of frictional melting. Melt formed and intruded into pre-existing anisotropies. In mafic granulites, brittle faulting is localized in a previously formed thin high-temperature mylonite bands. migmatitic gneisses are deformed into

  19. Science Rocks!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prestwich, Dorothy; Sumrall, Joseph; Chessin, Debby A.

    2010-01-01

    It all began one Monday morning. Raymond could not wait to come to large group. In his hand, he held a chunk of white granite he had found. "Look at my beautiful rock!" he cried. The rock was passed around and examined by each student. "I wonder how rocks are made?" wondered one student. "Where do they come from?" asked another. At this moment, a…

  20. Rock flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matveyev, S. N.

    1986-01-01

    Rock flows are defined as forms of spontaneous mass movements, commonly found in mountainous countries, which have been studied very little. The article considers formations known as rock rivers, rock flows, boulder flows, boulder stria, gravel flows, rock seas, and rubble seas. It describes their genesis as seen from their morphological characteristics and presents a classification of these forms. This classification is based on the difference in the genesis of the rubbly matter and characterizes these forms of mass movement according to their source, drainage, and deposit areas.

  1. Structural analysis and implicit 3D modelling of high-grade host rocks to the Venetia kimberlite diatremes, Central Zone, Limpopo Belt, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basson, I. J.; Creus, P. K.; Anthonissen, C. J.; Stoch, B.; Ekkerd, J.

    2016-05-01

    The Beit Bridge Complex of the Central Zone (CZ) of the Limpopo Belt hosts the 519 ± 6 Ma Venetia kimberlite diatremes. Deformed shelf- or platform-type supracrustal sequences include the Mount Dowe, Malala Drift and Gumbu Groups, comprising quartzofeldspathic units, biotite-bearing gneiss, quartzite, metapelite, metacalcsilicate and ortho- and para-amphibolite. Previous studies define tectonometamorphic events at 3.3-3.1 Ga, 2.7-2.5 Ga and 2.04 Ga. Detailed structural mapping over 10 years highlights four deformation events at Venetia. Rules-based implicit 3D modelling in Leapfrog Geo™ provides an unprecedented insight into CZ ductile deformation and sheath folding. D1 juxtaposed gneisses against metasediments. D2 produced a pervasive axial planar foliation (S2) to isoclinal F2 folds. Sheared lithological contacts and S2 were refolded into regional, open, predominantly southward-verging, E-W trending F3 folds. Intrusion of a hornblendite protolith occurred at high angles to incipient S2. Constrictional-prolate D4 shows moderately NE-plunging azimuths defined by elongated hornblendite lenses, andalusite crystals in metapelite, crenulations in fuchsitic quartzite and sheath folding. D4 overlaps with a: 1) 2.03-2.01 Ga regional M3 metamorphic overprint; b) transpressional deformation at 2.2-1.9 Ga and c) 2.03 Ga transpressional, dextral shearing and thrusting around the CZ and d) formation of the Avoca, Bellavue and Baklykraal sheath folds and parallel lineations.

  2. Structural analysis and implicit 3D modelling of high-grade host rocks to the Venetia kimberlite diatremes, Central Zone, Limpopo Belt, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basson, I. J.; Creus, P. K.; Anthonissen, C. J.; Stoch, B.; Ekkerd, J.

    2016-05-01

    The Beit Bridge Complex of the Central Zone (CZ) of the Limpopo Belt hosts the 519 ± 6 Ma Venetia kimberlite diatremes. Deformed shelf- or platform-type supracrustal sequences include the Mount Dowe, Malala Drift and Gumbu Groups, comprising quartzofeldspathic units, biotite-bearing gneiss, quartzite, metapelite, metacalcsilicate and ortho- and para-amphibolite. Previous studies define tectonometamorphic events at 3.3-3.1 Ga, 2.7-2.5 Ga and 2.04 Ga. Detailed structural mapping over 10 years highlights four deformation events at Venetia. Rules-based implicit 3D modelling in Leapfrog Geo™ provides an unprecedented insight into CZ ductile deformation and sheath folding. D1 juxtaposed gneisses against metasediments. D2 produced a pervasive axial planar foliation (S2) to isoclinal F2 folds. Sheared lithological contacts and S2 were refolded into regional, open, predominantly southward-verging, E-W trending F3 folds. Intrusion of a hornblendite protolith occurred at high angles to incipient S2. Constrictional-prolate D4 shows moderately NE-plunging azimuths defined by elongated hornblendite lenses, andalusite crystals in metapelite, crenulations in fuchsitic quartzite and sheath folding. D4 overlaps with a: 1) 2.03-2.01 Ga regional M3 metamorphic overprint; b) transpressional deformation at 2.2-1.9 Ga and c) 2.03 Ga transpressional, dextral shearing and thrusting around the CZ and d) formation of the Avoca, Bellavue and Baklykraal sheath folds and parallel lineations.

  3. 'Tetl' Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image, taken by the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during the rover's trek through the 'Columbia Hills' at 'Gusev Crater,' shows the horizontally layered rock dubbed 'Tetl.' Scientists hope to investigate this rock in more detail, aiming to determine whether the rock's layering is volcanic or sedimentary in origin. If for some reason this particular rock is not favorably positioned for grinding and examination by the toolbox of instruments on the rover's robotic arm, Spirit will be within short reach of another similar rock, dubbed 'Coba.' Spirit took this image on its 264th martian day, or sol (Sept. 29, 2004). This is a false-color composite image generated from the panoramic camera's 750-, 530-, and 430-nanometer filters.

  4. Art Rocks with Rock Art!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bickett, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses rock art which was the very first "art." Rock art, such as the images created on the stone surfaces of the caves of Lascaux and Altimira, is the true origin of the canvas, paintbrush, and painting media. For there, within caverns deep in the earth, the first artists mixed animal fat, urine, and saliva with powdered minerals…

  5. Terby's Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    27 January 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows some of the light-toned, layered, sedimentary rock outcrops in northern Terby Crater. Terby is located along the north edge of Hellas Planitia. The sedimentary rocks might have been deposited in a greater, Hellas-filling sea -- or not. Today, the rocks are partly covered by dark-toned sediment and debris.

    Location near: 27.2oS, 285.3oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  6. Rock Garden

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This false color composite image of the Rock Garden shows the rocks 'Shark' and 'Half Dome' at upper left and middle, respectively. Between these two large rocks is a smaller rock (about 0.20 m wide, 0.10 m high, and 6.33 m from the Lander) that was observed close-up with the Sojourner rover (see PIA00989).

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  7. 'Lutefisk' Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit used its panoramic camera to take this image of a rock called 'Lutefisk' on the rover's 286th martian day (Oct. 22, 2004). The surface of the rock is studded with rounded granules of apparently more-resistant material up to several millimeters (0.1 inch) or more across. The visible portion of Lutefisk is about 25 centimeters (10 inches) across.

  8. Snow Avalanche Disturbance Ecology: Examples From the San Juan Mountains, Colorado.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonson, S.; Fassnacht, S. R.

    2008-12-01

    We evaluated landscape ecology approaches to characterize snow avalanche paths based on patterns of plant species composition and evidence of disturbance. Historical records of avalanche incidents, patterns in the annual growth layers of woody plants, and distributions of plant species can be used to quantify and map the frequency and magnitude of snow slide events. Near Silverton, Colorado, a series of snow storms in January of 2005 resulted in many avalanche paths running full track at 30 and 100 year return frequency. Many avalanches cut fresh trimlines, widening their tracks by uprooting, stripping, and breaking mature trees. Powerful avalanches deposited massive piles of snow, rocks, and woody debris in their runout zones. We used cross-section discs and cores of representative downed trees to detect dendro-ecological signals of past snow avalanche disturbance. Avalanche signals included impact scars from the moving snow and associated wind blast, relative width of annual growth rings, and development of reaction wood in response to tilting. Initial measurements of plant diversity and disturbance along the elevation gradient of an avalanche path near Silverton indicate that avalanche activity influences patterns of forest cover, contributes to the high local plant species diversity, and provides opportunities for new seedling establishment.

  9. An experimental assessment of vehicle disturbance effects on migratory shorebirds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tarr, N.M.; Simons, T.R.; Pollock, K.H.

    2010-01-01

    Off-road vehicle (ORV) traffic is one of several forms of disturbance thought to affect shorebirds at migration stopover sites. Attempts to measure disturbance effects on shorebird habitat use and behavior at stopover sites are difficult because ORV disturbance is frequently confounded with habitat and environmental factors. We used a before-after-control-impact experimental design to isolate effects of vehicle disturbance from shorebird responses to environmental and habitat factors. We manipulated disturbance levels within beach closures along South Core Banks, North Carolina, USA, and measured changes in shorebird abundance and location, as well as the activity of one focal species, the sanderling (Calidris alba), within paired control and impact plots. We applied a discrete treatment level of one flee-response-inducing event every 10 minutes on impact plots. We found that disturbance reduced total shorebird and black-bellied plover (Pluvialis squatarola) abundance and reduced relative use of microhabitat zones above the swash zone (wet sand and dry sand) by sanderlings, black-bellied plovers, willets (Tringa semipalmata), and total shorebirds. Sanderlings and total shorebirds increased use of the swash zone in response to vehicle disturbance. Disturbance reduced use of study plots by sanderlings for resting and increased sanderling activity, but we did not detect an effect of vehicle disturbance on sanderling foraging activity. We provide the first estimates of how a discrete level of disturbance affects shorebird distributions among ocean beach microhabitats. Our findings provide a standard to which managers can compare frequency and intensity of disturbance events at other shorebird stopover and roosting sites and indicate that limiting disturbance will contribute to use of a site by migratory shorebirds. ?? 2010 The Wildlife Society.

  10. Fault zone hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bense, V. F.; Gleeson, T.; Loveless, S. E.; Bour, O.; Scibek, J.

    2013-12-01

    Deformation along faults in the shallow crust (< 1 km) introduces permeability heterogeneity and anisotropy, which has an important impact on processes such as regional groundwater flow, hydrocarbon migration, and hydrothermal fluid circulation. Fault zones have the capacity to be hydraulic conduits connecting shallow and deep geological environments, but simultaneously the fault cores of many faults often form effective barriers to flow. The direct evaluation of the impact of faults to fluid flow patterns remains a challenge and requires a multidisciplinary research effort of structural geologists and hydrogeologists. However, we find that these disciplines often use different methods with little interaction between them. In this review, we document the current multi-disciplinary understanding of fault zone hydrogeology. We discuss surface- and subsurface observations from diverse rock types from unlithified and lithified clastic sediments through to carbonate, crystalline, and volcanic rocks. For each rock type, we evaluate geological deformation mechanisms, hydrogeologic observations and conceptual models of fault zone hydrogeology. Outcrop observations indicate that fault zones commonly have a permeability structure suggesting they should act as complex conduit-barrier systems in which along-fault flow is encouraged and across-fault flow is impeded. Hydrogeological observations of fault zones reported in the literature show a broad qualitative agreement with outcrop-based conceptual models of fault zone hydrogeology. Nevertheless, the specific impact of a particular fault permeability structure on fault zone hydrogeology can only be assessed when the hydrogeological context of the fault zone is considered and not from outcrop observations alone. To gain a more integrated, comprehensive understanding of fault zone hydrogeology, we foresee numerous synergistic opportunities and challenges for the discipline of structural geology and hydrogeology to co-evolve and

  11. Évolution minéralogique des argilites en zone sous-saturée oxydée : exemple des parois du tunnel de Tournemire (Aveyron, France)Mineralogical evolution of argillites in dehydrated-oxidised zones: the example of the argillitic walls from Tournemire tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charpentier, Delphine; Cathelineau, Michel; Mosser-Ruck, Régine; Bruno, Gérard

    2001-05-01

    Digging of underground work such as that of the Tournemire tunnel in a Toarcian argillite formation, has an impact on the surface mineralogy of the rock blocks. In spite of its very low water content, the argillite is reactive as a consequence of the modification of the redox conditions. Thus, atmospheric oxygen in presence of adsorbed water induces pyrite corrosion and formation of secondary mineral phases such as gypsum, celestite, jarosite and Fe-hydroxides, which play a significant role on the water-rock equilibria of the mechanically disturbed zone.

  12. Extracting Information from Folds in Rocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudleston, Peter John

    1986-01-01

    Describes the three processes of folding in rocks: buckling, bending, and passive folding. Discusses how geometrical properties and strain distributions help to identify which processes produce natural folds, and also provides information about the mechanical properties of rocks, and the sense of shear in shear zones. (TW)

  13. Experimental and Numerical Study on Stress Relaxation of Sandstones Disturbed by Dynamic Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wancheng; Li, Shuai; Niu, Leilei; Liu, Kai; Xu, Tao

    2016-10-01

    Time-dependent rheological deformation of rocks affects the stability of underground stopes or constructions. It may also be altered by dynamic disturbances, such as rock blasting. To study such effects, a new stress relaxation-disturbance testing machine was invented, capable of loading conditions for stress relaxation and dynamic disturbance. Effects of testing machine stiffness on rock deformation behavior were examined to confirm that rocks had undergone stress relaxation. Stress relaxation tests on specimens under uniaxial compression were carried out over 6 or more days. Under single-stage stress relaxation, axial stress relaxed within 5-7 days, stabilizing at constant strain. During two-stage stress relaxation, larger stress decay was observed under the higher strain level. A dynamic disturbance from a pendulum hammer was applied to specimens under stress relaxation to evaluate their response. In these tests, stress decline and strain increase were related to residual strain induced by the dynamic disturbance. The strain variation in specimens was found to be within 1.5 % of values before the disturbance. Finally, a damage-based constitutive model for rocks subjected to stress relaxation and dynamic disturbance is proposed. It reproduces the stress relaxation behavior of rock observed in our experiments. The model was used to quantify stress relaxation of rocks and the effects of dynamic disturbance on this process. The larger stress decay of rocks under higher strain is likely related to damage in the rock. Clearly, increases in strain and decreases in stress induced by dynamic loading, coupled with rock damage, are over-estimated in our numerical simulations.

  14. Sleep Disturbances in Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Kamath, Jayesh; Virdi, Sundeep; Winokur, Andrew

    2015-12-01

    Sleep disturbances are prevalent in patients with schizophrenia and play a critical role in the morbidity and mortality associated with the illness. Subjective and objective assessments of sleep in patients with schizophrenia have identified certain consistent findings. Findings related to the sleep structure abnormalities have shown correlations with important clinical aspects of the illness. Disruption of specific neurotransmitter systems and dysregulation of clock genes may play a role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia-related sleep disturbances. Antipsychotic medications play an important role in the treatment of sleep disturbances in these patients and have an impact on their sleep structure.

  15. Disturbance and change in biodiversity

    PubMed Central

    Dornelas, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Understanding how disturbance affects biodiversity is important for both fundamental and applied reasons. Here, I investigate how disturbances with different ecological effects change biodiversity metrics. I define three main types of disturbance effects: D disturbance (shifts in mortality rate), B disturbance (shifts in reproductive rates) and K disturbance (shifts in carrying capacity). Numerous composite disturbances can be defined including any combination of these three types of ecological effects. The consequences of D, B and K disturbances, as well as of composite DBK disturbances are examined by comparing metrics before and after a disturbance, in disturbed and undisturbed communities. I use simulations of neutral communities and examine species richness, total abundance and species abundance distributions. The patterns of change in biodiversity metrics are consistent among different types of disturbance. K disturbance has the most severe effects, followed by D disturbance, and B disturbance has nearly negligible effects. Consequences of composite DBK disturbances are more complex than any of the three types of disturbance, with unimodal relationships along a disturbance gradient arising when D, B and K are negatively correlated. Importantly, regardless of disturbance type, community isolation enhances the negative consequences and hinders the positive effects of disturbances. PMID:20980319

  16. New mineralogical and isotopic constraints on Main Zone-hosted PGE mineralisation at Moorddrift, northern Bushveld Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holwell, D. A.; Jones, A.; Smith, J. W.; Boyce, A. J.

    2013-08-01

    The northern limb of the Bushveld Complex, South Africa contains a number of occurrences of platinum-group element (PGE) mineralisation within Main Zone rocks, whereas the rest of the complex has PGE-depleted Main Zone units. On the farm Moorddrift, Cu-Ni-PGE sulphide mineralisation is hosted within the Upper Main Zone in a layered package of gabbronorites, mottled anorthosites and thin pyroxenites. Our observations indicate that a 10-m-thick, `reef-style' package of mineralisation has been extensively `disturbed', forming a mega breccia which in some localities may distribute mineralised rocks over intersections of over 300 m. The sulphides are made up of pyrrhotite, pentlandite and chalcopyrite, heavily altered around their margins and overprinted by secondary pyrite. Platinum-group mineral assemblages typical of primary magmatic deposits, with Pt and Pd tellurides and sperrylite, are present in the `reef-style' package, whereas there is a decrease in tellurides and an increase in antimonides in the `disturbed' package, interpreted to be related to hydrothermal recrystallization during veining and brecciation. Sulphur isotopes show that all sulphides within the mineralised package on Moorddrift have a crustal signature consistent with local country rock sediments of the Transvaal Supergroup. We interpret the mineralisation at Moorddrift as a primary sulphide reef, likely produced as a result of the mixing of crustally contaminated magmas in the Upper Main Zone, which has been locally disrupted post-crystallisation. At present, there are no firm links between Moorddrift and the other known PGE occurrences in the Main Zone at the Aurora and Waterberg projects, although the stratigraphic position of all may be similar and thus intriguing. Nonetheless, they do demonstrate that the Main Zone of the northern limb of the Bushveld Complex, unlike the eastern and western limbs, can be considered a fertile unit for potential PGE mineralisation.

  17. Effect of crustal heterogeneities and effective rock strength on the formation of HP and UHP rocks.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuber, Georg; Kaus, Boris; Schmalholz, Stefan; White, Richard

    2015-04-01

    The formation of high pressure and ultra-high pressure rocks has been controversially discussed in recent years. Most existing petrological interpretations assume that pressure in the Earth is lithostatic and therefore HP and UHP rocks have to come from great depth, which usually involves going down a subduction channel and being exhumed again. Yet, an alternative explanation points out that pressure in the lithosphere is often non-lithostatic and can be either smaller or larger than lithostatic as a function of location and time. Whether this effect is tectonically significant or not depends on the magnitude of non-lithostatic pressure, and as a result a number of researchers have recently performed numerical simulations to address this. Somewhat disturbingly, they obtained widely differing results with some claiming that overpressures as large as a GPa can occur (Schmalholz et al. 2014), whereas others show that overpressures of exhumed rocks are generally less than 20% and thus insignificant (Li et al. 2010; Burov et al. 2014). In order to understand where these discrepancies come from, we reproduce the simulations of Li et al (2010) of a typical subduction and collision scenario, using an independently developed numerical code (MVEP2). For the same model setup and parameters, we confirm the earlier results of Li et al. (2010) and obtain no more than ~20% overpressure in exhumed rocks of the subduction channel. Yet, a critical assumption in their models is that the subducted crust is laterally homogeneous and that it has a low effective friction angle that is less than 7o. The friction angle of (dry) rocks is experimentally well-constrained to be around 30o, and low effective friction angles require, for example, high-fluid pressures. Whereas high fluid pressures might exist in the sediment-rich upper crust, they are likely to be much lower or absent in the lower crust from which melt has been extracted or in rocks that underwent a previous orogenic cycle. In a

  18. Rock Paintings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Julienne Edwards

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the integration of art and academics in a fifth-grade instructional unit on Native American culture. Describes how students studied Native American pictographs, designed their own pictographs, made their own tools, and created rock paintings of their pictographs using these tools. Provides a list of references on Native American…

  19. Rock mass characterisation and stability analyses of excavated slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zangerl, Christian; Lechner, Heidrun

    2016-04-01

    Excavated slopes in fractured rock masses are frequently designed for open pit mining, quarries, buildings, highways, railway lines, and canals. These slopes can reach heights of several hundreds of metres and in cases concerning open pit mines slopes larger than 1000 m are not uncommon. Given that deep-seated slope failures can cause large damage or even loss of life, the slope design needs to incorporate sufficient stability. Thus, slope design methods based on comprehensive approaches need to be applied. Excavation changes slope angle, groundwater flow, and blasting increases the degree of rock mass fracturing as well as rock mass disturbance. As such, excavation leads to considerable stress changes in the slopes. Generally, slope design rely on the concept of factor of safety (FOS), often a requirement by international or national standards. A limitation of the factor of safety is that time dependent failure processes, stress-strain relationships, and the impact of rock mass strain and displacement are not considered. Usually, there is a difficulty to estimate the strength of the rock mass, which in turn is controlled by an interaction of intact rock and discontinuity strength. In addition, knowledge about in-situ stresses for the failure criterion is essential. Thus, the estimation of the state of stress of the slope and the strength parameters of the rock mass is still challenging. Given that, large-scale in-situ testing is difficult and costly, back-calculations of case studies in similar rock types or rock mass classification systems are usually the methods of choice. Concerning back-calculations, often a detailed and standardised documentation is missing, and a direct applicability to new projects is not always given. Concerning rock mass classification systems, it is difficult to consider rock mass anisotropy and thus the empirical estimation of the strength properties possesses high uncertainty. In the framework of this study an approach based on

  20. 1992 system disturbances

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    When a utility experiences an electric system emergency that requires reporting to the DOE, the utility sends a copy of the report to its Regional Council, which then sends a copy to NERC. Canadian utilities often voluntarily file emergency reports to DOE and NERC as well. NERC's annual review of system disturbances begins in November when the Disturbance Analysis Working Group meets to discuss each disturbance reported to NERC so far that year. The Group then contacts the Regional Council or utility(ies) involved and requests a detailed report of each incident. The Group then summarizes the report for this Review and analyzes it using the NERC Operating Guides and Planning Policies and Guides as the analysis categories. The Commentary section includes the conclusions and recommendations that were formulated from the analyses in this report plus the general experiences of the Working Group through the years. In 1992, utilities reported 22 incidents of system disturbances, load reductions, or unusual occurrences. This is eight fewer than reported in 1991. These incidents are listed chronologically and categorized as: fourteen system interruptions that resulted in loss of customer service, eight unusual occurrences that did not cause a service interruption. No public appeals to reduce demand or voltage reductions occurred in 1992. This document contains reports of 11 incidents plus a summary of the damage from Hurricane Andrew. Each utility or Region approved its analysis in this report. Included is a table of Disturbances by Analysis Category that offers a quick review of the categories applicable to each incident.

  1. White Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 19 April 2002) The Science 'White Rock' is the unofficial name for this unusual landform which was first observed during the Mariner 9 mission in the early 1970's. As later analysis of additional data sets would show, White Rock is neither white nor dense rock. Its apparent brightness arises from the fact that the material surrounding it is so dark. Images from the Mars Global Surveyor MOC camera revealed dark sand dunes surrounding White Rock and on the floor of the troughs within it. Some of these dunes are just apparent in the THEMIS image. Although there was speculation that the material composing White Rock could be salts from an ancient dry lakebed, spectral data from the MGS TES instrument did not support this claim. Instead, the White Rock deposit may be the erosional remnant of a previously more continuous occurrence of air fall sediments, either volcanic ash or windblown dust. The THEMIS image offers new evidence for the idea that the original deposit covered a larger area. Approximately 10 kilometers to the southeast of the main deposit are some tiny knobs of similarly bright material preserved on the floor of a small crater. Given that the eolian erosion of the main White Rock deposit has produced isolated knobs at its edges, it is reasonable to suspect that the more distant outliers are the remnants of a once continuous deposit that stretched at least to this location. The fact that so little remains of the larger deposit suggests that the material is very easily eroded and simply blows away. The Story Fingers of hard, white rock seem to jut out like icy daggers across a moody Martian surface, but appearances can be deceiving. These bright, jagged features are neither white, nor icy, nor even hard and rocky! So what are they, and why are they so different from the surrounding terrain? Scientists know that you can't always trust what your eyes see alone. You have to use other kinds of science instruments to measure things that our eyes can

  2. Meridiani Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    16 September 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows the complex surfaces of some of the light- and intermediate-toned sedimentary rock exposed by erosion in eastern Sinus Meridiani. Similar rocks occur at the Mars Exploration Rover, Opportunity, site, but they are largely covered by windblown sand and granules. The dark feature with a rayed pattern is the product of a meteor impact.

    Location near: 0.8oN, 355.2oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Autumn

  3. Terby's Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    25 August 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows light-toned, layered, sedimentary rock outcrops in the crater, Terby. The crater is located on the north rim of Hellas Basin. If one could visit the rocks in Terby, one might learn from them whether they formed in a body of water. It is possible, for example, that Terby was a bay in a larger, Hellas-wide sea.

    Location near: 27.9oS, 285.7oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Winter

  4. Reconstruction of crustal blocks of California on the basis of initial strontium isotopic compositions of Mesozoic granitic rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kistler, Ronald Wayne; Peterman, Zell E.

    1978-01-01

    Initial 87Sr/ 86 Sr was determined for samples of Mesozoic granitic rocks in the vicinity of the Garlock fault zone in California. These data along with similar data from the Sierra Nevada and along the San Andreas fault system permit a reconstruction of basement rocks offset by the Cenozoic lateral faulting along both the San Andreas and Garlock fault systems. The location of the line of initial 87Sr/ 86 Sr = 0.7060 can be related to the edge of the Precambrian continental crust in the western United States. Our model explains the present configuration of the edge of Precambrian continental crust as the result of two stages of rifting that occurred about 1,250 to 800 m.y. ago, during Belt sedimentation, and about 600 to 350 m.y. ago, prior to and during the development of the Cordilleran geosyncline and to left-lateral translation along a locus of disturbance identified in the central Mojave Desert. The variations in Rb, Sr, and initial 87Sr/ 86 Sr of the Mesozoic granitic rocks are interpreted as due to variations in composition and age of the source materials of the granitic rocks. The variations of Rb, Sr, and initial 87Sr/ 86 Sr in Mesozoic granitic rocks, the sedimentation history during the late Precambrian and Paleozoic, and the geographic position of loci of Mesozoic magmatism in the western United States are related to the development of the continental margin and different types of lithosphere during rifting.

  5. Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    6 November 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows outcrops of sedimentary rocks in a crater located just north of the Sinus Meridiani region. Perhaps the crater was once the site of a martian lake.

    Location near: 2.9oN, 359.0oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Autumn

  6. Thermal Inertia of Rocks and Rock Populations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golombek, M. P.; Jakosky, B. M.; Mellon, M. T.

    2001-01-01

    The effective thermal inertia of rock populations on Mars and Earth is derived from a model of effective inertia versus rock diameter. Results allow a parameterization of the effective rock inertia versus rock abundance and bulk and fine component inertia. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  7. Magnetic fields over active tectonic zones in ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kopytenko, Yu. A.; Serebrianaya, P.M.; Nikitina, L.V.; Green, A.W.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of our work is to estimate the electromagnetic effects that can be detected in the submarine zones with hydrothermal activity. It is known that meso-scale flows appear in the regions over underwater volcanoes or hot rocks. Their origin is connected with heat flux and hot jets released from underwater volcanoes or faults in a sea bottom. Values of mean velocities and turbulent velocities in plumes were estimated. Quasiconstant magnetic fields induced by a hot jet and a vortex over a plume top are about 1-40 nT. Variable magnetic fields are about 0.1-1 nT. These magnetic disturbances in the sea medium create an additional natural electromagnetic background that must be considered when making detailed magnetic surveys. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Rock Driller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Thomas M.

    2001-01-01

    The next series of planetary exploration missions require a method of extracting rock and soil core samples. Therefore a prototype ultrasonic core driller (UTCD) was developed to meet the constraints of Small Bodies Exploration and Mars Sample Return Missions. The constraints in the design are size, weight, power, and axial loading. The ultrasonic transducer requires a relatively low axial load, which is one of the reasons this technology was chosen. The ultrasonic generator breadboard section can be contained within the 5x5x3 limits and weighs less than two pounds. Based on results attained the objectives for the first phase were achieved. A number of transducer probes were made and tested. One version only drills, and the other will actually provide a small core from a rock. Because of a more efficient transducer/probe, it will run at very low power (less than 5 Watts) and still drill/core. The prototype generator was built to allow for variation of all the performance-effecting elements of the transducer/probe/end effector, i.e., pulse, duty cycle, frequency, etc. The heart of the circuitry is what will be converted to a surface mounted board for the next phase, after all the parameters have been optimized and the microprocessor feedback can be installed.

  9. Waveguide disturbance detection method

    DOEpatents

    Korneev, Valeri A.; Nihei, Kurt T.; Myer, Larry R.

    2000-01-01

    A method for detection of a disturbance in a waveguide comprising transmitting a wavefield having symmetric and antisymmetric components from a horizontally and/or vertically polarized source and/or pressure source disposed symmetrically with respect to the longitudinal central axis of the waveguide at one end of the waveguide, recording the horizontal and/or vertical component or a pressure of the wavefield with a vertical array of receivers disposed at the opposite end of the waveguide, separating the wavenumber transform of the wavefield into the symmetric and antisymmetric components, integrating the symmetric and antisymmetric components over a broad frequency range, and comparing the magnitude of the symmetric components and the antisymmetric components to an expected magnitude for the symmetric components and the antisymmetric components for a waveguide of uniform thickness and properties thereby determining whether or not a disturbance is present inside the waveguide.

  10. Atmospheric Disturbance Environment Definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tank, William G.

    1994-01-01

    Traditionally, the application of atmospheric disturbance data to airplane design problems has been the domain of the structures engineer. The primary concern in this case is the design of structural components sufficient to handle transient loads induced by the most severe atmospheric "gusts" that might be encountered. The concern has resulted in a considerable body of high altitude gust acceleration data obtained with VGH recorders (airplane velocity, V, vertical acceleration, G, altitude, H) on high-flying airplanes like the U-2 (Ehernberger and Love, 1975). However, the propulsion system designer is less concerned with the accelerations of the airplane than he is with the airflow entering the system's inlet. When the airplane encounters atmospheric turbulence it responds with transient fluctuations in pitch, yaw, and roll angles. These transients, together with fluctuations in the free-stream temperature and pressure will disrupt the total pressure, temperature, Mach number and angularity of the inlet flow. For the mixed compression inlet, the result is a disturbed throat Mach number and/or shock position, and in extreme cases an inlet unstart can occur (cf. Section 2.1). Interest in the effects of inlet unstart on the vehicle dynamics of large, supersonic airplanes is not new. Results published by NASA in 1962 of wind tunnel studies of the problem were used in support of the United States Supersonic Transport program (SST) (White, at aI, 1963). Such studies continued into the late 1970's. However, in spite of such interest, there never was developed an atmospheric disturbance database for inlet unstart analysis to compare with that available for the structures load analysis. Missing were data for the free-stream temperature and pressure disturbances that also contribute to the unStart problem.

  11. [Neuroendocrine disturbances in obesity].

    PubMed

    Isidro, M L; Alvarez, P; Martínez, T; Cordido, F

    2004-01-01

    Obesity is associated with different disturbances in endocrine function. Both spontaneous growth hormone (GH) secretion and its response to several stimuli have shown to be reduced in obese patients. The GH responses to GH-releasing hormone and other challenges by pyridostigmine suggest that the reduction in GH secretion is related to an increased somatostatinergic tone. Other experiments point to a down-regulation of somatostatin receptors in the somatotroph cell. Ghrelin administration is followed by a massive GH release, but the possibility that ghrelin or GHRH deficiency are the cause of GH deficiency in obesity is unlikely. The increase in free fatty acids in obesity might be related to GH reduction, since acipimox administration is able to reverse GH secretion. In women, abdominal obesity is associated with hyperandrogenism and low sex hormone-binding globulin levels. Obese men have low testosterone and gonadotrophin concentrations, specially in cases of morbid obesity. An increase in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity and some resistance to dexamethasone suppression have been described in abdominal obesity. This effect may be due to neuroendocrine alterations related to a genetic origin. Adrenal hyperfunction may favour cardiovascular and metabolic complications. There are no disturbances in thyroid function. Sometimes a reduction in prolactin response to several stimuli has been reported. This effect may be due to hyperinsulinaemia or to disturbances in the dopaminergic tone.

  12. Vehicle Disturbance Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clapp, Brian

    2001-07-01

    The Vehicle Disturbance Test {VDT} is used to characterize uncompensated environmental disturbances acting upon the HST during normal operation. The VDT is a passive test {not a forced-response test} used to obtain signatures for both externally induced {e.g. SA-3} and internally induced {e.g. NCC and ACS mechanisms} disturbances for comparison with past VDT results. The disturbances observed will be used as the nominal on-orbit disturbances in pointing control simulations until the next VDT is run. The test occurs after release, and most of the VDT can be run during the BEA period. The -V1 sunpoint portion of the VDT occurs after the BEA period is complete. The VDT shall consist of five separate tests that need not occur consecutively. The overall duration of the VDT tests is at least 17 orbits of spacecraft time including {1} at least 1 full orbit at +V3 sunpoint prior to NCS CPL turn-on while performing ACS mechanism motions simulating routine flight operations, {2} at least 5 full orbits at +V3 sunpoint prior to NCS CPL turn-on, {3} at least 1 full orbit at +V3 sunpoint during NCC startup, {4} at least 5 full orbits at +V3 sunpoint while NCC is operating at steady-state, and {5} at least 5 full orbits at -V1 sunpoint with the NCC operating at steady-state. Each test is initiated via SMS execution of stored program macros in the HST flight computer to switch the attitude control law gains to low-bandwidth maneuver gains, command the gyros into low mode, terminate Velocity aberration and parallax {VAP} processing, and modify flight computer diagnostic mnemonics to display the roll component of DVTHEP. The nominal attitude control law configuration will be restored at the end of each test via SMS execution of stored program macros. The stored program command macros are developed specifically for the VDT by the Flight Software and Pointing Control System groups.

  13. Disturbing Behavior Checklists" Technical Manual

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Algozzine, Bob

    2012-01-01

    Ecological theorists have suggested that "disturbance" may result from an interaction between a child's behavior and reactions to that behavior within ecosystems such as schools. In this context, behavior is viewed as "disturbing" rather than "disturbed" and equal emphasis is given to the child and to individuals with whom the child interacts when…

  14. Rock Properties Model

    SciTech Connect

    C. Lum

    2004-09-16

    The purpose of this model report is to document the Rock Properties Model version 3.1 with regard to input data, model methods, assumptions, uncertainties and limitations of model results, and qualification status of the model. The report also documents the differences between the current and previous versions and validation of the model. The rock properties model provides mean matrix and lithophysae porosity, and the cross-correlated mean bulk density as direct input to the ''Saturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Abstraction'', MDL-NBS-HS-000021, REV 02 (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170042]). The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in Section 6.6 and 8.2. Model validation accomplished by corroboration with data not cited as direct input is discussed in Section 7. The revision of this model report was performed as part of activities being conducted under the ''Technical Work Plan for: The Integrated Site Model, Revision 05'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169635]). The purpose of this revision is to bring the report up to current procedural requirements and address the Regulatory Integration Team evaluation comments. The work plan describes the scope, objectives, tasks, methodology, and procedures for this process.

  15. Vehicle Disturbance Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clapp, Brian

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of the VDT is to measure and characterize uncompensated environmental disturbances acting upon the HST during normal operation. The VDT is a passive test {not a forced-response test} used to obtain signatures for both externally induced {e.g. SCM, SA-3, SSM thermal gradients} and internally induced {e.g. HGA, RWA, COS and WFC3 mechanisms} disturbances affecting HST LOS pointing. The disturbances observed will be used as the nominal on-orbit disturbances in pointing control simulations until the next VDT is run.The test occurs after release, and most of the VDT can be run during the BEA period. The ?V1 sunpoint portion of the VDT usually occurs after the BEA period is complete. The VDT shall consist of two separate tests that need not occur consecutively. The overall duration of the VDT is at least 13 orbits of spacecraft time including {1} at least 8 orbits at +V3 sunpoint after achieving thermal equilibrium {at least 36-hours at +V3 sunpoint} and three out of 8-orbits have RWA Friction Compensation turned Off, and {2} at least 5 orbits at ?V1 sunpoint {all or part of this segment have RWA Friction Compensation turned Off}. At the beginning of each test, the attitude control law gains are switched to maneuver gains, and the gyros are commanded to low mode. The nominal attitude control law configuration will be restored at the end of each test.Each test is initiated via SMS execution of stored program macros in the HST flight computer to switch the attitude control law gains to low-bandwidth maneuver gains, command the gyros into low mode, terminate Velocity aberration and parallax {VAP} processing, and manage the status of on-board RWA Friction Compensation. The nominal attitude control law configuration will be restored at the end of each test via SMS execution of stored program macros. The stored program command macros are developed specifically for the VDT by the Flight Software and Pointing Control System groups.

  16. A Rock Encyclopedia That Includes Rock Samples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laznicka, Peter

    1981-01-01

    Described is a rock encyclopedia combining rock sample sets and encyclopedic word and picture entries which can be used as a realistic information resource for independent study or as a part of a course. (JT)

  17. Sleep Disturbances in Neurodevelopmental Disorders.

    PubMed

    Robinson-Shelton, Althea; Malow, Beth A

    2016-01-01

    Sleep disturbances are extremely prevalent in children with neurodevelopmental disorders compared to typically developing children. The diagnostic criteria for many neurodevelopmental disorders include sleep disturbances. Sleep disturbance in this population is often multifactorial and caused by the interplay of genetic, neurobiological and environmental overlap. These disturbances often present either as insomnia or hypersomnia. Different sleep disorders present with these complaints and based on the clinical history and findings from diagnostic tests, an appropriate diagnosis can be made. This review aims to provide an overview of causes, diagnosis, and treatment of sleep disturbances in neurodevelopmental disorders that present primarily with symptoms of hypersomnia and/or insomnia. PMID:26719309

  18. Evolution of Rock Cracks Under Unloading Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, R. Q.; Huang, D.

    2014-03-01

    Underground excavation normally causes instability of the mother rock due to the release and redistribution of stress within the affected zone. For gaining deep insight into the characteristics and mechanism of rock crack evolution during underground excavation, laboratory tests are carried out on 36 man-made rock specimens with single or double cracks under two different unloading conditions. The results show that the strength of rock and the evolution of cracks are clearly influenced by both the inclination angle of individual cracks with reference to the unloading direction and the combination geometry of cracks. The peak strength of rock with a single crack becomes smaller with the inclination angle. Crack propagation progresses intermittently, as evidenced by a sudden increase in deformation and repeated fluctuation of measured stress. The rock with a single crack is found to fail in three modes, i.e., shear, tension-shear, and splitting, while the rock bridge between two cracks is normally failed in shear, tension-shear, and tension. The failure mode in which a crack rock or rock bridge behaves is found to be determined by the inclination angle of the original crack, initial stress state, and unloading condition. Another observation is that the secondary cracks are relatively easily created under high initial stress and quick unloading.

  19. An Early Pliocene thermal disturbance of the main central thrust, central Nepal: Implications for Himalayan tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copeland, Peter; Harrison, T. Mark; Hodges, Kip V.; MaruéJol, Patricia; Le Fort, Patrick; Pecher, Arnaud

    1991-05-01

    Since the beginning of the collision between India and Asia at about 50 Ma, the convergence in the Himalaya has largely been taken up along major thrust zones. In this study, samples of the Lesser Himalaya Formations, up to 10 km below the Main Central Thrust (MCT), and the Greater Himalaya Sequence, up to 12 km above the MCT, have been analyzed by the 40Ar/39Ar and U-Pb methods to investigate the thermal history of the MCT. The ages can be summarized as follows: (1) The youngest ages from muscovites (3.1 Ma), biotites (3.4 Ma), and hornblendes (4.1 Ma) all come from within 1 km of the MCT, (2) there is a marked asymmetry of ages between the footwall and the hanging wall of the MCT; the maximum mica age in the hanging wall (Greater Himalaya Sequence) is 13 Ma, whereas a muscovite 5 km below the MCT, in the footwall, has an age spectrum with a gradient from 400 to 1400 Ma, (3) five K-feldspars from -6.2 to 11.9 km above the MCT all give minimum ages in the range 3.0-6.4 Ma, and (4) a 206Pb/238U age on a brannerite from the Greater Himalayan Sequence is 4.8 Ma. Structural and petrologic observations preclude the possibility that this age-distance distribution reflects faulting within the Greater Himalaya Sequence and production of the necessary thermal energy by shear heating requires unrealistically high shear stresses. Infiltration of hot fluids through the MCT zone appears to be the best hypothesis to explain these data. Simple numerical simulations, which account for heat transfer by advection within the fluid flow zone and by conduction outside it, indicate that the observed age distribution could have been produced by infiltration of hot fluids through the MCT zone at circa 5 to 4 Ma within the following range of conditions: the fluids heated rocks to temperatures in the range 470 to 510°C for less than 1 million years in a region narrower than the entire MCT zone. The temperature of the thermal disturbance inferred from the 40Ar/39Ar data is consistent with

  20. Scheelite and coexisting F-rich zoned garnet, vesuvianite, fluorite, and apatite in calc-silicate rocks from the Mogok metamorphic belt, Myanmar: Implications for metasomatism in marble and the role of halogens in W mobilization and mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shun; Chen, Yi; Liu, Chuan-Zhou; Wang, Jian-Gang; Su, Bin; Gao, Yi-Jie; Wu, Fu-Yuan; Sein, Kyaing; Yang, Yue-Heng; Mao, Qian

    2016-03-01

    Scheelite, which is an important ore of tungsten and colored gemstone, is well developed in the calc-silicate rocks from the Mogok metamorphic belt (MMB), Myanmar. In this study, the textural, mineralogical, and compositional characteristics of scheelite and its associated minerals were systematically investigated to constrain the petrogenesis of scheelite-bearing calc-silicate rocks and the tungsten transfer and mineralization mechanism in a hydrothermal-metasomatic system. The petrological evidence, bulk and mineral geochemical signatures, and mass-transfer calculations indicate that the calc-silicate rocks formed by local metasomatism of marble via the introduction of an externally derived Si-Al-Fe-W-F-bearing, H2O-rich fluid phase. The distinct compositional zonations [F, Fe, Ca, and heavy rare earth elements (HREEs)] of garnet in the calc-silicate rocks record a two-stage metasomatic process and significant compositional variation in the associated fluid. The late-stage metasomatic fluid that led to the formation of the F-rich garnet rims, scheelite, and most of the calc-silicate minerals has noticeably higher fluorine activity (aF-), oxygen fugacity (fo2), and HREE content than the early-stage metasomatic fluid responsible for the garnet cores. The MMB scheelite exhibits typical "skarn-type" compositional characteristics with a high LaN/YbN ratio (100-180), a negative Eu anomaly (δEu = 0.3-0.5), and a high Mo content (1100-1330 ppm). These geochemical signatures are primarily controlled by the protolith, metasomatic fluid, redox conditions, and coexisting mineral phases. The enrichment of rare earth elements (REEs) and high field strength elements (HFSEs) in the MMB scheelite was dominated by two substitution reactions: Ca2+ + W6+ = REE3+ + HFSE5+ and 3Ca2+ = 2REE3+ + □Ca (where □Ca is a Ca-site vacancy). Considerable amounts of F and OH in the metasomatic fluid substituted for O in the garnet via the substitute reaction 4(F, OH)- = 4O2- + Si4+, leading

  1. The application of the intermediate disturbance hypothesis to physical systems: a case study on floodplain soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayburg, Scott; Neave, Melissa; Thompson-Laing, Justin

    2010-05-01

    Disturbances, defined as discrete events that disrupt physical and/or biological systems, are a component of every natural system. Disturbance ecology has been dominated, for the last 30 years or so, by the intermediate disturbance hypothesis that states that biological diversity will be maximised where disturbance occurs at an intermediate level. A wide range of disturbances and organisms have been examined with respect to the intermediate disturbance hypothesis and in many cases (especially with respect to sessile organisms) the theory has proven valid. In rivers, lakes, wetlands and floodplains, the predominant agent of disturbance is flooding. In flood disturbed environments, the intermediate disturbance hypothesis has been shown to apply to terrestrial and aquatic vegetation, but conflicting results have been observed when dealing with mobile organisms like macroinvertebrates, fish or amphibians. The argument for the validity of the intermediate disturbance hypothesis (irrespective of disturbance type) stems from the notion that an intermediate frequency of disturbance promotes diversity by: 1) preventing the competitive exclusion by the dominant species that can arise in infrequently disturbed sites; and 2) facilitating greater diversity than that observed in highly-disturbed sites where only species tolerant of the disturbance can thrive. A singular omission in this logic, and indeed in research into the intermediate disturbance hypothesis more generally, has been the lack of focus on its application or relation to physical systems. This study addresses this lack by investigating whether an intermediate level of flood disturbance leads to a greater diversity of soil character (assessed using a wide range of physical and geochemical soil properties). Four flood frequency (or disturbance frequency) categories are included in this study spanning the range from frequent through to infrequent flood disturbance. These are: a high-inundation-frequency flood zone

  2. Uranium-lead isotope systematics and apparent ages of zircons and other minerals in precambrian granitic rocks, Granite Mountains, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ludwig, K. R.; Stuckless, J.S.

    1978-01-01

    Zircon suites from the two main types of granite in the Granite Mountains, Wyoming, yielded concordia-intercept ages of 2,640??20 m.y. for a red, foliated granite (granite of Long Creek Mountain) and 2,595??40 m.y. for the much larger mass of the granite of Lankin Dome. These ages are statistically distinct (40??20 m.y. difference) and are consistent with observed chemical and textural differences. The lower intercepts of the zircon chords of 50??40 and 100+ 75 m.y. for the granite of Long Creek Mountain and granite of Lankin Dome, respectively, are not consistent with reasonable continuous diffusion lead-loss curves but do correspond well with the known (Laramide) time of uplift of the rocks. Epidote, zircon, and apatite from silicified and epidotized zones in the granites all record at least one postcrystallization disturbance in addition to the Laramide event and do not define a unique age of silicification and epidotization. The lower limit of ???2,500 m.y. provided by the least disturbed epidote, however, suggests that these rocks were probably formed by deuteric processes shortly after emplacement of the granite of the Lankin Dome. The earlier of the two disturbances that affected the minerals of the silicified-epidotized rock can be bracketed between 1,350 and 2,240 m.y. ago and is probably the same event that lowered mineral K-Ar and ages in the region. Zircon suites from both types of granite show well-defined linear correlations among U content, common-Pb content, and degree of discordance. One of the zircon suites has an extremely high common-Pb content (up to 180 ppm) and exhibits a component of radiogenic-Pb loss that is apparently unrelated to radiation damage. ?? 1978 Springer-Verlag.

  3. Rollerjaw Rock Crusher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Gregory; Brown, Kyle; Fuerstenau, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The rollerjaw rock crusher melds the concepts of jaw crushing and roll crushing long employed in the mining and rock-crushing industries. Rollerjaw rock crushers have been proposed for inclusion in geological exploration missions on Mars, where they would be used to pulverize rock samples into powders in the tens of micrometer particle size range required for analysis by scientific instruments.

  4. Disturbing Pop-Tart

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The Sojourner rover's front right camera imaged Pop-tart, a small rock or indurated soil material which was pushed out of the surrounding drift material by Sojourner's front left wheel during a soil mechanics experiment.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  5. Syn-collision Hairhan layered intrusion, Lakes Zone, Western Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnevskiy, A. V.; Izokh, A. E.; Kalugin, V. M.; Gertner, I. F.

    2012-04-01

    In the structure of the Lakes Zone of Western Mongolia, which is reconstructed as the Early Cambrian island arc (Lakes island arc terrane), there are several groups of contiguous space gabbroic intrusions, merged in Hirgisnuur complex. The largest (70 km2) is Hairhan intrusion, located in the central part of the Lake Zone in the Bumbat-Hairhan ridge. The structure of the intrusion disturbed by later tectonic movements and the subsequent formation of Cambrian granitoids Tohtoginshil complex. The structures of the body are two groups of rocks: layered series and marginal facies, fragmentary spread to the periphery of intrusion. Gabbronorites of marginal facies have intrusive contacts with the sedimentary rocks of Early Cambrian age Burgastay formation. The marginal facies, apparent thickness which is 1.5 km, is composed primarily of non-olivine gabbronorites in which there is trachytoid and sometimes bedding. Layered series composes the central part of the Hairhan intrusion, the direction of layering has a northwest strike, coaxial with the long axis of the intrusion. The lower part of the layered series consists mainly troctolites with minor olivine gabbroids. The upper part of the layered series consists mainly of olivine gabbro, troctolite occur here less frequently also observed small schlieren anorthosites. Of particular interest is the horizon taxitic gabbro and being above it - the horizon orbicular gabbro at the top of the layered series. The rocks are widely manifested magmatic disruptive and plastic deformation - both macro and micro levels. They are expressed in the collapse of layering of elements in small folds of varying amplitude (typically to a few tens centimeters), often passing into areas and zones taxitic disruption. The greatest number of these structural elements characteristic of the upper part of the layered series, including the orbicular gabbro and troctolites taxitic horizons. These features indicate intensive tectonic processes that

  6. Sleep Disturbances in Mood Disorders.

    PubMed

    Rumble, Meredith E; White, Kaitlin Hanley; Benca, Ruth M

    2015-12-01

    The article provides an overview of common and differentiating self-reported and objective sleep disturbances seen in mood-disordered populations. The importance of considering sleep disturbances in the context of mood disorders is emphasized, because a large body of evidence supports the notion that sleep disturbances are a risk factor for onset, exacerbation, and relapse of mood disorders. In addition, potential mechanisms for sleep disturbance in depression, other primary sleep disorders that often occur with mood disorders, effects of antidepressant and mood-stabilizing drugs on sleep, and the adjunctive effect of treating sleep in patients with mood disorders are discussed.

  7. The High-Risk (Disturbed and Disturbing) College Student

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollingsworth, Kathy R.; Dunkle, John H.; Douce, Louise

    2009-01-01

    The disturbed and disturbing college student causes the most vexing concerns for student affairs administrators. The Assessment-Intervention of Student Problems (AISP) model offers a useful and easily understood framework for dealing with the various challenges of this high-risk student population. This chapter focuses on changes that have…

  8. Ionospheric disturbance dynamo

    SciTech Connect

    Blanc, M.; Richmond, A.D.

    1980-04-01

    A numerical simulation study of the thermospheric winds produced by auroral heating during magnetic storms, and of their global dynamo effects, establishes the main features of the ionospheric disturbanc dynamo. Driven by auroral heating, a Hadley cell is created with equatorward winds blowing above about 120 km at mid-latitudes. The transport of angular momentum by these winds produces a subrotation of the midlatitude thermosphere, or westward motion with respect to the earth. The westward winds in turn drive equatorward Pedersen currents which accumulate charge toward the equator, resulting in the generation of a poleward electric field, a westward E x B drift, and an eastward current. When realistic local time conductivity variations are simulated, the eastward mid-latitude current is found to close partly via lower latitudes, resulting in an 'anti-Sq' type of current vortex. Both electric field and current at low latitudes thus vary in opposition to their normal quiet-day behavior. This total pattern of distrubance winds, electric fields, and currents is superimposed upon the background quiet-day pattern. When the neutral winds are artificially confined on the nightside, the basic pattern of predominantly westward E x B plasma drifts still prevails on the nightside but no longer extends into the dayside. Considerable observational evidence exists, suggesting that the ionospheric disturbance dynamo has an appreciable influence on storm-time ionospheric electric fields at middle and low latitudes.

  9. In situ and experimental evidence for acidic weathering of rocks and soils on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurowitz, J. A.; McLennan, S. M.; Tosca, N. J.; Arvidson, R. E.; Michalski, J. R.; Ming, D. W.; Schröder, C.; Squyres, S. W.

    2006-01-01

    Experimental data for alteration of synthetic Martian basalts at pH = 0-1 indicate that chemical fractionations at low pH are vastly different from those observed during terrestrial weathering. Rock surface analyses from Gusev crater are well described by the relationships apparent from low-pH experimental alteration data. A model for rock surface alteration is developed, which indicates that a leached alteration zone is present on rock surfaces at Gusev. This zone is not chemically fractionated to a large degree from the underlying rock interior, indicating that the rock surface alteration process has occurred at low water to rock ratio. The geochemistry of natural rock surfaces analyzed by APXS is consistent with a mixture between adhering soil/dust and the leached alteration zone. The chemistry of rock surfaces analyzed after brushing with the RAT is largely representative of the leached alteration zone. The chemistry of rock surfaces analyzed after grinding with the RAT is largely representative of the interior of the rock, relatively unaffected by the alteration process occurring at the rock surface. Elemental measurements from the Spirit, Opportunity, Pathfinder, and Viking 1 landing sites indicate that soil chemistry from widely separated locations is consistent with the low-pH, low water to rock ratio alteration relationships developed for Gusev rocks. Soils are affected principally by mobility of Fe and Mg, consistent with alteration of olivine-bearing basalt and subsequent precipitation of Fe- and Mg-bearing secondary minerals as the primary control on soil geochemistry.

  10. Subclassification of School Phobic Disturbances.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Leslie; And Others

    The confusion surrounding all aspects of school refusal may rest partly on the misguided assumption that the disturbance represents a single syndrome. Five consistently emerging variables which may help distinguish among school phobic types were abstracted from the literature: extensiveness of disturbance, mode of onset, age, fear source, and…

  11. Numerical study of rock blasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanov, Yu. P.; Bakeev, R. A.; Yudin, A. S.; Kuznetsova, N. S.

    2015-10-01

    The paper presents numerical simulation results on fracture of a concrete block due to dynamic explosive loads applied to the walls of a blast hole. Considered in the study is the influence of the pulse shape and rock properties on the pattern of irreversible deformation and cracking. It is found that a fractured zone bounded by a plastically deformed contour always arises around the explosion site. Comparison of elastoplastic deformation and fracture induced in the concrete block by explosion pulses of different durations and amplitudes shows that shorter pulses with higher amplitudes and steeper rise times provide a higher blasting efficiency.

  12. Rockburst Generation in Discontinuous Rock Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Ben-Guo; Zelig, Ravit; Hatzor, Yossef H.; Feng, Xia-Ting

    2016-10-01

    We study rockburst generation in discontinuous rock masses using theoretical and numerical approaches. We begin by developing an analytical solution for the energy change due to tunneling in a continuous rock mass using linear elasticity. We show that the affected zone where most of the increase in elastic strain energy takes place is restricted to an annulus that extends to a distance of three diameters from the tunnel center, regardless of initial tunnel diameter, magnitude of in situ stress, and in situ stress ratio. By considering local elastic strain concentrations, we further delineate the Rockbursting Prone Zone found to be concentrated in an annulus that extends to one diameter from the tunnel center, regardless of original stress ratio, magnitude, and the stiffness of the rock mass. We proceed by arguing that in initially discontinuous rock masses shear stress amplification due to tunneling will inevitably trigger block displacements along preexisting discontinuities much before shear failure of intact rock elements will ensue, because of the lower shear strength of discontinuities with respect to intact rock elements, provided of course that the blocks are removable. We employ the numerical discrete element DDA method to obtain, quantitatively, the kinetic energy, the elastic strain energy, and the dissipated energy in the affected zone in a discontinuous rock due to tunneling. We show that the kinetic energy of ejected blocks due to strain relaxation increases with increasing initial stress and with decreasing frictional resistance of preexisting discontinuities. Finally, we demonstrate how controlled strain energy release by means of top heading and bench excavation methodology can assist in mitigating rockburst hazards due to stain relaxation.

  13. Rock Cracking Indices for Improved Tunnel Support Design: A Case Study for Columnar Jointed Rock Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xia-Ting; Hao, Xian-Jie; Jiang, Quan; Li, Shao-jun; Hudson, John A.

    2016-06-01

    Measurements indicate that the development of cracking is a key feature relating to the strength and collapse of a columnar jointed rock mass. In this context, a new support design method utilising rock cracking indices for columnar jointed rock mass under high stress is proposed to restrain the development of cracking in the surrounding rock mass. The method involves limiting the cracking evolution of the surrounding rock mass by designing the appropriate parameters and time of installation of the support system. Two indices are suggested: the allowable depth of the excavation damaged zone (EDZ); and the allowable damage extent of the rock mass in the EDZ. The method involves limiting the evolution of cracking in the surrounding rock mass by designing the parameters and time of installation of the support system. The support system should have a suitable stiffness and installation time so as to restrain the evolution of the depth and damage extent of the EDZ within the surrounding rock. Therefore, the depth and damage extent of the EDZ, as well as the axial stress in the anchor bolts, are calculated at different distances between the support location and the tunnel working face to find the appropriate stiffness and installation time of the support system. The method has been successfully adopted to determine the thickness of shotcrete, the arrangement and installation time of rockbolts, and other parameters, for five large diversion tunnels at the Baihetan hydropower station, China, which were excavated in columnar jointed rock masses.

  14. Western Disturbances: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimri, A. P.; Niyogi, D.; Barros, A. P.; Ridley, J.; Mohanty, U. C.; Yasunari, T.; Sikka, D. R.

    2015-06-01

    Cyclonic storms associated with the midlatitude Subtropical Westerly Jet (SWJ), referred to as Western Disturbances (WDs), play a critical role in the meteorology of the Indian subcontinent. WDs embedded in the southward propagating SWJ produce extreme precipitation over northern India and are further enhanced over the Himalayas due to orographic land-atmosphere interactions. During December, January, and February, WD snowfall is the dominant precipitation input to establish and sustain regional snowpack, replenishing regional water resources. Spring melt is the major source of runoff to northern Indian rivers and can be linked to important hydrologic processes from aquifer recharge to flashfloods. Understanding the dynamical structure, evolution-decay, and interaction of WDs with the Himalayas is therefore necessary to improve knowledge which has wide ranging socioeconomic implications beyond short-term disaster response including cold season agricultural activities, management of water resources, and development of vulnerability-adaptive measures. In addition, WD wintertime precipitation provides critical mass input to existing glaciers and modulates the albedo characteristics of the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau, affecting large-scale circulation and the onset of the succeeding Indian Summer Monsoon. Assessing the impacts of climate variability and change on the Indian subcontinent requires fundamental understanding of the dynamics of WDs. In particular, projected changes in the structure of the SWJ will influence evolution-decay processes of the WDs and impact Himalayan regional water availability. This review synthesizes past research on WDs with a perspective to provide a comprehensive assessment of the state of knowledge to assist both researchers and policymakers, and context for future research.

  15. Global accuracy estimates of point and mean undulation differences obtained from gravity disturbances, gravity anomalies and potential coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jekeli, C.

    1979-01-01

    Through the method of truncation functions, the oceanic geoid undulation is divided into two constituents: an inner zone contribution expressed as an integral of surface gravity disturbances over a spherical cap; and an outer zone contribution derived from a finite set of potential harmonic coefficients. Global, average error estimates are formulated for undulation differences, thereby providing accuracies for a relative geoid. The error analysis focuses on the outer zone contribution for which the potential coefficient errors are modeled. The method of computing undulations based on gravity disturbance data for the inner zone is compared to the similar, conventional method which presupposes gravity anomaly data within this zone.

  16. New oil source rocks cut in Greek Ionian basin

    SciTech Connect

    Karakitsios, V.; Rigakis, N.

    1996-02-12

    The Ionian zone of Northwest Greece (Epirus region) constitutes part of the most external zones of the Hellenides (Paxos zone, Ionian zone, Gavrovo Tripolitza zone). The rocks of the Ionian zone range from Triassic evaporites and associated breccias through a varied series of Jurassic through Upper Eocene carbonates and lesser cherts and shales followed by Oligocene flysch. The surface occurrences of petroleum in the Ionian zone are mainly attributed to Toarcian Lower Posidonia beds source rocks and lesser to late Callovian-Tithonian Upper Posidonia beds and to the Albian-Cenomanian Upper Siliceous zone or Vigla shales of the Vigla limestones. Oil that could not be attributed to the above source rocks is believed to have an origin from Triassic formations that contain potential source rocks in Albania and Italy. However, several samples of the shales of Triassic breccias from outcrops and drillholes were analyzed in the past, but the analytical results were not so promising since their hydrocarbon potential was low. In this article, the authors will present their analytical results of the Ioannina-1 well, where for the first time they identified some very rich source beds in the Triassic breccias formation of Northwest Greece.

  17. Theory of wing rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, C.-H.; Lan, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    Wing rock is one type of lateral-directional instabilities at high angles of attack. To predict wing rock characteristics and to design airplanes to avoid wing rock, parameters affecting wing rock characteristics must be known. A new nonlinear aerodynamic model is developed to investigate the main aerodynamic nonlinearities causing wing rock. In the present theory, the Beecham-Titchener asymptotic method is used to derive expressions for the limit-cycle amplitude and frequency of wing rock from nonlinear flight dynamics equations. The resulting expressions are capable of explaining the existence of wing rock for all types of aircraft. Wing rock is developed by negative or weakly positive roll damping, and sustained by nonlinear aerodynamic roll damping. Good agreement between theoretical and experimental results is obtained.

  18. The Rock Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Raman J.; Bushee, Jonathan

    1977-01-01

    Presents a rock cycle diagram suitable for use at the secondary or introductory college levels which separates rocks formed on and below the surface, includes organic materials, and separates products from processes. (SL)

  19. Rocks and Minerals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Provides background information on rocks and minerals, including the unique characteristics of each. Teaching activities on rock-hunting and identification, mineral configurations, mystery minerals, and growing crystals are provided. Reproducible worksheets are included for two of the activities. (TW)

  20. Rocks in Our Pockets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plummer, Donna; Kuhlman, Wilma

    2005-01-01

    To introduce students to rocks and their characteristics, teacher can begin rock units with the activities described in this article. Students need the ability to make simple observations using their senses and simple tools.

  1. Disturbance and California riparian tree establishment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendix, J.; Cowell, C. M.

    2010-12-01

    As is the case in many ecosystems, tree establishment in riparian corridors is often episodic, following disturbance events that clear colonization sites. In many riparian settings, flooding is the most obvious, and relevant disturbance agent. However, in Mediterranean-climate regions, fire is an equally important disturbance agent. In California, the frequency and severity of both floods and fire are expected to change with projected climate change, making an understanding of their roles key to understanding future ecological processes in California riparian environments. In this paper, we use tree-ring data from the Transverse Ranges of Southern California to explore the relative importance of fire and flood in the establishment of riparian gallery forest. We examined 42 cores of Alnus rhombifolia, Populus fremontii and Quercus agrifolia from the riparian zone adjacent to Piedra Blanca and Potrero John Creeks in California’s Transverse Ranges, and compared their establishment dates with records of fire and floods, to see how establishment related to disturbance history. Our results show some evidence for major fire having an impact, as all of the largest stems dated to the few years following the 1932 Matilija fire, which had burned all of the sites in our sample. The remainder of the record is less straightforward, although there is an establishment peak in the 1970s, which may be related to a 1975 fire that burned part of the Potrero John watershed. Of note, the establishment chronology shows no relationship to the flood record, as years of major floods do not relate to either prolific or sparse years in the tree-ring record. This record suggests that large fires may serve as a trigger for tree establishment in California riparian settings, but that they are hardly a prerequisite, as many stems germinated between fires. Indeed, ongoing regeneration is apparently independent of disturbance, given the apparent irrelevance of flooding in this regard. The result

  2. [Sleep disturbance in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Nomura, Takashi; Inoue, Yuichi; Nakashima, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    Many patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) complain about sleep disturbances. These symptoms originate from motor symptoms, nocturnal problems, psychiatric symptoms, and other sleep disorders including Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), REM sleep behavior disorder (RBD), Restless legs syndrome (RLS), and Sleep apnea syndrome (SAS). Especially, RBD is paid attention to prodromal symptoms of PD. Also, one third of patients with PD have RBD symptoms. Moreover, RBD is one of aggravating factors of motor symptoms, autonomic dysfunctions, and dementia. Now, the evidence based medicine for sleep disturbances is lack in patients with PD. We need to evaluate various causes of sleep disturbances in detail and deal with individuals.

  3. Principles of rock deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolas, A.

    1987-01-01

    This text focuses on the recent achievements in the analysis of rock deformation. It gives an analytical presentation of the essential structures in terms of kinetic and dynamic interpretation. The physical properties underlying the interpretation of rock structures are exposed in simple terms. Emphasized in the book are: the role of fluids in rock fracturing; the kinematic analysis of magnetic flow structures; the application of crystalline plasticity to the kinematic and dynamic analysis of the large deformation imprinted in many metamorphic rocks.

  4. Rock and Sexuality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frith, Simon; McRobbie, Angela

    1978-01-01

    Discusses rock as a form of both sexual expression and control. Describes rock's representations of masculinity and femininity and considers the contradictions involved in the representations. Relates the effects of rock to its form--as music, as commodity, as culture, and as entertainment. (JMF)

  5. My Pet Rock

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lark, Adam; Kramp, Robyne; Nurnberger-Haag, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Many teachers and students have experienced the classic pet rock experiment in conjunction with a geology unit. A teacher has students bring in a "pet" rock found outside of school, and the students run geologic tests on the rock. The tests include determining relative hardness using Mohs scale, checking for magnetization, and assessing luster.…

  6. 68. LITTLE ROCK AND PALMDALE IRRIGATION DISTRICT, LITTLE ROCK DAM: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    68. LITTLE ROCK AND PALMDALE IRRIGATION DISTRICT, LITTLE ROCK DAM: STRESS SHEET, SHEET 4; MAY, 1918. Littlerock Water District files. - Little Rock Creek Dam, Little Rock Creek, Littlerock, Los Angeles County, CA

  7. Two-interferometer fiber optic sensor with disturbance localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondrat, M.; Szustakowski, M.; Ciurapinski, W.; Zyczkowski, M.

    2006-09-01

    We present investigation results of a new generation of the fiber optic perimeter sensor in a Sagnac and Michelson interferometers configuration. This sensor can detect a potential intruder and determine its position along a protected zone. We propose a localization method that makes use of the inherent properties of both interferometers. After demodulation of signals from both interferometers, the obtained amplitude characteristic of the Sagnac interferometer depends on position of a disturbance along the interferometer, while amplitude characteristic of the Michelson interferometer do not depend on this position. So, quotient of both demodulated characteristics makes it possible to localize the disturbance. Arrangement of a laboratory model of the sensor and its signal processing scheme is also presented. During research of the laboratory model of the sensor, it was possible to detect the position of the disturbance with resolution of about 40m along the 6-km long sensor.

  8. Database on unstable rock slopes in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oppikofer, Thierry; Nordahl, Bo; Bunkholt, Halvor; Nicolaisen, Magnus; Hermanns, Reginald L.; Böhme, Martina; Yugsi Molina, Freddy X.

    2014-05-01

    Several large rockslides have occurred in historic times in Norway causing many casualties. Most of these casualties are due to displacement waves triggered by a rock avalanche and affecting coast lines of entire lakes and fjords. The Geological Survey of Norway performs systematic mapping of unstable rock slopes in Norway and has detected up to now more than 230 unstable slopes with significant postglacial deformation. This systematic mapping aims to detect future rock avalanches before they occur. The registered unstable rock slopes are stored in a database on unstable rock slopes developed and maintained by the Geological Survey of Norway. The main aims of this database are (1) to serve as a national archive for unstable rock slopes in Norway; (2) to serve for data collection and storage during field mapping; (3) to provide decision-makers with hazard zones and other necessary information on unstable rock slopes for land-use planning and mitigation; and (4) to inform the public through an online map service. The database is organized hierarchically with a main point for each unstable rock slope to which several feature classes and tables are linked. This main point feature class includes several general attributes of the unstable rock slopes, such as site name, general and geological descriptions, executed works, recommendations, technical parameters (volume, lithology, mechanism and others), displacement rates, possible consequences, hazard and risk classification and so on. Feature classes and tables linked to the main feature class include the run-out area, the area effected by secondary effects, the hazard and risk classification, subareas and scenarios of an unstable rock slope, field observation points, displacement measurement stations, URL links for further documentation and references. The database on unstable rock slopes in Norway will be publicly consultable through the online map service on www.skrednett.no in 2014. Only publicly relevant parts of

  9. Advanced Rock Drilling Technologies Using High Laser Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckstegge, Frederik; Michel, Theresa; Zimmermann, Maik; Roth, Stephan; Schmidt, Michael

    Drilling through hard rock formations causes high mechanical wear and most often environmental disturbance. For the realization of an Advanced Adiabatic Compressed Air Energy Storage (AA-CAES) power plant a new and efficient method for tunneling utilising laser technology to support mechanical ablation of rock formations will be developed. Laser irradiation of inhomogeneous rock surfaces causes irregular thermal expansion leading to the formation of cracks and splintering as well as melting and slag-formation. This study focuses on the interaction of laser irradiation with calcite, porphyrite and siderite rock formations. A high power disc laser system at 1030nm wavelength is used to investigate the specific energy necessary to remove a unit volume depending on interaction times and applied power. Specific energies have been measured and an increase of fragility and brittleness of the rock surface has been observed.

  10. Disturbance and diversity at two spatial scales.

    PubMed

    Limberger, Romana; Wickham, Stephen A

    2012-03-01

    The spatial scale of disturbance is a factor potentially influencing the relationship between disturbance and diversity. There has been discussion on whether disturbances that affect local communities and create a mosaic of patches in different successional stages have the same effect on diversity as regional disturbances that affect the whole landscape. In a microcosm experiment with metacommunities of aquatic protists, we compared the effect of local and regional disturbances on the disturbance-diversity relationship. Local disturbances destroyed entire local communities of the metacommunity and required reimmigration from neighboring communities, while regional disturbances affected the whole metacommunity but left part of each local community intact. Both disturbance types led to a negative relationship between disturbance intensity and Shannon diversity. With strong local disturbance, this decrease in diversity was due to species loss, while strong regional disturbance had no effect on species richness but reduced the evenness of the community. Growth rate appeared to be the most important trait for survival after strong local disturbance and dominance after strong regional disturbance. The pattern of the disturbance-diversity relationship was similar for both local and regional diversity. Although local disturbances at least temporally increased beta diversity by creating a mosaic of differently disturbed patches, this high dissimilarity did not result in regional diversity being increased relative to local diversity. The disturbance-diversity relationship was negative for both scales of diversity. The flat competitive hierarchy and absence of a trade-off between competition and colonization ability are a likely explanation for this pattern.

  11. Calcic myrmekite in anorthositic and gabbroic rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffries, C.M.; Dymek, R.F.

    1985-01-01

    Myrmekite is a common feature of granitic plutonic rocks and quartzo-feldspathic gneisses, but it is rarely reported in anorthositic and gabbroic rocks. The authors have identified myrmekitic intergrowths of quartz and calcic plagioclase in a variety of plagioclase-rich cumulate rocks, including samples from a number of massif anorthosites and layered igneous intrusions. It appears that calcic myrmekite has been frequently overlooked, and is a common accessory feature in these rock types. Chemical and textural characteristics of myrmekite in the St-Urbain massif anorthosite (Quebec) and the Bushveld Igneous Complex (South Africa) have several features in common, but this myrmekite appears to be fundamentally different from that described by most previous investigators. Whereas myrmekite typically consists of a vermicular intergrowth of sodic plagioclase and quartz that occurs adjacent to alkali feldspar, the intergrowths in these rocks contain highly calcic plagioclase and lack the intervening alkali feldspar. In addition, the plagioclase in the myrmekite is more calcic than that in the surrounding rock. The boundary between the myrmekite and the host material is generally extremely sharp, although reverse zoning of host plagioclase may obscure the contact in some cases. The textural and chemical evidence is consistent with a replacement origin for these intergrowths; the proportion of quartz in the myrmekite is in close agreement with the predicted amount of silica that is generated by the theoretical replacement reaction. It appears that water played a key role in the replacement process.

  12. Habitability of Earth-like Planet Disturbed by a Third Body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Cássia Domingos, Rita; Almeida Prado, A. B.; Winter, O.

    2013-05-01

    Abstract (2,250 Maximum Characters): In this work, we investigate the habitability of “Earth-like” exoplanets disturbed by a giant planet. The assumptions used here are the same ones of the restricted elliptic three-body problem, which means that there is a central main body, a disturbing body in an elliptical orbit and a third body with a negligible mass both around this main body. First, we consider a habitable zone of 0.9 to 1.37 AU. Then, we numerically simulate the whole system taking into account a distribution of massless particles. This study is made considering a range of different values for semi-major axis, eccentricity and inclination of the disturbing body. In particular, the so-called critical angle of the third-body disturbing, which is a value for the inclination such that any near-circular orbit with inclination below this remains near circular, is discussed for Earth-like planets into habitable zone. The results obtained show that orbits of a habitable Earth-like planet is still possible if the disturbing body has low inclination and/or eccentricity. This means that the planet would be located within the habitable zone. However, high eccentricity and/or inclination for disturbing body imply that Earth-like planet orbit changes to a highly eccentric orbit with pericenter and/or apocenter distances outside the habitable zone on short time-scales.

  13. The geology and mechanics of formation of the Fort Rock Dome, Yavapai County, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuis, Gary S.

    1996-01-01

    The Fort Rock Dome, a craterlike structure in northern Arizona, is the erosional product of a circular domal uplift associated with a Precambrian shear zone exposed within the crater and with Tertiary volcanism. A section of Precambrian to Quaternary rocks is described, and two Tertiary units, the Crater Pasture Formation and the Fort Rock Creek Rhyodacite, are named. A mathematical model of the doming process is developed that is consistent with the history of the Fort Rock Dome.

  14. Exploring fault rocks at the nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viti, Cecilia

    2010-05-01

    The mechanical properties of a fault are strongly dependent on mineralogy and microstructure of the fault rocks. X-ray diffraction (XRD) methods, combined with optical and scanning electron microscopies (OM and SEM, respectively), are the conventional tools to investigate bulk mineralogy and microstructures of the fault rocks. However, fault rocks are often formed by ultrafine-grained minerals (below 1 - 2 microns, i.e., below the resolution limits of OM and SEM), requiring the use of a high-resolution technique, such as the transmission electron microscopy (TEM), that combines images, diffraction and chemical data, down to the nanoscale. Here, I summarize a few examples of TEM study on fault rocks, obtained from both nature and deformation experiments and covering different kinds of rocks, from carbonates to ultramafics and quartz-feldspatic rocks. In particular: 1) Mineralogical and micro/nanostructural study of fault core samples from the Zuccale low-angle normal fault (Elba Island, Italy; carbonatic protolite). TEM investigation showed large amounts of oriented and interconnected talc lamellae, affected by intense interlayer delamination, giving rise to "sublamellae" down to 10 - 20 nm thick. This peculiar nanotexture suggests easy frictional sliding along an almost infinite number of sliding surfaces, thus explaining the weakness of this fault. 2) Mineralogical and micro/nanostructural characterization of the slip zones produced by high-velocity friction experiments on carbonatic and ultramafic rocks. TEM investigation of the slip zones revealed thermal decomposition (by frictional heating) of the starting minerals (dolomite and antigorite, respectively), and allowed the accurate characterization of the high-temperature, ultrafine-grained mineral assemblages (grain size from a few nm to 200 nm). 3) Mineralogical and micro/nanostructural study of a natural pseudotachylite in quartz-feldspatic rocks (northern Victoria land, Antarctica), showing thermal

  15. The Rock Physics Handbook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mavko, Gary; Mukerji, Tapan; Dvorkin, Jack

    2003-10-01

    The Rock Physics Handbook conveniently brings together the theoretical and empirical relations that form the foundations of rock physics, with particular emphasis on seismic properties. It also includes commonly used models and relations for electrical and dielectric rock properties. Seventy-six articles concisely summarize a wide range of topics, including wave propagation, AVO-AVOZ, effective media, poroelasticity, pore fluid flow and diffusion. The book contains overviews of dispersion mechanisms, fluid substitution, and Vp-Vs relations. Useful empirical results on reservoir rocks and sediments, granular media, tables of mineral data, and an atlas of reservoir rock properties complete the text. This distillation of an otherwise scattered and eclectic mass of knowledge is presented in a form that can be immediately applied to solve real problems. Geophysics professionals, researchers and students as well as petroleum engineers, well log analysts, and environmental geoscientists will value The Rock Physics Handbook as a unique resource.

  16. Managing Sleep Disturbances in Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xun

    2016-01-01

    Sleep disturbances, particularly daytime sleepiness and insomnia, are common problems reported by patients suffering from liver cirrhosis. Poor sleep negatively impacts patients' quality of life and cognitive functions and increases mortality. Although sleep disturbances can be an early sign of hepatic encephalopathy (HE), many patients without HE still complain of poor quality sleep. The pathophysiology of these disturbances is not fully understood but is believed to be linked to impaired hepatic melatonin metabolism. This paper provides an overview for the clinician of common comorbidities contributing to poor sleep in patients with liver disease, mainly restless leg syndrome and obstructive sleep apnea. It discusses nondrug and pharmacologic treatment options in these patients, such as the use of light therapy and histamine (H1) blockers. PMID:27242950

  17. Zipper and freeway shear zone junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passchier, Cees; Platt, John

    2016-04-01

    Ductile shear zones are usually presented as isolated planar high-strain domains in a less deformed wall rock, characterised by shear sense indicators such as characteristic deflected foliation traces. Many shear zones, however, form branched systems and if movement on such branches is contemporaneous, the resulting geometry can be complicated and lead to unusual fabric geometries in the wall rock. For Y-shaped shear zone junctions with three simultaneously operating branches, and with slip directions at a high angle to the branch line, eight basic types of shear zone triple junctions are possible, divided into three groups. The simplest type, called freeway junctions, have similar shear sense on all three branches. If shear sense is different on the three branches, this can lead to space problems. Some of these junctions have shear zone branches that join to form a single branch, named zipper junctions, or a single shear zone which splits to form two, known as wedge junctions. Closing zipper junctions are most unusual, since they form a non-active high-strain zone with opposite deflection of foliations. Shear zipper and shear wedge junctions have two shear zones with similar shear sense, and one with the opposite sense. All categories of shear zone junctions show characteristic flow patterns in the shear zone and its wall rock. Shear zone junctions with slip directions normal to the branch line can easily be studied, since ideal sections of shear sense indicators lie in the plane normal to the shear zone branches and the branch line. Expanding the model to allow slip oblique and parallel to the branch line in a full 3D setting gives rise to a large number of geometries in three main groups. Slip directions can be parallel on all branches but oblique to the branch line: two slip directions can be parallel and a third oblique, or all three branches can have slip in different directions. Such more complex shear zone junctions cannot be studied to advantage in a

  18. Structural evolution of the Mejerda zone, northern Tunisia

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, A.; Grocott, J. ); Grant, G. ); Moody, R.; Sandman, R. )

    1991-08-01

    The Mejerda zone lies southeast of the Tellian Atlas and has been regarded as part of the reactivated foreland to this late Palaeogene to Neogene thrust belt. Folds have a northeast-southwest (Atlas) trend to the zone contains Triassic, Jurassic, Cretaceous, and Tertiary sediments, including source and reservoir rocks. Northeast-southwest trending Miocene-Pliocene-Pleistocene basin in the zone have attracted petroleum exploration. In the Mejerda zone, Triassic rocks are generally held to have been emplaced diapirically. However, they often outcrop in thin, fault-bounded sheets and not in diapiric domelike structures. Furthermore, there is no unequivocal evidence for the existence of extensive salt deposits in the zone, either at outcrop or in boreholes. Instead, the Triassic rocks are red clastics with some gypsum and black dolomites. Balanced cross sections show that a thin-skinned thrust model with a decollement in the Triassic is consistent with the surface geology of the Mejerda zone. In this model the Triassic rocks decorate low-angle thrust faults. Shortening is estimated to be 40-50%, and the zone is part of the Atlas thrust belt and not a reactivated foreland. As well as thrust-generated old-over-young stratigraphic superpositions, many tectonic contacts in the Mejerda zone place young rocks on old. Such superpositions may be caused by out-of-sequence thrusts but more likely reflect northwest-southeast extension following thrusting. This extension formed the longitudinal Miocene-Pliocene-Pleistocene basins which conceal thrust-belt structures.

  19. The Disturbing Student and the Judicial Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ragle, John D.; Paine, Gage E.

    2009-01-01

    The Assessment-Intervention of Student Problems (AISP) model is a useful tool for preparing student affairs professionals to assess the problems of disturbed, disturbing, or disturbed/disturbing students and to make appropriate referrals. It is particularly useful because it emphasizes the necessity of developing an integrated system for this…

  20. A seismic survey of the Manson disturbed area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sendlein, L. V. A.; Smith, T. A.

    1971-01-01

    The region in north-central Iowa referred to as the Manson disturbed area was investigated with the seismic refraction method and the bedrock configuration mapped. The area is approximately 30 km in diameter and is not detectable from the surface topography; however, water wells that penetrate the bedrock indicate that the bedrock is composed of disturbed Cretaceous sediments with a central region approximately 6 km in diameter composed of Precambrian crystalline rock. Seismic velocity differences between the overlying glacial till and the Cretaceous sediments were so small that a statistical program was developed to analyze the data. The program developed utilizes existing 2 segment regression analyses and extends the method to fit 3 or more regression lines to seismic data.

  1. Opaque rock fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Abhijit, B.; Molinaroli, E.; Olsen, J.

    1987-05-01

    The authors describe a new, rare, but petrogenetically significant variety of rock fragments from Holocene detrital sediments. Approximately 50% of the opaque heavy mineral concentrates from Holocene siliciclastic sands are polymineralic-Fe-Ti oxide particles, i.e., they are opaque rock fragments. About 40% to 70% of these rock fragments show intergrowth of hm + il, mt + il, and mt + hm +/- il. Modal analysis of 23,282 opaque particles in 117 polished thin sections of granitic and metamorphic parent rocks and their daughter sands from semi-arid and humid climates show the following relative abundances. The data show that opaque rock fragments are more common in sands from igneous source rocks and that hm + il fragments are more durable. They assume that equilibrium conditions existed in parent rocks during the growth of these paired minerals, and that the Ti/Fe ratio did not change during oxidation of mt to hm. Geothermometric determinations using electron probe microanalysis of opaque rock fragments in sand samples from Lake Erie and the Adriatic Sea suggest that these rock fragments may have equilibrated at approximately 900/sup 0/ and 525/sup 0/C, respectively.

  2. Bounce Rock Dimple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This panoramic camera image shows the hole drilled by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's rock abrasion tool into the rock dubbed 'Bounce' on Sol 65 of the rover's journey. The tool drilled about 7 millimeters (0.3 inches) into the rock and generated small piles of 'tailings' or rock dust around the central hole, which is about 4.5 centimeters (1.7 inches) across. The image from sol 66 of the mission was acquired using the panoramic camera's 430 nanometer filter.

  3. Hungry for Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image from the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit hazard identification camera shows the rover's perspective just before its first post-egress drive on Mars. On Sunday, the 15th martian day, or sol, of Spirit's journey, engineers drove Spirit approximately 3 meters (10 feet) toward its first rock target, a football-sized, mountain-shaped rock called Adirondack (not pictured). In the foreground of this image are 'Sashimi' and 'Sushi' - two rocks that scientists considered investigating first. Ultimately, these rocks were not chosen because their rough and dusty surfaces are ill-suited for grinding.

  4. Rock glaciers in the South Shetland Islands, Western Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrano, Enrique; López-Martínez, Jerónimo

    2000-10-01

    Rock glaciers are found in the peripheral regions of Antarctica particularly in the Antarctic Peninsula region. Study of these features is relevant for the palaeoenvironmental reconstruction of maritime Antarctica because they are indicators of permafrost and periglacial conditions. This paper reports and analyzes the results of an inventory of rock glaciers and protalus lobes in the South Shetland Islands. Nine rock glaciers and eleven protalus lobes have been identified. All of them are located in recently deglaciated zones between 300 m a.s.l. and sea level and they cover an area of 497×103 m 2. Tongue-shaped rock glaciers are more common than lobate types, being in general of medium and small sizes. They are talus rock glaciers (55%) and debris rock glaciers (45%), according to the genetic classification. The lack of a preferred orientation suggests that there is no significant microclimate control on their distribution. They are related to particular morphodynamic situations. Estimated annual velocities, based on relationships with raised beaches and transported debris volumes, range between 2.4 and 97 cm year -1, within the ranges reported for other rock glaciers. Three groups of rock glaciers can be recognised: (a) those immediate postdating the last major ice recession, (b) rock glaciers younger than 2000 years BP but pre-dating the Little Ice Age (LIA), and (c) rock glaciers formed during the LIA.

  5. M-MRAC for Nonlinear Systems with Bounded Disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepanyan, Vahram; Krishnakumar, Kalmanje

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents design and performance analysis of a modified reference model MRAC (M-MRAC) architecture for a class of multi-input multi-output uncertain nonlinear systems in the presence of bounded disturbances. M-MRAC incorporates an error feedback in the reference model definition, which allows for fast adaptation without generating high frequency oscillations in the control signal, which closely follows the certainty equivalent control signal. The benefits of the method are demonstrated via a simulation example of an aircraft's wing rock motion.

  6. 76 FR 70644 - Special Local Regulations; Seminole Hard Rock Winterfest Boat Parade, New River and Intracoastal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-15

    ... series of moving buffer zones around participant vessels as they transit from Cooley's Landing Marina to... from entering, transiting through, anchoring in, or remaining within any of the buffer zones unless... of a series of buffer zones around vessels participating in the Seminole Hard Rock Winterfest...

  7. Sleep Disturbances in Frontotemporal Dementia.

    PubMed

    McCarter, Stuart J; St Louis, Erik K; Boeve, Bradley F

    2016-09-01

    Sleep disorders appear to be frequent comorbidities in patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Insomnia and excessive daytime sleepiness commonly occur in patients with FTD and significantly contribute to caregiver burden and burnout. Sleep is severely fragmented in FTD patients, likely secondary to behavioral disturbances, other primary sleep disorders such as sleep disordered breathing and restless leg syndrome, and neurodegeneration of nuclei involved in sleep and wakefulness. Treatment of primary sleep disorders may improve excessive daytime sleepiness and sleep quality and may improve daytime cognitive functioning. Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder is rare in FTD and may be confused with excessive nocturnal activity due to disturbed circadian rhythm. The relationship between FTD, sleep quality, and sleep disorders requires further study to better understand the contribution of disturbed sleep to daytime neurocognitive functioning and quality of life in FTD. Further, future studies should focus on comparing sleep disturbances between different FTD syndromes, especially behavioral variant FTD and primary progressive aphasia. Comorbid sleep disorders should be promptly sought and treated in patients with FTD to improve patient and caregiver quality of life. PMID:27485946

  8. RESILIENCE OF ECOSYSTEMS TO DISTURBANCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Resilience, in an ecological context, is one of several terms that characterize the response of an ecosystem to disturbance. Other such terms include persistence, resistance and stability. Two definitions of resilience have become prominent in the literature, both of which derive...

  9. State Definitions of Emotional Disturbance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wery, Jessica J.; Cullinan, Douglas

    2013-01-01

    This article examines definitions state education agencies use to describe the federal education disability called "emotional disturbance." State definitions were collected so that various aspects of them could be analyzed and compared with results of similar studies completed in the 1970s and 1980s. Among results are that state definitions have…

  10. Welcome to Rock Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varelas, Maria; Benhart, Jeaneen

    2004-01-01

    At the beginning of the school year, the authors, a first-grade teacher and a teacher educator, worked together to "spice up" the first-grade science curriculum. The teacher had taught the unit Rocks, Sand, and Soil several times, conducting hands-on explorations and using books to help students learn about properties of rocks, but she felt the…

  11. Rock Bites into 'Bounce'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This panoramic camera image from the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity features the 6.44 millimeter (0.25 inch) deep hole ground into the rock dubbed 'Bounce' by the rover's rock abrasion tool. The tool took 2 hours and 15 minutes to grind the hole on sol 66 of the rover's journey. A combination of limited solar power and the rock's jagged texture led the rock abrasion tool team to set very aggressive grinding parameters to ensure that the end result was a full circle, suitable for a thorough read from the rover's spectrometers.

    Bounce's markedly different appearance (when compared to the rocks that were previously examined in the Eagle Crater outcrop) made it a natural target for rover research. In order to achieve an ideal position from which to grind into the rock, Opportunity moved in very close with its right wheel next to Bounce. In this image, the panoramic camera on the rover's mast is looking down, catching the tip of the solar panel which partially blocks the full circle ground by the rock abrasion tool.

    The outer ring consists of the cuttings from the rock, pushed out by the brushes on the grinding instrument. The dark impression at the top of the outer circle was caused by the instrument's contact mechanism which serves to stabilize it while grinding.

  12. Rock Cycle Roulette.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Stan M.; Palmer, Courtney

    2000-01-01

    Introduces an activity on the rock cycle. Sets 11 stages representing the transitions of an earth material in the rock cycle. Builds six-sided die for each station, and students move to the stations depending on the rolling side of the die. Evaluates students by discussing several questions in the classroom. Provides instructional information for…

  13. Session: Hard Rock Penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Dunn, James C.; Drumheller, Douglas S.; Glowka, David A.; Lysne, Peter

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five presentations: ''Hard Rock Penetration - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''Overview - Hard Rock Penetration'' by James C. Dunn; ''An Overview of Acoustic Telemetry'' by Douglas S. Drumheller; ''Lost Circulation Technology Development Status'' by David A. Glowka; ''Downhole Memory-Logging Tools'' by Peter Lysne.

  14. Layered Rocks in Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    19 June 2004 Exposures of layered, sedimentary rock are common on Mars. From the rock outcrops examined by the Mars Exploration Rover, Opportunity, in Meridiani Planum to the sequence in Gale Crater's central mound that is twice the thickness of of the sedimentary rocks exposed by Arizona's Grand Canyon, Mars presents a world of sediment to study. This unusual example, imaged by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC), shows eroded layer outcrops in a crater in Terra Tyrrhena near 15.4oS, 270.5oW. Sedimentary rocks provide a record of past climates and events. Perhaps someday the story told by the rocks in this image will be known via careful field work. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the left.

  15. Deep drilling technology for hot crystalline rock

    SciTech Connect

    Rowley, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    The development of Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal systems at the Fenton Hill, New Mexico site has required the drilling of four deep boreholes into hot, Precambrian granitic and metamorphic rocks. Thermal gradient holes, four observation wells 200 m (600 ft) deep, and an exploration core hole 800 m (2400 ft) deep guided the siting of the four deep boreholes. Results derived from the exploration core hole, GT-1 (Granite Test No. 1), were especially important in providing core from the granitic rock, and establishing the conductive thermal gradient and heat flow for the granitic basement rocks. Essential stratigraphic data and lost drilling-fluid zones were identified for the volcanic and sedimentary rocks above the contact with the crystalline basement. Using this information drilling strategies and well designs were then devised for the planning of the deeper wells. The four deep wells were drilled in pairs, the shallowest were planned and drilled to depths of 3 km in 1975 at a bottom-hole temperature of nearly 200/sup 0/C. These boreholes were followed by a pair of wells, completed in 1981, the deepest of which penetrated the Precambrian basement to a vertical depth of 4.39 km at a temperature of 320/sup 0/C.

  16. Disturbance regimes, resilience, and recovery of animal communities and habitats in lotic ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reice, Seth R.; Wissmar, Robert C.; Naiman, Robert J.

    1990-09-01

    Disturbance regime is a critical organizing feature of stream communities and ecosystems. The position of a given reach in the river basin and the sediment type within that reach are two key determinants of the frequency and intensity of flow-induced disturbances. We distinguish between predictable and unpredictable events and suggest that predictable discharge events are not disturbances. We relate the dynamics of recovery from disturbance (i.e., resilience) to disturbance regime (i.e., the disturbance history of the site). The most frequently and predictably disturbed sites can be expected to demonstrate the highest resilience. Spatial scale is an important dimension of community structure, dynamics, and recovery from disturbance. We compare the effects on small patches (⩽1 m2) to the effects of large reaches at the river basin level. At small scales, sediment movements and scour are major factors affecting the distribution of populations of aquatic insects or algae. At larger scales, we must deal with channel formation, bank erosion, and interactions with the riparian zone that will affect all taxa and processes. Our understanding of stream ecosystem recovery rests on our grasp of the historical, spatial, and temporal background of contemporary disturbance events.

  17. Increased tolerance to humans among disturbed wildlife.

    PubMed

    Samia, Diogo S M; Nakagawa, Shinichi; Nomura, Fausto; Rangel, Thiago F; Blumstein, Daniel T

    2015-01-01

    Human disturbance drives the decline of many species, both directly and indirectly. Nonetheless, some species do particularly well around humans. One mechanism that may explain coexistence is the degree to which a species tolerates human disturbance. Here we provide a comprehensive meta-analysis of birds, mammals and lizards to investigate species tolerance of human disturbance and explore the drivers of this tolerance in birds. We find that, overall, disturbed populations of the three major taxa are more tolerant of human disturbance than less disturbed populations. The best predictors of the direction and magnitude of bird tolerance of human disturbance are the type of disturbed area (urbanized birds are more tolerant than rural or suburban populations) and body mass (large birds are more tolerant than small birds). By identifying specific features associated with tolerance, these results guide evidence-based conservation strategies to predict and manage the impacts of increasing human disturbance on birds. PMID:26568451

  18. Increased tolerance to humans among disturbed wildlife

    PubMed Central

    Samia, Diogo S. M.; Nakagawa, Shinichi; Nomura, Fausto; Rangel, Thiago F.; Blumstein, Daniel T.

    2015-01-01

    Human disturbance drives the decline of many species, both directly and indirectly. Nonetheless, some species do particularly well around humans. One mechanism that may explain coexistence is the degree to which a species tolerates human disturbance. Here we provide a comprehensive meta-analysis of birds, mammals and lizards to investigate species tolerance of human disturbance and explore the drivers of this tolerance in birds. We find that, overall, disturbed populations of the three major taxa are more tolerant of human disturbance than less disturbed populations. The best predictors of the direction and magnitude of bird tolerance of human disturbance are the type of disturbed area (urbanized birds are more tolerant than rural or suburban populations) and body mass (large birds are more tolerant than small birds). By identifying specific features associated with tolerance, these results guide evidence-based conservation strategies to predict and manage the impacts of increasing human disturbance on birds. PMID:26568451

  19. Increased tolerance to humans among disturbed wildlife.

    PubMed

    Samia, Diogo S M; Nakagawa, Shinichi; Nomura, Fausto; Rangel, Thiago F; Blumstein, Daniel T

    2015-01-01

    Human disturbance drives the decline of many species, both directly and indirectly. Nonetheless, some species do particularly well around humans. One mechanism that may explain coexistence is the degree to which a species tolerates human disturbance. Here we provide a comprehensive meta-analysis of birds, mammals and lizards to investigate species tolerance of human disturbance and explore the drivers of this tolerance in birds. We find that, overall, disturbed populations of the three major taxa are more tolerant of human disturbance than less disturbed populations. The best predictors of the direction and magnitude of bird tolerance of human disturbance are the type of disturbed area (urbanized birds are more tolerant than rural or suburban populations) and body mass (large birds are more tolerant than small birds). By identifying specific features associated with tolerance, these results guide evidence-based conservation strategies to predict and manage the impacts of increasing human disturbance on birds.

  20. Fibre optic sensor with disturbance localization in one optical fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyczkowski, M.; Ciurapinski, W.

    2007-05-01

    Ordinary perimeter security systems consist of many individual sensors with detection range 200-300 meters. These limitations are connected with physical phenomena that are used in microwave and infrared barriers as well as in ground and fence cable sensors. On the contrary, fiber optic perimeter sensors can be applied in the range of many kilometers and zone length 200-300 meters is degradation of their possibilities. This paper presents investigation results of a new generation of the fiber optic perimeter sensor in a two Sagnac and Sagna'c interferometers configuration. This system can detect a potential intruder and determine its position along a protected zone. We propose a method that makes use of the inherent properties of both interferometers. After demodulation of signals from both interferometers, obtained amplitude characteristic of the Sagnac interferometer depends on position of a disturbance along the both interferometer. So, quotient of both demodulated characteristics is proportional to the position of the disturbance. Arrangement of a laboratory model of the sensor and its signal processing scheme is presented. During research of a laboratory model, it was possible to detect the position of the disturbance with resolution of about 50m along a 10-km long sensor.

  1. Our World: The Rock Cycle

    NASA Video Gallery

    Find out how rocks brought to Earth by the Apollo astronauts have helped NASA learn more about the rock cycle. Compare igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks found on Earth to three types of ro...

  2. Circadian misalignment in mood disturbances.

    PubMed

    Lewy, Alfred J

    2009-12-01

    Recent refinements in methodology allow chronobiological researchers to answer the following questions: is there circadian misalignment in sleep and mood disturbances, and, if so, is it of the phase-advance or phase-delay type? Measurement of the dim light melatonin onset-to-midsleep interval, or phase-angle difference, in sleep and mood disorders should answer these questions. Although the phase-advance hypothesis of affective disorders was formulated three decades ago, recent studies suggest that many, if not all, mood disturbances have a circadian misalignment component of the phase-delay type, operationally defined as a delay in the dim light melatonin onset relative to the sleep/wake cycle. Phase-delayed disorders can be treated with bright light in the morning and/or low-dose melatonin in the afternoon/evening. Phase-advanced disorders can be treated with bright light in the evening and/or low-dose melatonin in the morning.

  3. Interplanetary Disturbances Affecting Space Weather

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wimmer-Schweingruber, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    The Sun somehow accelerates the solar wind, an incessant stream of plasma originating in coronal holes and some, as yet unidentified, regions. Occasionally, coronal, and possibly sub-photospheric structures, conspire to energize a spectacular eruption from the Sun which we call a coronal mass ejection (CME). These can leave the Sun at very high speeds and travel through the interplanetary medium, resulting in a large-scale disturbance of the ambient background plasma. These interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs) can drive shocks which in turn accelerate particles, but also have a distinct intrinsic magnetic structure which is capable of disturbing the Earth's magnetic field and causing significant geomagnetic effects. They also affect other planets, so they can and do contribute to space weather throughout the heliosphere. This paper presents a historical review of early space weather studies, a modern-day example, and discusses space weather throughout the heliosphere.

  4. Vision Disturbances in Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Costello, Fiona

    2016-04-01

    Visual disturbances are frequently encountered in multiple sclerosis (MS), and include problems with how affected individuals see the world (afferent visual pathway symptoms) and how their eyes move together (efferent visual pathway disorders). Optic neuritis is the most common afferent visual pathway manifestation of MS, from which visual recovery is often incomplete. Visual field defects caused by lesions in the retrochiasmal or retrogeniculate regions of the afferent visual pathway also occur, albeit less frequently. Efferent visual pathway lesions causing ocular misalignment and nystagmus may lead to diplopia and oscillopsia, respectively. Vision loss has a major impact on perceptions regarding quality of life in MS. Therefore, it is important for clinicians to be able to identify and localize the underlying basis of visual disturbances to provide the best care possible for their patients. PMID:27116725

  5. Extended Active Disturbance Rejection Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Zhiqiang (Inventor); Tian, Gang (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Multiple designs, systems, methods and processes for controlling a system or plant using an extended active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) based controller are presented. The extended ADRC controller accepts sensor information from the plant. The sensor information is used in conjunction with an extended state observer in combination with a predictor that estimates and predicts the current state of the plant and a co-joined estimate of the system disturbances and system dynamics. The extended state observer estimates and predictions are used in conjunction with a control law that generates an input to the system based in part on the extended state observer estimates and predictions as well as a desired trajectory for the plant to follow.

  6. Extended Active Disturbance Rejection Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Zhiqiang (Inventor); Tian, Gang (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Multiple designs, systems, methods and processes for controlling a system or plant using an extended active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) based controller are presented. The extended ADRC controller accepts sensor information from the plant. The sensor information is used in conjunction with an extended state observer in combination with a predictor that estimates and predicts the current state of the plant and a co-joined estimate of the system disturbances and system dynamics. The extended state observer estimates and predictions are used in conjunction with a control law that generates an input to the system based in part on the extended state observer estimates and predictions as well as a desired trajectory for the plant to follow.

  7. Extended active disturbance rejection controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Zhiqiang (Inventor); Tian, Gang (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Multiple designs, systems, methods and processes for controlling a system or plant using an extended active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) based controller are presented. The extended ADRC controller accepts sensor information from the plant. The sensor information is used in conjunction with an extended state observer in combination with a predictor that estimates and predicts the current state of the plant and a co-joined estimate of the system disturbances and system dynamics. The extended state observer estimates and predictions are used in conjunction with a control law that generates an input to the system based in part on the extended state observer estimates and predictions as well as a desired trajectory for the plant to follow.

  8. Space Weathering of Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Space weathering discussions have generally centered around soils but exposed rocks will also incur the effects of weathering. On the Moon, rocks make up only a very small percentage of the exposed surface and areas where rocks are exposed, like central peaks, are often among the least space weathered regions we find in remote sensing data. However, our studies of weathered Ap 17 rocks 76015 and 76237 show that significant amounts of weathering products can build up on rock surfaces. Because rocks have much longer surface lifetimes than an individual soil grain, and thus record a longer history of exposure, we can study these products to gain a deeper perspective on the weathering process and better assess the relative impo!1ance of various weathering components on the Moon. In contrast to the lunar case, on small asteroids, like Itokowa, rocks make up a large fraction of the exposed surface. Results from the Hayabusa spacecraft at Itokowa suggest that while the low gravity does not allow for the development of a mature regolith, weathering patinas can and do develop on rock surfaces, in fact, the rocky surfaces were seen to be darker and appear spectrally more weathered than regions with finer materials. To explore how weathering of asteroidal rocks may differ from lunar, a set of ordinary chondrite meteorites (H, L, and LL) which have been subjected to artificial space weathering by nanopulse laser were examined by TEM. NpFe(sup 0) bearing glasses were ubiquitous in both the naturally-weathered lunar and the artificially-weathered meteorite samples.

  9. BALD ROCK AND MIDDLE FORK FEATHER RIVER ROADLESS AREAS, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sorensen, Martin L.; Buehler, Alan R.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a mineral-resource assessment of the Bald Rock and Middle Fork Feather River Roadless Areas in California indicate several areas within the Middle Fork Feather River Roadless Area that have probable mineral-resource potential. A probable potential for placer gold exists at various localities, both in areas covered by Tertiary volcanic rocks and in small streams that drain into the Middle Fork of the Feather River. A probable potential for small deposits of chromite exists in tracts underlain by ultramafic rocks in the Melones fault zone. A probable potential for lead-silver deposits is recognized at the east end of the Middle Fork Feather River Roadless Area.

  10. The initiation of brittle faults in crystalline rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crider, Juliet G.

    2015-08-01

    Faults in the upper crust initiate from pre-existing (inherited) or precursory (early-formed) structures and typically grow by the mechanical interaction and linkage of these structures. In crystalline rock, rock architecture, composition, cooling, and exhumation influence the initiation of faults, with contrasting styles observed in plutonic rocks, extrusive igneous rocks, and foliated metamorphic rocks. Brittle fault growth in granitic rock is commonly controlled by the architecture of inherited joints or preexisting dikes. In basalt, abundant joints control the surface expression of faulting, and enhanced compliance due to abundant joints leads to folding and deformation asymmetry in the fault zone. Highly reactive mafic minerals likely become rapidly evolving fault rocks. In foliated metamorphic rocks, fault initiation style is strongly influenced by strength anisotropy relative to the principal stress directions, with fracturing favored when the foliation is aligned with the directions of principal stress. The continuity of micas within the foliation also influences the micromechanics of fault initiation. Brittle kink bands are an example of a strain-hardening precursory structure unique to foliated rock. Each of these fault initiation processes produces different initial fault geometry and spatial heterogeneity that influence such properties as fault permeability and seismogenesis.

  11. Detached rock evaluation device

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, David R.

    1986-01-01

    A rock detachment evaluation device (10) having an energy transducer unit 1) for sensing vibrations imparted to a subject rock (172) for converting the sensed vibrations into electrical signals, a low band pass filter unit (12) for receiving the electrical signal and transmitting only a low frequency segment thereof, a high band pass filter unit (13) for receiving the electrical signals and for transmitting only a high frequency segment thereof, a comparison unit (14) for receiving the low frequency and high frequency signals and for determining the difference in power between the signals, and a display unit (16) for displaying indicia of the difference, which provides a quantitative measure of rock detachment.

  12. Rock Garden Mosaic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This image mosaic of part of the 'Rock Garden' was taken by the Sojourner rover's left front camera on Sol 71 (September 14). The rock 'Shark' is at left center and 'Half Dome' is at right. Fine-scale textures on the rocks are clearly seen. Broken crust-like material is visible at bottom center.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  13. Weird 'Endurance' Rock Ahead

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows a bizarre, lumpy rock dubbed 'Wopmay' on the inner slopes of 'Endurance Crater.' Scientists say the rock's unusual texture is unlike any others observed so far at Meridiani Planum. Wopmay measures approximately 1 meter (3.3 feet) across. The image was taken by the rover's panoramic camera on sol 195 (Aug. 11, 2004). Opportunity will likely travel to this or a similar rock in coming sols for a closer look at the alien surface.

  14. Continental Basaltic Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, G. L.

    2003-12-01

    During the past few decades, geochemical studies of continental basaltic rocks and their petrologic kin have become mainstays of studies of the continental lithosphere. These igneous rocks have taken on such an important role largely because the chemical and isotopic composition of continental basaltic rocks and their mantle (see Chapter 2.05) and crustal xenoliths (see Chapter 3.01) provide the best proxy record available to earth scientists for the chemical and physical evolution of the deep continental lithosphere and underlying mantle, areas that are otherwise resistant to direct study. Keeping this in mind, the primary goal of this chapter is to illustrate how geochemical data can be used both to assess the origin of these rocks and to study the evolution of the continental lithosphere.A complete overview of continental basaltic rocks will not be attempted here, because continental "basalts" come in too wide a range of compositions, and because of the sheer volume of geochemical data available for such rocks worldwide. The scope of the chapter is limited to a discussion of a select group of ultramafic to mafic composition "intraplate" continental igneous rocks consisting primarily of kimberlites, potassic and sodic alkali basalts, and continental flood basalts. Igneous rocks forming at active continental margins, such as convergent or transform plate margins, are important examples of continental magmatism but are not directly discussed here (convergent margin magmas are discussed in Chapters 2.11, 3.11, and 3.18). The geochemistry of intraplate igneous rocks of the ocean basins are covered in Chapters 2.04 and 3.16. Although basaltic magmatism has occurred throughout the Earths history, the majority of the examples presented here are from Mesozoic and Cenozoic volcanic fields due to the more complete preservation of younger continental mafic igneous rocks. While considerable effort has been expended in studying the chemical differentiation of mafic magmas

  15. [Sleep disturbance caused by noise].

    PubMed

    Vallet, M

    1982-05-01

    This contribution is a state-of-the-art of recent knowledge regarding effects from environmental noise on sleep and proposes acoustic thresholds likely to help public authorities in setting up regulations. It recalls physiological sleep aspects and the cyclic organization of the various stages; then it examines noise effects, principally those arising from road traffic, planes and trains. Such effects are firstly considered as changes in sleep organization during night. It is noted that laboratory and home experiments lead to the same conclusions: duration of deep sleep is appreciably reduced for younger people, while the dream phase is disturbed for older people. These disturbances are associated with an average energetic level Leq. Then partial effects are investigated, either electro-encephalographic or cardiac; these effects are more especially associated with isolated acoustic phenomena and determined from the noise peak level. Other variables, e.g. back noise, phenomena number per period, interval between two noises, have an effect on probability of a local phenomenon which can be connected to a given peak level. The conclusion is that two acoustic values must be retained for considering sleep disturbances: the first one is the energetic level inside the room, with a comfort threshold of 35 dB(A) by night, and the second one is the lowest peak level which should not exceed 50 dB(A).

  16. Critical zone evolution at the hillslope scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rempe, D. M.; Dietrich, W. E.; Oshun, J.; Dawson, T. E.

    2014-12-01

    The critical zone, which extends from the top of the canopy to the elevation of unweathered bedrock, hosts a variety of processes that control the evolution of the topographic surface. Though studies of hillslope evolution tend to focus on erosion and soil production mechanisms near the surface, evidence suggests that weathering and fluid transport processes that occur at depths beyond the soil influence hillslope form. Despite this, little is known about what controls the boundary between weathered and fresh bedrock (Zb) under hillslopes and few direct observations of Zb and moisture dynamics within weathered rock exist. This study presents observations from a heavily monitored 4000 m2 experimental hillslope within the Eel River Critical Zone Observatory in northern California. Drilling data, groundwater monitoring, and geophysical imaging reveal a weathered bedrock zone that thickens towards the divide and is consistent with a theory for predicting Zb under hillslopes that links channel incision to the drainage of fresh bedrock within the hillslope. Direct observations of rock moisture indicate that moisture dynamics within weathered rock regulate streamflow and transpiration. Water transport in the weathered bedrock occurs via two mechanisms: a diffuse wetting front and rapid transport along fractures. This water recharges a seasonally perched water table that provides baseflow. Rock moisture storage increases upslope and remains seasonally elevated longer into the dry season of this Mediterranean climate suggesting that Zb and the spatial distribution of weathered rock controls the spatial and temporal moisture dyanmics in hillslopes. Data from vegetative water use monitoring efforts suggest that rock moisture influences forest ecosystem dynamics and thus physical weathering, erosion mechanisms, climate (via transpiration), and baseflow. Our observations within the interior of this hillslope highlight the consequences of critical zone evolution on the

  17. [Terminology and manifestations of eruption disturbances].

    PubMed

    Janssen, K I; Raghoebar, G M; Visser, A; Vissink, A

    2014-04-01

    Eruption disturbances of teeth are not unusual; many variations are encountered and eruption disturbances can negatively influence the development of the tooth and jaw system. Causes of eruption disturbances can be categorized into general and local factors. The clinical spectrum of eruption disturbances involves syndromic and non-syndromic problems for both kinds of factors, varying from delayed eruption to primary failure of eruption. The following types of eruption disturbances should be distinguished: impaction, primary retention, secondary retention and primary failure of eruption. Early detection of eruption disturbances and timely and appropriate treatment of the various eruption disturbances play an important role in preventing the negative effects of eruption disturbances on the development of the dentition and the craniofacial skeleton.

  18. Our World: Lunar Rock

    NASA Video Gallery

    Learn about NASA'€™s Lunar Sample Laboratory Facility at Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. See how NASA protects these precious moon rocks brought to Earth by the Apollo astronauts. Explore t...

  19. Writing Rock Music Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Donal

    1980-01-01

    Suggests ways student reviewers of rock music groups can write better reviews. Among the suggestions made are that reviewers occasionally discuss the audience or what makes a particular group unique, support general comment with detail, and avoid ecstatic adjectives. (TJ)

  20. East Candor Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    24 September 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a thick, massive outcrop of light-toned rock exposed within eastern Candor Chasma, part of the vast Valles Marineris trough system. Dark, windblown sand has banked against the lower outcrop slopes. Outcrops such as this in the Valles Marineris chasms have been known since Mariner 9 images were obtained in 1972. However, the debate as to whether these represent sedimentary or igneous rocks has not been settled within the Mars science community. In either case, they have the physical properties of sedimentary rock (that is, they are formed of fine-grained materials), but some igneous rocks made up of volcanic ash may also exhibit these properties. This image is located near 7.8oS, 65.3oW, and covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) across. The scene is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  1. Rock in Its Elements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacCluskey, Thomas

    1969-01-01

    A discussion of the following musical elements of rock: rhythm, melody, harmony, and form. A impromptu analysis made at a session of the Youth Music Symposium, July 25, 1969. Remarks transcribed from tape. (Author/AP)

  2. Terby's Layered Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    14 March 2004 Layered rock outcrops are common all across Mars, and the Mars rover, Opportunity, has recently investigated some layered rocks in Meridiani Planum. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows layered sedimentary rocks in northern Terby Crater, located just north of the giant Hellas Basin near 27.5oS, 285.8oW. Hundreds of layers are exposed in a deposit several kilometers thick within Terby. A history of events that shaped the northern Hellas region is recorded in these rocks, just waiting for a person or robot to investigate. The picture covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  3. Broken Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    18 May 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows broken-up blocks of sedimentary rock in western Candor Chasma. There are several locations in western Candor that exhibit this pattern of broken rock. The manner in which these landforms were created is unknown; it is possible that there was a landslide or a meteoritic impact that broke up the materials. One attribute that is known: in some of these cases, it seems that the rock was broken and then buried by later sedimentary rocks, before later being exhumed so that they can be seen from orbit today.

    Location near: 6.9oS, 75.5oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Winter

  4. Layered Rock Ahead

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Now that solar conjunction is over so that communication between Earth and Mars is no longer blocked by the Sun, NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit is continuing its trek through the 'Columbia Hills' in Gusev Crater. Straight ahead, in the foreground of this image, is a horizontally layered rock dubbed 'Tetl,' which scientists hope to investigate. Layering can be either volcanic or sedimentary in origin; researchers aim to determine which of these processes created this rock. If for some reason this particular rock is not favorably positioned for grinding and examination by the toolbox of instruments on the rover's robotic arm, Spirit will be within short reach of another similar rock, dubbed 'Coba,' just to the right, toward the middle of this image. Spirit took this image with its navigation camera on its 263rd martian day, or sol (Sept. 28, 2004).

  5. Ancient Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-469, 31 August 2003

    The terraced area in this Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image is an outcropping of ancient, sedimentary rock. It occurs in a crater in western Arabia Terra near 10.8oN, 4.5oW. Sedimentary rocks provide a record of past environments on Mars. Field work will likely be required to begin to get a good understanding of the nature of the record these rocks contain. Their generally uniform thickness and repeated character suggests that deposition of fine sediment in this crater was episodic, if not cyclic. These rocks might be indicators of an ancient lake, or they might have been deposited from grains settling out of an earlier, thicker, martian atmosphere. This image covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) across and is illuminated from the lower left.

  6. Tithonium Chasma's Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-565, 5 December 2003

    Exposures of light-toned, layered, sedimentary rocks are common in the deep troughs of the Valles Marineris system. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows an example from western Tithonium Chasma. The banding seen here is an eroded expression of layered rock. Sedimentary rocks can be composed of (1) the detritus of older, eroded and weathered rocks, (2) grains produced by explosive volcanism (tephra, also known as volcanic ash), or (3) minerals that were chemically precipitated out of a body of liquid such as water. These outcrops are located near 4.8oS, 89.7oW. The image covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated from the lower left.

  7. Focus on the Rock.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shewell, John

    1994-01-01

    Describes historical accounts of the manipulation and importance of the Earth and its mineral resources. A foldout, "Out of the Rock," provides a collection of activities and information that helps make integration of the aforementioned concepts easy. (ZWH)

  8. Rock Outcrop Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The color image on the lower left shows a rock outcrop at Meridiani Planum, Mars. This image was taken by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity, looking north, and was acquired on the 4th sol, or martian day, of the rover's mission (Jan. 27, 2004). The yellow box outlines an area detailed in the top left image, which is a monochrome (single filter) image from the rover's panoramic camera. The top image uses solid colors to show several regions on or near the rock outcrop from which spectra were extracted: the dark soil above the outcrop (yellow), the distant horizon surface (aqua), a bright rock in the outcrop (green), a darker rock in the outcrop (red), and a small dark cobblestone (blue). Spectra from these regions are shown in the plot to the right.

  9. Application of Flow Laws to the Rheology of Shear Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirth, Greg

    2015-04-01

    A limitation in the application of experimental flow laws is that lab data are often obtained from single phase aggregates, rather than rocks. Using a combination of microstructural observations, thermobarometry, metamorphic petrology and thermochronology (where possible), we have identified several scenarios where shear zone rheology appears to operate at conditions where the nominally stronger multi-phase rock deforms by diffusion creep and the single-phase regions of the same rocks deform by dislocation creep of the weak phase. Examples include mafic rocks from the oceanic crust (Mehl and Hirth, 2008), hydrated mafic rocks from lower continental crust (Getsinger et al., 2013) and ophiolites (Homburg et al., 2010), and peridotites from both oceanic transform (Warren and Hirth, 2006) and ophiolites (Skemer et al., 2010). In each case, the extrapolation of experimental data provide evidence that the texture of the poly-phase rock evolves such that the effective viscosity of poly-phase regions deforming by diffusion creep is comparable to that of the single-phase regions deforming by dislocation creep. As such, these scenarios suggest that in many situations using flow laws for single phase aggregates actually provides a reasonable approximation for shear zone rheology. In this presentation, I will provide examples of these scenarios, discuss mechanisms for the grain size evolution of the poly-phase rocks that facilitate the production of the "uniform viscosity layers" in shear zones, and the implications of these observations for the rheology of shear zones and the interpretation of post-seismic geodetic data.

  10. Mont Terri Underground Rock Laboratory, Switzerland-Research Program And Key Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nussbaum, C. O.; Bossart, P. J.

    2012-12-01

    Argillaceous formations generally act as aquitards because of their low hydraulic conductivities. This property, together with the large retention capacity of clays for cationic contaminants and the potential for self-sealing, has brought clay formations into focus as potential host rocks for the geological disposal of radioactive waste. Excavated in the Opalinus Clay formation, the Mont Terri underground rock laboratory in the Jura Mountains of NW Switzerland is an important international test site for researching clay formations. Research is carried out in the underground facility, which is located adjacent to the security gallery of the Mont Terri motorway tunnel. Fifteen partners from European countries, USA, Canada and Japan participate in the project. The objectives of the research program are to analyze the hydrogeological, geochemical and rock mechanical properties of the Opalinus Clay, to determine the changes induced by the excavation of galleries and by heating of the rock formation, to test sealing and container emplacement techniques and to evaluate and improve suitable investigation techniques. For the safety of deep geological disposal, it is of key importance to understand the processes occurring in the undisturbed argillaceous environment, as well as the processes in a disturbed system, during the operation of the repository. The objectives are related to: 1. Understanding processes and mechanisms in undisturbed clays and 2. Experiments related to repository-induced perturbations. Experiments of the first group are dedicated to: i) Improvement of drilling and excavation technologies and sampling methods; ii) Estimation of hydrogeological, rock mechanical and geochemical parameters of the undisturbed Opalinus Clay. Upscaling of parameters from laboratory to in situ scale; iii) Geochemistry of porewater and natural gases; evolution of porewater over time scales; iv) Assessment of long-term hydraulic transients associated with erosion and thermal

  11. Rock slope stability

    SciTech Connect

    Kliche, C.A.

    1999-07-01

    Whether you're involved in surface mine design, surface mine production, construction, education, or regulation, this is an important new book for your library. It describes the basic rock slope failure modes and methods of analysis--both kinematic and kinetic techniques. Chapters include geotechnical and geomechanical analysis techniques, hydrology, rock slope stabilization techniques, and geotechnical instrumentation and monitoring. Numerous examples, drawings and photos enhance the text.

  12. Catchment disturbance and stream metabolism: Patterns in ecosystem respiration and gross primary production along a gradient of upland soil and vegetation disturbance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houser, J.N.; Mulholland, P.J.; Maloney, K.O.

    2005-01-01

    Catchment characteristics determine the inputs of sediments and nutrients to streams. As a result, natural or anthropogenic disturbance of upland soil and vegetation can affect instream processes. The Fort Benning Military Installation (near Columbus, Georgia) exhibits a wide range of upland disturbance levels because of spatial variability in the intensity of military training. This gradient of disturbance was used to investigate the effect of upland soil and vegetation disturbance on rates of stream metabolism (ecosystem respiration rate [ER] and gross primary production rate [GPP]). Stream metabolism was measured using an open-system, single-station approach. All streams were net heterotrophic during all seasons. ER was highest in winter and spring and lowest in summer and autumn. ER was negatively correlated with catchment disturbance level in winter, spring, and summer, but not in autumn. ER was positively correlated with abundance of coarse woody debris, but not significantly related to % benthic organic matter. GPP was low in all streams and generally not significantly correlated with disturbance level. Our results suggest that the generally intact riparian zones of these streams were not sufficient to protect them from the effect of upland disturbance, and they emphasize the role of the entire catchment in determining stream structure and function. ?? 2005 by The North American Benthological Society.

  13. Rock and Soil Types at Pathfinder Landing Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Type areas of rocks and soils. (A) Dark rock type and bright soil type: Shown is the dark rock Barnacle Bill. Reflectance spectra typical of fresh basalt and APXS spectra indicating more silica-rich basaltic andesite compositions characterize this type. These rocks are typically the small boulders and intermediate-sized cobbles at the Pathfinder site. The bright soil type is very common and in this case comprises Barnacle Bill's wind tail and much of the surround soil area. This soil has a high reflectance and a strongly reddened spectrum indicative of oxidized ferric minerals. (B) Bright rock type: Shown is the bright rock Wedge. Reflectance spectra typical of weathered basalt and APXS spectra indicating basaltic compositions characterize this type. These rocks are typically larger than 1 meter in diameter and many display morphologies indicating flood deposition. (C) Pink rock type: Shown is the pink rock Scooby Doo. APXS and reflectance spectra indicate a composition and optical characteristics similar to the drift soil. However, the morphology of the pink rock type indicates a cemented or rocklike structure. This material may be a chemically cemented hardpan that underlies much of the Pathfinder site. (D) Dark soil type: The dark soil type is typically found on the windward sides of rocks or in rock-free areas like Photometry Flats (shown here) where the bright soil has been striped away by aeolian action or in open areas. Other locations include the Mermaid Dune. (E) Disturbed soil type: The darkening of disturbed soil relative to its parent material, bright soil, as a result of changes in soil texture and compaction caused by movement of the rover and retraction of the lander airbag. (F) Lamb-like soil type: This soil type shows reflectance and spectral characteristics intermediate between the bright and dark soils. Its distinguishing feature is a weak spectral absorption near 900 nanometers not seen in either the bright or dark soils.

    NOTE: original

  14. In-Situ and Experimental Evidence for Acidic Weathering of Rocks and Soils on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurowitz, J. A.; McLennan, S. M.; Tosca, N. J.; Arvidson, R. E.; Michalski, J. R.; Ming, D.; Schroeder, C.; Squyres, S. W.

    2006-01-01

    Experimental data for alteration of synthetic Martian basalts at pH=0-1 indicate that chemical fractionations at low pH are vastly different from those observed during terrestrial weathering. Rock analyses from Gusev crater are well described by the relationships apparent from low pH experimental alteration data. A model for rock surface alteration is developed which indicates that a leached alteration zone is present on rock surfaces at Gusev. This zone is not chemically fractionated to a large degree from the underlying rock interior, indicating that the rock surface alteration process has occurred at low fluid-to-rock ratio. The geochemistry of natural rock surfaces analyzed by APXS is consistent with a mixture between adhering soil/dust and the leached alteration zone. The chemistry of rock surfaces analyzed after brushing with the RAT is largely representative of the leached alteration zone. The chemistry of rock surfaces analyzed after grinding with the RAT is largely representative of the interior of the rock, relatively unaffected by the alteration process occurring at the rock surface. Elemental measurements from the Spirit, Opportunity, Pathfinder and Viking 1 landing sites indicate that soil chemistry from widely separated locations is consistent with the low-pH, low fluid to rock ratio alteration relationships developed for Gusev rocks. Soils are affected principally by mobility of FeO and MgO, consistent with alteration of olivine-bearing basalt and subsequent precipitation of FeO and MgO bearing secondary minerals as the primary control on soil geochemistry.

  15. Petrology of metamorphic rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Suk, M.

    1983-01-01

    ''Petrology of Metamorphic Rocks'' reviews Central European opinions about the origin and formation of metamorphic rocks and their genetic systems, confronting the works of such distinguished European scientists as Rosenbusch, Becke, Niggli, Sander, Eskola, Barth and others with present-day knowledge and the results of Soviet and American investigations. The initial chapters discuss the processes that give rise to metamorphic rocks, and the main differences between regional metamorphism and other types of alterations, the emphasis being laid on the material characteristic of the processes of metamorphism, metasomatism and ultrametamorphism. Further chapters give a brief characterization of research methods, together with a detailed genetic classification based on the division of primary rocks into igneous rocks, sediments and ore materials. The effects of metamorphic alterations and those of the properties of the primary rocks are analyzed on the basis of examples taken chiefly from the Bohemian Massif, the West Carpathians, other parts of the European Variscides, from the crystalline Scandinavian Shelf in Norway and Finland, and from the Alps. Typical examples are documented by a number of charts, photographs and petrographical - particularly petrochemical - data.

  16. Weathering of rock 'Ginger'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    One of the more unusual rocks at the site is Ginger, located southeast of the lander. Parts of it have the reddest color of any material in view, whereas its rounded lobes are gray and relatively unweathered. These color differences are brought out in the inset, enhanced at the upper right. In the false color image at the lower right, the shape of the visible-wavelength spectrum (related to the abundance of weathered ferric iron minerals) is indicated by the hue of the rocks. Blue indicates relatively unweathered rocks. Typical soils and drift, which are heavily weathered, are shown in green and flesh tones. The very red color in the creases in the rock surface correspond to a crust of ferric minerals. The origin of the rock is uncertain; the ferric crust may have grown underneath the rock, or it may cement pebbles together into a conglomerate. Ginger will be a target of future super-resolution studies to better constrain its origin.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  17. Assessment of the efficiency of thermal pressurisation using natural pseudotachylyte-bearing rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, T. M.; Brantut, N.

    2014-12-01

    The efficiency of thermal pressurisation as a dynamic weakening mechanism during earthquake slip relies on the thermal and hydraulic properties of the rocks surrounding the slip zone. A common approach to test the effect of thermal pressurisation is to make theoretical predictions using fault rock properties (permeability, porosity, compressibility) measured on exhumed fault rock samples. However, it is generally not possible to test whether those predictions are valid. Here, we attempt to assess the effectiveness of thermal pressurisation by comparing theoretical predictions of temperature rise to field estimates based on pseudotachylytes-bearing rocks. We measure hydraulic and transport properties of a suite of fault rocks (a healed fracture damage zone, an unhealed fracture damage zone and the intact parent rock) from the pseudotachylyte-bearing Gole Larghe fault in the Adamello batholith (Italy), and use them as inputs in realistic numerical simulations of thermal pressurisation. We find that the melting temperature can be reached only if damaged, unhealed rock properties are used, and not with the intact or the healed fault rock properties. A 10 fold increase in permeability, or a 4 fold increase in pore compressiblity of the intact rock is required to achieve melting. Our results emphasise the existence of dynamic damage processes which strongly modify fault rocks properties during earthquake propagation, and indirectly affect earthquake propagation itself by decreasing the efficiency of thermal pressurisation as a weakening mechanism.

  18. Flow Of Groundwater From Soil To Crystalline Rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olofsson, B.

    1994-03-01

    Knowledge of groundwater flow from soil or surface water to crystalline bedrock has usually been derived from indirect studies of drawdown in soil due to underground constructions, as well as from analysis of water chemistry and from tracer experiments. Infiltration into the bedrock occurs at specific sites where suitable combinations of geological and hydrological variables exist. Flow from soil to rock in the saturated zone occurs where conductors in the bedrock, such as fractures and fracture zones, are hydraulically connected to a groundwater reservoir in permeable soil or to horizons of permeable and constructive material in heterogeneous soil. Of particular importance for infiltration are the hydraulic conditions of the contact zone between soil and rock. A thin layer of silt on the bedrock surface often blocks the water flow. The micro-topography of the bedrock surface is important since fracture zones usually give depressions in the surface, in which accumulations of sorted and conductive material often can be found. A strong heterogeneity in the infiltration from soil to rock is evidenced by statistical analyses of the flow related to various geological and hydrogeological variables, as well as from analyses of groundwater chemistry and tracer experiments. In order to estimate the infiltration from soil to rock and to carry out mathematical modelling of the groundwater flow, it is necessary to have a good knowledge of the hydraulic conditions of the superficial rock and soil as well as of the conditions at the soil/bedrock contact zone. Information on the saturated flow from soil to rock is essential for calculation of water budgets, for assessments of spread of pollutants and for estimations of leakage into underground constructions.

  19. 32 CFR 643.114 - Civil disturbances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Civil disturbances. 643.114 Section 643.114... ESTATE Additional Authority of Commanders § 643.114 Civil disturbances. Without reference to higher... facilities during civil disturbance for not more than 30 days to the National Guard and to municipal,...

  20. Experimental Study of Slabbing and Rockburst Induced by True-Triaxial Unloading and Local Dynamic Disturbance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Kun; Tao, Ming; Li, Xi-bing; Zhou, Jian

    2016-09-01

    Slabbing/spalling and rockburst are unconventional types of failure of hard rocks under conditions of unloading and various dynamic loads in environments with high and complex initial stresses. In this study, the failure behaviors of different rock types (granite, red sandstone, and cement mortar) were investigated using a novel testing system coupled to true-triaxial static loads and local dynamic disturbances. An acoustic emission system and a high-speed camera were used to record the real-time fracturing processes. The true-triaxial unloading test results indicate that slabbing occurred in the granite and sandstone, whereas the cement mortar underwent shear failure. Under local dynamically disturbed loading, none of the specimens displayed obvious fracturing at low-amplitude local dynamic loading; however, the degree of rock failure increased as the local dynamic loading amplitude increased. The cement mortar displayed no failure during testing, showing a considerable load-carrying capacity after testing. The sandstone underwent a relatively stable fracturing process, whereas violent rockbursts occurred in the granite specimen. The fracturing process does not appear to depend on the direction of local dynamic loading, and the acoustic emission count rate during rock fragmentation shows that similar crack evolution occurred under the two test scenarios (true-triaxial unloading and local dynamically disturbed loading).

  1. Effects of human disturbance on nest placement of the woodpigeon (Columba palumbus): a case study from the Middle Atlas, Morocco.

    PubMed

    Hanane, Saâd

    2014-06-01

    The woodpigeon (Columba palumbus) is a common and widespread bird in Morocco (North Africa). I examined, over 2 years (2010 and 2011), the breeding density and nest placement of this game species in relation to nest site habitat and degree of human disturbance. The study area was in the Middle Atlas Tighboula mountain forest, Morocco, in a disturbed and an undisturbed site. Using data collected in the 2 study sites, I aimed to identify the factors influencing the placement of nests within holm oak trees (Quercus rotundifolia) and their densities. I found that habitat structures, influenced by grazing disturbance, have affected nesting density and the location of nests of this species. Woodpigeons place their nests in a higher position (3.42 ± 0.19 m) when disturbance intensity is high and lower (1.68 ± 0.1 m) when disturbance intensity is low, and show higher nesting density in less disturbed zone (3.1 ± 0.4 nests/ha) than in highly disturbed zones (1.4 ± 0.2 nests/ha). Grazing disturbance could pose a threat to population persistence at a broader scale and could potentially reduce the abundance of this species by altering the composition and the structure of the forest nesting habitat. Further multi-scale studies are needed to assess the effects of different levels of grazing disturbance on woodpigeon nest density and placement, and to enhance our knowledge of the breeding behavior of this game species under variable environments.

  2. Subsurface Geology of the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy Site

    SciTech Connect

    Levey, Schon S.

    2010-12-01

    The Precambrian rock penetrated by wells EE-2A and -3A belongs to one or more granitic to granodioritic plutons. The plutonic rock contains two major xenolith zones of amphibolite, locally surrounded by fine-grained mafic rock of hybrid igneous origin. The granodiorite is cut by numerous leucogranite dikes that diminish in abundance with depth. The most prominent structural feature is the main breccia zone, in which the rock is highly fractured and moderately altered. This zone is at least 75 m thick and is of uncertain but near-horizontal orientation. Fracture abundance decreases with increasing depth below the main breccia zone, and fractures tend to be associated with leucogranite dikes. This association suggests that at least some of the fractures making up the geothermal reservoir are of Precambrian age or have long-range orientations controlled by the presence of Precambrian-age granitic dikes.

  3. Biostratigraphic zonation of Bathonian-Callovian rocks from Gebel El-Maghara Northern Sinai, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdalla Hegab, Adel A.

    The Bathonian-Callovian rocks of El-Maghara have been subdivided into seven biostratigraphic zones mainly based on their brachiopod fauna. The internal structures of the well preserved brachiopoda have also been elucidated.

  4. Disturbance functions of the Goertler instability on an airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dagenhart, J. R.; Mangalam, S. M.

    1986-01-01

    Goertler vortices arise in boundary layers along concave surfaces due to centrifugal effects. This paper presents some results of an experiment conducted to study the development of these vortices on an airfoil with a pressure gradient in the concave region where an attached laminar boundary layer was insured with suction through a perforated panel. A sublimating chemical technique was used to visualize Goertler vortices and the velocity field was measured by laser velocimetry. Experimental disturbance functions are compared with those predicted by the linear stability theory. The trend of vortex amplification in the concave zone and damping in the following convex region is shown to essentially follow the theoretical predictions.

  5. Sleep Disturbances in the Elderly.

    PubMed

    Zdanys, Kristina F; Steffens, David C

    2015-12-01

    Sleep disturbances are a common presenting symptom of older-age adults to their physicians. This article explores normal changes in sleep pattern with aging and primary sleep disorders in the elderly. Behavioral factors and primary psychiatric disorders affecting sleep in this population are reviewed. Further discussion examines sleep changes associated with 2 common forms of neurocognitive disorder: Alzheimer disease and Lewy Body Dementia. Common medical illnesses in the elderly are discussed in relation to sleep symptoms. Nonpharmacological and pharmacologic treatment strategies are summarized, with emphasis placed on risk of side effects in older adults. Future targets are considered.

  6. Pollack Crater's White Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This image of White Rock in Pollack crater was taken by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) on February 3, 2007 at 1750 UTC (12:50 p.m. EST), near 8 degrees south latitude, 25 degrees east longitude. The CRISM image was taken in 544 colors covering 0.36-3.92 micrometers, and shows features as small as 40 meters (132 feet) across. The region covered is roughly 20 kilometers (12 miles) long and 10 kilometers (6 miles) wide at its narrowest point.

    First imaged by the Mariner 9 spacecraft in 1972, the enigmatic group of wind-eroded ridges known as White Rock has been the subject of many subsequent investigations. White Rock is located on the floor of Pollack Crater in the Sinus Sabaeus region of Mars. It measures some 15 by 18 kilometers (9 by 11 miles) and was named for its light-colored appearance. In contrast-enhanced images, the feature's higher albedo or reflectivity compared with the darker material on the floor of the crater makes it appear white. In reality, White Rock has a dull, reddish color more akin to Martian dust. This higher albedo as well as its location in a topographic low suggested to some researchers that White Rock may be an eroded remnant of an ancient lake deposit. As water in a desert lake on Earth evaporates, it leaves behind white-colored salts that it leached or dissolved out of the surrounding terrain. These salt deposits may include carbonates, sulfates, and chlorides.

    In 2001, the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) on NASA's Mars Global Surveyor measured White Rock and found no obvious signature of carbonates or sulfates, or any other indication that White Rock holds evaporite minerals. Instead, it found Martian dust.

    CRISM's challenge was to obtain greater detail of White Rock's mineralogical composition and how it formed. The instrument operates at a different wavelength range than TES, giving it greater sensitivity to carbonate, sulfate and phyllosilicate (clay-like) minerals. It also

  7. Upland disturbance affects headwater stream nutrients and suspended sediments during baseflow and stormflow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houser, J.N.; Mulholland, P.J.; Maloney, K.O.

    2006-01-01

    Because catchment characteristics determine sediment and nutrient inputs to streams, upland disturbance can affect stream chemistry. Catchments at the Fort Benning Military Installation (near Columbus, Georgia) experience a range of upland disturbance intensities due to spatial variability in the intensity of military training. We used this disturbance gradient to investigate the effects of upland soil and vegetation disturbance on stream chemistry. During baseflow, mean total suspended sediment (TSS) concentration and mean inorganic suspended sediment (ISS) concentration increased with catchment disturbance intensity (TSS: R2 = 0.7, p = 0.005, range = 4.0-10.1 mg L-1; ISS: R2 = 0.71, p = 0.004, range = 2.04-7.3 mg L-1); dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration (R2 = 0.79, p = 0.001, range = 1.5-4.1 mg L-1) and soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) concentration (R2 = 0.75, p = 0.008, range = 1.9-6.2 ??g L-1) decreased with increasing disturbance intensity; and ammonia (NH 4+), nitrate (NO3-), and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) concentrations were unrelated to disturbance intensity. The increase in TSS and ISS during storms was positively correlated with disturbance (R2 = 0.78 and 0.78, p = 0.01 and 0.01, respectively); mean maximum change in SRP during storms increased with disturbance (r = 0.7, p = 0.04); and mean maximum change in NO3- during storms was marginally correlated with disturbance (r = 0.58, p = 0.06). Soil characteristics were significant predictors of baseflow DOC, SRP, and Ca 2+, but were not correlated with suspended sediment fractions, any nitrogen species, or pH. Despite the largely intact riparian zones of these headwater streams, upland soil and vegetation disturbances had clear effects on stream chemistry during baseflow and stormflow conditions. ?? ASA, CSSA, SSSA.

  8. Effects of habitat disturbance on survival rates of softshell turtles (Apalone spinifera) in an urban stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plummer, M.V.; Krementz, D.G.; Powell, L.A.; Mills, N.E.

    2008-01-01

    We monitored Spiny Softshell Turtles (Apalone spinifera) using mark-recapture during 1994-2005 in Gin Creek, Searcy, Arkansas. In 1997-2000 the creek bed and riparian zone were bulldozed in an effort to remove debris and improve water flow. This disturbance appeared to reduce the quantity and quality of turtle habitat. We tested for the potential effect of this habitat disturbance on the survival rates of marked turtles. We estimated annual survival rates for the population using models that allowed for variation in survival by state of maturation, year, and effects of the disturbance; we evaluated two different models of the disturbance impact. The first disturbance model incorporated a single change in survival rates, following the disturbance, whereas the second disturbance model incorporated three survival rates: pre- and postdisturbance, as well as a short-term decline during the disturbance. We used a state-transition model for our mark-recapture analysis, as softshells transition from juveniles to adults in a variable period of time. Our analysis indicated that survival varied by maturation state and was independent of a time trend or the disturbance. Annual survival rates were lower for juveniles (S?? = 0.717, SE = 0.039) than for adults (S?? = 0.836, SE = 0.025). Despite the dramatic habitat disturbance, we found no negative effects on survival rates. Our results demonstrate that, like a few other freshwater turtle species known to thrive in urban environments, populations of A. spinifera are resilient and can persist in urban environments despite periodic habitat disturbances. Copyright 2008 Society for the Study of Amphibians and Reptiles.

  9. Regional recovery of the disturbing gravitational potential by inverting satellite gravitational gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitoňák, Martin; Šprlák, Michal; Hamáčková, Eliška; Novák, Pavel

    2016-04-01

    Regional recovery of the disturbing gravitational potential in the area of Central Europe from satellite gravitational gradients data is discussed in this contribution. The disturbing gravitational potential is obtained by inverting surface integral formulas which transform the disturbing gravitational potential onto disturbing gravitational gradients in the spherical local north-oriented frame. Two numerical approaches that solve the inverse problem are considered. In the first approach, the integral formulas are rigorously decomposed into two parts, that is, the effects of the gradient data within near and distant zones. While the effect of the near zone data is sought as an inverse problem, the effect of the distant zone data is synthesized from the global gravitational model GGM05S using spectral weights given by truncation error coefficients up to the degree 150. In the second approach, a reference gravitational field up to the degree 180 is applied to reduce and smooth measured gravitational gradients. In both cases we recovered the disturbing gravitational potential from each of the four well-measured gravitational gradients of the GOCE satellite separately as well as from their combination. Obtained results are compared with the EGM2008, DIR-r2, TIM-r2 and SPW-r2 global gravitational models. The best fit was achieved for EGM2008 and the second approach combining all four well-measured gravitational gradients with rms of 1.231 m2 s-2.

  10. Endolithic pedogenesis and rock varnish on massive crystalline rocks in East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mergelov, N. S.; Goryachkin, S. V.; Shorkunov, I. G.; Zazovskaya, E. P.; Cherkinsky, A. E.

    2012-10-01

    Desert varnish and endolithic organisms are two widespread phenomena that have been studied in detail separately; their interaction and their genetic relationships have virtually escaped the attention of researchers. Both phenomena are of indubitable interest for pedology: endolithic organisms as an agent of soil formation and rock varnish as a probable product of pedogenesis. It is argued that the system of endolithic organisms, their functioning products, and the rock has all the features inherent to soils: the rock layer subjected to the influence of external abiogenic factors and living organisms dwelling in the rock and synthesizing and decomposing organic substances. The action of biogenic and abiogenic agents leads to the in situ transformation of the rock with the accumulation and removal of the products of this transformation and with the development of vertical heterogeneity in the form of microhorizons composing the soil microprofile. Instrumental measurements indicate that the carbon content in the endolithic horizons developed by biota in granitoid rocks of the Larsemann Hills oasis varies from 0.2 to 3.3%, the nitrogen content in these horizons varies from 0.02 to 0.47%, and the radiocarbon age of their organic matter reaches 480 ± 25 yrs. The products of the pedogenesis are represented by fine earth materials and by abundant and often multilayered films and coatings on the rock surface and on the lower sides of the desquamation (spalling) plates. Scanning electron microscopy with X-ray microprobe analysis indicates that the major elements composing these films are O, C, Si, Al, Fe, Ca, Mg, and S. It is shown that the films of the rock varnish and the organomineral films in the fissured zone of the rock under the plate with endolithic communities have certain similarity in their morphology and composition: the films of the rock varnish also contain biota (dead cells or cells in the dormant state), and their botryoidal structure is similar to the

  11. Estimating the radon emanation coefficient from crystalline rocks into groundwater.

    PubMed

    Przylibski, T A

    2000-09-01

    A simple method is proposed to estimate the coefficient of radon emanation from crystalline rocks into underground waters. In these cases, the crystalline rock seems as both the source and the reservoir of the radon. The calculations are based on a formula proposed by Maché for determining the concentration of radon in underground waters. Due to the inaccuracy of estimating some parameters (e.g. porosity), the results have a significant error. The advantage of this method is its simplicity and the possibility of obtaining results in a relatively short time. The estimated values of the emanation coefficient for selected crystalline rocks of the Sudety Mountains (SW Poland) vary from 7 to 41%, and after considering the error resulting from the estimation of rock porosity, saturation and density, the values range from 5 to 60%. The highest values of emanation coefficient (41, 33 and 21%) have been obtained for rocks in areas of tectonic dislocations and the lowest ones are for rocks outside dislocation zones (9 and 7%). The calculations imply that the emanation coefficient of rocks may have a greater influence on radon concentration in underground waters than the contents of radium in the reservoir rocks.

  12. Experimental assessment of borehole wall drilling damage in basaltic rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Fuenkajorn, K.; Daemen, J.J.K.

    1986-06-01

    Ring tension tests, permeability tests, and microscopic fracture studies have been performed to investigate the borehole damage induced at low confining pressure by three drilling techniques (diamond, percussion and rotary). Specimens are drilled with three hole sizes (38, 76, and 102 mm diameter) in Pomona basalt and Grande basaltic andesite. The damaged zone is characterized in terms of fractures and fracture patterns around the hole, and in terms of tensile strength reduction of the rock around the holes. Experimental results show that the thickness of the damaged zone around the hole ranges from 0.0 to 1.7 mm. A larger drill bit induces more wall damage than does a smaller one. Different drilling techniques show different damage characteristics (intensity and distribution). Damage characteristics are governed not only by drilling parameters (bit size, weight on bit, rotational speed, diamond radius, and energy), but also by properties of the rock. The weaker rock tends to show more intense damage than does the stronger one. Cracks within grains or cleavage fractures are predominant in slightly coarser grained rock (larger than 0.5 mm grain size) while intergranular cracks are predominant in very fine grained rock (smaller than 0.01 mm grain size). The damaged zones play no significant role in the flow path around a borehole plug.

  13. Street lighting disturbs commuting bats.

    PubMed

    Stone, Emma Louise; Jones, Gareth; Harris, Stephen

    2009-07-14

    Anthropogenic disturbance is a major cause of worldwide declines in biodiversity. Understanding the implications of this disturbance for species and populations is crucial for conservation biologists wishing to mitigate negative effects. Anthropogenic light pollution is an increasing global problem, affecting ecological interactions across a range of taxa and impacting negatively upon critical animal behaviors including foraging, reproduction, and communication (for review see). Almost all bats are nocturnal, making them ideal subjects for testing the effects of light pollution. Previous studies have shown that bat species adapted to foraging in open environments feed on insects attracted to mercury vapor lamps. Here, we use an experimental approach to provide the first evidence of a negative effect of artificial light pollution on the commuting behavior of a threatened bat species. We installed high-pressure sodium lights that mimic the intensity and light spectra of streetlights along commuting routes of lesser horseshoe bats (Rhinolophus hipposideros). Bat activity was reduced dramatically and the onset of commuting behavior was delayed in the presence of lighting, with no evidence of habituation. These results demonstrate that light pollution may have significant negative impacts upon the selection of flight routes by bats. PMID:19540116

  14. Pulse homodyne field disturbance sensor

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1997-01-01

    A field disturbance sensor operates with relatively low power, provides an adjustable operating range, is not hypersensitive at close range, allows co-location of multiple sensors, and is inexpensive to manufacture. The sensor includes a transmitter that transmits a sequence of transmitted bursts of electromagnetic energy. The transmitter frequency is modulated at an intermediate frequency. The sequence of bursts has a burst repetition rate, and each burst has a burst width and comprises a number of cycles at a transmitter frequency. The sensor includes a receiver which receives electromagnetic energy at the transmitter frequency, and includes a mixer which mixes a transmitted burst with reflections of the same transmitted burst to produce an intermediate frequency signal. Circuitry, responsive to the intermediate frequency signal indicates disturbances in the sensor field. Because the mixer mixes the transmitted burst with reflections of the transmitted burst, the burst width defines the sensor range. The burst repetition rate is randomly or pseudo-randomly modulated so that bursts in the sequence of bursts have a phase which varies. A second range-defining mode transmits two radio frequency bursts, where the time spacing between the bursts defines the maximum range divided by two.

  15. Pulse homodyne field disturbance sensor

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1997-10-28

    A field disturbance sensor operates with relatively low power, provides an adjustable operating range, is not hypersensitive at close range, allows co-location of multiple sensors, and is inexpensive to manufacture. The sensor includes a transmitter that transmits a sequence of transmitted bursts of electromagnetic energy. The transmitter frequency is modulated at an intermediate frequency. The sequence of bursts has a burst repetition rate, and each burst has a burst width and comprises a number of cycles at a transmitter frequency. The sensor includes a receiver which receives electromagnetic energy at the transmitter frequency, and includes a mixer which mixes a transmitted burst with reflections of the same transmitted burst to produce an intermediate frequency signal. Circuitry, responsive to the intermediate frequency signal indicates disturbances in the sensor field. Because the mixer mixes the transmitted burst with reflections of the transmitted burst, the burst width defines the sensor range. The burst repetition rate is randomly or pseudo-randomly modulated so that bursts in the sequence of bursts have a phase which varies. A second range-defining mode transmits two radio frequency bursts, where the time spacing between the bursts defines the maximum range divided by two. 12 figs.

  16. Introducing a disturbance ionosphere index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakowski, N.; Borries, C.; Wilken, V.

    2012-01-01

    Although ionospheric perturbations such as traveling ionospheric disturbances have a strong impact on Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) and other space-based radio systems, the description of individual perturbations is difficult. To overcome this problem, it is suggested to use a disturbance ionosphere index (DIX) that describes the perturbation degree of the ionosphere in a less specific form as a proxy. Although such an index does not describe the exact propagation conditions at the measurement site, the estimated index number indicates the probability of a potential impact on radio systems used in communication, navigation, and remote sensing. The definition of such a DIX must take into account the following major requirements: relevance to practical needs, objective measure of ionospheric conditions, easy and reproducible computation, and availability of a reliable database. Since the total electron content has been shown in many publications to act as an outstanding parameter for quantifying the range error and also the strength of ionospheric perturbations, we propose a DIX that is based on GNSS measurements. To illustrate the use of the index, recent storms monitored in 2011 and the Halloween storm are discussed. The proposed index is a robust and objective measure of the ionospheric state, applicable to radio systems which are impacted by a highly variable perturbed ionosphere.

  17. Ganges Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    24 May 2004 Mariner 9 images acquired in 1972 first revealed a large, light-toned, layered mound in Ganges Chasma, part of the vast Valles Marineris trough system. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a higher-resolution view of these rocks than was achieved by Mariner 9 or Viking, and higher than can be obtained by Mars Odyssey or Mars Express. The image, with a resolution of about 3.7 meters (12 feet) per pixel, shows eroded layered rock outcrops in Ganges Chasma. These rocks record a history of events that occurred either in Ganges Chasma, or in the rocks brought to the surface by the opening of Ganges Chasma. Either way, the story they might tell could be as fascinating and unprecedented as the story told by sedimentary rocks investigated this year in Meridiani Planum by the Opportunity Mars Exploration Rover ... no one knows. The image is located near 7.3oS, 48.8oW, and covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) across. The picture is illuminated by sunlight from the upper left.

  18. Strength measurements of The Geysers reservoir rock

    SciTech Connect

    Lockner, D.A.; Byerlee, J.D.

    1980-09-01

    Rock samples taken from two outcrops and cores from well bores at the Geysers geothermal field were tested at temperatures and pressures similar to those found in the field. Both intact cylinders and cylinders containing 30/sup 0/ sawcuts were deformed at confining pressures of 200 to 1000 bars, pore pressure of 30 bars, and temperatures of 150 to 250/sup 0/C. Constant strain rate tests gave a coefficient of friction of 0.68. Friction was independent of rock type, temperature and strain rate. Most cores taken from the producing zone were highly fractured. For this reason, intact samples were rarely 50% stronger than the frictional strength. At 500 bars confining pressure, P wave velocity of 6.2 km/sec was measured for a sample taken from an outcrop. Porosities and permeabilities were also measured.

  19. Potassium metasomatism and diffusion in Cretaceous K-bentonites from the disturbed belt, northwestern Montana and in the Middle Devonian Tioga K-bentonite, eastern USA

    SciTech Connect

    Altaner, S.P.

    1985-01-01

    This thesis presents X-ray diffraction, elemental K/Ar, and petrographic data of K-bentonites and enclosing shales from the Marias River Formation (Late Cretaceous) in the disturbed belt of Montana to determine the kind and extent of chemical exchange between bentonite beds and shale host rocks during K-bentonite formation. One 2.5 m thick K-bentonite bed and five thinner K-bentonite beds are zoned mineralogically and chemically, with illite- and potassium-rich upper and lower contacts and a smectite-rich potassium-poor middle. In all case, the formation of smectite-rich clay minerals appears to be due to a deficient supply of K and not lower temperatures. For K-bentonites that were originally vitric tuffs, K appears to be the only major element that is metasomatically derived, however, the exact source of K was not determined. I/S from the 2.5 m thick K-bentonite bed is zoned with respect to K/Ar age, with the contacts giving ages 3-4 m.y. older than the center. This difference in apparent age is interpreted to indicate that K transport in the bentonite was diffusion controlled. Solution of the coupled equations for chemical transport and reaction (illitization) for the 2.5 m thick bentonite yields a diffusion coefficient for K transport of about 5-8 x 10 cm/sec. Solutions assuming this value predict I/S zonation observed in thinner bentonite beds. The Tioga (Middle Devonian) K-bentonite, studied from outcrop localities in New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia. West Virginia, Indiana, and Illinois, shows a broader range in I/S layer composition and stacking order than reported in previous studies of this unit because this study examined rocks from a larger region and therefore from a wider range of thermal grades than previous studies.

  20. An engineering rock classification to evaluate seismic rock-fall susceptibility and its application to the Wasatch Front

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harp, E.L.; Noble, M.A.

    1993-01-01

    Investigations of earthquakes world wide show that rock falls are the most abundant type of landslide that is triggered by earthquakes. An engineering classification originally used in tunnel design, known as the rock mass quality designation (Q), was modified for use in rating the susceptibility of rock slopes to seismically-induced failure. Analysis of rock-fall concentrations and Q-values for the 1980 earthquake sequence near Mammoth Lakes, California, defines a well-constrained upper bound that shows the number of rock falls per site decreases rapidly with increasing Q. Because of the similarities of lithology and slope between the Eastern Sierra Nevada Range near Mammoth Lakes and the Wasatch Front near Salt Lake City, Utah, the probabilities derived from analysis of the Mammoth Lakes region were used to predict rock-fall probabilities for rock slopes near Salt Lake City in response to a magnitude 6.0 earthquake. These predicted probabilities were then used to generalize zones of rock-fall susceptibility. -from Authors

  1. New Hydrologic Insights to Advance Geophysical Investigation of the Unsaturated Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimmo, J. R.; Perkins, K. S.

    2015-12-01

    Advances in hydrology require information from the unsaturated zone, especially for problems related to groundwater contamination, water-supply sustainability, and ecohydrology. Unsaturated-zone processes are notoriously difficult to quantify; soils and rocks are visually opaque, spatially variable in the extreme, and easily disturbed by instrument installation. Thus there is great value in noninvasive techniques that produce water-related data of high density in space and time. Methods based on resistivity and electromagnetic waves have already produced significant new understanding of percolation processes, root-zone water retention, influences of evapotranspiration on soil-water, and effects of preferential flow. Further developments are underway for such purposes as noninvasive application to greater depths, increased resolution, adaptation for lab-scale experiments, and calibration in heterogeneous media. Beyond these, however, there is need for a stronger marriage of hydrologic and geophysical knowledge and perspective. Possible means to greater and faster progress include: Apply the latest hydrologic understanding, both pore-scale and macroscopic, to the detection of preferential flow paths and their degree of activation. In the continuing advancement of hardware and techniques, draw creatively from developments in such fields as high-energy physics, medical imaging, astrogeology, high-tech semiconductors, and bioinstrumentation. Sidestep the imaging process where possible to measure essential properties and fluxes more directly. Pose questions that have a strong end-use character, like "how does storm intensity relate to aquifer recharge rate" rather than "what is the shape of the wetting front". The greatest advances in geophysical investigation of the unsaturated zone will come from methods informed by the latest understanding of unsaturated systems and processes, and aimed as directly as possible at the answers to important hydrologic questions.

  2. Heavy-mineral analysis of sedimentary rocks of northern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morris, Robert Hamilton

    1952-01-01

    The Navy Oil Unit of the United States Geological Survey has been investigating the geology of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 4, northern Alaska. As part of this program, heavy-mineral samples were prepared from cores of the test wells and core holes and studied to determine stratigraphic correlations. Using the following criteria: (1) presence of diagnostic minerals or mineral suites; (2) relative abundance of specific minerals; (3) degree of rounding of mineral grains; (4) distinction as to grain form; eight heavy-mineral zones have been recognized in Triassic, Jurassic, Cretaceous, and Quaternary sedimentary rocks. Correlations based on these zones are shown. Source areas and rocks are discussed in relation to geologic history and genesis of the Mesozoic and Quaternary sedimentary rocks.

  3. Rock mechanics research awards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, John E.

    The U.S. National Committee for Rock Mechanics, at its June 1983 annual meeting, adopted three actions to enhance the competition and public awareness of its annual awards program for rock mechanics papers. It will issue a call for nominations of outstanding papers; it will request participating societies to announce the names of award winners and the titles of papers, and it will publish an abstract of the winning papers in the proceedings of the annual U.S. Rock Mechanics Symposium in the year following the awards.The competition is open to papers, by U.S residents or students in a U.S. school, published in an English language publication normally available in the United States. The following authors and papers are the 1983 award winners:

  4. Gale Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-439, 1 August 2003

    Gale Crater, located in the Aeolis region near 5.5oS, 222oW, contains a mound of layered sedimentary rock that stands higher than the rim of the crater. This giant mound suggests that the entire crater was not only once filled with sediment, it was also buried beneath sediment. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows some of the eroded remains of the sedimentary rock that once filled Gale Crater. The layers form terraces; wind has eroded the material to form the tapered, pointed yardang ridges seen here. The small circular feature in the lower right quarter of the picture is a mesa that was once a small meteor impact crater that was filled, buried, then exhumed from within the sedimentary rock layers exposed here. This image is illuminated from the left.

  5. Ladon Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    6 June 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows light-toned, layered, sedimentary rocks exposed by the fluids that carved the Ladon Valles system in the Erythraeum region of Mars. These rocks are so ancient that their sediments were deposited, cemented to form rock, and then eroded by the water (or other liquid) that carved Ladon Valles, so far back in Martian history that such liquids could still flow on the planet's surface.

    Location near: 20.8oS, 30.0oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Spring

  6. West Candor Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    11 December 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows light-toned, layered, sedimentary rock exposures in western Candor Chasma, part of the vast Valles Marineris trough system. Most of west Candor's interior includes exposures of layered rock with very few superimposed impact craters. The rock may be very ancient, but the lack of craters suggests that the erosion of these materials is on-going.

    Location near: 6.3oS, 76.0oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Southern Summer

  7. Faulted Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    27 June 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows some of the layered, sedimentary rock outcrops that occur in a crater located at 8oN, 7oW, in western Arabia Terra. Dark layers and dark sand have enhanced the contrast of this scene. In the upper half of the image, one can see numerous lines that off-set the layers. These lines are faults along which the rocks have broken and moved. The regularity of layer thickness and erosional expression are taken as evidence that the crater in which these rocks occur might once have been a lake. The image covers an area about 1.9 km (1.2 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  8. Eos Chaos Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    11 January 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows light-toned, layered rock outcrops in Eos Chaos, located near the east end of the Valles Marineris trough system. The outcrops occur in the form of a distinct, circular butte (upper half of image) and a high slope (lower half of image). The rocks might be sedimentary rocks, similar to those found elsewhere exposed in the Valles Marineris system and the chaotic terrain to the east of the region.

    Location near: 12.9oS, 49.5oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Southern Summer

  9. Sedimentary Rock Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-348, 2 May 2003

    This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image acquired in March 2003 shows dozens of repeated layers of sedimentary rock in a western Arabia Terra crater at 8oN, 7oW. Wind has sculpted the layered forms into hills somewhat elongated toward the lower left (southwest). The dark patches at the bottom (south) end of the image are drifts of windblown sand. These sedimentary rocks might indicate that the crater was once the site of a lake--or they may result from deposition by wind in a completely dry, desert environment. Either way, these rocks have something important to say about the geologic history of Mars. The area shown is about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  10. Kinematics of the Towaliga, Bartletts Ferry, and Goat Rock fault in the southernmost Appalachians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steltenpohl, Mark G.

    1988-09-01

    Subhorizontal shear sense along subvertical mylonite zones marking the southeast and northwest flanks of the Pine Mountain belt in Alabama, i.e., the Towaliga, Bartletts Ferry, and Goat Rock fault zones, has been deduced from S-C composite planar fabrics, extensional shear bands, displaced broken grains, asymmetric folds, and porphyroclast systems. Quartz and feldspar elongation lineations are generally subhorizontal and closely correspond to estimated sliplines. Each of the fault zones records dominantly dextral shear; the Towaliga has an apparent minor oblique, down-to-the-north normal component, and the Goat Rock has a minor down-to-the-south normal component. The mylonite zones postdate the early to middle Paleozoic schistosity in rocks outside the shear zones and thus are considered to be late Paleozoic in age. Results imply persistence of the late Paleozoic (Alleghanian?) dextral shear system into the southernmost exposures of the Appalachian orogen.

  11. Digital carbonate rock physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saenger, Erik H.; Vialle, Stephanie; Lebedev, Maxim; Uribe, David; Osorno, Maria; Duda, Mandy; Steeb, Holger

    2016-08-01

    Modern estimation of rock properties combines imaging with advanced numerical simulations, an approach known as digital rock physics (DRP). In this paper we suggest a specific segmentation procedure of X-ray micro-computed tomography data with two different resolutions in the µm range for two sets of carbonate rock samples. These carbonates were already characterized in detail in a previous laboratory study which we complement with nanoindentation experiments (for local elastic properties). In a first step a non-local mean filter is applied to the raw image data. We then apply different thresholds to identify pores and solid phases. Because of a non-neglectable amount of unresolved microporosity (micritic phase) we also define intermediate threshold values for distinct phases. Based on this segmentation we determine porosity-dependent values for effective P- and S-wave velocities as well as for the intrinsic permeability. For effective velocities we confirm an observed two-phase trend reported in another study using a different carbonate data set. As an upscaling approach we use this two-phase trend as an effective medium approach to estimate the porosity-dependent elastic properties of the micritic phase for the low-resolution images. The porosity measured in the laboratory is then used to predict the effective rock properties from the observed trends for a comparison with experimental data. The two-phase trend can be regarded as an upper bound for elastic properties; the use of the two-phase trend for low-resolution images led to a good estimate for a lower bound of effective elastic properties. Anisotropy is observed for some of the considered subvolumes, but seems to be insignificant for the analysed rocks at the DRP scale. Because of the complexity of carbonates we suggest using DRP as a complementary tool for rock characterization in addition to classical experimental methods.

  12. Fluid processes in subduction zones.

    PubMed

    Peacock, S A

    1990-04-20

    Fluids play a critical role in subduction zones and arc magmatism. At shallow levels in subduction zones (<40 kilometers depth), expulsion of large volumes of pore waters and CH(4)-H(2)O fluids produced by diagenetic and low-grade metamorphic reactions affect the thermal and rheological evolution of the accretionary prism and provide nutrients for deep-sea biological communities. At greater depths, H(2)O and CO(2) released by metamorphic reactions in the subducting oceanic crust may alter the bulk composition in the overlying mantle wedge and trigger partial melting reactions. The location and conse-quences of fluid production in subduction zones can be constrained by consideration of phase diagrams for relevant bulk compositions in conjunction with fluid and rock pressure-temperature-time paths predicted by numerical heat-transfer models. Partial melting of subducting, amphibole-bearing oceanic crust is predicted only within several tens of million years of the initiation of subduction in young oceanic lithosphere. In cooler subduction zones, partial melting appears to occur primarily in the overlying mantle wedge as a result of fluid infiltration. PMID:17784486

  13. Fluid processes in subduction zones.

    PubMed

    Peacock, S A

    1990-04-20

    Fluids play a critical role in subduction zones and arc magmatism. At shallow levels in subduction zones (<40 kilometers depth), expulsion of large volumes of pore waters and CH(4)-H(2)O fluids produced by diagenetic and low-grade metamorphic reactions affect the thermal and rheological evolution of the accretionary prism and provide nutrients for deep-sea biological communities. At greater depths, H(2)O and CO(2) released by metamorphic reactions in the subducting oceanic crust may alter the bulk composition in the overlying mantle wedge and trigger partial melting reactions. The location and conse-quences of fluid production in subduction zones can be constrained by consideration of phase diagrams for relevant bulk compositions in conjunction with fluid and rock pressure-temperature-time paths predicted by numerical heat-transfer models. Partial melting of subducting, amphibole-bearing oceanic crust is predicted only within several tens of million years of the initiation of subduction in young oceanic lithosphere. In cooler subduction zones, partial melting appears to occur primarily in the overlying mantle wedge as a result of fluid infiltration.

  14. Fracture system influence on the reservoirs rock formation of Ordovician-Devonian carbonates in West Siberia tectonic depression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koveshnikov, A. E.; Nesterova, A. C.; Dolgaya, T. F.

    2016-09-01

    During the Paleozoic period from the beginning of the Cambrian to the end of the Carboniferous in the boundaries of the West Siberia tectonic depression there occurred the sea, where the carbonate platforms were formed by the limestones accumulation. All the area at the end of the Carboniferous period was turned to land. Resulting from Gertsynskaya folding in the times of Permian - Triassic the formed deposits were folded and denudated to a considerable extent. Besides, the reservoir rocks of the crust of weathering including redeposited one, were formed as a result of hypergenesis, during the continental stand of the area in the near-surface zone. A new geological prospecting unit has been suggested which underlies these crusts of weathering and formed during fracture tectonic processes with hydrothermal-metasomatic limestones reworking and the processes of hydrothermal leaching and dolomitization. So, in the carbonate platforms the system of fissure zones related to tectonic disturbance was formed. This has a dendrite profile where the series of tangential, more thinned fractures deviate from the stem and finish in pores and caverns. The carbonate platforms formation in the West Siberia tectonic depression has been analyzed, their dynamics and gradual increasing from the minimal in Ordovician and Silurian to maximal at the end of the Late Devonian has been shown.

  15. Theory of wing rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, C. H.; Lan, C. E.

    1984-01-01

    A theory is developed for predicting wing rock characteristics. From available data, it can be concluded that wing rock is triggered by flow asymmetries, developed by negative or weakly positive roll damping, and sustained by nonlinear aerodynamic roll damping. A new nonlinear aerodynamic model that includes all essential aerodynamic nonlinearities is developed. The Beecham-Titchener method is applied to obtain approximate analytic solutions for the amplitude and frequency of the limit cycle based on the three degree-of-freedom equations of motion. An iterative scheme is developed to calculate the average aerodynamic derivatives and dynamic characteristics at limit cycle conditions. Good agreement between theoretical and experimental results is obtained.

  16. Rock blasting environmental impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Agreda, C.

    1995-12-31

    The rock blasting environmental impacts such as: flyrock, ground vibrations, air-blast, and/or noise, dust and fumes are identified and mentioned. Some comments on the correction factors that might be taken into consideration to calculate the initial velocity and the maximum projection of the rock fragments are mentioned as well. The blast fumes causes, its alleviation and protective measures are identified, described and discussed. To mitigate, minimize and/or avoid blast fumes, the AN/FO, Al/AN/FO and S/AN/FO dry blasting agents optimum equations are developed, discussed and recommended.

  17. Diverse Rock Named Squash

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This image from the Sojourner rover's right front camera was taken on Sol 27. The Pathfinder lander is seen at middle left. The large rock at right, nicknamed 'Squash', exhibits a diversity of textures. It looks very similar to a conglomerate, a type of rock found on Earth that forms from sedimentary processes.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and managed the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  18. Rock Outcrops near Hellas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    7 October 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows light-toned, layered rock outcrops in a pitted and eroded region just northeast of Hellas Planitia. The light-toned materials are most likely sedimentary rocks deposited early in martian history (but long after the Hellas Basin formed by a giant asteroid or comet impact). The scene also includes a plethora of large dark-toned, windblown ripples. The image is located near 27.2oS, 280.7oW, and covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the upper left.

  19. Layered Rocks In Melas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    20 June 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC), image shows exposures of finely-bedded sedimentary rocks in western Melas Chasma, part of the vast Valles Marineris trough system. Rocks similar to these occur in neighboring west Candor Chasma, as well. The picture is located near 9.1oS, 74.5oW, and covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. The scene is illuminated by sunlight from the left/upper left.

  20. Sedimentary Rocks and Dunes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    25 November 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows buttes composed of light-toned, sedimentary rock exposed by erosion within a crater occurring immediately west of Schiaparelli Basin near 4.0oS, 347.9oW. Surrounding these buttes is a field of dark sand dunes and lighter-toned, very large windblown ripples. The sedimentary rocks might indicate that the crater interior was once the site of a lake. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  1. Sedimentary Rock Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    27 January 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows layers of sedimentary rock in a crater in western Arabia Terra. Layered rock records the history of a place, but an orbiter image alone cannot tell the entire story. These materials record some past episodes of deposition of fine-grained material in an impact crater that is much larger than the image shown here. The picture is located near 3.4oN, 358.7oW, and covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi.) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  2. Sedimentary Rock Remnants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    29 July 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows knobs of remnant, wind-eroded, layered sedimentary rock that once completely covered the floor of a crater located west of the Sinus Meridiani region of Mars. Sedimentary rock outcrops are common throughout the Sinus Meridiani region and its surrounding cratered terrain.

    Location near: 2.2oN, 7.9oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Autumn

  3. The Marocche rock avalanches (Trentino, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Martin, Silvana; Campedel, Paolo; Viganò, Alfio; Alberti, Silvio; Rigo, Manuel; Vockenhuber, Christof

    2015-04-01

    The floors of the Adige and Sarca River valleys are punctuated by numerous rock avalanche deposits of undetermined age. With a view to understanding predisposition and triggering factors, thus ultimately paleoseismicity in the region, we are studying the geomorphology and timing of the largest rock avalanches of the River Sarca-Lake Garda area (e.g., Marocche, Monte Spinale, Lago di Tovel, Lago di Molveno, San Giovanni and Torbole). Among the most extensive of these deposits, with an area of 13 km2 and a volume of about 109 m3, are the Marocche. Marocche deposits cover the lower Sarca valley north of Lake Garda for a length of more than 8 km with 200 m of debris. Both collapse and bedding parallel sliding are a consequence of dip slopes and the extreme relief on the right side of the valley of nearly 2000 m from the bedrock below the valley floor to the peaks combined with the zones of structural weakness. The rock avalanches developed within carbonate rocks of Mesozoic age, mainly limestones of the Jurassic Calcari Grigi Group. The main scarps are located on the western side of the lower Sarca Valley, along the steep faces of Mt. Brento and Mt. Casale. The presence of these scarps is strictly related to the Southern Giudicarie and the Ballino fault systems. The former is here constituted by regular NNE-directed ESE-vergent thrust faults. The latter has been reactivated as normal faults. These complicated structural relationships favored complex failure mechanisms, including rock slide and massive collapse. At the Marocche itself, based on field relationships and analysis of lidar imagery, we differentiated two large rock avalanches: the Marocca di Kas in the south which overlies and in part buries the Marocche (s.s.) in the northern sector. Previous mapping had suggested up to five rock avalanches in the area where we differentiate two. In spite of hypotheses suggesting failure of the rock avalanches onto stagnating late Pleistocene glaciers, preliminary 36Cl

  4. Effects of upland disturbance and instream restoration on hydrodynamics and ammonium uptake in headwater streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roberts, B.J.; Mulholland, P.J.; Houser, J.N.

    2007-01-01

    Delivery of water, sediments, nutrients, and organic matter to stream ecosystems is strongly influenced by the catchment of the stream and can be altered greatly by upland soil and vegetation disturbance. At the Fort Benning Military Installation (near Columbus, Georgia), spatial variability in intensity of military training results in a wide range of intensities of upland disturbance in stream catchments. A set of 8 streams in catchments spanning this upland disturbance gradient was selected for investigation of the impact of disturbance intensity on hydrodynamics and nutrient uptake. The size of transient storage zones and rates of NH4+ uptake in all study streams were among the lowest reported in the literature. Upland disturbance did not appear to influence stream hydrodynamics strongly, but it caused significant decreases in instream nutrient uptake. In October 2003, coarse woody debris (CWD) was added to 1/2 of the study streams (spanning the disturbance gradient) in an attempt to increase hydrodynamic and structural complexity, with the goals of enhancing biotic habitat and increasing nutrient uptake rates. CWD additions had positive short-term (within 1 mo) effects on hydrodynamic complexity (water velocity decreased and transient storage zone cross-sectional area, relative size of the transient storage zone, fraction of the median travel time attributable to transient storage over a standardized length of 200 m, and the hydraulic retention factor increased) and nutrient uptake (NH4+ uptake rates increased). Our results suggest that water quality in streams with intense upland disturbances can be improved by enhancing instream biotic nutrient uptake capacity through measures such as restoring stream CWD. ?? 2007 by The North American Benthological Society.

  5. Effects of upland disturbance and instream restoration on hydrodynamics and ammonium uptake in headwater streams

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Brian J; Mulholland, Patrick J; Houser, Jeffrey N

    2007-01-01

    Delivery of water, sediments, nutrients, and organic matter to stream ecosystems is strongly influenced by the catchment of the stream and can be altered greatly by upland soil and vegetation disturbance. At the Fort Benning Military Installation (near Columbus, Georgia), spatial variability in intensity of military training results in a wide range of intensities of upland disturbance in stream catchments. A set of 8 streams in catchments spanning this upland disturbance gradient was selected for investigation of the impact of disturbance intensity on hydrodynamics and nutrient uptake. The size of transient storage zones and rates of NH4+ uptake in all study streams were among the lowest reported in the literature. Upland disturbance did not appear to influence stream hydrodynamics strongly, but it caused significant decreases in instream nutrient uptake. In October 2003, coarse woody debris (CWD) was added to of the study streams (spanning the disturba