Science.gov

Sample records for diverse delayed effects

  1. Local Effects of Delayed Food

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davison, Michael; Baum, William M.

    2007-01-01

    Five pigeons were trained on a procedure in which seven concurrent variable-interval schedules arranged seven different food-rate ratios in random sequence in each session. Each of these components lasted for 10 response-produced food deliveries, and components were separated by 10-s blackouts. We varied delays to food (signaled by blackout)…

  2. Delayed gastric emptying of liquids and solids following Roux-en-Y biliary diversion.

    PubMed Central

    Hocking, M P; Vogel, S B; Falasca, C A; Woodward, E R

    1981-01-01

    Recent reports cite an increased incidence in delayed gastric emptying following Roux-en-Y biliary diversion for alkaline reflux gastritis. The effect of Roux-en-Y diversion on the gastric emptying of liquids and solids was evaluated following vagotomy and antrectomy and vagotomy and subtotal gastrectomy. Twenty dogs underwent placements of large Thomas cannula in the stomach. Four dogs with intact stomachs served a controls. Eight dogs each with vagotomy and antrectomy were subdivided into Roux-en-Y gastrojejunostomy (RYA) and a Billroth II (B-IIA) group. Eight dogs each with vagotomy and subtotal gastrectomy were subdivided into similar groups. Four dogs - Roux-en-Y (RSTG) and four dogs - Billroth II (B-IISTG). Gastric emptying of solid food, normal saline and 25% dextrose was evaluated. RYA dogs demonstrated a significant delay in gastric emptying of solids compared with corresponding B-IIA animals. RYA dogs had 76, 61 and 42% of solid food retained at three, five and eight hours while B-II animals retained 56, 41 and 20%, respectively. The results are highly significant at all time intervals (p less than 0.001 at five and eight hours). Control animals retained 34, 17 and 3% of solid food at three, five and eight hours. RSTG animals had 73, 52 and 28% retained solids at three, five and eight hours, while B-IISTG animals had 55, 42 and 13% retention, respectively (p less than 0.05 at eight hours). Normal saline was significantly delayed in both Roux-en-Y subgroups compared with B-II dogs (p less than 0.02 in V/A, p less than 0.05 in V/STG). There was a trend toward delayed emptying of 25% dextrose in the Roux-en-Y groups, but significance was achieved only in the RYA compared with B-IIA groups (p less than 0.02 at 30 minutes). Delayed gastric emptying following Roux-en-Y gastrojejunostomy is documented in the experimental animals which underwent vagotomy and appears greater in magnitude than that observed following vagotomy and B-II gastrectomy. These data

  3. Isolation Effect in Immediate and Delayed Recall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellezza, Francis S.; Cheney, Terry L.

    1973-01-01

    If the hypothesis of selective rehearsal is used to account for the isolation effect, then the recall of isolated items will depend both on the serial position of the isolated item and on whether recall is immediate or delayed. (Author)

  4. Diversity and time delays induce resonance in a modular neuronal network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Y. B.; Yang, X. L.; Kurths, J.

    2014-12-01

    This paper focuses on the resonance dynamics of a modular neuronal network consisting of several small-world subnetworks. The considered network is composed of delay-coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo (FHN) neurons, whose characteristic parameters present diversity in the form of quenched noise. Our numerical results indicate that when such a network is subjected to an external subthreshold periodic signal, its collective response is optimized for an intermediate level of diversity, namely, a resonant behavior can be induced by an appropriate level of diversity. How the probabilities of intramodule and intermodule connections, as well as the number of subnetworks influence the diversity-induced resonance are also discussed. Further, conclusive evidences demonstrate the nontrivial role of time-delayed coupling on the diversity-induced resonance properties. Especially, multiple resonance is obviously detected when time delays are located at integer multiples of the oscillation period of the signal. Moreover, the phenomenon of fine-tuned delays in inducing multiple resonance remains when diversity is within an intermediate range. Our findings have implications that neural systems may profit from their generic diversity and delayed coupling to optimize the response to external stimulus.

  5. Delayed Ischemic Stroke after Flow Diversion of Large Posterior Communicating Artery Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Si On; Chung, Yeon Gu; Won, Yu Sam

    2016-01-01

    For securing large, giant, and wide-neck aneurysms, conventional coil embolization has substantial limitations, such as incomplete occlusion, recanalization, and a high recurrence rate. To overcome these limitations, a novel paradigm was suggested and, as a result, flow-diverting device was developed. The flow-diverting device is an innovative and effective technique to allow securing of large, giant, and wide-neck aneurysms. In numerous studies, the flow-diverting device has shown better outcomes than coil embolization. However, the flow-diverting device has also some risks, including rupture of aneurysm, intracerebral hemorrhage, and ischemic stroke. In addition, with more experience, unexpected complications are also reported.5)7) In the present case, we experienced a delayed ischemic stroke at 27 days after endovascular treatment. The patient had multiple aneurysms and, among them, we treated a large posterior communicating artery aneurysm using Pipeline™ Embolization Device. The patient was tolerable for 25 days, but then suddenly presented intermittent right hemiparesis. In the initial diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), there was no acute lesion; however, in the follow-up MRI, an acute ischemic stroke was found in the territory of anterior choroidal artery which was covered by Pipeline Embolization Device. We suspect that neo-intimal overgrowth or a tiny thrombus have led to this delayed complication. Through our case, we learned that the neurosurgeon should be aware of the possibility of delayed ischemic stroke after flow diversion, as well as, long-term close observation and follow-up angiography are necessary even in the event of no acute complications. PMID:27114962

  6. Delayed hemorrhagic complications after flow diversion for intracranial aneurysms: a literature overview

    PubMed Central

    Rouchaud, Aymeric; Brinjikji, Waleed; Lanzino, Giuseppe; Cloft, Harry J.; Kadirvel, Ramanthan; Kallmes, David F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Delayed aneurysm rupture and delayed intraparenchymal hemorrhages (DIPH) are poorly understood and often fatal complications of flow diversion (FD) for intracranial aneurysms. The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors for these complications. Materials and Methods We performed a systematic review on post-FD delayed aneurysm rupture and DIPH. For each reported case we collected the following information: aneurysm location, size and rupture status, type of flow-diverter used, timing of the hemorrhage, and neurological outcome. We reported descriptive statistics of patients suffering DIPH and delayed aneurysm rupture to determine if there were any characteristics consistently present among patients with these complications. Results We identified 81 delayed aneurysms ruptures and 101 DIPH. 76.6% (45/58) of the delayed ruptures occurred within one month. The prognosis of delayed ruptures was poor, with 81.3% (61/75) experiencing death or poor neurological outcome. Giant aneurysms accounted for 46.3% of ruptures (31/67). 80.9% (55/68) of these aneurysms were initially unruptured. 17.8% (13/73) of the delayed ruptured aneurysms had prior or concomitant coiling. DIPHs were ipsilateral to the treated aneurysm in 82.2% (60/73) of cases. 86.0% (43/50) of the DIPH occurred within one month after FDS. Combined morbidity/mortality rate was 68.5% (50/73 following DIPH. 23.0% of DIPHs (14/61) occurred in patients with giant aneurysms. Conclusions Our study demonstrates that giant aneurysms represent almost 50% of delayed aneurysm ruptures in the flow-diverter literature. About 20% of delayed ruptures occurred despite associated coiling. A substantial proportion of DIPHs occur early following FDS treatment of giant aneurysms. PMID:26553302

  7. Angular dependence of Wigner time delay: Relativistic Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, A.; Deshmukh, P. C.; Manson, S. T.; Kkeifets, A. S.

    2016-05-01

    Laser assisted photoionization time delay mainly consists of two parts: Wigner time delay, and time delay in continuum-continuum transition. Wigner time delay results from the energy derivative of the phase of the photoionization amplitude (matrix element). In general, the photoionization time delay is not the same in all directions relative to the incident photon polarization, although when a single transition dominates the amplitude, the resultant time delay is essentially isotropic. The relativistic-random-phase approximation is employed to determine the Wigner time delay in photoionization from the outer np subshells of the noble gas atoms, Ne through Xe. The time delay is found to significantly depend on angle, as well as energy. The angular dependence of the time delay is found to be quite sensitive to atomic dynamics and relativistic effects, and exhibit strong energy and angular variation in the neighborhood of Cooper minima. Work supported by DOE, Office of Chemical Sciences and DST (India).

  8. Delay time and Hartman effect in strain engineered graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xi Deng, Zhi-Yong; Ban, Yue

    2014-05-07

    Tunneling times, including group delay and dwell time, are studied for massless Dirac electrons transmitting through a one-dimensional barrier in strain-engineered graphene. The Hartman effect, the independence of group delay on barrier length, is induced by the strain effect, and associated with the transmission gap and the evanescent mode. The influence of barrier height/length and strain modulus/direction on the group delay is also discussed, which provides the flexibility to control the group delay with applications in graphene-based devices. The relationship between group delay and dwell time is finally derived to clarify the nature of the Hartman effect.

  9. Propofol effects on atrial fibrillation wavefront delays.

    PubMed

    Cervigón, Raquel; Moreno, Javier; Millet, José; Pérez-Villacastín, Julián; Castells, Francisco

    2010-08-01

    Since the cardiac activity during atrial fibrillation (AF) may be influenced by autonomic modulations, in this study, a novel method to quantify the effects of the most common anesthetic agent (propofol) in AF ablation procedures is introduced. This study has two main objectives: first, to assess whether the sedation earlier to radio frequency ablation affects the arrhythmia itself, and second, to provide new information that contributes to a better understanding of the influence of the autonomic nervous system on AF. The methodology presented is based on the measurement of synchronization and delay indexes between two atrial activations at adjacent intracavitary electrodes. These parameters aim to estimate whether two activations at different sites may be caused by the same propagating wavefront, or otherwise, are the consequence of independent wavefronts. The results showed that the mentioned indexes have a different behavior at both atria: the right atrium becomes more synchronized with propofol administration, whereas the synchronization index decreases at the left atrium.

  10. Effects of signaled versus unsignaled delay of reinforcement on choice.

    PubMed Central

    McDevitt, M A; Williams, B A

    2001-01-01

    Pigeons chose between 5-s and 15-s delay-of-reinforcement alternatives. The first key peck to satisfy the choice schedule began a delay timer, and food was delivered at the end of the interval. Key pecks during the delay interval were measured, but had no scheduled effect. In Experiment 1, signal conditions and choice schedules were varied across conditions. During unsignaled conditions, no stimulus change signaled the beginning of a delay interval. During differential and nondifferential signal conditions, offset of the choice stimuli and onset of a delay stimulus signaled the beginning of a delay interval. During differential signal conditions, different stimuli were correlated with the 5-s and 15-s delays, whereas the same stimulus appeared during both delay durations during nondifferential signal conditions. Pigeons showed similar, extreme levels of preference for the 5-s delay alternative during unsignaled and differentially signaled conditions. Preference levels were reliably lower with nondifferential signals. Experiment 2 assessed preference with two pairs of unsignaled delays in which the ratio of delays was held constant but the absolute duration was increased fourfold. No effect of absolute duration was found. The results highlight the importance of delayed primary reinforcement effects and challenge models of choice that focus solely on conditioned reinforcement. PMID:11394485

  11. Tunable delay time and Hartman effect in graphene magnetic barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Ban, Yue; Wang, Lin-Jun; Chen, Xi

    2015-04-28

    Tunable group delay and Hartman effect have been investigated for massless Dirac electrons in graphene magnetic barriers. In the presence of magnetic field, dwell time is found to be equal to net group delay plus the group delay contributing from the lateral shifts. The group delay times are discussed in both cases of normal and oblique incidence, to clarify the nature of Hartman effect. In addition, the group delay in transmission can be modulated from subluminality to superluminality by adjusting the magnetic field, which may also lead to potential applications in graphene-based microelectronics.

  12. Effect of speedup delay on shuttle bus schedule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatani, Takashi

    2016-10-01

    We study the bus schedule in the shuttle bus transportation system controlled by speedup. The bus schedule is closely related to the dynamic motion of the bus. The motion of a shuttle bus depends on the inflow rate of passengers and the delayed speedup control. The delayed speedup control has an important effect on the dynamic motion of the bus. We present the delayed map model for the dynamics of the shuttle bus with the delayed speedup control. The bus motion changes from a stable state, through a periodic state, to a quasi-periodic state by the delayed speedup control. The return map of the tour time displays a smooth closed curve and the bus motion is quasi-periodic. The dynamic transition to the quasi-periodic motion changes greatly with the delay time. We clarify the effect of the delayed speedup control on the bus schedule.

  13. The effects of the framing of time on delay discounting.

    PubMed

    DeHart, William Brady; Odum, Amy L

    2015-01-01

    We examined the effects of the framing of time on delay discounting. Delay discounting is the process by which delayed outcomes are devalued as a function of time. Time in a titrating delay discounting task is often framed in calendar units (e.g., as 1 week, 1 month, etc.). When time is framed as a specific date, delayed outcomes are discounted less compared to the calendar format. Other forms of framing time; however, have not been explored. All participants completed a titrating calendar unit delay-discounting task for money. Participants were also assigned to one of two delay discounting tasks: time as dates (e.g., June 1st, 2015) or time in units of days (e.g., 5000 days), using the same delay distribution as the calendar delay-discounting task. Time framed as dates resulted in less discounting compared to the calendar method, whereas time framed as days resulted in greater discounting compared to the calendar method. The hyperboloid model fit best compared to the hyperbola and exponential models. How time is framed may alter how participants attend to the delays as well as how the delayed outcome is valued. Altering how time is framed may serve to improve adherence to goals with delayed outcomes.

  14. Resonance Effects in Photoemission Time Delays.

    PubMed

    Sabbar, M; Heuser, S; Boge, R; Lucchini, M; Carette, T; Lindroth, E; Gallmann, L; Cirelli, C; Keller, U

    2015-09-25

    We present measurements of single-photon ionization time delays between the outermost valence electrons of argon and neon using a coincidence detection technique that allows for the simultaneous measurement of both species under identical conditions. The analysis of the measured traces reveals energy-dependent time delays of a few tens of attoseconds with high energy resolution. In contrast to photoelectrons ejected through tunneling, single-photon ionization can be well described in the framework of Wigner time delays. Accordingly, the overall trend of our data is reproduced by recent Wigner time delay calculations. However, besides the general trend we observe resonance features occurring at specific photon energies. These features have been qualitatively reproduced and identified by a calculation using the multiconfigurational Hartree-Fock method, including the influence of doubly excited states and ionization thresholds.

  15. Resonance Effects in Photoemission Time Delays.

    PubMed

    Sabbar, M; Heuser, S; Boge, R; Lucchini, M; Carette, T; Lindroth, E; Gallmann, L; Cirelli, C; Keller, U

    2015-09-25

    We present measurements of single-photon ionization time delays between the outermost valence electrons of argon and neon using a coincidence detection technique that allows for the simultaneous measurement of both species under identical conditions. The analysis of the measured traces reveals energy-dependent time delays of a few tens of attoseconds with high energy resolution. In contrast to photoelectrons ejected through tunneling, single-photon ionization can be well described in the framework of Wigner time delays. Accordingly, the overall trend of our data is reproduced by recent Wigner time delay calculations. However, besides the general trend we observe resonance features occurring at specific photon energies. These features have been qualitatively reproduced and identified by a calculation using the multiconfigurational Hartree-Fock method, including the influence of doubly excited states and ionization thresholds. PMID:26451550

  16. Effects of delay and probability combinations on discounting in humans.

    PubMed

    Cox, David J; Dallery, Jesse

    2016-10-01

    To determine discount rates, researchers typically adjust the amount of an immediate or certain option relative to a delayed or uncertain option. Because this adjusting amount method can be relatively time consuming, researchers have developed more efficient procedures. One such procedure is a 5-trial adjusting delay procedure, which measures the delay at which an amount of money loses half of its value (e.g., $1000 is valued at $500 with a 10-year delay to its receipt). Experiment 1 (n=212) used 5-trial adjusting delay or probability tasks to measure delay discounting of losses, probabilistic gains, and probabilistic losses. Experiment 2 (n=98) assessed combined probabilistic and delayed alternatives. In both experiments, we compared results from 5-trial adjusting delay or probability tasks to traditional adjusting amount procedures. Results suggest both procedures produced similar rates of probability and delay discounting in six out of seven comparisons. A magnitude effect consistent with previous research was observed for probabilistic gains and losses, but not for delayed losses. Results also suggest that delay and probability interact to determine the value of money. Five-trial methods may allow researchers to assess discounting more efficiently as well as study more complex choice scenarios. PMID:27498073

  17. List item memory in rats: effects of delay and delay task.

    PubMed

    Harper, D N; McLean, A P; Dalrymple-Alford, J C

    1993-10-01

    The Serial Position Effect (SPE) was studied in rats using 2 manipulations analogous to those that have been shown to decrease the recency effect but leave the primacy effect intact in human Ss. In Part 1, delays (5 s to 60 s) were imposed between exposure to a sequence of arms presented in a 12-arm radial maze and a subsequent test phase. In Part 2, the effect of free access to food in a short (10-s) delay was examined. The results from Parts 1 and 2 showed that the primacy and recency effects were differentially sensitive to the delay and events within it. In particular the recency effect was found to be more sensitive to disruption from these sources. The present demonstration of a reduction in recency with procedures analogous to those used with humans extends the evidence, suggesting that the SPE obtained in rats and humans is a similar phenomenon.

  18. Why Do Rereading Lag Effects Depend on Test Delay?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawson, Katherine A.

    2012-01-01

    In previous research, rereading after a long lag versus a short lag led to greater performance on delayed tests but not on immediate tests. The current study tested two accounts of why the effects of rereading lag depend on test delay. The "levels of representation" ("LOR") "hypothesis" states that the effects reflect differential emphasis on…

  19. Reversing the Signaled Magnitude Effect in Delayed Matching to Sample: Delay-Specific Remembering?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, K. Geoffrey; Brown, Glenn S.

    2011-01-01

    Pigeons performed a delayed matching-to-sample task in which large or small reinforcers for correct remembering were signaled during the retention interval. Accuracy was low when small reinforcers were signaled, and high when large reinforcers were signaled (the signaled magnitude effect). When the reinforcer-size cue was switched from small to…

  20. Abolishing the effect of reinforcement delay on human causal learning.

    PubMed

    Buehner, Marc J; May, Jon

    2004-04-01

    Associative learning theory postulates two main determinants for human causal learning: contingency and contiguity. In line with such an account, participants in Shanks, Pearson, and Dickinson (1989) failed to discover causal relations involving delays of more than two seconds. More recent research has shown that the impact of contiguity and delay is mediated by prior knowledge about the timeframe of the causal relation in question. Buehner and May (2002, 2003) demonstrated that the detrimental effect of delay can be significantly reduced if reasoners are aware of potential delays. Here we demonstrate for the first time that the negative influence of delay can be abolished completely by a subtle change in the experimental instructions. Temporal contiguity is thus not essential for human causal learning.

  1. Effects of amphetamine on delay discounting in rats depend upon the manner in which delay is varied.

    PubMed

    Maguire, David R; Henson, Cedric; France, Charles P

    2014-12-01

    Whether stimulant drugs like amphetamine increase or decrease choice of larger delayed reinforcers over smaller immediately available reinforcers under delay discounting procedures can depend on several factors, including the order in which delay is presented. This study examined whether the order of delay presentation impacts drug effects on discounting in rats (n = 8) trained and tested under an ascending order, a descending order, as well as under a fixed delay condition. Responses on one lever delivered 1 food pellet immediately and responses on the other lever delivered 3 food pellets immediately or after a delay (4-32 s). In Experiment 1, the delay to the larger reinforcer varied within session and the order of delay presentation (ascending or descending) varied across conditions. In Experiment 2, the same delay value was presented in all blocks of the session (i.e., delay was fixed), and delay varied across conditions. Under the ascending order of delay, amphetamine (0.32-1.78 mg/kg) increased choice of the larger reinforcer in some rats and decreased choice in others. In the same rats responding under the descending and fixed delay conditions, amphetamine markedly decreased choice of the larger reinforcer even in the component associated with no delay. In some subjects, the effects of amphetamine differed depending on the manner in which delay was presented, indicating that drug-induced changes in performance were due, in part, to mechanisms other than altered sensitivity to reinforcer delay. These results also suggest that a history of responding under both orders of delay presentation can modulate drug effects. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'CNS Stimulants'.

  2. Components of Effective Diversity Training Programmes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wentling, Rose Mary; Palma-Rivas, Nilda

    1999-01-01

    Interviews with 12 diversity experts uncovered components of effective diversity training programs: management commitment and support, inclusion in strategic planning, attention to specific organizational needs, qualified trainers, mandatory attendance, inclusiveness, trust and confidentiality, accountability, and clearly focused evaluation. (SK)

  3. Symptomatic Very Delayed Parent Artery Occlusion After Flow Diversion Stent Embolization

    PubMed Central

    OISHI, Hidenori; TERANISHI, Kosuke; NONAKA, Senshu; YAMAMOTO, Munetaka; ARAI, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    Flow diversion stents (FDSs) are constructed from high-density braided mesh, which alters intra-aneurysmal hemodynamics and leads to aneurysm occlusion by inducing thrombus formation. Although there are potential complications associated with FDS embolization, one of the serious complications is the parent artery occlusion due to the in-stent thrombosis. A 72-year-old woman with a symptomatic giant fusiform aneurysm in the cavernous segment of ICA underwent single-layer pipeline embolization device (PED) embolization. Six-month and 1-year follow-up conventional angiographies showed the residual blood flow in the aneurysm. Two-year follow-up MRI showed the aneurysm sac shrinkage and the antiplatelet therapy was discontinued. The patient suffered from symptomatic parent artery occlusion due to the in-stent thrombosis, 4 months after antiplatelet therapy discontinuation. The patient with the incompletely occluded aneurysm after PED embolization should be given long-term antiplatelet therapy because of the risk of delayed parent artery occlusion. PMID:27169622

  4. Child, family, and childcare predictors of delayed school entry and kindergarten retention among linguistically and ethnically diverse children.

    PubMed

    Winsler, Adam; Hutchison, Lindsey A; De Feyter, Jessica J; Manfra, Louis; Bleiker, Charles; Hartman, Suzanne C; Levitt, Jerome

    2012-09-01

    Concern about kindergarten retention is on the rise within the current climate of high-stakes testing and escalating kindergarten expectations. Kindergarten retention has been linked in previous research to various risk factors such as poverty, low maternal education, single parent status, minority status, English language learner (ELL) status, and male gender. However, these factors are also associated with poor school readiness and low kindergarten performance--the very reasons children are retained in the 1st place. This study teases apart unique and combined predictors of delayed entry into kindergarten and kindergarten retention with a large (n = 13,191) ethnically diverse, at-risk sample of children. Delayed kindergarten entry was rare for this sample but more likely among boys, native English speakers, those with poorer school readiness, less maternal education, and greater resources, and those who attended childcare rather than public school prekindergarten (pre-K) at age 4 years. Boys were more likely to be retained in kindergarten, but only because of their poorer school readiness. After strong effects for age 4 school readiness were controlled, only poverty, ELL status, and preschool program attendance predicted retention. ELL students were less likely to be retained than were native speakers, and those who attended public school pre-K programs were less likely to be retained, compared with those in childcare at age 4 years. After controlling for children's actual performance in kindergarten their 1st time, Caucasian children and children with lower language and social skills at age 4 years were more likely to repeat kindergarten. PMID:22288368

  5. The diversity effect in diagnostic reasoning.

    PubMed

    Rebitschek, Felix G; Krems, Josef F; Jahn, Georg

    2016-07-01

    Diagnostic reasoning draws on knowledge about effects and their potential causes. The causal-diversity effect in diagnostic reasoning normatively depends on the distribution of effects in causal structures, and thus, a psychological diversity effect could indicate whether causally structured knowledge is used in evaluating the probability of a diagnosis, if the effect were to covary with manipulations of causal structures. In four experiments, participants dealt with a quasi-medical scenario presenting symptom sets (effects) that consistently suggested a specified diagnosis (cause). The probability that the diagnosis was correct had to be rated for two opposed symptom sets that differed with regard to the symptoms' positions (proximal or diverse) in the causal structure that was initially acquired. The causal structure linking the diagnosis to the symptoms and the base rate of the diagnosis were manipulated to explore whether the diagnosis was rated as more probable for diverse than for proximal symptoms when alternative causations were more plausible (e.g., because of a lower base rate of the diagnosis in question). The results replicated the causal diversity effect in diagnostic reasoning across these conditions, but no consistent effects of structure and base rate variations were observed. Diversity effects computed in causal Bayesian networks are presented, illustrating the consequences of the structure manipulations and corroborating that a diversity effect across the different experimental manipulations is normatively justified. The observed diversity effects presumably resulted from shortcut reasoning about the possibilities of alternative causation.

  6. Effect of exposure delay of concrete into aggressive environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abimouloud, Youcef; Kriker, Abdelouahed

    2016-07-01

    Some regions in the world suffered since several years from environmental problems such as underground level water rising. Water table effects durability of concrete implantation in the underground by the ease of luckless chemical elements ingress mainly through concrete the foundations of structures such as sulfate, chloride, and acids. For that reason a lot of foundations structures were made with SRPC (sulfate resisting Portland cement). This study is a contribution to assess the effect of exposure delay of concrete into aggressive fields, as a kind of cure which protects concrete from aggressive factors and allows it to acquire the needed strength. The study has shown that concrete exposure delay into aggressive environment is not a kind of cure mainly for concrete made with SRPC. Concrete with SRPC immediately exposed to aggressive environment shows a better mechanical resistance than concrete that has known exposure delay.

  7. Effects of Acute and Chronic Cocaine Administration on Titrating-Delay Matching-to-Sample Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kangas, Brian D.; Branch, Marc N.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of cocaine were examined under a titrating-delay matching-to-sample procedure. In this procedure, the delay between sample stimulus offset and comparison stimuli onset adjusts as a function of the subject's performance. Specifically, matches increase the delay and mismatches decrease the delay. Titrated delay values served as the…

  8. Catastrophizing delays the analgesic effect of distraction.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Claudia M; Witmer, Kenny; Simango, Mpepera; Carteret, Alene; Loggia, Marco L; Campbell, James N; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A; Edwards, Robert R

    2010-05-01

    Behavioral analgesic techniques such as distraction reduce pain in both clinical and experimental settings. Individuals differ in the magnitude of distraction-induced analgesia, and additional study is needed to identify the factors that influence the pain relieving effects of distraction. Catastrophizing, a set of negative emotional and cognitive processes, is widely recognized to be associated with increased reports of pain. We sought to evaluate the relationship between catastrophizing and distraction analgesia. Healthy participants completed three sessions in a randomized order. In one session (Pain Alone), pain was induced by topical application of a 10% capsaicin cream and simultaneous administration of a tonic heat stimulus. In another session (Pain+Distraction), identical capsaicin+heat application procedures were followed, but subjects played video games that required a high level of attention. During both sessions, verbal ratings of pain were obtained and participants rated their degree of catastrophizing. During the other session (Distraction Alone) subjects played the video games in the absence of any pain stimulus. Pain was rated significantly lower during the distraction session compared to the "Pain Alone" session. In addition, high catastrophizers rated pain significantly higher regardless of whether the subjects were distracted. Catastrophizing did not influence the overall degree of distraction analgesia; however, early in the session high catastrophizers had little distraction analgesia, though later in the session low and high catastrophizers rated pain similarly. These results suggest that both distraction and catastrophizing have substantial effects on experimental pain in normal subjects and these variables interact as a function of time.

  9. Effect of multiple time-delay on vibrational resonance.

    PubMed

    Jeevarathinam, C; Rajasekar, S; Sanjuán, M A F

    2013-03-01

    We report our investigation on the effect of multiple time-delay on vibrational resonance in a single Duffing oscillator and in a system of n Duffing oscillators coupled unidirectionally and driven by both a low- and a high-frequency periodic force. For the single oscillator, we obtain analytical expressions for the response amplitude Q and the amplitude g of the high-frequency force at which resonance occurs. The regions in parameter space of enhanced Q at resonance, as compared to the case in absence of time-delay, show a bands-like structure. For the two-coupled oscillators, we explain all the features of variation of Q with the control parameter g. For the system of n-coupled oscillators with a single time-delay coupling, the response amplitudes of the oscillators are shown to be independent of the time-delay. In the case of a multi time-delayed coupling, undamped signal propagation takes place for coupling strength (δ) above a certain critical value (denoted as δu). Moreover, the response amplitude approaches a limiting value QL with the oscillator number i. We obtain analytical expressions for both δu and QL. PMID:23556973

  10. Gompertzian stochastic model with delay effect to cervical cancer growth

    SciTech Connect

    Mazlan, Mazma Syahidatul Ayuni binti; Rosli, Norhayati binti; Bahar, Arifah

    2015-02-03

    In this paper, a Gompertzian stochastic model with time delay is introduced to describe the cervical cancer growth. The parameters values of the mathematical model are estimated via Levenberg-Marquardt optimization method of non-linear least squares. We apply Milstein scheme for solving the stochastic model numerically. The efficiency of mathematical model is measured by comparing the simulated result and the clinical data of cervical cancer growth. Low values of Mean-Square Error (MSE) of Gompertzian stochastic model with delay effect indicate good fits.

  11. Gompertzian stochastic model with delay effect to cervical cancer growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazlan, Mazma Syahidatul Ayuni binti; Rosli, Norhayati binti; Bahar, Arifah

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, a Gompertzian stochastic model with time delay is introduced to describe the cervical cancer growth. The parameters values of the mathematical model are estimated via Levenberg-Marquardt optimization method of non-linear least squares. We apply Milstein scheme for solving the stochastic model numerically. The efficiency of mathematical model is measured by comparing the simulated result and the clinical data of cervical cancer growth. Low values of Mean-Square Error (MSE) of Gompertzian stochastic model with delay effect indicate good fits.

  12. Chaotifying delayed recurrent neural networks via impulsive effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şaylı, Mustafa; Yılmaz, Enes

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, chaotification of delayed recurrent neural networks via chaotically changing moments of impulsive actions is considered. Sufficient conditions for the presence of Li-Yorke chaos with its ingredients proximality, frequent separation, and existence of infinitely many periodic solutions are theoretically proved. Finally, effectiveness of our theoretical results is illustrated by an example with numerical simulations.

  13. The Delay Hypothesis: The Manifestation of Media Effects over Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Jakob D.; Bernat, Jennifer K.; Wilson, Kari M.; Goonewardene, Julie

    2011-01-01

    A between-participants experiment (N = 147) tested for the presence of a delayed effect following exposure to an episode of a legal drama that contained false information. Participants were more likely to endorse false beliefs if they were queried two weeks after watching the program rather than immediately following exposure. The relationship…

  14. Chaotifying delayed recurrent neural networks via impulsive effects.

    PubMed

    Şaylı, Mustafa; Yılmaz, Enes

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, chaotification of delayed recurrent neural networks via chaotically changing moments of impulsive actions is considered. Sufficient conditions for the presence of Li-Yorke chaos with its ingredients proximality, frequent separation, and existence of infinitely many periodic solutions are theoretically proved. Finally, effectiveness of our theoretical results is illustrated by an example with numerical simulations.

  15. Control of epidemics on complex networks: Effectiveness of delayed isolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Tiago; Young, Lai-Sang

    2015-08-01

    We study isolation as a means to control epidemic outbreaks in complex networks, focusing on the consequences of delays in isolating infected nodes. Our analysis uncovers a tipping point: if infected nodes are isolated before a critical day dc, the disease is effectively controlled, whereas for longer delays the number of infected nodes climbs steeply. We show that dc can be estimated explicitly in terms of network properties and disease parameters, connecting lowered values of dc explicitly to heterogeneity in degree distribution. Our results reveal also that initial delays in the implementation of isolation protocols can have catastrophic consequences in heterogeneous networks. As our study is carried out in a general framework, it has the potential to offer insight and suggest proactive strategies for containing outbreaks of a range of serious infectious diseases.

  16. Control of epidemics on complex networks: Effectiveness of delayed isolation.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Tiago; Young, Lai-Sang

    2015-08-01

    We study isolation as a means to control epidemic outbreaks in complex networks, focusing on the consequences of delays in isolating infected nodes. Our analysis uncovers a tipping point: if infected nodes are isolated before a critical day dc, the disease is effectively controlled, whereas for longer delays the number of infected nodes climbs steeply. We show that dc can be estimated explicitly in terms of network properties and disease parameters, connecting lowered values of dc explicitly to heterogeneity in degree distribution. Our results reveal also that initial delays in the implementation of isolation protocols can have catastrophic consequences in heterogeneous networks. As our study is carried out in a general framework, it has the potential to offer insight and suggest proactive strategies for containing outbreaks of a range of serious infectious diseases. PMID:26382469

  17. The Effects of Attending a Diverse College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinrichs, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The question of whether there are benefits to be obtained from having a diverse student body is a key issue in the debate over affirmative action. This paper estimates the effects of college racial diversity on post-college earnings, civic behavior, and satisfaction with the college attended. I use the Beginning Postsecondary Students survey,…

  18. Learning from feedback: Spacing and the delay-retention effect.

    PubMed

    Smith, Troy A; Kimball, Daniel R

    2010-01-01

    Most modern research on the effects of feedback during learning has assumed that feedback is an error correction mechanism. Recent studies of feedback-timing effects have suggested that feedback might also strengthen initially correct responses. In an experiment involving cued recall of trivia facts, we directly tested several theories of feedback-timing effects and also examined the effects of restudy and retest trials following immediate and delayed feedback. Results were not consistent with theories assuming that the only function of feedback is to correct initial errors but instead supported a theoretical account assuming that delaying feedback strengthens initially correct responses due to the spacing of encoding opportunities: Delaying feedback increased the probability of correct response perseveration on the final retention test but had minimal effects on error correction or error perseveration probabilities. In a 2nd experiment, the effects of varying the lags between study, test, and feedback trials during learning provided further support for the spacing hypothesis. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2009 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Effect of Delay on Children's Delay-Execute Prospective Memory Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rendell, Peter G.; Vella, Melissa J.; Kliegel, Matthias; Terrett, Gill

    2009-01-01

    To date, little work has been done investigating prospective memory in children, particularly using a delay-execute paradigm. Two experiments were conducted to investigate this issue with children aged 5-11 years. While playing a computer driving game, children's ability to carry out a delayed intention either immediately a target cue appeared or…

  20. Formulation and solution of the delayed gamma dose rate problem using the concept of effective delayed gamma production cross section

    SciTech Connect

    Liew, S.L.; Ku, L.P.

    1989-06-01

    With appropriate approximations, the delayed gamma dose rate problem can be formulated in terms of the effective delayed gamma production cross section. The coupled neutron-delayed-gamma transport equations then take the same form as the coupled neutron-prompt-gamma transport equations and they can, therefore, be solved directly in the same manner. This eliminates the need for the tedious and error prone flux coupling step in conventional calculations. Mathematical formulation and solution algorithms are derived. The advantages of this method are illustrated by an example of its application in the solution of a practical design problem. 62 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  1. The effect of cognitive challenge on delay discounting.

    PubMed

    Aranovich, Gabriel J; McClure, Samuel M; Fryer, Susanna; Mathalon, Daniel H

    2016-01-01

    Recent findings suggest that the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), a region consistently associated with impulse control, is vulnerable to transient suppression of its activity and attendant functions by excessive stress and/or cognitive demand. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we show that a capacity-exceeding cognitive challenge induced decreased DLPFC activity and correlated increases in the preference for immediately available rewards. Consistent with growing evidence of a link between working memory capacity and delay discounting, the effect was inversely proportional to baseline performance on a working memory task. Subjects who performed well on the working memory task had unchanged, or even decreased, delay discounting rates, suggesting that working memory ability may protect cognitive control from cognitive challenge.

  2. Effect of Departure Delays on Manned Mars Mission Selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Prasun N.; Tartabini, Paul V.

    1995-01-01

    This study determines the effect on the initial mass in low Earth orbit (IMLEO) of delaying departure from Mars and Earth by 5, 15, and 30 days, once a nominal mission to Mars has been selected. Additionally, the use of a deep-space maneuver (DSM) is considered in order to alleviate the IMLEO penalties. Three different classes of missions are analyzed, using chemical and nuclear thermal propulsion systems in the 2000-2025 time frame: opposition, conjunction, and fast-transfer conjunction. The results indicate that Mars and Earth delays can lead to large IMLEO penalties. Opposition and fast-transfer conjunction-class missions have the highest IMLEO penalties, upwards of 432.4 and 1977.3 metric tons (mt), respectively. Conjunction-class missions, on the other hand, tend to be insensitive to Mars and Earth delays, having IMLEO penalties under 103.5 mt. As expected, nuclear thermal propulsion had significantly lower IMLEO penalties than chemical propulsion. The use of a DSM does not significantly reduce the penalties. The results of this study can enable mission designers to incorporate the influence of off-nominal departure conditions of the interplanetary trajectory in the overall conceptual design of a Mars transfer vehicle.

  3. Effects of herbivores on grassland plant diversity.

    PubMed

    Olff, H; Ritchie, M E

    1998-07-01

    The role of herbivores in controlling plant species richness is a critical issue in the conservation and management of grassland biodiversity. Numerous field experiments in grassland plant communities show that herbivores often, but not always, increase plant diversity. Recent work suggests that the mechanisms of these effects involve alteration of local colonization of species from regional species pools or local extinction of species, and recent syntheses and models suggest that herbivore effects on plant diversity should vary across environmental gradients of soil fertility and precipitation.

  4. Fetal Cocaine Exposure: Neurologic Effects and Sensory-Motor Delays

    PubMed Central

    Arendt, Robert E.; Minnes, Sonnia; Singer, Lynn T.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Research on animal models demonstrates that fetal cocaine exposure results in neurologic deficits in memory and learning. Although drug effects on human infants are difficult to separate from other environmental influences of a drug-using lifestyle, studies suggest that infants exposed to cocaine in utero have reduced growth, delays in sensory-motor development, attentional deficits, and depressed responsivity to social stimulation. Standard interventions to promote behavioral state regulation in affected infants may be helpful when parents are capable of participating. PMID:25688173

  5. Effect of time delay on recognition memory for pictures: the modulatory role of emotion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the modulatory role of emotion in the effect of time delay on recognition memory for pictures. Participants viewed neutral, positive and negative pictures, and took a recognition memory test 5 minutes, 24 hours, or 1 week after learning. The findings are: 1) For neutral, positive and negative pictures, overall recognition accuracy in the 5-min delay did not significantly differ from that in the 24-h delay. For neutral and positive pictures, overall recognition accuracy in the 1-week delay was lower than in the 24-h delay; for negative pictures, overall recognition in the 24-h and 1-week delay did not significantly differ. Therefore negative emotion modulates the effect of time delay on recognition memory, maintaining retention of overall recognition accuracy only within a certain frame of time. 2) For the three types of pictures, recollection and familiarity in the 5-min delay did not significantly differ from that in the 24-h and the 1-week delay. Thus emotion does not appear to modulate the effect of time delay on recollection and familiarity. However, recollection in the 24-h delay was higher than in the 1-week delay, whereas familiarity in the 24-h delay was lower than in the 1-week delay.

  6. Isolating Behavioral Mechanisms of Inter-Temporal Choice: Nicotine Effects on Delay Discounting and Amount Sensitivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Locey, Matthew L.; Dallery, Jesse

    2009-01-01

    Many drugs of abuse produce changes in impulsive choice, that is, choice for a smaller-sooner reinforcer over a larger-later reinforcer. Because the alternatives differ in both delay and amount, it is not clear whether these drug effects are due to the differences in reinforcer delay or amount. To isolate the effects of delay, we used a titrating…

  7. A study of the effect of group delay distortion on an SMSK satellite communications channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of group delay distortion on an SMSK satellite communications channel have been investigated. Software and hardware simulations have been used to determine the effects of channel group delay variations with frequency on the bit error rate for a 220 Mbps SMSK channel. These simulations indicate that group delay distortions can significantly degrade the bit error rate performance. The severity of the degradation is dependent on the amount, type, and spectral location of the group delay distortion.

  8. Effects of restraint on expansion due to delayed ettringite formation

    SciTech Connect

    Bouzabata, Hassina; Multon, Stephane; Sellier, Alain; Houari, Hacene

    2012-07-15

    Delayed ettringite formation (DEF) is a chemical reaction that causes expansion in civil engineering structures. The safety level of such damaged structures has to be reassessed. To do this, the mechanical conditions acting on DEF expansions have to be analysed and, in particular, the variation of strength with expansion and the effect of restraint on the DEF expansion. This paper highlights several points: DEF expansion is isotropic in stress-free conditions, compressive stresses decrease DEF expansion in the direction subjected to restraint and lead to cracks parallel to the restraint, and expansion measured in the stress-free direction of restrained specimens is not modified. Thus restraint causes a decrease of the volumetric expansion and DEF expansion under restraint is anisotropic. Moreover, the paper examines the correlation between DEF expansion and concrete damage, providing data that can be used for the quantification of the effect of stresses on DEF induced expansion.

  9. Delayed effects of ionizing radiation on the ear

    SciTech Connect

    Bohne, B.A.; Marks, J.E.; Glasgow, G.P.

    1985-07-01

    The question of damage to the ear from exposure to ionizing radiation was addressed by exposing groups of chinchillas to fractioned doses of radiation (2 Gy per day) for total doses ranging from 40 to 90 Gy. In order to allow any delayed effects of radiation to become manifest, the animals were sacrificed two years after completion of treatment and their temporal bones were prepared for microscopic examination. The most pronounced effect of treatment was degeneration of sensory and supporting cells and loss of eighth nerve fibers in the organ of Corti. Damage increased with increasing dose of radiation. The degree of damage found in many of these ears was of sufficient magnitude to produce a permanent sensorineural hearing loss.

  10. Effect of Small Transmission Delay on Human Behavior in Audio Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, Hitoshi; Mochizuki, Kaname

    Transmission delay in audio communications is a well-known obstacle to achieving smooth communication. However, it is not known what kinds of effects are caused by small delays. We hypothesized that the small delay in the listener's responses disturbs the speaker's “verbal conditioning, ” where the verbal behavior of the speaker varies in accordance with the listener's responses. We examined whether the small delays in the listener's responses disturb the speaker's verbal conditioning using an artificial-grammar learning task. The results suggested that a 300-ms delay disturbed the participants' verbal conditioning although they were not adequately aware of the delay.

  11. [Effect of hypertonic saline solution on delayed neuronal death].

    PubMed

    Hamaguchi, S; Ogata, H; Masawa, N

    1994-04-01

    This experiment was performed to investigate whether hypertonic saline has a preventive effect on delayed neuronal death in the CA1 subfield of the hippocampus. Twenty gerbils were used, and after being anesthetized by inhalation of 1% halothane, both common carotid arteries were occluded for 2.5 min. The animals were injected intravenously with 2 ml/kg of 10% NaCl immediately after reperfusion, and 2 ml/kg of physiological saline solution was used in the same manner in a control group. Five days later, histopathological changes in the CA1 subfield were observed by staining with hematoxylin-eosin and examining sections of the brain under a light microscope. Degenerative or necrotic pyramidal cells exhibited cell shrinkage, nuclear pyknosis, dark staining of the cytoplasm vacuolation and disappearance of the radial striated zone. The pyramidal cell degeneration rate in a 1 mm length of CA1 subfield was 95.6 +/- 1.6% in the ischemia-reperfusion-saline group and 7.1 +/- 3.0% in ischemia-reperfusion-hypertonic saline group, and the difference was statistically significant. This study verified that hypertonic saline prevented delayed neuronal death in the CA1 subfield of hippocampal area after ischemia-reperfusion.

  12. Effects of postmortem delays on protein composition and oxidation.

    PubMed

    ElHajj, Zeinab; Cachot, Amélie; Müller, Terry; Riederer, Irène M; Riederer, Beat M

    2016-03-01

    Human autopsy brain tissue is widely used to study neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and other diseases. However, when it comes to an evaluation of data obtained from such tissue, it is essential to consider potential postmortem effects on protein composition, posttranslational modification and proteolysis with increasing postmortem delays. In this study, we analyzed mouse brain tissues with different postmortem delays (pmd) of 0 h, 6h and 24h, for changes in protein composition, proteolysis and modifications such as S-nitrosylation, carbonylation and ubiquitination. Proteins involved in Alzheimer's disease (AD) were of special interest, including cytoskeletal and synaptic proteins or proteins involved in inflammation. Several proteins were fairly resistant to degradation during the first 6h but started to degrade thereafter. S-nitrosylation and carbonylation showed not much variation, except for those proteins that were susceptible to degradation. Brain spectrin was S-nitrosylated at death, and S-nitrosylated degradation fragments were measured at a pmd of 24h, indicating a susceptibility of brain spectrin to degradation. Furthermore, the physiological role of S-nitrosylation remains to be investigated. When studying human brain tissue, some proteins are more susceptible to degradation than others, while ubiquitination and carbonylation were little affected during the first 24h after death.

  13. Region effects influence local tree species diversity

    PubMed Central

    Ricklefs, Robert E.; He, Fangliang

    2016-01-01

    Global patterns of biodiversity reflect both regional and local processes, but the relative importance of local ecological limits to species coexistence, as influenced by the physical environment, in contrast to regional processes including species production, dispersal, and extinction, is poorly understood. Failure to distinguish regional influences from local effects has been due, in part, to sampling limitations at small scales, environmental heterogeneity within local or regional samples, and incomplete geographic sampling of species. Here, we use a global dataset comprising 47 forest plots to demonstrate significant region effects on diversity, beyond the influence of local climate, which together explain more than 92% of the global variation in local forest tree species richness. Significant region effects imply that large-scale processes shaping the regional diversity of forest trees exert influence down to the local scale, where they interact with local processes to determine the number of coexisting species. PMID:26733680

  14. Region effects influence local tree species diversity.

    PubMed

    Ricklefs, Robert E; He, Fangliang

    2016-01-19

    Global patterns of biodiversity reflect both regional and local processes, but the relative importance of local ecological limits to species coexistence, as influenced by the physical environment, in contrast to regional processes including species production, dispersal, and extinction, is poorly understood. Failure to distinguish regional influences from local effects has been due, in part, to sampling limitations at small scales, environmental heterogeneity within local or regional samples, and incomplete geographic sampling of species. Here, we use a global dataset comprising 47 forest plots to demonstrate significant region effects on diversity, beyond the influence of local climate, which together explain more than 92% of the global variation in local forest tree species richness. Significant region effects imply that large-scale processes shaping the regional diversity of forest trees exert influence down to the local scale, where they interact with local processes to determine the number of coexisting species. PMID:26733680

  15. Region effects influence local tree species diversity.

    PubMed

    Ricklefs, Robert E; He, Fangliang

    2016-01-19

    Global patterns of biodiversity reflect both regional and local processes, but the relative importance of local ecological limits to species coexistence, as influenced by the physical environment, in contrast to regional processes including species production, dispersal, and extinction, is poorly understood. Failure to distinguish regional influences from local effects has been due, in part, to sampling limitations at small scales, environmental heterogeneity within local or regional samples, and incomplete geographic sampling of species. Here, we use a global dataset comprising 47 forest plots to demonstrate significant region effects on diversity, beyond the influence of local climate, which together explain more than 92% of the global variation in local forest tree species richness. Significant region effects imply that large-scale processes shaping the regional diversity of forest trees exert influence down to the local scale, where they interact with local processes to determine the number of coexisting species.

  16. Effect of caffeine on radiation-induced mitotic delay: delayed expression of G/sub 2/ arrest

    SciTech Connect

    Rowley, R.; Zorch, M.; Leeper, D.B.

    1984-01-01

    In the presence of 5 mM caffeine, irradiated (1.5 Gy) S and G/sub 2/ cells progressed to mitosis in register and without arrest in G/sub 2/. Caffeine (5 mM) markedly reduced mitotic delay even after radiation doses up to 20 Gy. When caffeine was removed from irradiated (1.5 Gy) and caffeine-treated cells, a period of G/sub 2/ arrest followed, similar in length to that produced by radiation alone. The arrest expressed was independent of the duration of the caffeine treatment for exposures up to 3 hr. The similarity of the response to the cited effects of caffeine on S-phase delay suggests a common basis for delay induction in S and G/sub 2/ phases.

  17. The effect of process delay on dynamical behaviors in a self-feedback nonlinear oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Chenggui; Ma, Jun; Li, Chuan; He, Zhiwei

    2016-10-01

    The delayed feedback loops play a crucial role in the stability of dynamical systems. The effect of process delay in feedback is studied numerically and theoretically in the delayed feedback nonlinear systems including the neural model, periodic system and chaotic oscillator. The process delay is of key importance in determining the evolution of systems, and the rich dynamical phenomena are observed. By introducing a process delay, we find that it can induce bursting electric activities in the neural model. We demonstrate that this novel regime of amplitude death also exists in the parameter space of feedback strength and process delay for the periodic system and chaotic oscillator. Our results extend the effect of process delay in the paper of Zou et al.(2013) where the process delay can eliminate the amplitude death of the coupled nonlinear systems.

  18. Effects of Time Delay on Three Interacting Species System with Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yi-Jian; Mei, Dong-Cheng

    2008-09-01

    We study the effects of time delay in three interacting species system with noise. The time evolution and spatiotemporal pattern in the Lotka-Volterra model of three interacting species with noise and time delay were investigated by means of stochastic simulation. Our results indicate that: (i) Time delay induces the synchronously periodic oscillations of the three species densities; (ii) Time delay cause the spatiotemporal pattern to be concentrated.

  19. Effect of Pressure on Piloted Ignition Delay of PMMA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McAllister, Sara; Lai, Janice; Scott, Sarah; Ramirez-Correa, Amelia; Fernandez-Pello, Carlos; Urban, David; Ruff, Gary

    2008-01-01

    In order to reduce the risk of decompression sickness associated with spacewalks, NASA is considering designing the next generation of exploration vehicles and habitats with a different cabin environment than used previously. The proposed environment uses a total cabin pressure of 52.7 to 58.6 kPa with an oxygen concentration of 30 to 34% by volume and was chosen with material flammability in mind. Because materials may burn differently under these conditions and there is little information on how this new environment affects the flammability of the materials onboard, it is important to conduct material flammability experiments at the intended exploration atmosphere. One method to evaluate material flammability is by its ease of ignition. To this end, piloted ignition delay tests were conducted in the Forced Ignition and Spread Test (FIST) apparatus subject to this new environment. In these tests, polymethylmethacylate (PMMA) was exposed to a range of oxidizer flow velocities and externally applied heat fluxes. The ultimate goal is to determine the individual effect of pressure and the combined effect of pressure and oxygen concentration on the ignition delay. Tests were conducted for a baseline case of normal pressure and oxygen concentration, low pressure (58.6 kPa) with normal oxygen (21%). Future work will focus on low pressure with 32% oxygen concentration (space exploration atmosphere - SEA) conditions. It was found that reducing the pressure while keeping the oxygen concentration at 21% reduced the ignition time by 17% on average. It was also noted that the critical heat flux for ignition decreases in low-pressure conditions. Because tests conducted in standard atmospheric conditions will underpredict the flammability of materials intended for use on spacecraft, fire safety onboard at exploration atmospheres may be compromised.

  20. The effects of delayed auditory and visual feedback on speech production.

    PubMed

    Chesters, Jennifer; Baghai-Ravary, Ladan; Möttönen, Riikka

    2015-02-01

    Monitoring the sensory consequences of articulatory movements supports speaking. For example, delaying auditory feedback of a speaker's voice disrupts speech production. Also, there is evidence that this disruption may be decreased by immediate visual feedback, i.e., seeing one's own articulatory movements. It is, however, unknown whether delayed visual feedback affects speech production in fluent speakers. Here, the effects of delayed auditory and visual feedback on speech fluency (i.e., speech rate and errors), vocal control (i.e., intensity and pitch), and speech rhythm were investigated. Participants received delayed (by 200 ms) or immediate auditory feedback, while repeating sentences. Moreover, they received either no visual feedback, immediate visual feedback, or delayed visual feedback (by 200, 400, and 600 ms). Delayed auditory feedback affected fluency, vocal control, and rhythm. Immediate visual feedback had no effect on any of the speech measures when it was combined with delayed auditory feedback. Delayed visual feedback did, however, affect speech fluency when it was combined with delayed auditory feedback. In sum, the findings show that delayed auditory feedback disrupts fluency, vocal control, and rhythm and that delayed visual feedback can strengthen the disruptive effect of delayed auditory feedback on fluency.

  1. The effects of delayed auditory and visual feedback on speech production

    PubMed Central

    Chesters, Jennifer; Baghai-Ravary, Ladan; Möttönen, Riikka

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring the sensory consequences of articulatory movements supports speaking. For example, delaying auditory feedback of a speakers’ voice disrupts speech production. Also, there is evidence that this disruption may be decreased by immediate visual feedback, i.e., seeing one’s own articulatory movements. It is, however, unknown whether delayed visual feedback affects speech production in fluent speakers. Here, the effects of delayed auditory and visual feedback on speech fluency (i.e., speech rate and errors), vocal control (i.e., intensity and pitch) and speech rhythm were investigated. Participants received delayed (by 200 ms) or immediate auditory feedback, whilst repeating sentences. Moreover, they received either no visual feedback, immediate visual feedback or delayed visual feedback (by 200, 400 and 600 ms). Delayed auditory feedback affected fluency, vocal control and rhythm. Immediate visual feedback had no effect on any of the speech measures when it was combined with delayed auditory feedback. Delayed visual feedback did, however, affect speech fluency when it was combined with delayed auditory feedback. In sum, the findings show that delayed auditory feedback disrupts fluency, vocal control and rhythm and that delayed visual feedback can strengthen the disruptive effect of delayed auditory feedback on fluency. PMID:25698020

  2. Multitrophic diversity effects of network degradation.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Elizabeth; Peres, Carlos A; Hawes, Joseph E; Naeem, Shahid

    2016-07-01

    Predicting the functional consequences of biodiversity loss in realistic, multitrophic communities remains a challenge. No existing biodiversity-ecosystem function study to date has simultaneously incorporated information on species traits, network topology, and extinction across multiple trophic levels, while all three factors are independently understood as critical drivers of post-extinction network structure and function. We fill this gap by comparing the functional consequences of simulated species loss both within (monotrophic) and across (bitrophic) trophic levels, in an ecological interaction network estimated from spatially explicit field data on tropical fecal detritus producer and consumers (mammals and dung beetles). We simulated trait-ordered beetle and mammal extinction separately (monotrophic extinction) and the coextinction of beetles following mammal loss (bitrophic extinction), according to network structure. We also compared the diversity effects of bitrophic extinction models using a standard monotrophic function (the daily production or consumption of fecal detritus) and a unique bitrophic functional metric (the proportion of daily detritus production that is consumed). We found similar mono- and bitrophic diversity effects, regardless of which species traits were used to drive extinctions, yet divergent predictions when different measures of function were used. The inclusion of information on network structure had little apparent effect on the qualitative relationship between diversity and function. These results contribute to our growing understanding of the functional consequences of biodiversity from real systems and underscore the importance of species traits and realistic functional metrics to assessments of the ecosystem impacts of network degradation through species loss. PMID:27547324

  3. Multitrophic diversity effects of network degradation.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Elizabeth; Peres, Carlos A; Hawes, Joseph E; Naeem, Shahid

    2016-07-01

    Predicting the functional consequences of biodiversity loss in realistic, multitrophic communities remains a challenge. No existing biodiversity-ecosystem function study to date has simultaneously incorporated information on species traits, network topology, and extinction across multiple trophic levels, while all three factors are independently understood as critical drivers of post-extinction network structure and function. We fill this gap by comparing the functional consequences of simulated species loss both within (monotrophic) and across (bitrophic) trophic levels, in an ecological interaction network estimated from spatially explicit field data on tropical fecal detritus producer and consumers (mammals and dung beetles). We simulated trait-ordered beetle and mammal extinction separately (monotrophic extinction) and the coextinction of beetles following mammal loss (bitrophic extinction), according to network structure. We also compared the diversity effects of bitrophic extinction models using a standard monotrophic function (the daily production or consumption of fecal detritus) and a unique bitrophic functional metric (the proportion of daily detritus production that is consumed). We found similar mono- and bitrophic diversity effects, regardless of which species traits were used to drive extinctions, yet divergent predictions when different measures of function were used. The inclusion of information on network structure had little apparent effect on the qualitative relationship between diversity and function. These results contribute to our growing understanding of the functional consequences of biodiversity from real systems and underscore the importance of species traits and realistic functional metrics to assessments of the ecosystem impacts of network degradation through species loss.

  4. On the delay effects of different channels in Internet-based networked control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yun-Bo; Kim, Jongrae; Sun, Xi-Ming; Liu, Guo-Ping

    2013-11-01

    The sensor-to-controller and the controller-to-actuator delays in networked control systems (NCSs) are investigated for the first time with respect to their different effects on the system performance. This study starts with identifying the delay-independent and delay-dependent control laws in NCSs, and confirms that only two delay-dependent control laws can cause different delay effects in different channels. The conditions under which the different delays in different channels can cause different effects are then given for both delay-dependent control laws. The results are verified by numerical examples. Potentially, these results can be regarded as important design principles in the practical implementation of NCSs.

  5. Delayed effects of external radiation exposure: A brief history

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.W.

    1995-11-01

    Within months of Roentgen`s discovery of X rays, severe adverse effects were reported, but not well publicized. As a result, over the next two decades, fluoroscope operators suffered lethal skin carcinomas. Later, case reports appeared concerning leukemia in radiation workers, and infants born with severe mental retardation after their mothers had been given pelvic radiotherapy early in pregnancy. Fluoroscopy and radiotherapy for benign disorders continued to be used with abandon until authoritative reports were published on the adverse effects of ionizing radiation by the U.S. NAS-NRC and the UK MRC in 1956. Meanwhile, exposure to the atomic bombs in Japan had occurred and epidemics of delayed effects began to be recognized among the survivors: cataracts, leukemia and severe mental retardation among newborn infants after intra-uterine exposure. No statistically significant excess of germ-cell genetic effects was detected by six clinical measurements, the F{sub 1} mortality, cytogenetic studies or biochemical genetic studies. Somatic cell effects were revealed by long-lasting chromosomal aberrations in peripheral lymphocytes, and somatic cell mutations were found at the glycophorin A locus in erythrocytes. Molecular biology is a likely focus of new studies based on the function of the gene for ataxia telangiectasia, a disorder in which children have severe, even lethal acute radiation reactions when given conventional doses of radiotherapy for lymphoma, to which they are prone. The tumor registries in Hiroshima and Nagasaki now provide incidence data that show the extent of increases in eight common cancers and no increase in eight others. The possibility of very late effects of A-bomb exposure is suggested by recent reports of increased frequencies of hyperparathyroidism, parathyroid cancers and certain causes of death other than cancer. 88 refs., 1 fig.

  6. The effect of delayed responding on Stroop-like task performance among preschoolers.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Derek E; Fosco, Whitney

    2012-01-01

    Forty-four preschoolers completed 2 conditions of a Stroop-like procedure (e.g., saying "boat" for car and "car" for boat) that differed in whether a 3-s delay was imposed before responding. The test card was visible during the delay period for half of the children and occluded for the other children. Preschoolers' interference control was significantly improved in the delay condition. There was no difference between the two delay variants (test card visible or occluded). Children were more prone to interference as testing progressed regardless of whether the delay was present. These results suggest that delays effectively reduce interference by reducing the potency of the competing response during test trials, although memory demands may moderate the effectiveness of delays.

  7. Effect of delayed aging on mechanical properties of an Al-Cu-Mg alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Ravindranathan, S.P.; Kashyap, K.T.; Kumar, S.R.; Ramachandra, C.; Chatterji, B.

    2000-02-01

    The effect of delayed aging on mechanical properties is characteristically found in Al-Mg-Si alloys. Delayed aging refers to the time elapsed between solutionizing and artificial aging. Delayed aging leads to inferior properties. This effect was investigated in an Al-Cu-Mg alloy (AU2GN) of nominal composition Al-2Cu-1.5Mg-1Fe-1Ni as a function of delay. This alloy also showed a drop in mechanical properties with delay. The results are explained on the basis of Pashley's kinetic model to qualitatively explain the evolution of a coarse precipitate structure with delay. It is found that all the results of delayed aging in the Al-Cu-Mg alloys are similar to those found in Al-Mg-Si alloys.

  8. The effect of caffeine ingestion on delayed onset muscle soreness.

    PubMed

    Hurley, Caitlin F; Hatfield, Disa L; Riebe, Deborah A

    2013-11-01

    The beneficial effects of caffeine on aerobic activity and resistance training performance are well documented. However, less is known concerning caffeine's potential role in reducing perception of pain and soreness during exercise. In addition, there is no information regarding the effects of caffeine on delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). The primary purpose of this study was to examine the effect of caffeine ingestion on muscle soreness, blood enzyme activity, and performance after a bout of elbow flexion/extension exercise. Nine low-caffeine-consuming males (body mass: 76.68 ± 8.13 kg; height: 179.18 ± 9.35 cm; age: 20 ± 1 year) were randomly assigned to ingest either caffeine or placebo 1 hour before completing 4 sets of 10 bicep curls on a preacher bench, followed by a fifth set in which subjects completed as many repetitions as possible. Soreness and soreness on palpation intensity were measured using three 0-10 visual analog scales before exercise, and 24, 48, 72, 96, and 120 hours after exercise. After a washout period, subjects crossed over to the other treatment group. Caffeine ingestion resulted in significantly (p ≤ 0.05) lower levels of soreness on day 2 and day 3 compared with placebo. Total repetitions in the final set of exercise increased with caffeine ingestion compared with placebo. This study demonstrates that caffeine ingestion immediately before an upper-body resistance training out enhances performance. A further beneficial effect of sustained caffeine ingestion in the days after the exercise bout is an attenuation of DOMS. This decreased perception of soreness in the days after a strenuous resistance training workout may allow individuals to increase the number of training sessions in a given time period.

  9. Effects of unsignaled delays of reinforcement on fixed-interval schedule performance.

    PubMed

    Elcoro, Mirari; Lattal, Kennon A

    2011-09-01

    Key pecking of pigeons was maintained by a fixed-interval (FI) 61-s schedule. The effects of resetting and nonresetting unsignaled delays of reinforcement then were examined. The resetting delay was programmed as a differential-reinforcement-of-other-behavior schedule, and the nonresetting delay as a fixed-time schedule. Three delay durations (0.5, 1 and 10s) were examined. Overall response rates were decreased by one and 10-s delays and increased by 0.5-s delays. Response patterns changed from positively accelerated to more linear when resetting or nonresetting 10-s delays were imposed, but remained predominantly positively accelerated when resetting and nonresetting 0.5- and 1-s delays were in effect. In general, temporal control, as measured by quarter-life values, changed less than overall response rates when delays of reinforcement were in effect. The response patterns controlled by FI schedules are more resilient to the nominally disruptive effects of delays of reinforcement than are corresponding overall response rates.

  10. A theoretical account of cognitive effects in delay discounting.

    PubMed

    Kurth-Nelson, Zeb; Bickel, Warren; Redish, A David

    2012-04-01

    Although delay discounting, the attenuation of the value of future rewards, is a robust finding, the mechanism of discounting is not known. We propose a potential mechanism for delay discounting such that discounting emerges from a search process that is trying to determine what rewards will be available in the future. In this theory, the delay dependence of the discounting of future expected rewards arises from three assumptions. First, that the evaluation of outcomes involves a search process. Second, that the value is assigned to an outcome proportionally to how easy it is to find. Third, that outcomes that are less delayed are typically easier for the search process to find. By relaxing this third assumption (e.g. by assuming that episodically-cued outcomes are easier to find), our model suggests that it is possible to dissociate discounting from delay. Our theory thereby explains the empirical result that discounting is slower to episodically-imagined outcomes, because these outcomes are easier for the search process to find. Additionally, the theory explains why improving cognitive resources such as working memory slows discounting, by improving searches and thereby making rewards easier to find. The three assumptions outlined here are likely to be instantiated during deliberative decision-making, but are unlikely in habitual decision-making. We model two simple implementations of this theory and show that they unify empirical results about the role of cognitive function in delay discounting, and make new neural, behavioral, and pharmacological predictions.

  11. Effects of hippocampal lesions on spatial delayed responses in dog.

    PubMed

    Kowalska, D M

    1995-01-01

    Thirteen dogs were trained to perform spatial delayed responses to auditory cues in a three-choice Nencki testing apparatus with a delay of 0 s and then 10 s with a criterion of 90% correct responses in 90 consecutive trials. Then six dogs received bilateral surgical removal of the hippocampus via the cortex of the suprasylvian gyrus (without additional injury to the entorhinal and parahippocampal cortex). Three dogs received control surgical ablation of the suprasylvian gyrus, which was damaged in ablation of the hippocampus, and four dogs served as intact controls. After the surgery or rest period, the dogs were tested for their retention (10-s delay), and then they were given additional tests with extended delays (30, 60, and 120 s) and with distractions during the 60-s delay period. In comparison with both control groups, dogs with hippocampal ablations had moderately impaired postoperative retention, as evidenced by the elevated numbers of errors on criterion. In subsequent stages of testing with extended delays, the impairment was greater and was significantly correlated with the extent of injury to the hippocampus. These data, together with an analysis of the animals' responses to the three-choice situation, indicate that in dogs lesions of the hippocampus impair spatial memory.

  12. A theoretical account of cognitive effects in delay discounting

    PubMed Central

    Kurth-Nelson, Zeb; Bickel, Warren; Redish, A. David

    2012-01-01

    Although delay discounting, the attenuation of the value of future rewards, is a robust finding, the mechanism of discounting is not known. We propose a potential mechanism for delay discounting such that discounting emerges from a search process trying to determine what rewards will be available in the future. In this theory, the delay dependence of the discounting of future expected rewards arises from three assumptions. First, that evaluation of outcomes involves a search process. Second, that value is assigned to an outcome proportionally to how easy it is to find. Third, that outcomes that are less delayed are typically easier for the search process to find. By relaxing this third assumption (for example, by assuming that episodically cued outcomes are easier to find), our model suggests that it is possible to dissociate discounting from delay. Our theory thereby explains the empirical result that discounting is slower to episodically-imagined outcomes, because these outcomes are easier for the search process to find. Additionally, the theory explains why improving cognitive resources such as working memory slows discounting, by improving searches and thereby making rewards easier to find. The three assumptions outlined here are likely to be instantiated during deliberative decision-making, but unlikely in habitual decision-making. We model two simple implementations of this theory and show that they unify empirical results about the role of cognitive function in delay discounting, and make new neural, behavioral, and pharmacological predictions. PMID:22487035

  13. Time-Delayed Subsidies: Interspecies Population Effects in Salmon

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Michelle C.; Reynolds, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Cross-boundary nutrient inputs can enhance and sustain populations of organisms in nutrient-poor recipient ecosystems. For example, Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) can deliver large amounts of marine-derived nutrients to freshwater ecosystems through their eggs, excretion, or carcasses. This has led to the question of whether nutrients from one generation of salmon can benefit juvenile salmon from subsequent generations. In a study of 12 streams on the central coast of British Columbia, we found that the abundance of juvenile coho salmon was most closely correlated with the abundance of adult pink salmon from previous years. There was a secondary role for adult chum salmon and watershed size, followed by other physical characteristics of streams. Most of the coho sampled emerged in the spring, and had little to no direct contact with spawning salmon nutrients at the time of sampling in the summer and fall. A combination of techniques suggest that subsidies from spawning salmon can have a strong, positive, time-delayed influence on the productivity of salmon-bearing streams through indirect effects from previous spawning events. This is the first study on the impacts of nutrients from naturally-occurring spawning salmon on juvenile population abundance of other salmon species. PMID:24911974

  14. Effect of geometrical irregularities on propagation delay in axonal trees.

    PubMed Central

    Manor, Y; Koch, C; Segev, I

    1991-01-01

    Multiple successive geometrical inhomogeneities, such as extensive arborization and terminal varicosities, are usual characteristics of axons. Near such regions the velocity of the action potential (AP) changes. This study uses AXONTREE, a modeling tool developed in the companion paper for two purposes: (a) to gain insights into the consequence of these irregularities for the propagation delay along axons, and (b) to simulate the propagation of APs along a reconstructed axon from a cortical cell, taking into account information concerning the distribution of boutons (release sites) along such axons to estimate the distribution of arrival times of APs to the axons release sites. We used Hodgkin and Huxley (1952) like membrane properties at 20 degrees C. Focusing on the propagation delay which results from geometrical changes along the axon (and not from the actual diameters or length of the axon), the main results are: (a) the propagation delay at a region of a single geometrical change (a step change in axon diameter or a branch point) is in the order of a few tenths of a millisecond. This delay critically depends on the kinetics and the density of the excitable channels; (b) as a general rule, the lag imposed on the AP propagation at a region with a geometrical ratio GR greater than 1 is larger than the lead obtained at a region with a reciprocal of that GR value; (c) when the electronic distance between two successive geometrical changes (Xdis) is small, the delay is not the sum of the individual delays at each geometrical change, when isolated. When both geometrical changes are with GR greater than 1 or both with GR less than 1, this delay is supralinear (larger than the sum of individual delays). The two other combinations yield a sublinear delay; and (d) in a varicose axon, where the diameter changes frequently from thin to thick and back to thin, the propagation velocity may be slower than the velocity along a uniform axon with the thin diameter. Finally, we

  15. Confounding effects of phase delays on causality estimation.

    PubMed

    Vakorin, Vasily A; Mišić, Bratislav; Krakovska, Olga; Bezgin, Gleb; McIntosh, Anthony R

    2013-01-01

    Linear and non-linear techniques for inferring causal relations between the brain signals representing the underlying neuronal systems have become a powerful tool to extract the connectivity patterns in the brain. Typically these tools employ the idea of Granger causality, which is ultimately based on the temporal precedence between the signals. At the same time, phase synchronization between coupled neural ensembles is considered a mechanism implemented in the brain to integrate relevant neuronal ensembles to perform a cognitive or perceptual task. Phase synchronization can be studied by analyzing the effects of phase-locking between the brain signals. However, we should expect that there is no one-to-one mapping between the observed phase lag and the time precedence as specified by physically interacting systems. Specifically, phase lag observed between two signals may interfere with inferring causal relations. This could be of critical importance for the coupled non-linear oscillating systems, with possible time delays in coupling, when classical linear cross-spectrum strategies for solving phase ambiguity are not efficient. To demonstrate this, we used a prototypical model of coupled non-linear systems, and compared three typical pipelines of inferring Granger causality, as established in the literature. Specifically, we compared the performance of the spectral and information-theoretic Granger pipelines as well as standard Granger causality in their relations to the observed phase differences for frequencies at which the signals become synchronized to each other. We found that an information-theoretic approach, which takes into account different time lags between the past of one signal and the future of another signal, was the most robust to phase effects.

  16. Delay effects in the human sensory system during balancing.

    PubMed

    Stepan, Gabor

    2009-03-28

    Mechanical models of human self-balancing often use the Newtonian equations of inverted pendula. While these mathematical models are precise enough on the mechanical side, the ways humans balance themselves are still quite unexplored on the control side. Time delays in the sensory and motoric neural pathways give essential limitations to the stabilization of the human body as a multiple inverted pendulum. The sensory systems supporting each other provide the necessary signals for these control tasks; but the more complicated the system is, the larger delay is introduced. Human ageing as well as our actual physical and mental state affects the time delays in the neural system, and the mechanical structure of the human body also changes in a large range during our lives. The human balancing organ, the labyrinth, and the vision system essentially adapted to these relatively large time delays and parameter regions occurring during balancing. The analytical study of the simplified large-scale time-delayed models of balancing provides a Newtonian insight into the functioning of these organs that may also serve as a basis to support theories and hypotheses on balancing and vision.

  17. Impacts of Wake Effect and Time Delay on the Dynamic Analysis of Wind Farms Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    El-Fouly, Tarek H. M.; El-Saadany, Ehab F.; Salama, Magdy M. A.

    2008-01-01

    This article investigates the impacts of proper modeling of the wake effects and wind speed delays, between different wind turbines' rows, on the dynamic performance accuracy of the wind farms models. Three different modeling scenarios were compared to highlight the impacts of wake effects and wind speed time-delay models. In the first scenario,…

  18. Effect of delayed auditory feedback on normal speakers at two speech rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuart, Andrew; Kalinowski, Joseph; Rastatter, Michael P.; Lynch, Kerry

    2002-05-01

    This study investigated the effect of short and long auditory feedback delays at two speech rates with normal speakers. Seventeen participants spoke under delayed auditory feedback (DAF) at 0, 25, 50, and 200 ms at normal and fast rates of speech. Significantly two to three times more dysfluencies were displayed at 200 ms (p<0.05) relative to no delay or the shorter delays. There were significantly more dysfluencies observed at the fast rate of speech (p=0.028). These findings implicate the peripheral feedback system(s) of fluent speakers for the disruptive effects of DAF on normal speech production at long auditory feedback delays. Considering the contrast in fluency/dysfluency exhibited between normal speakers and those who stutter at short and long delays, it appears that speech disruption of normal speakers under DAF is a poor analog of stuttering.

  19. Voyager 2 Test Of The Radar Time-Delay Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krisher, Timothy P.; Anderson, John D.; Taylor, Anthony H.

    1993-01-01

    Report presents analysis of radio range measurements generated during superior solar conjunction of Voyager 2 spacecraft in December 1985. One in continuing series of studies directed toward verifying prediction, according to theory of general relativity, that electromagnetic signal propagating near Sun is delayed by solar gravitational field.

  20. The Effect of Concurrent Semantic Categorization on Delayed Serial Recall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acheson, Daniel J.; MacDonald, Maryellen C.; Postle, Bradley R.

    2011-01-01

    The influence of semantic processing on the serial ordering of items in short-term memory was explored using a novel dual-task paradigm. Participants engaged in 2 picture-judgment tasks while simultaneously performing delayed serial recall. List material varied in the presence of phonological overlap (Experiments 1 and 2) and in semantic content…

  1. Effects of Delayed Constructed-Response Identity Matching on Spelling of Dictated Words

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanna, Elenice S.; de Souza, Deisy G.; de Rose, Julio C.; Fonseca, Monica

    2004-01-01

    We studied the effects of delayed constructed-response identity marching on spelling with 6 first graders with histories of school failure. After training, the children learned to spell words to dictation and their cursive writing improved. These results replicate studies showing that delayed constructed-response matching establishes spelling. For…

  2. Stability and bifurcation in a reaction-diffusion model with nonlocal delay effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shangjiang

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, the existence, stability, and multiplicity of spatially nonhomogeneous steady-state solution and periodic solutions for a reaction-diffusion model with nonlocal delay effect and Dirichlet boundary condition are investigated by using Lyapunov-Schmidt reduction. Moreover, we illustrate our general results by applications to models with a single delay and one-dimensional spatial domain.

  3. The Effects of Inflation and Interest Rates on Delay Discounting in Human Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kawashima, Kentaro

    2006-01-01

    Interest and inflation rates may be major determinants of delay discounting, but these variables have not been controlled in past experiments because they depend on macroeconomic conditions. This study uses a computer game-like task to investigate the effects of inflation rates on people's subjective valuation of delayed rewards. During the task,…

  4. The Effect of D-Cycloserine on Immediate vs. Delayed Extinction of Learned Fear

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langton, Julia M.; Richardson, Rick

    2010-01-01

    We compared the effect of D-cycloserine (DCS) on immediate (10 min after conditioning) and delayed (24 h after conditioning) extinction of learned fear in rats. DCS facilitated both immediate and delayed extinction when the drug was administered after extinction training. However, DCS did not facilitate immediate extinction when administered prior…

  5. Connected cruise control: modelling, delay effects, and nonlinear behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orosz, Gábor

    2016-08-01

    Connected vehicle systems (CVS) are considered in this paper where vehicles exchange information using wireless vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communication. The concept of connected cruise control (CCC) is established that allows control design at the level of individual vehicles while exploiting V2V connectivity. Due to its high level of modularity the proposed design can be applied to large heterogeneous traffic systems. The dynamics of a simple CVS is analysed in detail while taking into account nonlinearities in the vehicle dynamics as well as in the controller. Time delays that arise due to intermittencies and packet drops in the communication channels are also incorporated. The results are summarised using stability charts which allow one to select control gains to maintain stability and ensure disturbance attenuation when the delay is below a critical value.

  6. Impulsivity in students with serious emotional disturbance: the interactive effects of reinforcer rate, delay, and quality.

    PubMed

    Neef, N A; Mace, F C; Shade, D

    1993-01-01

    We conducted two studies extending basic matching research on self-control and impulsivity to the investigation of choices of students diagnosed as seriously emotionally disturbed. In Study 1 we examined the interaction between unequal rates of reinforcement and equal versus unequal delays to reinforcer access on performance of concurrently available sets of math problems. The results of a reversal design showed that when delays to reinforcer access were the same for both response alternatives, the time allocated to each was approximately proportional to obtained reinforcement. When the delays to reinforcer access differed between the response alternatives, there was a bias toward the response alternative and schedule with the lower delays, suggesting impulsivity (i.e., immediate reinforcer access overrode the effects of rate of reinforcement). In Study 2 we examined the interactive effects of reinforcer rate, quality, and delay. Conditions involving delayed access to the high-quality reinforcers on the rich schedule (with immediate access to low-quality reinforcers earned on the lean schedule) were alternated with immediate access to low-quality reinforcers on the rich schedule (with delayed access to high-quality reinforcers on the lean schedule) using a reversal design. With 1 student, reinforcer quality overrode the effects of both reinforcer rate and delay to reinforcer access. The other student tended to respond exclusively to the alternative associated with immediate access to reinforcers. The studies demonstrate a methodology based on matching theory for determining influential dimensions of reinforcers governing individuals' choices.

  7. Decomposer diversity and identity influence plant diversity effects on ecosystem functioning.

    PubMed

    Eisenhauer, Nico; Reich, Peter B; Isbell, Forest

    2012-10-01

    Plant productivity and other ecosystem functions often increase with plant diversity at a local scale. Alongside various plant-centered explanations for this pattern, there is accumulating evidence that multi-trophic interactions shape this relationship. Here, we investigated for the first time if plant diversity effects on ecosystem functioning are mediated or driven by decomposer animal diversity and identity using a double-diversity microcosm experiment. We show that many ecosystem processes and ecosystem multifunctionality (herbaceous shoot biomass production, litter removal, and N uptake) were affected by both plant and decomposer diversity, with ecosystem process rates often being maximal at intermediate to high plant and decomposer diversity and minimal at both low plant and decomposer diversity. Decomposers relaxed interspecific plant competition by enlarging chemical (increased N uptake and surface-litter decomposition) and spatial (increasing deep-root biomass) habitat space and by promoting plant complementarity. Anecic earthworms and isopods functioned as key decomposers; although decomposer diversity effects did not solely rely on these two decomposer species, positive plant net biodiversity and complementarity effects only occurred in the absence of isopods and the presence of anecic earthworms. Using a structural equation model, we explained 76% of the variance in plant complementarity, identified direct and indirect effect paths, and showed that the presence of key decomposers accounted for approximately three-quarters of the explained variance. We conclude that decomposer animals have been underappreciated as contributing agents of plant diversity-ecosystem functioning relationships. Elevated decomposer performance at high plant diversity found in previous experiments likely positively feeds back to plant performance, thus contributing to the positive relationship between plant diversity and ecosystem functioning.

  8. Delays in Human-Computer Interaction and Their Effects on Brain Activity.

    PubMed

    Kohrs, Christin; Angenstein, Nicole; Brechmann, André

    2016-01-01

    The temporal contingency of feedback is an essential requirement of successful human-computer interactions. The timing of feedback not only affects the behavior of a user but is also accompanied by changes in psychophysiology and neural activity. In three fMRI experiments we systematically studied the impact of delayed feedback on brain activity while subjects performed an auditory categorization task. In the first fMRI experiment, we analyzed the effects of rare and thus unexpected delays of different delay duration on brain activity. In the second experiment, we investigated if users can adapt to frequent delays. Therefore, delays were presented as often as immediate feedback. In a third experiment, the influence of interaction outage was analyzed by measuring the effect of infrequent omissions of feedback on brain activity. The results show that unexpected delays in feedback presentation compared to immediate feedback stronger activate inter alia bilateral the anterior insular cortex, the posterior medial frontal cortex, the left inferior parietal lobule and the right inferior frontal junction. The strength of this activation increases with the duration of the delay. Thus, delays interrupt the course of an interaction and trigger an orienting response that in turn activates brain regions of action control. If delays occur frequently, users can adapt, delays become expectable, and the brain activity in the observed network diminishes over the course of the interaction. However, introducing rare omissions of expected feedback reduces the system's trustworthiness which leads to an increase in brain activity not only in response to such omissions but also following frequently occurring and thus expected delays. PMID:26745874

  9. Effect of delayed reporting of band recoveries on survival estimates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderson, David R.; Burnham, Kenneth P.

    1980-01-01

    Brownie et al. (U.S. Fish and Wildl. Serv., Resource Publ. 131, 1978) presented 14 models based on an array of explicit assumptions for the study of survival in avian populations. These methods are replacing the life table methods previously used to estimate survival rates (e.g., Burnham and Anderson, J. Wildl. Manage., 43: 356-366, 1979). The new methods allow survival or recovery rates, or both, to be constant, time-specific, or time- and age-specific. In studies to estimate survival rates for birds the data are often from recoveries of birds shot or found dead during the hunting season and reported to the Bird Banding Laboratory by sportsmen, conservation agency employees, or the general public. This note examines the bias in estimating annual survival due to a proportion of the recoveries being incorrectly reported a year late. Specifically, a few recoveries each year of, for example, adult male American Widgeon (Anas americana) banded in California are reported as being recovered in year i + 1 when in fact they were actually recovered the previous year i. Delayed reporting might typically be caused by people finding a band in their health clothing in the fall of the year and, being embarrassed about their failure to report the band when it was taken, report it a year late not mentioning the actual year of recovery. Heuristically, delayed reporting should bias estimated annual survival rates upwards because it appears from the data that the birds corresponding to the "delayed" recoveries actually lived an additional year.

  10. Prescription Drug Marketing Act of 1987; Prescription Drug Amendments of 1992; policies, requirements, and administrative procedures; delay of effective date. Final rule; delay of effective date.

    PubMed

    2004-02-23

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is further delaying, until December 1, 2006, the effective date of certain requirements of a final rule published in the Federal Register of December 3, 1999 (64 FR 67720). In the Federal Register of May 3, 2000 (65 FR 25639), the agency delayed until October 1, 2001, the effective date of certain requirements in the final rule relating to wholesale distribution of prescription drugs by distributors that are not authorized distributors of record, and distribution of blood derivatives by entities that meet the definition of a "health care entity" in the final rule. The agency further delayed the effective date of these requirements in three subsequent Federal Register notices. Most recently, in the Federal Register of January 31, 2003 (68 FR 4912), FDA delayed the effective date until April 1, 2004. This action further delays the effective date of these requirements until December 1, 2006. The final rule implements the Prescription Drug Marketing Act of 1987 (PDMA), as modified by the Prescription Drug Amendments of 1992 (PDA), and the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act of 1997 (the Modernization Act). The agency is taking this action to address concerns about the requirements in the final rule raised by affected parties. As explained in the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section, FDA is working with stakeholders through its counterfeit drug initiative to facilitate widespread, voluntary adoption of track and trace technologies that will generate a de facto electronic pedigree, including prior transaction history back to the original manufacturer, as a routine course of business. If this technology is widely adopted, it is expected to help fulfill the pedigree requirements of the PDMA and obviate or resolve many of the concerns that have been raised with respect to the final rule by ensuring that an electronic pedigree travels with a drug product at all times. Therefore, it is necessary to delay the effective date of Sec

  11. Prescription Drug Marketing Act of 1987; Prescription Drug Amendments of 1992; policies, requirements, and administrative procedures; delay of effective date. Final rule; delay of effective date.

    PubMed

    2004-02-23

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is further delaying, until December 1, 2006, the effective date of certain requirements of a final rule published in the Federal Register of December 3, 1999 (64 FR 67720). In the Federal Register of May 3, 2000 (65 FR 25639), the agency delayed until October 1, 2001, the effective date of certain requirements in the final rule relating to wholesale distribution of prescription drugs by distributors that are not authorized distributors of record, and distribution of blood derivatives by entities that meet the definition of a "health care entity" in the final rule. The agency further delayed the effective date of these requirements in three subsequent Federal Register notices. Most recently, in the Federal Register of January 31, 2003 (68 FR 4912), FDA delayed the effective date until April 1, 2004. This action further delays the effective date of these requirements until December 1, 2006. The final rule implements the Prescription Drug Marketing Act of 1987 (PDMA), as modified by the Prescription Drug Amendments of 1992 (PDA), and the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act of 1997 (the Modernization Act). The agency is taking this action to address concerns about the requirements in the final rule raised by affected parties. As explained in the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section, FDA is working with stakeholders through its counterfeit drug initiative to facilitate widespread, voluntary adoption of track and trace technologies that will generate a de facto electronic pedigree, including prior transaction history back to the original manufacturer, as a routine course of business. If this technology is widely adopted, it is expected to help fulfill the pedigree requirements of the PDMA and obviate or resolve many of the concerns that have been raised with respect to the final rule by ensuring that an electronic pedigree travels with a drug product at all times. Therefore, it is necessary to delay the effective date of Sec

  12. Age modulates the effect of COMT genotype on delay discounting behavior

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Christopher T.; Boettiger, Charlotte A.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale and objective A form of impulsivity, the tendency to choose immediate over delayed rewards (delay-discounting) has been associated with a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene (COMTval158met; rs4680). However, existing data regarding the nature of this association conflicts. We have previously reported that adults homozygous for valine (val) at the COMTval158met SNP demonstrate greater delay-discounting than do methionine (met) allele carriers (Boettiger et al. 2007). In contrast, a recent study of adolescent males found that those with the met/met genotype demonstrate greater delay-discounting than do val-allele carriers (Paloyelis et al. 2010). Based on reported age-related changes in frontal dopamine function and COMT expression, we hypothesized that the association of COMT genotype with delay-discounting behavior is modulated by age from late adolescence to young adulthood. Methods To test this hypothesis, we genotyped late adolescents (18–21 years; n=72) and adults (22–40 years; n=70) for the COMTval158met polymorphism, measured their delay-discounting behavior, and tested for an interaction between age group and COMT genotype. Results This cross-sectional study found that age modulates COMTval158met genotype effects on delay-discounting behavior. Among met-carriers, delay-discounting was negatively correlated with age from late adolescence to adulthood, while among val/val individuals delay-discounting was positively correlated with age across this range. Conclusions These results confirm our previous finding of enhanced delay-discounting among val/val adults relative to met-allele carriers, and help reconcile existing literature. We propose a single U-shaped model of the relationship between frontal DA levels and impulsive choice that accounts for both adolescent and adult data. PMID:22349272

  13. Delay or probability discounting in a model of impulsive behavior: effect of alcohol.

    PubMed

    Richards, J B; Zhang, L; Mitchell, S H; de Wit, H

    1999-03-01

    Little is known about the acute effects of drugs of abuse on impulsivity and self-control. In this study, impulsivity was assessed in humans using a computer task that measured delay and probability discounting. Discounting describes how much the value of a reward (or punisher) is decreased when its occurrence is either delayed or uncertain. Twenty-four healthy adult volunteers ingested a moderate dose of ethanol (0.5 or 0.8 g/kg ethanol: n = 12 at each dose) or placebo before completing the discounting task. In the task the participants were given a series of choices between a small, immediate, certain amount of money and $10 that was either delayed (0, 2, 30, 180, or 365 days) or probabilistic (i.e., certainty of receipt was 1.0, .9, .75, .5, or .25). The point at which each individual was indifferent between the smaller immediate or certain reward and the $10 delayed or probabilistic reward was identified using an adjusting-amount procedure. The results indicated that (a) delay and probability discounting were well described by a hyperbolic function; (b) delay and probability discounting were positively correlated within subjects; (c) delay and probability discounting were moderately correlated with personality measures of impulsivity; and (d) alcohol had no effect on discounting. PMID:10220927

  14. Relativistic effects in photoionization time delay near the Cooper minimum of noble-gas atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Soumyajit; Mandal, Ankur; Jose, Jobin; Varma, Hari R.; Deshmukh, P. C.; Kheifets, A. S.; Dolmatov, V. K.; Manson, S. T.

    2014-11-01

    Time delay of photoemission from valence n s , n p3 /2 , and n p1 /2 subshells of noble-gas atoms is theoretically scrutinized within the framework of the dipole relativistic random phase approximation. The focus is on the variation of time delay in the vicinity of the Cooper minima in photoionization of the outer subshells of neon, argon, krypton, and xenon, where the corresponding dipole matrix element changes its sign while passing through a node. It is revealed that the presence of the Cooper minimum in one photoionization channel has a strong effect on time delay in other channels. This is shown to be due to interchannel coupling.

  15. Effects of delayed auditory feedback on speech kinematics in fluent speakers

    PubMed Central

    Sasisekaran, Jayanthi

    2013-01-01

    Summary The effects of delayed auditory feedback on behavioral responses and speech kinematics were investigated. Participants were 10 males (M age = 22.2, SD = 3.7) and 10 females (M age = 20.5, SD = 2.2). Participants were required to repeat short (six-syllable) and longer (11-syllable) non-words in a reading task. Speech errors, lip movement variability, and movement duration of labial trajectories under delayed feedback were compared to effects under gated speech feedback and a control or synchronous auditory feedback condition. Repeated measures analysis indicated lower percent of correct productions, higher variability and slower duration of lip movements in the delayed feedback condition compared to the gated feedback and control conditions. Implications for auditory feedback of movement control in continuous speech and for theories of delayed auditory feedback that attribute a role to movements are discussed. PMID:23409597

  16. Effects of time delay and pitch control sensitivity in the flared landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berthe, C. J.; Chalk, C. R.; Wingarten, N. C.; Grantham, W.

    1986-01-01

    Between December 1985 and January 1986, a flared landing program was conducted, using the USAF Total In-Flight simulator airplane, to examine time delay effects in a formal manner. Results show that as pitch sensitivity is increased, tolerance to time delay decreases. With the proper selection of pitch sensitivity, Level I performance was maintained with time delays ranging from 150 milliseconds to greater than 300 milliseconds. With higher sensitivity, configurations with Level I performance at 150 milliseconds degraded to level 2 at 200 milliseconds. When metrics of time delay and pitch sensitivity effects are applied to enhance previously developed predictive criteria, the result is an improved prediction technique which accounts for significant closed loop items.

  17. The effects of long delay and transmission errors on the performance of TP-4 implementations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durst, Robert C.; Evans, Eric L.; Mitchell, Randy C.

    1991-01-01

    A set of tools that allows us to measure and examine the effects of transmission delay and errors on the performance of TP-4 implementations has been developed. The tools give insight into both the large- and small-scale behaviors of an implementation. These tools have been systematically applied to a commercial implementation of TP-4. Measurements show, among other things, that a 2-second one-way transmission delay and an effective bit-error rate of 1 error per 100,000 bits can result in a 95 percent reduction in TP-4 throughput. The detailed statistics give insight into why transmission delay and errors affect this implementations so significantly and support a number of 'lessons learned' that could be applied to TP-4 implementations that operate more robustly across networks with long transmission delays and transmission errors.

  18. Network-scale effect on synchronizability of fully coupled network with connection delay.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Y G; Wang, Z H

    2016-04-01

    Network-scale effect on synchronizability of fully coupled network with connection delay is investigated in this paper. The master stability function, which governs the stability of synchronization manifold, is first obtained by separating the synchronization manifold direction from other transverse directions. Then, by introducing a new time variable in the master stability function, it is shown the effect of connection delay can be weakened with the increase of network scale, and thus, in contrast to the situation without connection delay, large network scale is more positive to the synchronizability of fully coupled network with connection delay. Those findings are confirmed by the studies on two specific networks with nodes of typical nonlinear dynamical systems. PMID:27131482

  19. Effective Retention Strategies for Diverse Employees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Musser, Linda R.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses methods to determine why employees leave or stay, based on experiences at Pennsylvania State University libraries. Considers retention tools that work best to retain diverse employees, including mentoring, networking, career and learning opportunities, balance between work and home life, a welcoming climate, and support for research.…

  20. Effect of delayed evisceration on the microbial quality of meat.

    PubMed

    Gill, C O; Penney, N; Nottingham, P M

    1976-04-01

    The postomortem invasion of muscle and other tissues by bacteria from the intestinal tract was studied with the use of radioactive tracers. The injection of 14C-labeled bacteria or spores into the intestines of guinea pig carcasses within 24 h of death resulted in the rapid spread of 14C throughout carcasses. When live bacteria were injected along with the labeled cells, it was not possible to isolate viable organisms from the body tissues if the living animal had been exposed to the bacteria. It appears that animals are immune to their normal intestinal flora and that this immunity persists after death; thus passage of these bacteria into the lymphatic system does not necessarily result in the presence of live bacteria in carcass tissues. It therefore seems that a delay of up to 24 h before evisceration would not lead to deep tissue contamination of the carcass by organisms usually present in the intestines. Further evidence for this hypothesis was obtained by showing that muscle and lymph nodes from uneviscerated lamb carcasses hung for 24 h at 20 C remained sterile.

  1. Effects of the gaseous and liquid water content of the atmosphere on range delay and Doppler frequency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flock, W. L.

    1981-01-01

    When high precision is required for range measurement on Earth space paths, it is necessary to correct as accurately as possible for excess range delays due to the dry air, water vapor, and liquid water content of the atmosphere. Calculations based on representative values of atmospheric parameters are useful for illustrating the order of magnitude of the expected delays. Range delay, time delay, and phase delay are simply and directly related. Doppler frequency variations or noise are proportional to the time rate of change of excess range delay. Tropospheric effects were examined as part of an overall consideration of the capability of precision two way ranging and Doppler systems.

  2. Diversity begets diversity? The effects of board composition on the appointment and success of women CEOs.

    PubMed

    Cook, Alison; Glass, Christy

    2015-09-01

    Previous research on the effects of leadership diversity on firm outcomes has produced inconsistent and inconclusive findings. While some scholars argue that diversity increases organizational equity and enhances performance, others argue that diversity increases conflict, reduces cooperation and harms performance. This study tests the impact of a variety of compositional factors on firm outcomes. Specifically, we analyze whether and how board composition affects the advancement and mobility of women CEOs and firm performance. Our analysis relies on a unique data set of all Chief Executive Officers (CEOs) and Board of Directors (BODs) in Fortune 500 companies over a ten-year period. We find a marginally significant positive relationship between board diversity and the likelihood of a woman being appointed CEO. We further find that board diversity significantly and positively influences the post-promotion success of women CEOs. Our findings suggest that board composition is critical for the appointment and success of women CEOs, and increasing board diversity should be central to any organizational diversity efforts. PMID:26188443

  3. The effects of practice and delay on motor skill learning and retention.

    PubMed

    Savion-Lemieux, Tal; Penhune, Virginia B

    2005-03-01

    The present study assessed the effects of amount of practice and length of delay on the learning and retention of a timed motor sequence task. Participants learned to reproduce ten-element visual sequences by tapping in synchrony with the stimulus. Participants were randomly assigned to a varied-practice condition or a varied-delay condition. In the varied-practice condition, participants received either one, three, or six blocks of practice followed by a fixed 4-week delayed-recall. In the varied-delay condition, participants received three blocks of practice followed by a varied delay of either 3 days, or 2, 4, or 8 weeks. Learning was assessed by changes in accuracy, response variance, and percent response asynchrony. Our results showed that amount of practice per se did not affect learning and retention of the task. Rather, distribution of practice over several days was the most important factor affecting learning and retention. We hypothesize that passage of time is essential for a maximum benefit of practice to be gained, as the time delay may allow for consolidation of learning, possibly reflecting plastic changes in motor cortical representations of the skill. With regards to delay, our findings suggest that explicit and motoric components of a motor sequence are likely to be learned and maintained in separate but interacting systems. First, only the longest delay group showed decrements in percent correct, indicating that longer lengths of delay might hinder retrieval of explicit aspects of the task. Second, all groups showed a decrement in percent response asynchrony, suggesting that synchronization may be a more difficult parameter to maintain because it relies heavily on sensorimotor integration. PMID:15551084

  4. Plant diversity effects on root decomposition in grasslands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hongmei; Mommer, Liesje; van Ruijven, Jasper; de Kroon, Hans; Gessler, Arthur; Scherer-Lorenzen, Michael; Wirth, Christian; Weigelt, Alexandra

    2016-04-01

    Loss of plant diversity impairs ecosystem functioning. Compared to other well-studied processes, we know little about whether and how plant diversity affects root decomposition, which is limiting our knowledge on biodiversity-carbon cycling relationships in the soil. Plant diversity potentially affects root decomposition via two non-exclusive mechanisms: by providing roots of different substrate quality and/or by altering the soil decomposition environment. To disentangle these two mechanisms, three decomposition experiments using a litter-bag approach were conducted on experimental grassland plots differing in plant species richness, functional group richness and functional group composition (e.g. presence/absence of grasses, legumes, small herbs and tall herbs, the Jena Experiment). We studied: 1) root substrate quality effects by decomposing roots collected from the different experimental plant communities in one common plot; 2) soil decomposition environment effects by decomposing standard roots in all experimental plots; and 3) the overall plant diversity effects by decomposing community roots in their 'home' plots. Litter bags were installed in April 2014 and retrieved after 1, 2 and 4 months to determine the mass loss. We found that mass loss decreased with increasing plant species richness, but not with functional group richness in the three experiments. However, functional group presence significantly affected mass loss with primarily negative effects of the presence of grasses and positive effects of the presence of legumes and small herbs. Our results thus provide clear evidence that species richness has a strong negative effect on root decomposition via effects on both root substrate quality and soil decomposition environment. This negative plant diversity-root decomposition relationship may partly account for the positive effect of plant diversity on soil C stocks by reducing C loss in addition to increasing primary root productivity. However, to fully

  5. Effects of Diversity Experiences on Critical Thinking Skills: Who Benefits?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loes, Chad; Pascarella, Ernest; Umbach, Paul

    2012-01-01

    This study analyzed data from the Wabash National Study of Liberal Arts Education to estimate the unique effects of exposure to classroom diversity and involvement in interactional diversity on growth in critical thinking skills during the first year of college. Net of important confounding influences, neither classroom nor interactional diversity…

  6. Are Tree Species Diversity and Genotypic Diversity Effects on Insect Herbivores Mediated by Ants?

    PubMed

    Campos-Navarrete, María José; Abdala-Roberts, Luis; Munguía-Rosas, Miguel A; Parra-Tabla, Víctor

    2015-01-01

    Plant diversity can influence predators and omnivores and such effects may in turn influence herbivores and plants. However, evidence for these ecological feedbacks is rare. We evaluated if the effects of tree species (SD) and genotypic diversity (GD) on the abundance of different guilds of insect herbivores associated with big-leaf mahogany (Swietenia macrophylla) were contingent upon the protective effects of ants tending extra-floral nectaries of this species. This study was conducted within a larger experiment consisting of mahogany monocultures and species polycultures of four species and -within each of these two plot types- mahogany was represented by either one or four maternal families. We selected 24 plots spanning these treatment combinations, 10 mahogany plants/plot, and within each plot experimentally reduced ant abundance on half of the selected plants, and surveyed ant and herbivore abundance. There were positive effects of SD on generalist leaf-chewers and sap-feeders, but for the latter group this effect depended on the ant reduction treatment: SD positively influenced sap-feeders under ambient ant abundance but had no effect when ant abundance was reduced; at the same time, ants had negative effects on sap feeders in monoculture but no effect in polyculture. In contrast, SD did not influence specialist stem-borers or leaf-miners and this effect was not contingent upon ant reduction. Finally, GD did not influence any of the herbivore guilds studied, and such effects did not depend on the ant treatment. Overall, we show that tree species diversity influenced interactions between a focal plant species (mahogany) and ants, and that such effects in turn mediated plant diversity effects on some (sap-feeders) but not all the herbivores guilds studied. Our results suggest that the observed patterns are dependent on the combined effects of herbivore identity, diet breadth, and the source of plant diversity.

  7. Are Tree Species Diversity and Genotypic Diversity Effects on Insect Herbivores Mediated by Ants?

    PubMed

    Campos-Navarrete, María José; Abdala-Roberts, Luis; Munguía-Rosas, Miguel A; Parra-Tabla, Víctor

    2015-01-01

    Plant diversity can influence predators and omnivores and such effects may in turn influence herbivores and plants. However, evidence for these ecological feedbacks is rare. We evaluated if the effects of tree species (SD) and genotypic diversity (GD) on the abundance of different guilds of insect herbivores associated with big-leaf mahogany (Swietenia macrophylla) were contingent upon the protective effects of ants tending extra-floral nectaries of this species. This study was conducted within a larger experiment consisting of mahogany monocultures and species polycultures of four species and -within each of these two plot types- mahogany was represented by either one or four maternal families. We selected 24 plots spanning these treatment combinations, 10 mahogany plants/plot, and within each plot experimentally reduced ant abundance on half of the selected plants, and surveyed ant and herbivore abundance. There were positive effects of SD on generalist leaf-chewers and sap-feeders, but for the latter group this effect depended on the ant reduction treatment: SD positively influenced sap-feeders under ambient ant abundance but had no effect when ant abundance was reduced; at the same time, ants had negative effects on sap feeders in monoculture but no effect in polyculture. In contrast, SD did not influence specialist stem-borers or leaf-miners and this effect was not contingent upon ant reduction. Finally, GD did not influence any of the herbivore guilds studied, and such effects did not depend on the ant treatment. Overall, we show that tree species diversity influenced interactions between a focal plant species (mahogany) and ants, and that such effects in turn mediated plant diversity effects on some (sap-feeders) but not all the herbivores guilds studied. Our results suggest that the observed patterns are dependent on the combined effects of herbivore identity, diet breadth, and the source of plant diversity. PMID:26241962

  8. Are Tree Species Diversity and Genotypic Diversity Effects on Insect Herbivores Mediated by Ants?

    PubMed Central

    Campos-Navarrete, María José; Abdala-Roberts, Luis; Munguía-Rosas, Miguel A.; Parra-Tabla, Víctor

    2015-01-01

    Plant diversity can influence predators and omnivores and such effects may in turn influence herbivores and plants. However, evidence for these ecological feedbacks is rare. We evaluated if the effects of tree species (SD) and genotypic diversity (GD) on the abundance of different guilds of insect herbivores associated with big-leaf mahogany (Swietenia macrophylla) were contingent upon the protective effects of ants tending extra-floral nectaries of this species. This study was conducted within a larger experiment consisting of mahogany monocultures and species polycultures of four species and –within each of these two plot types– mahogany was represented by either one or four maternal families. We selected 24 plots spanning these treatment combinations, 10 mahogany plants/plot, and within each plot experimentally reduced ant abundance on half of the selected plants, and surveyed ant and herbivore abundance. There were positive effects of SD on generalist leaf-chewers and sap-feeders, but for the latter group this effect depended on the ant reduction treatment: SD positively influenced sap-feeders under ambient ant abundance but had no effect when ant abundance was reduced; at the same time, ants had negative effects on sap feeders in monoculture but no effect in polyculture. In contrast, SD did not influence specialist stem-borers or leaf-miners and this effect was not contingent upon ant reduction. Finally, GD did not influence any of the herbivore guilds studied, and such effects did not depend on the ant treatment. Overall, we show that tree species diversity influenced interactions between a focal plant species (mahogany) and ants, and that such effects in turn mediated plant diversity effects on some (sap-feeders) but not all the herbivores guilds studied. Our results suggest that the observed patterns are dependent on the combined effects of herbivore identity, diet breadth, and the source of plant diversity. PMID:26241962

  9. Effectiveness of brief time-out with and without contingent delay: a comparative analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Mace, F C; Page, T J; Ivancic, M T; O'Brien, S

    1986-01-01

    We evaluated a commonly used component of brief time-out, in which release from time-out is delayed contingent on the occurrence of disruption. Data were collected for one normal and two mentally retarded children on time-out-producing behaviors (aggression and disruption) as well as delay-producing behaviors during time-out (loud vocalizations, out-of-chair, aggression, and disruption). The results of a combination ABAC reversal and multiple-baseline design indicated that, under the conditions used in this investigation, both delay and no delay variations were effective in reducing the frequency of the target behaviors. Implications for the use of time-out to reduce aberrant behaviors are discussed. PMID:3710950

  10. The effects of the delays on systems subject to manual control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    Results are presented of an experimental study to determine the effects of time delays in manual control systems. A simple, fixed-base laboratory simulation facility is used for determining pilot dynamics and tracking performance in a series of single-axis, compensatory tracking tasks. In these tasks, three time-delay values and three controlled-element dynamics are used. The delays are chosen to encompass values encountered in experimental and operational aircraft. It is noted that the controlled-element dynamics replicate those found in many previous manual control studies, that is, the classical displacement, rate, and acceleration control systems. The experimental effort is complemented with an analytical pilot modeling study where the parameters of a structural model of the human pilot are adjusted so as to provide excellent matches to the experimentally determined pilot dynamics. The experimental and analytical studies both indicate that time delays cause significant changes in pilot equalization requirements.

  11. An effect of immediate reinforcement and delayed punishment, with possible implications for self-control.

    PubMed

    Epstein, R

    1984-12-01

    Behavior said to show self-control occurs virtually always as an alternative to behavior that produces conflicting consequences. One class of such consequences, immediate reinforcement and delayed punishment, is especially pervasive. Three experiments are described in which an effect of immediate reinforcement and delayed punishment is demonstrated. The results suggest that when immediate reinforcement and delayed punishment are imminent, the reinforcer alone controls the organism's behavior (in other words the organism behaves "impulsively"). The key to self-control, therefore, may be the acquisition of a large number of avoidance behaviors relevant to reinforcers that are correlated with delayed punishment. Human self-control may indeed involve such a process but undoubtedly involves others as well.

  12. Effect of unsignaled delays between stimuli in a chain schedule on responding and resistance to change.

    PubMed

    Bell, Matthew C; Gomez, Belen E

    2008-03-01

    Behavioral momentum theory is an evolving theoretical account of the strength of behavior. One challenge for the theory is determining the role of signal stimuli in determining response strength. This study evaluated the effect of an unsignaled delay between the initial link and terminal link of a two-link chain schedule on resistance to change using a multiple schedule of reinforcement. Pigeons were presented two different signaled delay to reinforcement schedules. Both schedules employed a two-link chain schedule with a variable interval 120-s initial link followed by a 5-s fixed time terminal link schedule. One of the schedules included a 5-s unsignaled delay between the initial link and the terminal link. Resistance to change was assessed with two separate disruption procedures: extinction and adding a variable time 20-s schedule of reinforcement to the inter-component interval. Baseline responding was lower in the schedule with the unsignaled delay but resistance to change for the initial link was unaffected by the unsignaled delay. The results suggest that not all unsignaled delays are equal in their effect on resistance to change.

  13. Effect of delay and storage on whole-blood clotting analysis as determined by thrombelastography.

    PubMed

    Orlikowski, C E; Murray, W B; Rocke, D A

    1993-01-01

    The thrombelastogram (TEG) measures the viscoelastic properties of clotting blood, displaying a visual trace of all phases of coagulation and fibrinolysis. Thrombelastography can be performed on whole blood (WBTEG) or on citrated blood or plasma, citrated samples facilitating delayed analysis but requiring recalcification of the sample. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of delay and storage method on WBTEG measurement. Thrombelastographic analysis of coagulation in whole blood was investigated after delays of 3 and 6 minutes in polystyrene syringes (PS3 and PS6) and 3 minutes in silicone-coated glass tubes (SG3). Thrombelastograms of the delayed samples were compared with those measured immediately. Silicone-coated glass tubes activated coagulation, as seen by shorter r times (p < 0.01), shorter r + k times (p < 0.01), and larger maximum amplitude (ma) values (p < 0.01) compared with TEG values determined immediately after sampling. In the SG3 group, 20% of samples had clotted by 3 minutes, and the use of SG tubes for this purpose cannot be recommended. A delay of 6 minutes in PS had less effect on the activation of clotting in the earlier stages in that the r time was prolonged (p < 0.01). However, there appeared to be some activation later in that k time was shorter (p < 0.01) and ma was wider (p < 0.05). Overall, a 3-minute delay in PS produced the best values.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. Time-delay effects on the aging transition in a population of coupled oscillators.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Bhumika; Sharma, Devendra; Sen, Abhijit

    2014-10-01

    We investigate the influence of time-delayed coupling on the nature of the aging transition in a system of coupled oscillators that have a mix of active and inactive oscillators, where the aging transition is defined as the gradual loss of collective synchrony as the proportion of inactive oscillators is increased. We start from a simple model of two time-delay coupled Stuart-Landau oscillators that have identical frequencies but are located at different distances from the Hopf bifurcation point. A systematic numerical and analytic study delineates the dependence of the critical coupling strength (at which the system experiences total loss of synchrony) on time delay and the average distance of the system from the Hopf bifurcation point. We find that time delay can act to facilitate the aging transition by lowering the threshold coupling strength for amplitude death in the system. We then extend our study to larger systems of globally coupled active and inactive oscillators including an infinite system in the thermodynamic limit. Our model system and results can provide a useful paradigm for understanding the functional robustness of diverse physical and biological systems that are prone to aging transitions.

  15. The Effect of Delayed Auditory Feedback on Activity in the Temporal Lobe while Speaking: A Positron Emission Tomography Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takaso, Hideki; Eisner, Frank; Wise, Richard J. S.; Scott, Sophie K.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Delayed auditory feedback is a technique that can improve fluency in stutterers, while disrupting fluency in many nonstuttering individuals. The aim of this study was to determine the neural basis for the detection of and compensation for such a delay, and the effects of increases in the delay duration. Method: Positron emission…

  16. The Effects of Short Interval Delay of Reinforcement Upon Human Discrimination Learning. IMRID Papers and Reports Vol. 4 No. 12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kral, Paul A.; And Others

    Investigates the effect of delay of reinforcement upon human discrimination learning with particular emphasis on the form of the gradient within the first few seconds of delay. In previous studies subjects are usually required to make an instrumental response to a stimulus, this is followed by the delay interval, and finally, the reinforcement…

  17. Learning from Feedback: Spacing and the Delay-Retention Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Troy A.; Kimball, Daniel R.

    2010-01-01

    Most modern research on the effects of feedback during learning has assumed that feedback is an error correction mechanism. Recent studies of feedback-timing effects have suggested that feedback might also strengthen initially correct responses. In an experiment involving cued recall of trivia facts, we directly tested several theories of…

  18. Evaluation of delayed effects of ionizing radiation: an historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Stewart, A M

    1991-01-01

    It is widely assumed that after the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki there were no lasting effects of the acute injuries (which included extensive damage to blood forming tissues by the radiation) or the massively high death rate (which was caused by environmental effects of the blast as well as personal injuries). However, close inspection of the dose response curves for non-cancer deaths has shown that this could be a false impression caused by one effect of marrow aplasia being confused with leukemia (defective erythropoiesis) and a second effect being confused with early selection in favor of general fitness (defective immune responses). Possible consequences of such confusion (for cancer risk coefficients) are discussed in relation to what is known about late effects of prenatal x-rays and occupational exposures to radiation. PMID:1805618

  19. Effects of delayed gastric emptying on postprandial glucose kinetics, insulin sensitivity, and β-cell function.

    PubMed

    Hinshaw, Ling; Schiavon, Michele; Mallad, Ashwini; Man, Chiara Dalla; Basu, Rita; Bharucha, Adil E; Cobelli, Claudio; Carter, Rickey E; Basu, Ananda; Kudva, Yogish C

    2014-09-15

    Controlling meal-related glucose excursions continues to be a therapeutic challenge in diabetes mellitus. Mechanistic reasons for this need to be understood better to develop appropriate therapies. To investigate delayed gastric emptying effects on postprandial glucose turnover, insulin sensitivity, and β-cell responsivity and function, as a feasibility study prior to studying patients with type 1 diabetes, we used the triple tracer technique C-peptide and oral minimal model approach in healthy subjects. A single dose of 30 μg of pramlintide administered at the start of a mixed meal was used to delay gastric emptying rates. With delayed gastric emptying rates, peak rate of meal glucose appearance was delayed, and rate of endogenous glucose production (EGP) was lower. C-peptide and oral minimal models enabled the assessments of β-cell function, insulin sensitivity, and β-cell responsivity simultaneously. Delayed gastric emptying induced by pramlintide improved total insulin sensitivity and decreased total β-cell responsivity. However, β-cell function as measured by total disposition index did not change. The improved whole body insulin sensitivity coupled with lower rate of appearance of EGP with delayed gastric emptying provides experimental proof of the importance of evaluating pramlintide in artificial endocrine pancreas approaches to reduce postprandial blood glucose variability in patients with type 1 diabetes. PMID:25074985

  20. Working-memory training: effects on delay discounting in male Long Evans rats.

    PubMed

    Renda, C Renee; Stein, Jeffrey S; Madden, Gregory J

    2015-01-01

    Delay discounting describes the devaluation of a reward as the delay to the receipt of the reward increases. Because steep delay discounting is robustly correlated with a number of behavioral problems (e.g., substance dependence, gambling) and some evidence suggests steep discounting precedes and predicts drug-taking in humans and rats, this study sought to experimentally reduce rats' delay discounting. Human stimulant-dependent participants given working-memory training reportedly decreased their rates of discounting relative to a sham-training group (Bickel, Yi, Landes, Hill, & Baxter, 2011). To evaluate the cross-species generality of this effect, 38 male Long-Evans rats, matched on pretraining delay-discounting rates, were randomly assigned to receive 140 sessions of working-memory training or sham training (which required no memory of the sample stimulus). Large between-group differences in working memory were observed after training; however, posttraining delay-discounting rates were undifferentiated across groups. Potential explanations for these findings are discussed.

  1. Effective delayed neutron fraction and prompt neutron lifetime of Tehran research reactor mixed-core.

    PubMed

    Lashkari, A; Khalafi, H; Kazeminejad, H

    2013-05-01

    In this work, kinetic parameters of Tehran research reactor (TRR) mixed cores have been calculated. The mixed core configurations are made by replacement of the low enriched uranium control fuel elements with highly enriched uranium control fuel elements in the reference core. The MTR_PC package, a nuclear reactor analysis tool, is used to perform the analysis. Simulations were carried out to compute effective delayed neutron fraction and prompt neutron lifetime. Calculation of kinetic parameters is necessary for reactivity and power excursion transient analysis. The results of this research show that effective delayed neutron fraction decreases and prompt neutron lifetime increases with the fuels burn-up. Also, by increasing the number of highly enriched uranium control fuel elements in the reference core, the prompt neutron lifetime increases, but effective delayed neutron fraction does not show any considerable change. PMID:24976672

  2. Effective delayed neutron fraction and prompt neutron lifetime of Tehran research reactor mixed-core.

    PubMed

    Lashkari, A; Khalafi, H; Kazeminejad, H

    2013-05-01

    In this work, kinetic parameters of Tehran research reactor (TRR) mixed cores have been calculated. The mixed core configurations are made by replacement of the low enriched uranium control fuel elements with highly enriched uranium control fuel elements in the reference core. The MTR_PC package, a nuclear reactor analysis tool, is used to perform the analysis. Simulations were carried out to compute effective delayed neutron fraction and prompt neutron lifetime. Calculation of kinetic parameters is necessary for reactivity and power excursion transient analysis. The results of this research show that effective delayed neutron fraction decreases and prompt neutron lifetime increases with the fuels burn-up. Also, by increasing the number of highly enriched uranium control fuel elements in the reference core, the prompt neutron lifetime increases, but effective delayed neutron fraction does not show any considerable change.

  3. Effective delayed neutron fraction and prompt neutron lifetime of Tehran research reactor mixed-core

    PubMed Central

    Lashkari, A.; Khalafi, H.; Kazeminejad, H.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, kinetic parameters of Tehran research reactor (TRR) mixed cores have been calculated. The mixed core configurations are made by replacement of the low enriched uranium control fuel elements with highly enriched uranium control fuel elements in the reference core. The MTR_PC package, a nuclear reactor analysis tool, is used to perform the analysis. Simulations were carried out to compute effective delayed neutron fraction and prompt neutron lifetime. Calculation of kinetic parameters is necessary for reactivity and power excursion transient analysis. The results of this research show that effective delayed neutron fraction decreases and prompt neutron lifetime increases with the fuels burn-up. Also, by increasing the number of highly enriched uranium control fuel elements in the reference core, the prompt neutron lifetime increases, but effective delayed neutron fraction does not show any considerable change. PMID:24976672

  4. The Effects of Social Skills Groups for Young Children with Social Delays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koyama, Takanori

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted as a program evaluation of an existing social skills program. A review of literature identified a limited number of empirical studies on group-based social skills training for young children with social delays. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of social skills groups as well as the effects of homework…

  5. Assessing the Effectiveness of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy with Language Delayed Children: A Clinical Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falkus, Gila; Tilley, Ciara; Thomas, Catherine; Hockey, Hannah; Kennedy, Anna; Arnold, Tina; Thorburn, Blair; Jones, Katie; Patel, Bhavika; Pimenta, Claire; Shah, Rena; Tweedie, Fiona; O'Brien, Felicity; Leahy, Ruth; Pring, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Parent-child interaction therapy (PCIT) is widely used by speech and language therapists to improve the interactions between children with delayed language development and their parents/carers. Despite favourable reports of the therapy from clinicians, little evidence of its effectiveness is available. We investigated the effects of PCIT as…

  6. Exponential synchronization for fuzzy cellular neural networks with time-varying delays and nonlinear impulsive effects.

    PubMed

    Pu, Hao; Liu, Yanmin; Jiang, Haijun; Hu, Cheng

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, the globally exponential synchronization of delayed fuzzy cellular neural networks with nonlinear impulsive effects are concerned. By utilizing inequality techniques and Lyapunov functional method, some sufficient conditions on the exponential synchronization are obtained based on [Formula: see text]-norm. Finally, a simulation example is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results.

  7. Effect of caffeine and adenosine on G2 repair: mitotic delay and chromosome damage.

    PubMed

    González-Fernández, A; Hernández, P; López-Sáez, J F

    1985-04-01

    Proliferating plant cells treated during the late S period with 5-aminouracil (AU), give the typical response that DNA-damaging agents induce, characterized by: an important mitotic delay, and a potentiation of the chromosome damage by caffeine post-treatment. The study of labelled prophases, after a tritiated thymidine pulse, allowed evaluation of the mitotic delay induced by AU as well as its reversion by caffeine, while chromosome damage was estimated by the percentage of anaphases and telophases showing chromosomal aberrations. Post-treatment with adenosine alone has shown no effect on mitotic delay or chromosomal damage. However, when cells after AU were incubated in caffeine plus adenosine, the chromosome damage potentiation was abolished without affecting the caffeine action on mitotic delay. As a consequence, we postulate that caffeine could have two effects on G2 cells with damaged DNA: the first, to cancel their mitotic delay and the second to inhibit some DNA-repair pathway(s). Only this last effect could be reversed by adenosine.

  8. Institutions and Cultural Diversity: Effects of Democratic and Propaganda Processes on Local Convergence and Global Diversity.

    PubMed

    Ulloa, Roberto; Kacperski, Celina; Sancho, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    In a connected world where people influence each other, what can cause a globalized monoculture, and which measures help to preserve the coexistence of cultures? Previous research has shown that factors such as homophily, population size, geography, mass media, and type of social influence play important roles. In the present paper, we investigate for the first time the impact that institutions have on cultural diversity. In our first three studies, we extend existing agent-based models and explore the effects of institutional influence and agent loyalty. We find that higher institutional influence increases cultural diversity, while individuals' loyalty to their institutions has a small, preserving effect. In three further studies, we test how bottom-up and top-down processes of institutional influence impact our model. We find that bottom-up democratic practices, such as referenda, tend to produce convergence towards homogeneity, while top-down information dissemination practices, such as propaganda, further increase diversity. In our last model--an integration of bottom-up and top-down processes into a feedback loop of information--we find that when democratic processes are rare, the effects of propaganda are amplified, i.e., more diversity emerges; however, when democratic processes are common, they are able to neutralize or reverse this propaganda effect. Importantly, our models allow for control over the full spectrum of diversity, so that a manipulation of our parameters can result in preferred levels of diversity, which will be useful for the study of other factors in the future. We discuss possible mechanisms behind our results, applications, and implications for political and social sciences. PMID:27058247

  9. Institutions and Cultural Diversity: Effects of Democratic and Propaganda Processes on Local Convergence and Global Diversity.

    PubMed

    Ulloa, Roberto; Kacperski, Celina; Sancho, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    In a connected world where people influence each other, what can cause a globalized monoculture, and which measures help to preserve the coexistence of cultures? Previous research has shown that factors such as homophily, population size, geography, mass media, and type of social influence play important roles. In the present paper, we investigate for the first time the impact that institutions have on cultural diversity. In our first three studies, we extend existing agent-based models and explore the effects of institutional influence and agent loyalty. We find that higher institutional influence increases cultural diversity, while individuals' loyalty to their institutions has a small, preserving effect. In three further studies, we test how bottom-up and top-down processes of institutional influence impact our model. We find that bottom-up democratic practices, such as referenda, tend to produce convergence towards homogeneity, while top-down information dissemination practices, such as propaganda, further increase diversity. In our last model--an integration of bottom-up and top-down processes into a feedback loop of information--we find that when democratic processes are rare, the effects of propaganda are amplified, i.e., more diversity emerges; however, when democratic processes are common, they are able to neutralize or reverse this propaganda effect. Importantly, our models allow for control over the full spectrum of diversity, so that a manipulation of our parameters can result in preferred levels of diversity, which will be useful for the study of other factors in the future. We discuss possible mechanisms behind our results, applications, and implications for political and social sciences.

  10. Institutions and Cultural Diversity: Effects of Democratic and Propaganda Processes on Local Convergence and Global Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Ulloa, Roberto; Kacperski, Celina; Sancho, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    In a connected world where people influence each other, what can cause a globalized monoculture, and which measures help to preserve the coexistence of cultures? Previous research has shown that factors such as homophily, population size, geography, mass media, and type of social influence play important roles. In the present paper, we investigate for the first time the impact that institutions have on cultural diversity. In our first three studies, we extend existing agent-based models and explore the effects of institutional influence and agent loyalty. We find that higher institutional influence increases cultural diversity, while individuals' loyalty to their institutions has a small, preserving effect. In three further studies, we test how bottom-up and top-down processes of institutional influence impact our model. We find that bottom-up democratic practices, such as referenda, tend to produce convergence towards homogeneity, while top-down information dissemination practices, such as propaganda, further increase diversity. In our last model—an integration of bottom-up and top-down processes into a feedback loop of information—we find that when democratic processes are rare, the effects of propaganda are amplified, i.e., more diversity emerges; however, when democratic processes are common, they are able to neutralize or reverse this propaganda effect. Importantly, our models allow for control over the full spectrum of diversity, so that a manipulation of our parameters can result in preferred levels of diversity, which will be useful for the study of other factors in the future. We discuss possible mechanisms behind our results, applications, and implications for political and social sciences. PMID:27058247

  11. Monte Carlo and deterministic computational methods for the calculation of the effective delayed neutron fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Zhaopeng; Talamo, Alberto; Gohar, Yousry

    2013-07-01

    The effective delayed neutron fraction β plays an important role in kinetics and static analysis of the reactor physics experiments. It is used as reactivity unit referred to as "dollar". Usually, it is obtained by computer simulation due to the difficulty in measuring it experimentally. In 1965, Keepin proposed a method, widely used in the literature, for the calculation of the effective delayed neutron fraction β. This method requires calculation of the adjoint neutron flux as a weighting function of the phase space inner products and is easy to implement by deterministic codes. With Monte Carlo codes, the solution of the adjoint neutron transport equation is much more difficult because of the continuous-energy treatment of nuclear data. Consequently, alternative methods, which do not require the explicit calculation of the adjoint neutron flux, have been proposed. In 1997, Bretscher introduced the k-ratio method for calculating the effective delayed neutron fraction; this method is based on calculating the multiplication factor of a nuclear reactor core with and without the contribution of delayed neutrons. The multiplication factor set by the delayed neutrons (the delayed multiplication factor) is obtained as the difference between the total and the prompt multiplication factors. Using Monte Carlo calculation Bretscher evaluated the β as the ratio between the delayed and total multiplication factors (therefore the method is often referred to as the k-ratio method). In the present work, the k-ratio method is applied by Monte Carlo (MCNPX) and deterministic (PARTISN) codes. In the latter case, the ENDF/B nuclear data library of the fuel isotopes (235U and 238U) has been processed by the NJOY code with and without the delayed neutron data to prepare multi-group WIMSD neutron libraries for the lattice physics code DRAGON, which was used to generate the PARTISN macroscopic cross sections. In recent years Meulekamp and van der Marck in 2006 and Nauchi and Kameyama

  12. Glucocorticoids Protect Against the Delayed Behavioral and Cellular Effects of Acute Stress on the Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Rajnish P.; Anilkumar, Shobha; McEwen, Bruce; Chattarji, Sumantra

    2013-01-01

    Background A single episode of acute immobilization stress has previously been shown to trigger a delayed onset of anxiety-like behavior and spinogenesis in the basolateral amygdala (BLA) of rats. Spurred on by a seemingly paradoxical observation in which even a modest increase in corticosterone (CORT), caused by a single vehicle injection before stress, could dampen the delayed effects of stress, we hypothesized a protective role for glucocorticoids against stress. Methods We tested this hypothesis by analyzing how manipulations in CORT levels modulate delayed increase in anxiety-like behavior of rats on the elevated plus-maze 10 days after acute stress. We also investigated the cellular correlates of different levels of anxiety under different CORT conditions by quantifying spine density on Golgi-stained BLA principal neurons. Results CORT in drinking water for 12 hours preceding acute stress prevented delayed increase in anxiety rather than exacerbating it. Conversely, vehicle injection failed to prevent the anxiogenic effect of stress in bilaterally adrenalectomized rats. However, when CORT was restored in adrenalectomized rats by injection, the delayed anxiogenic effect of stress was once again blocked. Finally, high and low anxiety states were accompanied by high and low levels of BLA spine density. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the presence of elevated levels of CORT at the time of acute stress confers protection against the delayed enhancing effect of stress on BLA synaptic connectivity and anxiety-like behavior. These observations are consistent with clinical reports on the protective effects of glucocorticoids against the development of posttraumatic symptoms triggered by traumatic stress. PMID:22572034

  13. Automated problem scheduling and reduction of synchronization delay effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saltz, Joel H.

    1987-01-01

    It is anticipated that in order to make effective use of many future high performance architectures, programs will have to exhibit at least a medium grained parallelism. A framework is presented for partitioning very sparse triangular systems of linear equations that is designed to produce favorable preformance results in a wide variety of parallel architectures. Efficient methods for solving these systems are of interest because: (1) they provide a useful model problem for use in exploring heuristics for the aggregation, mapping and scheduling of relatively fine grained computations whose data dependencies are specified by directed acrylic graphs, and (2) because such efficient methods can find direct application in the development of parallel algorithms for scientific computation. Simple expressions are derived that describe how to schedule computational work with varying degrees of granularity. The Encore Multimax was used as a hardware simulator to investigate the performance effects of using the partitioning techniques presented in shared memory architectures with varying relative synchronization costs.

  14. Discounting of delayed food rewards in pigeons and rats: is there a magnitude effect?

    PubMed Central

    Green, Leonard; Myerson, Joel; Holt, Daniel D; Slevin, John R; Estle, Sara J

    2004-01-01

    Temporal discounting refers to the decrease in the present, subjective value of a reward as the time to its receipt increases. Results from humans have shown that a hyperbola-like function describes the form of the discounting function when choices involve hypothetical monetary rewards. In addition, magnitude effects have been reported in which smaller reward amounts are discounted more steeply than larger amounts. The present research examines the cross-species generality of these findings using real rewards, namely food pellets, with both pigeons and rats. As with humans, an adjusting amount procedure was used to estimate the amount of immediate reward judged equal in value to a delayed reward. Different amounts of delayed food rewards (ranging from 5 to 32 pellets in pigeons and from 5 to 20 pellets in rats) were studied at delays varying from 1 s to 32 s. A simple hyperbola, similar to the hyperbola-like mathematical function that describes the discounting of hypothetical monetary rewards in humans, described the discounting of food rewards in both pigeons and rats. These results extend the generality of the mathematical model of discounting. Rates of discounting delayed food rewards were higher for pigeons than for rats. Unlike humans, however, neither pigeons nor rats showed a reliable magnitude effect: Rate of discounting did not vary systematically as a function of the amount of the delayed reward. PMID:15113132

  15. Effects of additional food in a delayed predator-prey model.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Banshidhar; Poria, Swarup

    2015-03-01

    We examine the effects of supplying additional food to predator in a gestation delay induced predator-prey system with habitat complexity. Additional food works in favor of predator growth in our model. Presence of additional food reduces the predatory attack rate to prey in the model. Supplying additional food we can control predator population. Taking time delay as bifurcation parameter the stability of the coexisting equilibrium point is analyzed. Hopf bifurcation analysis is done with respect to time delay in presence of additional food. The direction of Hopf bifurcations and the stability of bifurcated periodic solutions are determined by applying the normal form theory and the center manifold theorem. The qualitative dynamical behavior of the model is simulated using experimental parameter values. It is observed that fluctuations of the population size can be controlled either by supplying additional food suitably or by increasing the degree of habitat complexity. It is pointed out that Hopf bifurcation occurs in the system when the delay crosses some critical value. This critical value of delay strongly depends on quality and quantity of supplied additional food. Therefore, the variation of predator population significantly effects the dynamics of the model. Model results are compared with experimental results and biological implications of the analytical findings are discussed in the conclusion section.

  16. Delay-Induced Triple-Zero Bifurcation in a Delayed Leslie-Type Predator-Prey Model with Additive Allee Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Jiao; Song, Yongli; Yu, Pei

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a Leslie-type predator-prey model with ratio-dependent functional response and Allee effect on prey is considered. We first study the existence of the multiple positive equilibria and their stability. Then we investigate the effect of delay on the distribution of the roots of characteristic equation and obtain the conditions for the occurrence of simple-zero, double-zero and triple-zero singularities. The formulations for calculating the normal form of the triple-zero bifurcation of the delay differential equations are derived. We show that, under certain conditions on the parameters, the system exhibits homoclinic orbit, heteroclinic orbit and periodic orbit.

  17. Grazer diversity effects in an eelgrass-epiphyte-microphytobenthos system.

    PubMed

    Jaschinski, Sybill; Aberle, Nicole; Gohse-Reimann, Sandra; Brendelberger, Heinz; Wiltshire, Karen H; Sommer, Ulrich

    2009-03-01

    The dramatic loss of biodiversity and its consequences for ecosystem processes have been of considerable interest in recent ecological studies. However, the complex and interacting processes influencing diversity effects in multitrophic systems are still poorly understood. We used an experimental eelgrass system to study the effects of changing richness of three consumer species on the biomass, diversity and taxonomic composition of both epiphytic and benthic microalgal assemblages. After 1 week, consumer richness enhanced the grazing impact on epiphyte biomass relative to single consumer treatments and a positive effect of consumer richness on prey diversity was found. Moreover, strong effects of consumer species identity on taxonomic composition were found in both microalgal assemblages. However, the effects of consumer richness were not consistent over time. The consequences of high nutrient availability seemed to have masked consumer richness effects.

  18. Effect of the Colorado River Diversion on Matagorda Bay Epifauna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilber, D. H.; Bass, R.

    1998-09-01

    The effect on epifauna of the Colorado River diversion, which restored river flow to Matagorda Bay, Texas, U.S.A. was assessed using three independent data sets and analytical approaches. A monitoring study conducted by the Galveston District, U.S. Corps of Engineers, revealed lower croaker and brown shrimp abundances for 3 years following the diversion compared to their abundances during 3 pre-diversion years. No changes in the abundances of white shrimp, blue crabs and spot were evident in this monitoring study. The relative distributions of these common epifaunal organisms within the eastern arm of the bay, where the redirected river-mouth empties, did not change following the diversion. Analyses of data (1982-1995) from a long-term trawl-survey programme conducted by the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (TPWD) indicated that the catches of common epibenthic organisms in the eastern arm of the bay following the diversion were also within the range of historic variation. Species richness decreased significantly at the eastern stations where salinities were lower following the diversion. Commercial fishery landings of most species in the post-diversion period were within the range of historic variation. Oyster landings, however, were consistently low for the 4 years for which post-diversion data were available, probably because previously harvestable reefs were lost to sedimentation and burial close to the redirected river mouth. Prior to the diversion (1970-1991), oyster landings were negatively associated with the same year's maximum annual river flows and the duration of low flows (<14 m 3 s -1) 2 years previous ( r2=0·63, P<0·001). The regression results indicate that post-diversion increases in freshwater inflows during low flow periods will likely benefit oyster harvests 2 years later Increases to oyster yields may take several more years to be realized and will be contingent upon the success of harvests from the newly created oyster reefs along the

  19. Process-dependent risk of delayed health effects for welders.

    PubMed Central

    Stern, R M

    1981-01-01

    In most industrialized countries large numbers of workers are exposed to welding fumes. Although the general pattern of welders' health may not significantly differ from that of workers in other dusty industrial occupations which demonstrate elevated incidence of respiratory tract diseases with long latency periods, the extremely wide range of substances at potentially high concentrations produced by various welding technologies may give rise to undetected process-specific high-risk working conditions: ("hot spots"). The origin, prevalence and range of magnitude of such hot spots, especially for cancer of the respiratory tract, is discussed, with emphasis placed on the assessment of risk resulting from exposure to Cr(VI) and Ni accompanying the use of various technologies for the welding of stainless and high alloy steels. The wide variation of health effects found within the industry, however, indicates the need for a standard protocol for future epidemiological studies, as well as for the development of suitable methodologies for experimental risk assessment. PMID:7333241

  20. Effects of stomatal delays on the economics of leaf gas exchange under intermittent light regimes.

    PubMed

    Vico, Giulia; Manzoni, Stefano; Palmroth, Sari; Katul, Gabriel

    2011-11-01

    • Understory plants are subjected to highly intermittent light availability and their leaf gas exchanges are mediated by delayed responses of stomata and leaf biochemistry to light fluctuations. In this article, the patterns in stomatal delays across biomes and plant functional types were studied and their effects on leaf carbon gains and water losses were quantified. • A database of more than 60 published datasets on stomatal responses to light fluctuations was assembled. To interpret these experimental observations, a leaf gas exchange model was developed and coupled to a novel formulation of stomatal movement energetics. The model was used to test whether stomatal delays optimize light capture for photosynthesis, whilst limiting transpiration and carbon costs for stomatal movement. • The data analysis showed that stomatal opening and closing delays occurred over a limited range of values and were strongly correlated. Plant functional type and climate were the most important drivers of stomatal delays, with faster responses in graminoids and species from dry climates. • Although perfectly tracking stomata would maximize photosynthesis and minimize transpiration at the expense of large opening costs, the observed combinations of opening and closure times appeared to be consistent with a near-optimal balance of carbon gain, water loss and movement costs. PMID:21851359

  1. Effect of the heterogeneous neuron and information transmission delay on stochastic resonance of neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingyun; Zhang, Honghui; Chen, Guanrong

    2012-12-01

    We study the effect of heterogeneous neuron and information transmission delay on stochastic resonance of scale-free neuronal networks. For this purpose, we introduce the heterogeneity to the specified neuron with the highest degree. It is shown that in the absence of delay, an intermediate noise level can optimally assist spike firings of collective neurons so as to achieve stochastic resonance on scale-free neuronal networks for small and intermediate α(h), which plays a heterogeneous role. Maxima of stochastic resonance measure are enhanced as α(h) increases, which implies that the heterogeneity can improve stochastic resonance. However, as α(h) is beyond a certain large value, no obvious stochastic resonance can be observed. If the information transmission delay is introduced to neuronal networks, stochastic resonance is dramatically affected. In particular, the tuned information transmission delay can induce multiple stochastic resonance, which can be manifested as well-expressed maximum in the measure for stochastic resonance, appearing every multiple of one half of the subthreshold stimulus period. Furthermore, we can observe that stochastic resonance at odd multiple of one half of the subthreshold stimulus period is subharmonic, as opposed to the case of even multiple of one half of the subthreshold stimulus period. More interestingly, multiple stochastic resonance can also be improved by the suitable heterogeneous neuron. Presented results can provide good insights into the understanding of the heterogeneous neuron and information transmission delay on realistic neuronal networks.

  2. A Time-Delayed Mathematical Model for Tumor Growth with the Effect of a Periodic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shihe; Wei, Xiangqing; Zhang, Fangwei

    2016-01-01

    A time-delayed mathematical model for tumor growth with the effect of periodic therapy is studied. The establishment of the model is based on the reaction-diffusion dynamics and mass conservation law and is considered with a time delay in cell proliferation process. Sufficient conditions for the global stability of tumor free equilibrium are given. We also prove that if external concentration of nutrients is large the tumor will not disappear and the conditions under which there exist periodic solutions to the model are also determined. Results are illustrated by computer simulations.

  3. A Time-Delayed Mathematical Model for Tumor Growth with the Effect of a Periodic Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shihe; Wei, Xiangqing; Zhang, Fangwei

    2016-01-01

    A time-delayed mathematical model for tumor growth with the effect of periodic therapy is studied. The establishment of the model is based on the reaction-diffusion dynamics and mass conservation law and is considered with a time delay in cell proliferation process. Sufficient conditions for the global stability of tumor free equilibrium are given. We also prove that if external concentration of nutrients is large the tumor will not disappear and the conditions under which there exist periodic solutions to the model are also determined. Results are illustrated by computer simulations. PMID:27274763

  4. A Time-Delayed Mathematical Model for Tumor Growth with the Effect of a Periodic Therapy.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shihe; Wei, Xiangqing; Zhang, Fangwei

    2016-01-01

    A time-delayed mathematical model for tumor growth with the effect of periodic therapy is studied. The establishment of the model is based on the reaction-diffusion dynamics and mass conservation law and is considered with a time delay in cell proliferation process. Sufficient conditions for the global stability of tumor free equilibrium are given. We also prove that if external concentration of nutrients is large the tumor will not disappear and the conditions under which there exist periodic solutions to the model are also determined. Results are illustrated by computer simulations. PMID:27274763

  5. Effects of large herbivores on grassland arthropod diversity.

    PubMed

    van Klink, R; van der Plas, F; van Noordwijk, C G E Toos; WallisDeVries, M F; Olff, H

    2015-05-01

    Both arthropods and large grazing herbivores are important components and drivers of biodiversity in grassland ecosystems, but a synthesis of how arthropod diversity is affected by large herbivores has been largely missing. To fill this gap, we conducted a literature search, which yielded 141 studies on this topic of which 24 simultaneously investigated plant and arthropod diversity. Using the data from these 24 studies, we compared the responses of plant and arthropod diversity to an increase in grazing intensity. This quantitative assessment showed no overall significant effect of increasing grazing intensity on plant diversity, while arthropod diversity was generally negatively affected. To understand these negative effects, we explored the mechanisms by which large herbivores affect arthropod communities: direct effects, changes in vegetation structure, changes in plant community composition, changes in soil conditions, and cascading effects within the arthropod interaction web. We identify three main factors determining the effects of large herbivores on arthropod diversity: (i) unintentional predation and increased disturbance, (ii) decreases in total resource abundance for arthropods (biomass) and (iii) changes in plant diversity, vegetation structure and abiotic conditions. In general, heterogeneity in vegetation structure and abiotic conditions increases at intermediate grazing intensity, but declines at both low and high grazing intensity. We conclude that large herbivores can only increase arthropod diversity if they cause an increase in (a)biotic heterogeneity, and then only if this increase is large enough to compensate for the loss of total resource abundance and the increased mortality rate. This is expected to occur only at low herbivore densities or with spatio-temporal variation in herbivore densities. As we demonstrate that arthropod diversity is often more negatively affected by grazing than plant diversity, we strongly recommend considering the

  6. Effects of large herbivores on grassland arthropod diversity

    PubMed Central

    van Klink, R; van der Plas, F; van Noordwijk, C G E (Toos); WallisDeVries, M F; Olff, H

    2015-01-01

    Both arthropods and large grazing herbivores are important components and drivers of biodiversity in grassland ecosystems, but a synthesis of how arthropod diversity is affected by large herbivores has been largely missing. To fill this gap, we conducted a literature search, which yielded 141 studies on this topic of which 24 simultaneously investigated plant and arthropod diversity. Using the data from these 24 studies, we compared the responses of plant and arthropod diversity to an increase in grazing intensity. This quantitative assessment showed no overall significant effect of increasing grazing intensity on plant diversity, while arthropod diversity was generally negatively affected. To understand these negative effects, we explored the mechanisms by which large herbivores affect arthropod communities: direct effects, changes in vegetation structure, changes in plant community composition, changes in soil conditions, and cascading effects within the arthropod interaction web. We identify three main factors determining the effects of large herbivores on arthropod diversity: (i) unintentional predation and increased disturbance, (ii) decreases in total resource abundance for arthropods (biomass) and (iii) changes in plant diversity, vegetation structure and abiotic conditions. In general, heterogeneity in vegetation structure and abiotic conditions increases at intermediate grazing intensity, but declines at both low and high grazing intensity. We conclude that large herbivores can only increase arthropod diversity if they cause an increase in (a)biotic heterogeneity, and then only if this increase is large enough to compensate for the loss of total resource abundance and the increased mortality rate. This is expected to occur only at low herbivore densities or with spatio-temporal variation in herbivore densities. As we demonstrate that arthropod diversity is often more negatively affected by grazing than plant diversity, we strongly recommend considering the

  7. Effects of an Oral Advanced Organizer on Immediate and Delayed Retention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkman, Grace; Shaw, Edward L., Jr.

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a comparative advance organizer in an oral format on learners' immediate and delayed retention of subject matter related to food and nutrition when controlling for learners' prior knowledge level. Another area of interest was to investigate whether paraphrasing the comparative advance…

  8. Effects of Speaker Immersion on Independent Speaker Behavior of Preschool Children with Verbal Delays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Denise E.; Nuzzolo, Robin; Stolfi, Lauren; Natarelli, Sarah

    2006-01-01

    Speaker immersion is a tactic that uses multiple establishing operations to increase speaker behavior for individuals with limited mand and tact repertoires. The purpose of this paper was to evaluate the effects of speaker immersion on the number of independent mands, tacts, and autoclitics emitted by young children with verbal delays. In the…

  9. 77 FR 61513 - Voluntary Licensing of Amateur Rocket Operations; Correction; Delay of Effective Date

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-10

    ... opportunity to voluntarily apply for a commercial space transportation license or experimental permit. The FAA has received several adverse comments to this rule, and delays the effective date to allow time for... . For legal questions, contact Laura Montgomery, Senior Attorney for Commercial Space...

  10. Effects of delayed winter harvest on biomass yield and quality of napiergrass and energycane

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Napiergrass (Cenchrus purpureus Schumach) and energycane (Saccharum hyb.) are high-yielding perennial grasses that are well-suited for biomass production in the southeast USA. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of delayed winter harvest on biomass yield and quality of these two ...

  11. The Delay of Principle B Effect (DPBE) and Its Absence in Some Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Di Sciullo, Anna Maria; Aguero-Bautista, Calixto

    2008-01-01

    The Delay of Principle B Effect (DPBE) has been discussed in various studies that show that children around age 5 seem to violate Principle B of Binding Theory (Chomsky, 1981, and related works), when the antecedent of the pronoun is a name, but not when the antecedent is a quantifier. The analysis we propose can explain the DPBE in languages of…

  12. Effects of wrapping time delays on fermentation characteristics of baled alfalfa silages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Baled silage is an attractive forage conservation approach for small and mid-sized dairy or beef producers, partly because it limits the risks associated with baling dry hay during wet or unstable weather conditions. Our objectives were to test the effects of delayed wrapping on silage fermentation,...

  13. Effect of delayed wrapping and wrapping source on digestibility and intake of alfalfa silage in sheep

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Delays often occur between baling and wrapping during production of baled silage that increases exposure time of the forage to oxygen. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of two different wrapping sources and time intervals between baling and wrapping on intake and digestibility of al...

  14. Effects of wrapping time delays on the nutritive value of baled alfalfa silages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Baled silages are an attractive forage conservation option, especially for small and mid-sized beef and dairy producers. Our objectives were to test the effects of delayed wrapping on the nutritive value of baled alfalfa silages on a pre- and post-storage basis. A secondary objective was to evaluate...

  15. Electron correlation effects on photoionization time delay in atomic Ar and Xe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, A.; Saha, S.; Decshmukh, P. C.; Manson, S. T.; Kheifets, A. S.

    2016-05-01

    Time delay studies in photoionization processes have stimulated much interest as they provide valuable dynamical information about electron correlation and relativistic effects. In a recent work on Wigner time delay in the photoionization of noble gas atoms, it was found that correlations resulting from interchannel coupling involving shells with different principal quantum numbers have significant effects on 2s and 2p photoionization of Ne, 3s photoionization of Ar, and 3d photoionization of Kr. In the present work, photoionization time delay in inner and outer subshells of the noble gases Ar and Xe are examined by including electron correlations using different many body techniques: (i) the relativistic-random-phase approximation (RRPA), (ii) RRPA with relaxation, to include relaxation effects of the residual ion and (iii) the relativistic multiconfiguration Tamm-Dancoff (RMCTD) approximation. The (sometimes substantial) effects of the inclusion of non-RPA correlations on the photoionization Wigner time delay are reported. Work supported by DOE, Office of Chemical Sciences and DST (India).

  16. Microarray as a First Genetic Test in Global Developmental Delay: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trakadis, Yannis; Shevell, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Aim: Microarray technology has a significantly higher clinical yield than karyotyping in individuals with global developmental delay (GDD). Despite this, it has not yet been routinely implemented as a screening test owing to the perception that this approach is more expensive. We aimed to evaluate the effect that replacing karyotype with…

  17. 78 FR 6025 - Electronic Fund Transfers (Regulation E) Temporary Delay of Effective Date

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-29

    ...: The effective date of the Final Rules published February 7, 2012 (77 FR 6194) and August 20, 2012 (77 FR 50244) and technical correction published July 10, 2012 (77 FR 40459) is delayed. The Bureau will...-Frank Act. 77 FR 6194 (February Final Rule).\\3\\ On August 20, 2012, the Bureau published a...

  18. The Effects of Behavioral History on Response Acquisition with Immediate and Delayed Reinforcement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snycerski, Susan; Laraway, Sean; Huitema, Bradley E.; Poling, Alan

    2004-01-01

    Effects of prior exposure to the experimental chamber with levers present or absent and variable-time (VT) 60-s water deliveries arranged during one, five, or no 1-hr sessions were examined in rats during a 6-hr response-acquisition session in which presses on one lever produced water delivery immediately or after a 15-s resetting delay, and…

  19. The Effects of Test Trial and Processing Level on Immediate and Delayed Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Sau Hou

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effects of test trial and processing level on immediate and delayed retention. Seventy-six college students were randomly assigned first to the single test and the repeated test trials, and then to the shallow processing level and the deep processing level to study forty stimulus words.…

  20. Effect of discontinuities on the group delay of a microwave transmission line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beatty, R. W.; Otoshi, T. Y.

    1975-01-01

    The problem is considered of the effect of reflections from discontinuities at each end of a transmission line on the group delay at microwave frequencies. Previous work is briefly reviewed and a general analysis is made. Graphical data are presented based upon the formulas developed. Experimental results are given which confirm the theory.

  1. The Effects of Delayed Reinforcement on Variability and Repetition of Response Sequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odum, Amy L.; Ward, Ryan D.; Burke, K. Anne; Barnes, Christopher A.

    2006-01-01

    Four experiments examined the effects of delays to reinforcement on key peck sequences of pigeons maintained under multiple schedules of contingencies that produced variable or repetitive behavior. In Experiments 1, 2, and 4, in the repeat component only the sequence right-right-left-left earned food, and in the vary component four-response…

  2. Teaching Effectiveness and Course Evaluation: The Role of Academic Delay of Gratification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bembenutty, Hefer; McKeachie, Wilbert J.; Karabenick, Stuart A.; Lin, Yi-Guang

    This study adopted a social cognitive approach to examine the association between academic delay of gratification and students' rating of teachers and course effectiveness. Also investigated were the motivational tendencies of students and teacher and classroom characteristics that served to clarify the association. Participants were 113 college…

  3. [Systematization of data and information on delayed consequences of the effects of chemicals in humans].

    PubMed

    Ianno, L V; Pimenova, M N; Osipova, I V

    1993-01-01

    The systematization and analysis of the data connected with delayed consequences arising in human body from exposure to dangerous chemicals have been carried out. The paper contains the list of dangerous chemicals exerting mutagenic or carcinogenic effects and chromosome aberrations. The cytologic express method of revealing mucous membrane dysplasia resulting from exposure to some chemical mutagens have been evaluated.

  4. Teaching Effectiveness, Course Evaluation, and Academic Performance: The Role of Academic Delay of Gratification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bembenutty, Hefer

    2009-01-01

    Academic delay of gratification is a significant and positive predictor of students' final course grades, even after controlling for the effect of their rating of the course, expected grade, and degree of interest, importance, and utility of the academic task. Students' expected course grades are by far the strongest predictor of their final…

  5. Age of Word Acquisition Effects in Treatment of Children with Phonological Delays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gierut, Judith A.; Morrisette, Michele L.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of the age of acquisition (AoA) of words were examined in the clinical treatment of 10 preschool children with phonological delays. Using a single-subject multiple-baseline experimental design, children were enrolled in one of four conditions that varied the AoA of the treated words (early vs. late acquired) relative to their…

  6. Improving Classroom Learning: The Effectiveness of Time Delay within the TEACCH Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurt, Onur; Parsons, Chris

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of a constant time delay (CTD) strategy within a TEACCH approach and the views of the classroom teacher surrounding the teaching process. Three male students with autism participated in the study. Both qualitative and quantitative methods were used to collect and analyze data. Although experimental…

  7. Effects of natural gas composition on ignition delay under diesel conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naber, J. D.; Siebers, D. L.; Dijulio, S. S.; Westbrook, C. K.

    1993-12-01

    Effects of variations in natural gas composition on autoignition of natural gas under direct-injection (DI) diesel engine conditions were studied experimentally in a constant-volume combustion vessel and computationally using a chemical kinetic model. Four fuel blends were investigated: pure methane, a capacity weighted mean natural gas, a high ethane content natural gas, and a natural gas with added propane typical of peak shaving conditions. Experimentally measured ignition delays were longest for pure methane and became progressively shorter as ethane and propane concentrations increased. At conditions characteristic of a DI compression ignition natural gas engine at Top Dead Center (CR = 23:1, p = 6.8 MPa, T = 1150K), measured ignition delays for the four fuels varied from 1.8 ms for the peak shaving and high ethane gases to 2.7 ms for pure methane. Numerically predicted variations in ignition delay as a function of natural gas composition agreed with these measurements.

  8. UAS Air Traffic Controller Acceptability Study-2: Effects of Communications Delays and Winds in Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comstock, James R., Jr.; Ghatas, Rania W.; Consiglio, Maria C.; Chamberlain, James P.; Hoffler, Keith D.

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of Communications Delays and Winds on Air Traffic Controller ratings of acceptability of horizontal miss distances (HMDs) for encounters between UAS and manned aircraft in a simulation of the Dallas-Ft. Worth East-side airspace. Fourteen encounters per hour were staged in the presence of moderate background traffic. Seven recently retired controllers with experience at DFW served as subjects. Guidance provided to the UAS pilots for maintaining a given HMD was provided by information from self-separation algorithms displayed on the Multi-Aircraft Simulation System. Winds tested did not affect the acceptability ratings. Communications delays tested included 0, 400, 1200, and 1800 msec. For longer communications delays, there were changes in strategy and communications flow that were observed and reported by the controllers. The aim of this work is to provide useful information for guiding future rules and regulations applicable to flying UAS in the NAS.

  9. Effects of natural gas composition on ignition delay under diesel conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Naber, J.D.; Siebers, D.L.; Di Julio, S.S.; Westbrook, C.K.

    1993-12-03

    Effects of variations in natural gas composition on autoignition of natural gas under direct-injection (DI) diesel engine conditions were studied experimentally in a constant-volume combustion vessel and computationally using a chemical kinetic model. Four fuel blends were investigated: pure methane, a capacity weighted mean natural gas, a high ethane content natural gas, and a natural gas with added propane typical of peak shaving conditions. Experimentally measured ignition delays were longest for pure methane and became progressively shorter as ethane and propane concentrations increased. At conditions characteristic of a DI compression ignition natural gas engine at Top Dead Center (CR=23:1, p = 6.8 MPa, T = 1150K), measured ignition delays for the four fuels varied from 1.8 ms for the peak shaving and high ethane gases to 2.7 ms for pure methane. Numerically predicted variations in ignition delay as a function of natural gas composition agreed with these measurements.

  10. Monkey memory: same/different concept learning, serial probe acquisition, and probe delay effects.

    PubMed

    Wright, A A; Santiago, H C; Sands, S F

    1984-10-01

    Three rhesus monkeys were trained and tested in a same/different task with six successive sets of 70 item pairs to an 88% accuracy on each set. Their poor initial transfer performance (55% correct) with novel stimuli improved dramatically to 85% correct following daily item changes in the training stimuli. They acquired a serial-probe-recognition (SPR) task with variable (1-6) item list lengths. This SPR acquisition, although gradual, was more rapid for the monkeys than for pigeons similarly trained. Testing with a fixed list length of four items at different delays between the last list item and the probe test item revealed changes in the serial-position function: a recency effect (last items remembered well) for 0-s delay, recency and primacy effects (first and last list items remembered well) for 1-, 2-, and 10-s delays, and only a primacy effect for the longest 30-s delay. These results are compared with similar ones from pigeons and are discussed in relation to theories of memory processing.

  11. Effect of delayed polymerization time and bracket manipulation on orthodontic bracket bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponikvar, Michael J.

    This study examined the effect of bracket manipulation in combination with delayed polymerization times on orthodontic bracket shear bond strength and degree of resin composite conversion. Orthodontics brackets were bonded to extracted third molars in a simulated oral environment after a set period of delayed polymerization time and bracket manipulation. After curing the bracket adhesive, each bracket underwent shear bond strength testing followed by micro-Raman spectroscopy analysis to measure the degree of conversion of the resin composite. Results demonstrated the shear bond strength and the degree of conversion of ceramic brackets did not vary over time. However, with stainless steel brackets there was a significant effect (p ≤ 0.05) of delay time on shear bond strength between the 0.5 min and 10 min bracket groups. In addition, stainless steel brackets showed significant differences related to degree of conversion over time between the 0.5 min and 5 min groups, in addition to the 0.5 min and 10 min groups. This investigation suggests that delaying bracket adhesive polymerization up to a period of 10 min then adjusting the orthodontic bracket may increase both shear bond strength and degree of conversion of stainless steel brackets while having no effect on ceramic brackets.

  12. Population diversity and the portfolio effect in an exploited species.

    PubMed

    Schindler, Daniel E; Hilborn, Ray; Chasco, Brandon; Boatright, Christopher P; Quinn, Thomas P; Rogers, Lauren A; Webster, Michael S

    2010-06-01

    One of the most pervasive themes in ecology is that biological diversity stabilizes ecosystem processes and the services they provide to society, a concept that has become a common argument for biodiversity conservation. Species-rich communities are thought to produce more temporally stable ecosystem services because of the complementary or independent dynamics among species that perform similar ecosystem functions. Such variance dampening within communities is referred to as a portfolio effect and is analogous to the effects of asset diversity on the stability of financial portfolios. In ecology, these arguments have focused on the effects of species diversity on ecosystem stability but have not considered the importance of biologically relevant diversity within individual species. Current rates of population extirpation are probably at least three orders of magnitude higher than species extinction rates, so there is a pressing need to clarify how population and life history diversity affect the performance of individual species in providing important ecosystem services. Here we use five decades of data from Oncorhynchus nerka (sockeye salmon) in Bristol Bay, Alaska, to provide the first quantification of portfolio effects that derive from population and life history diversity in an important and heavily exploited species. Variability in annual Bristol Bay salmon returns is 2.2 times lower than it would be if the system consisted of a single homogenous population rather than the several hundred discrete populations it currently consists of. Furthermore, if it were a single homogeneous population, such increased variability would lead to ten times more frequent fisheries closures. Portfolio effects are also evident in watershed food webs, where they stabilize and extend predator access to salmon resources. Our results demonstrate the critical importance of maintaining population diversity for stabilizing ecosystem services and securing the economies and livelihoods

  13. Eutrophication weakens stabilizing effects of diversity in natural grasslands.

    PubMed

    Hautier, Yann; Seabloom, Eric W; Borer, Elizabeth T; Adler, Peter B; Harpole, W Stanley; Hillebrand, Helmut; Lind, Eric M; MacDougall, Andrew S; Stevens, Carly J; Bakker, Jonathan D; Buckley, Yvonne M; Chu, Chengjin; Collins, Scott L; Daleo, Pedro; Damschen, Ellen I; Davies, Kendi F; Fay, Philip A; Firn, Jennifer; Gruner, Daniel S; Jin, Virginia L; Klein, Julia A; Knops, Johannes M H; La Pierre, Kimberly J; Li, Wei; McCulley, Rebecca L; Melbourne, Brett A; Moore, Joslin L; O'Halloran, Lydia R; Prober, Suzanne M; Risch, Anita C; Sankaran, Mahesh; Schuetz, Martin; Hector, Andy

    2014-04-24

    Studies of experimental grassland communities have demonstrated that plant diversity can stabilize productivity through species asynchrony, in which decreases in the biomass of some species are compensated for by increases in others. However, it remains unknown whether these findings are relevant to natural ecosystems, especially those for which species diversity is threatened by anthropogenic global change. Here we analyse diversity-stability relationships from 41 grasslands on five continents and examine how these relationships are affected by chronic fertilization, one of the strongest drivers of species loss globally. Unmanipulated communities with more species had greater species asynchrony, resulting in more stable biomass production, generalizing a result from biodiversity experiments to real-world grasslands. However, fertilization weakened the positive effect of diversity on stability. Contrary to expectations, this was not due to species loss after eutrophication but rather to an increase in the temporal variation of productivity in combination with a decrease in species asynchrony in diverse communities. Our results demonstrate separate and synergistic effects of diversity and eutrophication on stability, emphasizing the need to understand how drivers of global change interactively affect the reliable provisioning of ecosystem services in real-world systems.

  14. Interaction effect of contingency management and sex on delay-discounting changes among treatment-seeking smokers.

    PubMed

    Weidberg, Sara; Landes, Reid D; García-Rodríguez, Olaya; Yoon, Jin H; Secades-Villa, Roberto

    2015-10-01

    Despite the potential influence of sex on delay-discounting rates, there is no previous evidence with regard to the effect of this variable on the clinical interventions aimed at modifying delay-discounting rates. This study assessed the effect of sex on the association between the type of treatment received (either cognitive-behavioral treatment [CBT] alone or combined with contingency management [CM + CBT]) and delay-discounting changes at end of treatment and 6-month follow-up. This aim was addressed after controlling for the influence of baseline delay discounting. Treatment-seeking smokers (N = 116) were randomly assigned to either CM + CBT (n = 69) or CBT alone (n = 47). Participants completed delay-discounting assessments at intake, at end of treatment, and at 6-month follow-up. Results showed that there was a significant interaction effect of treatment type and sex, such that women who received CM decreased their discounting more than women who did not. However, this effect was not found among men. Participants who discounted most at intake showed the greatest delay-discounting decreases. Lastly, smoking abstinence did not affect changes in delay discounting. The current results suggest that CM intervention may have a differential effect on delay-discounting changes as a function of sex. This finding supports the relevance of considering the effect of individual variables when assessing changes in delay discounting due to clinical interventions.

  15. Delayed conifer mortality after fuel reduction treatments: Interactive effects of fuel, fire intensity, and bark beetles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Youngblood, A.; Grace, J.B.; Mciver, J.D.

    2009-01-01

    Many low-elevation dry forests of the western United States contain more small trees and fewer large trees, more down woody debris, and less diverse and vigorous understory plant communities compared to conditions under historical fire regimes. These altered structural conditions may contribute to increased probability of unnaturally severe wildfires, susceptibility to uncharacteristic insect outbreaks, and drought-related mortality. Broad-scale fuel reduction and restoration treatments are proposed to promote stand development on trajectories toward more sustainable structures. Little research to date, however, has quantified the effects of these treatments on the ecosystem, especially delayed and latent tree mortality resulting directly or indirectly from treatments. In this paper, we explore complex hypotheses relating to the cascade of effects that influence ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) and Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) mortality using structural equation modeling (SEM). We used annual census and plot data through six growing seasons after thinning and four growing seasons after burning from a replicated, operational-scale, completely randomized experiment conducted in northeastern Oregon, USA, as part of the national Fire and Fire Surrogate study. Treatments included thin, burn, thin followed by burn (thin+burn), and control. Burn and thin+burn treatments increased the proportion of dead trees while the proportion of dead trees declined or remained constant in thin and control units, although the density of dead trees was essentially unchanged with treatment. Most of the new mortality (96%) occurred within two years of treatment and was attributed to bark beetles. Bark beetle-caused tree mortality, while low overall, was greatest in thin + burn treatments. SEM results indicate that the probability of mortality of large-diameter ponderosa pine from bark beetles and wood borers was directly related to surface fire severity and bole charring, which in

  16. The effects of time delay in man-machine control systems: Implications for design of flight simulator Visual-Display-Delay compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crane, D. F.

    1984-01-01

    When human operators are performing precision tracking tasks, their dynamic response can often be modeled by quasilinear describing functions. That fact permits analysis of the effects of delay in certain man machine control systems using linear control system analysis techniques. The analysis indicates that a reduction in system stability is the immediate effect of additional control system delay, and that system characteristics moderate or exaggerate the importance of the delay. A selection of data (simulator and flight test) consistent with the analysis is reviewed. Flight simulator visual-display delay compensation, designed to restore pilot aircraft system stability, was evaluated in several studies which are reviewed here. The studies range from single-axis, tracking-task experiments (with sufficient subjects and trials to establish the statistical significance of the results) to a brief evaluation of compensation of a computer generated imagery (CGI) visual display system in a full six degree of freedom simulation. The compensation was effective, improvements in pilot performance and workload or aircraft handling qualities rating (HQR) were observed. Results from recent aircraft handling qualities research literature, which support the compensation design approach, are also reviewed.

  17. A Job with a Future? Delay Discounting, Magnitude Effects, and Domain Independence of Utility for Career Decisions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenfelder, Thomas E.; Hantula, Donald A.

    2003-01-01

    Seniors (n=20) assessed two job offers with differences in domain (salary/tasks), delay (career-long earnings), and magnitude (initial salary offer). Contrary to discounted utility theory, choices reflected nonconstant discount rates for future salary/tasks (delay effect), lower discount rates for salary/preferred tasks (magnitude effect), and a…

  18. IgE adjuvant effect caused by particles - immediate and delayed effects.

    PubMed

    Granum, B; Gaarder, P I; Løvik, M

    2001-01-01

    Diesel exhaust particles are reported to increase the specific IgE response to ovalbumin (OVA) and pollen. Evidence has been provided that the particle core contributes to this adjuvant activity. The purpose of our study was to investigate the effect of well-defined simple particles, polystyrene particles (PSP), on the production of allergen-specific IgE in a mouse model. The IgE adjuvant effect of PSP was investigated in experiments using intranasal (i.n.) instillation, intratracheal (i.t.) instillation or intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection. Delayed and cumulative adjuvant effects were investigated by giving mice i.p. injections with PSP 1-3 days, or on 4 consecutive days before OVA, respectively. The levels of allergen-specific and total IgE were measured. Irrespectively of immunisation route and protocol, OVA in combination with PSP elicited increased levels of both allergen-specific and total IgE when compared with OVA alone. Therefore, in the experimental model, particles were found to augment the specific IgE response to an allergen even when the allergen was introduced several days after the particles. These findings imply that individuals exposed to particulate air pollution at one point of time may develop an increased reaction towards allergens inhaled later that day or even several days after the particle exposure. PMID:11164617

  19. Tracking with asymptotic sliding mode and adaptive input delay effect compensation of nonlinearly perturbed delayed systems applied to traffic feedback control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirkin, Boris; Haddad, Jack; Shtessel, Yuri

    2016-09-01

    Asymptotical sliding mode-model reference adaptive control design for a class of systems with parametric uncertainty, unknown nonlinear perturbation and external disturbance, and with known input and state delays is proposed. To overcome the difficulty to directly predict the plant state under uncertainties, a control design is based on a developed decomposition procedure, where a 'generalised error' in conjunction with auxiliary linear dynamic blocks with adjustable gains is introduced and the sliding variable is formed on the basis of this error. The effect of such a decomposition is to pull the input delay out of first step of the design procedure. As a result, similarly to the classical Smith predictor, the adaptive control architecture based only on the lumped-delays, i.e. without conventional in such cases difficult-implemented distributed-delay blocks. Two new adaptive control schemes are proposed. A linearisation-based control design is constructed for feedback control of an urban traffic region model with uncertain dynamics. Simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the developed adaptive control method.

  20. Delayed information flow effect in economy systems. An ACP model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miśkiewicz, Janusz; Ausloos, M.

    2007-08-01

    Applying any strategy requires some knowledge about the past state of the system. Unfortunately in the case of economy, collecting information is a difficult, expensive and time consuming process. Therefore, the information about the system is usually known only at the end of some well-defined intervals, e.g. through company, national bank inflation data and Gross Domestic Product (GDP) reports, etc. They describe a (market) situation in the past. The time delay is specific to the market branch. It can be very short (e.g. stock market offer is updated every minute or so and this information is quasi-immediately available) or long, like months in the case of agricultural markets, when the decisions are taken based on the results from the previous harvest. The analysis of the information flow delay can be based on the Ausloos-Clippe-Pękalski (ACP) model of spatial evolution of economic systems. The entities can move on a (square) lattice and when meeting take one of the two following decisions: merge or create a new entity. The decision is based on the system state, which is known with some time delay. The effect of system's feedback is hereby investigated. We consider the case of company distribution evolution in a heterogeneous field. The information flow time delay implies different final states, including cycles; it is like a control parameter in a logistic map.

  1. Joint effects of mitosis and intracellular delay on viral dynamics: two-parameter bifurcation analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Michael Y; Shu, Hongying

    2012-05-01

    To understand joint effects of logistic growth in target cells and intracellular delay on viral dynamics in vivo, we carry out two-parameter bifurcation analysis of an in-host model that describes infections of many viruses including HIV-I, HBV and HTLV-I. The bifurcation parameters are the mitosis rate r of the target cells and an intracellular delay τ in the incidence of viral infection. We describe the stability region of the chronic-infection equilibrium E* in the two-dimensional (r, τ) parameter space, as well as the global Hopf bifurcation curves as each of τ and r varies. Our analysis shows that, while both τ and r can destabilize E* and cause Hopf bifurcations, they do behave differently. The intracellular delay τ can cause Hopf bifurcations only when r is positive and sufficiently large, while r can cause Hopf bifurcations even when τ = 0. Intracellular delay τ can cause stability switches in E* while r does not.

  2. Vascular hyper-reactivity following arterial balloon injury: distant and delayed effects.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Andrew J

    2004-05-01

    The adverse functional effects of balloon angioplasty include simple procedure failure, compromise of vessel lumen (rupture), and restenosis. A much less well-defined repercussion of balloon injury to arteries is a paradoxical alteration in vascular reactivity at an anatomically distant site. The paper by Accorsi-Mendonça in the current issue presents new data showing that, following balloon injury to the rat left common carotid artery, there is a delayed hyperreactivity to both phenylephrine and angiotensin II in the contralateral artery. The pharmacological basis of these effects is unknown, although the authors demonstrate that products of cyclooxygenase (COX) 1 or 2 are responsible for the hyperreactivity to angiotensin II and phenylephrine, respectively. The absence of delayed hyperreactivity to these agents in the aorta of injured rats would suggest that a humoral factor is not involved.

  3. Toilet training children with autism and developmental delays: an effective program for school settings.

    PubMed

    Cocchiola, Michael A; Martino, Gayle M; Dwyer, Lisa J; Demezzo, Kelly

    2012-01-01

    Current research literature on toilet training for children with autism or developmental delays focuses on smaller case studies, typically with concentrated clinical support. Limited research exists to support an effective school-based program to teach toileting skills implemented by public school staff. We describe an intervention program to toilet train 5 children with autism or developmental delays who demonstrated no prior success in the home or school setting. Intervention focused on (a) removal of diapers during school hours, (b) scheduled time intervals for bathroom visits, (c) a maximum of 3 min sitting on the toilet, (d) reinforcers delivered immediately contingent on urination in the toilet, and (e) gradually increased time intervals between bathroom visits as each participant met mastery during the preceding, shorter time interval. The program was effective across all 5 cases in a community-based elementary school. Paraprofessional staff implemented the program with minimal clinical oversight.

  4. Magnitude Effects for Experienced Rewards at Short Delays in the Escalating Interest Task

    PubMed Central

    Young, Michael E.; Webb, Tara L.; Sutherland, Steven C.; Jacobs, Eric A.

    2012-01-01

    A first-person shooter video game was adapted for the study of choice between smaller sooner and larger later rewards. Participants chose when to fire a weapon that increased in damage potential over a short interval. When the delay to maximum damage was shorter (5 – 8 s), people showed greater sensitivity to the consequences of their choices than when the delay was longer (17 – 20 s). Participants also evidenced a magnitude effect by waiting proportionally longer when the damage magnitudes were doubled for all rewards. The experiment replicated the standard magnitude effect with this new video game preparation over time scales similar to those typically used in nonhuman animal studies and without complications due to satiation or cost. PMID:23188742

  5. The smoking Stroop and delay discounting in smokers: effects of environmental smoking cues.

    PubMed

    Field, Matt; Rush, Michelle; Cole, Jon; Goudie, Andrew

    2007-08-01

    We investigated the effects of exposure to environmental smoking-related cues (holding a lit cigarette in an environment previously associated with smoking) on cigarette craving, colour naming of smoking-related words in a modified Stroop task, and on the delay discounting of hypothetical rewards, in daily cigarette smokers (N = 30). Compared to exposure to neutral cues, exposure to smoking-related cues was associated with increased cigarette craving and slower colour naming of smoking-related compared to matched control words. However, smoking cues had no effect on delay discounting. These results suggest that smoking cues increase craving and the ability of smoking-related words to grab the attention, but do not influence impulsive decision-making. Theoretical and clinical implications are discussed.

  6. The effect of reinforcer magnitude on probability and delay discounting of experienced outcomes in a computer game task in humans.

    PubMed

    Greenhow, Anna K; Hunt, Maree J; Macaskill, Anne C; Harper, David N

    2015-09-01

    Delay and uncertainty of receipt both reduce the subjective value of reinforcers. Delay has a greater impact on the subjective value of smaller reinforcers than of larger ones while the reverse is true for uncertainty. We investigated the effect of reinforcer magnitude on discounting of delayed and uncertain reinforcers using a novel approach: embedding relevant choices within a computer game. Participants made repeated choices between smaller, certain, immediate outcomes and larger, but delayed or uncertain outcomes while experiencing the result of each choice. Participants' choices were generally well described by the hyperbolic discounting function. Smaller numbers of points were discounted more steeply than larger numbers as a function of delay but not probability. The novel experiential choice task described is a promising approach to investigating both delay and probability discounting in humans.

  7. The effect of reinforcer magnitude on probability and delay discounting of experienced outcomes in a computer game task in humans.

    PubMed

    Greenhow, Anna K; Hunt, Maree J; Macaskill, Anne C; Harper, David N

    2015-09-01

    Delay and uncertainty of receipt both reduce the subjective value of reinforcers. Delay has a greater impact on the subjective value of smaller reinforcers than of larger ones while the reverse is true for uncertainty. We investigated the effect of reinforcer magnitude on discounting of delayed and uncertain reinforcers using a novel approach: embedding relevant choices within a computer game. Participants made repeated choices between smaller, certain, immediate outcomes and larger, but delayed or uncertain outcomes while experiencing the result of each choice. Participants' choices were generally well described by the hyperbolic discounting function. Smaller numbers of points were discounted more steeply than larger numbers as a function of delay but not probability. The novel experiential choice task described is a promising approach to investigating both delay and probability discounting in humans. PMID:26377438

  8. Interactive effects of delayed bedtime and family-associated factors on depression in elementary school children.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jin-Ding; Tung, Ho-Jui; Hsieh, Yu-Hsin; Lin, Fu-Gong

    2011-01-01

    Shorter sleep time was reported to be associated with psychological functioning in children. We intended to examine the relationship between nocturnal sleep duration and depression status by investigating if delayed bedtime could be one of the enhancement factors for depression in children. A cross-sectional study was performed to investigate the depression status in elementary school children in middle Taiwan. Total 676 participants from 29 schools, in grades 3-6 were recruited to participate in the study. A modified depression scale for domestic school children was used to determine the depression status. Data of depression-related demographic characteristics, family, school variables and bedtime data were collected with a structured questionnaire. The results showed that almost one in five children (18%) had depression status. Delayed bedtime, child-parent relationship, family climate, and peer relationship were found to be the main predictors of childhood depression. Further stratification analysis showed that delayed bedtime significantly interacted with family climate and peer relationship on childhood depression. The risk of depression for children with a delayed bedtime of 10 PM and either in a non-harmonious family life or without a close parent-child relationship was 4.35 and 4.73 times greater than the reference group respectively. This study provides evidence for interactive effects between delayed bedtime and family concern factors which synergistically elevated the risk of childhood depression. This information may serve as a practical guide for parents and school teachers by recognizing that an adequate bedtime schedule could serve as a preventive measure against depression in children.

  9. The early effects of delayed cord clamping in term infants born to Libyan mothers.

    PubMed

    Emhamed, Musbah Omar; van Rheenen, Patrick; Brabin, Bernard J

    2004-10-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the haematological effects of the timing of umbilical cord clamping in term infants 24 h after birth in Libya. Mother-infant pairs were randomly assigned to early cord clamping (within 10s after delivery) or delayed clamping (after the cord stopped pulsating). Maternal haematological status was assessed on admission in the delivery room. Infant haematological status was evaluated in cord blood and 24 h after birth. Bilirubin concentration was assessed at 24 h. 104 mother-infant pairs were randomized to delayed (n=58) or early cord clamping (n=46). At baseline the groups had similar demographic and biomedical characteristics, except for a difference in maternal haemoglobin, which was significantly higher in the early clamping group (11.7 g/dL, SD 1.3 g/dL versus 10.9 g/dL, SD 1.6 g/dL; P=0.0035). Twenty-four hours after delivery the mean infant haemoglobin level was significantly higher in the delayed clamping group (18.5 g/dL versus 17.1 g/dL; P=0.0005). No significant differences were found in clinical jaundice or plethora. Surprisingly, blood analysis showed that two babies in the early clamping group had total serum bilirubin levels (> 15 mg/dL) that necessitated phototherapy. There were no babies in the late clamping group who required phototherapy. Three infants in the delayed clamping group had polycythaemia without symptoms, for which no partial exchange transfusion was necessary. Delaying cord clamping until the pulsations stop increases the red cell mass in term infants. It is a safe, simple and low cost delivery procedure that should be incorporated in integrated programmes aimed at reducing iron deficiency anaemia in infants in developing countries.

  10. Time Delay Effect in a Living Coupled Oscillator System with the Plasmodium of Physarum polycephalum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamatsu, Atsuko; Fujii, Teruo; Endo, Isao

    2000-08-01

    A living coupled oscillator system was constructed by a cell patterning method with a plasmodial slime mold, in which parameters such as coupling strength and distance between the oscillators can be systematically controlled. Rich oscillation phenomena between the two-coupled oscillators, namely, desynchronizing and antiphase/in-phase synchronization were observed according to these parameters. Both experimental and theoretical approaches showed that these phenomena are closely related to the time delay effect in interactions between the oscillators.

  11. Measurements of effective delayed neutron fraction in a fast neutron reactor using the perturbation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hao-Jun; Yin, Yan-Peng; Fan, Xiao-Qiang; Li, Zheng-Hong; Pu, Yi-Kang

    2016-06-01

    A perturbation method is proposed to obtain the effective delayed neutron fraction β eff of a cylindrical highly enriched uranium reactor. Based on reactivity measurements with and without a sample at a specified position using the positive period technique, the reactor reactivity perturbation Δρ of the sample in β eff units is measured. Simulations of the perturbation experiments are performed using the MCNP program. The PERT card is used to provide the difference dk of effective neutron multiplication factors with and without the sample inside the reactor. Based on the relationship between the effective multiplication factor and the reactivity, the equation β eff = dk/Δρ is derived. In this paper, the reactivity perturbations of 13 metal samples at the designable position of the reactor are measured and calculated. The average β eff value of the reactor is given as 0.00645, and the standard uncertainty is 3.0%. Additionally, the perturbation experiments for β eff can be used to evaluate the reliabilities of the delayed neutron parameters. This work shows that the delayed neutron data of 235U and 238U from G.R. Keepin’s publication are more reliable than those from ENDF-B6.0, ENDF-B7.0, JENDL3.3 and CENDL2.2. Supported by Foundation of Key Laboratory of Neutron Physics, China Academy of Engineering Physics (2012AA01, 2014AA01), National Natural Science Foundation (11375158, 91326104)

  12. 76 FR 82115 - Wage Methodology for the Temporary Non-Agricultural Employment H-2B Program; Delay of Effective Date

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-30

    ... effective date of the rule amending 20 CFR part 655, published January 19, 2011, at 76 FR 3452, delayed at 76 FR 45667, August 1, 2011, and further delayed at 76 FR 59896, September 28, 2011, and 76 FR 73508...-agricultural Employment H-2B Program; Final Rule (the Wage Rule) on January 19, 2011, 76 FR 3452. The Wage...

  13. The Effects of Constant Time Delay and Strategic Instruction on Students with Learning Disabilities' Maintenance and Generalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Margaret M.; Houchins, David E.; Shippen, Margaret E.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this series of case studies was to compare the impact of Constant Time Delay and Strategic Instruction on the maintenance and generalization of learning. Four middle school students with learning disabilities were effectively taught two different groups of multiplication facts using Constant Time Delay and Strategic instruction. The…

  14. Effects of Stimulus Context, Study Time, and Delay on Visual Recognition Memory in Six-Month-Old Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faber, Melissa M.

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether context facilitated memory and whether this facilitation was still evident after a delay. Infants were expected to recognize pictures significantly longer when they were tested with the same context cues. This context effect was expected to be even after a 5-minute delay. The subjects were 64…

  15. The Effects of Embedded Skill Instruction on the Acquisition of Target and Nontarget Skills in Preschoolers with Developmental Delays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daugherty, Stefanie; Grisham-Brown, Jennifer; Hemmeter, Mary Louise

    2001-01-01

    In the current study, a constant time delay (CTD) procedure was embedded in classroom activities and routines to teach counting to three preschool children with speech and language delays. CTD was effective in teaching numbers to all three children. One child out of two also was able to acquire non-target information. (Contains references.) (CR)

  16. Delayed mortality effects cut the malaria transmission potential of insecticide-resistant mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Viana, Mafalda; Hughes, Angela; Matthiopoulos, Jason; Ranson, Hilary; Ferguson, Heather M

    2016-08-01

    Malaria transmission has been substantially reduced across Africa through the distribution of long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs). However, the emergence of insecticide resistance within mosquito vectors risks jeopardizing the future efficacy of this control strategy. The severity of this threat is uncertain because the consequences of resistance for mosquito fitness are poorly understood: while resistant mosquitoes are no longer immediately killed upon contact with LLINs, their transmission potential may be curtailed because of longer-term fitness costs that persist beyond the first 24 h after exposure. Here, we used a Bayesian state-space model to quantify the immediate (within 24 h of exposure) and delayed (>24 h after exposure) impact of insecticides on daily survival and malaria transmission potential of moderately and highly resistant laboratory populations of the major African malaria vector Anopheles gambiae Contact with LLINs reduced the immediate survival of moderately and highly resistant An. gambiae strains by 60-100% and 3-61%, respectively, and delayed mortality impacts occurring beyond the first 24 h after exposure further reduced their overall life spans by nearly one-half. In total, insecticide exposure was predicted to reduce the lifetime malaria transmission potential of insecticide-resistant vectors by two-thirds, with delayed effects accounting for at least one-half of this reduction. The existence of substantial, previously unreported, delayed mortality effects within highly resistant malaria vectors following exposure to insecticides does not diminish the threat of growing resistance, but posits an explanation for the apparent paradox of continued LLIN effectiveness in the presence of high insecticide resistance. PMID:27402740

  17. [Effect of anti-inflammatory agents and immunostimulants on delayed hypersensitivity].

    PubMed

    Bogdanova, A Sh

    1987-02-01

    Combination of nonnarcotic analgetics (antiphlogistic drugs) such as acetylsalicylic acid, indomethacin, voltaren and naproxen and immunostimulators such as prodigiozan, levamisole and methyluracil were studied with respect to their effect on delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) to dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB) in noninbred albino rats of both sexes. The drugs were administered after sensitization. It was shown that prodigiozan did not change DTH to DNCB. Levamisole and methyluracil lowered DTH to DNCB. The effect of levamisole was preserved in the presence of indomethacin and voltaren. Indomethacin and voltaren inhibited DTH. Acetylsalicylic acid and naproxen did not change it. Prodigiozan, methyluracil and levamisole did not change the character of the effect of the above antiphlogistic drugs on DTH.

  18. Predator diversity effects in an exotic freshwater food web.

    PubMed

    Naddafi, Rahmat; Rudstam, Lars G

    2013-01-01

    Cascading trophic interactions are often defined as the indirect effects of a predator on primary producers through the effect of the predator on herbivores. These effects can be both direct through removal of herbivores [density-mediated indirect interactions (DMIIs)] or indirect through changes in the behavior of the herbivores [trait-mediated indirect interactions (TMIIs)]. How the relative importance of these two indirect interactions varies with predator diversity remains poorly understood. We tested the effect of predator diversity on both TMIIs and DMIIs on phytoplankton using two competitive invasive dreissenid mussel species (zebra mussel and quagga mussel) as the herbivores and combinations of one, two or all three species of the predators pumpkinseed sunfish, round goby, and rusty crayfish. Predators had either direct access to mussels and induced both TMII and DMII, or no direct access and induced only TMII through the presence of risk cues. In both sets of treatments, the predators induced a trophic cascade which resulted in more phytoplankton remaining with predators present than with only mussels present. The trophic cascade was weaker in three-predator and two-predator treatments than in one-predator treatments when predators had direct access to dreissenids (DMIIs and TMIIs). Crayfish had higher cascading effects on phytoplankton than both pumpkinseed and round goby. Increased predator diversity decreased the strength of DMIIs but had no effect on the strength of TMIIs. The strength of TMIIs was higher with zebra than quagga mussels. Our study suggests that inter-specific interference among predators in multi-species treatments weakens the consumptive cascading effects of predation on lower trophic levels whereas the importance of predator diversity on trait mediated effects depends on predator identity. PMID:23991126

  19. Predator Diversity Effects in an Exotic Freshwater Food Web

    PubMed Central

    Naddafi, Rahmat; Rudstam, Lars G.

    2013-01-01

    Cascading trophic interactions are often defined as the indirect effects of a predator on primary producers through the effect of the predator on herbivores. These effects can be both direct through removal of herbivores [density-mediated indirect interactions (DMIIs)] or indirect through changes in the behavior of the herbivores [trait-mediated indirect interactions (TMIIs)]. How the relative importance of these two indirect interactions varies with predator diversity remains poorly understood. We tested the effect of predator diversity on both TMIIs and DMIIs on phytoplankton using two competitive invasive dreissenid mussel species (zebra mussel and quagga mussel) as the herbivores and combinations of one, two or all three species of the predators pumpkinseed sunfish, round goby, and rusty crayfish. Predators had either direct access to mussels and induced both TMII and DMII, or no direct access and induced only TMII through the presence of risk cues. In both sets of treatments, the predators induced a trophic cascade which resulted in more phytoplankton remaining with predators present than with only mussels present. The trophic cascade was weaker in three-predator and two-predator treatments than in one-predator treatments when predators had direct access to dreissenids (DMIIs and TMIIs). Crayfish had higher cascading effects on phytoplankton than both pumpkinseed and round goby. Increased predator diversity decreased the strength of DMIIs but had no effect on the strength of TMIIs. The strength of TMIIs was higher with zebra than quagga mussels. Our study suggests that inter-specific interference among predators in multi-species treatments weakens the consumptive cascading effects of predation on lower trophic levels whereas the importance of predator diversity on trait mediated effects depends on predator identity. PMID:23991126

  20. Design and In Vivo Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Ketoprofen Delayed Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Cerciello, Andrea; Auriemma, Giulia; Morello, Silvana; Pinto, Aldo; Del Gaudio, Pasquale; Russo, Paola; Aquino, Rita P

    2015-10-01

    For the treatment of inflammatory-based diseases affected by circadian rhythms, the development of once-daily dosage forms is required to target early morning symptoms. In this study, Zn-alginate beads containing ketoprofen (K) were developed by a tandem technique prilling/ionotropic gelation. The effect of main critical variables on particles micromeritics, inner structure as well as on drug loading and in vitro drug release was studied. The in vivo anti-inflammatory efficacy was evaluated using a modified protocol of carrageenan-induced edema in rat paw administering beads to rats by oral gavage at 0, 3, or 5 h before edema induction. Good drug loading and desired particle size and morphology were obtained for the optimized formulation F20. In vitro dissolution studies showed that F20 had a gastroresistant behavior and delayed release of the drug in simulated intestinal fluid. The in vitro delayed release pattern was clearly reflected in the prolonged anti-inflammatory effect in vivo of F20, compared to pure ketoprofen; F20, administered 3 h before edema induction, showed a significant anti-inflammatory activity, reducing maximum paw volume in response to carrageenan injection, whereas no response was observed for ketoprofen. The designed beads appear a promising platform suitable for a delayed release of anti-inflammatory drugs. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association J Pharm Sci 104:3451-3458, 2015. PMID:26088065

  1. Sensitivity and uncertainty in the effective delayed neutron fraction ({beta}{sub eff})

    SciTech Connect

    Kodeli, I. I.

    2012-07-01

    Precise knowledge of effective delayed neutron fraction ({beta}{sub eff}) and of the corresponding uncertainty is important for reactor safety analysis. The interest in developing the methodology for estimating the uncertainty in {beta}{sub eff} was expressed in the scope of the UAM project of the OECD/NEA. A novel approach for the calculation of the nuclear data sensitivity and uncertainty of the effective delayed neutron fraction is proposed, based on the linear perturbation theory. The method allows the detailed analysis of components of {beta}{sub eff} uncertainty. The procedure was implemented in the SUSD3D sensitivity and uncertainty code applied to several fast neutron benchmark experiments from the ICSBEP and IRPhE databases. According to the JENDL-4 covariance matrices and taking into account the uncertainty in the cross sections and in the prompt and delayed fission spectra the total uncertainty in {beta}eff was found to be of the order of {approx}2 to {approx}3.5 % for the studied fast experiments. (authors)

  2. Competitive coexistence and competitive exclusion for a nonlinear community with delay effect and impulsive birth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yanping; Zhang, Feng; Wei, Jianzhou

    2016-12-01

    By constructing a population model of multi-species competition, a community with nonlinear interaction relationship is investigated, in which the species' response delay and environmental fluctuation effects (i.e., seasonal fluctuation of resource supplies and species' reproductive activities) on population are considered. Firstly, the conditions about competitive coexistence (i.e., persistence of all species) and competitive exclusion (i.e., only partial of species, but not all, keep persistence) of the community are established, and the underlying ecological mechanism of these results are analyzed. Secondly, by some illustrative examples, the interactive effects of nonlinear competition, species' response delay and environmental fluctuation on the structure of community are explored. It is demonstrated that small response delay and slight deviation of nonlinear competition indexes from 1 have little impact on the coexistence of community, but acute changes have distinct negative influence on community coexistence. This reveals to us that parameter perturbations of natural communities should keep in an appropriate range, which is of great significance in conservation and restoration biology.

  3. Effect of sodium ferulate on delayed rectifier K+ currents in PC12 cells

    PubMed Central

    WANG, WEI; WANG, YUYUN; ZHANG, CHUNLEI; SUN, MENGMENG; ZHU, XIAOYIN

    2014-01-01

    In order to investigate the effect of sodium ferulate (SF) on voltage-activated K+ channels, the delayed rectifier K+ current (Ik) in PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cells was recorded using the automated patch-clamp method. The results indicated that following the application of SF, the Ik in PC12 cells was significantly decreased in a concentration-dependent manner. The analysis of activation kinetic curves and inactivation kinetic curves of Ik showed that SF had an effect on the activation and inactivation kinetics. Following the application of 15.3 μM SF, the activation curve of the Ik of PC12 cells was shifted to positive potentials and the inactivation curve of the Ik of PC12 cells was shifted to negative potentials. This study revealed that the delayed rectifier K+ currents of PC12 cells were inhibited following SF treatment in a concentration-dependent manner. The mechanism may be associated with the delayed activation and enhanced inactivation of Ik-associated channels. PMID:25120634

  4. Design and In Vivo Anti-Inflammatory Effect of Ketoprofen Delayed Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Cerciello, Andrea; Auriemma, Giulia; Morello, Silvana; Pinto, Aldo; Del Gaudio, Pasquale; Russo, Paola; Aquino, Rita P

    2015-10-01

    For the treatment of inflammatory-based diseases affected by circadian rhythms, the development of once-daily dosage forms is required to target early morning symptoms. In this study, Zn-alginate beads containing ketoprofen (K) were developed by a tandem technique prilling/ionotropic gelation. The effect of main critical variables on particles micromeritics, inner structure as well as on drug loading and in vitro drug release was studied. The in vivo anti-inflammatory efficacy was evaluated using a modified protocol of carrageenan-induced edema in rat paw administering beads to rats by oral gavage at 0, 3, or 5 h before edema induction. Good drug loading and desired particle size and morphology were obtained for the optimized formulation F20. In vitro dissolution studies showed that F20 had a gastroresistant behavior and delayed release of the drug in simulated intestinal fluid. The in vitro delayed release pattern was clearly reflected in the prolonged anti-inflammatory effect in vivo of F20, compared to pure ketoprofen; F20, administered 3 h before edema induction, showed a significant anti-inflammatory activity, reducing maximum paw volume in response to carrageenan injection, whereas no response was observed for ketoprofen. The designed beads appear a promising platform suitable for a delayed release of anti-inflammatory drugs. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association J Pharm Sci 104:3451-3458, 2015.

  5. Hopf bifurcation in a diffusive Lotka-Volterra type system with nonlocal delay effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shangjiang; Yan, Shuling

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of a diffusive Lotka-Volterra type model for two species with nonlocal delay effect and Dirichlet boundary conditions is investigated in this paper. The existence and multiplicity of spatially nonhomogeneous steady-state solutions are obtained by means of Lyapunov-Schmidt reduction. The stability of spatially nonhomogeneous steady-state solutions and the existence of Hopf bifurcation with the changes of the time delay are obtained by analyzing the distribution of eigenvalues of the infinitesimal generator associated with the linearized system. By the normal form theory and the center manifold reduction, the stability and bifurcation direction of Hopf bifurcating periodic orbits are derived. Finally, our theoretical results are illustrated by a model with homogeneous kernels and one-dimensional spatial domain.

  6. Prospective memory in dynamic environments: effects of load, delay, and phonological rehearsal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, M.; Dismukes, K.; Remington, R.

    2001-01-01

    A new paradigm was developed to examine prospective memory performance in a visual-spatial task that resembles some aspects of the work of air traffic controllers. Two experiments examined the role of workload (number of aeroplanes that participants directed), delay (between receipt of prospective instructions and execution), and phonological rehearsal. High workload increased prospective memory errors but increasing delay from 1-3 or 5 minutes had no effect. Shadowing aurally presented text reduced prospective memory performance, presumably because it prevented verbal rehearsal of the prospective instructions. However, performance on the foreground task of directing aeroplanes to routine destinations was affected only by workload and not by opportunity for rehearsal. Our results suggest that ability to maintain performance on a routine foreground task while performing a secondary task--perhaps analogous to conversation--does not predict ability to retrieve a prospective intention to deviate from the routine.

  7. The Effects of a Working Memory Load on Delay Discounting in Those with Externalizing Psychopathology

    PubMed Central

    Finn, Peter R.; Gunn, Rachel L.; Gerst, Kyle R.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of executive working memory (EWM) capacity on impulsive decision-making in a sample of young adults (n=623) that varied in degree of externalizing psychopathology (EXT) by examining: (i) the effects of WM load on delay discounting rates, and, (ii) the association between EWM capacity and delay discounting rates. EXT was measured as a latent variable indicated by lifetime problems with alcohol, marijuana, other drugs, childhood conduct, and adult antisocial behavior. Results showed that (i) the WM load increased discounting rates throughout the spectrum of EXT, (ii) EXT was associated with higher discounting rates and lower EMW capacity, and (iii) WM capacity was significantly associated with higher discounting rates when controlling for IQ, but only after a WM load. The results are discussed in terms of the role of EWM capacity in impulsive decision making in EXT. PMID:25893146

  8. Delayed cord clamping in red blood cell alloimmunization: safe, effective, and free?

    PubMed

    McAdams, Ryan M

    2016-04-01

    Hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN), an alloimmune disorder due to maternal and fetal blood type incompatibility, is associated with fetal and neonatal complications related to red blood cell (RBC) hemolysis. After delivery, without placental clearance, neonatal hyperbilirubinemia may develop from ongoing maternal antibody-mediated RBC hemolysis. In cases refractory to intensive phototherapy treatment, exchange transfusions (ET) may be performed to prevent central nervous system damage by reducing circulating bilirubin levels and to replace antibody-coated red blood cells with antigen-negative RBCs. The risks and costs of treating HDN are significant, but appear to be decreased by delayed umbilical cord clamping at birth, a strategy that promotes placental transfusion to the newborn. Compared to immediate cord clamping (ICC), safe and beneficial short-term outcomes have been demonstrated in preterm and term neonates receiving delayed cord clamping (DCC), a practice that may potentially be effective in cases RBC alloimmunization.

  9. Effects of Acute and Chronic Flunitrazepam on Delay Discounting in Pigeons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eppolito, Amy K.; France, Charles P.; Gerak, Lisa R.

    2011-01-01

    Delay to delivery of a reinforcer can decrease responding for that reinforcer and increase responding for smaller reinforcers that are available concurrently and delivered without delay; acute administration of drugs can alter responding for large, delayed reinforcers, although the impact of chronic treatment on delay discounting is not well…

  10. Does Socioeconomic Diversity Make a Difference? Examining the Effects of Racial and Socioeconomic Diversity on the Campus Climate for Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Julie J.; Denson, Nida; Bowman, Nicholas A.

    2013-01-01

    This article considers whether the socioeconomic diversity of the undergraduate student body and experiences with cross-class interaction (CCI) are significantly related to cross-racial interaction (CRI) and engagement with curricular/co-curricular diversity (CCD) activities. Individual students who reported higher levels of CCI had significantly…

  11. Investigation of the effects of bandwidth and time delay on helicopter roll-axis handling qualities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pausder, Heinz-Juergen; Blanken, Chris L.

    1993-01-01

    Several years of cooperative research conducted under the U.S./German Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) in helicopter flight control has recently resulted in a successful handling qualities study. The focus of this cooperative research has been the effects on handling qualities due to time delays in combination with a high bandwidth vehicle. The jointly performed study included the use of U.S. ground-based simulation and German in-flight simulation facilities. The NASA-Ames Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS) was used to develop a high bandwidth slalom tracking task which took into consideration the constraints of the facilities. The VMS was also used to define a range of the test parameters and to perform initial handling qualities evaluations. The flight tests were conducted using DLR's variable-stability BO 105 S3 Advanced Technology Testing Helicopter System (ATTHeS). Configurations included a rate command and an attitude command response system with added time delays up to 160 milliseconds over the baseline and bandwidth values between 1.5 and 4.5 rad/sec. Sixty-six evaluations were performed in about 25 hours of flight time during ten days of testing. The results indicate a need to more tightly constrain the allowable roll axis phase delay for the Level 1 and Level 2 requirements in the U.S. Army's specification for helicopter handling qualities, ADS-33C.

  12. Protective effect of Cissus quadrangularis Linn. on diabetes induced delayed fetal skeletal ossification

    PubMed Central

    Sirasanagandla, Srinivasa Rao; Ranganath Pai, K. Sreedhara; Potu, Bhagath Kumar; Bhat, Kumar MR

    2014-01-01

    Background: Delayed fetal skeletal ossification is one of the known complications of maternal diabetes. Objective: The present study was designed to evaluate the protective role of petroleum ether extract of Cissus quadrangularis (PECQ) on diabetes-induced delayed fetal skeletal ossification. Materials and Methods: Female Wistar rats were rendered diabetic with streptozotocin (STZ, 40 mg/kg, intraperitonial) before mating. After confirmation of pregnancy, the pregnant rats were divided into three groups: normal control group, diabetic control group, and diabetic + CQ group. The diabetic + CQ group pregnant rats were treated with PECQ (500 mg/kg body weight) throughout their gestation period. Immediately after delivery, pups were collected from all three groups and processed for alizarin red S–alcian blue staining in order to examine the pattern of skeletal ossification. Results: Fewer ossification centers and decreased extent of ossification of forelimb and hindlimb bones were observed in the neonatal pups of diabetic control group as compared to those in the normal control group. PECQ pretreatment significantly restored the ossification centers and improved the extent of ossification of forelimb and hindlimb bones in the neonatal pups of diabetic + CQ group as compared to those in the diabetic control group. Conclusions: The results suggested that PECQ treatment is effective against diabetes-induced delayed fetal skeletal ossification. However, further studies on the isolation and characterization of active constituents of PECQ, which can cross the placental barrier and are responsible for the bone anabolic activity are warranted. PMID:24812472

  13. P wave velocity structure below India and Tibet incorporating anisotropic delay time effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohanty, Debasis D.; Singh, Arun; O'Driscoll, Leland J.; Ravi Kumar, M.; Srinagesh, D.; Humphreys, Eugene D.

    2016-03-01

    We incorporate the effects of anisotropy to refine the continental-scale 3-D isotropic velocity model previously produced for India and Tibet by inverting 52,050 teleseismic P wave residuals. We have exploited a total of 1648 individual SKS splitting parameters to calculate the P wave travel time corrections due to azimuthal anisotropy. Our results suggest that anisotropy affects the P wave delays significantly (-0.3 to +0.5 s). Integration of these corrections into the 3-D modeling is achieved in two ways: (a) a priori adjustment to the delay time vector and (b) inverting only for anisotropic delays by introducing strong damping above 80 km and below 360 km depths and then subtracting the obtained anisotropic artifact image from the isotropic image, to get the corrected image. Under the assumption of azimuthal anisotropy resulting from lattice preferred orientation (LPO) alignment due to horizontal flow, the bias in isotropic P wave tomographic images is clear. The anisotropy corrected velocity perturbations are in the range of ±1.2% at depths of around 150 km and reduced further at deeper levels. Although the bias due to anisotropy does not affect the gross features, it does introduce certain artifacts at deeper levels.

  14. Effect of multiple and delayed jet impact and penetration on concrete target borehole diameter

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, M J; Baum, D W; Kuklo, R M; Simonson, S C

    2001-01-26

    The effect of multiple and delayed jet impact and penetration on the borehole diameter in concrete targets is discussed in this paper. A first-order principle of shaped-charge jet penetration is that target hole volume is proportional to the energy deposited in the target by the jet. This principle is the basis for the relation that target borehole diameter at any depth along the penetration path is proportional to the jet energy deposited in the target at that location. Our current research shows that the 'jet energy per unit hole volume constant' for concrete can be substantially altered by the use of multiple and delayed jet impacts. It has been shown that enhanced entrance crater formation results from the simultaneous impact and penetration of three shaped-charge jets. We now demonstrate that enhanced borehole diameter is also observed by the simultaneous impact and penetration of multiple shaped-charge jets followed by the delayed impact and penetration of a single shaped-charge jet.

  15. Effect of Earth and Mars departure delays on human missions to Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Prasun N.; Tartabini, Paul V.

    1993-01-01

    This study determines the impact on the initial mass in low-Earth orbit (IMLEO) for delaying departure from Mars and Earth by 5, 15, and 30 days, once a nominal mission to Mars has been selected. Additionally, the use of a deep space maneuver (DSM) is attempted to alleviate the IMLEO penalties. Three different classes of missions are analyzed using chemical and nuclear thermal propulsion systems in the 2000-2025 time-frame: opposition, conjunction, and fast-transfer conjunction. The results indicate that Mars and Earth delays can lead to large IMLEO penalties. Opposition and fast-transfer conjunction class missions have the highest IMLEO penalties, upwards of 432.4 mt and 1977.3 mt, respectively. Conjunction class missions, on the other hand, tend to be insensitive to Mars and Earth delays having IMLEO penalties under 103.5 mt. As expected, nuclear thermal propulsion had significantly lower IMLEO penalties as compared to chemical propulsion. The use of a DSM is found not to have a significant impact on reducing the IMLEO penalties. Through this investigation, the effect of off-nominal departure conditions on the overall mission (i.e., IMLEO) can be gained, enabling mission designers to incorporate the influence of off-nominal departure conditions of the interplanetary trajectory in the overall conceptual design process of a Mars transfer vehicle.

  16. Investigation of the effects of bandwidth and time delay on helicopter roll-axis handling qualities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blanken, Chris L.; Pausder, Heinz-Jurgen

    1994-01-01

    Several years of cooperative research conducted under the U.S./German Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) in helicopter aeromechanics have recently resulted in a successful handling qualities study. The focus of this cooperative research has been the effect of time delays in a high bandwidth vehicle on handling qualities. The jointly performed study included the use of U.S. ground-based simulation and German in-flight simulation facilities. The NASA-Ames Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS) was used to develop a high bandwidth slalom tracking task which took into consideration the constraints of the facilities. The VMS was used to define a range of the test parameters and to perform initial handling qualities evaluations. The flight tests were conducted using DLR's variable-stability BO 105 S3 Advanced Technology Testing Helicopter System (ATTHeS). Configurations included a rate command and an attitude command response system with added time delays of up to 160 milliseconds over the baseline and band width values between 1.5 and 4.5 rad/sec. Sixty-six evaluations were performed in about 25 hours of flight time during ten days of testing. The results indicate a need to more tightly constrain the allowable roll axis phase delay for the Level 1 and Level 2 requirements in the U.S. Army's specification for helicopter handling qualities Aeronautical Design Standard (ADS)-33C.

  17. Effect of delayed light curing of a resin composite on marginal integrity in cylindrical dentine cavities.

    PubMed

    Manabe, A; Debari, K; Itoh, K; Hisamitsu, H; Wakumoto, S

    1993-12-01

    The effect of delayed light curing of resin composite on marginal adaptation has been examined by measuring the wall-to-wall polymerization contraction gap when using a commercial resin composite together with experimental dentine bonding systems to restore cylindrical preparations in dentine. Morphological changes in dentine during dentine bonding procedures were observed using a scanning electron microscope. In a previous report, the contraction gap width for a resin composite increased when irradiation of the resin system was delayed, despite the use of a dentine bonding system considered to be 'contraction' gap free. Such deterioration in marginal adaptation was minimized by use of an experimental dentine primer, 40% erythritol methacrylate aqueous solution (EM), followed by the use of a commercial dual- or autocured dentine bonding agent. Under scanning electron microscopy, the dentine surface microstructure became unclear after EM priming, and a polymer film was detected after polymerization of the dual-cured dentine bonding agent. The hydrogelled primer and the formation of a polymer network on the dentine surface may prevent the flow of fluid from the pulp through the dentine tubules, and maintain marginal integrity if there is delay in light curing of light-activated resin composite systems.

  18. Predator diversity, intraguild predation, and indirect effects drive parasite transmission.

    PubMed

    Rohr, Jason R; Civitello, David J; Crumrine, Patrick W; Halstead, Neal T; Miller, Andrew D; Schotthoefer, Anna M; Stenoien, Carl; Johnson, Lucinda B; Beasley, Val R

    2015-03-10

    Humans are altering biodiversity globally and infectious diseases are on the rise; thus, there is interest in understanding how changes to biodiversity affect disease. Here, we explore how predator diversity shapes parasite transmission. In a mesocosm experiment that manipulated predator (larval dragonflies and damselflies) density and diversity, non-intraguild (non-IG) predators that only consume free-living cercariae (parasitic trematodes) reduced metacercarial infections in tadpoles, whereas intraguild (IG) predators that consume both parasites and tadpole hosts did not. This likely occurred because IG predators reduced tadpole densities and anticercarial behaviors, increasing per capita exposure rates of the surviving tadpoles (i.e., via density- and trait-mediated effects) despite the consumption of parasites. A mathematical model demonstrated that non-IG predators reduce macroparasite infections, but IG predation weakens this "dilution effect" and can even amplify parasite burdens. Consistent with the experiment and model, a wetland survey revealed that the diversity of IG predators was unrelated to metacercarial burdens in amphibians, but the diversity of non-IG predators was negatively correlated with infections. These results are strikingly similar to generalities that have emerged from the predator diversity-pest biocontrol literature, suggesting that there may be general mechanisms for pest control and that biocontrol research might inform disease management and vice versa. In summary, we identified a general trait of predators--where they fall on an IG predation continuum--that predicts their ability to reduce infections and possibly pests in general. Consequently, managing assemblages of predators represents an underused tool for the management of human and wildlife diseases and pest populations.

  19. Effects of development and delayed feed access on ghrelin expression in neonatal broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Yu, Y; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, H H; Tao, H; Ou, C B; Wang, Q X; Guo, F; Ma, J Y

    2016-10-01

    Two experiments were conducted to study the effects of development and delayed feed access on ghrelin expression in neonatal chickens. In experiment 1, ghrelin levels in ad libitum-fed chickens were assessed from hatching (0 h) to 120 h. Ghrelin mRNA expression increased after hatching and reached peak levels at 24 h; levels were 1.8-fold higher compared to those at 0 h. Afterward, ghrelin expression decreased consistently throughout the later experimental period, and at 120 h, it was only 16.0% of 0 h levels. The density of ghrelin immunopositive cells in the proventriculus and plasma ghrelin levels decreased slightly from hatching to 48 h and later increased slowly until the end of the experimental period. In a follow-up study, chickens were assigned randomly into 2 groups after hatching, a control group ( C: , fed ad libitum) and a delayed feeding group ( F+SF: , 72-h fast period, subsequently fed ad libitum). Delayed feed access for 72 h up-regulated ghrelin mRNA expression significantly in the proventriculus (P < 0.05) to 2.1-fold higher levels compared to the control, while the density of ghrelin immunopositive cells and the plasma ghrelin level decreased (P < 0.05) to 28.4% and 64.8% of the control, respectively. After the onset of feeding, the ghrelin mRNA expression in the delayed feeding group was decreased but still higher than that of the control (P < 0.05). The density of ghrelin immunopositive cells and the plasma ghrelin level climbed quickly and all returned to the control level with a supply of food for 48 h. These results suggest that the onset of feeding in neonatal chickens stimulated an increase in ghrelin peptide levels and that ghrelin peptide levels increased with age. Neonatal chickens respond to food deprivation in a different way than do young and adult chickens. PMID:27194732

  20. Effect of educational television commercial on pre-hospital delay in patients with ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Nishijima, Haruo; Kon, Tomoya; Ueno, Tatsuya; Haga, Rie; Yamazaki, Keishi; Yagihashi, Kei; Funamizu, Yukihisa; Arai, Akira; Suzuki, Chieko; Nunomura, Jin-ichi; Baba, Masayuki; Tomiyama, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    Administering intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-tPA) within 4.5 h or endovascular procedures within 8 h of ischemic stroke onset may reduce the risk of disability. The effectiveness of media campaigns to raise stroke awareness and shorten pre-hospital delay is unclear. We studied 1144 consecutive ischemic stroke patients at Aomori Prefectural Central Hospital, Japan, between March 2010 and February 2014. From March 2012, the government sponsored an educational campaign based on a television commercial to improve knowledge of stroke symptoms and encourage ambulance calls for facial palsy, arm palsy, or speech disturbance. For the 544 and 600 patients admitted before and during the intervention, respectively, we recorded the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, stroke type, the time when patients or bystanders recognized stroke symptoms, and hospital arrival time. Pre-hospital delay, as the time interval from awareness of stroke to hospital arrival, was categorized as 0-3, 3-6, and 6+ h. The mean pre-hospital delay was shorter (12.0 vs 13.5 h; P = 0.0067), the proportion of patients arriving within 3 h was larger (55.7 vs 46.5 %; P = 0.0021), and the proportion arriving after 6 h was smaller (32.7 vs 39.5 %; P = 0.0162) in the intervention group than in the pre-intervention group. There was no significant difference in the proportion of patients treated with r-tPA (6 and 7.5 % of the intervention and pre-intervention groups, respectively). A television-based public education campaign potentially reduced pre-hospital delay for ischemic stroke patients, but the r-tPA treatment rate was unchanged.

  1. Effects of topsoil removal on seedling emergence and species diversity

    SciTech Connect

    Winkel, V.K.; Ostler, W.K.

    1994-02-01

    Approximately 800 hectares on the US Department of Energy Nevada Test Site and vicinity are contaminated with Plutonium. As part of a cleanup effort, both the vegetation and the top 5--10 cm of soil may be removed. A study was developed to determine the effects of topsoil removal on seedling emergence and plant species diversity. Trial plots were prepared by removing 5, 10, or 20 cm of topsoil, seeding a mix of nine native species, mulching with straw, and then anchoring the straw with erosion netting. Additional plots (0 topsoil removal treatment) were lightly bladed to remove existing vegetation and then treated as above. Approximately 85 mm of supplemental irrigation was applied to help initiate germination during early spring. Seedling density data of seeded and nonseeded species was collected following emergence, and species diversity was calculated with the Shannon diversity index for the nonseeded species. Densities of seeded species either were unaffected by or increased with increased depth of topsoil removal. In general, densities of nonseeded species decreased with increased depth of topsoil removal. The number of species, species diversity and evenness also decreased with increased depth of topsoil removal. Initial emergence of seeded species is apparently unaffected by topsoil removal at this site.

  2. Effects of racial diversity on complex thinking in college students.

    PubMed

    Antonio, Anthony Lising; Chang, Mitchell J; Hakuta, Kenji; Kenny, David A; Levin, Shana; Milem, Jeffrey F

    2004-08-01

    An experiment varying the racial (Black, White) and opinion composition in small-group discussions was conducted with college students (N = 357) at three universities to test for effects on the perceived novelty of group members' contributions to discussion and on participants' integrative complexity. Results showed that racial and opinion minorities were both perceived as contributing to novelty. Generally positive effects on integrative complexity were found when the groups had racial- and opinion-minority members and when members reported having racially diverse friends and classmates. The findings are discussed in the context of social psychological theories of minority influence and social policy implications for affirmative action. The research supports claims about the educational significance of race in higher education, as well as the complexity of the interaction of racial diversity with contextual and individual factors. PMID:15270993

  3. Single-gene speciation with pleiotropy: effects of allele dominance, population size, and delayed inheritance.

    PubMed

    Yamamichi, Masato; Sasaki, Akira

    2013-07-01

    Single-gene speciation is considered to be unlikely, but an excellent example is found in land snails, in which a gene for left-right reversal has given rise to new species multiple times. This reversal might be facilitated by their small population sizes and maternal effect (i.e., "delayed inheritance," in which an individual's phenotype is determined by the genotype of its mother). Recent evidence suggests that a pleiotropic effect of the speciation gene on antipredator survival may also promote speciation. Here we theoretically demonstrate that, without a pleiotropic effect, in small populations the fixation probability of a recessive mutant is higher than a dominant mutant, but they are identical for large populations and sufficiently weak selection. With a pleiotropic effect that increases mutant viability, a dominant mutant has a higher fixation probability if the strength of viability selection is sufficiently greater than that of reproductive incompatibility, whereas a recessive mutant has a higher fixation probability otherwise. Delayed inheritance increases the fixation probability of a mutant if viability selection is sufficiently weaker than reproductive incompatibility. Our results clarify the conflicting effects of viability selection and positive frequency-dependent selection due to reproductive incompatibility and provide a new perspective to single-gene speciation theory. PMID:23815656

  4. Effects of Levosulpiride in Patients with Functional Dyspepsia Accompanied by Delayed Gastric Emptying

    PubMed Central

    Song, Chi-Wook; Chun, Hoon-Jae; Kim, Chang-Duck; Ryu, Ho-Sang; Choe, Jae-Gol; Hyun, Jin-Hai

    1998-01-01

    Objectives Levosulpiride is the levo-enantiomer of sulpiride, a well-known antiemetic, antidyspeptic and antipsychotic drug. This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of levosulpiride on dyspeptic symptoms and gastric motor function in a group of patients with functional dyspepsia showing delayed gastric emptying. Method Forty two eligible patients were entered into a 3 week, double-blind randomized comparison of 25mg of levosulpiride or placebo t.i.d.. Symptom assessment and gastric scintigraphy following the intake of scrambled egg sandwich, were performed in each patient before and after treatment. Results The improvement of symptom score in levosulpiride group was higher than the placebo group (p<0.05). We assessed global efficacy, which was excellent in 1 (6%), good 11 (65%), fair 4 (24%), nil 1 (6%) of those receiving levosulpiride, and fair 9(60%), nil 5 (33%), poor 1 (6%) of those receiving placebo. Levosulpiride tended to be more effective than placebo in relieving the dyspeptic symptoms especially in the subgroups of dysmotility-like (p<0.05) and nonspecific (p<0.05) as compared to other subgroups (p=0.16). The reduction of gastric emptying time after levosulpiride treatment was more marked than Placebo group (p<0.05). We found a significant correlation between changes of symptom score and gastric emptying time (r=0.47, p=0.01. No serious adverse effects were reported after administration of either levosulpiride or placebo. Only two patients reported mild somnolence during levosulpiride administration. Conclusions Levosulpiride is effective and well tolerated in patients with functional dyspepsia accompanied by delayed gastric emptying. Its efficacy may be related to its action on the gastric motor function by improving the delayed gastric emptying. PMID:9538626

  5. Urbanisation effects on the functional diversity of avian agricultural communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippi-Codaccioni, Ondine; Clobert, Jean; Julliard, Romain

    2009-09-01

    Urbanisation is affecting ecological communities worldwide. Despite the disproportionate impact on farmland over other habitats, the effect on farmland bird communities has been poorly studied. Considering the still-alarming conservation status of farmland birds, investigations into the effects of pressures such as urbanisation on those communities could be of great interest for their conservation. We studied the urbanisation effects on functional diversity using existing indices designed for the purpose of standardisation. This study uses a functional character measuring species habitat specialisation for indices calculation. A bird survey was conducted on 92 plots of 1 × 1 km chosen after stratification on the proportion of urban area and farmland habitat (either 0, 25, 50, 75%), with the focus on farmland habitat. Two aspects of urbanisation were studied: the intensity and the age of the urbanisation. Functional richness was found to decrease with urbanisation, while functional evenness and divergence increased in a nonlinear way. No significant difference was observed in functional richness and evenness with urbanisation age, however extreme ages of urbanisation (young and old) showed higher niche differentiation concerning specialisation. This implies less important resource competition for species and a more vulnerable state for the ecosystem. Using functional diversity indices based on specialisation allows a better insight in the consequences of urbanisation on diversity/ecosystem-community functioning, which is of crucial importance in the face of global changes.

  6. Effect of delayed icing on biogenic amines formation and bacterial contribution of iced common carp (Cyprinus carpio).

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Seyed Vali; Hamzeh, Ali; Moslemi, Mehran; Lashkan, Aria Babakhani; Iglesias, Antonio; Feás, Xesús

    2013-12-12

    The variation of six biogenic amines (BAs) and total viable count (TVC) in common carp (Cyprinus carpio) stored in ice with 0, 4 and 8 h delay before icing was evaluated in a period of 4 days. Delayed icing led to significant (p < 0.05) increases in TVC throughout the period of storage and showed a good correlation with BAs content. The obtained data showed that putrescine and cadaverine were predominant in all samples and it was indicated that they could be proper indicators to determine the carp quality. Spermidine and spermine increased slightly toward the end of storage and the levels of dangerous BAs (histamine and tyramine) were under the limit over the period. As a result, it is indicated that delaying time affects on formation of BAs and the effect in samples with 8 h delay was significantly (p < 0.05) more than those with 0 and 4 h delay.

  7. Telerobotic Surgery: An Intelligent Systems Approach to Mitigate the Adverse Effects of Communication Delay. Chapter 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardullo, Frank M.; Lewis, Harold W., III; Panfilov, Peter B.

    2007-01-01

    An extremely innovative approach has been presented, which is to have the surgeon operate through a simulator running in real-time enhanced with an intelligent controller component to enhance the safety and efficiency of a remotely conducted operation. The use of a simulator enables the surgeon to operate in a virtual environment free from the impediments of telecommunication delay. The simulator functions as a predictor and periodically the simulator state is corrected with truth data. Three major research areas must be explored in order to ensure achieving the objectives. They are: simulator as predictor, image processing, and intelligent control. Each is equally necessary for success of the project and each of these involves a significant intelligent component in it. These are diverse, interdisciplinary areas of investigation, thereby requiring a highly coordinated effort by all the members of our team, to ensure an integrated system. The following is a brief discussion of those areas. Simulator as a predictor: The delays encountered in remote robotic surgery will be greater than any encountered in human-machine systems analysis, with the possible exception of remote operations in space. Therefore, novel compensation techniques will be developed. Included will be the development of the real-time simulator, which is at the heart of our approach. The simulator will present real-time, stereoscopic images and artificial haptic stimuli to the surgeon. Image processing: Because of the delay and the possibility of insufficient bandwidth a high level of novel image processing is necessary. This image processing will include several innovative aspects, including image interpretation, video to graphical conversion, texture extraction, geometric processing, image compression and image generation at the surgeon station. Intelligent control: Since the approach we propose is in a sense predictor based, albeit a very sophisticated predictor, a controller, which not only

  8. Delayed ejaculation

    MedlinePlus

    Ejaculatory incompetence; Sex - delayed ejaculation; Retarded ejaculation; Anejaculation; Infertility - delayed ejaculation ... include: Religious background that makes the person view sex as sinful Lack of attraction for a partner ...

  9. Stress and selective attention: Immediate and delayed stress effects on inhibition of return.

    PubMed

    Larra, Mauro F; Pramme, Lisa; Schächinger, Hartmut; Frings, Christian

    2016-10-01

    The relationship between attention and stress is far from understood. In fact, some studies reported better attentional selection during and after stress, some studies reported worse attentional selection, and some studies reported no effects of stress on attentional selection at all. We argue that given the complexity of both concepts more data are needed as to ultimately understand this relationship. Here we use an established attentional task that yields the inhibition of return (IOR) effect which is assumed to tap attentional control of oculomotor behavior. Participants were stressed with a Cold Pressor Test (CPT) and immediate and delayed effects of stress on hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activation and IOR were analyzed. IOR was neither by immediate nor by delayed after-effects of the CPT stress procedure modulated, instead, we observed reliable and significant IOR in all experimental conditions. Attentional control of oculomotor behavior is therefore not altered after CPT stress, nor related to the post-stress activity of the HPA axis. PMID:27552495

  10. Mechanisms Controlling the Plant Diversity Effect on Soil Microbial Community Composition and Soil Microbial Diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellado Vázquez, P. G.; Lange, M.; Griffiths, R.; Malik, A.; Ravenek, J.; Strecker, T.; Eisenhauer, N.; Gleixner, G.

    2015-12-01

    Soil microorganisms are the main drivers of soil organic matter cycling. Organic matter input by living plants is the major energy and matter source for soil microorganisms, higher organic matter inputs are found in highly diverse plant communities. It is therefore relevant to understand how plant diversity alters the soil microbial community and soil organic matter. In a general sense, microbial biomass and microbial diversity increase with increasing plant diversity, however the mechanisms driving these interactions are not fully explored. Working with soils from a long-term biodiversity experiment (The Jena Experiment), we investigated how changes in the soil microbial dynamics related to plant diversity were explained by biotic and abiotic factors. Microbial biomass quantification and differentiation of bacterial and fungal groups was done by phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analysis; terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism was used to determine the bacterial diversity. Gram negative (G-) bacteria predominated in high plant diversity; Gram positive (G+) bacteria were more abundant in low plant diversity and saprotrophic fungi were independent from plant diversity. The separation between G- and G+ bacteria in relation to plant diversity was governed by a difference in carbon-input related factors (e.g. root biomass and soil moisture) between plant diversity levels. Moreover, the bacterial diversity increased with plant diversity and the evenness of the PLFA markers decreased. Our results showed that higher plant diversity favors carbon-input related factors and this in turn favors the development of microbial communities specialized in utilizing new carbon inputs (i.e. G- bacteria), which are contributing to the export of new C from plants to soils.

  11. Mathematical modeling of the nonlinear electrodynamics effect of signal delay in the magnetic field of pulsars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gapochka, M. G.; Denisov, M. M.; Denisova, I. P.; Kalenova, N. V.; Korolev, A. F.

    2015-11-01

    The paper is devoted to mathematical modeling of the nonlinear vacuum electrodynamics effect: the action of the strong magnetic field of a pulsar on the propagation of electromagnetic waves. It is shown that, due to the birefringence of the vacuum, for one normal wave, it takes more time to travel from a pulsar to a detector installed on astrophysical satellites than for the other normal wave. The delay of the pulse carried by the second normal wave relative to pulse carried by the first normal wave from the common point of origin to the satellite is calculated.

  12. The Viking relativity experiment. [radio transmission delay due to solar gravitation effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shapiro, I. I.; Reasenberg, R. D.; Macneil, P. E.; Goldstein, R. B.; Brenkle, J. P.; Cain, D. L.; Komarek, T.; Zygielbaum, A. I.; Cuddihy, W. F.; Michael, W. H., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements of the round-trip time of flight of radio signals transmitted from the earth to the Viking spacecraft are being analyzed to test the predictions of Einstein's theory of general relativity. According to this theory the signals will be delayed by up to approximately 250 microsec owing to the direct effect of solar gravity on the propagation. A very preliminary qualitative analysis of the Viking data obtained near the 1976 superior conjunction of Mars indicates agreement with the predictions to within the estimated uncertainty of 0.5%.

  13. EMBEDDED LENSING TIME DELAYS, THE FERMAT POTENTIAL, AND THE INTEGRATED SACHS–WOLFE EFFECT

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Bin; Kantowski, Ronald; Dai, Xinyu

    2015-05-01

    We derive the Fermat potential for a spherically symmetric lens embedded in a Friedman–Lemaître–Robertson–Walker cosmology and use it to investigate the late-time integrated Sachs–Wolfe (ISW) effect, i.e., secondary temperature fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) caused by individual large-scale clusters and voids. We present a simple analytical expression for the temperature fluctuation in the CMB across such a lens as a derivative of the lens’ Fermat potential. This formalism is applicable to both linear and nonlinear density evolution scenarios, to arbitrarily large density contrasts, and to all open and closed background cosmologies. It is much simpler to use and makes the same predictions as conventional approaches. In this approach the total temperature fluctuation can be split into a time-delay part and an evolutionary part. Both parts must be included for cosmic structures that evolve and both can be equally important. We present very simple ISW models for cosmic voids and galaxy clusters to illustrate the ease of use of our formalism. We use the Fermat potentials of simple cosmic void models to compare predicted ISW effects with those recently extracted from WMAP and Planck data by stacking large cosmic voids using the aperture photometry method. If voids in the local universe with large density contrasts are no longer evolving we find that the time delay contribution alone predicts values consistent with the measurements. However, we find that for voids still evolving linearly, the evolutionary contribution cancels a significant part of the time delay contribution and results in predicted signals that are much smaller than recently observed.

  14. Embedded Lensing Time Delays, the Fermat Potential, and the Integrated Sachs-Wolfe Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Kantowski, Ronald; Dai, Xinyu

    2015-05-01

    We derive the Fermat potential for a spherically symmetric lens embedded in a Friedman-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker cosmology and use it to investigate the late-time integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect, i.e., secondary temperature fluctuations in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) caused by individual large-scale clusters and voids. We present a simple analytical expression for the temperature fluctuation in the CMB across such a lens as a derivative of the lens’ Fermat potential. This formalism is applicable to both linear and nonlinear density evolution scenarios, to arbitrarily large density contrasts, and to all open and closed background cosmologies. It is much simpler to use and makes the same predictions as conventional approaches. In this approach the total temperature fluctuation can be split into a time-delay part and an evolutionary part. Both parts must be included for cosmic structures that evolve and both can be equally important. We present very simple ISW models for cosmic voids and galaxy clusters to illustrate the ease of use of our formalism. We use the Fermat potentials of simple cosmic void models to compare predicted ISW effects with those recently extracted from WMAP and Planck data by stacking large cosmic voids using the aperture photometry method. If voids in the local universe with large density contrasts are no longer evolving we find that the time delay contribution alone predicts values consistent with the measurements. However, we find that for voids still evolving linearly, the evolutionary contribution cancels a significant part of the time delay contribution and results in predicted signals that are much smaller than recently observed.

  15. A novel approach to delayed-start analyses for demonstrating disease-modifying effects in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Liu-Seifert, Hong; Andersen, Scott W; Lipkovich, Ilya; Holdridge, Karen C; Siemers, Eric

    2015-01-01

    One method for demonstrating disease modification is a delayed-start design, consisting of a placebo-controlled period followed by a delayed-start period wherein all patients receive active treatment. To address methodological issues in previous delayed-start approaches, we propose a new method that is robust across conditions of drug effect, discontinuation rates, and missing data mechanisms. We propose a modeling approach and test procedure to test the hypothesis of noninferiority, comparing the treatment difference at the end of the delayed-start period with that at the end of the placebo-controlled period. We conducted simulations to identify the optimal noninferiority testing procedure to ensure the method was robust across scenarios and assumptions, and to evaluate the appropriate modeling approach for analyzing the delayed-start period. We then applied this methodology to Phase 3 solanezumab clinical trial data for mild Alzheimer's disease patients. Simulation results showed a testing procedure using a proportional noninferiority margin was robust for detecting disease-modifying effects; conditions of high and moderate discontinuations; and with various missing data mechanisms. Using all data from all randomized patients in a single model over both the placebo-controlled and delayed-start study periods demonstrated good statistical performance. In analysis of solanezumab data using this methodology, the noninferiority criterion was met, indicating the treatment difference at the end of the placebo-controlled studies was preserved at the end of the delayed-start period within a pre-defined margin. The proposed noninferiority method for delayed-start analysis controls Type I error rate well and addresses many challenges posed by previous approaches. Delayed-start studies employing the proposed analysis approach could be used to provide evidence of a disease-modifying effect. This method has been communicated with FDA and has been successfully applied to actual

  16. Delayed development induced by toxicity to the host can be inherited by a bacterial-dependent, transgenerational effect

    PubMed Central

    Fridmann-Sirkis, Yael; Stern, Shay; Elgart, Michael; Galili, Matana; Zeisel, Amit; Shental, Noam; Soen, Yoav

    2014-01-01

    Commensal gut bacteria in many species including flies are integral part of their host, and are known to influence its development and homeostasis within generation. Here we report an unexpected impact of host–microbe interactions, which mediates multi-generational, non-Mendelian inheritance of a stress-induced phenotype. We have previously shown that exposure of fly larvae to G418 antibiotic induces transgenerationally heritable phenotypes, including a delay in larval development, gene induction in the gut and morphological changes. We now show that G418 selectively depletes commensal Acetobacter species and that this depletion explains the heritable delay, but not the inheritance of the other phenotypes. Notably, the inheritance of the delay was mediated by a surprising trans-generational effect. Specifically, bacterial removal from F1 embryos did not induce significant delay in F1 larvae, but nonetheless led to a considerable delay in F2. This effect maintains a delay induced by bacterial-independent G418 toxicity to the host. In line with these findings, reintroduction of isolated Acetobacter species prevented the inheritance of the delay. We further show that this prevention is partly mediated by vitamin B2 (Riboflavin) produced by these bacteria; exogenous Riboflavin led to partial prevention and inhibition of Riboflavin synthesis compromised the ability of the bacteria to prevent the inheritance. These results identify host–microbe interactions as a hitherto unrecognized factor capable of mediating non-Mendelian inheritance of a stress-induced phenotype. PMID:24611070

  17. Reinforcement Delay Fading during Differential Reinforcement of Communication: The Effects of Signals on Response Maintenance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Michael E.; Lerman, Dorothea C.; Fisher, Wayne W.; Roane, Henry S.; Zangrillo, Amanda N.

    2011-01-01

    Signals during delays to reinforcement may lessen reductions in responding that typically occur when there is a delay between a response and its reinforcer. Sparse applied research has been devoted to understanding the conditions under which responding may be maintained when delays to reinforcement are introduced. We evaluated the extent to which…

  18. Simultaneous nominal and effective differential group delay in-service monitoring method for optical communications systems.

    PubMed

    Simões, Glauco C C P; Floridia, Claudio; Franciscangelis, Carolina; Argentato, Márcio C; Romero, Murilo A

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, we propose an in-service method to simultaneously monitor both nominal and effective values of differential group delay (DGD) in wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM) optical communication systems, in a per channel basis. The method is based on coherent heterodyne detection of the optical signal. We have demonstrated that the technique is capable to recover nominal DGD values from 0 ps to 90 ps while, at same time, to provide the effective DGD parameter, related to the impairment of optical channels. The relationship between the Q factor and effective DGD was also demonstrated, both numerically and experimentally, for distinct nominal values of DGD inserted on the system, by varying the state of polarization (SOP) of the optical signal at the input of the DGD element.

  19. Effect of advanced and delayed rotation on the dominant flow pattern and its temporal evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uksul, Esra; Krishna, Swathi; Mulleners, Karen

    2015-11-01

    During a flapping cycle of an insect, complex time dependent flows are produced as the wing reciprocates, producing a maximum lift at the stroke reversals. By flipping the wing rapidly at the end of each stroke, the insect modulates the flow around the wing and hence the aerodynamic forces necessary to hover. The duration and starting point of the flip play an important role in determining the amount of lift produced. To understand and tailor the effect of wing kinematics on the aerodynamic performance we focussed on the vortex dynamics of the flow field. Phase-averaged data from particle image velocimetry was used to evaluate the flow features inherent to changes in rotation during a stroke of a flat plate, which is modelled based on hoverfly characteristics. The period of rotation is one-third of the total time period. A +10% phase shift is used for delayed rotation, a -10% phase shift for advanced rotation. Vortex detection methods like the λ2 and Γ2 criteria are used to determine the effect of a delay or early rotation on the trajectories, size, shape and location of the prominent vortical structures. Proper orthogonal decomposition is used to study the influence of the phase-shifts on the dominant mode structure and the related time-scales.

  20. Effects of a single reflection with varied horizontal angle and time delay on speech intelligibility.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, T; Ando, Y

    1991-12-01

    Previously, almost all physical measures for estimating speech intelligibility in a room have been derived from only temporal-monaural criteria. This paper shows that speech intelligibility for a sound field with a single reflection depends not only on the temporal-monaural factor but also on the spatial-binaural factor of the sound field. Articulation tests for sound fields simulated with a single reflection of delay time delta t1 after the direct sound were conducted changing the horizontal incident angle xi of the reflection. Remarkable findings are as followings: (1) speech intelligibility (SI) decreases with increasing delay time delta t1, (2) SI increases when xi approaches 90 degrees; the horizontal angle of the reflection causes a significant effect on SI, and (3) the analysis of variance for articulation test scores clearly demonstrated that the effects of both delta t1 and xi on SI are fully independent. Concerning result (2), if listeners get a spatial separation of signals at the two ears, then the listener's capability for speech perception is assumed to be improved due to "adding" further information to the temporal pattern recognition. PMID:1787252

  1. Effect of surface reactions on ignition delay of methanol/air mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, J. P.; Yang, H. L.; Jiang, L. Q.; Wang, X. H.; Zhao, D. Q.

    2014-11-01

    A surface reaction kinetic model for the combustion of methanol/air mixture was developed in order to investigate the ignition inhibitory mechanism of wall on the premixed gas in a micro closed volume. In this model, except for H, O, OH and CH3 radicals, the absorption of hydrogen peroxide and hydroperoxyl on the surface were also considered. By applying CHEMKIN-Pro software, the model was integrated into the calculation of homogeneous combustion process of gas mixture. Surface reactions were found resulting in the increase of ignition delay time. The sensitivity analysis showed that the loss of hydrogen peroxide on the wall was the main reason, due to the direct suppression effect on the generation and accumulation of OH in the radical pool. However, the loss of hydroperoxyl would take the place of hydrogen peroxide as the main inhibitory factor when the sticking coefficient became as large as the order of 10-3. In addition, the ignition delay time increased with sticking coefficient or surface-area-to-volume ratio. Enhancing the initial temperature of premixed gas was able to reduce the inhibitory effect of surface reactions.

  2. Reduction of the effects of the communication delays in scientific algorithms on message passing MIMD architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saltz, J. H.; Naik, V. K.; Nicol, D. M.

    1986-01-01

    The efficient implementation of algorithms on multiprocessor machines requires that the effects of communication delays be minimized. The effects of these delays on the performance of a model problem on a hypercube multiprocessor architecture is investigated and methods are developed for increasing algorithm efficiency. The model problem under investigation is the solution by red-black Successive Over Relaxation YOUN71 of the heat equation; most of the techniques described here also apply equally well to the solution of elliptic partial differential equations by red-black or multicolor SOR methods. Methods for reducing communication traffic and overhead on a multiprocessor are identified and results of testing these methods on the Intel iPSC Hypercube reported. Methods for partitioning a problem's domain across processors, for reducing communication traffic during a global convergence check, for reducing the number of global convergence checks employed during an iteration, and for concurrently iterating on multiple time-steps in a time-dependent problem. Empirical results show that use of these models can markedly reduce a numewrical problem's execution time.

  3. Small diversity effects on ocean primary production under environmental change in a diversity-resolving ocean ecosystem model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prowe, A. E. F.; Pahlow, M.; Dutkiewicz, S.; Oschlies, A.

    2013-07-01

    Marine ecosystem models used to investigate how global change affects ocean ecosystems and their functioning typically omit pelagic diversity. Diversity, however, can affect functions such as primary production and their sensitivity to environmental changes. Using a global ocean ecosystem model that explicitly resolves phytoplankton diversity within four phytoplankton functional types (PFTs) we investigate the model's ability to capture diversity effects on primary production under environmental change. An idealized scenario with a sudden reduction in vertical mixing causes diversity and primary-production changes that turn out to be largely independent of the number of coexisting phytoplankton types. The model provides a small number of niches with respect to nutrient use in accordance with the PFTs defined in the model, and increasing the number of phytoplankton types increases the resolution within the niches. The variety of traits and trade-offs resolved in the model constrains diversity effects such as niche complementarity, which operate between, but not within PFTs. The number and nature of the niches formulated in the model, for example via trade-offs or different PFTs, thus determines the diversity effects on ecosystem functioning captured in ocean ecosystem models.

  4. Genetic diversity through the looking glass: Effect of enrichment bias

    SciTech Connect

    Dunbar, J.; Forney, L.; White, S.

    1997-04-01

    The effect of enrichment bias on the diversity of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetate (2,4-D)-degrading (2,4-D{sup +}) bacteria recovered from soil was evaluated by comparing the diversity of isolates obtained by direct plating to the diversity of isolates obtained from 85 liquid batch cultures. By the two methods, a total of 159 isolates were purified from 1 g of soil and divided into populations based on repeated extragenic palindromic sequence PCR (rep-PCR) genomic fingerprints. Approximately 42% of the direct-plating isolates hybridized with the tfdA and tfdB genes from Alcaligenes eutrophus JMP134(pJP4), 27% hybridized with the tfdA and tfdB genes from Burk holderia sp. strain RASC, and 30% hybridized with none of the probes. In contrast, the enrichment isolates not only represented fewer populations than the isolates obtained by direct plating but also exhibited, almost exclusively, a single hybridization pattern with 2,4-D catabolic gene probes. Approximately 98% of the enrichment isolates possessed pJP4-type tfd4 and tfdB genes, whereas isolates containing RASC-type tfdA and tfdB genes were obtained from only 2 of the 85 enrichment cultures. The skewed occurrence of the pJP4-type genes among the isolates obtained by enrichment suggests that the competitive fitness of 2,4-D{sup +} populations during growth with 2,4-D may be influenced either by specific tfd alleles or by genetic factors linked to these alleles. Moreover, the results indicate that evaluation of the diversity and distribution of catabolic pathways in nature can be highly distorted by the use of enrichment culture techniques. 34 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Predator diversity, intraguild predation, and indirect effects drive parasite transmission

    PubMed Central

    Rohr, Jason R.; Civitello, David J.; Crumrine, Patrick W.; Halstead, Neal T.; Miller, Andrew D.; Schotthoefer, Anna M.; Stenoien, Carl; Johnson, Lucinda B.; Beasley, Val R.

    2015-01-01

    Humans are altering biodiversity globally and infectious diseases are on the rise; thus, there is interest in understanding how changes to biodiversity affect disease. Here, we explore how predator diversity shapes parasite transmission. In a mesocosm experiment that manipulated predator (larval dragonflies and damselflies) density and diversity, non-intraguild (non-IG) predators that only consume free-living cercariae (parasitic trematodes) reduced metacercarial infections in tadpoles, whereas intraguild (IG) predators that consume both parasites and tadpole hosts did not. This likely occurred because IG predators reduced tadpole densities and anticercarial behaviors, increasing per capita exposure rates of the surviving tadpoles (i.e., via density- and trait-mediated effects) despite the consumption of parasites. A mathematical model demonstrated that non-IG predators reduce macroparasite infections, but IG predation weakens this “dilution effect” and can even amplify parasite burdens. Consistent with the experiment and model, a wetland survey revealed that the diversity of IG predators was unrelated to metacercarial burdens in amphibians, but the diversity of non-IG predators was negatively correlated with infections. These results are strikingly similar to generalities that have emerged from the predator diversity–pest biocontrol literature, suggesting that there may be general mechanisms for pest control and that biocontrol research might inform disease management and vice versa. In summary, we identified a general trait of predators—where they fall on an IG predation continuum—that predicts their ability to reduce infections and possibly pests in general. Consequently, managing assemblages of predators represents an underused tool for the management of human and wildlife diseases and pest populations. PMID:25713379

  6. Life in varying environments: experimental evidence for delayed effects of juvenile environment on adult life history.

    PubMed

    Helle, Heikki; Koskela, Esa; Mappes, Tapio

    2012-05-01

    1. The effects of environment experienced during early development on phenotype as an adult has started to gain vast amounts of interest in various taxa. Some evidence on long-term effects of juvenile environment is available, but replicated experimental studies in wild animals are still lacking. 2. Here we report the first replicated experiment in wild mammals which examines the long-term effects of juvenile and adult environments on individual fitness (reproduction, survival and health). The early development of bank vole (Myodes glareolus) individuals took place in either food-supplemented or un-supplemented outdoor enclosures. After the summer, adult individuals were reciprocally changed to either a similar or opposite resource environment to overwinter. 3. Adult environment had an overriding effect on reproductive success of females so that females overwintering in food-supplemented enclosures had a higher probability of breeding and advanced the initiation of breeding. However, the characteristics of their litters were determined by juvenile environment: females initially grown in food-supplemented conditions subsequently produced larger litters with bigger pups and a male-biased sex ratio. 4. In males, individuals growing in un-supplemented conditions had the highest survival irrespective of adult environment during winter, whereas in females, neither the juvenile nor adult environments affected their survival significantly. The physiological condition of voles in spring, as determined by haematological parameters, was also differentially affected by juvenile (plasma proteins and male testosterone) and adult (haematocrit) environments. 5. Our results suggest that (i) life-history trajectories of voles are not strictly specialized to a certain environment and (ii) the plastic life-history responses to present conditions can actually be caused by delayed effects of the juvenile environment. More generally, the results are important for understanding

  7. Effect of cisapride on delayed gastric emptying in gastro-oesophageal reflux disease.

    PubMed Central

    Maddern, G J; Jamieson, G G; Myers, J C; Collins, P J

    1991-01-01

    Some patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease have delayed gastric emptying. This study investigates the effect of cisapride on gastric emptying in 34 patients with proved reflux and delayed gastric emptying of solids. They were enrolled in a double blind controlled crossover study. Placebo or cisapride (10 mg) tablets were given three times a day for three days followed by further assessment of gastric emptying. The protocol was repeated with the crossover tablet. Gastric emptying was assessed by a dual radionuclide technique. The percentage of a solid meal remaining in the stomach at 100 minutes (% R100 minutes) and the time taken for 50% of the liquid to empty (T50 minutes) were calculated and analysed by the Wilcoxon matched pairs signed ranks test and expressed as medians (ranges). For gastric emptying of solids the initial % R100 minutes (70 (60-100)%) was not significantly different from placebo (71 (35-100)%). After cisapride treatment a significant acceleration (p less than 0.001) in gastric emptying occurred (% R100 minutes, 50.5 (28-93)%). Similarly with gastric emptying of liquids, the initial T50 minute value was 26.5 (12-82) minutes, after placebo the value was 28 (11-81) minutes, but this was significantly accelerated with cisapride (p less than 0.03) to 22.5 (6-61) minutes. The acceleration in gastric emptying occurred in the proximal portion of the stomach for gastric emptying of both solids and liquids suggesting that this is the principal site of action of cisapride. We conclude that cisapride significantly accelerates gastric emptying of both solids and liquids in patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease and delayed gastric emptying. PMID:2040466

  8. Effect of the Topology and Delayed Interactions in Neuronal Networks Synchronization

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Toni; Garcia, Guadalupe C.; Eguíluz, Víctor M.; Vicente, Raúl; Pipa, Gordon; Mirasso, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    As important as the intrinsic properties of an individual nervous cell stands the network of neurons in which it is embedded and by virtue of which it acquires great part of its responsiveness and functionality. In this study we have explored how the topological properties and conduction delays of several classes of neural networks affect the capacity of their constituent cells to establish well-defined temporal relations among firing of their action potentials. This ability of a population of neurons to produce and maintain a millisecond-precise coordinated firing (either evoked by external stimuli or internally generated) is central to neural codes exploiting precise spike timing for the representation and communication of information. Our results, based on extensive simulations of conductance-based type of neurons in an oscillatory regime, indicate that only certain topologies of networks allow for a coordinated firing at a local and long-range scale simultaneously. Besides network architecture, axonal conduction delays are also observed to be another important factor in the generation of coherent spiking. We report that such communication latencies not only set the phase difference between the oscillatory activity of remote neural populations but determine whether the interconnected cells can set in any coherent firing at all. In this context, we have also investigated how the balance between the network synchronizing effects and the dispersive drift caused by inhomogeneities in natural firing frequencies across neurons is resolved. Finally, we show that the observed roles of conduction delays and frequency dispersion are not particular to canonical networks but experimentally measured anatomical networks such as the macaque cortical network can display the same type of behavior. PMID:21637767

  9. Differential Effects of the Cannabinoid Agonist WIN55,212-2 on Delay and Trace Eyeblink Conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Steinmetz, Adam B.; Freeman, John H.

    2014-01-01

    Central cannabinoid-1 receptors (CB1R) play a role in the acquisition of delay eyeblink conditioning but not trace eyeblink conditioning in humans and animals. However, it is not clear why trace conditioning is immune to the effects of cannabinoid receptor compounds. The current study examined the effects of variants of delay and trace conditioning procedures to elucidate the factors that determine the effects of CB1R agonists on eyeblink conditioning. In Experiment 1 rats were administered the cannabinoid agonist WIN55,212-2 during delay, long delay, or trace conditioning. Rats were impaired during delay and long delay but not trace conditioning; the impairment was greater for long delay than delay conditioning. Trace conditioning was further examined in Experiment 2 by manipulating the trace interval and keeping constant the conditioned stimulus (CS) duration. It was found that when the trace interval was 300 ms or less WIN55,212-2 administration impaired the rate of learning. Experiment 3 tested whether the trace interval duration or the relative durations of the CS and trace interval were critical parameters influencing the effects of WIN55,212-2 on eyeblink conditioning. Rats were not impaired with a 100 ms CS, 200 ms trace paradigm but were impaired with a 1000 ms CS, 500 ms trace paradigm, indicating that the duration of the trace interval does not matter but the proportion of the interstimulus interval occupied by the CS relative to the trace period is critical. Taken together the results indicate that cannabinoid agonists affect cerebellar learning the CS is longer than the trace interval. PMID:24128358

  10. Transactional problem content in cost discounting: parallel effects for probability and delay.

    PubMed

    Jones, Stephen; Oaksford, Mike

    2011-05-01

    Four experiments investigated the effects of transactional content on temporal and probabilistic discounting of costs. Kusev, van Schaik, Ayton, Dent, and Chater (2009) have shown that content other than gambles can alter decision-making behavior even when associated value and probabilities are held constant. Transactions were hypothesized to lead to similar effects because the cost to a purchaser always has a linked gain, the purchased commodity. Gain amount has opposite effects on delay and probabilistic discounting (e.g., Benzion, Rapoport, & Yagil, 1989; Green, Myerson, & Ostaszewski, 1999), a finding that is not consistent with descriptive decision theory (Kahneman & Tversky, 1979; Loewenstein & Prelec, 1992). However, little or no effect on discounting has been observed for losses or costs. Experiment 1, using transactions, showed parallel effects for temporal and probabilistic discounting: Smaller amounts were discounted more than large amounts. As the cost rises, people value the commodity more, and they consequently discount less. Experiment 2 ruled out a possible methodological cause for this effect. Experiment 3 replicated Experiment 1. Experiment 4, using gambles, showed no effect for temporal discounting, because of the absence of the linked gain, but the same effect for probabilistic discounting, because prospects implicitly introduce a linked gain (Green et al., 1999; Prelec & Loewenstein, 1991). As found by Kusev et al. (2009), these findings are not consistent with decision theory and suggest closer attention should be paid to the effects of content on decision making.

  11. Strong density- and diversity-related effects help to maintain tree species diversity in a neotropical forest

    PubMed Central

    Wills, Christopher; Condit, Richard; Foster, Robin B.; Hubbell, Stephen P.

    1997-01-01

    Intraspecific density-dependent effects in the Barro Colorado Island (Panama) study area are far stronger, and involve far more species, than previously had been suspected. Significant effects on recruitment, many extremely strong, are seen for 67 out of the 84 most common species in the plot, including the 10 most common. Significant effects on the intrinsic rate of increase are seen in 54 of the 84 species. These effects are far more common than interspecific effects, and are predominantly of the type that should maintain tree diversity. As a result, the more diverse an area in the forest is, the higher is the overall rate of increase of the trees in that area, although sheer crowding has by itself a negative effect. These findings are consistent with, but do not prove, an important role for host–pathogen interactions (defined broadly) in the maintenance of diversity. Ways are suggested by which to test host–pathogen models and competing models. PMID:11038601

  12. The effect of time delay on control stability of an electromagnetic active tuned mass damper for vibration control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, A.; Torres-Perez, A.; Kaczmarczyk, S.; Picton, P.

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the effect of time delays on the stability of a zero-placement position and velocity feedback law for a vibratory system comprising harmonic excitation equipped with an electromagnetic active tuned mass damper (ATMD). The purpose of the active control is broadening the vibration attenuation envelope of a primary mass to a higher frequency region identified as from 50±0.5Hz with a passive tuned mass damper (TMD) to a wider range of 50±5Hz with an ATMD. Stability conditions of the closed-loop system are determined by studying the position of the system closed-loop poles after the introduction of time delays for different excitation frequencies. A computer simulation of the model predicted that the proposed control system is subject to instability after a critical time delay margin dependent upon the frequency of excitation and the finding were experimentally validated. Three solutions are derived and experimentally tested for minimising the effect of time delays on the stability of the control system. The first solution is associated with the introduction of more damping in the absorber system. The second incorporates using a time-delayed ATMD by tuning its original natural resonant frequency to beyond the nominal operational frequency range of the composite system. The third involves an online gain tuning of filter coefficients in a dual arrangement of low-pass and high-pass filters to eliminate the effect time delays by manipulating the signal phase shifts.

  13. The effect of friendly touch on delay-of-gratification in preschool children.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Julia A; Berkowitz, Talia; Shusterman, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Physical touch has many documented benefits, but past research has paid little attention to the effects of touch on children's development. Here, we tested the effect of touch on children's compliance behaviour in a modified delay-of-gratification task. Forty children (M = 59 months) were randomly assigned to a touch or no touch group. Children in the intervention condition received a friendly touch on the back while being told that they should wait for permission to eat a candy. Results showed that children in the touch condition waited an average of two minutes longer to eat the candy than children in the no touch condition. This finding has implications for the potential of using touch to promote positive behaviours in children.

  14. Voice-specific information and the 20-second delayed-suffix effect.

    PubMed

    Balota, D A; Duchek, J M

    1986-10-01

    Two experiments were conducted to investigate the nature of the delayed-suffix effect reported by Watkins and Todres (1980). In both experiments, subjects were presented lists of digits for serial recall. At the end of each list either a tone or a voice reading aloud the word go was presented. The voice was either in the same voice that read the digits or in a different voice. Past research has indicated that the tone control produces the least interference, followed by the different-voice suffix, which in turn produces less interference than the same-voice suffix. The results of both experiments indicated that when subjects were tested on immediate recall for the lists, the typical ordering of tone control, different-voice suffix, and same-voice suffix on recall at the last serial position was found. However, when there was a 20-s filled interval between the last list item and the suffix, there was only a difference between the tone control and the same- and different-voice suffixes with no difference between the latter two conditions. In addition, Experiment 2 failed to support a simple attentional account of the differential influence of voice in the immediate and delayed-recall conditions. The results are viewed as supporting a perceptual tuning mechanism in which perceptual specificity decreases with the passage of time.

  15. Antioxidant activity and delayed aging effects of hot water extract from Chamaecyparis obtusa var. formosana leaves.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Szu-Chin; Li, Wen-Hsuan; Shi, Yeu-Ching; Yen, Pei-Ling; Lin, Huan-You; Liao, Vivian Hsiu-Chuan; Chang, Shang-Tzen

    2014-05-01

    The antioxidant activity and delayed aging effects of hot water extracts from leaves of Chamaecyparis obtusa var. formosana were investigated. Free radical, superoxide radical scavenging, and total phenolic content assays were employed to evaluate the in vitro activities of the extracts. In addition, in vivo assays using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans were also performed in this study. The results showed that among all soluble fractions obtained from the extracts, the ethyl acetate-soluble fraction has the best in vitro and in vivo antioxidant activities. Moreover, it decreased significantly the deposition of lipofuscin (aging pigment) and extended the lifespan of C. elegans. Bioactivity-guided fractionation yielded six potent antioxidant constituents from the ethyl acetate-soluble fraction, namely, catechin, quercetin, quercetin-3-O-α-rhamnoyranoside, myricetin-3-O-α-rhamnoyranoside, vanillic acid, and 4-hydroxybenzoic acid. Quercetin-3-O-α-rhamnoyranoside pretreatment showed the highest survival of C. elegans upon juglone exposure. Taken together, the results revealed that hot water extracts from C. obtusa var. formosana leaves have the potential to be used as a source for antioxidant or delayed aging health food. PMID:24766147

  16. Delayed effects of neutron irradiation on central nervous system microvasculature in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, J.H.; McGregor, J.M.; Clendenon, N.R.; Gordon, W.A.; Yates, A.J.; Gahbauer, R.A.; Barth, R.F.; Fairchild, R.G.

    1988-01-01

    Pathologic examination of a series of 14 patients with malignant gliomas treated with BNCT showed well demarcated zones of radiation damage characterized by coagulation necrosis. Beam attenuation was correlated with edema, loss of parenchymal elements, demyelination, leukocytosis, and peripheral gliosis. Vascular disturbances consisted of endothelial swelling, medial and adventitial proliferation, fibrin impregnation, frequent thrombosis, and perivascular inflammation. Radiation changes appeared to be acute and delayed. The outcome of the patients in this series was not significantly different from the natural course of the disease, even though two of the patients had no residual tumor detected at the time of autopsy. The intensity of the vascular changes raised a suspicion that boron may have sequestered in vessel walls, resulting in selectively high doses of radiation to these structures (Asbury et al., 1972), or that there may have been high blood concentrations of boron at the time of treatment. The potential limiting effects of a vascular ischemic reaction in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) prompted the following study to investigate the delayed response of microvascular structures in a rat model currently being used for pre-clinical investigations. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Special Effects: Antenna Wetting, Short Distance Diversity and Depolarization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, Roberto J.

    2000-01-01

    The Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) communications system operates in the Ka frequency band. ACTS uses multiple, hopping, narrow beams and very small aperture terminal (VSAT) technology to establish a system availability of 99.5% for bit-error-rates of 5 x 10(exp -7) Or better over the continental United States. In order maintain this minimum system availability in all US rain zones, ACTS uses an adaptive rain fade compensation protocol to reduce the impact of signal attenuation resulting from propagation effects. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of system and sub-system characterizations considering the statistical effects of system variances due to antenna wetting and depolarization effects. In addition the availability enhancements using short distance diversity in a sub-tropical rain zone are investigated.

  18. Presumed fair: ironic effects of organizational diversity structures.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Cheryl R; Major, Brenda; Jurcevic, Ines; Dover, Tessa L; Brady, Laura M; Shapiro, Jenessa R

    2013-03-01

    This research tests the hypothesis that the presence (vs. absence) of organizational diversity structures causes high-status group members (Whites, men) to perceive organizations with diversity structures as procedurally fairer environments for underrepresented groups (racial minorities, women), even when it is clear that underrepresented groups have been unfairly disadvantaged within these organizations. Furthermore, this illusory sense of fairness derived from the mere presence of diversity structures causes high-status group members to legitimize the status quo by becoming less sensitive to discrimination targeted at underrepresented groups and reacting more harshly toward underrepresented group members who claim discrimination. Six experiments support these hypotheses in designs using 4 types of diversity structures (diversity policies, diversity training, diversity awards, idiosyncratically generated diversity structures from participants' own organizations) among 2 high-status groups in tests involving several types of discrimination (discriminatory promotion practices, adverse impact in hiring, wage discrimination). Implications of these experiments for organizational diversity and employment discrimination law are discussed.

  19. Malaria epidemiology and economics: the effect of delayed immune acquisition on the cost-effectiveness of insecticide-treated bednets.

    PubMed Central

    Guyatt, H L; Snow, R W; Evans, D B

    1999-01-01

    An understanding of the epidemiology of a disease is central in evaluating the health impact and cost-effectiveness of control interventions. The epidemiology of life-threatening malaria is receiving renewed interest, with concerns that the implementation of preventive measures such as insecticide-treated bednets (ITNs) while protecting young children might in fact increase the risks of mortality and morbidity in older ages by delaying the acquisition of functional immunity. This paper aims to illustrate how a combined approach of epidemiology and economics can be used to (i) explore the long-term impact of changes in epidemiological profiles, and (ii) identify those variables that are critical in determining whether an intervention will be an efficient use of resources. The key parameters for determining effectiveness are the protective efficacy of ITNs (reduction in all-cause mortality), the malaria attributable mortality and the increased malaria-specific mortality risk due to delays in the acquisition of functional immunity. In particular, the analysis demonstrates that delayed immune acquisition is not a problem per se, but that the critical issue is whether it occurs immediately following the implementation of an ITN programme or whether it builds up slowly over time. In the 'worst case' scenario where ITNs immediately increase malaria-specific mortality due to reduced immunity, the intervention might actually cost lives. In other words, it might be better to not use ITNs. On the other hand, if reduced immunity takes two years to develop, ITNs would still fall into the category of excellent value for money compared to other health interventions, saving a year of life (YLL) at a cost of between US$25-30. These types of calculations are important in identifying the parameters which field researchers should be seeking to measure to address the important question of the net impact of delaying the acquisition of immunity through preventive control measures. PMID

  20. Effect of pre-fixation delay and freezing on mink testicular endpoints for environmental research.

    PubMed

    Spörndly-Nees, Ellinor; Ekstedt, Elisabeth; Magnusson, Ulf; Fakhrzadeh, Azadeh; Luengo Hendriks, Cris L; Holm, Lena

    2015-01-01

    There is growing interest in using wild animals to monitor the real-life cocktail effect of environmental chemicals on male reproduction. However, practical difficulties, such as long distances to the laboratory, generally prolong the time between euthanisation and specimen handling. For instance, tissue fixation is often performed on frozen material or on material where deterioration has started, which may affect tissue morphology. This study examined the effect of pre-fixation delay and freezing on mink testicular endpoints in order to determine robust endpoints in suboptimally handled specimens. Sexually mature farmed mink (n=30) selected at culling were divided into six groups and subjected to different time intervals between euthanisation and fixation or freezing: 0 hours (fixed immediately post mortem), 6 hours, 18 hours, 30 hours, 42 hours, or frozen 6 hours post mortem and thawed overnight. Unaffected endpoints when pre-fixation storage was extended to 30 hours included: area and diameter of the seminiferous tubules, length and weight of the testes, and acrosomes marked with Gata-4. Epithelial height, Sertoli cells marked with Gata-4 and cell morphology were affected endpoints after 6 hours of storage. Freezing the tissue prior to fixation severely altered cell morphology and reduced testicular weight, tubular diameter and area. Morphological changes seen after 6 hours included shredded germ cells and excess cytoplasm in seminiferous tubular lumen, chromatin rearrangements and increased germ cell death. Extended delay before fixation and freezing affected many endpoints in the mink testicular tissue. Some of these endpoints may mimic chemically induced effects, which is important to consider when evaluating specimens from wild animals for environmental toxicity. PMID:25933113

  1. Effect of Pre-Fixation Delay and Freezing on Mink Testicular Endpoints for Environmental Research

    PubMed Central

    Spörndly-Nees, Ellinor; Ekstedt, Elisabeth; Magnusson, Ulf; Fakhrzadeh, Azadeh; Luengo Hendriks, Cris L.; Holm, Lena

    2015-01-01

    There is growing interest in using wild animals to monitor the real-life cocktail effect of environmental chemicals on male reproduction. However, practical difficulties, such as long distances to the laboratory, generally prolong the time between euthanisation and specimen handling. For instance, tissue fixation is often performed on frozen material or on material where deterioration has started, which may affect tissue morphology. This study examined the effect of pre-fixation delay and freezing on mink testicular endpoints in order to determine robust endpoints in suboptimally handled specimens. Sexually mature farmed mink (n=30) selected at culling were divided into six groups and subjected to different time intervals between euthanisation and fixation or freezing: 0 hours (fixed immediately post mortem), 6 hours, 18 hours, 30 hours, 42 hours, or frozen 6 hours post mortem and thawed overnight. Unaffected endpoints when pre-fixation storage was extended to 30 hours included: area and diameter of the seminiferous tubules, length and weight of the testes, and acrosomes marked with Gata-4. Epithelial height, Sertoli cells marked with Gata-4 and cell morphology were affected endpoints after 6 hours of storage. Freezing the tissue prior to fixation severely altered cell morphology and reduced testicular weight, tubular diameter and area. Morphological changes seen after 6 hours included shredded germ cells and excess cytoplasm in seminiferous tubular lumen, chromatin rearrangements and increased germ cell death. Extended delay before fixation and freezing affected many endpoints in the mink testicular tissue. Some of these endpoints may mimic chemically induced effects, which is important to consider when evaluating specimens from wild animals for environmental toxicity. PMID:25933113

  2. Effects of delayed-release dimethyl fumarate on MRI measures in the phase 3 CONFIRM study

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Robert J.; Phillips, J. Theodore; Hutchinson, Michael; Havrdova, Eva; Kita, Mariko; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A.M.; Tozer, Daniel J.; MacManus, David G.; Yousry, Tarek A.; Goodsell, Mary; Yang, Minhua; Zhang, Ray; Viglietta, Vissia; Dawson, Katherine T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effects of oral delayed-release dimethyl fumarate (DMF; also known as gastro-resistant DMF) on MRI lesion activity and load, atrophy, and magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) measures from the Comparator and an Oral Fumarate in Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis (CONFIRM) study. Methods: CONFIRM was a 2-year, placebo-controlled study of the efficacy and safety of DMF 240 mg twice (BID) or 3 times daily (TID) in 1,417 patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS); subcutaneous glatiramer acetate 20 mg once daily was included as an active reference comparator. The number and volume of T2-hyperintense, T1-hypointense, and gadolinium-enhancing (Gd+) lesions, as well as whole brain volume and MTR, were assessed in 681 patients (MRI cohort). Results: DMF BID and TID produced significant and consistent reductions vs placebo in the number of new or enlarging T2-hyperintense lesions and new nonenhancing T1-hypointense lesions after 1 and 2 years of treatment and in the number of Gd+ lesions at week 24, year 1, and year 2. Lesion volumes were also significantly reduced. Reductions in brain atrophy and MTR changes with DMF relative to placebo did not reach statistical significance. Conclusions: The robust effects on MRI active lesion counts and total lesion volume in patients with RRMS demonstrate the ability of DMF to exert beneficial effects on inflammatory lesion activity in multiple sclerosis, and support DMF therapy as a valuable new treatment option in RRMS. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class I evidence of reduction in brain lesion number and volume, as assessed by MRI, over 2 years of delayed-release DMF treatment. PMID:25681448

  3. Reinforcer magnitude affects delay discounting and influences effects of d-amphetamine in rats.

    PubMed

    Krebs, Christopher A; Reilly, William J; Anderson, Karen G

    2016-09-01

    Impulsive choice in humans can be altered by changing reinforcer magnitude; however, this effect has not been found in rats. Current levels of impulsive choice can also influence effects of d-amphetamine. This study used a within-subject assessment to determine if impulsive choice is sensitive to changes in reinforcer magnitude, and whether effects of d-amphetamine are related to current levels of impulsive choice. A discounting procedure in which choice was for a smaller reinforcer available immediately or a larger reinforcer available after a delay that increased within session was used. Reinforcer magnitude was manipulated between conditions and impulsive choice was quantified using area under the curve (AUC). In the Smaller-Magnitude (SM) Condition, choice was between one food pellet and three food pellets. In the Larger-Magnitude (LM) Condition, choice was between two food pellets and six food pellets. Impulsive choice was greater in the SM Condition compared to the LM Condition. Further, effects of d-amphetamine (0.1-1.8mg/kg) were related to differences in impulsive choice. d-Amphetamine increased impulsive choice in the LM Condition, but had no effect on impulsive choice in the SM Condition. Overall, these results show that impulsive choice in rats is sensitive to changes in reinforcer magnitude, and that effects of d-amphetamine are influenced by current levels of impulsive choice.

  4. Reinforcer magnitude affects delay discounting and influences effects of d-amphetamine in rats.

    PubMed

    Krebs, Christopher A; Reilly, William J; Anderson, Karen G

    2016-09-01

    Impulsive choice in humans can be altered by changing reinforcer magnitude; however, this effect has not been found in rats. Current levels of impulsive choice can also influence effects of d-amphetamine. This study used a within-subject assessment to determine if impulsive choice is sensitive to changes in reinforcer magnitude, and whether effects of d-amphetamine are related to current levels of impulsive choice. A discounting procedure in which choice was for a smaller reinforcer available immediately or a larger reinforcer available after a delay that increased within session was used. Reinforcer magnitude was manipulated between conditions and impulsive choice was quantified using area under the curve (AUC). In the Smaller-Magnitude (SM) Condition, choice was between one food pellet and three food pellets. In the Larger-Magnitude (LM) Condition, choice was between two food pellets and six food pellets. Impulsive choice was greater in the SM Condition compared to the LM Condition. Further, effects of d-amphetamine (0.1-1.8mg/kg) were related to differences in impulsive choice. d-Amphetamine increased impulsive choice in the LM Condition, but had no effect on impulsive choice in the SM Condition. Overall, these results show that impulsive choice in rats is sensitive to changes in reinforcer magnitude, and that effects of d-amphetamine are influenced by current levels of impulsive choice. PMID:27418423

  5. Effective Listening: Barriers to Listening in a Diverse Business Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Augusta M.

    1991-01-01

    Maintains that listening skills are a critical starting point for the management of diversity in business organizations. Discusses listening barriers which prevent the nurturing of diversity in business. (PRA)

  6. Diversion from custody. II: Effect on hospital and prison resources.

    PubMed

    Joseph, P L; Potter, M

    1993-03-01

    Two hundred and one referrals to a psychiatric assessment scheme based at two inner-London magistrates' courts were followed up to assess the effect of the scheme on hospital and prison resources. Of the 65 hospital admissions, 50 (77%) derived some or marked benefit from psychiatric treatment. Those who did badly were more likely to be of no fixed abode, and had higher rates of criminality and previous compulsory admission to hospital. Absconding was the largest management problem; 30 (46%) of those admitted did so. Twelve months after admission, all patients except one had been discharged; 10 (15%) had been readmitted to hospital. The scheme generated an extra 21 (64%) hospital admissions per annum from the two courts, compared with the three years before its introduction. The saving in remand time to the prison was approximately double the increased admission time to hospital. However, the overall effect of early diversion on hospital and prison resources was small.

  7. Effects of time delay on symmetric two-species competition subject to noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Linru; Mei, Dongcheng

    2008-03-01

    Noise and time delay act simultaneously on real ecological systems. The Lotka-Volterra model of symmetric two-species competition with noise and time delay was investigated in this paper. By means of stochastic simulation, we find that (i) the time delay induces the densities of the two species to periodically oscillate synchronously; (ii) the stationary probability distribution function of the two-species densities exhibits a transition from multiple to single stability as the delay time increases; (iii) the characteristic correlation time for the sum of the two-species densities squared exhibits a nonmonotonic behavior as a function of delay time. Our results have the implication that the combination of noise and time delay could provide an efficient tool for understanding real ecological systems.

  8. The effect of enteric-coated, delayed-release peppermint oil on irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Merat, Shahin; Khalili, Shadi; Mostajabi, Pardise; Ghorbani, Anahita; Ansari, Reza; Malekzadeh, Reza

    2010-05-01

    Herbal remedies, particularly peppermint, have been reported to be helpful in controlling symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). We conducted a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study on 90 outpatients with IBS. Subjects took one capsule of enteric-coated, delayed-release peppermint oil (Colpermin) or placebo three times daily for 8 weeks. We visited patients after the first, fourth, and eighth weeks and evaluated their symptoms and quality of life. The number of subjects free from abdominal pain or discomfort changed from 0 at week 0 to 14 at week 8 in the Colpermin group and from 0 to 6 in controls (P < 0.001). The severity of abdominal pain was also reduced significantly in the Colpermin group as compared to controls. Furthermore, Colpermin significantly improved the quality of life. There was no significant adverse reaction. Colpermin is effective and safe as a therapeutic agent in patients with IBS suffering from abdominal pain or discomfort. PMID:19507027

  9. Effect of artificial acid rain and SO2 on characteristics of delayed light emission.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chenglong; Xing, Da; Zeng, Lizhang; Ding, Chunfeng; Chen, Qun

    2005-01-01

    The structure and function of chloroplast in plant leaves can be affected by acid rain and air pollution. The photosystem II in a plant is considered the primary site where light-induced delayed light emission (DLE) is produced. With the lamina of zijinghua (Bauhinia variegata L.) and soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) as testing models, we studied the effects of artificial acid rain and SO2 on characteristics of DLE by using a home-made weak luminescence detection system. The results show that the changes in DLE intensity of green plants can reflect the changes in chloroplast intactness and function. With proper calibration, DLE may provide an alternative means of evaluating environmental acid stress on plants. The changes in DLE intensity may provide a new approach for the detection of environmental pollution and its impact on the ecosystem.

  10. Existence and stability of almost periodic solutions of nonautonomous competitive systems with weak Allee effect and delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wanqin; Ye, Yuan

    2009-11-01

    In this paper, a class of nonautonomous Lotka-Volterra type multispecies competitive systems with weak Allee effect and delays are considered. By using Mawhin's continuation theorem of coincidence degree theory, we obtain some sufficient conditions for the existence of almost periodic solutions for the Lotka-Volterra system. On the case of no delays of Allee effects, by constructing a suitable Lyapunov function, we get a sufficient condition for the globally attractivity of the almost periodic solution for the Lotka-Volterra system. Moreover, we also present an illustrative example to show the effectiveness of our results.

  11. Acute effects of ginger extract on biochemical and functional symptoms of delayed onset muscle soreness

    PubMed Central

    Hoseinzadeh, Khadijeh; Daryanoosh, Farhad; Baghdasar, Parvin Javad; Alizadeh, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Inflammation and pain induced by delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) as a result of eccentric exercise (EE) or unaccustomed activity cause some difficulties in exercise for athletes. The purpose of this study was to survey the effect of ginger extract on biochemical and functional symptom of delayed onset muscle soreness. Methods: In a quasi-experimental study, 36 healthy female subjects, who were recruited by intra dormitory calls, randomly divided into 3 groups, including: ginger intake 1 hour before exercise (GIBE), ginger intake immediately after exercise (GIAE) and placebo group (PL). Subjects consumed capsules contain 60 mg of ginger extract (equivalent of 2 g dried ginger powder) or placebo before and after exercise. The exercise protocol consisted of a 20 minute step test using a 46cm step at a rate of 15 steps per minute. The blood samples were taken before, 1, 24 and 48 hour after exercise to assay creatine kinase (CK) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Muscle pain scores, isometric strength and circumference of thigh muscle, and hip range of motion were recorded at mentioned times. The analysis of variance (ANOVA) with repeated measure was used to determine the differences between groups. Results: The results showed a significant reduction of pain in GIBE compared to GIAE after 24 and 48h of EE and GIAE compared to PL (p<0.05). IL-6 changed significantly in GIBE compared to PL (p<0.05) after 1, 24, and 48h after EE. The other factors didn’t change meaningfully. Conclusion: The finding of this study suggests that 2 grams of ginger may have anti-inflammation and analgesic effect on DOMS. PMID:26793652

  12. Forced-exercise delays neuropathic pain in experimental diabetes: effects on voltage-activated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    Shankarappa, Sahadev A; Piedras-Rentería, Erika S; Stubbs, Evan B

    2011-07-01

    Physical exercise produces a variety of psychophysical effects, including altered pain perception. Elevated levels of centrally produced endorphins or endocannabinoids are implicated as mediators of exercise-induced analgesia. The effect of exercise on the development and persistence of disease-associated acute/chronic pain remains unclear. In this study, we quantified the physiological consequence of forced-exercise on the development of diabetes-associated neuropathic pain. Euglycemic control or streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic adult male rats were subdivided into sedentary or forced-exercised (2-10 weeks, treadmill) subgroups and assessed for changes in tactile responsiveness. Two weeks following STZ-treatment, sedentary rats developed a marked and sustained hypersensitivity to von Frey tactile stimulation. By comparison, STZ-treated diabetic rats undergoing forced-exercise exhibited a 4-week delay in the onset of tactile hypersensitivity that was independent of glucose control. Exercise-facilitated analgesia in diabetic rats was reversed, in a dose-dependent manner, by naloxone. Small-diameter (< 30 μm) DRG neurons harvested from STZ-treated tactile hypersensitive diabetic rats exhibited an enhanced (2.5-fold) rightward (depolarizing) shift in peak high-voltage activated (HVA) Ca(2+) current density with a concomitant appearance of a low-voltage activated (LVA) Ca(2+) current component. LVA Ca(2+) currents present in DRG neurons from hypersensitive diabetic rats exhibited a marked depolarizing shift in steady-state inactivation. Forced-exercise attenuated diabetes-associated changes in HVA Ca(2+) current density while preventing the depolarizing shift in steady-state inactivation of LVA Ca(2+) currents. Forced-exercise markedly delays the onset of diabetes-associated neuropathic pain, in part, by attenuating associated changes in HVA and LVA Ca(2+) channel function within small-diameter DRG neurons possibly by altering opioidergic tone. PMID:21554321

  13. The effectiveness of multimedia visual perceptual training groups for the preschool children with developmental delay.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Nan; Lin, Chin-Kai; Wei, Ta-Sen; Liu, Chi-Hsin; Wuang, Yee-Pay

    2013-12-01

    This study compared the effectiveness of three approaches to improving visual perception among preschool children 4-6 years old with developmental delays: multimedia visual perceptual group training, multimedia visual perceptual individual training, and paper visual perceptual group training. A control group received no special training. This study employed a pretest-posttest control group of true experimental design. A total of 64 children 4-6 years old with developmental delays were randomized into four groups: (1) multimedia visual perceptual group training (15 subjects); (2) multimedia visual perceptual individual training group (15 subjects); paper visual perceptual group training (19 subjects); and (4) a control group (15 subjects) with no visual perceptual training. Forty minute training sessions were conducted once a week for 14 weeks. The Test of Visual Perception Skills, third edition, was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention. Paired-samples t-test showed significant differences pre- and post-test among the three groups, but no significant difference was found between the pre-test and post-test scores among the control group. ANOVA results showed significant differences in improvement levels among the four study groups. Scheffe post hoc test results showed significant differences between: group 1 and group 2; group 1 and group 3; group 1 and the control group; and group 2 and the control group. No significant differences were reported between group 2 and group 3, and group 3 and the control group. The results showed all three therapeutic programs produced significant differences between pretest and posttest scores. The training effect on the multimedia visual perceptual group program and the individual program was greater than the developmental effect Both the multimedia visual perceptual group training program and the multimedia visual perceptual individual training program produced significant effects on visual perception. The

  14. Diverse Effects of a Seven-Year Experimental Grassland Fragmentation on Major Invertebrate Groups

    PubMed Central

    Braschler, Brigitte; Baur, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Habitat fragmentation is a major driver of biodiversity loss, but observed effects vary and may depend on the group examined. Time since fragmentation may explain some differences between taxonomical groups, as some species and thus species composition respond with a delay to changes in their environment. Impacts of drivers of global change may thus be underestimated in short-term studies. In our study we experimentally fragmented nutrient-poor dry calcareous grasslands and studied the response of species richness, individual density and species composition of various groups of invertebrates (gastropods, ants, ground beetles, rove beetles, orthoptera, spiders, woodlice) in 12 small (1.5 m * 1.5 m) and 12 large (4.5 m * 4.5 m) fragments and their corresponding control plots after 7 years. We further examined responses to fragmentation in relation to body size and habitat preferences. Responses to fragmentation varied between taxonomical groups. While spider species richness and individual density were lower in fragments, the opposite was true for an orthopteran species and woodlice. Species composition and β-diversity differed between fragments and control plots for some groups. However, the interaction treatment*plot size was rarely significant. Species with high occupancy rates in undisturbed control plots responded more negatively to the fragmentation, while species with large body size were relatively more abundant in fragments in some groups. No effect of the fragmentation was found for ants, which may have the longest lag times because of long-lived colonies. However, relationships between abundance and the species’ preferences for environmental factors affected by edge effects indicate that ant diversity too may be affected in the longer-term. Our results show the importance of considering different groups in conservation management in times of widespread fragmentation of landscapes. While species richness may respond slowly, changes in abundance related

  15. Diverse Effects of a Seven-Year Experimental Grassland Fragmentation on Major Invertebrate Groups.

    PubMed

    Braschler, Brigitte; Baur, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Habitat fragmentation is a major driver of biodiversity loss, but observed effects vary and may depend on the group examined. Time since fragmentation may explain some differences between taxonomical groups, as some species and thus species composition respond with a delay to changes in their environment. Impacts of drivers of global change may thus be underestimated in short-term studies. In our study we experimentally fragmented nutrient-poor dry calcareous grasslands and studied the response of species richness, individual density and species composition of various groups of invertebrates (gastropods, ants, ground beetles, rove beetles, orthoptera, spiders, woodlice) in 12 small (1.5 m * 1.5 m) and 12 large (4.5 m * 4.5 m) fragments and their corresponding control plots after 7 years. We further examined responses to fragmentation in relation to body size and habitat preferences. Responses to fragmentation varied between taxonomical groups. While spider species richness and individual density were lower in fragments, the opposite was true for an orthopteran species and woodlice. Species composition and β-diversity differed between fragments and control plots for some groups. However, the interaction treatment*plot size was rarely significant. Species with high occupancy rates in undisturbed control plots responded more negatively to the fragmentation, while species with large body size were relatively more abundant in fragments in some groups. No effect of the fragmentation was found for ants, which may have the longest lag times because of long-lived colonies. However, relationships between abundance and the species' preferences for environmental factors affected by edge effects indicate that ant diversity too may be affected in the longer-term. Our results show the importance of considering different groups in conservation management in times of widespread fragmentation of landscapes. While species richness may respond slowly, changes in abundance related to

  16. Diverse Effects of a Seven-Year Experimental Grassland Fragmentation on Major Invertebrate Groups.

    PubMed

    Braschler, Brigitte; Baur, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Habitat fragmentation is a major driver of biodiversity loss, but observed effects vary and may depend on the group examined. Time since fragmentation may explain some differences between taxonomical groups, as some species and thus species composition respond with a delay to changes in their environment. Impacts of drivers of global change may thus be underestimated in short-term studies. In our study we experimentally fragmented nutrient-poor dry calcareous grasslands and studied the response of species richness, individual density and species composition of various groups of invertebrates (gastropods, ants, ground beetles, rove beetles, orthoptera, spiders, woodlice) in 12 small (1.5 m * 1.5 m) and 12 large (4.5 m * 4.5 m) fragments and their corresponding control plots after 7 years. We further examined responses to fragmentation in relation to body size and habitat preferences. Responses to fragmentation varied between taxonomical groups. While spider species richness and individual density were lower in fragments, the opposite was true for an orthopteran species and woodlice. Species composition and β-diversity differed between fragments and control plots for some groups. However, the interaction treatment*plot size was rarely significant. Species with high occupancy rates in undisturbed control plots responded more negatively to the fragmentation, while species with large body size were relatively more abundant in fragments in some groups. No effect of the fragmentation was found for ants, which may have the longest lag times because of long-lived colonies. However, relationships between abundance and the species' preferences for environmental factors affected by edge effects indicate that ant diversity too may be affected in the longer-term. Our results show the importance of considering different groups in conservation management in times of widespread fragmentation of landscapes. While species richness may respond slowly, changes in abundance related to

  17. Diverse biological effects of electromagnetic-treated water.

    PubMed

    Yamabhai, Montarop; Chumseng, Suchintana; Yoohat, Kirana; Srila, Witsanu

    2014-07-01

    The effects of water treated with an electromagnetic field (EMF) were investigated on two biological systems, humans and plants. Purified de-ionised water was treated by (1) boiling, (2) exposure to microwave radiation, and (3) low frequency electromagnetic oscillation molecular resonance effect technology (MRET), before being used to prepare media for culturing human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from three healthy females. Our results indicated that PBMC culture in MRET-activated medium showed significantly less oxidative metabolism when compared to media prepared from other types of water. As for the effects on soybean, our results indicated that both MRET- and microwave-treated water greatly enhanced the length of the root. These results suggested that electromagnetic-treated water can have diverse biological effects on both animal and plant cells. Since these effects are related to the 'Memory of Water', hypothesis which has been suggested as an explanation of the action of high homeopathic dilutions, our finding warrant a further investigation on the mechanisms of various types of physically conditioned water on specific cellular activities. PMID:24931750

  18. Diverse biological effects of electromagnetic-treated water.

    PubMed

    Yamabhai, Montarop; Chumseng, Suchintana; Yoohat, Kirana; Srila, Witsanu

    2014-07-01

    The effects of water treated with an electromagnetic field (EMF) were investigated on two biological systems, humans and plants. Purified de-ionised water was treated by (1) boiling, (2) exposure to microwave radiation, and (3) low frequency electromagnetic oscillation molecular resonance effect technology (MRET), before being used to prepare media for culturing human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from three healthy females. Our results indicated that PBMC culture in MRET-activated medium showed significantly less oxidative metabolism when compared to media prepared from other types of water. As for the effects on soybean, our results indicated that both MRET- and microwave-treated water greatly enhanced the length of the root. These results suggested that electromagnetic-treated water can have diverse biological effects on both animal and plant cells. Since these effects are related to the 'Memory of Water', hypothesis which has been suggested as an explanation of the action of high homeopathic dilutions, our finding warrant a further investigation on the mechanisms of various types of physically conditioned water on specific cellular activities.

  19. Effects of allocryptopine on outward potassium current and slow delayed rectifier potassium current in rabbit myocardium

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yi-Cheng; Zhang, Yu; Tian, Liu-Yang; Li, Nan; Chen, Xi; Cai, Zhong-Qi; Zhu, Chao; Li, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Objective Allocryptopine (ALL) is an effective alkaloid of Corydalis decumbens (Thunb.) Pers. Papaveraceae and has proved to be anti-arrhythmic. The purpose of our study is to investigate the effects of ALL on transmural repolarizing ionic ingredients of outward potassium current (Ito) and slow delayed rectifier potassium current (IKs). Methods The monophasic action potential (MAP) technique was used to record the MAP duration of the epicardium (Epi), myocardium (M) and endocardium (Endo) of the rabbit heart and the whole cell patch clamp was used to record Ito and IKs in cardiomyocytes of Epi, M and Endo layers that were isolated from rabbit ventricles. Results The effects of ALL on MAP of Epi, M and Endo layers were disequilibrium. ALL could effectively reduce the transmural dispersion of repolarization (TDR) in rabbit transmural ventricular wall. ALL decreased the current densities of Ito and IKs in a voltage and concentration dependent way and narrowed the repolarizing differences among three layers. The analysis of gating kinetics showed ALL accelerated the channel activation of Ito in M layers and partly inhibit the channel openings of Ito in Epi, M and Endo cells. On the other hand, ALL mainly slowed channel deactivation of IKs channel in Epi and Endo layers without affecting its activation. Conclusions Our study gives partially explanation about the mechanisms of transmural inhibition of Ito and IKs channels by ALL in rabbit myocardium. These findings provide novel perspective regarding the anti-arrhythmogenesis application of ALL in clinical settings. PMID:27403141

  20. Glibenclamide enhances the effects of delayed hypothermia after experimental stroke in rats.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhou; Zhu, Shu-Zhen; Hu, Ya-Fang; Gu, Yong; Wang, Sheng-Nan; Lin, Zhen-Zhou; Xie, Zuo-Shan; Pan, Su-Yue

    2016-07-15

    In order to evaluate whether glibenclamide can extend the therapeutic window during which induced hypothermia can protect against stroke, we subjected adult male Sprague-Dawley rats to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). We first verified the protective effects of hypothermia induced at 0, 2, 4 or 6h after MCAO onset, and then we assessed the effects of the combination of glibenclamide and hypothermia at 6, 8 or 10h after MCAO onset. At 24h after MCAO, we assessed brain edema, infarct volume, modified neurological severity score, Evans Blue leakage and expression of Sulfonylurea receptor 1 (SUR1) protein and pro-inflammatory factors. No protective effects were observed when hypothermia was induced too long after MCAO. At 6h after MCAO onset, hypothermia alone failed to decrease cerebral edema and infarct volume, but the combination of glibenclamide and hypothermia decreased both. The combination also improved neurological outcome, ameliorated blood-brain barrier damage and decreased levels of COX-2, TNF-α and IL-1β. These results suggest that glibenclamide enhances and extends the therapeutic effects of delayed hypothermia against ischemia stroke, potentially by ameliorating blood-brain barrier damage and declining levels of pro-inflammatory factors. PMID:27134036

  1. 78 FR 19098 - Wage Methodology for the Temporary Non-Agricultural Employment H-2B Program; Delay of Effective Date

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-29

    ... rule amending 20 CFR part 655, published at 76 FR 3452 (January 19, 2011), originally effective January 1, 2012, and which was previously made effective September 30, 2011, at 76 FR 45667 (August 1, 2011); delayed to November 30, 2011, at 76 FR 59896 (September 28, 2011); to January 1, 2012, at 76 FR...

  2. Effects of Response-Signal Temporal Separation on Behavior Maintained under Temporally Defined Schedules of Delayed Signaled Reinforcement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pulido, Marco A.; Martinez, Guillermo

    2010-01-01

    The present study assessed the effects of systematically separating the cue from the response in temporally defined schedules of delayed signaled reinforcement. Identical schedules were used to study the effects of the independent variable on response acquisition and response maintenance. In the first experiment, 8 groups of 3 naive rats were…

  3. Effects of time delay and space on herbivore dynamics: linking inducible defenses of plants to herbivore outbreak

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Gui-Quan; Wang, Su-Lan; Ren, Qian; Jin, Zhen; Wu, Yong-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Empirical results indicate that inducible defenses of plants have effects on herbivore populations. However, little is known about how inducible defenses of plants have influences on herbivore outbreak when space effect is considered. To reveal the relationship between inducible defenses and herbivore outbreak, we present a mathematical model to describe the interaction of them. It was found that time delay plays dual effects in the persistence of herbivore populations: (i) large value of time delay may be associated with small density of herbivore populations, and thus causes the populations to run a higher risk of extinction; (ii) moderate value of time delay is beneficial for maintaining herbivore density in a determined range which may promote the persistence of herbivore populations. Additionally, we revealed that interaction of time delay and space promotes the growth of average density of herbivore populations during their outbreak period which implied that time delay may drive the resilience of herbivore populations. Our findings highlight the close relationship between inducible defenses of plants and herbivore outbreak. PMID:26084812

  4. Disentangling the roles of diversity resistance and priority effects in community assembly.

    PubMed

    Viana, Duarte S; Cid, Bertha; Figuerola, Jordi; Santamaría, Luis

    2016-11-01

    The assembly of many biological communities is constrained by the resistance exerted by resident species to immigration (biotic resistance). Two important mechanisms contribute to the generation of biotic resistance: diversity resistance and priority effects. These mechanisms have been explored through theoretical models and laboratory experiments, but the importance of their interplay in the assembly of natural communities remains untested. We used a mesocosm experiment with communities of aquatic plants and zooplankton assembled from natural propagule banks to test whether and how diversity resistance, mediated by the diversity of the resident community, and priority effects, mediated by the timing of immigrants' arrival, affect the establishment of immigrant species and community diversity. In plant communities, immigration success decreased with increasing resident-species richness (diversity resistance) and arrival time (priority effects). Further, diversity resistance was stronger in communities colonized later in the season, indicating that these mechanisms interacted to reinforce biotic resistance. This interaction ultimately determined species richness and beta-diversity in plant communities. For zooplankton, in contrast, neither the diversity of resident communities nor the time of arrival affected the establishment of immigrant species. In these communities, beta-diversity was explained by species sorting, namely biotic effects mediated by plant assemblages. Our results show that the progressive buildup of communities generates an interaction between diversity resistance and priority effects that eventually determines community diversity, unless species sorting mediated by environmental filtering supersedes the effect of biotic resistance. Therefore, disentangling the mechanisms underlying biotic resistance contributes to understand how species diversity is ultimately determined. PMID:27576552

  5. Disentangling the roles of diversity resistance and priority effects in community assembly.

    PubMed

    Viana, Duarte S; Cid, Bertha; Figuerola, Jordi; Santamaría, Luis

    2016-11-01

    The assembly of many biological communities is constrained by the resistance exerted by resident species to immigration (biotic resistance). Two important mechanisms contribute to the generation of biotic resistance: diversity resistance and priority effects. These mechanisms have been explored through theoretical models and laboratory experiments, but the importance of their interplay in the assembly of natural communities remains untested. We used a mesocosm experiment with communities of aquatic plants and zooplankton assembled from natural propagule banks to test whether and how diversity resistance, mediated by the diversity of the resident community, and priority effects, mediated by the timing of immigrants' arrival, affect the establishment of immigrant species and community diversity. In plant communities, immigration success decreased with increasing resident-species richness (diversity resistance) and arrival time (priority effects). Further, diversity resistance was stronger in communities colonized later in the season, indicating that these mechanisms interacted to reinforce biotic resistance. This interaction ultimately determined species richness and beta-diversity in plant communities. For zooplankton, in contrast, neither the diversity of resident communities nor the time of arrival affected the establishment of immigrant species. In these communities, beta-diversity was explained by species sorting, namely biotic effects mediated by plant assemblages. Our results show that the progressive buildup of communities generates an interaction between diversity resistance and priority effects that eventually determines community diversity, unless species sorting mediated by environmental filtering supersedes the effect of biotic resistance. Therefore, disentangling the mechanisms underlying biotic resistance contributes to understand how species diversity is ultimately determined.

  6. Effects of trimebutine maleate on delayed rectifier K+ currents in guinea-pig ventricular myocytes.

    PubMed

    Morisawa, T; Hasegawa, J; Tanabe, K; Watanabe, A; Kitano, M; Kishimoto, Y

    2000-04-01

    The effects of trimebutine maleate, a drug commonly used to regulate motility in the gastrointestinal tract, on the delayed rectifier K+ current (I(K)) were evaluated in guinea-pig ventricular myocytes to determine whether the drug has a proarrhythmic effect through blockade of I(K). Trimebutine decreased I(K) in a concentration-dependent manner. To investigate the effects of trimebutine on two components of I(K) (I(Kr) and I(Ks); rapidly activated and slowly activated components, respectively), we performed the envelope-of-tails test. Trimebutine-sensitive I(K) was determined by digital subtraction of I(K) during exposure to trimebutine from control I(K) for each duration of the test pulse over the range 50 ms-2 s. The ratio of deltaI(K,tail)/deltaI(K) plotted against pulse duration for trimebutine-sensitive I(K) gradually decreased to a steady-state value as the duration of the test pulse was lengthened. This finding suggested a weak inhibitory effect of trimebutine on both I(Kr) and I(Ks). The effects of trimebutine on the inward rectifier K+ current (I(K1)) responsible for the resting potential and final repolarization phase of the action potential were investigated by applying voltage clamp ramps over a broad range of potentials. No significant effects were observed at 10 or 100 microM. We next investigated the effects of the drug on the L-type Ca2+ current (I(Ca)). Significant inhibition of I(Ca) was observed at trimebutine concentrations greater than 10 microM. These results suggested that trimebutine maleate has weak inhibitory effects on I(Kr), I(Ks) and I(Ca) at concentrations much higher than those in clinical use. PMID:10813550

  7. Characterizing variation in mycorrhiza effect among diverse plant varieties.

    PubMed

    Sawers, Ruairidh J H; Gebreselassie, Mesfin N; Janos, David P; Paszkowski, Uta

    2010-03-01

    Exploitation of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi may be an important approach for development of reduced-input agriculture. We discuss the use of linear models to analyze variation in mycorrhiza response among diverse plant varieties in order to assess the value of mycorrhizas. Our approach allows elimination of variation linked to differences in plant performance in the absence of mycorrhizas and the selection of plant lines that might harbor genetic variation of use to improve the mycorrhizal symbiosis in agriculture. We illustrate our approach by applying it to previously published and to novel data. We suggest that in dealing with a relative trait such as mycorrhiza effect, the choice of measure used to quantify the trait greatly affects interpretation. In the plant populations under consideration, we find evidence for a greater potential to increase mycorrhiza benefit than previously suggested.

  8. Prospective Memory Deficits in Ecstasy Users: Effects of Longer Ongoing Task Delay Interval

    PubMed Central

    WEINBORN, MICHAEL; WOODS, STEVEN PAUL; NULSEN, CLAIRE; PARK, KATHERINE

    2011-01-01

    Ecstasy use has been associated with neurotoxicity and neurocognitive impairment in a variety of domains, including prospective memory (ProM), which involves the delayed execution of a previously encoded intention in response to a specific cue. The present study adopted the multiprocess theory of ProM to evaluate the hypothesis that ecstasy users would evidence differentially impaired ProM on longer versus shorter ongoing task delays. Ecstasy (n = 31) users, high-risk alcohol users (n = 21) and healthy nonusers (n = 31) completed the short (2-min) and long (15-min) delay ProM scales of the Memory for Intentions Screening Test. Results showed a significant group by ProM delay interaction, such that ecstasy users performed comparably to the comparison groups on short-delay trials, but were impaired on long-delay ProM, particularly for time-based cues. Among the ecstasy users, long-delay ProM was positively associated with risky decision-making, but not with retrospective memory or other aspects of executive functions. These findings suggest that ecstasy users may be particularly susceptible to deficits in strategic target monitoring and maintenance of cue-intention pairings over longer ProM delays. Findings are discussed in the context of their potential everyday functioning (e.g., academic, vocational) and treatment implications for ecstasy users. PMID:22047194

  9. Scopolamine Effects Under a Titrating-Delayed-Nonmatching-to-Position Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porritt, M.; Poling, A.

    2008-01-01

    In a study of working memory, the performance of rats under titrating-delayed-nonmatching- to-position (TDNMTP) procedures was examined. Overall accuracy and the number of trials completed were inversely related to titration value, whereas the highest delay attained was directly related to titration value. When given intraperitoneally,…

  10. The Effect of Delayed Responding on Stroop-Like Task Performance among Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Derek E.; Fosco, Whitney

    2012-01-01

    Forty-four preschoolers completed 2 conditions of a Stroop-like procedure (e.g., saying "boat" for car and "car" for boat) that differed in whether a 3-s delay was imposed before responding. The test card was visible during the delay period for half of the children and occluded for the other children. Preschoolers' interference control was…

  11. The Effects of Aging on Time Reproduction in Delayed Free-Recall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rakitin, B.C.; Stern, Y.; Malapani, C.

    2005-01-01

    The experiments presented here demonstrate that normal aging amplifies differences in time production occurring in delayed free-recall testing. Experiment 1 compared the time production ability of two healthy aged groups as well as college-aged participants. During the test session, which followed a 24-h delay and omitted all feedback and examples…

  12. The Effect of Brief Delays to Reinforcement on the Acquisition of Tacts in Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Majdalany, Lina; Wilder, David A.; Smeltz, Lindsay; Lipschultz, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    We used discrete-trial training to teach 3 children with autism to tact shapes of countries using 3 levels of reinforcement delay for correct responding: 0 s (immediate delivery), 6 s, and 12 s. Two of the 3 participants acquired the targets more quickly in the immediate-delivery condition, suggesting that delays as brief as 6 s may be detrimental…

  13. The Effects of Delaying Tracking in Secondary School: Evidence from the 1999 Education Reform in Poland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jakubowski, Maciej; Patrinos, Harry Anthony; Porta, Emilio Ernesto; Wisniewski, Jerzy

    2016-01-01

    Delaying tracking, extending students' exposure to a general academic education and increasing their time on task on basic competences (reading, mathematics) could improve academic outcomes. To test the hypothesis that delayed vocational streaming improves academic outcomes, this paper analyzes Poland's significant improvements in international…

  14. The domain effect in delay discounting: The roles of fungibility and perishability.

    PubMed

    Holt, Daniel D; Glodowski, Kathryn; Smits-Seemann, Rochelle R; Tiry, Andrew M

    2016-10-01

    There is a growing body of literature demonstrating domain effects where the rate of temporal discounting depends, in part, on the commodity being evaluated. The commodity of money, for example, is typically discounted much less steeply than commodities of entertainment or food. There are several plausible explanations for domain effects: differences in conditioned reinforcer status, degree of fungibility, and differences in metabolic function. While money can be thought of as a conditioned reinforcer exchangeable for a number of different outcomes (highly fungible), comparing money to food (non-fungible) does not separate whether the difference in rates of discounting are due to food having metabolic importance, being perishable, being less fungible, or all of the above. We systematically manipulated the degree of fungibility and perishability of various outcomes and found that while food outcomes tend to be discounted most steeply, the rate of discounting for these outcomes can be moderated by reducing perishability and by increasing fungibility. Important here is that we have identified two independent means of moderating the effect of delay on the value of the outcome.

  15. Universal Intervention Effects on Substance Use Among Young Adults Mediated by Delayed Adolescent Substance Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Spoth, Richard; Trudeau, Linda; Guyll, Max; Shin, Chungyeol; Redmond, Cleve

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the authors examine whether delayed substance initiation during adolescence, achieved through universal family-focused interventions conducted in middle school, can reduce problematic substance use during young adulthood. Sixth-grade students enrolled in 33 rural midwestern schools and their families were randomly assigned to 3 experimental conditions. Self-report questionnaires provided data at 7 time points for the Iowa Strengthening Families Program (ISFP), Preparing for the Drug Free Years (PDFY), and control groups through young adulthood. Five young adult substance frequency measures (drunkenness, alcohol-related problems, cigarettes, illicit drugs, and polysubstance use) were modeled as distal outcomes affected by the average level and rate of increase in substance initiation across the adolescent years in latent growth curve analyses. Results show that the models fit the data and that they were robust across outcomes and interventions, with more robust effects found for ISFP. The addition of direct intervention effects on young adult outcomes was not supported, suggesting long-term effects were primarily indirect. Relative reduction rates were calculated to quantify intervention-control differences on the estimated proportion of young adults indicating problematic substance use; they ranged from 19% to 31% for ISFP and from 9% to 16% for PDFY. PMID:19634956

  16. The domain effect in delay discounting: The roles of fungibility and perishability.

    PubMed

    Holt, Daniel D; Glodowski, Kathryn; Smits-Seemann, Rochelle R; Tiry, Andrew M

    2016-10-01

    There is a growing body of literature demonstrating domain effects where the rate of temporal discounting depends, in part, on the commodity being evaluated. The commodity of money, for example, is typically discounted much less steeply than commodities of entertainment or food. There are several plausible explanations for domain effects: differences in conditioned reinforcer status, degree of fungibility, and differences in metabolic function. While money can be thought of as a conditioned reinforcer exchangeable for a number of different outcomes (highly fungible), comparing money to food (non-fungible) does not separate whether the difference in rates of discounting are due to food having metabolic importance, being perishable, being less fungible, or all of the above. We systematically manipulated the degree of fungibility and perishability of various outcomes and found that while food outcomes tend to be discounted most steeply, the rate of discounting for these outcomes can be moderated by reducing perishability and by increasing fungibility. Important here is that we have identified two independent means of moderating the effect of delay on the value of the outcome. PMID:27542919

  17. Serial position functions following selective hippocampal lesions in monkeys: Effects of delays and interference✩

    PubMed Central

    Bachevalier, Jocelyne; Wright, Anthony A.; Katz, Jeffrey S.

    2013-01-01

    We examined the role of the hippocampus in list-memory processing. Three rhesus monkeys that had extensive experience in this task and had demonstrated full abstract-concept learning and excellent list memory performance (Katz et al., 2002; Wright et al., 2003) received bilateral neurotoxic hippocampal lesions and were re-tested in the serial list memory task. Effects of delays on memory performance were measured in all monkeys, whereas the effects of proactive interference were assessed in only one. Despite a slight change in performance of one of the three animals during re-learning of the same/different task, selective hippocampal damage had little or no effects on list memory accuracy. In addition, the hippocampal damage did not impact serial list position functions (SPFs) but slightly altered the dynamic of the SPF curves. Finally, even more remarkable was that accurate memory performance of one animal remained intact despite the use of small set size of 8 items that created high proactive interference across lists thereby eliminating any use of familiarity judgments to support performance. Together the findings indicate that, with short list items and extensive training in the task (i.e., reference memory), monkeys with selective hippocampal lesions may be able to use alternative memory processes (i.e., working memory) that are mediated by structures other than the hippocampus. PMID:23246643

  18. Effects of mouse genotype on bone wound healing and irradiation-induced delay of healing.

    PubMed

    Glowacki, Julie; Mizuno, Shuichi; Kung, Jason; Goff, Julie; Epperly, Michael; Dixon, Tracy; Wang, Hong; Greenberger, Joel S

    2014-01-01

    We tested the effects of mouse genotype (C57BL/6NHsd, NOD/SCID, SAMR1, and SAMP6) and ionizing irradiation on bone wound healing. Unicortical wounds were made in the proximal tibiae, and the time course of spontaneous healing and effects of irradiation were monitored radiographically and histologically. There was reproducible healing beginning with intramedullary osteogenesis, subsequent bone resorption by osteoclasts, gradual bridging of the cortical wound, and re-population of medullary hematopoietic cells. The most rapid wound closure was noted in SAMR1 mice, followed by SAMP6, C57BL/6NHsd, and NOD/SCID. Ionizing irradiation (20 Gy) to the leg significantly delayed bone wound healing in mice of all four genotypes. Mice with genetically-determined predisposition to early osteopenia (SAMP6) or with immune deficiency (NOD/SCID) had impairments in bone wound healing. These mouse models should be valuable for determining the effects of irradiation on bone healing and also for the design and testing of novel bone growth-enhancing drugs and mitigators of ionizing irradiation.

  19. Sucrose accelerates flower opening and delays senescence through a hormonal effect in cut lily flowers.

    PubMed

    Arrom, Laia; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2012-06-01

    Sugars are generally used to extend the vase life of cut flowers. Such beneficial effects have been associated with an improvement of water relations and an increase in available energy for respiration by floral tissues. In this study we aimed at evaluating to what extent (i) endogenous levels of sugars in outer and inner tepals, androecium and gynoecium are altered during opening and senescence of lily flowers; (ii) sugar levels increase in various floral tissues after sucrose addition to the vase solution; and (iii) sucrose addition alters the hormonal balance of floral tissues. Results showed that endogenous glucose levels increased during flower opening and decreased during senescence in all floral organs, while sucrose levels increased in outer and inner tepals and the androecium during senescence. Sucrose treatment accelerated flower opening, and delayed senescence, but did not affect tepal abscission. Such effects appeared to be exerted through a specific increase in the endogenous levels of sucrose in the gynoecium and of glucose in all floral tissues. The hormonal balance was altered in the gynoecium as well as in other floral tissues. Aside from cytokinin and auxin increases in the gynoecium; cytokinins, gibberellins, abscisic acid and salicylic acid levels increased in the androecium, while abscisic acid decreased in outer tepals. It is concluded that sucrose addition to the vase solution exerts an effect on flower opening and senescence by, among other factors, altering the hormonal balance of several floral tissues.

  20. Plant diversity effects on leaching of nitrate, ammonium, and dissolved organic nitrogen from an experimental grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leimer, Sophia; Oelmann, Yvonne; Wirth, Christian; Wilcke, Wolfgang

    2014-05-01

    Leaching of nitrogen (N) from soil represents a resource loss and, in particular leaching of nitrate, can threaten drinking water quality. As plant diversity leads to a more exhaustive resource use, we investigated the effects of plant species richness, functional group richness, and the presence of specific functional groups on nitrate, ammonium, dissolved organic N (DON), and total dissolved N (TDN) leaching from an experimental grassland in the first 4 years after conversion from fertilized arable land to unfertilized grassland. The experiment is located in Jena, Germany, and consists of 82 plots with 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, or 60 plant species and 1-4 functional groups (legumes, grasses, non-leguminous tall herbs, non-leguminous small herbs). Nitrate, ammonium, and TDN concentrations in soil solution in the 0-0.3 m soil layer were measured every second week during 4 years on 62 plots and DON concentrations were calculated as difference between TDN and inorganic N. Missing concentrations in soil solution were estimated using a Bayesian statistical model. Downward water fluxes (DF) per plot from the 0-0.3 m soil layer were simulated in weekly resolution with a water balance model in connection with a Bayesian model for simulating missing soil water content measurements. To obtain annual nitrate, ammonium, and DON leaching from the 0-0.3 m soil layer per plot, we multiplied the respective concentrations in soil solution with DF and aggregated the data to annual sums. TDN leaching resulted from summation of nitrate, ammonium, and DON leaching. DON leaching contributed most to TDN leaching, particularly in plots without legumes. Dissolved inorganic N leaching in this grassland was dominated by nitrate. The amount of annual ammonium leaching was small and little influenced by plant diversity. Species richness affected DON leaching only in the fourth and last investigated year, possibly because of a delayed soil biota effect that increased microbial transformation of organic

  1. Delayed protective effect of telmisartan on lung ischemia/reperfusion injury in valve replacement operations

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yongfeng; Zhang, Daguo; Xiang, Daokang

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the delayed protective effect of telmisartan on lung ischemic/reperfusion injury in patients undergoing heart valve replacement operations. In total, 180 patients diagnosed with rheumatic valve diseases were randomly divided into the telmisartan (T), captopril (C) and placebo (P) groups. In the telmisartan group, the patients were pretreated with telmisartan (1 mg/kg/day), at the time period 96–48 h before the operation, whereas in the C group, the patients were treated with captopril (1 mg/kg/day) at the time period 96–48 h prior to the operation control group. Each drug treatment group included a corresponding placebo treatment. The variables pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and A-aDO2 were measured prior to CPB and at 1, 3, 6 and 12 h after CPB. Pulmonary neutrophil (PMN) count in the left and right atrium blood as well as SOD malondialdehyde (MDA), NO, angiotensin II (AngII) value in the left atrium blood, were measured 30 min prior to and after CPB. The PVR parameters of the telmisartan and captopril groups were significantly lower than those of the placebo group (P<0.05). The A-aDO2 values in the telmisartan and captopril groups were significantly lower than those in the placebo group at 1, 3 and 6 h following CPB treatment. The difference between the right and left atrium blood PMN was significantly lower in the telmisartan and captopril intervention groups compared to that in the placebo group 30 min following CPB treatment. The left atrium blood SOD and NO values were significantly higher, whereas the MDA value was significantly lower in the telmisartan group compared to the control group 30 min following CPB treatment. As for AngII, there was no difference between the C and T groups, compared with the P group. In the two groups 30 min after treatment with CPB, 24 patients experienced varying degrees of cough, with the telmisartan group showing a significant difference (P<0.05). The hospitalization time was

  2. Effect of Short Study Abroad Course on Student Openness to Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ismail, Baraem; Morgan, Mark; Hayes, Kirby

    2006-01-01

    An important contributing factor to students' willingness to work with diverse people is their "openness" to diversity. The objective of this study was to test the effect of a short (3-wk) study abroad course to China on the openness to diversity/challenge of the 23 students participating in the China study abroad course. Students were given the…

  3. Effects of chill stress on prompt and delayed chlorophyll fluorescence from leaves.

    PubMed

    Melcarek, P K; Brown, G N

    1977-12-01

    This paper describes the utilization of a portable solid state device for the simultaneous measurement of prompt and delayed fluorescence transients in leaves from a variety of species subjected to temperature lowering. The induction transients of the two phenomena were not identical as the peak in prompt fluorescence yield always preceded that of delayed fluorescence. Temperature lowering delayed the occurrence of peak fluorescence, increased prompt fluorescence yield, decreased delayed fluorescence yield, and caused the occurrence of a new, more rapid delayed fluorescence transient. Leaves from all species had qualitatively the same type of induction curves although the response to temperature differed between species. The delayed fluorescence yield of chill-sensitive species was reduced to a greater extent than that of chill-insensitive species. Cold hardening leaf material did not greatly change the fluorescence response to temperature lowering. Arrhenius plots showed a linear relationship between delayed fluorescence yield and temperature. There were no breaks that would suggest membrane lipid phase changes. The data indicate that thylakoid membranes of chill-sensitive species are less capable of maintaining a light-induced high energy state at low temperatures than are thylakoid membranes of chill-resistant species. PMID:16660193

  4. Postartesunate delayed hemolysis is a predictable event related to the lifesaving effect of artemisinins.

    PubMed

    Jauréguiberry, Stéphane; Ndour, Papa A; Roussel, Camille; Ader, Flavie; Safeukui, Innocent; Nguyen, Marie; Biligui, Sylvestre; Ciceron, Liliane; Mouri, Oussama; Kendjo, Eric; Bricaire, François; Vray, Muriel; Angoulvant, Adéla; Mayaux, Julien; Haldar, Kasturi; Mazier, Dominique; Danis, Martin; Caumes, Eric; Thellier, Marc; Buffet, Pierre

    2014-07-10

    Patients with severe malaria treated with artesunate sometimes experience a delayed hemolytic episode. Artesunate (AS) induces pitting, a splenic process whereby dead parasites are expelled from their host erythrocytes. These once-infected erythrocytes then return to the circulation. We analyzed hematologic parameters in 123 travelers treated with AS for severe malaria. Among 60 nontransfused patients observed for more than 8 days, 13 (22%) had delayed hemolysis. The peak concentration of circulating once-infected erythrocytes was measured during the first week in 21 patients and was significantly higher in 9 patients with delayed hemolysis than in 12 with other patterns of anemia (0.30 vs 0.07; P = .0001). The threshold of 180 million once-infected erythrocytes per liter discriminated patients with delayed hemolysis with 89% sensitivity and 83% specificity. Once-infected erythrocyte morphology analyzed by using ImageStream in 4 patients showed an 8.9% reduction in their projected area, an alteration likely contributing to their shorter lifespan. Delayed clearance of infected erythrocytes spared by pitting during AS treatment is an original mechanism of hemolytic anemia. Our findings consolidate a disease framework for posttreatment anemia in malaria in which delayed hemolysis is a new entity. The early concentration of once-infected erythrocytes is a solid candidate marker to predict post-AS delayed hemolysis.

  5. Amplitude and phase effects on the synchronization of delay-coupled oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    D'Huys, O.; Vicente, R.; Danckaert, J.; Fischer, I.

    2010-12-15

    We consider the behavior of Stuart-Landau oscillators as generic limit-cycle oscillators when they are interacting with delay. We investigate the role of amplitude and phase instabilities in producing symmetry-breaking/restoring transitions. Using analytical and numerical methods we compare the dynamics of one oscillator with delayed feedback, two oscillators mutually coupled with delay, and two delay-coupled elements with self-feedback. Taking only the phase dynamics into account, no chaotic dynamics is observed, and the stability of the identical synchronization solution is the same in each of the three studied networks of delay-coupled elements. When allowing for a variable oscillation amplitude, the delay can induce amplitude instabilities. We provide analytical proof that, in case of two mutually coupled elements, the onset of an amplitude instability always results in antiphase oscillations, leading to a leader-laggard behavior in the chaotic regime. Adding self-feedback with the same strength and delay as the coupling stabilizes the system in the transverse direction and, thus, promotes the onset of identically synchronized behavior.

  6. A review on delayed toxic effects of sulfur mustard in Iranian veterans.

    PubMed

    Mansour Razavi, Seyed; Salamati, Payman; Saghafinia, Masoud; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Iranian soldiers were attacked with chemical bombs, rockets and artillery shells 387 times during the 8-years war by Iraq (1980-1988). More than 1,000 tons of sulfur mustard gas was used in the battlefields by the Iraqis against Iranian people. A high rate of morbidities occurred as the result of these attacks. This study aimed to evaluate the delayed toxic effects of sulfur mustard gas on Iranian victims. During a systematic search, a total of 193 (109 more relevant to the main aim) articles on sulfur mustard gas were reviewed using known international and national databases. No special evaluation was conducted on the quality of the articles and their publication in accredited journals was considered sufficient. High rate of morbidities as the result of chemical attacks by sulfur mustard among Iranian people occurred. Iranian researchers found a numerous late complications among the victims which we be listed as wide range of respiratory, ocular, dermatological, psychological, hematological, immunological, gastrointestinal and endocrine complications, all influenced the quality of life of exposed victims. The mortality rate due to this agent was 3%. Although, mortality rate induced by sulfur mustard among Iranian people was low, variety and chronicity of toxic effects and complications of this chemical agent were dramatic. PMID:23351810

  7. The effects of delayed auditory feedback revealed by bone conduction microphone in adult zebra finches

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, Makoto; Margoliash, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Vocal control and learning are critically dependent on auditory feedback in songbirds and humans. Continuous delayed auditory feedback (cDAF) robustly disrupts speech fluency in normal humans and has ameliorative effects in some stutterers; however, evaluations of the effects of cDAF on songbirds are rare. We exposed singing young (141–151 days old) adult zebra finch males to high-amplitude cDAF. cDAF exposure was achieved by the recording of bone-conducted sounds using a piezoelectric accelerometer, which resulted in high-quality song recordings that were relatively uncontaminated by airborne sounds. Under this condition of cDAF, birds rapidly (2–6 days) changed their song syllable timing. The one bird for which we were able to maintain the accelerometer recordings over a long period of time recovered slowly over more than a month after cDAF was discontinued. These results demonstrate that cDAF can cause substantial changes in the motor program for syllable timing generation over short intervals of time in adult zebra finches. PMID:25739659

  8. The effects of delayed auditory feedback revealed by bone conduction microphone in adult zebra finches.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Makoto; Margoliash, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Vocal control and learning are critically dependent on auditory feedback in songbirds and humans. Continuous delayed auditory feedback (cDAF) robustly disrupts speech fluency in normal humans and has ameliorative effects in some stutterers; however, evaluations of the effects of cDAF on songbirds are rare. We exposed singing young (141-151 days old) adult zebra finch males to high-amplitude cDAF. cDAF exposure was achieved by the recording of bone-conducted sounds using a piezoelectric accelerometer, which resulted in high-quality song recordings that were relatively uncontaminated by airborne sounds. Under this condition of cDAF, birds rapidly (2-6 days) changed their song syllable timing. The one bird for which we were able to maintain the accelerometer recordings over a long period of time recovered slowly over more than a month after cDAF was discontinued. These results demonstrate that cDAF can cause substantial changes in the motor program for syllable timing generation over short intervals of time in adult zebra finches. PMID:25739659

  9. The neuroprotective effect of eupatilin against ischemia/reperfusion-induced delayed neuronal damage in mice.

    PubMed

    Cai, Mudan; Phan, Phuong-Thuy T; Hong, Jin Gyu; Kim, Dong Hyun; Kim, Jong Min; Park, Se Jin; Liu, Xiaotong; Han, Jeong Eun; Park, Haeil; Choi, Ji Woong; Ryu, Jong Hoon

    2012-08-15

    Eupatilin, a pharmacologically active flavone derived from the Artemisia plant species, has been reported to have anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-allergic, and anti-tumor activities. In the present study, we investigated whether eupatilin exhibits neuroprotective activities against ischemia/reperfusion-induced delayed neuronal injury in mice. Transient global cerebral ischemia was induced in mice by bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO) for 15 min followed by reperfusion for 4 days. Eupatilin (1, 3, or 10 mg/kg, p.o.) was administered immediately after the reperfusion. Histochemical studies showed that eupatilin (10 mg/kg) increased the number of viable cells detected by Nissl staining and decreased the number of degenerating neuronal cells detected by Fluoro-Jade B staining in the hippocampal CA1 region. Western blotting indicated that eupatilin further increased the level of Akt phosphorylation at 8h after BCCAO. Furthermore, wortmannin, a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor, attenuated the eupatilin-induced increase of Akt phosphorylation. In addition, wortmannin completely reversed the eupatilin-induced neuroprotective effects observed at 4 days after reperfusion. These findings suggest that eupatilin is a promising therapeutic agent against global cerebral ischemia-induced neuronal damage and that its neuroprotective effects may be mediated in part by increased Akt phosphorylation.

  10. Responses to an intense sweetener in humans: immediate preference and delayed effects on intake.

    PubMed

    Monneuse, M O; Bellisle, F; Louis-Sylverstre, J

    1991-02-01

    Preferences for five aspartame concentrations (0.008, 0.028, 0.094, 0.235 and 0.627%) in a dairy product were assessed in men and women by 1) brief-exposure sensory evaluation tests and 2) intake tests. Sensory evaluation gave different preferred concentrations as compared to actual intake. In sensory evaluation tests, the lowest three intensities were preferred by most subjects; in intake tests, 0.028% was clearly preferred. The 24-h spontaneous food intake after intake test sessions was recorded. A peak of 24-h energy intake was observed after intake of 0.028% aspartame yogurt. This peak was 400 kcal higher than the 24-h caloric intake observed after tests of the sweetest yogurt (p less than 0.01), much more than accounted for by differences in yogurt intake. So the intake of yogurt plus aspartame exerted strong delayed effects. These effects are likely dependent on sensory factors (concentration) rather than postingestive mechanisms (dose).

  11. A review on delayed toxic effects of sulfur mustard in Iranian veterans

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Iranian soldiers were attacked with chemical bombs, rockets and artillery shells 387 times during the 8-years war by Iraq (1980–1988). More than 1,000 tons of sulfur mustard gas was used in the battlefields by the Iraqis against Iranian people. A high rate of morbidities occurred as the result of these attacks. This study aimed to evaluate the delayed toxic effects of sulfur mustard gas on Iranian victims. During a systematic search, a total of 193 (109 more relevant to the main aim) articles on sulfur mustard gas were reviewed using known international and national databases. No special evaluation was conducted on the quality of the articles and their publication in accredited journals was considered sufficient. High rate of morbidities as the result of chemical attacks by sulfur mustard among Iranian people occurred. Iranian researchers found a numerous late complications among the victims which we be listed as wide range of respiratory, ocular, dermatological, psychological, hematological, immunological, gastrointestinal and endocrine complications, all influenced the quality of life of exposed victims. The mortality rate due to this agent was 3%. Although, mortality rate induced by sulfur mustard among Iranian people was low, variety and chronicity of toxic effects and complications of this chemical agent were dramatic. PMID:23351810

  12. The effects of delayed reduction of tonic inhibition on ischemic lesion and sensorimotor function.

    PubMed

    Lake, Evelyn M R; Chaudhuri, Joydeep; Thomason, Lynsie; Janik, Rafal; Ganguly, Milan; Brown, Mary; McLaurin, JoAnne; Corbett, Dale; Stanisz, Greg J; Stefanovic, Bojana

    2015-10-01

    To aid in development of chronic stage treatments for sensorimotor deficits induced by ischemic stroke, we investigated the effects of GABA antagonism on brain structure and fine skilled reaching in a rat model of focal ischemia induced via cortical microinjections of endothelin-1 (ET-1). Beginning 7 days after stroke, animals were administered a gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) inverse agonist, L-655,708, at a dose low enough to afford α5-GABAA receptor specificity. A week after stroke, the ischemic lesion comprised a small hypointense necrotic core (6±1 mm(3)) surrounded by a large (62±11 mm(3)) hyperintense perilesional region; the skilled reaching ability on the Montoya staircase test was decreased to 34%±2% of the animals' prestroke performance level. On L-655,708 treatment, animals showed a progressive decrease in total stroke volume (13±4 mm(3) per week), with no change in animals receiving placebo. Concomitantly, treated animals' skilled reaching progressively improved by 9%±1% per week, so that after 2 weeks of treatment, these animals performed at 65%±6% of their baseline ability, which was 25%±11% better than animals given placebo. These data indicate beneficial effects of delayed, sustained low-dose GABAA antagonism on neuroanatomic injury and skilled reaching in the chronic stage of stroke recovery in an ET-1 rat model of focal ischemia.

  13. Non-autonomous lattice systems with switching effects and delayed recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xiaoying; Kloeden, Peter E.

    2016-09-01

    The long term behavior of a type of non-autonomous lattice dynamical systems is investigated, where these have a diffusive nearest neighborhood interaction and discontinuous reaction terms with recoverable delays. This problem is of both biological and mathematical interests, due to its application in systems of excitable cells as well as general biological systems involving delayed recovery. The problem is formulated as an evolution inclusion with delays and the existence of weak and strong solutions is established. It is then shown that the solutions generate a set-valued non-autonomous dynamical system and that this non-autonomous dynamical system possesses a non-autonomous global pullback attractor.

  14. Downhole delay assembly for blasting with series delay

    DOEpatents

    Ricketts, Thomas E.

    1982-01-01

    A downhole delay assembly is provided which can be placed into a blasthole for initiation of explosive in the blasthole. The downhole delay assembly includes at least two detonating time delay devices in series in order to effect a time delay of longer than about 200 milliseconds in a round of explosions. The downhole delay assembly provides a protective housing to prevent detonation of explosive in the blasthole in response to the detonation of the first detonating time delay device. There is further provided a connection between the first and second time delay devices. The connection is responsive to the detonation of the first detonating time delay device and initiates the second detonating time delay device. A plurality of such downhole delay assemblies are placed downhole in unfragmented formation and are initiated simultaneously for providing a round of explosive expansions. The explosive expansions can be used to form an in situ oil shale retort containing a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles.

  15. Effects of time delay and random rewiring on the stochastic resonance in excitable small-world neuronal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haitao; Wang, Jiang; Du, Jiwei; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xile; Liu, Chen

    2013-05-01

    The effects of time delay and rewiring probability on stochastic resonance and spatiotemporal order in small-world neuronal networks are studied in this paper. Numerical results show that, irrespective of the pacemaker introduced to one single neuron or all neurons of the network, the phenomenon of stochastic resonance occurs. The time delay in the coupling process can either enhance or destroy stochastic resonance on small-world neuronal networks. In particular, appropriately tuned delays can induce multiple stochastic resonances, which appear intermittently at integer multiples of the oscillation period of the pacemaker. More importantly, it is found that the small-world topology can significantly affect the stochastic resonance on excitable neuronal networks. For small time delays, increasing the rewiring probability can largely enhance the efficiency of pacemaker-driven stochastic resonance. We argue that the time delay and the rewiring probability both play a key role in determining the ability of the small-world neuronal network to improve the noise-induced outreach of the localized subthreshold pacemaker.

  16. Studies on effects of feedback delay on the convergence performance of adaptive time-domain equalizers for fiber dispersive channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Qun; Xu, Bo; Qiu, Kun

    2016-04-01

    Adaptive time-domain equalizer (TDE) is an important module for digital optical coherent receivers. From an implementation perspective, we analyze and compare in detail the effects of error signal feedback delay on the convergence performance of TDE using either least-mean square (LMS) or constant modulus algorithm (CMA). For this purpose, a simplified theoretical model is proposed based on which iterative equations on the mean value and the variance of the tap coefficient are derived with or without error signal feedback delay for both LMS- and CMA-based methods for the first time. The analytical results show that decreased step size has to be used for TDE to converge and a slower convergence speed cannot be avoided as the feedback delay increases. Compared with the data-aided LMS-based method, the CMA-based method has a slower convergence speed and larger variation after convergence. Similar results are confirmed using numerical simulations for fiber dispersive channels. As the step size increases, a feedback delay of 20 clock cycles might cause the TDE to diverge. Compared with the CMA-based method, the LMS-based method has a higher tolerance on the feedback delay and allows a larger step size for a faster convergence speed.

  17. Effects of time delay and random rewiring on the stochastic resonance in excitable small-world neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Yu, Haitao; Wang, Jiang; Du, Jiwei; Deng, Bin; Wei, Xile; Liu, Chen

    2013-05-01

    The effects of time delay and rewiring probability on stochastic resonance and spatiotemporal order in small-world neuronal networks are studied in this paper. Numerical results show that, irrespective of the pacemaker introduced to one single neuron or all neurons of the network, the phenomenon of stochastic resonance occurs. The time delay in the coupling process can either enhance or destroy stochastic resonance on small-world neuronal networks. In particular, appropriately tuned delays can induce multiple stochastic resonances, which appear intermittently at integer multiples of the oscillation period of the pacemaker. More importantly, it is found that the small-world topology can significantly affect the stochastic resonance on excitable neuronal networks. For small time delays, increasing the rewiring probability can largely enhance the efficiency of pacemaker-driven stochastic resonance. We argue that the time delay and the rewiring probability both play a key role in determining the ability of the small-world neuronal network to improve the noise-induced outreach of the localized subthreshold pacemaker.

  18. Protists have divergent effects on bacterial diversity along a productivity gradient.

    PubMed

    Bell, Thomas; Bonsall, Michael B; Buckling, Angus; Whiteley, Andrew S; Goodall, Timothy; Griffiths, Robert I

    2010-10-23

    Productivity and predation are thought to be crucial drivers of bacterial diversity. We tested how the productivity-diversity of a natural bacterial community is modified by the presence of protist predators with different feeding preferences. In the absence of predators, there was a unimodal relationship between bacterial diversity and productivity. We found that three protist species (Bodo, Spumella and Cyclidium) had widely divergent effects on bacterial diversity across the productivity gradient. Bodo and Cyclidium had little effect on the shape of the productivity-diversity gradient, while Spumella flattened the relationship. We explain these results in terms of the feeding preferences of these predators.

  19. Delayed and lasting effects of deep brain stimulation on locomotion in Parkinson's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuter, Anne; Modolo, Julien

    2009-06-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a variety of motor signs affecting gait, postural stability, and tremor. These symptoms can be improved when electrodes are implanted in deep brain structures and electrical stimulation is delivered chronically at high frequency (>100 Hz). Deep brain stimulation (DBS) onset or cessation affects PD signs with different latencies, and the long-term improvements of symptoms affecting the body axis and those affecting the limbs vary in duration. Interestingly, these effects have not been systematically analyzed and modeled. We compare these timing phenomena in relation to one axial (i.e., locomotion) and one distal (i.e., tremor) signs. We suggest that during DBS, these symptoms are improved by different network mechanisms operating at multiple time scales. Locomotion improvement may involve a delayed plastic reorganization, which takes hours to develop, whereas rest tremor is probably alleviated by an almost instantaneous desynchronization of neural activity in subcortical structures. Even if all PD patients develop both distal and axial symptoms sooner or later, current computational models of locomotion and rest tremor are separate. Furthermore, a few computational models of locomotion focus on PD and none exploring the effect of DBS was found in the literature. We, therefore, discuss a model of a neuronal network during DBS, general enough to explore the subcircuits controlling locomotion and rest tremor simultaneously. This model accounts for synchronization and plasticity, two mechanisms that are believed to underlie the two types of symptoms analyzed. We suggest that a hysteretic effect caused by DBS-induced plasticity and synchronization modulation contributes to the different therapeutic latencies observed. Such a comprehensive, generic computational model of DBS effects, incorporating these timing phenomena, should assist in developing a more efficient, faster, durable treatment of

  20. Powdery Mildew Decreases the Radial Growth of Oak Trees with Cumulative and Delayed Effects over Years

    PubMed Central

    Bert, Didier; Lasnier, Jean-Baptiste; Capdevielle, Xavier; Dugravot, Aline; Desprez-Loustau, Marie-Laure

    2016-01-01

    Quercus robur and Q. petraea are major European forest tree species. They have been affected by powdery mildew caused by Erysiphe alphitoides for more than a century. This fungus is a biotrophic foliar pathogen that diverts photosynthetate from the plant for its own nutrition. We used a dendrochronological approach to investigate the effects of different levels of infection severity on the radial growth of young oak trees. Oak infection was monitored at individual tree level, at two sites in southwestern France, over a five-year period (2001–2005). Mean infection severity was almost 75% (infected leaf area) at the end of the 2001 growing season, at both sites, but only about 40% in 2002, and 8%, 5% and 2% in 2003, 2004 and 2005, respectively. Infection levels varied considerably between trees and were positively related between 2001 and 2002. Increment cores were taken from each tree to assess annual ring widths and increases in basal area. Annual radial growth was standardised to take the effect of tree size into account. Annual standardised radial growth was significantly and negatively correlated with infection severity in the same year, for both 2001 and 2002, and at both sites. The decrease in growth reached 70–90% for highly infected trees. The earlywood width was poorly correlated with infection severity, but the proportion of latewood in tree rings was lower in highly infected trees (60%) than in less heavily infected trees (85%). Infection in 2001 and 2002 was found to have a cumulative effect on radial growth in these years, together with a delayed effect detectable in 2003. Thus, even non-lethal pathogens like powdery mildew can have a significant impact on tree functioning. This impact should be taken into account in growth and yield models, to improve predictions of forest net primary production. PMID:27177029

  1. Effects and disturbances on GPS-derived zenith tropospheric delay during the CONT08 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Haohan; Jin, Shuanggen; He, Xiufeng

    2012-09-01

    The zenith total delay (ZTD) can be retrieved from space geodetic techniques, e.g., Global Positioning System (GPS) and Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI), which plays a key role in climatological and atmospheric sciences. However, ZTD estimates still have lots of effects and uncertainties, particularly in GPS model errors. The continuous VLBI observations provide an opportunity to assess GPS ZTD estimates during the Continuous VLBI Campaign 2008 (CONT08) at 11 co-located stations from August 12 to 26, 2008. In this paper, the effects on GPS ZTD estimate and its disturbances are investigated using different mapping function models (GMF, NMF, and VMF1), Phase Center Variation (PCV) models (AZEL and ELEV) and Ocean Tide Loading (OTL) models (FES2004, CSR4.0 and GOT00). It has shown that the ZTDs from VLBI and GPS have an agreement in -3.88-3.74 mm with correlation coefficients of higher than 0.87. For mapping function models, there are no obvious differences, while the PCV model of ELEV is always a little better than AZEL for large scale network with mixed antenna types. For stations near to the coastlines, ocean loading effects must be corrected. While for short period, the effects with OTL models of FFES2004, CSR4.0 and GOT00 are always at the same level. In addition, significant diurnal cycles S1 (24 h period) and semidiurnal cycles S2 (12 h period) of GPS ZTD are found with amplitudes between 0.82 and 13.84 mm and 0.30 and 5.23 mm, respectively, which are closer to VLBI ZTD estimates. The correlation coefficients between VLBI and GPS ZTD are 0.85 and 0.95 in S1 and S2, respectively.

  2. Effects of Vocabulary Instruction Using Constant Time Delay on Expository Reading of Young Adults with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hua, Youjia; Woods-Groves, Suzanne; Kaldenberg, Erica R.; Scheidecker, Bethany J.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the effectiveness of using constant time delay (CTD) with young adults with intellectual disability on their vocabulary acquisition and retention, as well as expository reading comprehension. Four learners, ages 19 to 21 years, from a postsecondary education program for individuals with disabilities participated in the study.…

  3. Effects of Adapted Dialogic Reading on Oral Language and Vocabulary Knowledge of Latino Preschoolers at Risk for English Language Delays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Correa, Vivian I.; Lo, Ya-Yu; Godfrey-Hurrell, Kristi; Swart, Katie; Baker, Doris Luft

    2015-01-01

    In this single-case design study, we examined the effects of an adapted dialogic reading intervention on the oral language and vocabulary skills of four Latino preschool children who were at risk for English language delays. We used adapted dialogic reading strategies in English and two literacy games that included a rapid naming activity and…

  4. The Effects of an Intensive Shared Book-Reading Intervention for Preschool Children at Risk for Vocabulary Delay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollard-Durodola, Sharolyn D.; Gonzalez, Jorge E.; Simmons, Deborah C.; Kwok, Oiman; Taylor, Aaron B.; Davis, Matthew J.; Kim, Minjung; Simmons, Leslie

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the effects of an intensive shared book-reading intervention on the vocabulary development of preschool children who were at risk for vocabulary delay. The participants were 125 children, who the researchers stratified by classroom and randomly assigned to one of two shared book-reading conditions (i.e., the experimental, Words…

  5. Effects of Different Social Partners on the Discriminated Requesting of a Young Child with Autism and Severe Language Delays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drasgow, Erik; Halle, James W.; Phillips, Barbara

    2001-01-01

    A study examined effects of two adults on the requesting repertoire of a 3-year-old child with autism and language delays. Reinforcement contingencies associated with each adult were reversed after the participant reached a preestablished criterion of discriminated responding. The participant learned to request in a discriminated manner with each…

  6. 31 CFR 560.515 - 30-day delayed effective date for pre-May 7, 1995 trade contracts involving Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-May 7, 1995 trade contracts involving Iran. 560.515 Section 560.515 Money and Finance: Treasury....515 30-day delayed effective date for pre-May 7, 1995 trade contracts involving Iran. (a) All... involving Iran (a pre-existing trade contract), including the exportation of goods, services...

  7. 31 CFR 560.515 - 30-day delayed effective date for pre-May 7, 1995 trade contracts involving Iran.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-May 7, 1995 trade contracts involving Iran. 560.515 Section 560.515 Money and Finance: Treasury....515 30-day delayed effective date for pre-May 7, 1995 trade contracts involving Iran. (a) All... involving Iran (a pre-existing trade contract), including the exportation of goods, services...

  8. Effects of Delays on 6-Year-Old Children's Self-Generation and Retention of Knowledge through Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varga, Nicole L.; Bauer, Patricia J.

    2013-01-01

    The current research was an investigation of the effect of delay on self-generation and retention of knowledge derived through integration by 6-year-old children. Children were presented with novel facts from passages read aloud to them (i.e., "stem" facts) and tested for self-generation of new knowledge through integration of the facts. In…

  9. The Effect of Feedback Delay and Feedback Type on Perceptual Category Learning: The Limits of Multiple Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, John C.; Newell, Ben R.; Kalish, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    Evidence that learning rule-based (RB) and information-integration (II) category structures can be dissociated across different experimental variables has been used to support the view that such learning is supported by multiple learning systems. Across 4 experiments, we examined the effects of 2 variables, the delay between response and feedback…

  10. Rapid Acquisition of Preference in Concurrent Chains: Effects of "d"-Amphetamine on Sensitivity to Reinforcement Delay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ta, Wei-Min; Pitts, Raymond C.; Hughes, Christine E.; McLean, Anthony P.; Grace, Randolph C.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine effects of "d"-amphetamine on choice controlled by reinforcement delay. Eight pigeons responded under a concurrent-chains procedure in which one terminal-link schedule was always fixed- interval 8 s, and the other terminal-link schedule changed from session to session between fixed-interval 4 s and…

  11. Effects of an Embedded Phonological Awareness Intervention during Repeated Book Reading on Preschool Children with Language Delays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ziolkowski, Robyn A.; Goldstein, Howard

    2008-01-01

    Efficacy of an explicit phonological awareness intervention embedded within repeated shared book reading with preschool children from low-income backgrounds with language delays was investigated. A multiple-baseline design across behaviors assessed the effects of phonological awareness training on rhyme and letter-sound knowledge with 13 preschool…

  12. Effects of Constant Time Delay Procedure on the Halliwick's Method of Swimming Rotation Skills for Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yilmaz, Ilker; Konukman, Ferman; Birkan, Binyamin; Ozen, Arzu; Yanardag, Mehmet; Camursoy, Ilhan

    2010-01-01

    Effects of a constant time delay procedure on the Halliwick's method of swimming rotation skills (i.e., vertical and lateral rotation) for children with autism were investigated. A single subject multiple baseline model across behaviors with probe conditions was used. Participants were three boys, 8-9 years old. Data were collected over a 10-week…

  13. Delay compensation - Its effect in reducing sampling errors in Fourier spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zachor, A. S.; Aaronson, S. M.

    1979-01-01

    An approximate formula is derived for the spectrum ghosts caused by periodic drive speed variations in a Michelson interferometer. The solution represents the case of fringe-controlled sampling and is applicable when the reference fringes are delayed to compensate for the delay introduced by the electrical filter in the signal channel. Numerical results are worked out for several common low-pass filters. It is shown that the maximum relative ghost amplitude over the range of frequencies corresponding to the lower half of the filter band is typically 20 times smaller than the relative zero-to-peak velocity error, when delayed sampling is used. In the lowest quarter of the filter band it is more than 100 times smaller than the relative velocity error. These values are ten and forty times smaller, respectively, than they would be without delay compensation if the filter is a 6-pole Butterworth.

  14. The fragility of intergroup relations: divergent effects of delayed audiovisual feedback in intergroup and intragroup interaction.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Adam R; West, Tessa V; Dovidio, John F; Powers, Stacie Renfro; Buck, Ross; Henning, Robert

    2008-12-01

    Intergroup interactions between racial or ethnic majority and minority groups are often stressful for members of both groups; however, the dynamic processes that promote or alleviate tension in intergroup interaction remain poorly understood. Here we identify a behavioral mechanism-response delay-that can uniquely contribute to anxiety and promote disengagement from intergroup contact. Minimally acquainted White, Black, and Latino participants engaged in intergroup or intragroup dyadic conversation either in real time or with a subtle temporal disruption (1-s delay) in audiovisual feedback. Whereas intergroup dyads reported greater anxiety and less interest in contact after engaging in delayed conversation than after engaging in real-time conversation, intragroup dyads reported less anxiety in the delay condition than they did after interacting in real time. These findings have theoretical and practical implications for understanding intergroup communication and social dynamics and for promoting positive intergroup contact.

  15. Effect of delays on survival in patients with lung carcinoma in Montenegro.

    PubMed

    Živković, Danko

    2014-12-01

    Lung cancer is a global medical problem with a rising incidence and 5-year survival of 5%-10%. The aim of this study was to investigate whether waiting times and delays in diagnosis and treatment of patients with lung carcinoma have any bearing on prognosis and survi- val. The study was performed in the Brezovik Special Hospital for Lung Diseases and Tuberculosis. The study included all cases with the diagnosis of lung carcinoma in the Republic of Montenegro in 2009, a total of 206 patients, with follow up until the end of 2010. Median age was 66, median Karnofsky score 80, and male to female ratio 5:1. Diagnostic procedure was bronchoscopy in 89% of patients. Histologic type was small cell lung cancer in 25.7% and non small cell lung cancer in 74.3% of cases. Surgery was the main treatment for 24.4% of patients. Median delay from first symptoms to diagnosis of lung cancer was 10.35 weeks, mean 8 weeks (median patient's delay was 6.20 weeks, doctor's delay at primary health care 2.07 weeks and in pulmonology services 2.37 weeks). Median survival time for all patients was 39.27 weeks, mean 34. There was no statistically significant diffe- rence between patient's delay/doctor's delay/total delay and stage of lung carcinoma at the time of diagnosis, treatment choice and survival. Our results indicate that longer delay is not associated with poorer prognosis of lung carcinoma. The possible ways of reducing mortality of lung cancer include prevention by decreasing smoking prevalence and improved therapeutic options.

  16. Regulation of delayed-type hypersensitivity. III. Effect of cyclophosphamide on the suppressor cells for delayed-type hypersensitivity to sheep erythrocytes in mice.

    PubMed

    Gill, H K; Liew, F Y

    1978-03-01

    A previous study (Eur. J. Immunol. 1977. 7: 714) has shown that mice injected intravenously (i.v.) with 4 x10(9) sheep red blood cells (SRBC) produce cells which suppress delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH). These suppressor cells are theta-positive, antigen-specific and act via a soluble factor which does not bear immunoglobulin determinants (Eur. J. Immunol. 1978. 8: 168). The present paper demonstrates that these suppressor cells are inhibitable by cyclophosphamide (CY). Mice injected with graded amounts of CY two days prior to SRBC injection, showed maximum augmentation of DTH at 200 mg/kg body weight, a dose which completely suppressed the appearance of splenic plaque-forming cells (PFC) to SRBC. In contrast, lower doses of CY enhanced both DTH and PFC responses. Time course studies showed that CY inhibited the precursors of suppressor cells and had little or no effect on suppressor cells which have already encountered antigens. This was further confirmed by passive transfer studies which showed tha- suppressor cells were inhibited if CY was administered at the same time or 2 days before SRBC injection, but were not affected if CY was given after antigen stimulation. Direct evidence for the effect of CY on suppressor cells was obtained by cell fractination with a Ficoll density gradient. The denser suppressor cell population was absent from the spleens of mice treated with 200 mg/kg of CY 2 days before i.v. injection with 1 x 10(9) SRBC.

  17. Flow Effects on the Flammability Diagrams of Solid Fuels: Microgravity Influence on Ignition Delay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordova, J. L.; Walther, D. C.; Fernandez-Pello, A. C.; Steinhaus, T.; Torero, J. L.; Quintere, J. G.; Ross, H. D.

    1999-01-01

    The possibility of an accidental fire in space-based facilities is a primary concern of space exploration programs. Spacecraft environments generally present low velocity air currents produced by ventilation and heating systems (of the order of 0.1 m/s), and fluctuating oxygen concentrations around that of air due to CO2 removal systems. Recent experiments of flame spread in microgravity show the spread rate to be faster and the limiting oxygen concentration lower than in normal-gravity. To date, there is not a material flammability-testing protocol that specifically addresses issues related to microgravity conditions. The present project (FIST) aims to establish a testing methodology that is suitable for the specific conditions of reduced gravity. The concepts underlying the operation of the LIFT apparatus, ASTM-E 1321-93, have been used to develop the Forced-flow Ignition and flame-Spread Test (FIST). As in the LIFT, the FIST is used to obtain the flammability diagrams of the material, i.e., graphs of ignition delay time and flame spread rate as a function of the externally applied radiant flux, but under forced flow rather than natural convection conditions, and for different oxygen concentrations. Although the flammability diagrams are similar, the flammability properties obtained with the FIST are found to depend on the flow characteristics. A research program is currently underway with the purpose of implementing the FIST as a protocol to characterize the flammability performance of solid materials to be used in microgravity facilities. To this point, tests have been performed with the FIST apparatus in both normal-gravity and microgravity conditions to determine the effects of oxidizer flow characteristics on the flammability diagrams of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) fuel samples. The experiments are conducted at reduced gravity in a KC- 135 aircraft following a parabolic flight trajectory that provides up to 25 seconds of low gravity. The objective of the

  18. Effect of delayed breeding during the summer on profitability of dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Gobikrushanth, M; De Vries, A; Santos, J E P; Risco, C A; Galvão, K N

    2014-07-01

    The objective of this retrospective observational cohort study, combined with simulation, was to evaluate the effect of extending the voluntary waiting period (VWP) during the summer on profitability on a Florida dairy farm. Data from Holstein cows (n=1,416) that calved between June and September of 2007 and 2008 were used. Cows that calved between June 1 and July 21 (regular group; REG; n=719) were artificially inseminated (AI) for the first time upon estrus detection (ED) after the second PGF₂α of the Presynch protocol administered between 57 and 63 d in milk (DIM), or underwent timed AI using the Ovsynch protocol (TAI) if not detected in estrus. Cows that calved between July 22 and September 18 (extended group; EXT; n=697) underwent AI for the first time after the first or second PGF₂α starting November 14 or November 21 or underwent TAI if not detected in estrus. For second and subsequent AI, all cows underwent AI upon ED or enrolled on TAI after nonpregnancy diagnosis. Following these schemes, average VWP in the REG group and EXT group were 60 and 83 d, respectively. Overall profitability for both experimental and subsequent parities were calculated by subtracting the costs existing of feeding costs ($0.30/kg lactating cow diet; $0.25/kg dry cow diet), breeding costs ($2.65/dose PGF₂α; $2.40/dose GnRH; $0.25/injection administration; $10/semen straw; $5/AI; $3/pregnancy diagnosis), and other costs ($3/d) from the daily revenues with milk sales ($0.44/kg of milk), cow sales ($1.76/kg of live weight), and calf sales ($140/calf). A herd budget simulation was used to predict future cash flow after culling or end of subsequent parity until 6 yr after the start of the study to account for all cash flow consequences of extended VWP. Cows in the EXT group had greater first-service pregnancy per AI (PAI1) but still had greater days open and calving interval. Delaying breeding did not affect total cash flow because the EXT group had greater combined

  19. Effects of distance-dependent delay on small-world neuronal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jinjie; Chen, Zhen; Liu, Xianbin

    2016-04-01

    We study firing behaviors and the transitions among them in small-world noisy neuronal networks with electrical synapses and information transmission delay. Each neuron is modeled by a two-dimensional Rulkov map neuron. The distance between neurons, which is a main source of the time delay, is taken into consideration. Through spatiotemporal patterns and interspike intervals as well as the interburst intervals, the collective behaviors are revealed. It is found that the networks switch from resting state into intermittent firing state under Gaussian noise excitation. Initially, noise-induced firing behaviors are disturbed by small time delays. Periodic firing behaviors with irregular zigzag patterns emerge with an increase of the delay and become progressively regular after a critical value is exceeded. More interestingly, in accordance with regular patterns, the spiking frequency doubles compared with the former stage for the spiking neuronal network. A growth of frequency persists for a larger delay and a transition to antiphase synchronization is observed. Furthermore, it is proved that these transitions are generic also for the bursting neuronal network and the FitzHugh-Nagumo neuronal network. We show these transitions due to the increase of time delay are robust to the noise strength, coupling strength, network size, and rewiring probability.

  20. No effect of delay on the spatial representation of serial reach targets.

    PubMed

    Schütz, Immo; Henriques, Denise Y P; Fiehler, Katja

    2015-04-01

    When reaching for remembered target locations, it has been argued that the brain primarily relies on egocentric metrics and especially target position relative to gaze when reaches are immediate, but that the visuo-motor system relies stronger on allocentric (i.e., object-centered) metrics when a reach is delayed. However, previous reports from our group have shown that reaches to single remembered targets are represented relative to gaze, even when static visual landmarks are available and reaches are delayed by up to 12 s. Based on previous findings which showed a stronger contribution of allocentric coding in serial reach planning, the present study aimed to determine whether delay influences the use of a gaze-dependent reference frame when reaching to two remembered targets in a sequence after a delay of 0, 5 or 12 s. Gaze was varied relative to the first and second target and shifted away from the target before each reach. We found that participants used egocentric and allocentric reference frames in combination with a stronger reliance on allocentric information regardless of whether reaches were executed immediately or after a delay. Our results suggest that the relative contributions of egocentric and allocentric reference frames for spatial coding and updating of sequential reach targets do not change with a memory delay between target presentation and reaching.

  1. Effects of delay and noise in a negative feedback regulatory motif

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palassini, Matteo; Dies, Marta

    2009-03-01

    The small copy number of the molecules involved in gene regulation can induce nontrivial stochastic phenomena such as noise-induced oscillations. An often neglected aspect of regulation dynamics are the delays involved in transcription and translation. Delays introduce analytical and computational complications because the dynamics is non-Markovian. We study the interplay of noise and delays in a negative feedback model of the p53 core regulatory network. Recent experiments have found pronounced oscillations in the concentrations of proteins p53 and Mdm2 in individual cells subjected to DNA damage. Similar oscillations occur in the Hes-1 and NK-kB systems, and in circadian rhythms. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain this oscillatory behaviour, such as deterministic limit cycles, with and without delay, or noise-induced excursions in excitable models. We consider a generic delayed Master Equation incorporating the activation of Mdm2 by p53 and the Mdm2-promoted degradation of p53. In the deterministic limit and for large delays, the model shows a Hopf bifurcation. Via exact stochastic simulations, we find strong noise-induced oscillations well outside the limit-cycle region. We propose that this may be a generic mechanism for oscillations in gene regulatory systems.

  2. Effects of distance-dependent delay on small-world neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jinjie; Chen, Zhen; Liu, Xianbin

    2016-04-01

    We study firing behaviors and the transitions among them in small-world noisy neuronal networks with electrical synapses and information transmission delay. Each neuron is modeled by a two-dimensional Rulkov map neuron. The distance between neurons, which is a main source of the time delay, is taken into consideration. Through spatiotemporal patterns and interspike intervals as well as the interburst intervals, the collective behaviors are revealed. It is found that the networks switch from resting state into intermittent firing state under Gaussian noise excitation. Initially, noise-induced firing behaviors are disturbed by small time delays. Periodic firing behaviors with irregular zigzag patterns emerge with an increase of the delay and become progressively regular after a critical value is exceeded. More interestingly, in accordance with regular patterns, the spiking frequency doubles compared with the former stage for the spiking neuronal network. A growth of frequency persists for a larger delay and a transition to antiphase synchronization is observed. Furthermore, it is proved that these transitions are generic also for the bursting neuronal network and the FitzHugh-Nagumo neuronal network. We show these transitions due to the increase of time delay are robust to the noise strength, coupling strength, network size, and rewiring probability. PMID:27176338

  3. Prenatal exposure to ethanol disrupts spatial memory: effect of the training-testing delay period.

    PubMed

    Matthews, D B; Simson, P E

    1998-04-01

    The present study investigated how variations in the period of delay between training and testing in the Morris water maze task affect the use of spatial memory in adult rats that were prenatally exposed to ethanol. Previous results utilizing the Morris water maze task have shown that prenatal, or early postnatal, exposure to ethanol produces deficits in the use of spatial memory, a type of memory that is dependent on an intact hippocampus. However, in these prior studies the delay period between the training of animals and the testing of spatial memory is typically fixed at only 1 day. In the current study, which utilized a revised training procedure within the Morris water maze task, the period of delay between training and testing was altered such that it was either 1 day or 3 days. Following the 3-day delay, different levels of prenatal exposure to ethanol impaired the use of spatial memory. In contrast, following the 1-day delay, prenatal exposure to ethanol failed to impair the use of spatial memory. The present study thus shows that prenatal exposure to ethanol differentially affects spatial memory in the Morris water maze task depending on the period of delay between training and testing.

  4. Effects of distance-dependent delay on small-world neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jinjie; Chen, Zhen; Liu, Xianbin

    2016-04-01

    We study firing behaviors and the transitions among them in small-world noisy neuronal networks with electrical synapses and information transmission delay. Each neuron is modeled by a two-dimensional Rulkov map neuron. The distance between neurons, which is a main source of the time delay, is taken into consideration. Through spatiotemporal patterns and interspike intervals as well as the interburst intervals, the collective behaviors are revealed. It is found that the networks switch from resting state into intermittent firing state under Gaussian noise excitation. Initially, noise-induced firing behaviors are disturbed by small time delays. Periodic firing behaviors with irregular zigzag patterns emerge with an increase of the delay and become progressively regular after a critical value is exceeded. More interestingly, in accordance with regular patterns, the spiking frequency doubles compared with the former stage for the spiking neuronal network. A growth of frequency persists for a larger delay and a transition to antiphase synchronization is observed. Furthermore, it is proved that these transitions are generic also for the bursting neuronal network and the FitzHugh-Nagumo neuronal network. We show these transitions due to the increase of time delay are robust to the noise strength, coupling strength, network size, and rewiring probability.

  5. Effectiveness of Interaural Delays Alone as Cues During Dynamic Sound Localization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth M.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The contribution of interaural time differences (ITDs) to the localization of virtual sound sources with and without head motion was examined. Listeners estimated the apparent azimuth, elevation and distance of virtual sources presented over headphones. Stimuli (3 sec., white noise) were synthesized from minimum-phase representations of nonindividualized head-related transfer functions (HRTFs); binaural magnitude spectra were derived from the minimum phase estimates and ITDs were represented as a pure delay. During dynamic conditions, listeners were encouraged to move their heads; head position was tracked and stimuli were synthesized in real time using a Convolvotron to simulate a stationary external sound source. Two synthesis conditions were tested: (1) both interaural level differences (ILDs) and ITDs correctly correlated with source location and head motion, (2) ITDs correct, no ILDs (flat magnitude spectrum). Head movements reduced azimuth confusions primarily when interaural cues were correctly correlated, although a smaller effect was also seen for ITDs alone. Externalization was generally poor for ITD-only conditions and was enhanced by head motion only for normal HRTFs. Overall the data suggest that, while ITDs alone can provide a significant cue for azimuth, the errors most commonly associated with virtual sources are reduced by location-dependent magnitude cues.

  6. [Effects of change-over-delay in the signal-key procedure].

    PubMed

    Manabe, K; Kawashima, T

    1982-12-01

    The effects of change-over-delay (COD) in discrimination training using the signal-key procedure were investigated in the pigeon. In Experiment I, generalization gradients along the line-tilt dimension following the signal-key procedure with and without COD 2 s were studied. Regardless of the application of COD, following results were obtained: (1) Relative generalization gradients were similar. (2) No behavioral contrast was observed on the operant-key. (3) Some responding to the signal-key occurred during the VI component of the multiple VI EXT schedule. The responses on the signal-key decreased slightly with COD 2 s. These data suggest that the responses on the signal-key were maintained partly by response-reinforcer contingency. In Experiment II, local contrast in the signal-key procedure was investigated. Response distribution within 30 s period of stimulus presentation revealed that COD produced decreased number of responses to the signal-key after 1.5 s of stimulus onset. These suggest that the stimulus-reinforcer contingency is responsible primarily for the local contrast.

  7. Delayed effects of spiperone on serotonin1A receptors in the dorsal hippocampus of rats.

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, T; Blier, P; de Montigny, C

    1993-01-01

    The effects of 5-HT1A antagonists spiperone, methiothepin and BMY 7378 on [3H]-8-OH-DPAT binding were determined in vitro and ex vivo in rat hippocampus CA3 membrane preparations, and ex vivo in tissue sections of CA1 and CA3 subfields using quantitative autoradiography. In CA3 membranes from rats sacrificed 1 h or 24 h after administration of 5 mg/kg i.p. spiperone or methiothepin, no decrease in [3H]-8-OH-DPAT Bmax values approached statistical significance. Autoradiograms from identically treated rats showed significant increases in Kd values in both CA1 and CA3 hippocampal subfields 24 h but not 1 h after administration of the drugs, while no changes were observed in the dorsal raphe at either time. In vitro co-incubation of membranes with spiperone (200 or 500 nM) or methiothepin (500 nM) resulted in significant decreases in both affinity and Bmax values. In contrast, co-incubation with BMY 7378 (5 nM) increased only Kd values. GTP gamma S produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of specific [3H]8-OH-DPAT binding. At 0.1 mM of GTP gamma S, Kd values were increased three-fold and Bmax values were significantly decreased. When membranes were co-incubated with GTP gamma S and spiperone or BMY 7378, Kd values increased further. Moreover, the effects of spiperone and GTP gamma S on Bmax values were additive. It is concluded that BMY 7378 acts as a competitive antagonist at hippocampal post-synaptic 5-HT1A receptors, whereas spiperone and methiothepin exert their delayed antagonistic effects at these receptors through a non-competitive mechanism of action, possibly affecting the coupling of the receptors to their Gi/o proteins. PMID:8297925

  8. Protective effects of batimastat against hemorrhagic injuries in delayed jellyfish envenomation syndrome models.

    PubMed

    Wang, Beilei; Liu, Dan; Liu, Guoyan; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Qianqian; Zheng, Jiemin; Zhou, Yonghong; He, Qian; Zhang, Liming

    2015-12-15

    Previously, we established delayed jellyfish envenomation syndrome (DJES) models and proposed that the hemorrhagic toxins in jellyfish tentacle extracts (TE) play a significant role in the liver and kidney injuries of the experimental model. Further, we also demonstrated that metalloproteinases are the central toxic components of the jellyfish Cyanea capillata (C. capillata), which may be responsible for the hemorrhagic effects. Thus, metalloproteinase inhibitors appear to be a promising therapeutic alternative for the treatment of hemorrhagic injuries in DJES. In this study, we examined the metalloproteinase activity of TE from the jellyfish C. capillata using zymography analyses. Our results confirmed that TE possessed a metalloproteinase activity, which was also sensitive to heat. Then, we tested the effect of metalloproteinase inhibitor batimastat (BB-94) on TE-induced hemorrhagic injuries in DJES models. Firstly, using SR-based X-ray microangiography, we found that BB-94 significantly improved TE-induced hepatic and renal microvasculature alterations in DJES mouse model. Secondly, under synchrotron radiation micro-computed tomography (SR-μCT), we also confirmed that BB-94 reduced TE-induced hepatic and renal microvasculature changes in DJES rat model. In addition, being consistent with the imaging results, histopathological and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated UTP end labeling (TUNEL)-like staining observations also clearly corroborated this hypothesis, as BB-94 was highly effective in neutralizing TE-induced extensive hemorrhage and necrosis in DJES rat model. Although it may require further clinical studies in the near future, the current study opens up the possibilities for the use of the metalloproteinase inhibitor, BB-94, in the treatment of multiple organ hemorrhagic injuries in DJES.

  9. Short-term and delayed effects of mother death on calf mortality in Asian elephants

    PubMed Central

    Mar, Khyne U.; Lummaa, Virpi

    2016-01-01

    Long-lived, highly social species with prolonged offspring dependency can show long postreproductive periods. The Mother hypothesis proposes that a need for extended maternal care of offspring together with increased maternal mortality risk associated with old age select for such postreproductive survival, but tests in species with long postreproductive periods, other than humans and marine mammals, are lacking. Here, we investigate the Mother hypothesis with longitudinal data on Asian elephants from timber camps of Myanmar 1) to determine the costs of reproduction on female age-specific mortality risk within 1 year after calving and 2) to quantify the effects of mother loss on calf survival across development. We found that older females did not show an increased immediate mortality risk after calving. Calves had a 10-fold higher mortality risk in their first year if they lost their mother, but this decreased with age to only a 1.1-fold higher risk in the fifth year. We also detected delayed effects of maternal death: calves losing their mother during early ages still suffered from increased mortality risk at ages 3–4 and during adolescence but such effects were weaker in magnitude. Consequently, the Mother hypothesis could account for the first 5 years of postreproductive survival, but there were no costs of continued reproduction on the immediate maternal mortality risk. However, the observed postreproductive lifespan of females surviving to old age commonly exceeds 5 years in Asian elephants, and further studies are thus needed to determine selection for (postreproductive) lifespan in elephants and other comparably long-lived species. PMID:26792972

  10. Indexing Effects of Copy Number Variation on Genes Involved in Developmental Delay.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Mohammed; Pellecchia, Giovanna; Thiruvahindrapuram, Bhooma; D'Abate, Lia; Merico, Daniele; Chan, Ada; Zarrei, Mehdi; Tammimies, Kristiina; Walker, Susan; Gazzellone, Matthew J; Nalpathamkalam, Thomas; Yuen, Ryan K C; Devriendt, Koenraad; Mathonnet, Géraldine; Lemyre, Emmanuelle; Nizard, Sonia; Shago, Mary; Joseph-George, Ann M; Noor, Abdul; Carter, Melissa T; Yoon, Grace; Kannu, Peter; Tihy, Frédérique; Thorland, Erik C; Marshall, Christian R; Buchanan, Janet A; Speevak, Marsha; Stavropoulos, Dimitri J; Scherer, Stephen W

    2016-01-01

    A challenge in clinical genomics is to predict whether copy number variation (CNV) affecting a gene or multiple genes will manifest as disease. Increasing recognition of gene dosage effects in neurodevelopmental disorders prompted us to develop a computational approach based on critical-exon (highly expressed in brain, highly conserved) examination for potential etiologic effects. Using a large CNV dataset, our updated analyses revealed significant (P < 1.64 × 10(-15)) enrichment of critical-exons within rare CNVs in cases compared to controls. Separately, we used a weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) to construct an unbiased protein module from prenatal and adult tissues and found it significantly enriched for critical exons in prenatal (P < 1.15 × 10(-50), OR = 2.11) and adult (P < 6.03 × 10(-18), OR = 1.55) tissues. WGCNA yielded 1,206 proteins for which we prioritized the corresponding genes as likely to have a role in neurodevelopmental disorders. We compared the gene lists obtained from critical-exon and WGCNA analysis and found 438 candidate genes associated with CNVs annotated as pathogenic, or as variants of uncertain significance (VOUS), from among 10,619 developmental delay cases. We identified genes containing CNVs previously considered to be VOUS to be new candidate genes for neurodevelopmental disorders (GIT1, MVB12B and PPP1R9A) demonstrating the utility of this strategy to index the clinical effects of CNVs. PMID:27363808

  11. Indexing Effects of Copy Number Variation on Genes Involved in Developmental Delay

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Mohammed; Pellecchia, Giovanna; Thiruvahindrapuram, Bhooma; D’Abate, Lia; Merico, Daniele; Chan, Ada; Zarrei, Mehdi; Tammimies, Kristiina; Walker, Susan; Gazzellone, Matthew J.; Nalpathamkalam, Thomas; Yuen, Ryan K. C.; Devriendt, Koenraad; Mathonnet, Géraldine; Lemyre, Emmanuelle; Nizard, Sonia; Shago, Mary; Joseph-George, Ann M.; Noor, Abdul; Carter, Melissa T.; Yoon, Grace; Kannu, Peter; Tihy, Frédérique; Thorland, Erik C.; Marshall, Christian R.; Buchanan, Janet A.; Speevak, Marsha; Stavropoulos, Dimitri J.; Scherer, Stephen W.

    2016-01-01

    A challenge in clinical genomics is to predict whether copy number variation (CNV) affecting a gene or multiple genes will manifest as disease. Increasing recognition of gene dosage effects in neurodevelopmental disorders prompted us to develop a computational approach based on critical-exon (highly expressed in brain, highly conserved) examination for potential etiologic effects. Using a large CNV dataset, our updated analyses revealed significant (P < 1.64 × 10−15) enrichment of critical-exons within rare CNVs in cases compared to controls. Separately, we used a weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) to construct an unbiased protein module from prenatal and adult tissues and found it significantly enriched for critical exons in prenatal (P < 1.15 × 10−50, OR = 2.11) and adult (P < 6.03 × 10−18, OR = 1.55) tissues. WGCNA yielded 1,206 proteins for which we prioritized the corresponding genes as likely to have a role in neurodevelopmental disorders. We compared the gene lists obtained from critical-exon and WGCNA analysis and found 438 candidate genes associated with CNVs annotated as pathogenic, or as variants of uncertain significance (VOUS), from among 10,619 developmental delay cases. We identified genes containing CNVs previously considered to be VOUS to be new candidate genes for neurodevelopmental disorders (GIT1, MVB12B and PPP1R9A) demonstrating the utility of this strategy to index the clinical effects of CNVs. PMID:27363808

  12. Delaying time to first nocturnal void may have beneficial effects on reducing blood glucose levels.

    PubMed

    Juul, Kristian Vinter; Jessen, Niels; Bliwise, Donald L; van der Meulen, Egbert; Nørgaard, Jens Peter

    2016-09-01

    Experimental studies disrupting sleep and epidemiologic studies of short sleep durations indicate the importance of deeper and longer sleep for cardiometabolic health. We examined the potential beneficial effects of lengthening the first uninterrupted sleep period (FUSP) on blood glucose. Long-term data (≥3 months of treatment) were derived from three clinical trials, testing low-dose (10-100 µg) melt formulations of desmopressin in 841 male and female nocturia patients (90 % of which had nocturnal polyuria). We performed post hoc multiple regression with non-fasting blood glucose as dependent variable and the following potential covariates/factors: time-averaged change of FUSP since baseline, age, gender, race, ethnicity, baseline glucose, baseline weight, change in weight, patient metabolic status (normal, metabolic syndrome, type II diabetes), dose, follow-up interval, and time of random glucose sampling. Increases in FUSP resulted in statistically significant reductions in blood glucose (p = 0.0131), even after controlling for all remaining covariates. Per hour increase in time to first void was associated with glucose decreases of 1.6 mg/dL. This association was more pronounced in patients with increased baseline glucose levels (test of baseline glucose by FUSP change interaction: p < 0.0001). Next to FUSP change, other statistically significant confounding factors/covariates also associated with glucose changes were gender, ethnicity, metabolic subgroup, and baseline glucose. These analyses indicate that delaying time to first void may have beneficial effects on reducing blood glucose in nocturia patients. These data are among the first to suggest that improving sleep may have salutary effects on a cardiometabolic measure. PMID:27003433

  13. Rapid Acquisition of Preference in Concurrent Chains: Effects of D-amphetamine on Sensitivity to Reinforcement Delay

    PubMed Central

    T, Wei-Min; Pitts, Raymond C; Hughes, Christine E; McLean, Anthony P; Grace, Randolph C

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine effects of d-amphetamine on choice controlled by reinforcement delay. Eight pigeons responded under a concurrent-chains procedure in which one terminal-link schedule was always fixed-interval 8 s, and the other terminal-link schedule changed from session to session between fixed-interval 4 s and fixed-interval 16 s according to a 31-step pseudorandom binary sequence. After sufficient exposure to these contingencies (at least once through the pseudorandom binary sequence), the pigeons acquired a preference for the shorter reinforcement delay within each session. Estimates of the sensitivity to reinforcement immediacy were similar to those obtained in previous studies. For all pigeons, at least one dose of d-amphetamine attenuated preference and, hence, decreased estimates of sensitivity to reinforcement immediacy; in most cases, this effect occurred without a change in overall response rates. In many cases, the reduced sensitivity to reinforcement delay produced by d-amphetamine resulted primarily from a decrease in the asymptotic level of preference achieved within the session; in some cases, d-amphetamine produced complete indifference. These findings suggest that a reduction in the sensitivity to reinforcement delay may be an important behavioral mechanism of the effects of psychomotor stimulants. PMID:18338676

  14. Effects of Logged and Unlogged Forest Patches on Avifaunal Diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghadiri Khanaposhtani, Maryam; Kaboli, Mohammad; Karami, Mahmoud; Etemad, Vahid; Baniasadi, Saeedeh

    2013-03-01

    In the Hyrcanian forests of northern Iran, reduced-impact silviculture systems, (single-tree and group-tree selection) were applied over a large area, which generated different local habitat structures. The aim of this study was to assess the differences between treated and untreated areas of forest and their effect on avian richness, abundance and diversity (R.A.D). Birds were surveyed during the breeding season in 2009 by 100-point counts, equally distributed in the treated and untreated area. Avian R.A.D was significantly different and higher in the untreated area. Generally, forestry practices cause noticeable changes in canopy percentage, tree composition, snags and shrub number. Treated forest habitats in the area of study had a much more developed understory, fewer snags and fewer large diameter trees. The results highlighted the importance of forest maturity and showed that preventing silvicultural disturbances may not be the best solution for conserving and enhancing biodiversity. Rather, methods such as selective cutting seem an appropriate and sustainable way of forest management. It is suggested that forests should be managed to conserve structural elements which create favorable habitat for bird species, preventing future species losses due to logging practices.

  15. Calreticulin Enhances Porcine Wound Repair by Diverse Biological Effects

    PubMed Central

    Nanney, Lillian B.; Woodrell, Christopher D.; Greives, Mathew R.; Cardwell, Nancy L.; Pollins, Alonda C.; Bancroft, Tara A.; Chesser, Adrianne; Michalak, Marek; Rahman, Mohammad; Siebert, John W.; Gold, Leslie I.

    2008-01-01

    Extracellular functions of the endoplasmic reticulum chaperone protein calreticulin (CRT) are emerging. Here we show novel roles for exogenous CRT in both cutaneous wound healing and diverse processes associated with repair. Compared with platelet-derived growth factor-BB-treated controls, topical application of CRT to porcine excisional wounds enhanced the rate of wound re-epithelialization. In both normal and steroid-impaired pigs, CRT increased granulation tissue formation. Immunohistochemical analyses of the wounds 5 and 10 days after injury revealed marked up-regulation of transforming growth factor-β3 (a key regulator of wound healing), a threefold increase in macrophage influx, and an increase in the cellular proliferation of basal keratinocytes of the new epidermis and of cells of the neodermis. In vitro studies confirmed that CRT induced a greater than twofold increase in the cellular proliferation of primary human keratinocytes, fibroblasts, and microvascular endothelial cells (with 100 pg/ml, 100 ng/ml, and 1.0 pg/ml, respectively). Moreover, using a scratch plate assay, CRT maximally induced the cellular migration of keratinocytes and fibroblasts (with 10 pg/ml and 1 ng/ml, respectively). In addition, CRT induced concentration-dependent migration of keratinocytes, fibroblasts macrophages, and monocytes in chamber assays. These in vitro bioactivities provide mechanistic support for the positive biological effects of CRT observed on both the epidermis and dermis of wounds in vivo, underscoring a significant role for CRT in the repair of cutaneous wounds. PMID:18753412

  16. Effects of logged and unlogged forest patches on avifaunal diversity.

    PubMed

    Ghadiri Khanaposhtani, Maryam; Kaboli, Mohammad; Karami, Mahmoud; Etemad, Vahid; Baniasadi, Saeedeh

    2013-03-01

    In the Hyrcanian forests of northern Iran, reduced-impact silviculture systems, (single-tree and group-tree selection) were applied over a large area, which generated different local habitat structures. The aim of this study was to assess the differences between treated and untreated areas of forest and their effect on avian richness, abundance and diversity (R.A.D). Birds were surveyed during the breeding season in 2009 by 100-point counts, equally distributed in the treated and untreated area. Avian R.A.D was significantly different and higher in the untreated area. Generally, forestry practices cause noticeable changes in canopy percentage, tree composition, snags and shrub number. Treated forest habitats in the area of study had a much more developed understory, fewer snags and fewer large diameter trees. The results highlighted the importance of forest maturity and showed that preventing silvicultural disturbances may not be the best solution for conserving and enhancing biodiversity. Rather, methods such as selective cutting seem an appropriate and sustainable way of forest management. It is suggested that forests should be managed to conserve structural elements which create favorable habitat for bird species, preventing future species losses due to logging practices. PMID:23161251

  17. Biliopancreatic diversion: the effectiveness of duodenal switch and its limitations.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Blaire; Gill, Richdeep S; de Gara, Christopher J; Karmali, Shahzeer; Gagner, Michel

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of morbidly obese individuals is rising rapidly. Being overweight predisposes patients to multiple serious medical comorbidities including type two diabetes (T2DM), hypertension, dyslipidemia, and obstructive sleep apnea. Lifestyle modifications including diet and exercise produce modest weight reduction and bariatric surgery is the only evidence-based intervention with sustainable results. Biliopancreatic diversion (BPD) produces the most significant weight loss with amelioration of many obesity-related comorbidities compared to other bariatric surgeries; however perioperative morbidity and mortality associated with this surgery are not insignificant; additionally long-term complications including undesirable gastrointestinal side effects and metabolic derangements cannot be ignored. The overall quality of evidence in the literature is low with a lack of randomized control trials, a preponderance of uncontrolled series, and small sample sizes in the studies available. Additionally, when assessing remission of comorbidities, definitions are unclear and variable. In this review we explore the pros and cons of BPD, a less well known and perhaps underutilized bariatric procedure. PMID:24639868

  18. Dissociating the "retrieval success" regions of the brain: effects of retrieval delay.

    PubMed

    Huijbers, W; Pennartz, C M A; Daselaar, S M

    2010-01-01

    There is abundant evidence that the hippocampal formation critically supports episodic memory retrieval, the remembering of episodes including contextual details. Yet, a group of other brain regions has also been consistently implicated in successful episodic retrieval. This retrieval success network (RSN) includes the posterior midline region, medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), and posterior parietal cortex (PPC). Despite these consistent findings, the functional roles of the RSN regions remain poorly understood. Given that vivid remembering leads to high-confidence retrieval decisions, it is unclear whether activity in these regions reflects episodic long-term memory, or is merely associated with retrieval confidence. In order to distinguish between these alternatives, we manipulated study-test delays within the context of a continuous recognition task during fMRI-scanning. The design was based on previous evidence indicating that retrieval at short delays is easier leading to high-evidence mnemonic decisions, whereas retrieval at longer delays is more difficult but also more hippocampus-dependent. Confirming previous findings, we found that retrieval decisions at short delays were more accurate and faster, and that the hippocampus showed greater activity at longer delays. Within the other RSN regions, we found three distinct activation patterns as a function of delay. Similar to the hippocampus, the retrosplenial cortex showed increased activity as a function of retrieval delay. Dorsal PPC and the precuneus showed decreased activity. Finally, the posterior cingulate, medial PFC and ventral PPC showed a V-shaped pattern. These findings support the idea that dorsal PPC and the precuneus are involved in decision-related retrieval processes rather than successful remembering.

  19. Effects of simvastatin and taurine on delayed cerebral vasospasm following subarachnoid hemorrhage in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    LIN, CHENG; ZHAO, YUANLI; WAN, GANG; ZHU, ANLIN; WANG, HAO

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to observe the effects of simvastatin and taurine on delayed cerebral vasospasm (DCVS) following experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in rabbits. A total of 48 New Zealand white rabbits were allocated at random into four groups (control, SAH, SAH + simvastatin and SAH + taurine groups; n=12 each). The rabbit model of DCVS was established using a double hemorrhage method, which involved injecting autologous arterial blood into the cisterna magna in the SAH groups. The SAH + simvastatin group was administered oral simvastatin (5 mg/kg) daily between days 0–6. The SAH + taurine group was administered oral taurine (50 mg/kg) daily between days 0–6. Starch (50 mg/kg) was administered orally to the animals in the other two groups (control and SAH groups). The control group were not subjected to any other injections or treatment. The internal diameter and internal diameter/wall thickness of the basilar artery (BA) were measured. The expression levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 were determined using immunohistochemical and quantitative polymerase chain reaction methods following the sacrifice of all animals on day 7. The activity of nuclear factor (NF)-κB in the BA was also measured using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay. The BA walls in the SAH + simvastatin and SAH + taurine groups exhibited reduced narrowing and corrugation of the tunica elastica interna compared with the SAH group. At the protein and cDNA levels, it was found that cerebral vasospasm of the BA in the SAH + simvastatin and SAH + taurine groups was alleviated, as indicated by the reduced expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and NF-κB compared with the SAH group (P<0.05). In conclusion, simvastatin and taurine reduced DCVS following SAH in rabbits, which suggests that these compounds may exert anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:27073449

  20. Prophylactic Effects of Sauna on Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness of the Wrist Extensors

    PubMed Central

    Khamwong, Peanchai; Paungmali, Aatit; Pirunsan, Ubon; Joseph, Leonard

    2015-01-01

    Background: High-intensity of exercise or unaccustomed eccentric exercise can cause the phenomenon of Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage (EIMD) which usually results in cramps, muscle strain, impaired muscle function and delayed-onset muscle soreness. Objectives: This study investigated the prophylactic effects of sauna towards the symptoms associated with muscle damage from eccentric exercises of wrist extensor muscle group. Patients and Methods: A total of twenty-eight subjects (mean age 20.9 years old, SD = 1.6) were randomly divided into the sauna group (n = 14) and the control group (n = 14). In the sauna group, subjects received sauna before eccentric exercise of the wrist extensor. The eccentric exercises were conducted on the non-dominant arm by using an isokinetic dynamometer. Pain Intensity (PI), Pressure Pain Threshold (PPT) and passive range of motion of wrist flexion (PF-ROM) and extension (PE-ROM) were measured as pain variables. Grip Strength (GS) and Wrist Extension Strength (WES) were measured as variables of wrist extensor muscle function. All the measurements were performed at baseline, immediately after and from 1st to 8th days after the exercise-induced muscle damage. Results: The sauna group significantly demonstrated a lower deficit in ROM (passive flexion and passive extension), GS and WES following exercise than that of the control group (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Sauna application prior to the exercise-induced muscle damage demonstrated effectiveness in reduction of sensory impairment (PF-ROM and PE-ROM) and improvement of muscle functions (GS, and WES) in wrist extensor muscle group. PMID:26446307

  1. Identification and Characterization of Soluble Factors Involved in Delayed Effects of Low Dose Radiation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Baulch, Janet

    2013-09-11

    This is a 'glue grant' that was part of a DOE Low Dose project entitled 'Identification and Characterization of Soluble Factors Involved in Delayed Effects of Low Dose Radiation'. This collaborative program has involved Drs. David L. Springer from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), John H. Miller from Washington State University, Tri-cities (WSU) and William F. Morgan then from the University of Maryland, Baltimore (UMB). In July 2008, Dr. Morgan moved to PNNL and Dr. Janet E. Baulch became PI for this project at University of Maryland. In November of 2008, a one year extension with no new funds was requested to complete the proteomic analyses. The project stemmed from studies in the Morgan laboratory demonstrating that genomically unstable cells secret a soluble factor or factors into the culture medium, that cause cytogenetic aberrations and apoptosis in normal parental GM10115 cells. The purpose of this project was to identify the death inducing effect (DIE) factor or factors, estimate their relative abundance, identify the cell signaling pathways involved and finally recapitulate DIE in normal cells by exogenous manipulation of putative DIE factors in culture medium. As reported in detail in the previous progress report, analysis of culture medium from the parental cell line, and stable and unstable clones demonstrated inconsistent proteomic profiles as relate to candidate DIE factors. While the proposed proteomic analyses did not provide information that would allow DIE factors to be identified, the analyses provided another important set of observations. Proteomic analysis suggested that proteins associated with the cellular response to oxidative stress and mitochondrial function were elevated in the medium from unstable clones in a manner consistent with mitochondrial dysfunction. These findings correlate with previous studies of these clones that demonstrated functional differences between the mitochondria of stable and unstable clones. These

  2. Marital infidelity and its effect on pathogen diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berryman, Matthew J.

    2007-01-01

    Marital infidelity is usually examined solely in terms of strategies of men and women, with an emphasis on the enhanced payoff for male infidelity (provided he can get away with it). What are not clear are the strategies used, in terms of how often to engage in extra-marital affairs. It has been proposed that female strategies are governed by a "decision" to maximize the genetic diversity of her offspring, in order to better guarantee that at least some will survive against a common pathogen. This strategy would then impact on the strategies and diversity of pathogens. I make a number of predictions about both strategies and the genetic diversity of humans and pathogens, couched in game-theoretic terms. These predictions are then compared with the existing evidence on the strategies used by women and also in terms of the genetic diversity of human populations.

  3. Trophic transfer of biodiversity effects: functional equivalence of prey diversity and enrichment?

    PubMed

    Behl, Stephan; Schryver, Vera; Diehl, Sebastian; Stibor, Herwig

    2012-12-01

    Producer diversity is frequently assumed to be detrimental to herbivores, because less edible taxa are more likely to dominate diverse communities. Many producers are, however, complementary in their resource use, and primary production is often positively related to producer diversity. We performed an experiment with microalgae and a generalist herbivore to explore the hypothesis that such positive effects are transferred up the food chain and are functionally comparable to effects of enrichment with a limiting resource. In both absence and presence of grazers, primary production was positively affected by both light supply and producer diversity. Survival, reproduction, and biomass of herbivores were also positively affected by light supply and producer diversity, with both factors contributing equally to grazer performance. We conclude that producer diversity can indeed have similar positive effects on secondary production as enrichment with a limiting resource and discuss conditions under which such positive effects are likely to dominate over negative ones.

  4. Trophic transfer of biodiversity effects: functional equivalence of prey diversity and enrichment?

    PubMed Central

    Behl, Stephan; Schryver, Vera; Diehl, Sebastian; Stibor, Herwig

    2012-01-01

    Producer diversity is frequently assumed to be detrimental to herbivores, because less edible taxa are more likely to dominate diverse communities. Many producers are, however, complementary in their resource use, and primary production is often positively related to producer diversity. We performed an experiment with microalgae and a generalist herbivore to explore the hypothesis that such positive effects are transferred up the food chain and are functionally comparable to effects of enrichment with a limiting resource. In both absence and presence of grazers, primary production was positively affected by both light supply and producer diversity. Survival, reproduction, and biomass of herbivores were also positively affected by light supply and producer diversity, with both factors contributing equally to grazer performance. We conclude that producer diversity can indeed have similar positive effects on secondary production as enrichment with a limiting resource and discuss conditions under which such positive effects are likely to dominate over negative ones. PMID:23301176

  5. [Effects of delayed cord clamping on hemoglobin and ferritin levels in infants at three months of age].

    PubMed

    Venâncio, Sonia Isoyama; Levy, Renata Bertazzi; Saldiva, Sílvia Regina Dias Médici; Mondini, Lenise; Alves, Maria Cecília Goi Porto; Leung, Siu Lum

    2008-01-01

    This study assessed the effect of delayed (1 minute after delivery) clamping of the umbilical cord on hemoglobin and ferritin levels in infants at three months of age. Mothers and their infants born through vaginal delivery, at term, and without congenital anomalies (325 pairs) were recruited at a hospital in São Paulo, Brazil, in 2006 (164 in the delayed clamping subgroup and 161 in the early clamping subgroup). Maternal hemoglobin at delivery, umbilical cord hemoglobin, and ferritin were recorded. At three months follow-up, venous blood samples were drawn from 224 (69%) infants for hemoglobin and ferritin measurement. Socioeconomic, maternal reproductive, anthropometric, and infant feeding variables were studied. Multiple linear regression models were used to analyze the data. The effect of delayed clamping at birth, measured at three months, was only significant for ferritin (p = 0.040), and the concentration was higher (23.29ng/mL) in this subgroup as compared to the early clamping subgroup. Delayed umbilical cord clamping can serve as a strategy to improve infant iron status and prevent iron deficiency.

  6. Effects of reinforcer delay and variability in a successive-encounters procedure.

    PubMed

    Mazur, James E

    2008-11-01

    Pigeons responded in a successive-encounters procedure that consisted of a search period, a choice period, and a handling period. The search period was either a fixed-interval or a mixed-interval schedule presented on the center key of a three-key chamber. Upon completion of the search period, the center key was turned off and the two side keys were lit. A pigeon could either accept a delay followed by food (by pecking the right key) or reject this option and return to the search period (by pecking the left key). During the choice period, a red right key represented the long alternative (a long handling delay followed by food), and a green right key represented the short alternative (a short handling delay followed by food). The experiment consisted of a series of comparisons for which optimal diet theory predicted no changes in preference for the long alternative (because the overall rates of reinforcement were unchanged), whereas the hyperbolic-decay model predicted changes in preference (because the delays to the next possible reinforcer were varied). In all comparisons, the results supported the predictions of the hyperbolic-decay model, which states that the value of a reinforcer is inversely related to the delay between a choice response and reinforcer delivery.

  7. Effect of Internal Hydrogen on Delayed Cracking of Metastable Low-Nickel Austenitic Stainless Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papula, Suvi; Talonen, Juho; Todoshchenko, Olga; Hänninen, Hannu

    2014-10-01

    Metastable austenitic stainless steels, especially manganese-alloyed low-nickel grades, may be susceptible to delayed cracking after forming processes. Even a few wppm of hydrogen present in austenitic stainless steels as an inevitable impurity is sufficient to cause cracking if high enough fraction of strain-induced α'-martensite and high residual tensile stresses are present. The role of internal hydrogen content in delayed cracking of several metastable austenitic stainless steels having different alloying chemistries was investigated by means of Swift cup tests, both in as-supplied state and after annealing at 673 K (400 °C). Hydrogen content of the test materials in each state was analyzed with three different methods: inert gas fusion, thermal analysis, and thermal desorption spectroscopy. Internal hydrogen content in as-supplied state was higher in the studied manganese-alloyed low-nickel grades, which contributed to susceptibility of unstable grades to delayed cracking. Annealing of the stainless steels reduced their hydrogen content by 1 to 3 wppm and markedly lowered the risk of delayed cracking. Limiting drawing ratio was improved from 1.4 to 1.7 in grade 204Cu, from 1.7 to 2.0 in grade 201 and from 1.8 to 2.12 in grade 301. The threshold levels of α'-martensite and residual stress for delayed cracking at different hydrogen contents were defined for the test materials.

  8. A programmable-delay line.

    PubMed

    Schiano, J L; Trahiotis, C

    1987-01-01

    A relatively simple circuit is described which delays audio signals in 5 microseconds steps from 0 microsecond to 4000 microseconds. Delays are programmed via twelve TTL-level data lines. The magnitude response is flat and the phase response is linear from DC to 5 kHz. The gain of the circuit is fixed and independent of the selected delay. Delays are accurate to within 1 microsecond of the programmed value. The device is a nice alternative to other methods which have diverse shortcomings.

  9. Differential Memory Effects for Immediate and Delayed Feedback: A Delta Rule Explanation of Feedback Timing Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clariana, Roy B.

    This paper describes the possible effects of feedback on learning (associations) using a connectionist tool, the delta rule. Feedback in instruction can be described in terms of the interaction of stimulus inputs and response outputs, an associationist perspective. Here the delta rule is applied to each instance that an input and an output likely…

  10. Fear extinction in humans: effects of acquisition-extinction delay and masked stimulus presentations.

    PubMed

    Golkar, Armita; Öhman, Arne

    2012-10-01

    Fear extinction can be viewed as an inhibitory learning process. This is supported by post-extinction phenomena demonstrating the return of fear, such as reinstatement. Recent work has questioned this account, claiming that extinction initiated immediately after fear acquisition can abolish the return of fear. In the current study, participants were fear conditioned to four different conditioned stimuli (CS) and underwent extinction either immediately or after a 24 h delay. During extinction, we manipulated CS contingency awareness by presenting two of the CSs (one CS+, one CS-) under non-masked conditions and the other two CSs under masked conditions. Compared to delayed extinction, immediate extinction of non-masked CSs promoted less extinction of fear-potentiated startle and shock expectancy ratings and less reinstatement of fear-potentiated startle without affecting shock expectancy ratings. Critically, future research should clarify how the differences between immediate and delayed extinction in within-session extinction modulate the recovery of fear.

  11. Effect of body temperature on visual evoked potential delay and visual perception in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Regan, D; Murray, T J; Silver, R

    1977-11-01

    Seven multiple sclerosis patients were cooled and four heated, but evoked potential delay changed in only five out 11 experiments. Control limits were set by cooling eight and heating four control subjects. One patient gave anomalous results in that although heating degraded perceptual delay and visual acuity, and depressed the sine wave grating MTF, double-flash resolution was improved. An explanation is proposed in terms of the pattern of axonal demyelination. The medium frequency flicker evoked potential test seems to be a less reliable means of monitoring the progress of demyelination in multiple sclerosis patients than is double-flash campimetry or perceptual delay campimetry, although in some situations the objectivity of the evoked potential test would be advantageous.

  12. Effects of intraspecific diversity on survivorship, growth, and recruitment of the eastern oyster across sites.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Torrance C; Hughes, A Randall; Williams, Bethany; Garland, Hanna; Kimbro, David L

    2016-06-01

    Intraspecific diversity, particularly of foundation species, can significantly affect population, community, and ecosystem processes. Examining how genetic diversity relates to demographic traits provides a key mechanistic link from genotypic and phenotypic variation of taxa with complex life histories to their population dynamics. We conducted a field experiment to assess how two metrics of intraspecific diversity (cohort diversity, the number of independent juvenile cohorts created from different adult source populations, and genetic relatedness, genetic similarity among individuals within and across cohorts) affect the survivorship, growth, and recruitment of the foundation species Crassostrea virginica. To assess the effects of both cohort diversity and genetic relatedness on oyster demographic traits under different environmental conditions, we manipulated juvenile oyster diversity and predator exposure (presence/absence of a cage) at two sites differing in resource availability and predation intensity. Differences in predation pressure between sites overwhelmingly determined post-settlement survivorship of oysters. However, in the absence of predation (i.e., cage treatment), one or both metrics of intraspecific diversity, in addition to site, influenced long-term survivorship, growth, and recruitment. While both cohort diversity and genetic relatedness were negatively associated with long-term survivorship, genetic relatedness alone showed a positive association with growth and cohort diversity alone showed a positive association with recruitment. Thus, our results demonstrate that in the absence of predation, intraspecific diversity can affect multiple demographic traits of a foundation species, but the relative importance of these effects depends on the environmental context. Moreover, the magnitude and direction of these effects vary depending on the diversity metric, cohort diversity or genetic relatedness, suggesting that although they are inversely

  13. Effects of intraspecific diversity on survivorship, growth, and recruitment of the eastern oyster across sites.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Torrance C; Hughes, A Randall; Williams, Bethany; Garland, Hanna; Kimbro, David L

    2016-06-01

    Intraspecific diversity, particularly of foundation species, can significantly affect population, community, and ecosystem processes. Examining how genetic diversity relates to demographic traits provides a key mechanistic link from genotypic and phenotypic variation of taxa with complex life histories to their population dynamics. We conducted a field experiment to assess how two metrics of intraspecific diversity (cohort diversity, the number of independent juvenile cohorts created from different adult source populations, and genetic relatedness, genetic similarity among individuals within and across cohorts) affect the survivorship, growth, and recruitment of the foundation species Crassostrea virginica. To assess the effects of both cohort diversity and genetic relatedness on oyster demographic traits under different environmental conditions, we manipulated juvenile oyster diversity and predator exposure (presence/absence of a cage) at two sites differing in resource availability and predation intensity. Differences in predation pressure between sites overwhelmingly determined post-settlement survivorship of oysters. However, in the absence of predation (i.e., cage treatment), one or both metrics of intraspecific diversity, in addition to site, influenced long-term survivorship, growth, and recruitment. While both cohort diversity and genetic relatedness were negatively associated with long-term survivorship, genetic relatedness alone showed a positive association with growth and cohort diversity alone showed a positive association with recruitment. Thus, our results demonstrate that in the absence of predation, intraspecific diversity can affect multiple demographic traits of a foundation species, but the relative importance of these effects depends on the environmental context. Moreover, the magnitude and direction of these effects vary depending on the diversity metric, cohort diversity or genetic relatedness, suggesting that although they are inversely

  14. [Effect of early intervention on the interaction of developmentally delayed infants and their mothers].

    PubMed

    Chen, Y J; Chu, H H

    1995-12-01

    The purpose of this study was (1) to examine the interaction patterns of mothers and their developmentally delayed infants during free play and instructional episodes; (2) to investigate the influence of an early intervention program on the interaction patterns of mothers and their developmentally delayed infants; and (3) to investigate to what extent the maternal perceptions and expectations, perceived stress and involving motivation were associated with maternal behavior while interacting with their developmentally delayed infants. The participants of this study were twenty-one developmentally delayed infants and their mothers. Each mother-child dyad was videotaped in a laboratory playroom for 10-minutes of free play and a 5-minute instructional session. Mental and psychomotor development of the child were measured by Bayley scale. The perception of child development, expectation, and the stress of mothers were measured by a self-report questionnaire which was designed by a researcher in this study. The mothers' motivation of involvement was evaluated by teachers. On year after early intervention, it was found that (1) developmentally delayed infants increased locomotion, (2) mothers demonstrated more positive emotional expression during mother-child interaction, and (3) the score of HOME, mother's involvement, and the quality of mother-child interaction which was evaluated by teachers were significantly increased. Furthermore, the differences between situations indicated that the developmentally delayed infants were more toy-oriented during play than instruction. The mothers tended to be more helpful in attitude while they instructed their children. The mother's perception of child development and stress were found to be the critical factors affecting maternal teaching, controlling, and caring behavior. PMID:8551531

  15. Synergistic Effect between Amoxicillin and TLR Ligands on Dendritic Cells from Amoxicillin-Delayed Allergic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Quintero, Maria J.; Torres, Maria J.; Blazquez, Ana B.; Gómez, Enrique; Fernandez, Tahia D.; Doña, Inmaculada; Ariza, Adriana; Andreu, Inmaculada; Melendez, Lidia; Blanca, Miguel; Mayorga, Cristobalina

    2013-01-01

    Amoxicillin, a low-molecular-weight compound, is able to interact with dendritic cells inducing semi-maturation in vitro. Specific antigens and TLR ligands can synergistically interact with dendritic cells (DC), leading to complete maturation and more efficient T-cell stimulation. The aim of the study was to evaluate the synergistic effect of amoxicillin and the TLR2, 4 and 7/8 agonists (PAM, LPS and R848, respectively) in TLR expression, DC maturation and specific T-cell response in patients with delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions to amoxicillin. Monocyte-derived DC from 15 patients with DTH to amoxicillin and 15 controls were cultured with amoxicillin in the presence or absence of TLR2, 4 and 7/8 agonists (PAM, LPS and R848, respectively). We studied TLR1-9 gene expression by RT-qPCR, and DC maturation, lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine production by flow cytometry. DC from both patients and controls expressed all TLRs except TLR9. The amoxicillin plus TLR2/4 or TLR7/8 ligands showed significant differences, mainly in patients: AX+PAM+LPS induced a decrease in TLR2 and AX+R848 in TLR2, 4, 7 and 8 mRNA levels. AX+PAM+LPS significantly increased the percentage of maturation in patients (75%) vs. controls (40%) (p=0.036) and T-cell proliferation (80.7% vs. 27.3% of cases; p=0.001). Moreover, the combinations AX+PAM+LPS and AX+R848 produced a significant increase in IL-12p70 during both DC maturation and T-cell proliferation. These results indicate that in amoxicillin-induced maculopapular exanthema, the presence of different TLR agonists could be critical for the induction of the innate and adaptive immune responses and this should be taken into account when evaluating allergic reactions to these drugs. PMID:24066120

  16. Effect of cytokinins on delaying petunia flower senescence: a transcriptome study approach.

    PubMed

    Trivellini, Alice; Cocetta, Giacomo; Vernieri, Paolo; Mensuali-Sodi, Anna; Ferrante, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Flower senescence is a fascinating natural process that represents the final developmental stage in the life of a flower. Plant hormones play an important role in regulating the timing of flower senescence. Ethylene is a trigger and usually accelerates the senescence rate, while cytokinins are known to delay it. The aim of this work was to study the effect of 6-benzylaminopurine (BA) on petal senescence by transcript profile comparison after 3 or 6 h using a cross-species method by hybridizing petunia samples to a 4 × 44 K Agilent tomato array. The relative content of ethylene, abscisic acid, anthocyanins, total carotenoids and total phenols that determine the physiological behaviours of the petal tissue were measured. BA treatment prolonged the flower life and increased the concentrations of phenols and anthocyanins, while total carotenoids did not increase and were lower than the control. The ethylene biosynthetic and perception gene expressions were studied immediately after treatment until 24 h and all genes were repressed, while ethylene production was strongly induced after 4 days. The microarray analyses highlighted that BA strongly affected gene regulation after 3 h, but only 14% of genes remained differentially expressed after 6 h. The most affected pathways and genes were those related to stress, such as heat shock proteins, abscisic acid (ABA) catabolism and its signalling pathway, lipid metabolism and antioxidant defence systems. A gene annotation enrichment analysis using DAVID showed that the most important gene clusters were involved in energy generation and conservation processes. In addition to the ethylene pathway, cytokinins seem to be strongly involved the regulation of the ABA response in flower tissues. PMID:25425166

  17. [Delayed puberty].

    PubMed

    Antoniazzi, F; Zamboni, G; Tatò, L

    1996-01-01

    Delayed puberty can be defined as the absence of any signs of puberty in subjects that have attained an age at the upper limit (+2DS) for the onset of puberty, that means 13 years in girls and 14 years in boys. The causes of delayed puberty can be classified into three groups, functional temporary impairment in gonadotropin and sex steroid secretion (most frequently constitutional delay of puberty), hypothalamo-pituitary failure with deficiency in gonadotropin secretion, primary gonadal failure with increased gonadotropin levels. The Authors discuss about etiology, diagnostic testing and therapeutic approach in these conditions. The majority of children with delayed puberty are males that have only a constitutional delay of growth and puberty. It is difficult, in teenage years, to distinguish this common and benign condition from true gonadotropin deficiency, in spite of the variety of endocrine tests developed for this purpose. Individuals with constitutional delayed puberty with a bone age greater than 11.5 years, show after triptorelin stimulation an increase in LH capable of distinguishing them from patients with gonadotropin deficiency. In our opinion this could be an important screening test to exclude gonadotropin deficiency in boys with delayed puberty.

  18. Effect of herbicide combinations on Bt-maize rhizobacterial diversity.

    PubMed

    Valverde, José R; Marín, Silvia; Mellado, Rafael P

    2014-11-28

    Reports of herbicide resistance events are proliferating worldwide, leading to new cultivation strategies using combinations of pre-emergence and post-emergence herbicides. We analyzed the impact during a one-year cultivation cycle of several herbicide combinations on the rhizobacterial community of glyphosate-tolerant Bt-maize and compared them to those of the untreated or glyphosate-treated soils. Samples were analyzed using pyrosequencing of the V6 hypervariable region of the 16S rRNA gene. The sequences obtained were subjected to taxonomic, taxonomy-independent, and phylogeny-based diversity studies, followed by a statistical analysis using principal components analysis and hierarchical clustering with jackknife statistical validation. The resilience of the microbial communities was analyzed by comparing their relative composition at the end of the cultivation cycle. The bacterial communites from soil subjected to a combined treatment with mesotrione plus s-metolachlor followed by glyphosate were not statistically different from those treated with glyphosate or the untreated ones. The use of acetochlor plus terbuthylazine followed by glyphosate, and the use of aclonifen plus isoxaflutole followed by mesotrione clearly affected the resilience of their corresponding bacterial communities. The treatment with pethoxamid followed by glyphosate resulted in an intermediate effect. The use of glyphosate alone seems to be the less aggressive one for bacterial communities. Should a combined treatment be needed, the combination of mesotrione and s-metolachlor shows the next best final resilience. Our results show the relevance of comparative rhizobacterial community studies when novel combined herbicide treatments are deemed necessary to control weed growth.. PMID:25394507

  19. Intake-dependent effects of cocaine self-administration on impulsive choice in a delay discounting task

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Marci R.; Weiss, Virginia G.; Ouimet, Dominique J.; Fuchs, Rita A.; Morgan, Drake; Setlow, Barry

    2014-01-01

    Cocaine use is associated with high levels of impulsive choice (greater discounting of delayed rewards) in humans, but the cause/effect relationships between cocaine use and impulsive choice are not fully understood. In previous work, we found that both experimenter- and self-administration of fixed quantities of cocaine caused lasting increases in impulsive choice in rats. The present study extended these findings by taking into account baseline impulsive choice prior to self-administration, and by allowing rats free access to cocaine. Male Long-Evans rats were trained in a delay discounting task in which they made discrete-trial choices between small immediate and large delayed food rewards. Half of the rats were then implanted with intravenous catheters and, following recovery, allowed to self-administer cocaine HCl (1.0 mg/kg/infusion) in 6 hour sessions over 14 days. Control rats orally self-administered a sucrose solution under similar conditions. Upon completion of self-administration training, rats remained abstinent for 3 weeks before retesting in the delay discounting task. Cocaine and control groups did not differ prior to self-administration, but afterward, the cocaine group showed greater impulsive choice (fewer choices of large, delayed rewards) than controls. Additional analyses revealed that the effects of cocaine on impulsive choice were intake-dependent; rats classified as “low intake” did not differ from controls, whereas rats classified as “high intake” were significantly more impulsive than both controls and their pre-cocaine baseline. These findings are consistent with the idea that cocaine-induced, pharmacologically based neural adaptations promote the development of impulsive decision making. PMID:24841739

  20. In Vitro Studies on Space Radiation-Induced Delayed Genetic Responses: Shielding Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kadhim, Munira A.; Green, Lora M.; Gridley, Daila S.; Murray, Deborah K.; Tran, Da Thao; Andres, Melba; Pocock, Debbie; Macdonald, Denise; Goodhead, Dudley T.; Moyers, Michael F.

    2003-01-01

    normalized to physical dose, the monoenergetic proton field present inside the helmet-protected phantom produced equivalent biological responses, when compared to unshielded cells, as measured by the induction of delayed genetic effects in murine haematopoietic stem cells.

  1. The effect of pre-warming and delayed irradiation on marginal integrity of a resin-modified glass-ionomer.

    PubMed

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Mansoori-Karvandi, Tayebeh; Hadi, Saeed

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that the acid-base reactions and polymerization of resin-modified glass-ionomers (RMGIs) compete with and inhibit each other; however, external energy can also influence the properties of RMGIs. This in vitro study evaluated the effect of pre-warming and/or delayed light irradiation on marginal integrity of RMGIs in cervical restorations. Standard Class V cavities were prepared on the buccal aspects of 60 human maxillary premolars. Each cavity was treated with a cavity conditioner for 10 seconds, rinsed, and gently air-dried. An RMGI was applied to the prepared cavities as dictated by the study protocol. Group 1 samples were treated per manufacturers' instructions. Group 2 samples were photocured after a delay of 2 minutes. For samples in Group 3, the encapsulated material was pre-warmed (at 40° C) for 90 seconds; for Group 4 samples, capsules were pre-warmed and photocuring was delayed for 2.4 minutes. Microleakage scores were determined using dye penetration technique; Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests were used for statistical analysis (α = 0.05). The enamel groups exhibited statistically significant differences (P = 0.036), while the dentin groups did not (P = 0.122); however, in both cases, Group 2 demonstrated the highest marginal integrity. Based on the results of this study, pre-warming could jeopardize the marginal integrity of RMGIs in cervical restorations, while delaying the curing process might improve it (particularly for enamel). PMID:23220316

  2. The effects of peer-play level on initiations and responses of preschool children with delayed play skills.

    PubMed

    Tanta, Kari J; Deitz, Jean C; White, Owen; Billingsley, Felix

    2005-01-01

    The potential impact of peer-play opportunities on the overall development of young children has been well-documented in the social development, occupational therapy, and special education literature. However, the effect of peer characteristics on the manifestation and facilitation of specific types of play roles and behaviors has received little attention. This topic is of key importance to occupational therapists who are striving to develop interventions that enhance the development of social participation and play in preschool children. The purpose of this study was to examine the differences in initiation and response exhibited by preschool-aged children with social-play delays when participating in free-play dyads with peers of differing developmental levels. A single-subject alternating treatments design was replicated across five preschool-aged children with developmental play delays. Each child was paired with one peer who had lower developmental play skills and one peer who had higher developmental play skills. The arranged dyads were given the opportunity to play together in a specially designed playroom at their school. Their interactions were videotaped and later coded. All five children generally showed more initiation and response to initiation during play with higher-level peers, although one participant showed less differentiation for initiation than the other four children. An occupational therapist working with a preschool child with play delays and wanting to facilitate the child's initiation and response in play situations should consider pairing the child with play delays with a child who has higher play skills. PMID:16124210

  3. The effect of delayed placement of composite and double application of single-bottle adhesives on microleakage of composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Shafiei, Fereshteh; Kiomarsi, Nazanin; Alavi, Ali Asghar

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of delayed placement of composite and double application of adhesive on microleakage of two-step, total-etch (single-bottle) adhesives. Standard Class V cavities were prepared in 140 sound premolars and randomly assigned into 10 groups (n = 14). Excite, Optibond Solo Plus, and Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (as a control) were used. After the first layer of single-bottle adhesive was photocured, the adhesive was reapplied and photocured in four of the groups. A microhybrid composite was applied in five of the groups immediately after the adhesive was photocured; in the other five groups, the composite was placed after a three-minute delay. After 24 hours of storage in distilled water and thermocycling, the samples were placed in 1% methylene blue. All samples then were sectioned longitudinally and evaluated for microleakage at the occlusal and gingival margins under a stereomicroscope at 20x magnification. Data were analyzed using nonparametric tests. Delayed placement of composite significantly increased leakage at the gingival margins when single-bottle adhesives were used (p < 0.05). Double application of the single-bottle adhesives significantly reduced leakage at the gingival margin when placement of the composite was delayed. There was no significant difference between single and double application when the composite was placed immediately (p < 0.05).

  4. Effects of delays on 6-year-old children’s self-generation and retention of knowledge through integration

    PubMed Central

    Varga, Nicole L.; Bauer, Patricia J.

    2013-01-01

    The present research was an investigation of the effect of delay on self-generation and retention of knowledge derived through integration by 6-year-old children. Children were presented with novel facts from passages read aloud to them (stem facts) and tested for self-generation of new knowledge through integration of the facts. In Experiment 1, children integrated the stem facts at Session 1 and retained the self-generated memory traces over 1 week. In Experiment 2, 1-week delays were imposed either between the to-be-integrated facts (between-stem delay) or after the stem facts but before the test (before-test delay). Integration performance was diminished in both conditions. Moreover, memory for individual stem facts was lower in Experiment 2 than in Experiment 1, suggesting that self-generation through integration promoted memory for explicitly taught information. The results indicate the importance of tests for promoting self-generation through integration as well as for retaining newly self-generated and explicitly taught information. PMID:23563162

  5. Framing the Effect of Multiculturalism on Diversity Outcomes among Students at Historically Black Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dwyer, Brighid

    2006-01-01

    This article deals with the effect of multiculturalism on diversity outcomes among students at Historically Black Colleges and Universities. This investigation examines the multiculturalism literature, as well as the literature specific to HBCUs, in an attempt to answer the question: What is the effect of multiculturalism on diversity outcomes of…

  6. Raising White Privilege Awareness and Reducing Racial Prejudice: Assessing Diversity Course Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Kim A.

    2007-01-01

    Many diversity courses in psychology originally aimed to reduce student racial bias and raise their awareness of racism. However, quantitative data testing the effectiveness of such courses are lacking. This study assessed a required diversity course's effectiveness in raising awareness of White privilege and racism; increasing support for…

  7. Assessing the Effect of Disturbances on Ectomycorrhiza Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Iordache, Virgil; Gherghel, Felicia; Kothe, Erika

    2009-01-01

    Ectomycorrhiza (ECM) communities can be described on a species level or on a larger scale at an ecosystem level. Here we show that the species level approach of successional processes in ECM communities is not appropriate for understanding the diversity patterns of ECM communities at contaminated sites. An ecosystem based approach improves predictability since different biotic and abiotic factors are included. However, it still does not take into account the hierarchical structure of the ecosystem. We suggest that diversity patterns of ECMs communities in forests can best be investigated at three levels. This hypothetical approach for investigation can be tested at sites of secondary succession in areas contaminated with metals. Once the diversity patterns are appropriately described by a hierarchical ecosystem approach, to the species level is used to explain these patterns by populational and ecotoxicological mechanisms. PMID:19440391

  8. Long-term effects of sowing high or low diverse seed mixtures on plant and gastropod diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dedov, Ivailo; Stoyanov, Ivailo L.; Penev, Lyubomir; Harvey, Jeffrey A.; Van der Putten, Wim H.; Bezemer, T. Martijn

    2006-09-01

    A number of studies have reported that consumers affect a range of community-level processes, and in turn their diversity and abundance is influenced by the structure and diversity of the plant community. Although gastropods are important generalist herbivores in many environments, few studies have examined the effects of plant species richness and plant community structure on gastropods. This study investigated gastropod species richness and interactions with various above-ground parameters of the vegetation on an experimental field with four plant treatments: low and high diversity of sown later succession plant species, natural colonization at the start of the experiment and natural colonization after 3 years of continued agricultural practice. The investigated gastropod assemblage contained only seven species and was highly dominated by two of them. Both in pitfalls and with hand-sorting the number of species collected per plot was highest in plots with natural plant colonization. Multivariate analysis revealed that overall gastropod abundance was positively associated with plant height and percentage cover of plants, and negatively with percentage grass cover. The same pattern holds for one of the dominant species-complex ( Cochlicopa lubrica/ lubricella). The other dominant gastropod species ( Deroceras reticulatum) was more abundant in samples with higher percentages of moss cover and higher plant diversity, while less abundant at samples with higher plant cover, indicating that the gastropod species preferences may matter more than just their response to plant diversity. Two plant-gastropod species-level associations were observed: Senecio jacobaea with D. reticulatum and Tanacetum vulgare with Cochlicopa spp. The present study also demonstrated that pitfall-traps are suitable for collecting terrestrial gastropods, at least for species-poor grassland habitats.

  9. Pigeons' Memory for Number of Events: Effects of Intertrial Interval and Delay Interval Illumination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hope, Chris; Santi, Angelo

    2004-01-01

    In Experiment 1, pigeons were trained at a 0-s baseline delay to discriminate sequences of light flashes (illumination of the feeder) that varied in number but not time (2f/4s and 8f/4s). During training, the intertrial interval was illuminated by the houselight for Group Light, but it was dark for Group Dark. Testing conducted with dark delay…

  10. Immediate and Delayed Effects of Meta-Cognitive Instruction on Regulation of Cognition and Mathematics Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mevarech, Zemira R.; Amrany, Chagit

    2008-01-01

    The present study addressed two research questions: (a) the extent to which students who were exposed to meta-cognitive instruction are able to implement meta-cognitive processes in a delayed, stressful situation, in our case--being examined on the matriculation exam; and (b) whether students preparing themselves for the matriculation exam in…

  11. On the Effects of Signaling Reinforcer Probability and Magnitude in Delayed Matching to Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Glenn S.; White, K. Geoffrey

    2005-01-01

    Two experiments examined whether postsample signals of reinforcer probability or magnitude affected the accuracy of delayed matching to sample in pigeons. On each trial, red or green choice responses that matched red or green stimuli seen shortly before a variable retention interval were reinforced with wheat access. In Experiment 1, the…

  12. Teaching Children with Autism When Reward is Delayed: The Effects of Two Kinds of Marking Stimuli

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grindle, Corinna F.; Remington, Bob

    2005-01-01

    Three children with autism were taught to identify pictures of emotions in response to their spoken names. Their speed of acquisition was compared using a within-child alternating treatments design across three teaching conditions, each involving a 5 second delay to reinforcement. In the marked-before condition, an instruction encouraged the…

  13. Effects of Inclusions on Delayed Fracture Properties of Three TWinning Induced Plasticity (TWIP) Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Seokmin; Shin, Sang Yong; Kim, Hyoung Seop; Lee, Sunghak; Kim, Sung-Kyu; Chin, Kwang-Geun; Kim, Nack J.

    2013-02-01

    In the present study, delayed fracture properties of a high-Mn TWinning Induced Plasticity (TWIP) steel and two Al-added TWIP steels were examined by dipping tests of cup specimens in the boiled water, after which the microcrack formation behavior was analyzed. The TWIP steels contained a small amount of elongated MnS inclusions, spherical-shaped AlN particles, and submicron-sized (Fe,Mn)3C carbides. Since MnS inclusions worked as crack initiation sites, longitudinal cracks were formed along the cup forming direction mostly by MnS inclusions. These cracks were readily grown when high tensile residual stresses affected the cracking or hydrogen atoms were gathered inside cracks, which resulted in the delayed fracture. In the Al-added steels, MnS inclusions acted as crack initiation and propagation sites during cup forming or boiled-water dipping test, but residual stresses applied to MnS might be low for the crack initiation and growth. Thus, longitudinal cracks formed by MnS inclusions did not work much for delayed fracture. AlN particles present in the Al-added steels hardly acted as crack initiation or growth sites for the delayed fracture because of their spherical shape.

  14. The Negative Effects of Positive Reinforcement in Teaching Children with Developmental Delay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biederman, Gerald B.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    This study compared the performance of 12 children (ages 4 to 10) with developmental delay, each trained in 2 tasks, one through interactive modeling (with or without verbal reinforcement) and the other through passive modeling. Results showed that passive modeling produced better rated performance than interactive modeling and that verbal…

  15. Effects of Methylphenidate and Morphine on Delay-Discount Functions Obtained within Sessions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitts, Raymond C.; McKinney, A. Patrick

    2005-01-01

    Four rats responded under a "self-control" procedure designed to obtain delay- discount functions within sessions. Each session consisted of seven blocks, with seven trials within each block. Each block consisted of two initial forced- choice trials followed by five free-choice trials. On choice trials, the rats could press either of two…

  16. Effects of Vestibular Stimulation on Motor Development and Stereotyped Behavior of Developmentally Delayed Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacLean, William E., Jr.; Baumeister, Alfred A.

    1982-01-01

    Four developmentally delayed babies were given semicircular canal stimulation in an effort to facilitate their motor and reflex development. All of the children showed motor and/or reflex changes that were attributable to the vestibular stimulation. In addition, some evidence was obtained linking changes in stereotypic responding to the vestibular…

  17. Delayed ovulation and pregnancy outcome: effect ofenvironmental toxicants on the neuroendocrine control of theovary

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the female rat, we have shown that a burst exposure to environmental toxicants known to alter noradrenergic function will block the ovulatory surge of LH when administered during a sensitive period on the day of vaginal proestrus. Such treatments will delay ovulation by 24 h a...

  18. Interactive Effects of Delayed Bedtime and Family-Associated Factors on Depression in Elementary School Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Jin-Ding; Tung, Ho-Jui; Hsieh, Yu-Hsin; Lin, Fu-Gong

    2011-01-01

    Shorter sleep time was reported to be associated with psychological functioning in children. We intended to examine the relationship between nocturnal sleep duration and depression status by investigating if delayed bedtime could be one of the enhancement factors for depression in children. A cross-sectional study was performed to investigate the…

  19. Individual Variability in Delayed Auditory Feedback Effects on Speech Fluency and Rate in Normally Fluent Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chon, HeeCheong; Kraft, Shelly Jo; Zhang, Jingfei; Loucks, Torrey; Ambrose, Nicoline G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Delayed auditory feedback (DAF) is known to induce stuttering-like disfluencies (SLDs) and cause speech rate reductions in normally fluent adults, but the reason for speech disruptions is not fully known, and individual variation has not been well characterized. Studying individual variation in susceptibility to DAF may identify factors…

  20. Delaying Interference Training Has Equivalent Effects in Various Pavlovian Interference Paradigms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Elizabeth J.; Escobar, Martha; Kimble, Whitney

    2013-01-01

    Spontaneous recovery in extinction appears to be inversely related to the acquisition-to-extinction interval, but it remains unclear why this is the case. Rat subjects trained with one of three interference paradigms exhibited less spontaneous recovery of the original response after delayed than immediate interference, regardless of whether…

  1. A Method for Measuring the Effective Throughput Time Delay in Simulated Displays Involving Manual Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewell, W. F.; Clement, W. F.

    1984-01-01

    The advent and widespread use of the computer-generated image (CGI) device to simulate visual cues has a mixed impact on the realism and fidelity of flight simulators. On the plus side, CGIs provide greater flexibility in scene content than terrain boards and closed circuit television based visual systems, and they have the potential for a greater field of view. However, on the minus side, CGIs introduce into the visual simulation relatively long time delays. In many CGIs, this delay is as much as 200 ms, which is comparable to the inherent delay time of the pilot. Because most GCIs use multiloop processing and smoothing algorithms and are linked to a multiloop host computer, it is seldom possible to identify a unique throughput time delay, and it is therefore difficult to quantify the performance of the closed loop pilot simulator system relative to the real world task. A method to address these issues using the critical task tester is described. Some empirical results from applying the method are presented, and a novel technique for improving the performance of GCIs is discussed.

  2. Effects of Time between Trials on Rats' and Pigeons' Choices with Probabilistic Delayed Reinforcers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazur, James E.; Biondi, Dawn R.

    2011-01-01

    Parallel experiments with rats and pigeons examined reasons for previous findings that in choices with probabilistic delayed reinforcers, rats' choices were affected by the time between trials whereas pigeons' choices were not. In both experiments, the animals chose between a standard alternative and an adjusting alternative. A choice of the…

  3. Language Delay in Severely Neglected Children: A Cumulative or Specific Effect of Risk Factors?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sylvestre, Audette; Merette, Chantal

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: This research sought to determine if the language delay (LD) of severely neglected children under 3 years old was better explained by a cumulative risk model or by the specificity of risk factors. The objective was also to identify the risk factors with the strongest impact on LD among various biological, psychological, and…

  4. An influence of delayed reinforcement on the effectiveness of psychostimulants to enhance indices of attention under a five-choice serial reaction time procedure in male rats.

    PubMed

    Slezak, Jonathan M; Katz, Jonathan L

    2013-10-01

    The five-choice serial reaction time (5-CSRT) procedure has been considered a translational tool for assessments of the psychopharmacology of attention in preclinical research. Because greater sensitivity to delayed reinforcement may promote the development of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms, effects of reinforcer delay and psychostimulants on performances under a 5-CSRT procedure were determined. Male rats were trained to respond under a 5-CSRT procedure with different delay-of-reinforcement conditions (0, 2, 4, 8, 16 s), and effects of d-amphetamine, methylphenidate, and morphine (as a negative control) were assessed at 0- and 16-s delays. Under nondrug conditions, as the delay increased both response latency and the number of trials in which a response did not occur (omissions) increased, and the percent correct on trials when responses were emitted decreased. Only modest increases in the percent correct were found with psychostimulants during the 0-s delay condition; however, more substantial enhancements were found with a 16-s delay. Consistent effects of both psychostimulants at either delay on omissions and response latency were not observed. Morphine increased omissions and response latency at both delays and decreased the percent correct (16-s delay). Generally, responses during the intertrial interval were not systematically affected under any condition. The current results demonstrate that measures of attention in a 5-CSRT procedure are sensitive to changes in the delay to reinforcer delivery. More important, psychostimulants significantly enhanced a measure of attention only when reinforcers were delayed, which may be reflective of the psychopharmacological mechanisms involved with clinical treatment of ADHD symptoms.

  5. A Randomized Controlled Trial of a Brief Intervention for Delayed Psychological Effects in Snakebite Victims

    PubMed Central

    Wijesinghe, Chamara A.; Williams, Shehan S.; Kasturiratne, Anuradhani; Dolawaththa, Nishantha; Wimalaratne, Piyal; Wijewickrema, Buddhika; Jayamanne, Shaluka F.; Isbister, Geoffrey K.; Dawson, Andrew H.; Lalloo, David G.; de Silva, H. Janaka

    2015-01-01

    Background Snakebite results in delayed psychological morbidity and negative psycho-social impact. However, psychological support is rarely provided to victims. Aim To assess the effectiveness of a brief intervention which can be provided by non-specialist doctors aimed at reducing psychological morbidity following snakebite envenoming. Method In a single blind, randomized controlled trial, snakebite victims with systemic envenoming [n = 225, 168 males, mean age 42.1 (SD 12.4) years] were randomized into three arms. One arm received no intervention (n = 68, Group A), the second received psychological first aid and psychoeducation (dispelling prevalent cultural beliefs related to snakebite which promote development of a sick role) at discharge from hospital (n = 65, Group B), while the third received psychological first aid and psychoeducation at discharge and a second intervention one month later based on cognitive behavioural principles (n = 69, Group C). All patients were assessed six months after hospital discharge for the presence of psychological symptoms and level of functioning using standardized tools. Results At six months, there was a decreasing trend in the proportion of patients who were positive for psychiatric symptoms of depression and anxiety from Group A through Group B to Group C (Chi square test for trend = 7.901, p = 0.005). This was mainly due to a decreasing trend for symptoms of anxiety (chi-square for trend = 11.256, p = 0.001). There was also decreasing trend in the overall prevalence of disability from Group A through Group B to Group C (chi square for trend = 7.551, p = 0.006), predominantly in relation to disability in family life (p = 0.006) and social life (p = 0.005). However, there was no difference in the proportion of patients diagnosed with depression between the three groups (chi square for trend = 0.391, p = 0.532), and the intervention also had no effect on post-traumatic stress disorder. Conclusions A brief psychological

  6. Effects of Dispersal and Initial Diversity on the Composition and Functional Performance of Bacterial Communities.

    PubMed

    Zha, Yinghua; Berga, Mercè; Comte, Jérôme; Langenheder, Silke

    2016-01-01

    Natural communities are open systems and consequently dispersal can play an important role for the diversity, composition and functioning of communities at the local scale. It is, however, still unclear how effects of dispersal differ depending on the initial diversity of local communities. Here we implemented an experiment where we manipulated the initial diversity of natural freshwater bacterioplankton communities using a dilution-to-extinction approach as well as dispersal from a regional species pool. The aim was further to test whether dispersal effects on bacterial abundance and functional parameters (average community growth rates, respiration rates, substrate utilisation ability) differ in dependence of the initial diversity of the communities. First of all, we found that both initial diversity and dispersal rates had an effect on the recruitment of taxa from a regional source, which was higher in communities with low initial diversity and at higher rates of dispersal. Higher initial diversity and dispersal also promoted higher levels of richness and evenness in local communities and affected, both, separately or interactively, the functional performance of communities. Our study therefore suggests that dispersal can influence the diversity, composition and functioning of bacterial communities and that this effect may be enhanced if the initial diversity of communities is depleted. PMID:27182596

  7. Effects of Dispersal and Initial Diversity on the Composition and Functional Performance of Bacterial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Zha, Yinghua; Berga, Mercè; Comte, Jérôme; Langenheder, Silke

    2016-01-01

    Natural communities are open systems and consequently dispersal can play an important role for the diversity, composition and functioning of communities at the local scale. It is, however, still unclear how effects of dispersal differ depending on the initial diversity of local communities. Here we implemented an experiment where we manipulated the initial diversity of natural freshwater bacterioplankton communities using a dilution-to-extinction approach as well as dispersal from a regional species pool. The aim was further to test whether dispersal effects on bacterial abundance and functional parameters (average community growth rates, respiration rates, substrate utilisation ability) differ in dependence of the initial diversity of the communities. First of all, we found that both initial diversity and dispersal rates had an effect on the recruitment of taxa from a regional source, which was higher in communities with low initial diversity and at higher rates of dispersal. Higher initial diversity and dispersal also promoted higher levels of richness and evenness in local communities and affected, both, separately or interactively, the functional performance of communities. Our study therefore suggests that dispersal can influence the diversity, composition and functioning of bacterial communities and that this effect may be enhanced if the initial diversity of communities is depleted. PMID:27182596

  8. Diversity effect in category-based inductive reasoning of young children: evidence from two methods.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Luojin; Lee, Myung Sook; Huang, Yulan; Mo, Lei

    2014-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that diverse pieces of evidence, rather than similar pieces of evidence, are considered to have greater strength in adults' inductive reasoning. However, this diversity effect is inconsistently recognized by children. Three experiments using the same materials but different tasks examined whether young children consider the diversity principle in their reasoning. Although Experiment 1 applied a data selection task showed five-year-old children in both China and Korea were not sensitive to the diversity of evidence, Experiments 2 and 3 employed an identification task and demonstrated that children as young as five years were sensitive to diverse evidence. These findings indicated that young children, less than nine years of age, may have diversity effect. Methodological and cultural differences were discussed.

  9. Impulsive Aggression, Delay Discounting, and Adolescent Suicide Attempts: Effects of Current Psychotropic Medication Use and Family History of Suicidal Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Brady; McBee-Strayer, Sandra M.; Sheftall, Arielle H.; Ackerman, John; Stevens, Jack; Mendoza, Kristen; Campo, John V.; Brent, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Impulsive-aggressive behaviors have been consistently implicated in the phenomenology, neurobiology, and familial aggregation of suicidal behavior. The purpose of this study was to extend previous work by examining laboratory behavioral measures of delayed reward impulsivity and impulsive aggression in adolescent suicide attempters and never-suicidal comparison subjects. Methods: Using the Point Subtraction Aggression Paradigm (PSAP) and the Delay Discounting Task (DDQ), the authors examined delay discounting and impulsive aggression in 40 adolescent suicide attempters, ages 13–18, and 40 never-suicidal, demographically matched psychiatric comparison subjects. Results: Overall, suicide attempters and comparison subjects performed similarly on the PSAP and DDQ. There was a significant group by current psychotropic medication use interaction (p=0.013) for mean aggressive responses on the PSAP. Group comparisons revealed that attempters emitted more aggressive responses per provocation than comparison subjects, only in those not on psychotropic medication (p=0.049), whereas for those currently treated with psychotropic medication, there were no group differences (p>0.05). This interaction effect was specific to current antidepressant use. Among all subjects, family history of suicidal behavior (suicide or suicide attempt) in first degree relatives was significantly correlated with both delay discounting (r=−0.22, p=0.049), and aggressive responding (r=0.27, p=0.015). Family history of suicidal behavior was associated with delay discounting, but not with aggressive responding on the PSAP, after controlling for relevant covariates. Conclusions: In this study, impulsive-aggressive responding was associated with suicide attempt only in those not being treated with antidepressants. Future work to replicate and extend these findings could have important therapeutic implications for the treatment of depressed suicide attempters, many of whom are

  10. Effect of delayed diagnosis on disease course and management of Churg-Strauss syndrome: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Sokołowska, Barbara; Szczeklik, Wojciech; Mastalerz, Lucyna; Kuczia, Paweł; Wodkowski, Michał; Stodółkiewicz, Edyta; Macioł, Karolina; Musiał, Jacek

    2013-03-01

    Delayed diagnosis in patients with Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS) is largely attributed to the variable and nonspecific presentation of the disease's initial symptoms. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of delayed diagnosis on the course of CSS. We conducted a retrospective study of 30 CSS patients followed up in our department. In each patient, we assessed the delay in CSS diagnosis (the time when patients already fulfilled four out of six of the American College of Rheumatology criteria and the diagnosis was not yet established), the disease activity at the time of diagnosis, and organ involvement during CSS course. A median value of 2 weeks was chosen as the cutoff point after which the diagnosis was considered as delayed. Sixteen patients were diagnosed before (group 1) and 14 patients after this cutoff point (group 2). In group 2, we found a higher Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score at the moment of diagnosis (20.4 vs 25.1, p < 0.05) and a more severe disease course, resulting in more frequent hospitalization rates (0.64 vs 2.26/year, p < 0.00001), higher corticosteroids dose requirements (5.87 vs 11.57 mg/day converted to methylprednisolone, p < 0.0001), and additional immunosuppressive therapy administration (56.2 vs 92.8 %, p < 0.05) to maintain disease remission. All six perinuclear pattern of antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibobodies (pANCA)-positive patients (20 %) were found in group 1. Concluding, the delay in diagnosis of CSS of more than 2 weeks was found to be associated with a disease course that was more severe. The presence of the pANCA antibodies may occasionally facilitate establishment of the diagnosis.

  11. THE EFFECTIVENESS OF QUADRATS FOR MEASURING VASCULAR PLANT DIVERSITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quadrats are widely used for measuring characteristics of vascular plant communities. It is well recognized that quadrat size affects measurements of frequency and cover. The ability of quadrats of varying sizes to adequately measure diversity has not been established. An exha...

  12. Psychometric Evaluation of Lexical Diversity Indices: Assessing Length Effects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fergadiotis, Gerasimos; Wright, Heather Harris; Green, Samuel B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Several novel techniques have been developed recently to assess the breadth of a speaker's vocabulary exhibited in a language sample. The specific aim of this study was to increase our understanding of the validity of the scores generated by different lexical diversity (LD) estimation techniques. Four techniques were explored: D, Maas,…

  13. Diverse Effects of Training on Tests of Academic Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anastasi, Anne

    1981-01-01

    The nature of tests involved in the controversy on coaching is examined. Then coaching is considered against the background of diverse types of training that may affect test performance, and the implications of these various forms of training for the meaning and validity of test scores is discussed. (Author/BW)

  14. Using Video Effectively in Diverse Classes: What Students Want

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fee, Anthony; Budde-Sung, Amanda E. K.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the findings of an exploratory study into the perceptions of a culturally and linguistically diverse cohort of management students (n = 236) about the use of video as a teaching and learning tool. The results show that while students are generally favorable toward audiovisual materials, the choice of content, how the medium…

  15. Eutrophication weakens stabilizing effects of diversity in natural grasslands

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Experimental manipulations have demonstrated that plant diversity can stabilize ecosystem functioning through population asynchrony, with decreases in the functions of some species compensated by increases in others. However, the relevance to natural ecosystems is debated. We use a global study of...

  16. The Positive Educational Effects of Racial Diversity on Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Mitchell J.

    This study examined links between racial diversity on college campuses and positive educational outcomes. Data came from the Cooperative Institutional Research Program database, a longitudinal set of student and faculty surveys and research that assessed the impact of college on students. This study used data from a 1985 freshman survey and the…

  17. Direct simulation of phase delay effects on induced-charge electro-osmosis under large ac electric fields.

    PubMed

    Sugioka, Hideyuki

    2016-08-01

    The standard theory of induced-charge electro-osmosis (ICEO) often overpredicts experimental values of ICEO velocities. Using a nonsteady direct multiphysics simulation technique based on the coupled Poisson-Nernst-Planck and Stokes equations for an electrolyte around a conductive cylinder subject to an ac electric field, we find that a phase delay effect concerning an ion response provides a fundamental mechanism for electrokinetic suppression. A surprising aspect of our findings is that the phase delay effect occurs even at much lower frequencies (e.g., 50 Hz) than the generally believed charging frequency of an electric double layer (typically, 1 kHz) and it can decrease the electrokinetic velocities in one to several orders. In addition, we find that the phase delay effect may also cause a change in the electrokinetic flow directions (i.e., flow reversal) depending on the geometrical conditions. We believe that our findings move toward a more complete understanding of complex experimental nonlinear electrokinetic phenomena.

  18. Direct simulation of phase delay effects on induced-charge electro-osmosis under large ac electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugioka, Hideyuki

    2016-08-01

    The standard theory of induced-charge electro-osmosis (ICEO) often overpredicts experimental values of ICEO velocities. Using a nonsteady direct multiphysics simulation technique based on the coupled Poisson-Nernst-Planck and Stokes equations for an electrolyte around a conductive cylinder subject to an ac electric field, we find that a phase delay effect concerning an ion response provides a fundamental mechanism for electrokinetic suppression. A surprising aspect of our findings is that the phase delay effect occurs even at much lower frequencies (e.g., 50 Hz) than the generally believed charging frequency of an electric double layer (typically, 1 kHz) and it can decrease the electrokinetic velocities in one to several orders. In addition, we find that the phase delay effect may also cause a change in the electrokinetic flow directions (i.e., flow reversal) depending on the geometrical conditions. We believe that our findings move toward a more complete understanding of complex experimental nonlinear electrokinetic phenomena.

  19. Direct simulation of phase delay effects on induced-charge electro-osmosis under large ac electric fields.

    PubMed

    Sugioka, Hideyuki

    2016-08-01

    The standard theory of induced-charge electro-osmosis (ICEO) often overpredicts experimental values of ICEO velocities. Using a nonsteady direct multiphysics simulation technique based on the coupled Poisson-Nernst-Planck and Stokes equations for an electrolyte around a conductive cylinder subject to an ac electric field, we find that a phase delay effect concerning an ion response provides a fundamental mechanism for electrokinetic suppression. A surprising aspect of our findings is that the phase delay effect occurs even at much lower frequencies (e.g., 50 Hz) than the generally believed charging frequency of an electric double layer (typically, 1 kHz) and it can decrease the electrokinetic velocities in one to several orders. In addition, we find that the phase delay effect may also cause a change in the electrokinetic flow directions (i.e., flow reversal) depending on the geometrical conditions. We believe that our findings move toward a more complete understanding of complex experimental nonlinear electrokinetic phenomena. PMID:27627362

  20. Effects of the dark energy and flat rotation curve on the gravitational time delay of particle with non-zero mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Tamal; Ghosh, Shubhrangshu; Bhadra, Arunava

    2016-07-01

    The effects of several dark energy models on gravitational time delay of particles with non-zero mass are investigated and analytical expressions for the same are obtained at the first order accuracy. Also the expression for gravitational time delay under the influence of conformal gravity potential that well describes the flat rotation curve of spiral galaxies is derived. The findings suggest that (i) the conformal gravity description of dark matter reduces the net time delay in contrast to the effect of normal dark matter, and therefore in principle the models can be discriminated using gravitational time delay observations, and (ii) the effect of dark energy/flat rotation curve may be revealed from high-precision measurements of gravitational time delay of particles involving the megaparsec and beyond distance scale.

  1. Resource-Mediated Indirect Effects of Grassland Management on Arthropod Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Simons, Nadja K.; Gossner, Martin M.; Lewinsohn, Thomas M.; Boch, Steffen; Lange, Markus; Müller, Jörg; Pašalić, Esther; Socher, Stephanie A.; Türke, Manfred; Fischer, Markus; Weisser, Wolfgang W.

    2014-01-01

    Intensive land use is a driving force for biodiversity decline in many ecosystems. In semi-natural grasslands, land-use activities such as mowing, grazing and fertilization affect the diversity of plants and arthropods, but the combined effects of different drivers and the chain of effects are largely unknown. In this study we used structural equation modelling to analyse how the arthropod communities in managed grasslands respond to land use and whether these responses are mediated through changes in resource diversity or resource quantity (biomass). Plants were considered resources for herbivores which themselves were considered resources for predators. Plant and arthropod (herbivores and predators) communities were sampled on 141 meadows, pastures and mown pastures within three regions in Germany in 2008 and 2009. Increasing land-use intensity generally increased plant biomass and decreased plant diversity, mainly through increasing fertilization. Herbivore diversity decreased together with plant diversity but showed no response to changes in plant biomass. Hence, land-use effects on herbivore diversity were mediated through resource diversity rather than quantity. Land-use effects on predator diversity were mediated by both herbivore diversity (resource diversity) and herbivore quantity (herbivore biomass), but indirect effects through resource quantity were stronger. Our findings highlight the importance of assessing both direct and indirect effects of land-use intensity and mode on different trophic levels. In addition to the overall effects, there were subtle differences between the different regions, pointing to the importance of regional land-use specificities. Our study underlines the commonly observed strong effect of grassland land use on biodiversity. It also highlights that mechanistic approaches help us to understand how different land-use modes affect biodiversity. PMID:25188423

  2. Differentiating the Effects of Phonotactic Probability and Neighborhood Density on Vocabulary Comprehension and Production: A Comparison of Preschool Children with versus without Phonological Delays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storkel, Holly L.; Maekawa, Junko; Hoover, Jill R.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To differentiate the effect of phonotactic probability from that of neighborhood density on a vocabulary probe administered to preschool children with or without phonological delays. Method: Twenty preschool children with functional phonological delays and 34 preschool children with typical language development completed a 121-item…

  3. Task Engagement and Escape Maintained Challenging Behavior: Differential Effects of General and Explicit Cues when Implementing a Signaled Delay in the Delivery of Reinforcement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reichle, Joe; Johnson, LeAnne; Monn, Emily; Harris, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effects of explicit and general delay cues when implementing a tolerance for a delay in the delivery of a reinforcement procedure to increase task engagement and decrease escape maintained challenging behavior. Two preschool children with autism participated in an alternating treatments design with changing…

  4. Functional identity is the main driver of diversity effects in young tree communities.

    PubMed

    Tobner, Cornelia M; Paquette, Alain; Gravel, Dominique; Reich, Peter B; Williams, Laura J; Messier, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Two main effects are proposed to explain biodiversity-ecosystem functioning relationships: niche complementarity and selection effects. Both can be functionally defined using the functional diversity (FD) and functional identity (FI) of the community respectively. Herein, we present results from the first tree diversity experiment that separated the effect of selection from that of complementarity by varying community composition in high-density plots along a gradient of FD, independent of species richness and testing for the effects of FD and community weighted means of traits (a proxy for FI) on stem biomass increment (a proxy for productivity). After 4 years of growth, most mixtures did not differ in productivity from the averages of their respective monocultures, but some did overyield significantly. Those positive diversity effects resulted mostly from selection effects, primarily driven by fast-growing deciduous species and associated traits. Net diversity effect did not increase with time over 4 years.

  5. Functional identity is the main driver of diversity effects in young tree communities.

    PubMed

    Tobner, Cornelia M; Paquette, Alain; Gravel, Dominique; Reich, Peter B; Williams, Laura J; Messier, Christian

    2016-06-01

    Two main effects are proposed to explain biodiversity-ecosystem functioning relationships: niche complementarity and selection effects. Both can be functionally defined using the functional diversity (FD) and functional identity (FI) of the community respectively. Herein, we present results from the first tree diversity experiment that separated the effect of selection from that of complementarity by varying community composition in high-density plots along a gradient of FD, independent of species richness and testing for the effects of FD and community weighted means of traits (a proxy for FI) on stem biomass increment (a proxy for productivity). After 4 years of growth, most mixtures did not differ in productivity from the averages of their respective monocultures, but some did overyield significantly. Those positive diversity effects resulted mostly from selection effects, primarily driven by fast-growing deciduous species and associated traits. Net diversity effect did not increase with time over 4 years. PMID:27072428

  6. Effects of isoflurane on measurements of delayed lumininescence in Acetabularia acetabulum.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen Li; Van Wijk, Roeland; Xing, Da

    2005-01-01

    The volatile halogenated methyl ethyl ether, isoflurane, used as an anaesthetic, inhibits actin-based dynamics directly or indirectly in animal cells. In plant cells, most intracellular movements are related to actin pathways. We have used isoflurane in a unicellular alga, Acetabularia acetabulum, to test the dynamics of choloroplast organization. By measuring the delayed luminescence, we found that isoflurane worked efficiently in the unicellular organism and showed dose- and time-course-dependent actin-inhibition patterns. When A. acetabulum was treated with saturated solutions of isoflurane in artificial seawater (defined as 100% isoflurane) for 3 or 6 min, the delayed luminescence (DL) was decreased and was never recovered. In contrast, if treated with 75% diluted isoflurane, the DL was firstly inhibited and then recovered several hours later, and if treated with 50% diluted isoflurane, the change of DL was small. Our work proved that isoflurane can affect actin-related pathways in both animals and plants.

  7. Better late than never? The effect of feedback delay on ERP indices of reward processing

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Anna; Luhmann, Christian C.; Bress, Jennifer N.; Hajcak, Greg

    2012-01-01

    The feedback negativity (FN), an early neural response that differentiates rewards from losses, appears to be generated in part by reward circuits in the brain. A prominent model of the FN suggests that it reflects learning processes by which environmental feedback shapes behavior. Although there is evidence that human behavior is more strongly influenced by rewards that quickly follow actions, in nonlaboratory settings, optimal behaviors are not always followed by immediate rewards. However, it is not clear how the introduction of a delay between response selection and feedback impacts the FN. Thus, the present study used a simple forced choice gambling task to elicit the FN, in which feedback about rewards and losses was presented after either 1 or 6 s. Results suggest that, at short delays (1 s), participants clearly differentiated losses from rewards, as evidenced in the magnitude of the FN. At long delays (6 s), on the other hand, the difference between losses and rewards was negligible. Results are discussed in terms of eligibility traces and the reinforcement learning model of the FN. PMID:22752976

  8. Delay effect of magnesium stearate on tablet dissolution in acidic medium.

    PubMed

    Ariyasu, Aoi; Hattori, Yusuke; Otsuka, Makoto

    2016-09-25

    Magnesium stearate (Mg-St) is a common lubricant used for solid pharmaceutical formulations and is known for its property to cause delay of tablet dissolution. In this study, the mechanism underlying the delay caused by Mg-St was investigated with model metformin hydrochloride (HCl) tablets containing Mg-St by using the stationary disk method, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM-EDS), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The results revealed the process and mechanism of delay: the exposed amount of Mg-St on the tablet surface increases during the dissolution process, and tablet dissolution is limited by the diffusion of Mg-St. In addition, in the case of dissolution in acidic medium, stearic acid derived from Mg-St was detected on the tablet surface by FTIR. Because the solubility of stearic acid is lower than that of Mg-St, the slower dissolution in acidic medium than in neutral medium may be attributed to the generation of stearic acid. PMID:27444551

  9. Delayed behavioral and endocrine effects of sarin and stress exposure in mice.

    PubMed

    Mach, Mojmir; Grubbs, Robert D; Price, William A; Nagaoka, Maya; Dubovický, Michal; Lucot, James B

    2008-03-01

    The organophosphorus agent sarin is a potent inhibitor of acetylcholinesterase. Experiments tested the influence of exposure to low doses of sarin along with psychological stress on delayed behavioral and endocrine changes in mice. Motor activity, acoustic startle response (ASR), pre-pulse inhibition (PPI) of ASR, activity of cholinesterase in blood and catecholamine levels in adrenals were evaluated after low dose sarin exposure (3 x 0.4 LD50 subcutaneously) combined with chronic intermittent stress in C57BL/6J mice. While sarin alone produced depression of motor activity, no interaction of the stress with sarin exposure was observed. Cholinesterase activity was significantly reduced 24 h after exposure to sarin; however, the basal activity was re-established 3 weeks later. The combination of low dose sarin exposure and stress produced delayed behavioral change manifested as excessive grooming together with endocrine alterations in adrenals 7 weeks after exposure. The size of the adrenals in the combined exposure group was increased and the concentration of catecholamines was significantly decreased. In conclusion, these findings indicate that sarin in low doses is more dangerous when combined with shaker stress inducing delayed behavioral and endocrine changes. PMID:17503400

  10. Effect of Immediate and Delayed High-Strain Loading on Tendon-to-Bone Healing After Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Packer, Jonathan D.; Bedi, Asheesh; Fox, Alice J.; Gasinu, Selom; Imhauser, Carl W.; Stasiak, Mark; Deng, Xiang-Hua; Rodeo, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: We previously demonstrated, in a rat anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) graft reconstruction model, that the delayed application of low-magnitude-strain loading resulted in improved tendon-to-bone healing compared with that observed after immediate loading and after prolonged immobilization. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of higher levels of strain loading on tendon-to-bone healing. Methods: ACL reconstruction was carried out in a rat model in three randomly assigned groups: high-strain daily loading beginning on either (1) postoperative day one (immediate-loading group; n = 7) or (2) postoperative day four (delayed-loading group; n = 11) or (3) after prolonged immobilization (immobilized group; n = 8). Animals were killed two weeks after surgery and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and biomechanical testing of the bone-tendon-bone complex were carried out. Results: The delayed-loading group had greater tissue mineral density than either the immediate-loading or immobilized group (mean [and standard deviation], 813.0 ± 24.9 mg/mL compared with 778.4 ± 32.6 mg/mL and 784.9 ± 26.4 mg/mL, respectively; p < 0.05). There was a trend toward greater bone volume per total volume fraction in both the immobilized and the delayed-loading group compared with the immediate-loading group (0.24 ± 0.03 and 0.23 ± 0.06 compared with 0.20 ± 0.05; p = 0.06). Trabecular thickness was greater in the immobilized group compared with the immediate-loading group (106.5 ± 23.0 μm compared with 72.6 ± 10.6 μm; p < 0.01). There were no significant differences in failure load or stiffness between the immobilized group and either high-strain cyclic-loading group. Conclusions: Immediate application of high-strain loading appears to have a detrimental effect on healing in this rat model. Any beneficial effects of delayed loading on the healing tendon-bone interface (after a brief period of immobilization) may be offset by the detrimental effects of

  11. Interim analysis based on the weighted log-rank test for delayed treatment effects under staggered patient entry.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Mizuki; Matsuyama, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Fleming and Harrington's G(ρ,γ) class of weighted log-rank tests is appropriate for detecting delayed treatment effects such as those seen in cancer vaccines. A conditional power (CP) and an alpha spending function (ASF) approach are useful for interim analyses that are conducted with the aim of early termination due to futility and efficacy, respectively. However, calculation of the CP and the total Type I error probability are often not considered for delayed effects under the staggered patient entry. In this article, we first propose methods for calculating the CP analytically based on the weighted log-rank test. We compared the performances of the proposed methods with two other methods (i.e., usual log-rank test and optimal one) under the delayed alternatives. Our simulations demonstrated that the CP based on the weighted log-rank test was more powerful than that of the usual log-rank test and was comparable to the CP based on the optimal log-rank test. Second, we quantitatively evaluated the degree to which the Type I error probability was inflated when an ASF approach with forced independent increments assumption was applied to the weighted log-rank test. The proposed method will provide valuable tools in the decision-making stage of the interim analysis.

  12. Effect of syllable stress and serial position on error variability in polysyllabic productions of speech-delayed children.

    PubMed

    Klein, H B; Spector, C C

    1985-11-01

    This study explored the effect of naturally occurring interactions of syllable stress and serial positions, found in polysyllabic words, on the variability of phonological performance of speech-delayed children. The subjects were 8 mild to moderately delayed children between the ages of 5:2 and 6:11 with a mean age of 6:0. Continuous speech samples and nonimitated productions of polysyllabic single-word utterances were recorded and analyzed for each child. Two phonological processes (syllable deletion and intervocalic consonant deletion) were related to specific syllable context conditions. Increased process use in syllables of reduced stress occurring early in a sequence was predicted by the production patterns of young children initially learning to say words. Syllables with reduced stress also were found to be associated frequently with atypical error productions.

  13. On formation of the asymptotic spectrum of delayed neutron emitters in measuring the VVER-1000 scram system effectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shishkov, L. K.; Zizin, M. N.

    2014-12-01

    The process of formation of an asymptotic distribution of the neutron flux density in the reactor systems after introducing different negative reactivities is considered. The impact of two factors after the reactivity introduction is evaluated: (1) nonuniformity of perturbation of core properties, on one hand, and (2) a sharp reduction in the density of prompt neutrons, which prevents the appearance of new delayed neutron emitters distributed in accordance with the "new" prompt neutron distribution, on the other hand. The results of calculations show that the errors of measuring the scram system effectiveness using the method of inverse solution of the kinetics equation are caused by the fact that, after the negative reactivity insertion, the sources of prompt and delayed neutrons have different spatial distributions. In the case of high negative reactivities, this difference remains while the system still has neutrons, which can be measured.

  14. On formation of the asymptotic spectrum of delayed neutron emitters in measuring the VVER-1000 scram system effectiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Shishkov, L. K. Zizin, M. N.

    2014-12-15

    The process of formation of an asymptotic distribution of the neutron flux density in the reactor systems after introducing different negative reactivities is considered. The impact of two factors after the reactivity introduction is evaluated: (1) nonuniformity of perturbation of core properties, on one hand, and (2) a sharp reduction in the density of prompt neutrons, which prevents the appearance of new delayed neutron emitters distributed in accordance with the “new” prompt neutron distribution, on the other hand. The results of calculations show that the errors of measuring the scram system effectiveness using the method of inverse solution of the kinetics equation are caused by the fact that, after the negative reactivity insertion, the sources of prompt and delayed neutrons have different spatial distributions. In the case of high negative reactivities, this difference remains while the system still has neutrons, which can be measured.

  15. Effects of diversity and procrastination in priority queuing theory: the different power law regimes.

    PubMed

    Saichev, A; Sornette, D

    2010-01-01

    Empirical analyses show that after the update of a browser, or the publication of the vulnerability of a software, or the discovery of a cyber worm, the fraction of computers still using the older browser or software version, or not yet patched, or exhibiting worm activity decays as a power law approximately 1/t(alpha) with 0diversity of time deficit parameters in a population of individuals, the power law tail is changed into 1/t(alpha), with alpha is an element of (0.5,infinity), including the well-known case 1/t. We also study the effect of "procrastination," defined as the situation in which the target task may be postponed or delayed even after the individual has solved all other pending tasks. This regime provides an explanation for even slower apparent decay and longer persistence.

  16. Effects of diversity and procrastination in priority queuing theory: The different power law regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saichev, A.; Sornette, D.

    2010-01-01

    Empirical analyses show that after the update of a browser, or the publication of the vulnerability of a software, or the discovery of a cyber worm, the fraction of computers still using the older browser or software version, or not yet patched, or exhibiting worm activity decays as a power law ˜1/tα with 0<α≤1 over a time scale of years. We present a simple model for this persistence phenomenon, framed within the standard priority queuing theory, of a target task which has the lowest priority compared to all other tasks that flow on the computer of an individual. We identify a “time deficit” control parameter β and a bifurcation to a regime where there is a nonzero probability for the target task to never be completed. The distribution of waiting time T until the completion of the target task has the power law tail ˜1/t1/2 , resulting from a first-passage solution of an equivalent Wiener process. Taking into account a diversity of time deficit parameters in a population of individuals, the power law tail is changed into 1/tα , with αɛ(0.5,∞) , including the well-known case 1/t . We also study the effect of “procrastination,” defined as the situation in which the target task may be postponed or delayed even after the individual has solved all other pending tasks. This regime provides an explanation for even slower apparent decay and longer persistence.

  17. Psychometric Evaluation of Lexical Diversity Indices: Assessing Length Effects

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Heather Harris; Green, Samuel B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Several novel techniques have been developed recently to assess the breadth of a speaker's vocabulary exhibited in a language sample. The specific aim of this study was to increase our understanding of the validity of the scores generated by different lexical diversity (LD) estimation techniques. Four techniques were explored: D, Maas, measure of textual lexical diversity, and moving-average type–token ratio. Method Four LD indices were estimated for language samples on 4 discourse tasks (procedures, eventcasts, story retell, and recounts) from 442 adults who are neurologically intact. The resulting data were analyzed using structural equation modeling. Results The scores for measure of textual lexical diversity and moving-average type–token ratio were stronger indicators of the LD of the language samples. The results for the other 2 techniques were consistent with the presence of method factors representing construct-irrelevant sources. Conclusion These findings offer a deeper understanding of the relative validity of the 4 estimation techniques and should assist clinicians and researchers in the selection of LD measures of language samples that minimize construct-irrelevant sources. PMID:25766139

  18. The effects of island ontogeny on species diversity and phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Valente, Luis M; Etienne, Rampal S; Phillimore, Albert B

    2014-06-01

    A major goal of island biogeography is to understand how island communities are assembled over time. However, we know little about the influence of variable area and ecological opportunity on island biotas over geological timescales. Islands have limited life spans, and it has been posited that insular diversity patterns should rise and fall with an island's ontogeny. The potential of phylogenies to inform us of island ontogenetic stage remains unclear, as we lack a phylogenetic framework that focuses on islands rather than clades. Here, we present a parsimonious island-centric model that integrates phylogeny and ontogeny into island biogeography and can incorporate a negative feedback of diversity on species origination. This framework allows us to generate predictions about species richness and phylogenies on islands of different ages. We find that peak richness lags behind peak island area, and that endemic species age increases with island age on volcanic islands. When diversity negatively affects rates of immigration and cladogenesis, our model predicts speciation slowdowns on old islands. Importantly, we find that branching times of in situ radiations can be informative of an island's ontogenetic stage. This novel framework provides a quantitative means of uncovering processes responsible for island biogeography patterns using phylogenies.

  19. Modelling the effect of exposing algae to pulses of S-metolachlor: How to include a delay to the onset of the effect and in the recovery.

    PubMed

    Copin, Pierre-Jean; Perronet, Léa; Chèvre, Nathalie

    2016-01-15

    In agriculture, herbicides are applied to improve crop productivity. During and after rain event, herbicides can be transported by surface runoff in streams and rivers. As a result, the exposure pattern in creeks is time-varying, i.e., a repeated pollution of aquatic system. In previous studies, we developed a model to assess the effects of pulse exposure patterns on algae. This model was validated for triazines and phenylureas, which are substances that induce effects directly after exposure with no delay in recovery. However, other herbicides display a mode of action characterized by a time-dependency effect and a delay in recovery. In this study, we therefore investigate whether this previous model could be used to assess the effects of pulse exposure by herbicides with time delay in effect and recovery. The current study focuses on the herbicide S-metolachlor. We showed that the effect of the herbicide begins only after 20 h of exposure for the alga Scenedesmus vacuolatus based on both the optical density and algal cells size measurements. Furthermore, the duration of delay of the recovery for algae previously exposed to S-metolachlor was 20 h and did not depend on the pulse exposure duration or the height of the peak concentration. By accounting for these specific effects, the measured and predicted effects were similar when pulse exposure of S-metolachlor is tested on the alga S. vacuolatus. However, the sensitivity of the alga is greatly modified after being previously exposed to a pulse of S-metolachlor. In the case of scenarios composed of several pulses, this sensitivity should be considered in the modelling. Therefore, modelling the effects of any pulse scenario of S-metolachlor on an alga is feasible but requires the determination of the effect trigger, the delay in recovery and the possible change in the sensitivity of the alga to the substance. PMID:26410701

  20. Diversity Effects on Productivity Are Stronger within than between Trophic Groups in the Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Symbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Alexander M.; Antunes, Pedro M.; Klironomos, John N.

    2012-01-01

    Background The diversity of plants and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) has been experimentally shown to alter plant and AMF productivity. However, little is known about how plant and AMF diversity interact to shape their respective productivity. Methodology/Principal Findings We co-manipulated the diversity of both AMF and plant communities in two greenhouse studies to determine whether the productivity of each trophic group is mainly influenced by plant or AMF diversity, respectively, and whether there is any interaction between plant and fungal diversity. In both experiments we compared the productivity of three different plant species monocultures, or their respective 3-species mixtures. Similarly, in both studies these plant treatments were crossed with an AMF diversity gradient that ranged from zero (non-mycorrhizal controls) to a maximum of three and five taxonomically distinct AMF taxa, respectively. We found that within both trophic groups productivity was significantly influenced by taxon identity, and increased with taxon richness. These main effects of AMF and plant diversity on their respective productivities did not depend on each other, even though we detected significant individual taxon effects across trophic groups. Conclusions/Significance Our results indicate that similar ecological processes regulate diversity-productivity relationships within trophic groups. However, productivity-diversity relationships are not necessarily correlated across interacting trophic levels, leading to asymmetries and possible biotic feedbacks. Thus, biotic interactions within and across trophic groups should be considered in predictive models of community assembly. PMID:22629347

  1. Changing Attitudes over Time: Assessing the Effectiveness of a Workplace Diversity Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Probst, Tahira M.

    2003-01-01

    Diversity is increasing within the United States, and higher education will likely play a key role in preparing people to function in this new environment. This study assessed the effectiveness of a semester-long psychology workplace diversity course at changing student levels of ethnocentrism and attitudes regarding gender roles; the disabled;…

  2. Effectiveness of Diversity Infusion Modules on Students' Attitudes, Behavior, and Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saleh, Mahasin F.; Anngela-Cole, Linda; Boateng, Alice

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of diversity infusion modules provided to university students in a predominantly white homogeneous community. A mixed-method approach using a pre-post retrospective design was used to measure attitudes, behaviors, and knowledge about diversity issues, and included a comparison group…

  3. Effects of Reinforcer Probability, Delay, and Response Requirements on the Choices of Rats and Pigeons: Possible Species Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazur, James E.

    2005-01-01

    In Experiment 1 with rats, a left lever press led to a 5-s delay and then a possible reinforcer. A right lever press led to an adjusting delay and then a certain reinforcer. This delay was adjusted over trials to estimate an indifference point, or a delay at which the two alternatives were chosen about equally often. Indifference points increased…

  4. Multitrophic effects of experimental changes in plant diversity on cavity-nesting bees, wasps, and their parasitoids.

    PubMed

    Ebeling, Anne; Klein, Alexandra-Maria; Weisser, Wolfgang W; Tscharntke, Teja

    2012-06-01

    Plant diversity changes can impact the abundance, diversity, and functioning of species at higher trophic levels. We used an experimental gradient in grassland plant diversity ranging from 1 to 16 plant species to study multitrophic interactions among plants, cavity-nesting bees and wasps, and their natural enemies, and analysed brood cell density, insect diversity (species richness), and bee and wasp community similarity over two consecutive years. The bee and wasp communities were more similar among the high (16 species) diversity plots than among plots of the lower diversity levels (up to 8 species), and a more similar community of bees and wasps resulted in a more similar community of their parasitoids. Plant diversity, which was closely related to flower diversity, positively and indirectly affected bee diversity and the diversity of their parasitoids via increasing brood cell density of bees. Increasing plant diversity directly led to higher wasp diversity. Parasitism rates of bees and wasps (hosts) were not affected by plant diversity, but increased with the diversity of their respective parasitoids. Decreases in parasitism rates of bees arose from increasing brood cell density of bees (hosts), whereas decreasing parasitism rates of wasps arose from increasing wasp diversity (hosts). In conclusion, decreases in plant diversity propagated through different trophic levels: from plants to insect hosts to their parasitoids, decreasing density and diversity. The positive relationship between plant diversity and the community similarity of higher trophic levels indicates a community-stabilising effect of high plant diversity.

  5. Immediate and Delayed Effects of Word Frequency and Word Length on Eye Movements in Reading: A Reversed Delayed Effect of Word Length

    PubMed Central

    Pollatsek, Alexander; Juhasz, Barbara J.; Reichle, Erik D.; Machacek, Debra; Rayner, Keith

    2009-01-01

    Three experiments examined the effects in sentence reading of varying the frequency and length of an adjective on (a) fixations on the adjective and (b) fixations on the following noun. The gaze duration on the adjective was longer for low frequency than for high frequency adjectives and longer for long adjectives than for short adjectives. This contrasted with the spillover effects: Gaze durations on the noun were longer when adjectives were low frequency but were actually shorter when the adjectives were long. The latter effect, which seems anomalous, can be explained by three mechanisms: (a) Fixations on the noun are less optimal after short adjectives because of less optimal targeting; (b) shorter adjectives are more difficult to process because they have more neighbors; and (c) prior fixations before skips are less advantageous places to extract parafoveal information. The viability of these hypotheses as explanations of this reverse length effect on the noun was examined in simulations using an updated version of the E-Z Reader model PMID:18505334

  6. Superlatent inhibition and spontaneous recovery: differential effects of pre- and postconditioning CS-alone presentations after long delays in different contexts.

    PubMed

    Lubow, R E; De la Casa, L G

    2002-11-01

    In two pairs of three-stage conditioned taste aversion experiments, we examined the effects of delay interval (1 or 21 days) between the second and third stages, and of context in which the animals spent the delay (same as or different from the context of the other stages) on latent inhibition (LI) and spontaneous recovery following extinction. In the LI experiments (Experiments 1A and 1B), the first stage comprised nonreinforced presentations to saccharin or to water. In the second stage, rats were conditioned by saccharin paired with LiCl. In the extinction experiments (Experiments 2A and 2B), the order of the stages was reversed. For all experiments, Stage 3, the test stage, consisted of three presentations of saccharin alone. There was a super-LI effect in the saccharin-preexposed group that spent the 21-day delay in the different context (Experiment 1A). When the delay was spent in the same context, there was no difference in the amount of LI between the short- and long-delay groups (Experiment 1B). Conversely, there was a spontaneous recovery effect in the long-delay/same-context group (Experiment 2B), but not in the long-delay/different-context group (Experiment 2A). The pattern of results, incompatible with current explanations of delay-induced changes in memory performance, was interpreted in terms of an interaction between the delay conditions (same or different delay context), which modulate the extinction of previously acquired context-CS-nothing associations (during CS-alone presentations), and primacy effects.

  7. Disparate effects of plant genotypic diversity on foliage and litter arthropod communities

    SciTech Connect

    Crutsinger, Greg; Reynolds, Nicholas; Classen, Aimee T; Sanders, Dr. Nathan James

    2008-01-01

    Intraspecific diversity within plant species is increasingly recognized as an important influence on the structure of associated arthropod communities, though whether there are congruent responses of above- and belowground communities to intraspecific diversity remains unclear. In this study, we compare the effects of host-plant genotype and genotypic diversity of the perennial plant, Solidago altissima, on the arthropod community associated with living plant tissue (foliage-based community) and microarthropods associated with leaf litter (litter-based community). We found that variation among host-plant genotypes had strong effects on the diversity and composition of foliage-based arthropods, but only weak influence on litter-based microarthropods. Furthermore, host-plant genotypic diversity was positively related to the abundance and diversity of foliage-based arthropods, including herbivore and predator trophic levels. In contrast, there were minimal effects of genotypic diversity in litter on microarthropods. Our study illustrates that incorporating both above- and belowground perspective into community genetics studies leads to very different conclusions about the importance of intraspecific diversity, than when considering aboveground responses in isolation.

  8. Effect of multiple actuations, delayed inhalation and antistatic treatment on the lung bioavailability of salbutamol via a spacer device.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, D. J.; Lipworth, B. J.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to extend previous in vitro observations regarding the effects of multiple actuations of aerosols into spacer devices, delayed inhalation, and antistatic treatment of spacer devices on the amount of drug delivered for inhalation. An in vivo study of lung bioavailability of salbutamol from a large volume (Volumatic) spacer was conducted. METHODS: Ten healthy volunteers of mean age 20.5 years with a mean forced expiratory volume in one second of 112.1% predicted were studied in a randomised single blind (investigator blind) crossover study. 1200 micrograms of salbutamol was given with mouth rinsing (100 micrograms/puff) on four study days: single puffs via spacer, multiple puffs via spacer (3 x 4 puffs), single puffs with 20 second delay before inhalation via spacer, and single puffs via an antistatic treated spacer. All spacers, including those treated with antistatic, were prewashed prior to each study day. Measurements of lung bioavailability were made at five, 10, and 20 minutes after inhalation to determine peak (Cmax) and average (Cav) plasma salbutamol levels. Systemic beta 2 responses including finger tremor, heart rate, and plasma potassium levels were also evaluated. RESULTS: Single puffs from the spacer produced higher plasma salbutamol levels and greater systemic beta 2 responses than either multiple puffs or single puffs with delayed inhalation for a 1200 micrograms dose. For Cmax this amounted to a 1.93-fold (95% CI 1.68 to 2.19) greater lung bioavailability for single puffs than for multiple puffs and a 1.80-fold (95% CI 1.59 to 2.00) greater lung bioavailability for single puffs than for single puffs with a 20 second delay. Comparison of the normal and antistatic treated spacers (both prewashed) revealed differences for Cmax with levels 1.23-fold (95% CI 1.04 to 1.41) greater for the normal spacer. CONCLUSIONS: Delayed inhalation from a Volumatic spacer and the use of multiple puffs results in a considerable

  9. Effects of the delay and duration of self-generated wind on behavioral compensation in unilaterally cercus-ablated crickets, Gryllus bimaculatus.

    PubMed

    Takuwa, Hiroyuki; Mori, Daichi; Ozaki, Naoko; Kanou, Masamichi

    2013-05-01

    The effects of the delay and duration of wind self-generated during walking on the compensational recovery of escape direction were investigated in unilaterally cercus-ablated crickets, Gryllus bimaculatus. Artificial self-generated winds (self-stimulations; hereafter, SSts) from a nozzle set in front of a cricket placed on a styrofoam ball for stationary walking were used for training after unilateral cercus ablation. The delay and duration of artificial SSts were separately controlled. When the stimulus duration was fixed to 100 msec, the crickets trained with artificial SSts of 1000 msec delay showed a compensational recovery of the escape direction. However, no such compensational recovery was observed in crickets trained with artificial SSts of 1200, 1500, and 2000 msec delays. The relationship between the delay and duration of artificial SSts for compensational recovery was investigated. An artificial SSt with a longer delay required a longer-duration air current to cause a recovery of the escape direction. In contrast, an artificial SSt with a shorter delay was effective even when the duration was short. On the basis of the results obtained in the present study, we propose a hypothesis to explain the initial step for the compensation, that is, how the delay and duration of SSts are traded in terms of the compensational recovery of the escape direction.

  10. Effects of the delay and duration of self-generated wind on behavioral compensation in unilaterally cercus-ablated crickets, Gryllus bimaculatus.

    PubMed

    Takuwa, Hiroyuki; Mori, Daichi; Ozaki, Naoko; Kanou, Masamichi

    2013-05-01

    The effects of the delay and duration of wind self-generated during walking on the compensational recovery of escape direction were investigated in unilaterally cercus-ablated crickets, Gryllus bimaculatus. Artificial self-generated winds (self-stimulations; hereafter, SSts) from a nozzle set in front of a cricket placed on a styrofoam ball for stationary walking were used for training after unilateral cercus ablation. The delay and duration of artificial SSts were separately controlled. When the stimulus duration was fixed to 100 msec, the crickets trained with artificial SSts of 1000 msec delay showed a compensational recovery of the escape direction. However, no such compensational recovery was observed in crickets trained with artificial SSts of 1200, 1500, and 2000 msec delays. The relationship between the delay and duration of artificial SSts for compensational recovery was investigated. An artificial SSt with a longer delay required a longer-duration air current to cause a recovery of the escape direction. In contrast, an artificial SSt with a shorter delay was effective even when the duration was short. On the basis of the results obtained in the present study, we propose a hypothesis to explain the initial step for the compensation, that is, how the delay and duration of SSts are traded in terms of the compensational recovery of the escape direction. PMID:23646937

  11. The Effectiveness of Culturally-Based Social Stories to Increase Appropriate Behaviors of Children with Developmental Delays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Ning; Hammond, Helen; Ingalls, Lawrence

    2012-01-01

    The needs of students from culturally and linguistically diverse (CLD) backgrounds have become a growing concern in United States. As an even greater challenge, educators are looking at effective interventions to provide appropriate education for CLD students with disabilities. The Social Story technique is a practical behavioral intervention…

  12. Delay discounting, but not disinhibition or inattention, partially mediates the effects of neuroticism on disordered eating in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Thamotharan, Sneha; Hubbard, Meagan; Fields, Sherecce

    2015-08-01

    Adolescence represents an integral developmental period for the prevention and intervention of disordered eating. Individuals with high levels of neuroticism have been shown to respond with greater impulsivity and use of disordered eating as a coping mechanism. However, the exact mechanism through which neuroticism and impulsivity affect disordered eating remains unknown. To understand the effects of personality and impulsivity on disordered eating in adolescence, the present study aimed to investigate whether impulsivity mediated the relationship between neuroticism and disordered eating. Adolescents (N=40) between the ages of 13 and 19 (Mage=18.25years; S.D.=1.30) were queried on eating attitudes and personality, as well as completed behavioral tasks assessing impulsivity (delay discounting, disinhibition and inattention). Mediation analyses revealed that neuroticism was significantly associated with patterns of disordered eating, but delay discounting, and not disinhibition and inattention, appeared to mediate the relationship between neuroticism and disordered eating. These results should guide prospective research exploring the relations between neurotic and impulsive behavior, particularly delay discounting on disordered eating, which will assist in future treatment efforts targeting the development of maladaptive eating behaviors.

  13. Resveratrol exerts no effect on inflammatory response and delayed onset muscle soreness after a marathon in male athletes.

    PubMed Central

    Laupheimer, M W; Perry, M; Benton, S; Malliaras, P; Maffulli, N

    2014-01-01

    Objective We investigated whether the inflammatory response and delayed onset of muscle soreness after a marathon are altered by resveratrol, a natural polyphenolic flavonoid antioxidant. Design: Double blind placebo-controlled randomised pilot study. Setting: London Marathon. Participants: Marathon race participants Interventions: 7 healthy male athletes were randomised to receive Resveratrol (600 mg Resveratrol daily for 7 days immediately before the marathon) or a placebo. Main Outcome Measurements: Blood samples taken 48 hours before and 18–32 hours after the marathon were analysed for white blood cell count (WBC) and C-reactive protein (CRP). A VAS score was taken at the same times as the blood samples to assess delayed onset muscle soreness. Results: There were no significant differences between the two groups in terms of changes occurring between pre- and post- tests for WBC, CRP or VAS. Conclusions: There were no differences in immune response or delayed onset muscle soreness between resveratrol and placebo after a marathon. Further investigations are needed with longer treatment time and higher doses, analysing additional parameters such interleukins for a possible effect of resveratrol on the inflammatory response due to extensive exercise. To avoid a type II error, 17 subjects in each group would be required. PMID:25147765

  14. Delay discounting, but not disinhibition or inattention, partially mediates the effects of neuroticism on disordered eating in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Thamotharan, Sneha; Hubbard, Meagan; Fields, Sherecce

    2015-01-01

    Adolescence represents an integral developmental period for the prevention and intervention of disordered eating. Individuals with high levels of neuroticism have been shown to respond with greater impulsivity and use of disordered eating as a coping mechanism. However, the exact mechanism through which neuroticism and impulsivity affect disordered eating remains unknown. To understand the effects of personality and impulsivity on disordered eating in adolescence, the present study aimed to investigate whether impulsivity mediated the relationship between neuroticism and disordered eating. Adolescents (N = 40) between the ages of 13 and 19 (Mage = 18.25 years; S.D. = 1.30) were queried on eating attitudes and personality, as well as completed behavioral tasks assessing impulsivity (delay discounting, disinhibition and inattention). Mediation analyses revealed that both neuroticism was significantly associated with patterns of disordered eating, but delay discounting, and not disinhibition and inattention, appeared to mediate the relationship between neuroticism and disordered eating. These results should guide prospective research exploring the relations between neurotic and impulsive behavior, particularly delay discounting on disordered eating, which will assist in future treatment efforts targeting the development of maladaptive eating behaviors. PMID:26010818

  15. On racial diversity and group decision making: identifying multiple effects of racial composition on jury deliberations.

    PubMed

    Sommers, Samuel R

    2006-04-01

    This research examines the multiple effects of racial diversity on group decision making. Participants deliberated on the trial of a Black defendant as members of racially homogeneous or heterogeneous mock juries. Half of the groups were exposed to pretrial jury selection questions about racism and half were not. Deliberation analyses supported the prediction that diverse groups would exchange a wider range of information than all-White groups. This finding was not wholly attributable to the performance of Black participants, as Whites cited more case facts, made fewer errors, and were more amenable to discussion of racism when in diverse versus all-White groups. Even before discussion, Whites in diverse groups were more lenient toward the Black defendant, demonstrating that the effects of diversity do not occur solely through information exchange. The influence of jury selection questions extended previous findings that blatant racial issues at trial increase leniency toward a Black defendant.

  16. Plant diversity partitioning in Mediterranean croplands: effects of farming intensity, field edge, and landscape context.

    PubMed

    Concepción, Elena D; Fernández-González, Federico; Díaz, Mario

    2012-04-01

    Farmland biodiversity is affected by factors acting at various spatial scales. However, most studies to date have focused on the field or farm scales that only account for local (alpha) diversity, and these may underestimate the contribution of other diversity components (beta diversity) to total (gamma) farmland diversity. In this work, we aimed to identify the most suitable management options and the scale at which they should be implemented to maximize benefits for diversity. We used a multi-scale additive partitioning approach, with data on plant diversity from 640 plots in 32 cereal crop fields from three agricultural regions of central Spain that differed in landscape configuration. We analyzed the relative contribution to overall plant diversity of different diversity components at various spatial scales and how these diversity components responded to a set of local (application of agri-environment schemes [AES] and position within the field) and landscape (field size and landscape connectivity and composition) factors. Differences in species composition among regions and then among fields within regions contributed most to overall plant diversity. Positive edge effects were found on all diversity components at both the field- and regional scales, whereas application of AES benefited all diversity components only at the field scale. Landscape factors had strong influences on plant diversity, especially length of seminatural boundaries, which increased species richness at both the field and the regional scales. In addition, positive effects of percentage of nonproductive land-uses in the landscape were found on all diversity components at the regional scale. Results showed that components that contributed most to overall plant diversity were not benefited by current AES. We conclude that agri-environmental policies should incorporate and prioritize measures aimed at the maintenance of seminatural boundaries and patches of nonproductive habitats within

  17. Effects of inbreeding on the genetic diversity of populations.

    PubMed Central

    Charlesworth, Deborah

    2003-01-01

    The study of variability within species is important to all biologists who use genetic markers. Since the discovery of molecular variability among normal individuals, data have been collected from a wide range of organisms, and it is important to understand the major factors affecting diversity levels and patterns. Comparisons of inbreeding and outcrossing populations can contribute to this understanding, and therefore studying plant populations is important, because related species often have different breeding systems. DNA sequence data are now starting to become available from suitable plant and animal populations, to measure and compare variability levels and test predictions. PMID:12831472

  18. Delayed Effects of Whole Brain Radiotherapy in Germ Cell Tumor Patients With Central Nervous System Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, Danielle M. Einhorn, Lawrence H.

    2008-04-01

    Purpose: Central nervous system (CNS) metastases are uncommon in patients with germ cell tumors, with an incidence of 2-3%. CNS metastases have been managed with whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) and concomitant cisplatin-based combination chemotherapy. Our previous study did not observe serious CNS toxicity (Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 1991;22:17-22). We now report on 5 patients who developed delayed significant CNS toxicity. Patients and Methods: We observed 5 patients with delayed CNS toxicity. The initial diagnosis was between 1981 and 2003. All patients had poor-risk disease according to the International Germ Cell Consensus Collaborative Group criteria. Of the 5 patients, 3 had CNS metastases at diagnosis and 2 developed relapses with CNS metastases. These 5 patients underwent WBRT to 4,000-5,000 cGy in 18-28 fractions concurrently with cisplatin-based chemotherapy. Results: All 5 patients developed delayed symptoms consistent with progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. The symptoms included seizures, hemiparesis, cranial neuropathy, headaches, blindness, dementia, and ataxia. The median time from WBRT to CNS symptoms was 72 months (range, 9-228). Head imaging revealed multiple abnormalities consistent with gliosis and diffuse cerebral atrophy. Of the 5 patients, 3 had progressive and 2 stable symptoms. Treatment with surgery and/or steroids had modest benefit. The progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy resulted in significant debility in all 5 patients, resulting in death (3 patients), loss of work, steroid-induced morbidity, and recurrent hospitalizations. Conclusion: Whole brain radiotherapy is not innocuous in young patients with germ cell tumors and can cause late CNS toxicity.

  19. Positive effects of plant genotypic and species diversity on anti-herbivore defenses in a tropical tree species.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Xoaquín; Abdala-Roberts, Luis; Parra-Tabla, Víctor; Mooney, Kailen A

    2014-01-01

    Despite increasing evidence that plant intra- and inter-specific diversity increases primary productivity, and that such effect may in turn cascade up to influence herbivores, there is little information about plant diversity effects on plant anti-herbivore defenses, the relative importance of different sources of plant diversity, and the mechanisms for such effects. For example, increased plant growth at high diversity may lead to reduced investment in defenses via growth-defense trade-offs. Alternatively, positive effects of plant diversity on plant growth may lead to increased herbivore abundance which in turn leads to a greater investment in plant defenses. The magnitude of trait variation underlying diversity effects is usually greater among species than among genotypes within a given species, so plant species diversity effects on resource use by producers as well as on higher trophic levels should be stronger than genotypic diversity effects. Here we compared the relative importance of plant genotypic and species diversity on anti-herbivore defenses and whether such effects are mediated indirectly via diversity effects on plant growth and/or herbivore damage. To this end, we performed a large-scale field experiment where we manipulated genotypic diversity of big-leaf mahogany (Swietenia macrophylla) and tree species diversity, and measured effects on mahogany growth, damage by the stem-boring specialist caterpillar Hypsipyla grandella, and defensive traits (polyphenolics and condensed tannins in stem and leaves). We found that both forms of plant diversity had positive effects on stem (but not leaf) defenses. However, neither source of diversity influenced mahogany growth, and diversity effects on defenses were not mediated by either growth-defense trade-offs or changes in stem-borer damage. Although the mechanism(s) of diversity effects on plant defenses are yet to be determined, our study is one of the few to test for and show producer diversity effects on

  20. Positive Effects of Plant Genotypic and Species Diversity on Anti-Herbivore Defenses in a Tropical Tree Species

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Xoaquín; Abdala-Roberts, Luis; Parra-Tabla, Víctor; Mooney, Kailen A.

    2014-01-01

    Despite increasing evidence that plant intra- and inter-specific diversity increases primary productivity, and that such effect may in turn cascade up to influence herbivores, there is little information about plant diversity effects on plant anti-herbivore defenses, the relative importance of different sources of plant diversity, and the mechanisms for such effects. For example, increased plant growth at high diversity may lead to reduced investment in defenses via growth-defense trade-offs. Alternatively, positive effects of plant diversity on plant growth may lead to increased herbivore abundance which in turn leads to a greater investment in plant defenses. The magnitude of trait variation underlying diversity effects is usually greater among species than among genotypes within a given species, so plant species diversity effects on resource use by producers as well as on higher trophic levels should be stronger than genotypic diversity effects. Here we compared the relative importance of plant genotypic and species diversity on anti-herbivore defenses and whether such effects are mediated indirectly via diversity effects on plant growth and/or herbivore damage. To this end, we performed a large-scale field experiment where we manipulated genotypic diversity of big-leaf mahogany (Swietenia macrophylla) and tree species diversity, and measured effects on mahogany growth, damage by the stem-boring specialist caterpillar Hypsipyla grandella, and defensive traits (polyphenolics and condensed tannins in stem and leaves). We found that both forms of plant diversity had positive effects on stem (but not leaf) defenses. However, neither source of diversity influenced mahogany growth, and diversity effects on defenses were not mediated by either growth-defense trade-offs or changes in stem-borer damage. Although the mechanism(s) of diversity effects on plant defenses are yet to be determined, our study is one of the few to test for and show producer diversity effects on

  1. The effect of the Neolithic expansion on European molecular diversity

    PubMed Central

    Currat, Mathias; Excoffier, Laurent

    2005-01-01

    We performed extensive and realistic simulations of the colonization process of Europe by Neolithic farmers, as well as their potential admixture and competition with local Palaeolithic hunter–gatherers. We find that minute amounts of gene flow between Palaeolithic and Neolithic populations should lead to a massive Palaeolithic contribution to the current gene pool of Europeans. This large Palaeolithic contribution is not expected under the demic diffusion (DD) model, which postulates that agriculture diffused over Europe by a massive migration of individuals from the Near East. However, genetic evidence in favour of this model mainly consisted in the observation of allele frequency clines over Europe, which are shown here to be equally probable under a pure DD or a pure acculturation model. The examination of the consequence of range expansions on single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) diversity reveals that an ascertainment bias consisting of selecting SNPs with high frequencies will promote the observation of genetic clines (which are not expected for random SNPs) and will lead to multimodal mismatch distributions. We conclude that the different patterns of molecular diversity observed for Y chromosome and mitochondrial DNA can be at least partly owing to an ascertainment bias when selecting Y chromosome SNPs for studying European populations. PMID:15870030

  2. Non-targeted and delayed effects of exposure to ionizing radiation: II. Radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander effects in vivo, clastogenic factors and transgenerational effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, William F.

    2003-01-01

    The goal of this review is to summarize the evidence for non-targeted and delayed effects of exposure to ionizing radiation in vivo. Currently, human health risks associated with radiation exposures are based primarily on the assumption that the detrimental effects of radiation occur in irradiated cells. Over the years a number of non-targeted effects of radiation exposure in vivo have been described that challenge this concept. These include radiation-induced genomic instability, bystander effects, clastogenic factors produced in plasma from irradiated individuals that can cause chromosomal damage when cultured with nonirradiated cells, and transgenerational effects of parental irradiation that can manifest in the progeny. These effects pose new challenges to evaluating the risk(s) associated with radiation exposure and understanding radiation-induced carcinogenesis.

  3. Acute effects of delayed reperfusion following myocardial infarction: a 3D x-ray imaging analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simari, Robert D.; Bell, M. R.; Pao, Y. C.; Gersh, B. J.; Ritman, Erik L.

    1996-04-01

    Clinical and experimental data suggest that delayed reperfusion of the infarct related artery may limit infarct expansion without increasing myocardial salvage. In order to assess the potential mechanisms involved, an acute closed chest canine model of myocardial infarction and delayed reperfusion was studied. Nineteen dogs underwent 3D computed tomography in the Dynamic Spatial Reconstructor (a fast, volume imaging, CT scanner) at baseline and three and four hours later to estimate left ventricular chamber volumes, global distensibility and regional myocardial stiffness. A control group was scanned without intervention. An occlusion group underwent four hours of coronary artery occlusion. A reperfusion group underwent three hours of coronary artery occlusion followed by one hour of reperfusion. Similar infarct sizes were seen in the occlusion and reperfusion groups. Globally reperfusion was associated with increased left ventricular end diastolic pressure and prolongation of global relaxation. Regionally reperfusion was associated with increased myocardial stiffness, intramyocardial blood volume and wall thickness within the infarct zone relative to the not reperfused myocardium.

  4. Context-Dependent Diversity-Effects of Seaweed Consumption on Coral Reefs in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Humphries, Austin T.; McQuaid, Christopher D.; McClanahan, Tim R.

    2015-01-01

    Consumers and prey diversity, their interactions, and subsequent effects on ecosystem function are important for ecological processes but not well understood in high diversity ecosystems such as coral reefs. Consequently, we tested the potential for diversity-effects with a series of surveys and experiments evaluating the influence of browsing herbivores on macroalgae in Kenya’s fringing reef ecosystem. We surveyed sites and undertook experiments in reefs subject to three levels of human fishing influence: open access fished reefs, small and recently established community-managed marine reserves, and larger, older government-managed marine reserves. Older marine reserves had a greater overall diversity of herbivores and browsers but this was not clearly associated with reduced macroalgal diversity or abundance. Experiments studying succession on hard substrata also found no effects of consumer diversity. Instead, overall browser abundance of either sea urchins or fishes was correlated with declines in macroalgal cover. An exception was that the absence of a key fish browser genus, Naso, which was correlated with the persistence of Sargassum in a marine reserve. Algal selectivity assays showed that macroalgae were consumed at variable rates, a product of strong species-specific feeding and low overlap in the selectivity of browsing fishes. We conclude that the effects of browser and herbivore diversity are less than the influences of key species, whose impacts emerge in different contexts that are influenced by fisheries management. Consequently, identifying key herbivore species and managing to protect them may assist protecting reef functions. PMID:26673609

  5. Context-Dependent Diversity-Effects of Seaweed Consumption on Coral Reefs in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Humphries, Austin T; McQuaid, Christopher D; McClanahan, Tim R

    2015-01-01

    Consumers and prey diversity, their interactions, and subsequent effects on ecosystem function are important for ecological processes but not well understood in high diversity ecosystems such as coral reefs. Consequently, we tested the potential for diversity-effects with a series of surveys and experiments evaluating the influence of browsing herbivores on macroalgae in Kenya's fringing reef ecosystem. We surveyed sites and undertook experiments in reefs subject to three levels of human fishing influence: open access fished reefs, small and recently established community-managed marine reserves, and larger, older government-managed marine reserves. Older marine reserves had a greater overall diversity of herbivores and browsers but this was not clearly associated with reduced macroalgal diversity or abundance. Experiments studying succession on hard substrata also found no effects of consumer diversity. Instead, overall browser abundance of either sea urchins or fishes was correlated with declines in macroalgal cover. An exception was that the absence of a key fish browser genus, Naso, which was correlated with the persistence of Sargassum in a marine reserve. Algal selectivity assays showed that macroalgae were consumed at variable rates, a product of strong species-specific feeding and low overlap in the selectivity of browsing fishes. We conclude that the effects of browser and herbivore diversity are less than the influences of key species, whose impacts emerge in different contexts that are influenced by fisheries management. Consequently, identifying key herbivore species and managing to protect them may assist protecting reef functions. PMID:26673609

  6. Numerical and asymptotic studies of delay differential equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Mohit Hemchandra

    Two classes of differential delay equations exhibiting diverse phenomena are studied. The first one is a singularly perturbed delay differential equation which is used to model selected physical systems involving feedback where relaxation effects are combined with nonlinear driving from the past. In the limit of fast relaxation, the differential equation reduces to a difference equation or a map, due to the presence of the delay. A basic question in this field is how the behavior of the map is reflected in the behavior of the solutions of the delay differential equation. In this work, a generic logistic form is used for the underlying map and the above question is studied in the first period-doubling regime of the map. Using an efficient numerical algorithm, the shape and the period of the corresponding asymptotically stable periodic solution is studied first, for various values of the delay. In the limit of large delay, these solutions resemble square-waves of period close to twice the value of the delay, with sharp transition layers joining flat plateau-like regions. A Poincare-Lindstedt method involving a two-parameter perturbation expansion is applied to solve equations representing these layers and accurate expressions for the shape and the period of these solutions, in terms of Jacobi elliptic functions, are obtained. A similar approach is used to obtain leading order expressions for sub-harmonic solutions of shorter periods, but it is shown that while they are extremely long-lived for large values of delay, they eventually decay to the fundamental solutions mentioned above. The spectral algorithm used for the numerical integration is tested by comparing its accuracy and efficiency in obtaining stiff solutions of linear delay equations, with that of a current state-of-the-art time-stepping algorithm for integrating delay equations. Effect of delay on the synchronization of two nerve impulses traveling along two parallel nerve fibers, is the second question

  7. Plant diversity and identity effects on predatory nematodes and their prey.

    PubMed

    Kostenko, Olga; Duyts, Henk; Grootemaat, Saskia; De Deyn, Gerlinde B; Bezemer, T Martijn

    2015-02-01

    There is considerable evidence that both plant diversity and plant identity can influence the level of predation and predator abundance aboveground. However, how the level of predation in the soil and the abundance of predatory soil fauna are related to plant diversity and identity remains largely unknown. In a biodiversity field experiment, we examined the effects of plant diversity and identity on the infectivity of entomopathogenic nematodes (EPNs, Heterorhabditis and Steinernema spp.), which prey on soil arthropods, and abundance of carnivorous non-EPNs, which are predators of other nematode groups. To obtain a comprehensive view of the potential prey/food availability, we also quantified the abundance of soil insects and nonpredatory nematodes and the root biomass in the experimental plots. We used structural equation modeling (SEM) to investigate possible pathways by which plant diversity and identity may affect EPN infectivity and the abundance of carnivorous non-EPNs. Heterorhabditis spp. infectivity and the abundance of carnivorous non-EPNs were not directly related to plant diversity or the proportion of legumes, grasses and forbs in the plant community. However, Steinernema spp. infectivity was higher in monocultures of Festuca rubra and Trifolium pratense than in monocultures of the other six plant species. SEM revealed that legumes positively affected Steinernema infectivity, whereas plant diversity indirectly affected the infectivity of HeterorhabditisEPNs via effects on the abundance of soil insects. The abundance of prey (soil insects and root-feeding, bacterivorous, and fungivorous nematodes) increased with higher plant diversity. The abundance of prey nematodes was also positively affected by legumes. These plant community effects could not be explained by changes in root biomass. Our results show that plant diversity and identity effects on belowground biota (particularly soil nematode community) can differ between organisms that belong to the

  8. Genotypic diversity effects on the performance of Taraxacum officinale populations increase with time and environmental favorability.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Emily B M; Vellend, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Within-population genetic diversity influences many ecological processes, but few studies have examined how environmental conditions may impact these short-term diversity effects. Over four growing seasons, we followed experimental populations of a clonal, ubiquitous weed, Taraxacum officinale, with different numbers of genotypes in relatively favorable fallow field and unfavorable mowed lawn environmental treatments. Population performance (measured as total leaf area, seed production or biomass) clearly and consistently increased with diversity, and this effect became stronger over the course of the experiment. Diversity effects were stronger, and with different underlying mechanisms, in the fallow field versus the mowed lawn. Large genotypes dominated in the fallow field driving overyielding (via positive selection effects), whereas in the mowed lawn, where performance was limited by regular disturbance, there was evidence for complementarity among genotypes (with one compact genotype in particular performing better in mixture than monoculture). Hence, we predict stronger genotypic diversity effects in environments where intense intraspecific competition enhances genotypic differences. Our four-year field experiment plus seedling establishment trials indicate that genotypic diversity effects have far-reaching and context-dependent consequences across generations.

  9. Species' traits predict the effects of disturbance and productivity on diversity.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Nick M; Holyoak, Marcel; Mata, Tawny M; Davies, Kendi F; Melbourne, Brett A; Preston, Kim

    2008-04-01

    Disturbance is an important factor influencing diversity patterns. Ecological theory predicts that diversity peaks at intermediate levels of disturbance, but this pattern is not present in a majority of empirical tests and can be influenced by the level of ecosystem productivity. We experimentally tested the effects of disturbance on diversity and show that species' autecological traits and community relations predicted species loss. We found that - alone or in concert - increasing disturbance intensity or frequency, or decreasing productivity, reduced diversity. Our species did not exhibit a clear competition-colonization trade-off, and intrinsic growth rate was a more important predictor of response to disturbance and productivity than measures of competitive ability. Furthermore, competitive ability was more important in predicting responses when, in addition to killing individuals, disturbance returned nutrients to the ecosystem. Our results demonstrate that species' traits can help resolve conflicting patterns in the response of diversity to disturbance and productivity.

  10. Global exponential stability of complex-valued neural networks with both time-varying delays and impulsive effects.

    PubMed

    Song, Qiankun; Yan, Huan; Zhao, Zhenjiang; Liu, Yurong

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, the global exponential stability of complex-valued neural networks with both time-varying delays and impulsive effects is discussed. By employing Lyapunov functional method and using matrix inequality technique, several sufficient conditions in complex-valued linear matrix inequality form are obtained to ensure the existence, uniqueness and global exponential stability of equilibrium point for the considered neural networks. Moreover, the exponential convergence rate index is estimated, which depends on the system parameters. The proposed stability results are less conservative than some recently known ones in the literatures, which is demonstrated via two examples with simulations.

  11. Effects of different social partners on the discriminated requesting of a young child with autism and severe language delays.

    PubMed

    Drasgow, E; Halle, J W; Phillips, B

    2001-01-01

    We examined the effects of two adult social partners on the requesting repertoire of a young child with autism and severe language delays. We used a multiple-schedule design (Kazdin, 1982) to evaluate the request topography that the participant emitted relative to each social partner's contingent differential reinforcement for specific requesting forms. The contingencies associated with each adult were reversed after the participant reached a preestablished criterion of discriminated responding. The participant learned to request in a discriminated manner in the presence of each social partner. Implications of these results are discussed.

  12. The effects of taxonomic standardization on sampling-standardized estimates of historical diversity

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Peter J; Aberhan, Martin; Hendy, Austin; Kiessling, Wolfgang

    2006-01-01

    Occurrence-based databases such as the Palaeobiology database (PBDB) provide means of accommodating the heterogeneities of the fossil record when evaluating historical diversity patterns. Although palaeontologists have given ample attention to the effects of taxonomic practice on diversity patterns derived from synoptic databases (those using first and last appearances of taxa), workers have not examined the effects of taxonomic error on occurrence-based diversity studies. Here, we contrast diversity patterns and diversity dynamics between raw data and taxonomically vetted data in the PBDB to evaluate the effects of taxonomic errors. We examine three groups: Palaeozoic gastropods, Jurassic bivalves and Cenozoic bivalves. We contrast genus-level diversity patterns based on: (i) all occurrences assigned to a genus (i.e. both species records and records identifying only the genus), (ii) only occurrences for which a species is identified, and (iii) only occurrences for which a species is identified, but after vetting the genus to which the species is assigned. Extensive generic reassignments elevate origination and extinction rates within Palaeozoic gastropods and origination rates within Cenozoic bivalves. However, vetting increases generic richness markedly only for Cenozoic bivalves, and even then the increase is less than 10%. Moreover, the patterns of standing generic richness are highly similar under all three data treatments. Unless our results are unusual, taxonomic standardization can elevate diversity dynamics in some cases, but it will not greatly change inferred richness over time. PMID:17164209

  13. Effect of Conflict Resolution Maneuver Execution Delay on Losses of Separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cone, Andrew C.

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines uncertainty in the maneuver execution delay for data linked conflict resolution maneuvers. This uncertainty could cause the previously cleared primary conflict to reoccur or a secondary conflict to appear. Results show that the likelihood of a primary conflict reoccurring during a horizontal conflict resolution maneuver increases with larger initial turn-out angles and with shorter times until loss of separation. There is also a significant increase in the probability of a primary conflict reoccurring when the time until loss falls under three minutes. Increasing horizontal separation by an additional 1.5 nmi lowers the risk, but does not completely eliminate it. Secondary conflicts were shown to have a small probability of occurring in all tested configurations.

  14. Delay-based reservoir computing: noise effects in a combined analog and digital implementation.

    PubMed

    Soriano, Miguel C; Ortín, Silvia; Keuninckx, Lars; Appeltant, Lennert; Danckaert, Jan; Pesquera, Luis; van der Sande, Guy

    2015-02-01

    Reservoir computing is a paradigm in machine learning whose processing capabilities rely on the dynamical behavior of recurrent neural networks. We present a mixed analog and digital implementation of this concept with a nonlinear analog electronic circuit as a main computational unit. In our approach, the reservoir network can be replaced by a single nonlinear element with delay via time-multiplexing. We analyze the influence of noise on the performance of the system for two benchmark tasks: 1) a classification problem and 2) a chaotic time-series prediction task. Special attention is given to the role of quantization noise, which is studied by varying the resolution in the conversion interface between the analog and digital worlds. PMID:25608295

  15. Delay-based reservoir computing: noise effects in a combined analog and digital implementation.

    PubMed

    Soriano, Miguel C; Ortín, Silvia; Keuninckx, Lars; Appeltant, Lennert; Danckaert, Jan; Pesquera, Luis; van der Sande, Guy

    2015-02-01

    Reservoir computing is a paradigm in machine learning whose processing capabilities rely on the dynamical behavior of recurrent neural networks. We present a mixed analog and digital implementation of this concept with a nonlinear analog electronic circuit as a main computational unit. In our approach, the reservoir network can be replaced by a single nonlinear element with delay via time-multiplexing. We analyze the influence of noise on the performance of the system for two benchmark tasks: 1) a classification problem and 2) a chaotic time-series prediction task. Special attention is given to the role of quantization noise, which is studied by varying the resolution in the conversion interface between the analog and digital worlds.

  16. Delayed enhancement of multitasking performance: Effects of anodal transcranial direct current stimulation on the prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Wan-Yu; Zanto, Theodore P.; Anguera, Joaquin A.; Lin, Yung-Yang; Gazzaley, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Background The dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) has been proposed to play an important role in neural processes that underlie multitasking performance. However, this claim is underexplored in terms of direct causal evidence. Objective The current study aimed to delineate the causal involvement of the DLPFC during multitasking by modulating neural activity with transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) prior to engagement in a demanding multitasking paradigm. Methods The study is a single-blind, crossover, sham-controlled experiment. Anodal tDCS or sham tDCS was applied over left DLPFC in forty-one healthy young adults (aged 18–35 years) immediately before they engaged in a 3-D video game designed to assess multitasking performance. Participants were separated into three subgroups: real-sham (i.e., real tDCS in the first session, followed by sham tDCS in the second session one hour later), sham-real (sham tDCS first session, real tDCS second session), and sham-sham (sham tDCS in both sessions). Results The real-sham group showed enhanced multitasking performance and decreased multitasking cost during the second session, compared to first session, suggesting delayed cognitive benefits of tDCS. Interestingly, performance benefits were observed only for multitasking and not on a single-task version of the game. No significant changes were found between the first and second sessions for either the sham-real or the sham-sham groups. Conclusions These results suggest a causal role of left prefrontal cortex in facilitating the simultaneous performance of more than one task, or multitasking. Moreover, these findings reveal that anodal tDCS may have delayed benefits that reflect an enhanced rate of learning. PMID:26073148

  17. Effect of alpha-cypermethrin and theta-cypermethrin on delayed rectifier potassium currents in rat hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yu-Tao; Liu, Zhao-Wei; Yao, Yang; Yang, Zhuo; Zhang, Tao

    2009-03-01

    Cypermethrin is a photostable synthetic pyrethroid and the most widely used Type II pyrethroid pesticide. The effects of two different stereoisomers of cypermethrin insecticides, alpha-cypermethrin and theta-cypermethrin, on the delayed rectifier potassium current (IK) in hippocampal neurons of rat, were studied using whole-cell patch clamp technique. Alpha-cypermethrin and theta-cypermethrin decreased the amplitude value of IK, and shifted the steady state activation curve of IK towards negative potential at any concentrations (10(-9) M, 10(-8) M, 10(-7) M). Furthermore, at higher concentration, alpha-cypermethrin (10(-7) M) and theta-cypermethrin (10(-8) M, 10(-7) M) had observable effects of the steady state inactivation of IK. The results suggest that IK is the target of alpha-cypermethrin and theta-cypermethrin, which may explain the mechanism of toxic effects of both steroeisomers of cypermethrin on mammalian neurons. Cypermethrin-altered properties of voltage gated delayed rectifier K+ channels may contribute to neurotoxicity by eliciting abnormal electrical discharges in hippocampal CA3 neurons.

  18. The diversity-disease relationship: evidence for and criticisms of the dilution effect.

    PubMed

    Huang, Z Y X; VAN Langevelde, F; Estrada-Peña, A; Suzán, G; DE Boer, W F

    2016-08-01

    The dilution effect, that high host species diversity can reduce disease risk, has attracted much attention in the context of global biodiversity decline and increasing disease emergence. Recent studies have criticized the generality of the dilution effect and argued that it only occurs under certain circumstances. Nevertheless, evidence for the existence of a dilution effect was reported in about 80% of the studies that addressed the diversity-disease relationship, and a recent meta-analysis found that the dilution effect is widespread. We here review supporting and critical studies, point out the causes underlying the current disputes. The dilution is expected to be strong when the competent host species tend to remain when species diversity declines, characterized as a negative relationship between species' reservoir competence and local extinction risk. We here conclude that most studies support a negative competence-extinction relationship. We then synthesize the current knowledge on how the diversity-disease relationship can be modified by particular species in community, by the scales of analyses, and by the disease risk measures. We also highlight the complex role of habitat fragmentation in the diversity-disease relationship from epidemiological, evolutionary and ecological perspectives, and construct a synthetic framework integrating these three perspectives. We suggest that future studies should test the diversity-disease relationship across different scales and consider the multiple effects of landscape fragmentation. PMID:27041655

  19. Long-term transients and complex dynamics of a stage-structured population with time delay and the Allee effect.

    PubMed

    Morozov, A Yu; Banerjee, M; Petrovskii, S V

    2016-05-01

    Traditionally, mathematical modeling in population ecology is mainly focused on asymptotic behavior of the model, i.e. as given by the system attractors. Recently, however, transient regimes and especially long-term transients have been recognized as playing a crucial role in the dynamics of ecosystems. In particular, long-term transients are a potential explanation of ecological regime shifts, when an apparently healthy population suddenly collapses and goes extinct. In this paper, we show that the interplay between delay in maturation and a strong Allee effect can result in long-term transients in a single species system. We first derive a simple 'conceptual' model of the population dynamics that incorporates both a strong Allee effect and maturation delay. Unlike much of the previous work, our approach is not empirical since our model is derived from basic principles. We show that the model exhibits a high complexity in its asymptotic dynamics including multi-periodic and chaotic attractors. We then show the existence of long-term transient dynamics in the system, when the population size oscillates for a long time between locally stable stationary states before it eventually settles either at the persistence equilibrium or goes extinct. The parametric space of the model is found to have a complex structure with the basins of attraction corresponding to the persistence and extinction states being of a complicated shape. This impedes the prediction of the eventual fate of the population, as a small variation in the maturation delay or the initial population size can either bring the population to extinction or ensure its persistence.

  20. Effects of music therapy in the treatment of children with delayed speech development - results of a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Language development is one of the most significant processes of early childhood development. Children with delayed speech development are more at risk of acquiring other cognitive, social-emotional, and school-related problems. Music therapy appears to facilitate speech development in children, even within a short period of time. The aim of this pilot study is to explore the effects of music therapy in children with delayed speech development. Methods A total of 18 children aged 3.5 to 6 years with delayed speech development took part in this observational study in which music therapy and no treatment were compared to demonstrate effectiveness. Individual music therapy was provided on an outpatient basis. An ABAB reversal design with alternations between music therapy and no treatment with an interval of approximately eight weeks between the blocks was chosen. Before and after each study period, a speech development test, a non-verbal intelligence test for children, and music therapy assessment scales were used to evaluate the speech development of the children. Results Compared to the baseline, we found a positive development in the study group after receiving music therapy. Both phonological capacity and the children's understanding of speech increased under treatment, as well as their cognitive structures, action patterns, and level of intelligence. Throughout the study period, developmental age converged with their biological age. Ratings according to the Nordoff-Robbins scales showed clinically significant changes in the children, namely in the areas of client-therapist relationship and communication. Conclusions This study suggests that music therapy may have a measurable effect on the speech development of children through the treatment's interactions with fundamental aspects of speech development, including the ability to form and maintain relationships and prosodic abilities. Thus, music therapy may provide a basic and supportive therapy for

  1. Non-targeted and delayed effects of exposure to ionizing radiation: I. Radiation-induced genomic instability and bystander effects in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, William F.

    2003-01-01

    A long-standing dogma in the radiation sciences is that energy from radiation must be deposited in the cell nucleus to elicit a biological effect. A number of non-targeted, delayed effects of ionizing radiation have been described that challenge this dogma and pose new challenges to evaluating potential hazards associated with radiation exposure. These effects include induced genomic instability and non-targeted bystander effects. The in vitro evidence for non-targeted effects in radiation biology will be reviewed, but the question as to how one extrapolates from these in vitro observations to the risk of radiation-induced adverse health effects such as cancer remains open.

  2. Aphid and ladybird beetle abundance depend on the interaction of spatial effects and genotypic diversity.

    PubMed

    Genung, Mark A; Crutsinger, Gregory M; Bailey, Joseph K; Schweitzer, Jennifer A; Sanders, Nathan J

    2012-01-01

    Intraspecific variation and genotypic diversity of host-plants can affect the structure of associated arthropod communities and the dynamics of populations. Similarly, neighboring plants can also affect interactions between host-plants and their associated arthropods. However, most studies on the effects of host-plant genotypes have largely ignored the potential effects of neighboring host-plants on arthropod communities. In this study, we used a common garden experiment to ask how spatial effects of neighboring patches, along with genotype identity and genotypic diversity in tall goldenrod (Solidago altissima), affect the abundances of a common goldenrod herbivore (Uroleucon nigrotuberculatum) and their dominant predator (Harmonia axyridis, a ladybird beetle). Aphid abundance varied 80-fold among genotypes, while ladybird beetle abundance was not affected by genotype identity. Additionally, there were strong effects of neighboring plots: aphid abundance in a focal plot was positively correlated to aphid abundance in nearby plots, suggesting strong spatial patterning in the abundance of aphids. Neither aphid nor ladybird beetle abundance was affected by genotypic diversity. However, focal plot genotypic diversity mediated the strength of the neighborhood effect (i.e., strong effects for genotype polyculture focal plots and weak effects for genotype monoculture focal plots). Our results show that aphids were directly influenced by host-plant genotype identity while ladybird beetles responded mainly to prey abundance, and suggest that genotypic diversity can influence the effects of spatial processes on the plant-herbivore interactions. PMID:21805301

  3. Aphid and ladybird beetle abundance depend on the interaction of spatial effects and genotypic diversity.

    PubMed

    Genung, Mark A; Crutsinger, Gregory M; Bailey, Joseph K; Schweitzer, Jennifer A; Sanders, Nathan J

    2012-01-01

    Intraspecific variation and genotypic diversity of host-plants can affect the structure of associated arthropod communities and the dynamics of populations. Similarly, neighboring plants can also affect interactions between host-plants and their associated arthropods. However, most studies on the effects of host-plant genotypes have largely ignored the potential effects of neighboring host-plants on arthropod communities. In this study, we used a common garden experiment to ask how spatial effects of neighboring patches, along with genotype identity and genotypic diversity in tall goldenrod (Solidago altissima), affect the abundances of a common goldenrod herbivore (Uroleucon nigrotuberculatum) and their dominant predator (Harmonia axyridis, a ladybird beetle). Aphid abundance varied 80-fold among genotypes, while ladybird beetle abundance was not affected by genotype identity. Additionally, there were strong effects of neighboring plots: aphid abundance in a focal plot was positively correlated to aphid abundance in nearby plots, suggesting strong spatial patterning in the abundance of aphids. Neither aphid nor ladybird beetle abundance was affected by genotypic diversity. However, focal plot genotypic diversity mediated the strength of the neighborhood effect (i.e., strong effects for genotype polyculture focal plots and weak effects for genotype monoculture focal plots). Our results show that aphids were directly influenced by host-plant genotype identity while ladybird beetles responded mainly to prey abundance, and suggest that genotypic diversity can influence the effects of spatial processes on the plant-herbivore interactions.

  4. Direct, delayed and residual effects of applied wastewater from olive processing on zinc and copper availability in the soil-plant system

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, J.D.; Gallardo-Lara, F.

    1993-08-01

    The authors tested the effects of wastewater from olive processing, applied alone or in combination with different mineral complements, in pots containing calcareous soil. An initial barley crop, and a subsequent ryegrass crop, yielded information on the direct and delayed effects, respectively, of the by-product on Zn and Cu assimilability in the soil-plant system. As a direct effect, the application of wastewater tended to decrease Zn assimilability, but the delayed effect showed the opposite trend, especially when the by-product was added together with N-containing mineral supplements. The direct effect generally did not significantly modify Cu assimilability, however, the delayed effect significantly enhanced Cu uptake; this effect was potentiated by the joint application of N and P. At the end of the experiment, a residual effect of the application of wastewater alone was observed, as a significant increase in extractable Cu in soil, and a nonsignificant rise in extractable Zn.

  5. Partitioning the net effect of host diversity on an emerging amphibian pathogen.

    PubMed

    Becker, C Guilherme; Rodriguez, David; Toledo, L Felipe; Longo, Ana V; Lambertini, Carolina; Corrêa, Décio T; Leite, Domingos S; Haddad, Célio F B; Zamudio, Kelly R

    2014-11-22

    The 'dilution effect' (DE) hypothesis predicts that diverse host communities will show reduced disease. The underlying causes of pathogen dilution are complex, because they involve non-additive (driven by host interactions and differential habitat use) and additive (controlled by host species composition) mechanisms. Here, we used measures of complementarity and selection traditionally employed in the field of biodiversity-ecosystem function (BEF) to quantify the net effect of host diversity on disease dynamics of the amphibian-killing fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). Complementarity occurs when average infection load in diverse host assemblages departs from that of each component species in uniform populations. Selection measures the disproportionate impact of a particular species in diverse assemblages compared with its performance in uniform populations, and therefore has strong additive and non-additive properties. We experimentally infected tropical amphibian species of varying life histories, in single- and multi-host treatments, and measured individual Bd infection loads. Host diversity reduced Bd infection in amphibians through a mechanism analogous to complementarity (sensu BEF), potentially by reducing shared habitat use and transmission among hosts. Additionally, the selection component indicated that one particular terrestrial species showed reduced infection loads in diverse assemblages at the expense of neighbouring aquatic hosts becoming heavily infected. By partitioning components of diversity, our findings underscore the importance of additive and non-additive mechanisms underlying the DE.

  6. Delayed flowering and global warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, B. I.; Wolkovich, E. M.; Parmesan, C.

    2011-12-01

    Within general trends toward earlier spring, observed cases of species and ecosystems that have not advanced their phenology, or have even delayed it, appear paradoxical, especially when made in temperate regions experiencing significant warming. The typical interpretation of this pattern has been that non-responders are insensitive to relatively small levels of warming over the past 40 years, while species showing delays are often viewed as statistical noise or evidence for unknown confounding factors at play. However, plant physiology studies suggest that when winter chilling (vernalization) is required to initiate spring development, winter warming may retard spring events, masking expected advances caused by spring warming. Here, we analyzed long-term data on phenology and seasonal temperatures from 490 species on two continents and demonstrate that 1) apparent non-responders are indeed responding to warming, but their responses to winter and spring warming are opposite in sign, 2) observed trends in first flowering date depend strongly on the magnitude of a given species' response to autumn/winter versus spring warming, and 3) inclusion of these effects strongly improves hindcast predictions of long-term flowering trends. With a few notable exceptions, climate change research has focused on the overall mean trend towards phenological advance, minimizing discussion of apparently non-responding species. Our results illuminate an under-studied source of complexity in wild species responses and support the need for models incorporating diverse environmental cues in order to improve predictability of species responses to anthropogenic climate change.

  7. Demographic determinants of delayed divorce.

    PubMed

    Chan, L Y; Heaton, T B

    1989-01-01

    This study identifies factors that predict delayed divorce in the US. The findings show that factors which influence marital stability in general also correlate with delayed divorce in the same direction. Wife's age at marriage, age of the youngest child, wife's religion, region of residence, and metropolitan residence have substantial effects of delayed divorce, but the effects of race, parental divorce, premarital pregnancy, and socioeconomic status are small.

  8. Microbial Diversity and Structure Are Drivers of the Biological Barrier Effect against Listeria monocytogenes in Soil

    PubMed Central

    Vivant, Anne-Laure; Garmyn, Dominique; Maron, Pierre-Alain; Nowak, Virginie; Piveteau, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the ecology of pathogenic organisms is important in order to monitor their transmission in the environment and the related health hazards. We investigated the relationship between soil microbial diversity and the barrier effect against Listeria monocytogenes invasion. By using a dilution-to-extinction approach, we analysed the consequence of eroding microbial diversity on L. monocytogenes population dynamics under standardised conditions of abiotic parameters and microbial abundance in soil microcosms. We demonstrated that highly diverse soil microbial communities act as a biological barrier against L. monocytogenes invasion and that phylogenetic composition of the community also has to be considered. This suggests that erosion of diversity may have damaging effects regarding circulation of pathogenic microorganisms in the environment. PMID:24116193

  9. Chromosome Axis Defects Induce a Checkpoint-Mediated Delay and Interchromosomal Effect on Crossing Over during Drosophila Meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Joyce, Eric F.; McKim, Kim S.

    2010-01-01

    Crossovers mediate the accurate segregation of homologous chromosomes during meiosis. The widely conserved pch2 gene of Drosophila melanogaster is required for a pachytene checkpoint that delays prophase progression when genes necessary for DSB repair and crossover formation are defective. However, the underlying process that the pachytene checkpoint is monitoring remains unclear. Here we have investigated the relationship between chromosome structure and the pachytene checkpoint and show that disruptions in chromosome axis formation, caused by mutations in axis components or chromosome rearrangements, trigger a pch2-dependent delay. Accordingly, the global increase in crossovers caused by chromosome rearrangements, known as the “interchromosomal effect of crossing over,” is also dependent on pch2. Checkpoint-mediated effects require the histone deacetylase Sir2, revealing a conserved functional connection between PCH2 and Sir2 in monitoring meiotic events from Saccharomyces cerevisiae to a metazoan. These findings suggest a model in which the pachytene checkpoint monitors the structure of chromosome axes and may function to promote an optimal number of crossovers. PMID:20711363

  10. Development and Characterization of a High Throughput Screen to investigate the delayed Effects of Radiations Commonly Encountered in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, W. F.

    Astronauts based on the space station or on long-term space missions will be exposed to high Z radiations in the cosmic environment In order to evaluate the potentially deleterious effects of exposure to radiations commonly encountered in space we have developed and characterized a high throughput assay to detect mutation deletion events and or hyperrecombination in the progeny of exposed cells This assay is based on a plasmid vector containing a green fluorescence protein reporter construct We have shown that after stable transfection of the vector into human or hamster cells this construct can identify mutations specifically base changes and deletions as well as recombination events e g gene conversion or homologous recombination occurring as a result of exposure to ionizing radiation Our focus has been on those events occurring in the progeny of an irradiated cell that are potentially associated with radiation induced genomic instability rather than the more conventional assays that evaluate the direct immediate effects of radiation exposure Considerable time has been spent automating analysis of surviving colonies as a function of time after irradiation in order to determine when delayed instability is induced and the consequences of this delayed instability The assay is now automated permitting the evaluation of potentially rare events associated with low dose low dose rate radiations commonly encountered in space

  11. Delayed immune mediated adverse effects to hyaluronic Acid fillers: report of five cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Bitterman-Deutsch, Ora; Kogan, Leonid; Nasser, Faris

    2015-03-16

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) fillers in cosmetic medicine have been considered relatively safe, though fillers used in European countries and throughout the world are not necessarily approved by the Food and Drug Administration. As their use continues to expand worldwide, physicians in a wide range of medical specialties are authorized to perform HA injections, including general medicine practitioners and even dentists. An increasing number of reports have appeared regarding side effects to these products. It is now known that reactions to Hyaluronic acid are related not only to technical faults of the injections, but also to immune responses, including delayed hypersensitivity and granulomatous reactions. Herein, we describe five cases treated by a variety of treatment modalities, all with delayed reactions to different brands of hyaluronic acid fillers. As there is currently no standardization of treatment options of adverse effects, these cases accentuate the debate regarding the approach to the individual patient and the possible need for pre-testing in patients with an atopic tendency. PMID:25918619

  12. Do the adjusting-delay and increasing-delay tasks measure the same construct: delay discounting?

    PubMed

    Craig, Andrew R; Maxfield, Adam D; Stein, Jeffrey S; Renda, C Renee; Madden, Gregory J

    2014-08-01

    Delay discounting describes the subjective devaluation of a reward when it is delayed. In animals, the adjusting-delay (AD) and increasing-delay (ID) tasks often are used to assess individual differences in, and drug effects on, delay discounting. No study to date, however, has compared systematically the measures of discounting produced in these tasks. The current study examined the correlation between measures of delay discounting derived from AD and ID procedures. Twenty rats completed 30 sessions under each task (order counterbalanced across rats). Quantitative measures of delay discounting produced by the two tasks were positively correlated, suggesting that the AD and ID tasks measure the same underlying facet of impulsive choice (i.e. individual or conjoint sensitivities to reward delay and magnitude). The measures derived from either task, however, depended on the sequences in which the tasks were experienced. That is, pre-exposure to one task decreased discounting of delayed rewards in the second task. Consistent with other published findings, exposure to delayed consequences during the initial discounting assessment might explain this effect. Despite the observed correlation between ID and AD indifference delays, we suggest that the ID procedure might be a more appropriate procedure for pharmacological studies.

  13. Time-delay analysis of LISA gravitational wave data: Elimination of spacecraft motion effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estabrook, F. B.; Tinto, Massimo; Armstrong, J. W.

    2000-08-01

    LISA (Laser Interferometer Space Antenna) is a proposed mission which will use coherent laser beams exchanged between three remote spacecraft to detect and study low-frequency cosmic gravitational radiation. Modeling each spacecraft as moving almost inertially, rigidly carrying a laser, beam splitters and photodetectors, we previously showed how the measured time series of Doppler shifts of the six one-way laser beams between spacecraft pairs could be combined, with suitable time delays, to cancel exactly the otherwise overwhelming phase noise of the lasers. Three of the combinations synthesized data that could in principle be obtained if the spacecraft separations were very precisely equal, as in Michelson interferometry; seven other combinations offered possible design advantages and useful redundancy. Here we extend those results by presenting time-delay equations for Doppler data from the actual drag-free configuration envisaged for the LISA mission. Each spacecraft will carry two proof-masses, shielded within two non-inertial optical benches carrying lasers and photodetectors. In this full drag-free configuration there are now twelve Doppler data streams, six measured with beams between the three vertex spacecraft and two with beams between each of the optical bench pairs on the three spacecraft. We show that generalizations of our previous linear data combinations, now using these twelve one-way Doppler measurements, can cancel the noises of all six lasers and also remove Doppler shifts due to the non-inertial motions of the six optical benches. It is noteworthy that adjacent optical benches need not be rigidly connected and that no phase locking of their lasers is required. From the latest LISA estimates for power spectra of remaining Doppler noises (very-low-level proof-mass ``acceleration'' noise, photodetector shot noise, and beam pointing noise) we compute the sensitivities of the generalized data combinations X and P. In the Appendix we give defining

  14. Effective Early Learning: Mapping Diversity and Tracking Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pascal, Christine

    This paper describes and reviews the Effective Early Learning (EEL) Research Project's approach to quality evaluation and improvement in early childhood settings in the United Kingdom which focuses primarily on enhancing the effectiveness of the early learning experiences of young children. The project began work in May 1993 and is completing its…

  15. The effect of cold ischemia time on delayed graft function and acute rejection in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sert, Ismail; Colak, Hulya; Tugmen, Cem; Dogan, Sait Murat; Karaca, Cezmi

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the impact of cold ischemia time (CIT) on delayed graft function (DGF) and acute rejection (AR) among deceased donor kidney transplant recipients. The medical records of 111 patients who underwent kidney transplantation from deceased donors between November 1994 and July 2009 were retrospectively analyzed. DGF was observed in 54% of the patients and the prevalence of AR in the first year after transplantation was 9.9%. The incidence of DGF was higher among patients with longer CIT. There was no correlation between CIT and AR episodes. Higher body weight of recipients and donors, history of prior blood transfusion and advanced donor age were related with DGF. Patients with DGF had higher serum creatinine levels at the first, third and fifth years. There was a negative correlation between recipient body weight and creatinine clearance at the first year. CIT has an important role in the development of DGF as a modifiable risk factor. Moreover, donors with advanced age and higher body weight as well as recipients with higher body weight and history of blood transfusions are at risk for the development of DGF. Prevention of DGF may help to improve graft function at the first, third and fifth years and shorten the hospital stay.

  16. Delayed Alumina Scale Spallation on Rene'n5+y: Moisture Effects and Acoustic Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smialek, James L.; Morscher, Gregory N.

    2001-01-01

    The single crystal superalloy Rene'N5 (with or without Y-doping and hydrogen annealing) was cyclically oxidized at 1150 C for 1000 hours. After considerable scale growth (>= 500 hours), even the adherent alumina scales formed on Y-doped samples exhibited delayed interfacial spallation during subsequent water immersion tests, performed up to one year after oxidation. Spallation was characterized by weight loss, the amount of spalled area, and acoustic emission response. Hydrogen annealing (prior to oxidation) reduced spallation both before and after immersion, but without measurably reducing the bulk sulfur content of the Y-doped alloys. The duration and frequency of sequential, co-located acoustic emission events implied an interfacial crack growth rate at least 10(exp -3) m/s, but possibly higher than 10(exp 2) m/s. This is much greater than classic moisture-assisted slow crack growth rates in bulk alumina (10(exp -6) to 10(exp -3) m/s), which may still have occurred undetected by acoustic emission. An alternative failure sequence is proposed: an incubation process for preferential moisture ingress leads to a local decrease in interfacial toughness, thus allowing fast fracture driven by stored strain energy.

  17. Differential effects of paced and unpaced responding on delayed serial order recall in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Hill, S Kristian; Griffin, Ginny B; Houk, James C; Sweeney, John A

    2011-09-01

    Working memory for temporal order is a component of working memory that is especially dependent on striatal systems, but has not been extensively studied in schizophrenia. This study was designed to characterize serial order reproduction by adapting a spatial serial order task developed for nonhuman primate studies, while controlling for working memory load and whether responses were initiated freely (unpaced) or in an externally paced format. Clinically stable schizophrenia patients (n=27) and psychiatrically healthy individuals (n=25) were comparable on demographic variables and performance on standardized tests of immediate serial order recall (Digit Span, Spatial Span). No group differences were observed for serial order recall when read sequence reproduction was unpaced. However, schizophrenia patients exhibited significant impairments when responding was paced, regardless of sequence length or retention delay. Intact performance by schizophrenia patients during the unpaced condition indicates that prefrontal storage and striatal output systems are sufficiently intact to learn novel response sequences and hold them in working memory to perform serial order tasks. However, retention for newly learned response sequences was disrupted in schizophrenia patients by paced responding, when read-out of each element in the response sequence was externally controlled. The disruption of memory for serial order in paced read-out condition indicates a deficit in frontostriatal interaction characterized by an inability to update working memory stores and deconstruct 'chunked' information.

  18. Antioxidants delay clinical signs and systemic effects of ENU induced brain tumors in rats.

    PubMed

    Hervouet, E; Staehlin, O; Pouliquen, D; Debien, E; Cartron, P-F; Menanteau, J; Vallette, F M; Olivier, C

    2013-01-01

    According to our previous study suggesting that antioxidant properties of phytochemicals in the diet decrease glioma aggressiveness, we used a SUVIMAX-like diet ("Supplementation en VItamines et Minéraux AntioXydants") (enriched with alpha-tocopherol, beta carotene, vitamin C, zinc, and sodium selenite), adapted to rats. The present results showed that each of the antioxidants inhibited growth of glioma cells in vitro. When used in combination for in vivo studies, we showed a highly significant delay in the clinical signs of the disease, but not a statistical significant difference in the incidence of glioma in an Ethyl-nitrosourea (ENU)-model. The SUVIMAX-like diet decreased candidate markers of tumoral aggressiveness and gliomagenesis progression. The mRNA expressions of 2 common markers in human glioma: Mn-SOD (Manganese Superoxide Dismutase) and IGFBP5 (insulin growth factor binding protein) were reduced in the tumors of rats fed the antioxidant diet. In addition, the transcripts of two markers linked to brain tumor proliferation, PDGFRb (platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta) and Ki-67, were also significantly decreased. On the whole, our results suggest a protective role for antioxidants to limit aggressiveness and to some extent, progression of gliomas, in a rat model. PMID:23859036

  19. Thresholds, long delays and stability from generalized allosteric effect in protein networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chignola, Roberto; Dalla Pellegrina, Chiara; Fabbro, Alessio Del; Milotti, Edoardo

    2006-11-01

    Post-transductional modifications tune the functions of proteins and regulate the collective dynamics of biochemical networks that determine how cells respond to environmental signals. For example, protein phosphorylation and nitrosylation are well known to play a pivotal role in the intracellular transduction of activation and death signals. A protein can have multiple sites where chemical groups can reversibly attach in processes such as phosphorylation or nitrosylation. A microscopic description of these processes must take into account the intrinsic probabilistic nature of the underlying reactions. We apply combinatorial considerations to standard enzyme kinetics and in this way we extend to the dynamic regime a simplified version of the traditional models on the allosteric regulation of protein functions. We link a generic modification chain to a downstream Michaelis-Menten enzymatic reaction and we demonstrate numerically that this accounts both for thresholds and long time delays in the conversion of the substrate by the enzyme. The proposed mechanism is stable and robust and the higher the number of modification sites, the greater the stability. We show that a high number of modification sites converts a fast reaction into a slow process, and the slowing down depends on the number of sites and may span many orders of magnitude; in this way multisite modification of proteins stands out as a general mechanism that allows the transfer of information from the very short time scales of enzyme reactions (milliseconds) to the long time scale of cell response (hours).

  20. Effects of management on understory diversity in the forest ecosystems of northern Spain.

    PubMed

    Atauri, José A; de Pablo, Carlos L; de Agar, Pilar Martín; Schmitz, María F; Pineda, Francisco D

    2004-12-01

    Pine plantations are an alternative to marginal agriculture in many countries, and are often presented as an option that improves biodiversity. However, these plantations can have adverse environmental effects if improperly managed. To evaluate the effect of forest management practices on biodiversity, the diversity, species richness, dominance and frequency of understory woody plant species in different forests of the Basque Country (northern Spain) were compared. Plantations of exotic conifers (Pinus radiata [D.] Don) of different ages were compared with deciduous forests of Quercus robur L. and Fagus sylvatica L. The effects of different types and intensities of management were taken into account. The differences observed were mainly conditioned by the intensity of forestry management, although the response varied according to forest type and age. In unmanaged pine plantations, the diversity and species richness of the understory increased rapidly after planting (while dominance decreased), remained stable in the intermediate age range, and reached a maximum in plantations more than 25 years of age. Management practices resulted in decreased understory diversity and species richness, as well as greater dominance. This was more pronounced in younger than in older stands. Moderate management, however, favored a greater diversity of the understory in deciduous forests. The species composition of the plantations and deciduous forests were different, the latter having a wider range of characteristic species. Knowledge of how forestry practices influence biodiversity (in terms of diversity, richness, dominance, and species composition) may allow predictions to be made about the diversity achievable with different management systems.